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Sample records for ammonium molybdate vi

  1. Polymerization and photochromism of ammonium molybdate in porous glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, V. N.; Borisov, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    Modification of porous glass (PG) plates is carried out by impregnation with aqueous solutions of ammonium molybdate (NH4)2MoO4 with subsequent removal of water at 120°C. A long-wavelength shift of absorption spectra upon accumulation of the salt in PG indicates polymerization of MoO 4 2- anions at low concentrations of the encapsulated salt. Photochromism manifests itself as the anionic forms in PG become larger. UV irradiation of the modified plates causes enhancement of continuous absorption in the visible range. The proposed mechanism of photoreduction of the polianions in PG involves the removal of oxygen atoms from the bridging-Mo-O-Mo-bonds and stabilization of the colored forms by means of conjugation of the electrons released from the 4 d-levels of pentavalent molybdenum.

  2. Study of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference in the selenium determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium background correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela

    2002-02-01

    The use of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference when measuring selenium by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) with deuterium background correction was evaluated. Ammonium molybdate did not produce a selenium thermal stabilization; however, the presence of ammonium molybdate decreased the phosphate interference. The study was carried out with mussel acid digests and mussel slurries. Pd-Mg(NO 3) 2 was used as a chemical modifier at optimum concentrations of 300 and 250 mg l -1, respectively, yielding optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 and 2100 °C, respectively. A yellow solid (ammonium molybdophosphate) was obtained when adding ammonium molybdate to mussel acid digest solutions. This precipitate can be removed after centrifugation prior to ETAAS determination. Additionally, studies on the sampling of the solid ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) together with the liquid phase, as a slurry, were also developed. The volatilization of the solid AMP was not reached at temperatures lower than 2500 °C. By this way, phosphate, as AMP, is not present in the vapor phase at the atomization temperature (2100 °C), yielding a reduction of the spectral interference by phosphate. The proposed method was validated analyzing three reference materials of marine origin (DORM-1, DOLT-1 and TORT-1). Good agreement with the certified selenium contents was reached for all cases.

  3. Bis­[4,4′-(propane-1,3-di­yl)­dipiperidin­ium] β-octa­molybdate(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Driss, Mohamed; Ksiksi, Rekaya; Ben Amor, Fatma; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, bis­[4,4′-(propane-1,3-di­yl)­dipiperidin­ium] β-octa­molybdate(VI), (C13H28N2)2[Mo8O26], was produced by hydro­thermal reaction of an acidified aqueous solution of Na2MoO4·2H2O and 4,4′-trimethyl­ene­dipiperidine (L). The structure of the title compound consists of β-octa­molybdate(VI) anion clusters and protonated [H2 L]2+ cations. The octa­molybdate anion is located around an inversion center. N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the cations and anions ensure the cohesion of the structure and result in a three-dimensional network. PMID:21579027

  4. Combination of Pichia membranifaciens and ammonium molybdate for controlling blue mould caused by Penicillium expansum in peach fruit.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shifeng; Yuan, Yongjun; Hu, Zhichao; Zheng, Yonghua

    2010-07-15

    The potential enhancement of Pichia membranifaciens by ammonium molybdate (NH(4)Mo) to control blue mould caused by Penicillium expansum on peach fruit was investigated. Combining P. membranifaciens at 1x10(8) cell/ml with 1 mM NH(4)Mo provided a more effective control of blue mould rot than applying the yeast or NH(4)Mo alone. Addition of 1 mM NH(4)Mo significantly increased the growth of P. membranifaciens in peach wounds, but did not affect the population in nutrient yeast dextrose broth medium. The in vitro experiment showed that the combined treatment inhibited spore germination and germ tube elongation of P. expansum in comparison with the treatment of P. membranifaciens or NH(4)Mo alone. Moreover, P. membranifaciens, NH(4)Mo, and the combination of them did not impair the quality parameters including fruit firmness and content of total soluble solids, titratable acidity and vitamin C of peach fruit after 6 days of storage at 20 degrees C. These results suggested that the use of NH(4)Mo is a useful approach to improve the efficacy of P. membranifaciens for postharvest disease control in peach fruit.

  5. Characterization of arsenic (V) and arsenic (III) in water samples using ammonium molybdate and estimation by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sounderajan, Suvarna; Udas, A C; Venkataramani, B

    2007-10-01

    Arsenic (V) is known to form heteropolyacid with ammonium molybdate in acidic aqueous solutions, which can be quantitatively extracted into certain organic solvents. In the present work, 12-molybdoarsenic acid extracted in butan-1-ol is used for quantification of As (V). Total arsenic is estimated by converting arsenic (III) to arsenic (V) by digesting samples with concentrated nitric acid before extraction. Concentration of As (III) in the sample solutions could be calculated by the difference in total arsenic and arsenic (V). The characterization of arsenic was carried out by GFAAS using Pd as modifier. Optimization of the experimental conditions and instrumental parameters was investigated in detail. Recoveries of (90-110%) were obtained in the spiked samples. The detection limit was 0.2 microg l(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace amount of arsenic (III) and arsenic (V) in process water samples.

  6. Removal of As(V), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from aqueous environments by poly(acrylonitril-co-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride)-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Dudu, Tuba Ersen; Sahiner, Mehtap; Alpaslan, Duygu; Demirci, Sahin; Aktas, Nahit

    2015-09-15

    Cationic poly(Acrylonitril-co-Acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl Ammonium Chloride) (p(AN-co-APTMACl)) hydrogels in bulk were synthesized by using acrylonitrile (AN) and 3-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (APTMACl) as monomers. The prepared hydrogels were exposed to amidoximation reaction to replace hydrophobic nitrile groups with hydrophilic amidoxime groups that have metal ion binding ability. Those replacements were increased the hydrogels absorption capacity for As(V) and Cr(VI). Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms equations were utilized to obtain the best-fitted isotherm model for the absorption of the ions at different metal ion concentrations. The absorption data of As(V) ion were fitted well to Freundlich isotherm while those of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) ions were fitted well to Langmuir isotherm. The maximum absorption of poly(3-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (p(APTMACl)) and amid-p(AN-co-APTMACl) macro gels were 22.39 mg and 21.83 mg for As(V), and 30.65 mg and 18.16 mg for Cr(VI) ion per unit gram dried gel, respectively. Kinetically, the absorption behaviors of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions were fitted well to a pseudo 2nd-order kinetic model and those of As(V) ions were fitted well to a pseudo 1st order kinetic model.

  7. Influence of ammonium availability on expression of nifD and amtB genes during biostimulation of a U(VI) contaminated aquifer: implications for U(VI) removal and monitoring the metabolic state of Geobacteraceae

    SciTech Connect

    Mouser, Paula J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, Hila; Holmes, Dawn E.; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2009-03-25

    The influence of ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the physiological status of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by 2 orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 ?M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences suggested that ammonium may have been one factor influencing the community composition prior to acetate amendment with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species with higher ammonium and Dechloromonas species dominating at the site with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to acetate concentrations rather than ammonium levels. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium transporter gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during uranium reduction. The abundance of amtB was inversely correlated to ammonium levels, whereas nifD transcript levels were similar across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB transcript expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of subsurface Geobacter species. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical and physiological interactions at the field scale in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes during bioremediation.

  8. Heterogeneous photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) in UV-irradiated titania suspensions: Effect of protons, ammonium ions, and other interfacial aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Chenthamarakshan, C.R.; Rajeshwar, K.; Wolfrum, E.J.

    2000-03-21

    Heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions in UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} suspensions are comprised of two conjugate reaction pathways involving the photogenerated electrons and holes, respectively. The role of the hole reaction pathway in the dynamics of the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) is a major focus of this study. It is shown that proton supply plays a crucial role in this reduction reaction. Thus, the Cr(VI) photoreduction kinetics switch from first order to zero order as the proton concentration is systematically increased in the aqueous suspensions. Ammonium ions are also shown to exert a dramatic accelerating influence on Cr(VI) reduction in media of initial pH6. This new observation is rationalized by considering that these species act as hole scavengers. The consequent improvement in quantum yield combines with the facile proton generation upon NH{sub 4}{sup +} photooxidation, to result in the observed rate enhancement. Other interfacial aspects (i.e. adsorption) are also discussed.

  9. Extraction and separation of tungsten (VI) from aqueous media with Triton X-100-ammonium sulfate-water aqueous two-phase system without any extractant.

    PubMed

    Yongqiang Zhang; Tichang Sun; Tieqiang Lu; Chunhuan Yan

    2016-11-25

    An aqueous two-phase system composed of Triton X-100-(NH4)2SO4-H2O was proposed for extraction and separation of tungsten(VI) from aqueous solution without using any extractant. The effects of aqueous pH, concentration of ammonium sulfate, Triton X-100 and tungsten, extracting temperature on the extraction of tungsten were investigated. The extraction of tungsten has remarkable relationship with aqueous pH and are to above 90% at pH=1.0-3.0 under studied pH range (pH=1.0-7.0) and increases gradually with increasing Triton X-100 concentration, but decreases slightly with increasing ammonium sulfate concentration. The extraction percentage of tungsten is hardly relevant to temperature but its distribution coefficient linearly increases with increasing temperature within 303.15-343.15K. The distribution coefficient of tungsten increases with the increase of initial tungsten concentration (0.1-3%) and temperature (303.15 K-333.15K). The solubilization capacity of tungsten in Triton X-100 micellar phase is independent of temperature. FT-IR analysis reveals that there is no evident interaction between polytungstate anion and ether oxygen unit in Triton X-100, and DLS analysis indicates that zeta potential of Triton X-100 micellar phase have a little change from positive to negative after extracting tungsten. Based on the above-mentioned results, it can be deduced that polytungstate anions are solubilized in hydrophilic outer shell of Triton X-100 micelles by electrostatic attraction depending on its relatively high hydrophobic nature. The stripping of tungsten is mainly influenced by temperature and can be easily achieved to 95% in single stage stripping. The tungsten (VI) is separated out from solution containing Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Al(III), Cr(III) and Mn(II) under the suitable conditions.

  10. Cr(VI) sorption behavior from aqueous solutions onto polymeric microcapsules containing a long-chain quaternary ammonium salt: kinetics and thermodynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Barassi, Giancarlo; Valdés, Andrea; Araneda, Claudio; Basualto, Carlos; Sapag, Jaime; Tapia, Cristián; Valenzuela, Fernando

    2009-12-15

    This work studies the adsorption of Cr(VI) ions from an aqueous acid solution on hydrophobic polymeric microcapsules containing a long-chain quaternary ammonium salt-type extractant immobilized in their pore structure. The microcapsules were synthesized by adding the extractant Aliquat 336 during the in situ radical copolymerization of the monomers styrene (ST) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA). The microcapsules, which had a spherical shape with a rough surface, behaved as efficient adsorbents for Cr(VI) at the tested temperatures. The results of kinetics experiments carried out at different temperatures showed that the adsorption process fits well to a pseudo-second-order with an activation energy of 82.7 kJ mol(-1), confirming that the sorption process is controlled by a chemisorption mechanism. Langmuir's isotherms were found to represent well the experimentally observed sorption data. Thermodynamics parameters, namely, changes in standard free energy (DeltaG(0)), enthalpy (DeltaH(0)), and entropy (DeltaS(0)), are also calculated. The results indicate that the chemisorption process is spontaneous and exothermic. The entropy change value measured in this study shows that metal adsorbed on microcapsules leads to a less chaotic system than a liquid-liquid extraction system.

  11. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, S. A.; Shukor, M. Y.; Shamaan, N. A.; Mac Cormack, W. P.; Syed, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  12. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxo complexes in solution, inorganic analogues to crown-ethers. Part 2. Complex formation in the tetramethyl ammonium-, Li(+)-, Na(+)- and K(+)-uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate systems.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Szabó, Zoltán; Vallet, Valerie; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-10-07

    The constitution and equilibrium constants of ternary uranyl(vi) peroxide carbonate complexes [(UO2)p(O2)q(CO3)r](2(p-q-r)) have been determined at 0 °C in 0.50 M MNO3, M = Li, K, and TMA (tetramethyl ammonium), ionic media using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data; (17)O NMR data were used to determine the number of complexes present. The formation of cyclic oligomers, "[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]n", n = 4, 5, 6, with different stoichiometries depending on the ionic medium used, suggests that Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and TMA ions act as templates for the formation of uranyl peroxide rings where the uranyl-units are linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) bridged peroxide-ions. The templating effect is due to the coordination of the M(+)-ions to the uranyl oxygen atoms, where the coordination of Li(+) results in the formation of Li[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]4(7-), Na(+) and K(+) in the formation of Na/K[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) complexes, while the large tetramethyl ammonium ion promotes the formation of two oligomers, TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-). The NMR spectra demonstrate that the coordination of Na(+) in the five- and six-membered oligomers is significantly stronger than that of TMA(+); these observations suggest that the templating effect is similar to the one observed in the synthesis of crown-ethers. The NMR experiments also demonstrate that the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is slow on the (17)O chemical shift time-scale, while the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) and Na[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is fast. There was no indication of the presence of large clusters of the type identified by Burns and Nyman (M. Nyman and P. C. Burns, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 7314-7367) and possible reasons for this and the implications for the synthesis of large clusters are briefly discussed.

  13. Characterisation of the anodic layers formed on 2024 aluminium alloy, in tetraborate electrolyte containing molybdate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutarlier, V.; Pelletier, S.; Lallemand, F.; Gigandet, M. P.; Mekhalif, Z.

    2005-12-01

    Anodic layer growth on 2024 aluminium alloy at 70 °C, under 40 V, during 60 min, in 50 g L -1 di-sodium tetraborate solution containing di-sodium molybdate from 0.1 to 0.5 M (pH 10) is examined. Anodising behaviours strongly depend on additive concentration. Development of anodic films is favoured with weak molybdate additions (<0.3-0.4 M). The film thicknesses increase and the porosity of anodic layers decreases. Molybdenum (+VI), detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, is present in the anodic films and the Mo incorporation, studied by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, increases with molybdate concentration. However, for high molybdate concentrations (>0.4 M), anodising behaviour becomes complex with the formation of a blue molybdenum oxide at the cathode. The growth of aluminium oxide is hindered. As the anodic layers are thinner, the Mo(+VI) incorporation significantly decreases. These two configurations implicate different corrosion performances in 5% sodium chloride solution at 35 °C. As the alkaline anodic layer formed with 0.3 M molybdate species is the thickest and the Mo incorporation is the more pronounced, its corrosion resistance is the highest. The effect of morphology and composition of anodic films on pitting corrosion is also discussed.

  14. Crystal structure of the heptamolybdate(VI) (paramolybdate) ion, [Mo7O24]6-, in the ammonium and potassium tetrahydrate salts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T.; Gatehouse, B.M.; Leverett, P.

    1975-01-01

    The crystal structures of the isomorphous salts MI6 [Mo7O24],4H2O (M = NH4 or K) have been refined by three-dimensional X-ray diffraction methods. Unit cell dimensions of these monoclinic compounds, space group P21/C with Z = 4, are, ammonium salt: a = 8.3934 ?? 0.0008, b = 36.1703 ?? 0.0045, c = 10.4715 ?? 0.0011 A??, ?? = 115.958?? ?? 0.008??; and potassium salt: a = 8.15 ?? 0.02, b = 35.68 ?? 0.1, c = 10.30 ?? 0.02 A??, ?? = 115.2?? ?? 02??. By use of multiple Weissenberg patterns, 8197 intensity data (Mo-K?? radiation) for the ammonium compound and 2178 (Cu-K?? radiation) for the potassium compound were estimated visually and used to test and refine Lindqvist's proposed structure in the space group P21/c. Lindqvist's structure was confirmed and the full matrix least-squares isotropic refinement led to R 0.076 (ammonium) 0.120 (potassium), with direct unambiguous location of the cations and water molecules in the potassium compound.

  15. Molybdate in Rhizobial Seed-Coat Formulations Improves the Production and Nodulation of Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiqiong; Deng, Bo; Zhang, Yingjun; Cobb, Adam B.; Zhang, Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Rhizobia-legume symbiosis is the most well researched biological nitrogen fixation system. Coating legume seeds with rhizobia is now a recognized practical measure for improving the production of legume corp. However, the efficacy of some commercial rhizobia inoculants cannot be guaranteed in China due to the low rate of live rhizobia in these products. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to assess the effects of different rhizobial inoculant formulations on alfalfa productivity and nitrogen fixation. Two rhizobia strains, (ACCC17631 and ACCC17676), that are effective partners with alfalfa variety Zhongmu No. 1 were assessed with different concentrations of ammonium molybdate in seed-coat formulations with two different coating adhesives. Our study showed that the growth, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation ability of the plants inoculated with the ACCC17631 rhizobial strain were greatest when the ammonium molybdate application was0.2% of the formulation. An ammonium molybdate concentration of 0.1% was most beneficial to the growth of the plants inoculated with the ACCC17676 rhizobial strain. The sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium alginate, used as coating adhesives, did not have a significant effect on alfalfa biomass and nitrogen fixation. However, the addition of skimmed milk to the adhesive improved nitrogenase activity. These results demonstrate that a new rhizobial seed-coat formulation benefitted alfalfa nodulation and yield. PMID:28099471

  16. Molybdate in Rhizobial Seed-Coat Formulations Improves the Production and Nodulation of Alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiqiong; Deng, Bo; Zhang, Yingjun; Cobb, Adam B; Zhang, Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Rhizobia-legume symbiosis is the most well researched biological nitrogen fixation system. Coating legume seeds with rhizobia is now a recognized practical measure for improving the production of legume corp. However, the efficacy of some commercial rhizobia inoculants cannot be guaranteed in China due to the low rate of live rhizobia in these products. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to assess the effects of different rhizobial inoculant formulations on alfalfa productivity and nitrogen fixation. Two rhizobia strains, (ACCC17631 and ACCC17676), that are effective partners with alfalfa variety Zhongmu No. 1 were assessed with different concentrations of ammonium molybdate in seed-coat formulations with two different coating adhesives. Our study showed that the growth, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation ability of the plants inoculated with the ACCC17631 rhizobial strain were greatest when the ammonium molybdate application was0.2% of the formulation. An ammonium molybdate concentration of 0.1% was most beneficial to the growth of the plants inoculated with the ACCC17676 rhizobial strain. The sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium alginate, used as coating adhesives, did not have a significant effect on alfalfa biomass and nitrogen fixation. However, the addition of skimmed milk to the adhesive improved nitrogenase activity. These results demonstrate that a new rhizobial seed-coat formulation benefitted alfalfa nodulation and yield.

  17. Crystal structure of trans-cyclo­hexane-1,2-di­ammonium chromate(VI) from synchrotron X-ray diffraction data

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Dohyun; Choi, Jong-Ha

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the title hybrid compound, (C6H16N2)[CrO4], has been determined from synchrotron data. The organic cation adopts a chair conformation. The inorganic CrO4 2− anion is slightly distorted owing to its involvement in N—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions with neighbouring trans-cyclo­hexane-1,2-di­ammonium cations, whereby the two Cr—O bonds to the O atoms acting as acceptor atoms for two hydrogen bonds are slightly longer than the other two Cr—O bonds for which only one acceptor inter­action per O atom is observed. In the crystal, cations and anions are packed into layers parallel to (001), held together through the aforementioned N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:27980853

  18. Crystal structure of trans-cyclo-hexane-1,2-di-ammonium chromate(VI) from synchrotron X-ray diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dohyun; Choi, Jong-Ha

    2016-12-01

    The structure of the title hybrid compound, (C6H16N2)[CrO4], has been determined from synchrotron data. The organic cation adopts a chair conformation. The inorganic CrO4(2-) anion is slightly distorted owing to its involvement in N-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter-actions with neighbouring trans-cyclo-hexane-1,2-di-ammonium cations, whereby the two Cr-O bonds to the O atoms acting as acceptor atoms for two hydrogen bonds are slightly longer than the other two Cr-O bonds for which only one acceptor inter-action per O atom is observed. In the crystal, cations and anions are packed into layers parallel to (001), held together through the aforementioned N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  19. Molybdate Coatings for Protecting Aluminum Against Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; MacDowell, Louis G.

    2005-01-01

    Conversion coatings that comprise mixtures of molybdates and several additives have been subjected to a variety of tests to evaluate their effectiveness in protecting aluminum and alloys of aluminum against corrosion. Molybdate conversion coatings are under consideration as replacements for chromate conversion coatings, which have been used for more than 70 years. The chromate coatings are highly effective in protecting aluminum and its alloys against corrosion but are also toxic and carcinogenic. Hexavalent molybdenum and, hence, molybdates containing hexavalent molybdenum, have received attention recently as replacements for chromates because molybdates mimic chromates in a variety of applications but exhibit significantly lower toxicity. The tests were performed on six proprietary formulations of molybdate conversion coatings, denoted formulations A through F, on panels of aluminum alloy 2024-T3. A bare alloy panel was also included in the tests. The tests included electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), measurements of corrosion potentials, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  20. Ammonium methacrylate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium methacrylate ; CASRN 16325 - 47 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcin

  1. Ammonium sulfamate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium sulfamate ; CASRN 7773 - 06 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  2. Ammonium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium acetate ; CASRN 631 - 61 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  3. Simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in welding fume alkaline extracts by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ščančar, Janez; Berlinger, Balázs; Thomassen, Yngvar; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    CRM 545, Cr(VI) in welding dust loaded on a filter. Good agreement between determined and reported certified values was obtained. For molybdate, tungstate and vanadate the assessment of accuracy was performed by spiking welding fume filters. Good recoveries for all investigated species (98-101%) confirmed the accuracy of the analytical procedure.

  4. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  5. Acquisition and role of molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pederick, Victoria G; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ween, Miranda P; Begg, Stephanie L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO4 (2-)). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition.

  6. Light deflection in gadolinium molybdate ferroelastic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniorowski, Piotr; Bornarel, Jean

    2000-02-01

    The deflection of a He-Ne light beam by polydomain gadolinium molybdate (GMO) crystals has been studied with respect to incidence angle icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i on the sample at room temperature. The A and B deflected beams do not cross each other during the icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i variation, in contrast to results and calculations previously published. The model using the Fresnel equation confirms this result. The model presented is more accurate for numerical calculation than that using the Huygens construction.

  7. Effective parameter study for the facile and controlled growth of silver molybdate nano/micro rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenegro, Javier Esteban Enríquez; Singh, Dinesh Pratap

    2016-11-01

    Controlled growth of nano/micro structures by controlling the effective parameters is the basic requirement for the application point of view in various areas. Here we report the facile growth of silver molybdate nano/micro rods by mixing the solution of silver nitrate and ammonium molybdate at ambient condition followed by hydrothermal treatment at various temperatures for 12 h. To achieve the goal for the synthesis of long, high yield and homogeneous nanorods various effective parameters have been studied to set the most effective conditions for the growth. Among possible effective parameters first the temperature of the furnace was set by warring the temperature and then at the set temperature the concentration of reactants (NH4)6Mo7O24 and silver nitrate are varied respect to each other. The pH and temperature values were monitored during the mixing of the reactants. Structural/microstructural characterization revealed the optimum condition of 150°C of the furnace and the concentration of (NH4)6Mo7O24 and silver nitrate as described in various tables.

  8. Aggregate stability of silicon dioxide hydrosols modified by molybdates

    SciTech Connect

    Valyukhov, A.A.; Frolov, Y.G.; Nazarov, V.V.

    1986-03-01

    Modification of the surface of silica hydrosol by molybdates changes the relationship between structural and electrostatic contributions to the disjoining pressure, which maintains the aggregate stability of the sol.

  9. Molybdate binding by ModA, the periplasmic component of the Escherichia coli mod molybdate transport system.

    PubMed

    Imperial, J; Hadi, M; Amy, N K

    1998-03-13

    ModA, the periplasmic-binding protein of the Escherichia coli mod transport system was overexpressed and purified. Binding of molybdate and tungstate to ModA was found to modify the UV absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of the protein. Titration of these changes showed that ModA binds molybdate and tungstate in a 1:1 molar ratio. ModA showed an intrinsic fluorescence emission spectrum attributable to its three tryptophanyl residues. Molybdate binding caused a conformational change in the protein characterized by: (i) a shift of tryptophanyl groups to a more hydrophobic environment; (ii) a quenching (at pH 5.0) or enhancement (at pH 7.8) of fluorescence; and (iii) a higher availability of tryptophanyl groups to the polar quencher acrylamide. The tight binding of molybdate did not allow an accurate estimation of the binding constants by these indirect methods. An isotopic binding method with 99MoO42- was used for accurate determination of KD (20 nM) and stoichiometry (1:1 molar ratio). ModA bound tungstate with approximately the same affinity, but did not bind sulfate or phosphate. These KDs are 150- to 250-fold lower than those previously reported, and compatible with the high molybdate transport affinity of the mod system. The affinity of ModA for molybdate was also determined in vivo and found to be similar to that determined in vitro.

  10. Synthesis of magnetic chelating resins functionalized with tetraethylenepentamine for adsorption of molybdate anions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Atia, Asem A; Donia, Ahmed M; Awed, Haytham A

    2008-06-30

    Magnetic resins were synthesized through polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) in the presence of divinylbenzene (DVB) or N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as hydrophobic or hydrophilic crosslinker, respectively and in presence of suspended magnetite particles. The resins containing (DVB or MBA) as crosslinker were immobilized with tetraethylenepentamine (TEP) to give the amino resins, GMA/DVB/TEP (R1-en) and GMA/MBA/TEP (R2-en), respectively. The uptake behavior of the two resins was studied towards molybdate anions and uptake capacities of 4.24 and 6.18 mmol/g [as (Mo(VI)] were obtained using (R1-en) and (R2-en). Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order model pointing the influence of the textural properties of the resin on the rate of adsorption. Thermodynamic data indicated an endothermic adsorption process. The uptake of Mo(VI) and regeneration of the resins were also studied using the column method. Regeneration efficiency up to 90-96% was reached using ammonia buffer.

  11. Molybdate adsorption from steel slag eluates by subsoils.

    PubMed

    Matern, K; Rennert, T; Mansfeldt, T

    2013-11-01

    Steel slags are industrial by-products which are generated in large amounts worldwide, e.g. 150-230×10(6) Mg in 2012, and which are partly used for construction. Molybdenum (Mo) can be added during steel processing in order to harden the steel. The objective of this study was to evaluate the adsorption behaviour of molybdate (MoO4(2-)) from slag eluates in subsoils. Molybdate batch adsorption experiments were carried out with eluates obtained from two different kinds of steel slags (i) LD slag (Linz-Donawitz operation, LDS) and (ii) electric arc furnace slag (EAF) to assess the risk that may arise from the contamination of groundwater by the leaching of molybdate. Six different subsoils were chosen in order to provide a wide range of chemical properties (pH 4.0-7.6; dithionite-extractable Fe 0.73-14.7 g kg(-1)). Molybdate adsorption experiments were carried out at the pH of the steel slag eluates (pH 11-12) as well as at pH values adjusted to the soil pH. The data were evaluated with the Freundlich equation. Molybdate adsorption exhibited a maximum near pH 4 for steel slag eluates adjusted to the soil pH, and decreased rapidly with increasing pH until adsorption was virtually zero at pH>11. Adsorption was greater for soils with high amounts of dithionite-extractable Fe oxides. The extent and behaviour of molybdate adsorption from both eluates was similar. After a reaction time of 24h, the pH of the EAF slag eluate was lower than that of the LD steel slag eluate, which was caused by different acid buffer capacities. Some soils were able to decrease the pH of the EAF slag eluates by about 4 pH units, enhancing the adsorption of molybdate. Transport simulations indicated that molybdate discharge is low in acidic soils.

  12. Penta­ammonium hepta­sodium bis­[penta­kis(μ2-oxido)deca­oxido­bis­(μ5-phosphato)penta­molybdenum(VI)] henicosa­hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Bih, Hssain; Bih, Lahcen; Manoun, Bouchaid; Azrour, Mohamed; Lazor, Peter; El Ammari, Lahcen

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, (NH4)5Na7[Mo5P2O23]2·21H2O, was prepared under atmospheric conditions in aqueous solution at room temperature. The structure contains the [Mo5P2O23]6− heteropolyoxometallate anion, which has been previously reported a number of times with a variety of differing counter-cations. Each anion is built up of five MoO6 octa­hedra sharing an edge and forming a ring which is closed by common corners of the terminal octa­hedra. The rings are closed on both sides by two asymmetric PO4 tetra­hedra, sharing three corners with three MoO6 octa­hedra. The anions are chiral and the two independent anions in the asymmetric unit were arbitarily chosen with the same chirality, but the centrosymmetric crystal contains both enanti­omers. The structure can alternatively be described as a succession of layers parallel to (101), formed by the [Mo5P2O23]6− anions and linked by sodium chains. Water mol­ecules and ammonium ions fill the remaining space and ensure the cohesion through extensive N—H⋯O and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonding. PMID:21580198

  13. Insensitive Ammonium Nitrate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    is reduced by replacing the ammonium nitrate with a solid solution of potassium nitrate in form III ammonium nitrate wherein the potassium nitrate...constitutes from more than zero to less than 50 weight percent of the solid solution . (Author)

  14. [Affinity of the elements in group VI of the periodic table to tumors and organs].

    PubMed

    Ando, A; Hisada, K; Ando, I

    1976-10-01

    In order to investigate the tumor affinity radioisotopes, chromium (51Cr), molybdenum (99Mo), tungsten (181W), selenium (75Se) and tellurium (127mTe)--the elements of group VI in the periodic table--were examined, using the rats which were subcutaneously transplanted with Yoshida sarcoma. Seven preprarations, sodium chromate (Na251CrO4), chromium chloride (51CrCl3), normal ammonium molybdate ((NH4)299MoO7), sodium tungstate (Na2181WO4), sodium selenate (Na275SeO4), sodium selenite (Na275SeO3) and tellurous acid (H2127mTeO3) were injected intravenously to each group of tumor bearing rats. These rats were sacrificed at various periods after injection of each preparation: 3 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours in all preparations. The radioactivities of the tumor, blood, muscle, liver, kidney and spleen were measured by a well-type scintillation counter, and retention values (in every tissue including the tumor) were calculated in percent of administered dose per g-tissue weight. All of seven preparations did not have any affinity for malignant tumor. Na251CrO4 and H2127mTeO3 had some affinity for the kidneys, and Na275SeO3 had some affinity for the liver. Na2181WO4 and (NH4)299MoO4 disappeared very rapidly from the blood and soft tissue, and about seventy-five percent of radioactivity was excreted in urine within first 3 hours.

  15. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly progressing forms may have onset from birth, elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans (generally >100 μg/mg creatinine), severe dysostosis multiplex, short stature, and death before the 2nd or 3rd decades. A more slowly progressing form has been described as having later onset, mildly elevated glycosaminoglycans (generally <100 μg/mg creatinine), mild dysostosis multiplex, with death in the 4th or 5th decades. Other clinical findings may include cardiac valve disease, reduced pulmonary function, hepatosplenomegaly, sinusitis, otitis media, hearing loss, sleep apnea, corneal clouding, carpal tunnel disease, and inguinal or umbilical hernia. Although intellectual deficit is generally absent in MPS VI, central nervous system findings may include cervical cord compression caused by cervical spinal instability, meningeal thickening and/or bony stenosis, communicating hydrocephalus, optic nerve atrophy and blindness. The disorder is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner and is caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, located in chromosome 5 (5q13-5q14). Over 130 ARSB mutations have been reported, causing absent or reduced arylsulfatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase) activity and interrupted dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate degradation. Diagnosis generally requires evidence of clinical phenotype, arylsulfatase B enzyme activity <10% of the lower limit of normal in cultured fibroblasts or isolated leukocytes, and demonstration of a normal activity of a different sulfatase enzyme

  16. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI.

    PubMed

    Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Nicely, Helen; Harmatz, Paul; Turbeville, Sean

    2010-04-12

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly progressing forms may have onset from birth, elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans (generally >100 microg/mg creatinine), severe dysostosis multiplex, short stature, and death before the 2nd or 3rd decades. A more slowly progressing form has been described as having later onset, mildly elevated glycosaminoglycans (generally <100 microg/mg creatinine), mild dysostosis multiplex, with death in the 4th or 5th decades. Other clinical findings may include cardiac valve disease, reduced pulmonary function, hepatosplenomegaly, sinusitis, otitis media, hearing loss, sleep apnea, corneal clouding, carpal tunnel disease, and inguinal or umbilical hernia. Although intellectual deficit is generally absent in MPS VI, central nervous system findings may include cervical cord compression caused by cervical spinal instability, meningeal thickening and/or bony stenosis, communicating hydrocephalus, optic nerve atrophy and blindness. The disorder is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner and is caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, located in chromosome 5 (5q13-5q14). Over 130 ARSB mutations have been reported, causing absent or reduced arylsulfatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase) activity and interrupted dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate degradation. Diagnosis generally requires evidence of clinical phenotype, arylsulfatase B enzyme activity <10% of the lower limit of normal in cultured fibroblasts or isolated leukocytes, and demonstration of a normal activity of a different sulfatase

  17. Evidence that the modulator of the glucocorticoid-receptor complex is the endogenous molybdate factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bodine, P V; Litwack, G

    1988-01-01

    We have recently purified the modulator of the glucocorticoid-receptor complex from rat liver. Purified modulator inhibits glucocorticoid-receptor complex activation and stabilizes the steroid-binding ability of the unoccupied glucocorticoid receptor. Since these activities are shared by exogenous sodium molybdate, modulator appears to be the endogenous factor that sodium molybdate mimics. In this report, we present additional evidence for the mechanism of action of purified modulator. (i) Molybdate and modulator inhibit receptor activation as measured by DNA-cellulose binding, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and Sepharose 4B gel filtration. (ii) The ability of molybdate and modulator to inhibit receptor activation and stabilize the unoccupied receptor appears to be additive. (iii) Scatchard analysis of heat-destabilized unoccupied receptors indicates that the number of steroid-binding sites is reduced during destabilization, whereas the steroid dissociation constant remains unchanged. Molybdate and modulator stabilize the receptor by maintaining the number of steroid-binding sites. (iv) Molybdate and modulator do not inhibit alkaline phosphatase-induced destabilization of the unoccupied receptor. However, alkaline phosphatase-induced destabilization is reversed by the addition of dithiothreitol in the presence, but not in the absence, of molybdate or modulator. These results suggest that the mechanism of action for modulator is identical to that of sodium molybdate, and we propose that modulator is the endogenous molybdate factor for the glucocorticoid receptor. PMID:3422744

  18. Lithium vanado(V)molybdate(VI), Li[VMoO6

    PubMed Central

    Ezzine Yahmed, Safa; Nasri, Rawia; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Brannerite-type Li[VMoO6] has been synthesized by a solid state reaction route. The V and Mo atoms statistically occupy the same site with mirror symmetry and are octa­hedrally surrounded by O atoms. The framework is two-dimensional and is built up from edge-sharing (V,Mo)O6 octa­hedra forming (VMoO6)∞ layers that run parallel to the (001) plane. Li+ ions are situated in position with symmetry 2/m in the inter­layer space. The bond-valence analysis reveals that the Li+ ionic conductivity is along the [010] and [110] directions, and shows that this material may have inter­esting conduction properties. This simulation proposes a model of the lithium conduction pathways. PMID:24426977

  19. Bis(benzyl-trimethyl-ammonium) dichromate(VI).

    PubMed

    Jin, Lei; Liu, Ning

    2011-11-01

    The asymmetric part of the title compound, (C(10)H(16)N)(2)[Cr(2)O(7)], contains one cation and a half of the dichromate dianion, which has a staggered conformation and exhibits disorder of the bridging O atom around the inversion center over two positions in a 1:1 ratio. Weak inter-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link cations and anions into a three-dimensional structure.

  20. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  1. Dielectric and conducting behaviour of polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Want, Basharat; Zahoor Ahmad, Bhat; Bhat, Bilal Hamid

    2014-09-01

    Polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate spherulites have been obtained by using gel diffusion technique and characterized by different physio-chemical techniques. The surfaces of these spherulites are composed of nano-rod with an average diameter of about 80 nm. At room temperature the initial crystal structure is triclinic, space group P1. Thermal studies suggested a phase transition occurring in holmium octa-molybdate crystals at about 793 K. The electrical properties of the system have been studied as a function of frequency and temperature in the ranges of 20 Hz-3 MHz and 290-570 K, respectively. A giant dielectric constant and two loss peaks have been observed in the permittivity formalism. The conducting behaviour of the material is also discussed. The conductivity was found to be 1572 μ Ω-1 m-1 at room temperature and 3 MHz frequency. The conductivity of the polycrystalline material was attributed to the fact that it arises due to the migration of defects on the oxygen sub-lattice. Impedance studies were also performed in the frequency domain to infer the bulk and grain boundary contributions to the overall electric response of the material. The electrical responses have been attributed to the grain, grain-boundary, and interfacial effects.

  2. Role of Molybdate and Other Transition Metals in the Accumulation of Protochelin by Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Anthony S.; Page, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Both molybdate and iron are metals that are required by the obligately aerobic organism Azotobacter vinelandii to survive in the nutrient-limited conditions of its natural soil environment. Previous studies have shown that a high concentration of molybdate (1 mM) affects the formation of A. vinelandii siderophores such that the tricatecholate protochelin is formed to the exclusion of the other catecholate siderophores, azotochelin and aminochelin. It has been shown previously that molybdate combines readily with catecholates and interferes with siderophore function. In this study, we found that the manner in which each catecholate siderophore interacted with molybdate was consistent with the structure and binding potential of the siderophore. The affinity that each siderophore had for molybdate was high enough that stable molybdo-siderophore complexes were formed but low enough that the complexes were readily destabilized by Fe3+. Thus, competition between Fe3+ and molybdate did not appear to be the primary cause of protochelin accumulation; in addition, we determined that protochelin accumulated in the presence of vanadate, tungstate, Zn2+, and Mn2+. We found that all five of these metal ions partially inhibited uptake of 55Fe-protochelin and 55Fe-azotochelin complexes. Also, each of these metal ions partially inhibited the activity of ferric reductase, an enzyme important in the deferration of ferric siderophores. Our results suggest that protochelin accumulates in the presence of molybdate because protochelin uptake and conversion into its component parts, azotochelin and aminochelin, are inhibited by interference with ferric reductase. PMID:10742245

  3. Investigation of molybdate melts as an alternative method of reprocessing used nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hames, Amber L.; Tkac, Peter; Paulenova, Alena; Willit, James L.; Williamson, Mark A.

    2017-04-01

    An investigation of molybdate melts containing sodium molybdate (Na2MoO4) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) to achieve the separation of uranium from fission products by crystallization has been performed. The separation is based on the difference in solubility of the fission product metal oxides compared to the uranium oxide or molybdate in the molybdate melt. The molybdate melt dissolves uranium dioxide at high temperatures, and upon cooling, uranium precipitates as uranium dioxide or molybdate, whereas the fission product metals remain soluble in the melt. Small-scale experiments using gram quantities of uranium dioxide have been performed to investigate the feasibility of UO2 purification from the fission products. The composition of the uranium precipitate as well as data for partitioning of several fission product surrogates between the uranium precipitate and molybdate melt for various melt compositions are presented and discussed. The fission products Cs, Sr, Ru and Rh all displayed very large distribution ratios. The fission products Zr, Pd, and the lanthanides also displayed good distribution ratios (D > 10). A melt consisting of 20 wt% MoO3- 50 wt% Na2MoO4-30 wt% UO2 heated to 1313 K and cooled to 1123 K for the physical separation of the UO2 product from the melt, and washed once with Na2MoO4 displays optimum conditions for separation of the UO2 from the fission products.

  4. Aquatic acute toxicity assessments of molybdenum (+VI) to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Wei; Liang, Chenju; Yeh, Hui-Ju

    2016-03-01

    Generally, molybdenum (Mo) metals in the environment are very rare, but wastewater discharges from industrial processes may contain high concentrations of Mo, which has the potential to contaminate water or soil if not handled properly. In this study, the impact of three common compounds of hexavalent Mo (sodium molybdate (Na2MoO4‧2H2O), ammonium molybdate ((NH4)6Mo7O24‧4H2O) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3)) in an aquatic system were assessed based on 48-h exposure acute toxicity to Daphnia magna (D. magna). The LC50 toxicities for associated conjugate ions including Na(+), Cl(-), SO4(2-), and NH4(+) were determined. Furthermore, the LC50 values for the three forms of hexavalent Mo were determined, and the acute toxicities of the Mo forms were found to follow the order: (NH4)6Mo7O24‧4H2O > MoO3 > Na2MoO4‧2H2O in solution. (NH4)6Mo7O24‧4H2O exhibited the lowest LC50 of 43.3 mg L(-1) (corresponding to 23.5 mg Mo L(-1)) among the three molybdenum salts. The research confirmed that the toxicity of molybdenum in the aquatic system is highly dependent on the form of molybdenum salts used, and is also associated with the influence of the background water quality.

  5. The structures and properties of the new two-dimensional inorganic–organic hybrid materials based on the molybdate chains

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Na; Mu, Bao; Cao, Xinyu; Huang, Rudan

    2014-09-15

    A series of inorganic organic hybrid materials based on polyoxometalates(POMs), namely, [M{sup II}(HL){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][Mo{sup VI}{sub 6}O{sub 20}] [M=Co (1), Ni (2), Cu (3), Zn (4)], [Mn{sup IV}L{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][Mo{sup VI}{sub 6}O{sub 20}] (5), and (HL){sub 3}PMO{sub 12}O{sub 40} (6) [L=3-(4-pyridyl)pyrazole], have been synthesized. The compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The results from single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicate that 1–5 are isostructural. It is worth noting that the polyanions are bridged by Mo–O–Mo to form 1D inorganic chains, which are further connected via M ions to form 2D nets. In compound 6, the ligands are used as the positive ions to balance the charge of the compound. Moreover, the magnetic properties of compound 5 have also been investigated in detail. - Graphical abstract: In complex 1, The Co ion is six coordinated by four oxygen atoms from two Mo{sub 6}O{sub 20} and two water molecules, and two N atoms from two different ligand. It is noticeable that there is an one-dimensional chain molybdate, which is combined by O–Mo–O, then the chain parallel with each other, the Mo{sub 6} anion acts as a bidentate ligand providing O7 atoms to bridge CoII ions to form a 2D inorganic layer. Finally every nets become 3D structure by hydrogen bond. - Highlights: • Novel inorganic–organic hybrid materials have been prepared. • Compounds 1–5 contain the 1D molybdate chains composed of (MoO{sub 6}) octahedra. • The 1D chains parallel with each other to form a 2D inorganic layer.

  6. Molybdate and tungstate act like vanadate on glucose metabolism in isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fillat, C; Rodríguez-Gil, J E; Guinovart, J J

    1992-01-01

    In rat hepatocytes, molybdate and tungstate inactivate glycogen synthase by a mechanism independent of Ca2+ and activate glycogen phosphorylase by a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. On the other hand, both molybdate and tungstate increase fructose 2,6-bisphosphate levels and counteract the decrease in this metabolite induced by glucagon. These effectors do not directly modify 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase activity, even though they partially counteract the inactivation of this enzyme induced by glucagon. These effects are related to an increase on the glycolytic flux, as indicated by the increase in L-lactate and CO2 production and the decrease in glucose 6-phosphate levels in the presence of glucose. All these effects are similar to those previously reported for vanadate, although molybdate and tungstate are less effective than vanadate. These results could indicate that molybdate, tungstate and vanadate act on glucose metabolism in isolated hepatocytes by a similar mechanism of action. PMID:1313228

  7. 70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM NITRATE IN STORAGE. APRIL 18, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  8. Glufosinate-ammonium

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Glufosinate - ammonium ; CASRN 77182 - 82 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarci

  9. Acute ammonium dichromate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Meert, K L; Ellis, J; Aronow, R; Perrin, E

    1994-10-01

    We report the ingestion of ammonium dichromate by a child that resulted in multiple-organ-system failure and death. Exchange transfusion and hemodialysis were ineffective in removing significant amounts of chromium or causing sustained clinical improvement. We suggest that immediate, large doses of the reducing agent ascorbic acid would allow effective reduction of hexavalent chromium with less cellular toxicity.

  10. Molybdate transport in a chemically complex aquifer: Field measurements compared with solute-transport model predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    A natural-gradient tracer test was conducted in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Molybdate was included in the injectate to study the effects of variable groundwater chemistry on its aqueous distribution and to evaluate the reliability of laboratory experiments for identifying and quantifying reactions that control the transport of reactive solutes in groundwater. Transport of molybdate in this aquifer was controlled by adsorption. The amount adsorbed varied with aqueous chemistry that changed with depth as freshwater recharge mixed with a plume of sewage-contaminated groundwater. Molybdate adsorption was strongest near the water table where pH (5.7) and the concentration of the competing solutes phosphate (2.3 micromolar) and sulfate (86 micromolar) were low. Adsorption of molybdate decreased with depth as pH increased to 6.5, phosphate increased to 40 micromolar, and sulfate increased to 340 micromolar. A one-site diffuse-layer surface-complexation model and a two-site diffuse-layer surface-complexation model were used to simulate adsorption. Reactions and equilibrium constants for both models were determined in laboratory experiments and used in the reactive-transport model PHAST to simulate the two-dimensional transport of molybdate during the tracer test. No geochemical parameters were adjusted in the simulation to improve the fit between model and field data. Both models simulated the travel distance of the molybdate cloud to within 10% during the 2-year tracer test; however, the two-site diffuse-layer model more accurately simulated the molybdate concentration distribution within the cloud.

  11. Small Substrate Transport and Mechanism of a Molybdate ATP Binding Cassette Transporter in a Lipid Environment*

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Austin J.; Harrison, Alistair; Alvarez, Frances J. D.; Davidson, Amy L.; Pinkett, Heather W.

    2014-01-01

    Embedded in the plasma membrane of all bacteria, ATP binding cassette (ABC) importers facilitate the uptake of several vital nutrients and cofactors. The ABC transporter, MolBC-A, imports molybdate by passing substrate from the binding protein MolA to a membrane-spanning translocation pathway of MolB. To understand the mechanism of transport in the biological membrane as a whole, the effects of the lipid bilayer on transport needed to be addressed. Continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance and in vivo molybdate uptake studies were used to test the impact of the lipid environment on the mechanism and function of MolBC-A. Working with the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae, we found that MolBC-A functions as a low affinity molybdate transporter in its native environment. In periods of high extracellular molybdate concentration, H. influenzae makes use of parallel molybdate transport systems (MolBC-A and ModBC-A) to take up a greater amount of molybdate than a strain with ModBC-A alone. In addition, the movement of the translocation pathway in response to nucleotide binding and hydrolysis in a lipid environment is conserved when compared with in-detergent analysis. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy indicates that a lipid environment restricts the flexibility of the MolBC translocation pathway. By combining continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and substrate uptake studies, we reveal details of molybdate transport and the logistics of uptake systems that employ multiple transporters for the same substrate, offering insight into the mechanisms of nutrient uptake in bacteria. PMID:24722984

  12. Molybdate modulates mitogen and cyclosporin responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Fotios V; Delitheos, Andreas; Tiligada, Ekaterini

    2011-07-01

    The trace element molybdenum (Mo) is an essential component of key physiological systems in animals, plants and microorganisms. The molybdate oxoanion MoO(4)(2-) has been demonstrated to cause diverse yet poorly understood biochemical and pharmacological effects, such as non-specific inhibition of phosphatases and stabilization of steroid receptors. This study aimed to investigate the effects of molybdate on the activation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) ex vivo and its potential interaction with the widely used immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CsA). Lymphocyte activation was evaluated by performing multiple experiments determining blastogenesis in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from 5 healthy volunteers, following stimulation induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), in the absence or presence of 0.05-10 mM sodium molybdate or/and 2.5-30 μg/mL CsA. Blastogenesis was assessed by a morphometric assay based on the relative proportions of unactivated lymphocytes, activated lymphoblasts and cells with aberrant morphology after PHA-induced activation. Molybdate concentrations up to 1 mM showed no effect on lymphocyte blastogenesis, while higher concentrations exerted immunosuppressive actions on cultured hPBLs. Co-administration of 0.1 mM sodium molybdate with CsA, at doses up to 20 μg/mL, induced no alteration in the response of cultured hPBLs to CsA. However, molybdate potentiated the immunosuppressive action of higher CsA concentrations, implying a likely dose-related synergistic interaction of the two agents in PHA-stimulated blood lymphocytes. These observations are indicative of the possible biological importance of molybdate oxoanions in the modulation of hPBL activation that may have pharmacological consequences during the therapeutic application of immunomodulatory drugs.

  13. Properties of the periplasmic ModA molybdate-binding protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rech, S; Wolin, C; Gunsalus, R P

    1996-02-02

    The modABCD operon, located at 17 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome, encodes the protein components of a high affinity molybdate uptake system. Sequence analysis of the modA gene (GenBank L34009) predicts that it encodes a periplasmic binding protein based on the presence of a leader-like sequence at its N terminus. To examine the properties of the ModA protein, the modA structural gene was overexpressed, and its product was purified. The ModA protein was localized to the periplasmic space of the cell, and it was released following a gentle osmotic shock. The N-terminal sequence of ModA confirmed that a leader region of 24 amino acids was removed upon export from the cell. The apparent size of ModA is 31.6 kDa as determined by gel sieve chromatography, whereas it is 22.5 kDa when examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A ligand-dependent protein mobility shift assay was devised using a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protocol to examine binding of molybdate and other anions to the ModA periplasmic protein. Whereas molybdate and tungstate were bound with high affinity (approximately 5 microM), sulfate, chromate, selenate, phosphate, and chlorate did not bind even when tested at 2 mM. A UV spectral assay revealed apparent Kd values of binding for molybdate and tungstate of 3 and 7 microM, respectively. Strains defective in the modA gene were unable to transport molybdate unless high levels of the anion were supplied in the medium. Therefore the modA gene product is essential for high affinity molybdate uptake by the cell. Tungstate interference of molybdate acquisition by the cell is apparently due in part to the high affinity of the ModA protein for this anion.

  14. Structural and spectral investigation of terbium molybdate nanophosphor.

    PubMed

    Mani, Kamal P; Vimal, G; Biju, P R; Joseph, Cyriac; Unnikrishnan, N V; Ittyachen, M A

    2015-09-05

    Terbium molybdate nanophosphors were synthesized through a facile sol-gel route. The structure of the phosphors was characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the structure of the nanophosphor gradually changes from monoclinic to orthorhombic phase as heated from 700 to 900 °C. High resolution transmission electron microscopy, SAED and EDS were also employed to characterize the size, crystallinity and composition of the samples. Detailed spectroscopic investigations were carried out by Judd-Ofelt analysis based on UV-Visible-NIR absorption and emission spectra. The luminescence spectra suggest that phosphors with orthorhombic structure have better luminescence properties than the monoclinic structure. The phosphors showed intense green emission under near-UV excitation due to the energy transfer from the host lattice to Tb(3+) ions. The CIE coordinates suggest enhanced color purity for green emission and short fluorescence decay values proposes the suitability for LED applications. These phosphors can be applied as promising candidates for blue and near-UV excited WLEDs.

  15. Structural and spectral investigation of terbium molybdate nanophosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Kamal P.; Vimal, G.; Biju, P. R.; Joseph, Cyriac; Unnikrishnan, N. V.; Ittyachen, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Terbium molybdate nanophosphors were synthesized through a facile sol-gel route. The structure of the phosphors was characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the structure of the nanophosphor gradually changes from monoclinic to orthorhombic phase as heated from 700 to 900 °C. High resolution transmission electron microscopy, SAED and EDS were also employed to characterize the size, crystallinity and composition of the samples. Detailed spectroscopic investigations were carried out by Judd-Ofelt analysis based on UV-Visible-NIR absorption and emission spectra. The luminescence spectra suggest that phosphors with orthorhombic structure have better luminescence properties than the monoclinic structure. The phosphors showed intense green emission under near-UV excitation due to the energy transfer from the host lattice to Tb3+ ions. The CIE coordinates suggest enhanced color purity for green emission and short fluorescence decay values proposes the suitability for LED applications. These phosphors can be applied as promising candidates for blue and near-UV excited WLEDs.

  16. Rescaling metal molybdate nanostructures with biopolymer for energy storage having high capacitance with robust cycle stability.

    PubMed

    Minakshi, Manickam; Barmi, Maryam J; Jones, Robert T

    2017-03-14

    Hybrid capacitors can replace or complement batteries, while storing energy through ion adsorption and fast surface redox reactions. There is a growing demand in developing nanostructured materials as electrodes for hybrid systems that can enhance the specific capacitance by ion desolvation in the nanopores. Here, we demonstrate that rescaling the pore diameter with the aid of biopolymer at an optimal level during the synthesis of metal molybdate leads to high capacitance 124 F g(-1) giving robust capacitance retention of 80% over 2000 cycles for a constructed device (activated carbon vs. metal molybdate). The presence of biopolymer (l-glutamic acid) in the metal molybdate acts as a complexing agent of the metal ion while enhancing the mass transport and hence it's improved electrochemical performance. However, XPS and other elemental analyses illustrated no evidence for N doping but traces of other surface functional groups (i.e. C and O) could be present on the molybdate surface. The biopolymer synthetic approach has the advantage of yielding nanostructured material with a relatively narrow pore size distribution controlled by l-glutamic acid. This study will provide a generic route to rescale other metal molybdate, phosphate or oxide counterparts and be an added value to the database.

  17. Removal of molybdate from water by adsorption onto ZnCl2 activated coir pith carbon.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Sangeetha, D

    2006-07-01

    Removal and recovery of molybdate from aqueous solution was investigated using ZnCl2 activated carbon developed from coir pith. Studies were conducted to delineate the effects of contact time, adsorbent dose, molybdate concentration, pH and temperature. Two theoretical adsorption isotherms, namely, Langmuir and Freundlich were used to describe the experimental results. The Langmuir adsorption capacity (Q0) was found to be 18.9 mg molybdate/g of the adsorbent. Adsorption followed second order kinetics. Studies were performed at different pH values to find out the pH at which maximum adsorption occurred. The pH effect and desorption studies showed that ion exchange and chemisorption mechanism were involved in the adsorption process. Thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG0, DeltaH0 and DeltaS0 for the adsorption were evaluated. Effect of foreign ions on adsorption of molybdate has been examined. The results showed that ZnCl2 activated coir pith carbon was effective for the removal and recovery of molybdate from water.

  18. Ammonium imidazolium dichromate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Run-Qiang

    2012-04-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound, (C(3)H(5)N(2))(NH(4))[Cr(2)O(7)], the anions and cations are linked through N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, resulting in a three-dimensional structure which contains three kinds of layers parallel to (001). One layer contains imidazole cations, the other two layers the ammonium cations and dichromate anions. The dichromate anion has an eclipsed conformation with a dihedral angle of 14.65 (18)° between the mean planes of the O-P-O-P-O backbone.

  19. Hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sucha, V.; Elsass, F.; Eberl, D.D.; Kuchta, L'.; Madejova, J.; Gates, W.P.; Komadel, P.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic gel and glass of illitic composition, natural kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite were used as starting materials for hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite. Ammonium illite was prepared from synthetic gel by hydrothermal treatment at 300??C. The onset of crystallization began within 3 h, and well-crystallized ammonium illite appeared at 24 h. Increasing reaction time (up to four weeks) led to many illite layers per crystal. In the presence of equivalent proportions of potassium and ammonium, the gel was transformed to illite with equimolar contents of K and NH4. In contrast, synthesis using glass under the same conditions resulted in a mixture of mixed-layer ammonium illite-smectite with large expandability and discrete illite. Hydrothermal treatments of the fine fractions of natural kaolinite and illite-smectite produced ammonium illite from kaolinite but the illite-smectite remained unchanged.

  20. Optical filtering and luminescence property of some molybdates prepared by combustion synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, P. J.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2014-10-15

    As an important class of lanthanide inorganic compounds, rare earth ions doped molybdates have gained much attention due to their attractive luminescence and structural properties, supporting various promising applications as phosphor materials in the fields such as white light-emitting diodes, optical fibers, biolabel, lasers, and so on. The molybdate family has promising trivalent cation conducting properties and most of the optical properties result from electron transitions of the 4f shell, which are greatly affected by the composition and structures of rare-earth compounds. In this paper we report the molybdate CaMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} for red SSL and Bi{sub 1.4}Y{sub 0.6}MoO{sub 6}, Y{sub 6}MoO{sub 12} for optical filtering, prepared by one step combustion synthesis.

  1. Optical filtering and luminescence property of some molybdates prepared by combustion synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, P. J.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    As an important class of lanthanide inorganic compounds, rare earth ions doped molybdates have gained much attention due to their attractive luminescence and structural properties, supporting various promising applications as phosphor materials in the fields such as white light-emitting diodes, optical fibers, biolabel, lasers, and so on. The molybdate family has promising trivalent cation conducting properties and most of the optical properties result from electron transitions of the 4f shell, which are greatly affected by the composition and structures of rare-earth compounds. In this paper we report the molybdate CaMoO4:Eu3+ for red SSL and Bi1.4Y0.6MoO6, Y6MoO12 for optical filtering, prepared by one step combustion synthesis.

  2. Mo enrichment in black shale and reduction of molybdate by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Barton, L. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Lower Cambrian Black shale in Zunyi area of Guizhou Province, Southern China contains significant amount of Mo, As, and sulfide minerals. Additionally, Mo and sulfides are closely associated with organic matter of kerogen. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show pyrite micro-crystals and Mo-As-S-bearing carbon (kerogen). High-resolution TEM image shows that Mo-rich areas are Mo-sulfide (molybdenite) layers that form poorly crystalline structures in organic carbon matrix. X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS) indicate composition from the pyrite and the Mo-rich area. The black shale is very unique because of its high Mo concentration. One possible mechanism for enriching Mo from paleo-seawater is the involvement of SRB. Molybdate is an essential trace element required by biological systems including the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB); however, detrimental consequences may occur if molybdate is present in high concentrations in the environment. We followed the growth of Desulfovibrio gigas ATCC 19364, D. vulgaris Hildenborough, D. desulfuricans DSM 642, and D. desulfuricans DSM 27774 in media containing sub-lethal levels of molybdate and observed a red-brown color in the culture fluid. Spectral analysis of the culture fluid revealed absorption peaks at 467 nm, 395 nm and 314 nm and this color is proposed to be a molybdate-sulfide complex. Reduction of molybdate with the formation of molybdate disulfide occurs in the periplasm D. gigas and D. desulfuricans DSM 642. From these results we suggest that the occurrence of poorly crystalline Mo-sulfides in black shale may be a result from SRB reduction and selective enrichment of Mo in paleo-seawater. We suggest that similar SRB mechanism could cause the Mo enrichment in a ~ 2.5 billion years old late Archean McRae Shale, which is related to the great oxidation event of early earth atmosphere.

  3. Behavior of silver molybdate at high-pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, A.K.; Nithya, R.; Misra, Sunasira; Yagi, Takehiko

    2012-12-15

    Behavior of cubic spinel phase of Ag{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} is investigated at high pressure using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The P-V data are fitted to a third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state using a value of B{sub 0}=113 GPa and B Prime {sub 0}=4. The compound is also found to exhibit a phase transition around 5 GPa to a tetragonal structure and the two phases are found to coexist over a range of pressures. Raman spectra exhibit dramatic changes across the phase transition. Increase of X-ray background scattering and broadening of the Raman peaks associated with MoO{sub 4} tetrahedral ions in the high pressure phase suggest evolution of positional disorder. However, no evidence of pressure-induced amorphization was found up to 47 GPa. - Graphical abstract: Evolution of the integrated intensity of all the diffraction peaks between 12 and 18 degree 2{theta} as a function of pressure. The rapid decrease of the intensity suggests evolution of positional disorder in the high-pressure tetragonal phase. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First in-situ X-ray diffraction and Raman study of cubic silver molybdate at high pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Commencement of a structural transition to a tetragonal phase is found at 2.3 GPa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The high-pressure phase is found to have positional disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bulk modulus of 113 GPa is obtained from the equation of state.

  4. Luminescence and electrical behavior of lead molybdate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Parchur, A. K.; Rai, S. B.; Singh, P.

    2013-02-01

    We report our investigation on photoluminescence and electrical behavior of lead molybdate (PbMoO4) nanoparticles by spanning the solvent of reaction medium. The PbMoO4 nanoparticles were prepared in different solvents like ethylene glycol (EG), dimethyl sulfonic acid (DMSO) and 50% EG + 50% DMSO at room temperature. The crystallite size and strain acting on nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study and microstructure was studied by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The average crystallite sizes and strain were found to be ˜22, 24 and 25 nm and ˜0.0028, 0.0039 and 0.0048 for EG, DMSO and EG+DMSO solvents, respectively. The XRD peak corresponding to (112) were found to shift to lower angle by 0.02° for DMSA solvent as compared to EG. This confirmed the lattice expansion in the unit cell. The particle sizes measured from TEM measurements were found to be slightly greater than that obtained from XRD analysis. The photoluminescence (PL) measurements were carried out by using 266 nm Nd-YAG laser excitation (Mo-O CTB). The samples depicted strong BLUE color. The order of emission intensity in the samples was obtained in EG+DMSO > DMSO > EG order. This may be related to the formation of [MoO4] and [PbO8] clusters in PbMoO4 host. The electrical conductivity study were carried out for these samples and from this study, we concluded that the conduction mechanism in this system were polaronic in nature.

  5. Photocatalytic action of cerium molybdate and iron-titanium oxide hollow nanospheres on Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsonakis, I. A.; Kontogiani, P.; Pappas, G. S.; Kordas, G.

    2013-06-01

    This study is focused on the production of hollow nanospheres that reveal antibacterial action. Cerium molybdate and iron-titanium oxide hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 175 ± 15 and 221 ± 10 nm, respectively, were synthesized using emulsion polymerization and the sol-gel process. Their morphology characterization was accomplished using scanning electron microscopy. Their antibacterial action was examined on pure culture of Escherichia coli considering the loss of their viability. Both hollow nanospheres presented photocatalytic action after illumination with blue-black light, but those of cerium molybdate also demonstrated photocatalytic action in the dark. Therefore, the produced nanospheres can be used for antibacterial applications.

  6. Molybdic acid ionisation under hydrothermal conditions to 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minubayeva, Z.; Seward, T. M.

    2010-08-01

    This UV spectrophotometric study was aimed at providing precise, experimentally derived thermodynamic data for the ionisation of molybdic acid (H 2MoO 4) from 30 to 300 °C and at equilibrium saturated vapour pressures. The determination of the equilibrium constants and associated thermodynamic parameters were facilitated by spectrophotometric measurements using a specially designed high temperature optical Ti-Pd flow-through cell with silica glass windows. The following van't Hoff isochore equations describe the temperature dependence of the first and second ionisation constants of molybdic acid up to 300 °C:

  7. Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Mouser, P.J.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Elifantz, H.; Holmes, D.E.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-04-01

    The impact of ammonium availability on microbial community structure and the physiological status and activity of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by as much as two orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 {micro}M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that ammonium influenced the composition of the microbial community prior to acetate addition with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species at the site with the highest ammonium, and Dechloromonas species dominating at sites with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added, and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to the concentration of acetate that was delivered to each location rather than the amount of ammonium available in the groundwater. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium importer gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during in situ uranium reduction, and that the abundance of amtB transcripts was inversely correlated to ammonium levels across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression by subsurface Geobacter species are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of Geobacter species in subsurface environments during bioremediation. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical/physiological interactions at the field scale, in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes.

  8. Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horii, M.; Funakawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI) is being developed as the third Japanese three-axis stabilized engineering test satellite to establish the 2-ton geostationary operational satellite bus system and to demonstrate the high performance satellite communication technology for future operational satellites. The satellite is expected to be stationed at 154 deg east latitude. It will be launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan by a type H-II launch vehicle. The Deep Space Network (DSN) will support the prelaunch compatibility test, data interface verification testing, and launch rehersals. The DSN primary support period is from launch through the final AEF plus 1 hour. Contingency support is from final AEF plus 1 hour until launch plus 1 month. The coverage will consist of all the 26-m antennas as prime and the 34-m antennas at Madrid and Canberra as backup. Maximum support will consist of two 8-hour tracks per station for a 7-day period, plus the contingency support, if required. Information is given in tabular form for DSN support, telemetry, command, and tracking support responsibility.

  9. An analysis of the binding of repressor protein ModE to modABCD (molybdate transport) operator/promoter DNA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Grunden, A M; Self, W T; Villain, M; Blalock, J E; Shanmugam, K T

    1999-08-20

    Expression of the modABCD operon in Escherichia coli, which codes for a molybdate-specific transporter, is repressed by ModE in vivo in a molybdate-dependent fashion. In vitro DNase I-footprinting experiments identified three distinct regions of protection by ModE-molybdate on the modA operator/promoter DNA, GTTATATT (-15 to -8; region 1), GCCTACAT (-4 to +4; region 2), and GTTACAT (+8 to +14; region 3). Within the three regions of the protected DNA, a pentamer sequence, TAYAT (Y = C or T), can be identified. DNA-electrophoretic mobility experiments showed that the protected regions 1 and 2 are essential for binding of ModE-molybdate to DNA, whereas the protected region 3 increases the affinity of the DNA to the repressor. The stoichiometry of this interaction was found to be two ModE-molybdate per modA operator DNA. ModE-molybdate at 5 nM completely protected the modABCD operator/promoter DNA from DNase I-catalyzed hydrolysis, whereas ModE alone failed to protect the DNA even at 100 nM. The apparent K(d) for the interaction between the modA operator DNA and ModE-molybdate was 0.3 nM, and the K(d) increased to 8 nM in the absence of molybdate. Among the various oxyanions tested, only tungstate replaced molybdate in the repression of modA by ModE, but the affinity of ModE-tungstate for modABCD operator DNA was 6 times lower than with ModE-molybdate. A mutant ModE(T125I) protein, which repressed modA-lac even in the absence of molybdate, protected the same region of modA operator DNA in the absence of molybdate. The apparent K(d) for the interaction between modA operator DNA and ModE(T125I) was 3 nM in the presence of molybdate and 4 nM without molybdate. The binding of molybdate to ModE resulted in a decrease in fluorescence emission, indicating a conformational change of the protein upon molybdate binding. The fluorescence emission spectra of mutant ModE proteins, ModE(T125I) and ModE(Q216*), were unaffected by molybdate. The molybdate-independent mutant Mod

  10. Intercalation-controlled cyclodehydration of sorbitol in water over layered-niobium-molybdate solid acid.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuya; Furusato, Shogo; Takagaki, Atsushi; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Kikuchi, Ryuji; Oyama, S Ted

    2014-03-01

    Layered niobium molybdate (HNbMoO6 ) was used in the aqueous-phase dehydration of sorbitol and was found to exhibit remarkable selectivity toward its monomolecular-dehydrated intermediate 1,4-sorbitan. This was attributed to the selective intercalation of sorbitol within the interlayers with strong Brønsted acid sites.

  11. Novel geochemistry-inspired method for the deep removal of vanadium from molybdate solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jialiang; Deng, Yuping; Zhou, Qiuyue; Qin, Peixin; Liu, Yubo; Wang, Chengyan

    2017-06-05

    Separation of vanadium from molybdates is an essential task for processing the leaching solution of hazardous spent hydrodesulphurization (HDS) catalyst. In this study, the difference in the main naturally occurring mineral forms of Mo and V inspired us to develop a method for the deep removal of V from molybdate solution using Fe3O4 as an adsorbent. First, the adsorbent was synthesized with coprecipitation method, and then it was characterized by XRD, TEM, and VSM. The synthesized material consisted of pure Fe3O4 nanoparticles that exhibited paramagnetic property, with a saturated magnetization of 68.6emug(-1). The V removal efficiency was investigated using batch adsorption experiments in varying conditions. Results indicated that V could be deeply removed from various concentrations of molybdate solution at pH of 7.0-11.0 within 5min. A slight decrease was found in the adsorption ratio after the adsorbent had been reused for 4 cycles. The resulting molybdate solution contained less than 0.02gL(-1) of V, which satisfies the requirement for preparing high-quality products. Finally, a process flowchart is presented for the separation of Mo and V from the leaching solution of spent HDS catalyst, based on the excellent V removal performance and rapid separation rate of the Fe3O4 adsorbent.

  12. The molybdate-binding protein (ModA) of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Balan, Andrea; Santacruz, Carolina P; Moutran, Alexandre; Ferreira, Rita C C; Medrano, Francisco J; Pérez, Carlos A; Ramos, Carlos H I; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2006-12-01

    The modABC operon of phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. citri) encodes a putative ABC transporter involved in the uptake of the molybdate and tungstate anions. Sequence analyses showed high similarity values of ModA orthologs found in X. campestris pv. campestris (X. campestris) and Escherichia coli. The X. citri modA gene was cloned in pET28a and the recombinant protein, expressed in the E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain, purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The purified protein remained soluble and specifically bound molybdate and tungstate with K(d) 0.29+/-0.12 microM and 0.58+/-0.14 microM, respectively. Additionally binding of molybdate drastically enhanced the thermal stability of the recombinant ModA as compared to the apoprotein. This is the first characterization of a ModA ortholog expressed by a phytopathogen and represents an important tool for functional, biochemical and structural analyses of molybdate transport in Xanthomonas species.

  13. Toxicokinetics of ammonium perfluorohexanoate.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    Excretion patterns and rates of ammonium perfluorohexanoate (APFHx) after administration of a single and multiple (14 days) oral dose(s) at 50 mg/kg to male and female mice and rats were examined. The test substance was [(14)C]-labeled APFHx. After a single oral administration, total excretion was rapid, with mean recoveries of over 90% of the dose at 24 hours after administration, irrespective of gender or species. The major route of elimination was via the urine (means of percentage recovery between 73.0 and 90.2% of the dose), followed by the feces (means of percentage recovery between 7.0 and 15.5% of the dose). Elimination via expired air was negligible. For the multiple dose tests, multiple (13 daily doses) oral administration of APFHx was followed by a single oral administration of [(14)C]-APFHx. Excretion was rapid, with mean recoveries of over 90% of the administered dose (mean values >95% of the ultimately recovered material) at 24 hours after dosing, irrespective of gender or species. The major route of elimination was via the urine (means of percentage recovery between 77.8 and 83.4% of the dose), followed by the feces (means of percentage recovery between 9.6 and 12.9% of the dose).

  14. Determination of molybdenum (VI) in sea water with preliminary concentration by the method of ion flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, I. Yu.; Drapchinskaya, O.L.; Lebedeva, L.I.

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility of using the method of ion flotation for the concentration of microamounts of molybdenum (VI) during determination in sea water. The ion flotation method is used for the purification of industrial sewage from the ions of nonferrous metals, including molybdenum (VI) with its content of up to 50 mg/liter. A 1.10/sup -4/M solution of sodium molybdate in 0.1M NaOH was used. The effect of different factors on the ion flotation process of molybdenum (VI) was investigated: pH of the solution, flotation times, concentrations of surface-active substances (SAS), molybdenum (IV), extraneous salts. Data presented show that the ion flotation method in conjunction with the photometric method of determining molybdenum with brompyrogallol red (BPR) and cetylpridinium chloride (CP) (limit of detection 0.02 micrograms/liter) allows the content of molybdenum (VI) in sea water to be established with sufficient reliability and reproducibility.

  15. [Adsorptive Stabilization of Soil Cr (VI) Using HDTMA Modified Montmorillonite].

    PubMed

    2016-03-15

    A series of organo-montomorillonites were prepared using Na-montomorillonite and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA). The organo-montomorillonites were then investigated for the remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soils. FT-IR, XRD, SEM and N2 -BET, CEC, Zeta potential measurement were conducted to understand the structural changes of montmorillonites as different amounts of HDTMAs were added as modifier. The characterization results indicated that the clay interlayer spacing distance increased from 1. 25 nm to 2. 13 nm, the clay surface roughness decreased, the clay surface area reduced from 38.91 m² · g⁻¹ to 0.42 m² · g⁻¹, the clay exchangeable cation amount reduced from 62 cmol · kg⁻¹ to 9.9 cmol · kg⁻¹ and the clay surface charge changed from -29.1 mV to 5.59 mV as the dosage of HDTMA in montmorillonite was increased. The TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) was used to evaluate the leachate toxicity of Cr(VI). The effects of the initial soil Cr(VI) concentration, montmorillonites dosage, reaction time and HDTMA modification amount were investigated, respectively. The results revealed that modification of montmorillonites would manifest an attenuated physical adsorptive effect and an enhanced electrostatic adsorptive effect on Cr(VI), suggesting electrostatic effect was the major force that resulted in improved Cr(VI) adsorption onto HDTMA modified montmorillonites.

  16. High performance ammonium nitrate propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, F. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A high performance propellant having greatly reduced hydrogen chloride emission is presented. It is comprised of: (1) a minor amount of hydrocarbon binder (10-15%), (2) at least 85% solids including ammonium nitrate as the primary oxidizer (about 40% to 70%), (3) a significant amount (5-25%) powdered metal fuel, such as aluminum, (4) a small amount (5-25%) of ammonium perchlorate as a supplementary oxidizer, and (5) optionally a small amount (0-20%) of a nitramine.

  17. Development of an exchange assay for cytosolic glucocorticoid receptors using the synergistic effects of molybdate plus dithiothreitol

    SciTech Connect

    Kalimi, M.; Hubbard, J.R.

    1983-09-01

    A glucocorticoid receptor exchange assay has been developed for the accurate quantification of both free and steroid-bound receptors in rat liver cytosol. Hepatic cytosol from adrenalectomized rats was saturated in vitro with unlabeled corticosterone. Cytosol was subsequently treated with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone (with and without 1000-fold cold dexamethasone) for 2-28 h at 4 C in the presence of 10 mM molybdate plus 5 mM dithiothreitol (DTT). Complete exchange occurred between 16-28 h in the presence of molybdate plus DTT. In control and 10 mM molybdate (alone) treated samples only about 50% exchange was achieved. In the presence of 5 mM DTT (alone) approximately 60-70% exchange was observed. The exchange assay (utilizing molybdate plus DTT) was also applied to hepatic cytosol of adrenalectomized rats injected with corticosterone in vivo and to samples prebound with unlabeled dexamethasone.

  18. The Escherichia coli modE gene: effect of modE mutations on molybdate dependent modA expression.

    PubMed

    McNicholas, P M; Chiang, R C; Gunsalus, R P

    1996-11-15

    The Escherichia coli modABCD operon, which encodes a high-affinity molybdate uptake system, is transcriptionally regulated in response to molybdate availability by ModE. Here we describe a highly effective enrichment protocol, applicable to any gene with a repressor role, and establish its application in the isolation of transposon mutations in modE. In addition we show that disruption of the ModE C-terminus abolishes derepression in the absence of molybdate, implying this region of ModE controls the repressor activity. Finally, a mutational analysis of a proposed molybdate binding motif indicates that this motif does not function in regulating the repressor activity of ModE.

  19. Removal of molybdate and arsenate from aqueous solutions by flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Zouboulis, A.I.; Matis, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    Ion flotation and adsorbing colloid flotation have been studied in this paper for the effective removal of molybdenum(VI) and arsenic(V) from dilute aqueous solutions. These different flotation methods were also compared. Ion flotation using a cationic surfactant (dodecylamine) as collector, as well as adsorbing colloid flotation using ferric hydroxide as coprecipitant (or sorbent) and an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) as collector were examined. Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted in order to assess the effects of the following parameters of the efficiency of the process: pH value, dosages of chemical reagents, initial concentrations of arsenic and molybdenum, and the presence of foreign anions, such as Cl{sup -} and SO{sup 2}{sub 4}{sup -}. In practical applications, ion flotation or adsorbing colloid flotation may be selected according to the concentration of arsenic, molybdenum, and also the initial [Mo]/[As] molar ratios in solution.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  1. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  2. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  3. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  4. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  5. The surface of iron molybdate catalysts used for the selective oxidation of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Benjamin R.; Pudge, Geoffrey J. F.; Bugler, Keith G.; Rushby, Alice V.; Kondrat, Simon; Bartley, Jonathan; Golunski, Stanislaw; Taylor, Stuart H.; Gibson, Emma; Wells, Peter. P.; Brookes, Catherine; Bowker, Michael; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-06-01

    The oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde is a major chemical process carried out catalytically and iron molybdate is one of the major catalysts for this process. In this paper we explore the nature of the active and selective surfaces of iron molybdate catalysts and show that the effective catalysts comprise molybdenum rich surfaces. We conclude that it is therefore important to maximise the surface area of these active catalysts and to this end we have studied catalysts made using a new physical grinding method with oxalic acid. For super-stoichiometric materials (Fe:Mo = 1:2.2) the reaction data show that physical mixing produces effective catalysts, possibly offering an improvement over the conventional co-precipitation method.

  6. Tungsten transport protein A (WtpA) in Pyrococcus furiosus: the first member of a new class of tungstate and molybdate transporters.

    PubMed

    Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Krijger, Gerard C; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2006-09-01

    A novel tungstate and molybdate binding protein has been discovered from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This tungstate transport protein A (WtpA) is part of a new ABC transporter system selective for tungstate and molybdate. WtpA has very low sequence similarity with the earlier-characterized transport proteins ModA for molybdate and TupA for tungstate. Its structural gene is present in the genome of numerous archaea and some bacteria. The identification of this new tungstate and molybdate binding protein clarifies the mechanism of tungstate and molybdate transport in organisms that lack the known uptake systems associated with the ModA and TupA proteins, like many archaea. The periplasmic protein of this ABC transporter, WtpA (PF0080), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, WtpA was observed to bind tungstate (dissociation constant [K(D)] of 17 +/- 7 pM) and molybdate (K(D) of 11 +/- 5 nM) with a stoichiometry of 1.0 mol oxoanion per mole of protein. These low K(D) values indicate that WtpA has a higher affinity for tungstate than do ModA and TupA and an affinity for molybdate similar to that of ModA. A displacement titration of molybdate-saturated WtpA with tungstate showed that the tungstate effectively replaced the molybdate in the binding site of the protein.

  7. Electrodeposition of single-crystalline molybdenum layers from tungstate-molybdate melts

    SciTech Connect

    Esina, N.O.; Tarasova, K.P.; Baraboshkin, A.N.

    1987-07-01

    The structure and growth rates of single-crystalline molybdenum layers produced by electrolysis of tungstate-molybdate melts on single-crystalline substrates with the orientations (110), (112), (100), and (111) were investigated. Growth pyramids having a symmetry coincident with that of the substrate plane were revealed as the characteristic feature of surface structure of these layers. The change from single- to polycrystalline molybdenum structure occurs via the development of twinning defects.

  8. TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

    1958-06-10

    The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

  9. Infrared and Raman spectra of magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (struvite) and its isomorphous analogues. Part VI: FT-IR spectra of isomorphously isolated species. NH4+ ions isolated in MKPO 4·6H 2O (M = Mg; Ni) and PO43- ions isolated in MgNH 4AsO 4·6H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahil, A.; Šoptrajanov, B.; Najdoski, M.; Lutz, H. D.; Engelen, B.; Stefov, V.

    2008-03-01

    Examination of mixed crystals, especially those with isomorphously isolated ions, has proved very useful in spectra-structure correlation studies. Room (RT) and low temperature (LNT) FT-IR spectra of ammonium doped in MgKPO 4·6H 2O and NiKPO 4·6H 2O and phosphate doped in MgNH 4AsO 4·6H 2O in different degrees were recorded. All three compounds are isostructural with struvite, MgNH 4PO 4·6H 2O, space group Pmn2 1, forming substitutional mixed crystals with Cs symmetry of the anions. Analysis of the region of ν 4(NH 4), ν 3(PO 4) and ν 4(PO 4) modes of LNT FT-IR difference spectra of analogues with a small content of NH4+ and PO43- revealed the expected decrease of Td symmetry of free NH4+ and PO43- ions to Cs site symmetry. Due to the Cs site symmetry of the anions, the degeneration of the ν 4(NH 4), ν 3PO 4) and ν 4PO 4) modes is raised and, hence, three components are observed in the difference FT-IR spectra. This conclusion can not be derived only from studies of no-doped polycrystalline samples of struvite type compounds.

  10. Effect of solid-phase amorphization on the spectral characteristics of europium-doped gadolinium molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmurak, S. Z.; Kiselev, A. P.; Kurmasheva, D. M.; Red'Kin, B. S.; Sinitsyn, V. V.

    2010-05-01

    A method is proposed for detecting spectral characteristics of optically inactive molybdates of rare-earth elements by their doping with rare-earth ions whose luminescence lies in the transparency region of all structural modifications of the sample. Gadolinium molybdate is chosen as the object of investigations, while europium ions are used as an optically active and structurally sensitive admixture. It is shown that after the action of a high pressure under which gadolinium molybdate passes to the amorphous state, the spectral characteristics of Gd1.99Eu0.01(MoO4)3 (GMO:Eu) change radically; namely, considerable line broadening is observed in the luminescence spectra and the luminescence excitation spectra, while the long-wave threshold of optical absorption is shifted considerably (by approximately 1.1 eV) towards lower energies. It is found that by changing the structural state of GMO:Eu by solid-state amorphization followed by annealing, the spectral characteristics of the sample can be purposefully changed. This is extremely important for solving the urgent problem of designing high-efficiency light-emitting diodes producing “white” light.

  11. Ninhydrin-sodium molybdate chromogenic analytical probe for the assay of amino acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Shivakumar; Padmarajaiah, Nagaraja; Al-Tayar, Naef Ghllab Saeed; Shrestha, Ashwinee Kumar

    2017-02-15

    A sensitive method has been proposed for the quantification of amino acids and proteins using ninhydrin and sodium molybdate as chromogenic substrates in citrate buffer of pH5.6. A weak molybdate-hydrindantin complex plays the role in the formation of Ruhemann's purple. The linear response for the amino acid, amino acid mixture and Bovine serum albumin is between 0.999 and 66.80μM, 1.52 and 38μM and 5 and 100μg/L, respectively. The molar absorptivity of the individual amino acid by the proposed reaction extends from 0.58×10(4) to 2.86×10(4)M(-1)cm(-1). The linearity equations for the proposed ninhydrin-molybdate for amino acid mixture is Abs=0.021×Conc (μM)-0.002. The applicability of the proposed method has been justified in food and biological samples in conjunction with Kjeldahl method.

  12. Ninhydrin-sodium molybdate chromogenic analytical probe for the assay of amino acids and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantharaman, Shivakumar; Padmarajaiah, Nagaraja; Al-Tayar, Naef Ghllab Saeed; Shrestha, Ashwinee Kumar

    2017-02-01

    A sensitive method has been proposed for the quantification of amino acids and proteins using ninhydrin and sodium molybdate as chromogenic substrates in citrate buffer of pH 5.6. A weak molybdate-hydrindantin complex plays the role in the formation of Ruhemann's purple. The linear response for the amino acid, amino acid mixture and Bovine serum albumin is between 0.999 and 66.80 μM, 1.52 and 38 μM and 5 and 100 μg/L, respectively. The molar absorptivity of the individual amino acid by the proposed reaction extends from 0.58 × 104 to 2.86 × 104 M- 1 cm- 1. The linearity equations for the proposed ninhydrin-molybdate for amino acid mixture is Abs = 0.021 × Conc (μM) - 0.002. The applicability of the proposed method has been justified in food and biological samples in conjunction with Kjeldahl method.

  13. Sasse Modeling of First Cycle Neptunium (VI) Recovery Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J. E.

    2006-04-01

    A flowsheet has been proposed to separate neptunium from solutions in H-Canyon Tanks 16.4, 12.5, and 11.7 in the First Cycle solvent extraction banks, in which cerium(IV) (Ce(IV)) serves as an agent to oxidize neptunium to neptunium(VI) (Np(VI)). A SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction) spreadsheet model indicates that the proposed flowsheet is a feasible method for separating neptunium and uranium from sulfates, thorium, and other metal impurities. The proposed flowsheet calls for stripping the sulfates, thorium, and other metal impurities into the 1AW stream and extracting and then stripping the neptunium and uranium into the 1BP stream. SASSE predicts that separation of thorium from the other actinides can be accomplished with actinide losses of 0.01% or less. It is assumed that other metal impurities such as iron, aluminum, and fission products will follow the thorium into 1AW. Due to an organic/aqueous distribution coefficient that is close to one, SASSE predicts that plutonium(VI) (Pu(VI)) is split between the A Bank and B Bank aqueous output streams, with 27% going to 1AW and 73% going to 1BP. An extrapolated distribution coefficient based on unvalidated Ce(IV) distribution measurements at a single nitrate concentration and a comparison with thorium(IV) (Th(IV)) distributions indicates that Ce(IV) could reflux in 1B Bank. If the Ce(IV) distribution coefficient is lower than would be predicted by this single point extrapolation, but still higher than the distribution coefficient for Th(IV), then Ce(IV) would follow Np(VI) and uranium(VI) (U(VI)) into 1BP. The SASSE model was validated using data from a 1964 oxidizing flowsheet for the recovery of Np(VI) in Second Cycle. For the proposed flowsheet to be effective in recovering neptunium, the addition of approximately 0.025 M ceric ammonium nitrate (Ce(NH4)2(NO3)6) to both the 1AF and 1AS streams is required to stabilize the neptunium in the +6

  14. Benzylic Ammonium Ylide Mediated Epoxidations

    PubMed Central

    Roiser, Lukas; Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-01-01

    A high yielding synthesis of stilbene oxides using ammonium ylides has been developed. It turned out that the amine leaving group plays a crucial role as trimethylamine gives higher yields than DABCO or quinuclidine. The amine group also influences the diastereoselectivity, and detailed DFT calculations to understand the key parameters of these reactions have been carried out. PMID:27766017

  15. Control of H2S emission from swine manure using Na-nitrite and Na-molybdate.

    PubMed

    Predicala, Bernardo; Nemati, Mehdi; Stade, Sarah; Laguë, Claude

    2008-06-15

    Biogenic production of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) in oil reservoirs (souring) has been shown to be controlled effectively using nitrite and molybdate salts. In the present work the effects of addition of nitrite and molybdate on reducing the emission of H2S from swine manure slurry was investigated in the laboratory and semi-pilot scale systems. Addition of 80 mM nitrite or 2 mM molybdate (final concentration in the manure slurry) to fresh manure in the laboratory scale closed systems (125 mL and 4 L) reduced the concentration of H2S in the headspace gas from 1500 microL L(-1) to 10 microL L(-1) which maintained during the remaining period of trials (40-60 days). With aged manure, similar results were achieved with a lower level of nitrite (10 mM). Simultaneous or sequential additions of nitrite and molybdate to fresh manure had similar effects. Contrary to the systems simulating biological conditions in oil reservoirs in which simultaneous addition of nitrite and molybdate has been reported to have a synergistic effect, no synergism was observed when nitrite and molybdate were added to the manure simultaneously. Experiments with fresh manure slurry in the semi-pilot scale systems (200 L) confirmed the effectiveness of this approach in which addition of 80 mM nitrite or 2 mM molybdate or a combination of 80 mM nitrite and 2 mM molybdate decreased the concentration of the H2S in the headspace gas from an initial value of 500 microL L(-1) to a low level in the range 2-25 microL L(-1) and maintained these low levels during the remaining period of trials (16 days). The concentration of ammonia (NH3) in the headspace gas of the treated systems was similar to that observed in the control system (untreated), indicating that the treatment did not have an effect on the level of present NH3. Although the addition of nitrite or molybdate reduced emissions of H2S from swine manure and the associated health and safety concerns, it had little impact on the intensity of odour in the

  16. Electrochemical studies of molybdate-doped LiFePO4 as a cathode material in Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ketack; Kam, Daewoong; Kim, Yeonjoo; Kim, Sinwoong; Kim, Minsoo; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2013-05-01

    The use of molybdate as a new anionic dopant that replaces phosphate in LiFePO4 was studied. When a small amount of molybdate (0.5 mol%) was used as a dopant, the olivine structure was maintained, while the lattice volume increased by 0.4%. The expanded volume facilitates ionic transfer, because of which the capacity of doped LiFePO4 at high current discharge rates is higher than that of pure LiFePO4. The discharge value increased by 25.2% at a charge rate of 5 C when the material was doped with 0.5 mol% molybdate ions. The slight expansion of the lattice volume in the olivine structure facilitates a fast redox reaction by lowering the charge transfer resistance. The current values from cyclic voltammetry indicate that the oxidation (charge) process of the cathode material is more improved than the corresponding reduction (discharge) process. Increasing the level of doping beyond 0.5 mol% had no effect on the results. At some discharge rates, the discharge capacity became worse. Because molybdate is divalent while phosphate is trivalent, a large number of molybdate ions in the lattice can exert considerable stress on the structure.

  17. 21 CFR 582.7133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium alginate. 582.7133 Section 582.7133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Ammonium alginate. (a) Product. Ammonium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 184.1143 Section 184.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4, CAS...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 582.1143 Section 582.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 582.1143 Section 582.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 582.1143 Section 582.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 184.1143 Section 184.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT... GRAS § 184.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7783-20-2)...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 184.1143 Section 184.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4, CAS...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 184.1143 Section 184.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4, CAS...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 582.1143 Section 582.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 582.1143 Section 582.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  16. Extraction of urea and ammonium ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmi, R. T.; Husted, R. R.; Schulz, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Water purification system keeps urea and ammonium ion concentration below toxic limits in recirculated water of closed loop aquatic habitat. Urea is first converted to ammonium ions and carbon dioxide by enzygmatic action. Ammonium ions are removed by ion exchange. Bioburden is controlled by filtration through 0.45 micron millipore filters.

  17. 76 FR 70366 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 31 RIN 1601-AA52 Ammonium Nitrate Security Program AGENCY... ``Ammonium Nitrate Security Program,'' which was published in the Federal Register on August 3, 2011. The... 62311). Under the proposed Ammonium Nitrate Security Program, the DHS will regulate the sale...

  18. 76 FR 62311 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 31 RIN 1601-AA52 Ammonium Nitrate Security...), entitled ``Ammonium Nitrate Security Program,'' which was published in the Federal Register on August 3... of ammonium nitrate pursuant to section 563 of the Fiscal Year 2008 Department of Homeland...

  19. 76 FR 11273 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the suspended investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia... investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  20. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4249 (August 2011), entitled Ammonium Nitrate from...

  1. 21 CFR 556.375 - Maduramicin ammonium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... residues of maduramicin ammonium in chickens as follows: (a) A tolerance for maduramicin ammonium (marker residue) in chickens is 0.38 parts per million in fat (target tissue). A tolerance refers to the... animals. (b) The safe concentrations for total maduramicin ammonium residues in uncooked edible...

  2. Simple, rapid and effective preservation and reactivation of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacterium "Candidatus Brocadia sinica".

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Oshiki, Mamoru; Okabe, Satoshi

    2014-06-15

    It is still the biggest challenge to secure enough seeding biomass for rapid start-up of full-scale (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) anammox processes due to slow growth. Preservation of active anammox biomass could be one of the solutions. In this study, biomass of anammox bacterium, "Candidatus Brocadia sinica", immersed in various nutrient media were preserved at -80 °C, 4 °C and room temperature. After 45, 90 and 150 days of preservation, specific anammox activity (SAA) of the preserved anammox biomass was determined by measuring (29)N2 production rate and transcription levels of hzsA gene encoding hydrazine synthase alpha subunit. Storage in nutrient medium containing 3 mM of molybdate at room temperature with periodical (every 45 days) supply of NH4(+) and NO2(-) was proved to be the most effective storage technique for "Ca. Brocadia sinica" biomass. Using this preservation condition, 96, 92 and 65% of the initial SAA was sustained after 45, 90 and 150 days of storage, respectively. Transcription levels of hzsA gene in biomass correlated with the SAA (R(2) = 0.83), indicating it can be used as a genetic marker to evaluate the anammox activity of preserved biomass. Furthermore, the 90-day-stored biomass was successfully reactivated by immobilizing in polyvinyl alcohol (6%, w/v) and sodium alginate (2%, w/v) gel and then inoculated to up-flow column reactors. Total nitrogen removal rates rapidly increased to 7 kg-N m(-3) d(-1) within 35 days of operation. Based on these results, the room temperature preservation with molybdate addition is simple, cost-effective and feasible at a practical scale, which will accelerate the practical use of anammox process for wastewater treatment.

  3. Application of green seaweed biomass for MoVI sorption from contaminated waters. Kinetic, thermodynamic and continuous sorption studies.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, Fernando A; Medeot, Anabela C; González, Juan C; Sala, Luis F; Bellú, Sebastián E

    2015-05-15

    Spongomorpha pacifica biomass was evaluated as a new sorbent for Mo(VI) removal from aqueous solution. The maximum sorption capacity was found to be 1.28×10(6)±1×10(4) mg kg(-1) at 20°C and pH 2.0. Sorption kinetics and equilibrium studies followed pseudo-first order and Langmuir adsorption isotherm models, respectively. FTIR analysis revealed that carboxyl and hydroxyl groups were mainly responsible for the sorption of Mo(VI). SEM images show that morphological changes occur at the biomass surface after Mo(VI) sorption. Activation parameters and mean free energies obtained with Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm model demonstrate that the mechanism of sorption process was chemical sorption. Thermodynamic parameters demonstrate that the sorption process was spontaneous, endothermic and the driven force was entropic. The isosteric heat of sorption decreases with surface loading, indicating that S. pacifica has an energetically non-homogeneous surface. Experimental breakthrough curves were simulated by Thomas and modified dose-response models. The bed depth service time (BDST) model was employed to scale-up the continuous sorption experiments. The critical bed depth, Z0 was determined to be 1.7 cm. S.pacifica biomass showed to be a good sorbent for Mo(VI) and it can be used in continuous treatment of effluent polluted with molybdate ions.

  4. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  5. Purification of molybdenum oxide, growth and characterization of medium size zinc molybdate crystals for the LUMINEU program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlegel, V. N.; Berge, L.; Boiko, R. S.; Chapellier, M.; Chernyak, D. M.; Coron, N.; Danevich, F. A.; Decourt, R.; Degoda, V. Ya.; Devoyon, L.; Drillien, A.; Dumoulin, L.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gros, M.; Herve, S.; Ivanov, I. M.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kogut, Ya. P.; Koskas, F.; Loidl, M.; Magnier, P.; Makarov, E. P.; Mancuso, M.; de Marcillac, P.; Marnieros, S.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Nasonov, S. G.; Navick, X. F.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Paul, B.; Penichot, Y.; Pessina, G.; Plantevin, O.; Poda, D. V.; Redon, T.; Rodrigues, M.; Strazzer, O.; Tenconi, M.; Torres, L.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vasiliev, Ya. V.; Velazquez, M.; Viraphong, O.; Zhdankov, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    The LUMINEU program aims at performing a pilot experiment on neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo using radiopure ZnMoO4 crystals operated as scintillating bolometers. Growth of high quality radiopure crystals is a complex task, since there are no commercially available molybdenum compounds with the required levels of purity and radioactive contamination. This paper discusses approaches to purify molybdenum and synthesize compound for high quality radiopure ZnMoO4 crystal growth. A combination of a double sublimation (with addition of zinc molybdate) with subsequent recrystallization in aqueous solutions (using zinc molybdate as a collector) was used. Zinc molybdate crystals up to 1.5 kg were grown by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique, their optical, luminescent, diamagnetic, thermal and bolometric properties were tested.

  6. Phase equilibria diagrams, crystal growth peculiarities and Raman investigations of lead and sodium-bismuth tungstate-molybdate solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Andrei V.; Avanesov, Samvel A.; Yunalan, Tyliay M.; Klimenko, Valeriy A.; Ignatyev, Boris V.; Isaev, Vladislav A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a comprehensive study of lead and sodium-bismuth tungstate-molybdate solid solutions was carried out, including the clarification of their structural peculiarities and phase diagrams of PbMoO4-PbWO4 and NaBi(MoO4)2-NaBi(WO4)2 systems, the study of spontaneous Raman spectra of these compounds, as well as preliminary experiments on single crystals growth of lead tungstate-molybdate. The linewidths, peak and integral intensities of the totally symmetric Raman vibrations of solid solutions were estimated in comparison with known SRS-active crystals. The conditions of the Czochralski growth of optically transparent lead tungstate-molybdate mixed crystals were found and SRS effect was observed in these crystals when pumping by 12 ns 1064 nm laser pulses.

  7. The chronic toxicity of molybdate to marine organisms. I. Generating reliable effects data.

    PubMed

    Heijerick, D G; Regoli, L; Stubblefield, W

    2012-07-15

    A scientific research program was initiated by the International Molybdenum Association (IMOA) which addressed identified gaps in the environmental toxicity data for the molybdate ion (MoO(4)(2-)). These gaps were previously identified during the preparation of EU-REACH-dossiers for different molybdenum compounds (European Union regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical substances; EC, 2006). Evaluation of the open literature identified few reliable marine ecotoxicological data that could be used for deriving a Predicted No-Effect Concentration (PNEC) for the marine environment. Rather than calculating a PNEC(marine) using the assessment factor methodology on a combined freshwater/marine dataset, IMOA decided to generate sufficient reliable marine chronic data to permit derivation of a PNEC by means of the more scientifically robust species sensitivity distribution (SSD) approach (also called the statistical extrapolation approach). Nine test species were chronically exposed to molybdate (added as sodium molybdate dihydrate, Na(2)MoO(4)·2H(2)O) according to published standard testing guidelines that are acceptable for a broad range of regulatory purposes. The selected test organisms were representative for typical marine trophic levels: micro-algae/diatom (Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Dunaliella tertiolecta), macro-alga (Ceramium tenuicorne), mysids (Americamysis bahia), copepod (Acartia tonsa), fish (Cyprinodon variegatus), echinoderms (Dendraster exentricus, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) and molluscs (Mytilus edulis, Crassostrea gigas). Available NOEC/EC(10) levels ranged between 4.4 mg Mo/L (blue mussel M. edulis) and 1174 mg Mo/L (oyster C. gigas). Using all available reliable marine chronic effects data that are currently available, a HC(5,50%) (median hazardous concentration affecting 5% of the species) of 5.74(mg Mo)/L was derived with the statistical extrapolation approach, a value that can be used for national and

  8. Analysis of solid solutions stability in scheelite-type molybdates and tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, V.D.; Reznitskikh, O.G.; Velikodnyi, Yu.A.; Patrusheva, T.A.; Sivtsova, O.V.

    2011-10-15

    Mutual solubility of bivalent metal molybdates and tungstates with scheelite structure was theoretically estimated by calculating formation enthalpies and the maximal decomposition temperatures of solid solutions at different temperatures. The theoretical stability of continuous solid solutions in binary systems of bivalent metal molybdates and tungstates was found to be higher than reported literature data. After cooling down continuous substitution solid solution should remain in following systems: CaMoO{sub 4}-CdMoO{sub 4}, SrMoO{sub 4}-MMoO{sub 4} (M=Ba, Pb), BaMoO{sub 4}-PbMoO{sub 4}, SrWO{sub 4}-MWO{sub 4} (M=Ca, Pb), and BaWO{sub 4}-PbWO{sub 4}. There is a probability that at room temperature in systems CaMoO{sub 4}-SrMoO{sub 4,} CaWO{sub 4}-PbWO{sub 4}, and BaWO{sub 4}-SrWO{sub 4} the single homogeneity region may decompose to limited solid solutions. It was shown experimentally that a continuous series of scheelite-structure solid solutions M{sub 1-x}M{sup I}{sub x}TO{sub 4} can be formed via citrate synthesis at temperatures below 500 deg. S. - Graphical abstract: Calculated boundaries of solid solutions in BaWO{sub 4}-CaWO{sub 4} (1) and PbMoO{sub 4}-CaMoO{sub 4} (2) systems. Highlights: > Stability of solid solutions molybdates and tungstates has been investigated. > The ionic model for isovalent substitutions was used. > In 'polyhedral substitution model' enthalphies of mixing were calculated. > Most of the examined series of solid solutions is stable at room temperatures. > Solid solutions M{sub 1-x}M{sup I}{sub x}Mo(W)O{sub 4} (x=0-1) were formed via citrate synthesis below 500 S.

  9. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators.

  10. Electrical and mechanical properties of ZnO doped silver-molybdate glass-nanocomposite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Ranadip; Roy, Debasish; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2016-05-01

    Zno doped silver-molybdate glass-nanocomposites, 0.3 Ag2O - 0.7 [0.075 ZnO - 0.925 MoO3] have been prepared by melt-quenching method. Ionic conductivity of these glass-nanocomposites has been measured in wide temperature and frequency windows. Vicker's hardness methods have been employed to study micro-hardness of the as-prepared samples. Heat-treated counterparts for this glass-nanocomposites system has been analyzed in different temperature to observe the changes in conductivity as well as micro-hardness for that system.

  11. The chronic toxicity of molybdate to freshwater organisms. I. Generating reliable effects data.

    PubMed

    De Schamphelaere, K A C; Stubblefield, W; Rodriguez, P; Vleminckx, K; Janssen, C R

    2010-10-15

    The European Union regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical substances (REACH) (EC, 2006) requires the characterization of the chronic toxicity of many chemicals in the aquatic environment, including molybdate (MoO(4)(2-)). Our literature review on the ecotoxicity of molybdate revealed that a limited amount of reliable chronic no observed effect concentrations (NOECs) for the derivation of a predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) existed. This paper presents the results of additional ecotoxicity experiments that were conducted in order to fulfill the requirements for the derivation of a PNEC by means of the scientifically most robust species sensitivity distribution (SSD) approach (also called the statistical extrapolation approach). Ten test species were chronically exposed to molybdate (added as sodium molybdate dihydrate, Na(2)MoO(4)·2H(2)O) according to internationally accepted standard testing guidelines or equivalent. The 10% effective concentrations (EC10, expressed as measured dissolved molybdenum) for the most sensitive endpoint per species were 62.8-105.6 (mg Mo)/L for Daphnia magna (21day-reproduction), 78.2 (mg Mo)/L for Ceriodaphnia dubia (7day-reproduction), 61.2-366.2 (mg Mo)/L for the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (72h-growth rate), 193.6 (mg Mo)/L for the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus (48h-population growth rate), 121.4 (mg Mo)/L for the midge Chironomus riparius (14day-growth), 211.3 (mg Mo)/L for the snail Lymnaea stagnalis (28day-growth rate), 115.9 (mg Mo)/L for the frog Xenopus laevis (4day-larval development), 241.5 (mg Mo)/L for the higher plant Lemna minor (7day-growth rate), 39.3 (mg Mo)/L for the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas (34day-dry weight/biomass), and 43.2 (mg Mo)/L for the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (78day-biomass). These effect concentrations are in line with the few reliable data currently available in the open literature. The data presented in this study can

  12. Chromate Binding and Removal by the Molybdate-Binding Protein ModA.

    PubMed

    Karpus, Jason; Bosscher, Michael; Ajiboye, Ifedayo; Zhang, Liang; He, Chuan

    2017-02-02

    Effective and cheap methods and techniques for the safe removal of hexavalent chromate from the environment are in increasingly high demand. High concentrations of hexavalent chromate have been shown to have numerous harmful effects on human biology. We show that the E. coli molybdate-binding protein ModA is a genetically encoded tool capable of removing chromate from aqueous solutions. Although previously reported to not bind chromate, we show that ModA binds chromate tightly and is capable of removing chromate to levels well below current US federal standards.

  13. Crystallization, data collection and phasing of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, C P; Balan, A; Ferreira, L C S; Barbosa, J A R G

    2006-03-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ModA protein is the ABC periplasmic binding component responsible for the capture of molybdate. The protein was crystallized with sodium molybdate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of PEG or sulfate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.7 A using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 A. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is in progress.

  14. Sonochemical Process for the Preparation of Novel Calcium Zinc Molybdate Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanvase, B. A.; Kadam, V. B.; Rode, T. D.; Jadhao, P. R.

    2015-06-01

    The present work deals with the use of sonochemical and conventional mixing process for the preparation of calcium zinc molybdate (CZM) nanoparticles using calcium chloride and sodium zinc molybdate as a precursor material without addition of any emulsifying agent. This new process is useful to control the size and shape of the CZM nanoparticles. The formed product was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The formation of CZM was confirmed through XRD, FTIR and elemental analysis. The pH and conductivity results show that sonochemical process takes less time compared to conventional process for the preparation of CZM nanoparticles. The use of sonochemical process during the preparation of CZM nanoparticles results in reduction of the size and nearly the cubic shape is obtained due to the improved solute transfer rate, rapid nucleation, and formation of a large number of nuclei in the presence of cavitation.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of copper coordination polymers based on molybdates: Chemistry issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavani, K.; Ramanan, A.; Whittingham, M. S.

    2006-08-01

    Crystal engineering of metal organic coordination polymers or metal organic frameworks have been attracting unprecedented efforts in the past few years due to potential applications in the area of catalysis, gas separation and storage. Hydrothermal synthesis is a popular soft chemical route employed by a number of researchers to grow suitable single crystals for unambiguous structural characterization. The structural diversity of the various solid frameworks is attributed to the choice of metal, its ability to exist in multiple oxidation states exhibiting different coordination geometry and multidentate nature of organic ligands. Polyoxomolybdate is another interesting class of inorganic materials that are potential catalysts. A contemporary theme is to develop porous solids combining the acidic properties of oligomeric molybdates integrated with first-row transition metal ions that can form coordination polymers with suitable multidentate ligands. A bottleneck to this problem is to develop reliable synthetic protocols that can produce reproducible materials with designed structural characteristics. In this paper, we present our results on the formation of self-assembled metal organic hybrid solids from acidified aqueous molybdate solution containing cupric ions and one of the multidentate organic ligands (pyrazine, 2-pyrazine carboxylic acid or isonicotinic acid). We propose a molecular mechanism to rationalize the formation of solids.

  16. Polyaniline/cellulose fiber composite prepared using persulfate as oxidant for Cr(VI)-detoxification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyao; Zhou, Wanpeng; Qian, Xueren; Shen, Jing; An, Xianhui

    2013-01-30

    Cellulose fibers were engineered by in situ oxidative polymerization of aniline using ammonium persulfate as oxidant/initiator. The polyaniline/cellulose fiber composite was used for the treatment of Cr(VI)-contaminated water, and its effect was evaluated. Under the conditions studied, the composite exhibited very high water detoxification efficiency, as a result of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in combination with adsorption of the Cr(III) onto the cellulosic substrate. Cellulose fibers used in the study served two purposes simultaneously, i.e., carrier of polyaniline and the adsorbent for Cr(III). The complexation of polyaniline with cellulose fibers provided synergistic effects on Cr(VI)-detoxification.

  17. Inhibitive Effect of Molybdate Ions on the Electrochemical Behavior of Steel Rebar in Simulated Concrete Pore Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensabra, Hakim; Franczak, Agnieszka; Aaboubi, Omar; Azzouz, Noureddine; Chopart, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Several compounds tested as corrosion inhibitors have proven to possess good effectiveness in protection of steel rebar in concrete. However, most of them are considered as pollutant compounds, which limits their use. The aim of this work is to investigate the inhibitive effect of sodium molybdate, which is considered as a nonpollutant compound, against pitting corrosion of steel rebar in simulated concrete pore solution. Corrosion behaviors of steel in different solutions were studied by means of corrosion potential, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicate that the addition of sodium molybdate to the chlorinated solution decreases significantly the corrosion rate of steel. Due to its passivating character, the sodium molybdate inhibitor promotes the formation of a stable passive layer on the surface of steel, acting as a physical barrier against chloride ions, on one hand, and consolidating the passivation mechanism of steel, on the other. The optimal inhibition rate is given by the concentration of molybdate ions, corresponding to a [MoO4 2-]/[Cl-] that is equal to 0.5.

  18. Crystallization, data collection and phasing of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    SciTech Connect

    Santacruz, C. P.; Balan, A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.; Barbosa, J. A. R. G.

    2006-03-01

    The molybdate-binding protein (ModA) from X. axonopodis pv. citri was crystallized with sodium molybdate in the presence of PEG or sulfate. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å and belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1,} with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ModA protein is the ABC periplasmic binding component responsible for the capture of molybdate. The protein was crystallized with sodium molybdate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of PEG or sulfate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is in progress.

  19. Effect of chlorate, molybdate, and shikimic acid on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in aerobic and anaerobic cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorate is a bactericide that has potential as a pre-slaughter feed additive to improve food safety of meat products. The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of chlorate (5mM), molybdate (1 mM), and shikimate (0.34 mM) on the growth and chlorate-resistance of Salmonella enterica ...

  20. Structural study of ammonium metatungstate

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Joel B. Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2008-08-15

    Several techniques have been used to study the structure of the Keggin-type polyoxometalate salt ammonium metatungstate (AMT)-(NH{sub 4}){sub 6}[H{sub 2}W{sub 12}O{sub 40}]*nH{sub 2}O, a potential fuel cell catalyst. The dehydrated salt is comprised of a mixture of crystallites of different unit cells in a centered eutactic cubic configuration, with an average unit cell of a{approx_equal}12.295. Varied orientations of the Keggin ions in the cubic arrangement create the differences, and orientational variation within each unit cell size represents an energy well. Progressive hydration of each crystallite leads to expansion of the lattice, with the degree of expansion depending on the locations of the water added in relation to the Keggin ion, which is influenced by cation location and hydrogen bonding. The structural hypothesis is supported by electron diffraction of single and multicrystal samples, by powder density measurements, X-ray powder diffraction studies, synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction, and a priori structural modeling studies. Based on the structure, projected active site densities are compared with nanostructured platinum catalysts for fuel cell application. - Graphical abstract: The structure of ammonium metatungstate powders are highly dependent on hydration and POM molecule rotation, with cation and hydrogen bonding forces directing a mixture of structures that have been studied with bulk and single-crystal methods. The illustration shows Monte Carlo simulated anion structural disorder for the fully dehydrated form of the title compound.

  1. Phase Diagram of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often been subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood - resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety, in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN, in different chemical environments, at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 15 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 673 K. The present study has been supported by the U.S. DHS under Award Number 2008-ST-061-ED0001.

  2. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  3. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  4. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  5. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  6. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  7. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  8. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  9. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  10. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  11. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  12. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO-AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N2, N2O, and H2O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV' transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  13. Ammonium nonanoate broadcast application over onions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonium nonanoate occurs in nature and is primarily formed from biodegradation of higher fatty acids. Racer (40% ammonium nonaoate) is a potential contact herbicide for weed control in organic crop production. Field research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determin...

  14. Biodegradation of rocket propellant waste, ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqvi, S. M. Z.; Latif, A.

    1975-01-01

    The short term effects of ammonium perchlorate on selected organisms were studied. A long term experiment was also designed to assess the changes incurred by ammonium perchlorate on the nitrogen and chloride contents of soil within a period of 3 years. In addition, an attempt was made to produce methane gas from anaerobic fermentation of the aquatic weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...). It is prepared by the sublimation of a mixture of ammonium sulfate and calcium carbonate and occurs... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...). It is prepared by the sublimation of a mixture of ammonium sulfate and calcium carbonate and occurs... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sublimation of a mixture of ammonium sulfate and calcium carbonate and occurs as a white powder or a hard... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...). It is prepared by the sublimation of a mixture of ammonium sulfate and calcium carbonate and occurs... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  19. Dielectric relaxations in partly deuterated ammonium dichromate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, John le G.

    1987-12-01

    Two dielectric relaxations in partly deuterated ammonium dichromate are attributed to reorientations of mixed-isotope ammonium ions. Loss peaks were observed between 20 and 40 K and obey the Arrhenius law with activation energy 1.5 kcal/mol for the stronger relaxation. The dipole moment is of the order of 0.015 D.

  20. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: a potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    very small fraction of the total solid phase Cr, they are a potentially important source for Cr(VI) to groundwater. Enhanced groundwater recharge through the vadose zone due to irrigation could carry Cr(VI) from the vadose zone to the groundwater and may be the mechanism responsible for the correlation observed between elevated Cr(VI) and NO3- source concentrations in previously published data for valley groundwaters. Incubation of a valley subsoil showed a Cr(VI) production rate of 24 μg kg−1 a−1 suggesting that field Cr(VI) concentrations could be regenerated annually. Increased Cr(VI) production rates in H+-amended soil incubations indicate that soil acidification processes such as nitrification of ammonium in fertilizers could potentially increase the occurrence of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater. Thus, despite the natural origin of the Cr, Cr(VI) generation in the Sacramento Valley soils and sediments has the potential to be influenced by human activities.

  1. Evolution of Electrogenic Ammonium Transporters (AMTs)

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Tami R.; Ward, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The ammonium transporter gene family consists of three main clades, AMT, MEP, and Rh. The evolutionary history of the AMT/MEP/Rh gene family is characterized by multiple horizontal gene transfer events, gene family expansion and contraction, and gene loss; thus the gene tree for this family of transporters is unlike the organismal tree. The genomes of angiosperms contain genes for both electrogenic and electroneutral ammonium transporters, but it is not clear how far back in the land plant lineage electrogenic ammonium transporters occur. Here, we place Marchantia polymorpha ammonium transporters in the AMT/MEP/Rh phylogeny and we show that AMTs from the liverwort M. polymorpha are electrogenic. This information suggests that electrogenic ammonium transport evolved at least as early as the divergence of bryophytes in the land plant lineage. PMID:27066024

  2. Terahertz lattice dynamics of the potassium rare-earth binary molybdates.

    PubMed

    Poperezhai, S; Gogoi, P; Zubenko, N; Kutko, K; Kutko, V I; Kovalev, A S; Kamenskyi, D

    2017-03-08

    We report a systematic study of low-energy lattice vibrations in the layered systems KY(MoO4)2, KDy(MoO4)2, KEr(MoO4)2, and KTm(MoO4)2. A layered crystal structure and low symmetry of the local environment of the rare-earth ion cause the appearance of vibrational and electronic excitations in Terahertz frequencies. The interaction between these excitations leads to sophisticated dynamical properties, including non-linear effects in paramagnetic resonance spectra. The THz study in magnetic field allows for the clear distinction between lattice vibrations and electronic excitations. We measured the THz transmission spectra and show that the low energy lattice vibrations in binary molybdates can be well described within the quasi-one-dimensional model. The developed model describes the measured far-infrared spectra, and results of our calculations agree with previous Raman and ultrasound studies.

  3. Terahertz lattice dynamics of the potassium rare-earth binary molybdates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poperezhai, S.; Gogoi, P.; Zubenko, N.; Kutko, K.; Kutko, V. I.; Kovalev, A. S.; Kamenskyi, D.

    2017-03-01

    We report a systematic study of low-energy lattice vibrations in the layered systems KY(MoO4)2, KDy(MoO4)2, KEr(MoO4)2, and KTm(MoO4)2. A layered crystal structure and low symmetry of the local environment of the rare-earth ion cause the appearance of vibrational and electronic excitations in Terahertz frequencies. The interaction between these excitations leads to sophisticated dynamical properties, including non-linear effects in paramagnetic resonance spectra. The THz study in magnetic field allows for the clear distinction between lattice vibrations and electronic excitations. We measured the THz transmission spectra and show that the low energy lattice vibrations in binary molybdates can be well described within the quasi-one-dimensional model. The developed model describes the measured far-infrared spectra, and results of our calculations agree with previous Raman and ultrasound studies.

  4. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  5. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  6. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  7. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  8. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  9. Protostars and Planets VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, Henrik; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Henning, Thomas

    star and planet formation. They are used by students to dive into new topics, and they are much valued by experienced researchers as a comprehensive overview of the field with all its interactions. We hope that you will enjoy reading (and learning from) this book as much as we do. The organization of the Protostars and Planets conference was carried out in close collaboration between the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and the Center for Astronomy of the University Heidelberg, with generous support from the German Science Foundation. This volume is a product of effort and care by many people. First and foremost, we want to acknowledge the 250 contributing authors, as it is only due to their expertise and knowledge that such a comprehensive review compendium in all its depth and breadth is possible. The Protostars and Planets VI conference and this volume was a major undertaking, with support and contributions by many people and institutions. We like to thank the members of the Scientific Advisory Committee who selected the 38 teams and chapters out of more than 120 submitted proposals. Similarly, we are grateful to the reviewers, who provided valuable input and help to the chapter authors. The book would also not have been possible without the great support of Renée Dotson and other staff from USRA’s Lunar and Planetary Institute, who handled the detailed processing of all manuscripts and the production of the book, and of Allyson Carter and other staff from the University of Arizona Press. We are also grateful to Richard Binzel, the General Editor of the Space Science Series, for his constant support during the long process, from the original concept to this final product. Finally, we would like to express a very special thank you to the entire conference local organizing committee, and in particular, Carmen Cuevas and Natali Jurina, for their great commitment to the project and for a very fruitful and enjoyable collaboration.

  10. Characterization of Molybdate Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to investigate the corrosion inhibiting properties of newly developed proprietary molybdate conversion coatings on aluminum alloy 2024-T3 under immersion in aerated 5% (w/w) NaCl. Corrosion potential and EIS measurements were gathered for six formulations of the coating at several immersion times for two weeks. Nyquist as well as Bode plots of the data were obtained. The conversion-coated alloy panels showed an increase in the corrosion potential during the first 24 hours of immersion that later subsided and approached a steady value. Corrosion potential measurements indicated that formulations A, D, and F exhibit a protective effect on aluminum 2024-T3. The EIS spectra of the conversion-coated alloy were characterized by an impedance that is higher than the impedance of the bare alloy at all the immersion times. The low frequency impedance, Z(sub lf) (determined from the value at 0.05 Hz) for the conversion-coated alloy was higher at all the immersion times than that of the bare panel. This indicates improvement of corrosion resistance with addition of the molybdate conversion coating. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the presence of cracks in the coating and the presence of cubic crystals believed to be calcium carbonate. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the test panels revealed the presence of high levels of aluminum, oxygen, and calcium but did not detect the presence of molybdenum on the test panels. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated the presence of less than 0.01 atomic percent molybdenum on the surface of the coating.

  11. Modeling the effects of variable groundwater chemistry on adsorption of molybdate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were used to identify and quantify processes having a significant effect on molybdate (MoO42−) adsorption in a shallow alluvial aquifer on Cape Cod, assachusetts. Aqueous chemistry in the aquifer changes as a result of treated sewage effluent mixing with groundwater. Molybdate adsorption decreased as pH, ionic strength, and the concentration of competing anions increased. A diffuse-layer surface complexation model was used to simulate adsorption of MoO42−, phosphate (PO43−), and sulfate (SO42−) on aquifer sediment. Equilibrium constants for the model were calculated by calibration to data from batch experiments. The model was then used in a one-dimensional solute transport program to successfully simulate initial breakthrough of MoO42− from column experiments. A shortcoming of the solute transport program was the inability to account for kinetics of physical and chemical processes. This resulted in a failure of the model to predict the slow rate of desorption of MoO42− from the columns. The mobility of MoO42− ncreased with ionic strength and with the formation of aqueous complexes with calcium, magnesium, and sodium. Failure to account for MoO42− speciation and ionic strength in the model resulted in overpredicting MoO42− adsorption. Qualitatively, the laboratory data predicted the observed behavior of MoO42− in the aquifer, where retardation of MoO42− was greatest in uncontaminated roundwater having low pH, low ionic strength, and low concentrations of PO43− and SO42−.

  12. Controllable synthesis and characterization of cadmium molybdate octahedral nanocrystals by coprecipitation method

    SciTech Connect

    Shahri, Zahra; Sobhani, Azam; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: CdMoO{sub 4} nanocrystals have been synthesized via coprecipitation method by using Cd(Sal){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}·4H{sub 2}O as starting materials in water. Effects of temperature, reaction time, solvent, surfactant, cadmium and molybdate sources were investigated to reach optimum condition. It was found that particle size, morphology and phase of the final products could be greatly influenced via these parameters. - Highlights: • A facile coprecipitation method was successfully employed to prepare CdMoO{sub 4}. • The effects of some parameters were investigated. • PEG600, PVP, SDS and CTAB were used as surfactant. • Optimum condition for preparation CdMoO{sub 4} nanocrystals was investigated. - Abstract: Cadmium molybdate (CdMoO{sub 4}) nanocrystals have been successfully synthesized via coprecipitation method by using Cd(Sal){sub 2} (Sal = salicylidene) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}·4H{sub 2}O as starting materials in water as solvent. Effects of temperature, reaction time, solvent, surfactant and cadmium source were investigated to reach optimum condition. It was found that particle size, morphology and phase of the final products could be greatly influenced via these parameters. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  13. High-temperature phase transitions, spectroscopic properties, and dimensionality reduction in rubidium thorium molybdate family.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bin; Gesing, Thorsten M; Kegler, Philip; Modolo, Giuseppe; Bosbach, Dirk; Schlenz, Hartmut; Suleimanov, Evgeny V; Alekseev, Evgeny V

    2014-03-17

    Four new rubidium thorium molybdates have been synthesized by high-temperature solid-state reactions. The crystal structures of Rb8Th(MoO4)6, Rb2Th(MoO4)3, Rb4Th(MoO4)4, and Rb4Th5(MoO4)12 were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All these compounds construct from MoO4 tetrahedra and ThO8 square antiprisms. The studied compounds adopt the whole range of possible structure dimensionalities from zero-dimensional (0D) to three-dimensional (3D): finite clusters, chains, sheets, and frameworks. Rb8Th(MoO4)6 crystallizes in 0D containing clusters of [Th(MoO4)6](8-). The crystal structure of Rb2Th(MoO4)3 is based upon one-dimensional chains with configuration units of [Th(MoO4)3](2-). Two-dimensional sheets occur in compound Rb4Th(MoO4)4, and a 3D framework with channels formed by thorium and molybdate polyhedra has been observed in Rb4Th5(MoO4)12. The Raman and IR spectroscopic properties of these compounds are reported. Temperature-depended phase transition effects were observed in Rb2Th(MoO4)3 and Rb4Th(MoO4)4 using thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry analysis and high-temperature powder diffraction methods.

  14. Lasing properties of new Nd 3+-doped tungstate, molybdate, and fluoride materials under selective optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, Jan; Jelínkova, Helena; Basiev, Tolstoban T.; Doroschenko, Maxim E.; Ivleva, Ludmila I.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Zverev, Peter G.

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative efficiencies of new Nd 3+-doped laser active/Raman - tungstate, molybdate, and fluoride - materials (SrWO 4, PbWO 4, BaWO 4, SrMoO 4, PbMoO 4, SrF II, and LaF 3) under selective longitudinal optical pumping by the alexandrite (~750nm), or diode (~800nm) laser. Crystals with various length, orientations and active ions concentrations were tested. To optimize the output of the tested lasers a set of input dichroic and output dielectric mirrors with different reflectivities were used. For realized lasers operating at pulsed free-running regime, threshold energy, slope efficiency, emission wavelength, and radiation polarization were determined. For each crystal, fluorescence lifetime and absorption coefficient under given pumping were established. The slope efficiency in case of Nd 3+:PbMoO 4 laser at wavelength 1054nm was measured to be 54.3% with total efficiency of 46% which is the best result obtained for all new tested crystals. For Nd 3+ doped SrWO 4, PbWO 4, and BaWO 4 crystals simultaneous laser and self-Raman emission were demonstrated in Q-switched regime. Thus newly proposed laser Raman crystals demonstrate high efficiency for Nd 3+ laser oscillations comparable with well known and widely used Nd:KGW crystal. Further improvement in the quality of tungstate and molybdate type crystals should result in further increase in lasing efficiency at 1.06μm wavelength. Self Raman frequency conversion of Nd 3+-laser oscillations in these crystals should result in high efficient pulse shortening, high peak power and new wavelengths in 1.2-1.5μm wavelength region.

  15. Radiation-induced graft polymerization for the preparation of a highly efficient UHMWPE fibrous adsorbent for Cr(VI) removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qianhong; Hua, Jiangtao; Li, Rong; Xing, Zhe; Pang, Lijuan; Zhang, Mingxing; Xu, Lu; Wu, Guozhong

    2017-01-01

    A novel fibrous adsorbent containing amine and quaternary ammonium groups was prepared by radiation-induced graft of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber and further modifying with triethylenetetramine (TETA) and glycidyl trimethylammonium chloride (GTA). The ATR-IR spectra and SEM observation demonstrated that amine and quaternary ammonium groups were immobilized onto the surface of UHMWPE fiber. The principal factors affecting the adsorption of Cr(VI) ions have been investigated including pH of the aqueous solution, contact time, temperature and coexisting anions. This novel fibrous adsorbent could effectively adsorb Cr(VI) in the range of pH 1-9, and the maximum adsorption capacity reached 295 mg/g at pH 3 and 25 °C based on the Langmuir isotherm. It was found that adsorption equilibrium could be achieved within 2 h for initial Cr(VI) of 100 mg/L, following the pseudo-second order model. The effect of coexisting anions (including SO42-, H2PO4-, NO3-and Cl-) on the uptake of Cr(VI) was investigated in detail. Additionally, the adsorption saturated fiber could be regenerated by soaking in 0.5 mol/L NaOH solution, and the adsorption performance of this adsorbent could be maintained at 90% after eight cycles of adsorption-desorption. ATR-IR and XPS analysis revealed that Cr(VI) ions were adsorbed on the fiber adsorbent through ion exchange mechanism.

  16. Sorption of uranium(VI) ions from hydrochloric acid and ammonium chloride solutions by anion exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Pakholkov, V.S.; Denisova, L.A.; Rychkov, V.N.; Kurnosenko, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    The sorption of macroscopic quantities of uranium from solutions of UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ containing HCl and NH/sub 4/Cl in concentrations from 0.0 to 6.0 M by the AV-17 x 8, AV-16G, EDE-10P, AN-31, AN-2F, AN22, and AN-251 anion exchangers has been investigated under static conditions. The sorption isotherms are described by an equation similar to Freundlich's equation: K/sub d/ = K tilde x C/sub eq/sup 1/z/ or log K/sub d/ = log K tilde + 1/z x log C/sub eq/. Equations describing the dependence of the sorbability (or K/sub d/) on the equilibrium concentration of uranium in the solution have been obtained with the aid of the least-squares method. Conclusions regarding the chemistry of the exchange of uranium ions on anion exchangers in chloride solutions have been drawn on the basis of the UV spectra of the original solutions and the IR spectra of the ion exchangers obtained in this work, as well as the established general laws governing sorption.

  17. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  1. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-07

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO–AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV{sup ′} transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  2. Substrate specificity of Rhbg: ammonium and methyl ammonium transport

    PubMed Central

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M.; Boulpaep, Emile L.; Rabon, Edd; Schmidt, Eric; Hamm, L. Lee

    2010-01-01

    Rhbg is a nonerythroid membrane glycoprotein belonging to the Rh antigen family. In the kidney, Rhbg is expressed at the basolateral membrane of intercalated cells of the distal nephron and is involved in NH4+ transport. We investigated the substrate specificity of Rhbg by comparing transport of NH3/NH4+ with that of methyl amine (hydrochloride) (MA/MA+), often used to replace NH3/NH4+, in oocytes expressing Rhbg. Methyl amine (HCl) in solution exists as neutral methyl amine (MA) in equilibrium with the protonated methyl ammonium (MA+). To assess transport, we used ion-selective microelectrodes and voltage-clamp experiments to measure NH3/NH4+- and MA/MA+-induced intracellular pH (pHi) changes and whole cell currents. Our data showed that in Rhbg oocytes, NH3/NH4+ caused an inward current and decrease in pHi consistent with electrogenic NH4+ transport. These changes were significantly larger than in H2O-injected oocytes. The NH3/NH4+-induced current was not inhibited in the presence of barium or in the absence of Na+. In Rhbg oocytes, MA/MA+ caused an inward current but an increase (rather than a decrease) in pHi. MA/MA+ did not cause any changes in H2O-injected oocytes. The MA/MA+-induced current and pHi increase were saturated at higher concentrations of MA/MA+. Amiloride inhibited MA/MA+-induced current and the increase in pHi in oocytes expressing Rhbg but had no effect on control oocytes. These results indicate that MA/MA+ is transported by Rhbg but differently than NH3/NH4+. The protonated MA+ is likely a direct substrate whose transport resembles that of NH4+. Transport of electroneutral MA is also enhanced by expression of Rhbg. PMID:20592240

  3. Substrate specificity of Rhbg: ammonium and methyl ammonium transport.

    PubMed

    Nakhoul, Nazih L; Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M; Boulpaep, Emile L; Rabon, Edd; Schmidt, Eric; Hamm, L Lee

    2010-09-01

    Rhbg is a nonerythroid membrane glycoprotein belonging to the Rh antigen family. In the kidney, Rhbg is expressed at the basolateral membrane of intercalated cells of the distal nephron and is involved in NH4+ transport. We investigated the substrate specificity of Rhbg by comparing transport of NH3/NH4+ with that of methyl amine (hydrochloride) (MA/MA+), often used to replace NH3/NH4+, in oocytes expressing Rhbg. Methyl amine (HCl) in solution exists as neutral methyl amine (MA) in equilibrium with the protonated methyl ammonium (MA+). To assess transport, we used ion-selective microelectrodes and voltage-clamp experiments to measure NH3/NH4+- and MA/MA+-induced intracellular pH (pH(i)) changes and whole cell currents. Our data showed that in Rhbg oocytes, NH3/NH4+ caused an inward current and decrease in pH(i) consistent with electrogenic NH4+ transport. These changes were significantly larger than in H2O-injected oocytes. The NH3/NH4+-induced current was not inhibited in the presence of barium or in the absence of Na+. In Rhbg oocytes, MA/MA+ caused an inward current but an increase (rather than a decrease) in pH(i). MA/MA+ did not cause any changes in H2O-injected oocytes. The MA/MA+-induced current and pH(i) increase were saturated at higher concentrations of MA/MA+. Amiloride inhibited MA/MA+-induced current and the increase in pH(i) in oocytes expressing Rhbg but had no effect on control oocytes. These results indicate that MA/MA+ is transported by Rhbg but differently than NH3/NH4+. The protonated MA+ is likely a direct substrate whose transport resembles that of NH4+. Transport of electroneutral MA is also enhanced by expression of Rhbg.

  4. Non-destructive analysis of didymium and praseodymium molybdate crystals using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. K.; Joseph, Daisy; Pandita, Sanjay; Kotru, P. N.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of didymium (Di) and praseodymium molybdate crystals were carried out using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The assigned empirical chemical formulae of the composites were tested and verified by the EDXRF technique by estimating experimental major elemental concentration ratios. On the Basis of these ratios, the established formulae for some of the composite materials have been verified and suggestions made for their refinement. Non-destructive technique used in this analysis enables to retain the original crystal samples and makes rapid simultaneous scan of major elements such as La, Pr, Ned and Mo as well as impurities such as Ce. Absence of samarium(Sm) in the spectrum during analysis of didymium molybdate crystals indicated an incomplete growth of mixed rare earth single crystal. These crystals (e.g.,Di) are shown to be of modified stoichiometry with Ce as trace impurity.

  5. Electrochemical intercalation of lithium in ternary metal molybdates MMoO 4 (M: Cu, Zn, Ni and Fe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyzerovich, N. N.; Bramnik, K. G.; Buhrmester, T.; Ehrenberg, H.; Fuess, H.

    Ternary oxides with general formula MMoO 4 (where M is a 3d-transitional metal) were characterized as cathode materials for lithium rechargeable batteries by galvanostatic charge-discharge technique and cyclic voltammetry. The significant capacity fading after the first cycle of lithium insertion/removal takes place for different copper molybdates (α-CuMoO 4 and high-pressure modification CuMoO 4-III) corresponding to the irreversible copper reduction and formation of Li 2MoO 4 during the first discharge. X-ray powder diffraction data reveal the decomposition of pristine ZnMoO 4 by electrochemical reaction, lithium zinc oxide with the NaCl-type structure and Li 2MoO 3 seem to be formed. Lithium intercalation into nickel and iron molybdates is shown to proceed without phase transitions, but at unsatisfactory low operating voltages.

  6. One-step synthesis of in situ reduced metal Bi decorated bismuth molybdate hollow microspheres with enhancing photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Meng; Lu, Shiyu; Ma, Li; Gan, Mengyu

    2017-02-01

    In this feature work, in situ metal Bi are successfully modified bismuth molybdate hollow spheres using an effective one-pot solvthermal reduction without any temple. In order to deeply understand the influence of reduction conditions on the texture, surface state, and photocatalytic performance of the resulting samples, a series of products were synthesized by tuning the temperatures. The similar morphology, surface area of photocatalysis (BMO-160 and BMO-170) were synthesized, only with the different composition. The detailed characterization and analysis distinctly suggested that increasing solvothermal reduction temperature led to Bi3+ was in situ reduced to elementary substance Bi0 by ethylene glycol gradually and dispersed very uniform in bismuth molybdate. Benefiting from the enhanced charge separation, transfer, and donor density resulting from the formation of Bi decorated bismuth molybdate where Bi as cocatalyst, the photocatalytic performance of the reductive Bi/Bi2-xMoOy hollow spheres (BMO-170) is higher than that of the untreated Bi2-xMoOy hollow spheres (BMO-160) for Rh6G degradation under visible light irradiation. Additionally, the reductive BMO-170 has a superior stability after five cycles.

  7. Surface properties of AZ91 magnesium alloy after PEO treatment using molybdate salts and low current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzato, Luca; Brunelli, Katya; Napolitani, Enrico; Magrini, Maurizio; Dabalà, Manuele

    2015-12-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process is a recently developed electrochemical method used to produce on the surface of various metals oxide ceramic coatings that improve corrosion and wear properties of the substrate. In this work, PEO process was applied on AZ91 magnesium alloy using low current densities (0.05 A/cm2) and an alkaline solution of silicates with different concentrations of sodium molybdate (0.3-3 g/l). The effect of the low current densities of process and of molybdate salts on the corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied with potentiodynamic polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in chloride and sulfate environment. The morphology, the phases and the chemical composition of the coatings were examined using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EDS, X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The corrosion properties of the PEO coated samples were remarkably improved if compared with the uncoated samples. The addition of sodium molybdate, in determinate conditions, had a positive effect on the characteristics of the coatings in terms of corrosion resistance.

  8. Crystallographic structure and substrate-binding interactions of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Balan, Andrea; Santacruz-Pérez, Carolina; Moutran, Alexandre; Ferreira, Luís Carlos Souza; Neshich, Goran; Gonçalves Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro

    2008-02-01

    In Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac or X. citri), the modA gene codes for a periplasmic protein (ModA) that is capable of binding molybdate and tungstate as part of the ABC-type transporter required for the uptake of micronutrients. In this study, we report the crystallographic structure of the Xac ModA protein with bound molybdate. The Xac ModA structure is similar to orthologs with known three-dimensional structures and consists of two nearly symmetrical domains separated by a hinge region where the oxyanion-binding site lies. Phylogenetic analysis of different ModA orthologs based on sequence alignments revealed three groups of molybdate-binding proteins: bacterial phytopathogens, enterobacteria and soil bacteria. Even though the ModA orthologs are segregated into different groups, the ligand-binding hydrogen bonds are mostly conserved, except for Archaeglobus fulgidus ModA. A detailed discussion of hydrophobic interactions in the active site is presented and two new residues, Ala38 and Ser151, are shown to be part of the ligand-binding pocket.

  9. Biodegradation of rocket propellent waste, ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqui, S. M. Z.

    1975-01-01

    The impact of the biodegradation rate of ammonium perchlorate on the environment was studied in terms of growth, metabolic rate, and total biomass of selected animal and plant species. Brief methodology and detailed results are presented.

  10. Toxicology of ammonium sulfate in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Pepelko, W.E.; Mattox, J.K.; Cohen, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Despite the relatively low toxicity of ammonium sulfate in experimental animals, it cannot be concluded that increased sulfuric acid production is harmless to human health. Many other pollutants are present in ambient air with possible synergistic effects. Sulfuric acid undoubtedly reacts to produce other sulfates in ambient air which are often much more toxic. For example zinc sulfate and zinc ammonium sulfate are much more irritating to the lung than ammonium sulfate. In order to assess with more certainty the health effects of increased sulfuric acid production, it will be necessary to determine accurately that proportion inhaled as free sulfuric acid compared with ammonium sulfate as well as the proportion and kinds of other sulfates present in the atmosphere.

  11. 76 FR 46907 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... used in agricultural operations indicated that ammonium nitrate is the best choice for nitrogen... contains not less than 33 percent nitrogen by weight.'' See 6 U.S.C. 488(1)(A). DHS proposes to use...

  12. Evidence of ammonium ion-exchange properties of natural bentonite and application to ammonium detection.

    PubMed

    Zazoua, A; Kazane, I; Khedimallah, N; Dernane, C; Errachid, A; Jaffrezic-Renault, N

    2013-12-01

    Ammonium exchange with hybrid PVC-bentonite (mineral montmorillonite clay) thin film was revealed using FTIR spectroscopy, EDX, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effect of ammonium exchange on the charge transfer resistance of PVC-bentonite hybrid thin film was attributed to a modification of the intersheet distance and hydration of bentonite crystals. The obtained impedimetric ammonium sensor shows a linear range of detection from 10(-4)M to 1M and a detection limit around 10(-6)M.

  13. Electrochemically and bioelectrochemically induced ammonium recovery.

    PubMed

    Gildemyn, Sylvia; Luther, Amanda K; Andersen, Stephen J; Desloover, Joachim; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-01-22

    Streams such as urine and manure can contain high levels of ammonium, which could be recovered for reuse in agriculture or chemistry. The extraction of ammonium from an ammonium-rich stream is demonstrated using an electrochemical and a bioelectrochemical system. Both systems are controlled by a potentiostat to either fix the current (for the electrochemical cell) or fix the potential of the working electrode (for the bioelectrochemical cell). In the bioelectrochemical cell, electroactive bacteria catalyze the anodic reaction, whereas in the electrochemical cell the potentiostat applies a higher voltage to produce a current. The current and consequent restoration of the charge balance across the cell allow the transport of cations, such as ammonium, across a cation exchange membrane from the anolyte to the catholyte. The high pH of the catholyte leads to formation of ammonia, which can be stripped from the medium and captured in an acid solution, thus enabling the recovery of a valuable nutrient. The flux of ammonium across the membrane is characterized at different anolyte ammonium concentrations and currents for both the abiotic and biotic reactor systems. Both systems are compared based on current and removal efficiencies for ammonium, as well as the energy input required to drive ammonium transfer across the cation exchange membrane. Finally, a comparative analysis considering key aspects such as reliability, electrode cost, and rate is made. This video article and protocol provide the necessary information to conduct electrochemical and bioelectrochemical ammonia recovery experiments. The reactor setup for the two cases is explained, as well as the reactor operation. We elaborate on data analysis for both reactor types and on the advantages and disadvantages of bioelectrochemical and electrochemical systems.

  14. Electrochemically and Bioelectrochemically Induced Ammonium Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Gildemyn, Sylvia; Luther, Amanda K.; Andersen, Stephen J.; Desloover, Joachim; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-01-01

    Streams such as urine and manure can contain high levels of ammonium, which could be recovered for reuse in agriculture or chemistry. The extraction of ammonium from an ammonium-rich stream is demonstrated using an electrochemical and a bioelectrochemical system. Both systems are controlled by a potentiostat to either fix the current (for the electrochemical cell) or fix the potential of the working electrode (for the bioelectrochemical cell). In the bioelectrochemical cell, electroactive bacteria catalyze the anodic reaction, whereas in the electrochemical cell the potentiostat applies a higher voltage to produce a current. The current and consequent restoration of the charge balance across the cell allow the transport of cations, such as ammonium, across a cation exchange membrane from the anolyte to the catholyte. The high pH of the catholyte leads to formation of ammonia, which can be stripped from the medium and captured in an acid solution, thus enabling the recovery of a valuable nutrient. The flux of ammonium across the membrane is characterized at different anolyte ammonium concentrations and currents for both the abiotic and biotic reactor systems. Both systems are compared based on current and removal efficiencies for ammonium, as well as the energy input required to drive ammonium transfer across the cation exchange membrane. Finally, a comparative analysis considering key aspects such as reliability, electrode cost, and rate is made. This video article and protocol provide the necessary information to conduct electrochemical and bioelectrochemical ammonia recovery experiments. The reactor setup for the two cases is explained, as well as the reactor operation. We elaborate on data analysis for both reactor types and on the advantages and disadvantages of bioelectrochemical and electrochemical systems. PMID:25651406

  15. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165... § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food additive, quaternary ammonium chloride... the following compounds: n-dodecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (CAS Reg. No. 139-07-1);...

  16. 21 CFR 172.430 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 172.430 Section 172.430... CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.430 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in... human consumption so that the level of iron ammonium citrate does not exceed 25 parts per million...

  17. 21 CFR 172.430 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 172.430 Section 172.430... CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.430 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in... human consumption so that the level of iron ammonium citrate does not exceed 25 parts per million...

  18. 21 CFR 172.430 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 172.430 Section 172.430... CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.430 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in... human consumption so that the level of iron ammonium citrate does not exceed 25 parts per million...

  19. 21 CFR 172.430 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron ammonium citrate. 172.430 Section 172.430 Food... Anticaking Agents § 172.430 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in food in... consumption so that the level of iron ammonium citrate does not exceed 25 parts per million (0.0025...

  20. 21 CFR 573.560 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 573.560 Section 573.560... Additive Listing § 573.560 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in animal feed... consumption so that the level of iron ammonium citrate does not exceed 25 parts per million (0.0025...

  1. Efficient adsorption of both methyl orange and chromium from their aqueous mixtures using a quaternary ammonium salt modified chitosan magnetic composite adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Li, Pei; Cai, Jun; Xiao, Shoujun; Yang, Hu; Li, Aimin

    2016-07-01

    A quaternary ammonium salt modified chitosan magnetic composite adsorbent (CS-CTA-MCM) was prepared by combination of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Various techniques were used to characterize the molecular structure, surface morphology, and magnetic feature of this composite adsorbent. CS-CTA-MCM was employed for the removal of Cr(VI) and methyl orange (MO), an anionic dye, from water in respective single and binary systems. Compared with chitosan magnetic adsorbent (CS-MCM) without modification, CS-CTA-MCM shows evidently improved adsorption capacities for both pollutants ascribed to the additional quaternary ammonium salt groups. Based on the adsorption equilibrium study, MO bears more affinity to CS-CTA-MCM than Cr(VI) causing a considerable extent of preferential adsorption of dye over metal ions in their aqueous mixture. However, at weak acidic solutions, Cr(VI) adsorption is evidently improved due to more efficient Cr(VI) forms, i.e. dichromate and monovalent chromate, binding to this chitosan-based adsorbent. Thus chromium could be efficient removal together with MO at suitable pH conditions. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics indicate that adsorptions of Cr(VI) and MO by CS-CTA-MCM both follow a homogeneous monolayer chemisorption process. This magnetic adsorbent after saturated adsorption could be rapidly separated from water and easily regenerated using dilute NaOH aqueous solutions then virtually reused with little adsorption capacity loss.

  2. From spin glass to quantum spin liquid ground states in molybdate pyrochlores.

    PubMed

    Clark, L; Nilsen, G J; Kermarrec, E; Ehlers, G; Knight, K S; Harrison, A; Attfield, J P; Gaulin, B D

    2014-09-12

    We present new magnetic heat capacity and neutron scattering results for two magnetically frustrated molybdate pyrochlores: S=1 oxide Lu_{2}Mo_{2}O_{7} and S=1/2 oxynitride Lu_{2}Mo_{2}O_{5}N_{2}. Lu_{2}Mo_{2}O_{7} undergoes a transition to an unconventional spin glass ground state at T_{f}∼16  K. However, the preparation of the corresponding oxynitride tunes the nature of the ground state from spin glass to quantum spin liquid. The comparison of the static and dynamic spin correlations within the oxide and oxynitride phases presented here reveals the crucial role played by quantum fluctuations in the selection of a ground state. Furthermore, we estimate an upper limit for a gap in the spin excitation spectrum of the quantum spin liquid state of the oxynitride of Δ∼0.05  meV or Δ/|θ|∼0.004, in units of its antiferromagnetic Weiss constant θ∼-121  K.

  3. Dielectric barrier formation and tunneling magnetoresistance effect in strontium iron molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dem'yanov, S. E.; Kalanda, N. A.; Kovalev, L. V.; Avdeev, M. V.; Zheludkevich, M. L.; Garamus, V. M.; Willumeit, R.

    2013-06-01

    A comparative X-ray diffraction study of the initial single-phase metal-oxide compound-strontium iron molybdate Sr2FeMoO6 - δ (SFMO)-and that subjected to additional isothermal annealing shows that this heat treatment leads to the appearance of a SrMoO4 (SMO) phase. Small-angle neutron scattering measurements indicate that the SMO phase forms a dielectric shell surrounding SFMO grains, which has a characteristic thickness of 2-4 nm and extends above 120 nm. The character of the temperature dependence of the electric resistance corresponds to the metal-type conduction in single-phase SFMO and changes to a semiconductor type in the material with SMO dielectric shells, which is evidence of a tunneling mechanism of charge transfer. This conclusion is confirmed by an increase in the absolute value of the negative magnetoresistance of SFMO due to the appearance of a tunneling magnetoresistance component of the same sign.

  4. New double molybdate Na9Fe(MoO4)6: Synthesis, structure, properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, Aleksandra A.; Solodovnikov, Sergey F.; Basovich, Olga M.; Solodovnikova, Zoya A.; Belov, Dmitry A.; Pokholok, Konstantin V.; Gudkova, Irina A.; Stefanovich, Sergey Yu.; Lazoryak, Bogdan I.; Khaikina, Elena G.

    2013-09-01

    A new double molybdate Na9Fe(MoO4)6 was synthesized using solid state reactions and studied with X-ray powder diffraction, second harmonic generation (SHG) technique, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray fluorescence analysis, Mössbauer and dielectric impedance spectroscopy. Single crystals of Na9Fe(MoO4)6 were obtained and its structure was solved (the space group R3¯, a=14.8264(2), c=19.2402(3) Å, V=3662.79(9) Å3, Z=6, R=0.0132). The structure is related to that of sodium ion conductor II-Na3Fe2(AsO4)3. The basic structure units are polyhedral clusters composed of central FeО6 octahedron sharing edges with three Na(1)О6 octahedra. The clusters share common vertices with bridging МоО4 tetrahedra to form an open 3D framework where the cavities are occupied by Na(2) and Na(3) atoms. The compound melts incongruently at 904.7±0.2 K. Arrhenius type temperature dependence of electric conductivity σ has been registered in solid state (σ=6.8×10-2 S сm-1 at 800 K), thus allowing considering Na9Fe(MoO4)6 as a new sodium ion conductor.

  5. Effects of Te(IV) Oxo-Anion Incorporation into Thorium Molybdates and Tungstates.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bin; Klinkenberg, Martina; Bosbach, Dirk; Suleimanov, Evgeny V; Alekseev, Evgeny V

    2015-06-15

    The exploration of phase formation in the Th-Mo/W-Te systems has resulted in four mixed oxo-anion compounds from high-temperature solid-state reactions: ThWTe2O9, Th(WO4)(TeO3), ThMoTe2O9, and Th2(MoO4)(TeO3)3. All four compounds contain edge-sharing thorium polyhedra linked by MoO4/WO6 and different tellurium oxo-groups to form three-dimensional frameworks. In ThWTe2O9, each helical Th based chain is connected by four tungstotellurite clusters resulting in a building fragment which has a cross-section of four-leafed clovers. The structure of Th(WO4)(TeO3) exhibits a multilayer-sandwich framework composed of thorium tellurite layers with tungsten chains in between. In the case of the molybdate family, ThMoTe2O9 and Th2(MoO4)(TeO3)3 are built from puckered Th-Te sheets which are further interconnected by MoO4 tetrahedral linkers. The DSC-TG technique was performed to gain insight into the thermal behavior of the synthesized compounds. Raman spectra of as-prepared phases were obtained and analyzed for signature peaks.

  6. Two-photon interband absorption coefficients in tungstate and molybdate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukanin, V. I.; Karasik, A. Ya.

    2015-02-01

    Two-photon absorption (TPA) coefficients were measured in tungstate and molybdate crystals - BaWO4, KGW, CaMoO4, BaMoO4, CaWO4, PbWO4 and ZnWO4 upon different orientations of excitation polarization with respect to the crystallographic axes. Trains of 25 ps pulses with variable radiation intensities of third (349 nm) harmonics of passively mode-locked 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser were used for interband two-photon excitation of the crystals. It was suggested that in the case, when 349 nm radiation pumping energy exceeds the bandgap width (hν>Eg), the nonlinear excitation process can be considered as two-step absorption. The interband two-photon absorption in all the studied crystals induces the following one-photon absorption from the exited states, which affects the nonlinear process dynamics and leads to a hysteresis in the dependence of the transmission on the excitation intensity. This fact was taken into account under analysis of the experimental dependences of the reciprocal transmission on the excitation intensity. Laser excitation in the transparency region of the crystals caused stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) not for all the crystals studied. The measured nonlinear coefficients allowed us to explain the suppression of SRS in crystals as a result of competition between the SRS and TPA.

  7. Modeling oxyanion adsorption on ferralic soil, part 2: chromate, selenate, molybdate, and arsenate adsorption.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Claudio; Antelo, Juan; Fiol, Sarah; Arce, Florencio

    2014-10-01

    High levels of oxyanions are found in the soil environment, often as a result of human activity. At high concentrations, oxyanions can be harmful to both humans and wildlife. Information about the interactions between oxyanions and natural samples is essential for understanding the bioavailability, toxicity, and transport of these compounds in the environment. In the present study, the authors investigated the reactivity of different oxyanions (AsO4 , MoO4 , SeO4 , and CrO4 ) at different pH values in 2 horizons of a ferralic soil. By combining available microscopic data on iron oxides with the macroscopic data obtained, the authors were able to use the charge distribution model to accurately describe the adsorption of these 4 oxyanions and thus to determine the surface speciation. The charge distribution model was previously calibrated and evaluated using phosphate adsorption/desorption data. The adsorption behavior on ferralic soil is controlled mainly by the natural iron oxides present, and it is qualitatively analogous to that exhibited by synthetic iron oxides. The highest adsorption was found for arsenate ions, whereas the lowest was found for selenate, with chromate and molybdate ions showing an intermediate behavior.

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of reaction between silver molybdate and mercuric iodide in solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, M.A.; Rafiuddin

    1987-05-01

    The kinetics and the mechanism of the reaction between silver molybdate and mercuric iodide were studied in the solid state by X-ray, chemical analysis, and electrical conductivity measurements. This is a multistep reaction where Ag/sub 2/HgI/sub 4/ is formed as an intermediate. In an equimolar mixture of Ag/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/ and HgI/sub 2/, AgI an HgMoO/sub 4/ are formed, whereas in a 1:2 molar mixture Ag/sub 2/HgI/sub 4/ and HgMoO/sub 4/ are formed. The data for lateral diffusion best fit the equation X/sup n/ = kt, where X is the product thickness, t is time, and k and n are constants. This is a multistep solid state ionic reaction initiated by the diffusion of HgI/sub 2/ molecules as such and not through counterdiffusion of cations.

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Harmatz, Paul; Shediac, Renee

    2017-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI), or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient activity of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ASB). Progressive accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in organs and tissues leads to the development of multisystem clinical manifestations. The presentation of MPS VI is genotypically and phenotypically diverse, with a large number of potential disease-causing mutations and a phenotypic spectrum ranging from very slowly to very rapidly progressing disease. Diagnosis of MPS VI relies on presence of clinical features, increased GAG levels in urine or low ASB activity in dried blood spots, and measurement of enzyme activity levels in leukocytes or fibroblasts. The management of MPS VI involves enzyme replacement therapy and medical and surgical treatment of disease manifestations. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry of GAG-derived disaccharides in blood or urine is emerging as a valuable method in the diagnosis, prognosis and assessment of therapeutic efficacy in MPS VI.

  10. Transcription Factor OsDOF18 Controls Ammonium Uptake by Inducing Ammonium Transporters in Rice Roots

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yunfei; Yang, Wenzhu; Wei, Jinhuan; Yoon, Hyeryung; An, Gynheung

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most important mineral elements for plant growth. We studied the functional roles of Oryza sativa DNA BINDING WITH ONE FINGER 18 (OsDOF18) in controlling ammonium uptake. The growth of null mutants of OsDOF18 was retarded in a medium containing ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. In contrast, those mutants grew normally in a medium with nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. The gene expression was induced by ammonium but not by nitrate. Uptake of ammonium was lower in osdof18 mutants than in the wild type, while that of nitrate was not affected by the mutation. This indicated that OsDOF18 is involved in regulating ammonium transport. Among the 10 ammonium transporter genes examined here, expression of OsAMT1;1, OsAMT1;3, OsAMT2;1, and OsAMT4;1 was reduced in osdof18 mutants, demonstrating that the ammonium transporter genes function downstream of OsDOF18. Genes for nitrogen assimilation were also affected in the mutants. These results provide evidence that OsDOF18 mediates ammonium transport and nitrogen distribution, which then affects nitrogen use efficiency. PMID:28292004

  11. Laboratory, semi-pilot and room scale study of nitrite and molybdate mediated control of H(2)S emission from swine manure.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lyman; Predicala, Bernardo; Nemati, Mehdi

    2010-04-01

    The effects of manure age on emission of H(2)S and required level of nitrite or molybdate to control these emissions were investigated in the present work. Molybdate mediated control of H(2)S emission was also studied in semi-pilot scale open systems, and in specifically designed chambers which simulated swine production rooms. With fresh 1-, 3- and 6-month old manures average H(2)S concentration in the headspace gas of the closed systems were 4856+/-460, 3431+/-208, 1037+/-98 ppm and non-detectable, respectively. Moreover, the level of nitrite or molybdate required to control the emission of H(2)S decreased as manure age increased. In the semi-pilot scale open system and chambers, average H(2)S concentration at the surface of agitated fresh manure were 831+/-26 and 88.4+/-5.7 ppm, respectively. Furthermore, 0.1-0.25 mM molybdate was sufficient to control the emission of H(2)S. A cost study for an average size swine operation showed that the cost of treatment with molybdate was less than 1% of the overall production cost for each market hog.

  12. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 - 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a clean, controlled ISS environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 - 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 - 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of ISS-based tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected at periodic intervals throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the development of improved cycle model tables. This paper provides a

  13. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 -- 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a dust free, manufactured microgravity EVA environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 -- 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 -- 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of International Space Station (ISS)-based EVA tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected periodically throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the

  14. Shotcrete for underground support VI

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings consists of papers presented at the Shotcrete for Underground Support VI Conference held in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada, May 2-6, 1993. It covers three broad themes concerning shotcrete - engineering, research, and applications. Specifically, the proceedings presents papers on: (1) materials engineering; (2) shotcrete research; (3) engineering design; and (4) tunneling, soil nailing, and mining applications. The book concludes by presenting an international compilation of guidelines and recommendations on shotcrete. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Modeling of Cr(VI) Bioreduction Under Fermentative and Denitrifying Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Steefel, C.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    The mechanisms of bioreductive immobilization of Cr(VI) were investigated by reactive transport modeling of a set of flow-through column experiments performed using natural Hanford 100H aquifer sediment. The columns were continuously eluted with 5 μM Cr(VI), 5 mM lactate as the electron donor, and selected electron acceptors (tested individually). Here we focus on the two separate experimental conditions that showed the most removal of Cr(VI) from solution: fermentation and denitrification. In each case, a network of enzymatic and abiotic reaction pathways was considered to interpret the rate of chromate reduction. The model included biomass growth and decay, and thermodynamic limitations on reaction rates, and was constrained by effluent concentrations measured by IC and ICP-MS and additional information from bacterial isolates from column effluent. Under denitrifying conditions, Cr(VI) reduction was modeled as co-metabolic with nitrate reduction based on experimental observations and previous studies on a denitrifying bacterium derived from the Hanford 100H aquifer. The reactive transport model results supported this interpretation of the reaction mechanism and were used to quantify the efficiency of the process. The models results also suggest that biomass growth likely relied on a nitrogen source other than ammonium (e.g. nitrate). Under fermentative conditions and based on cell suspension studies performed on a bacterial isolate from the columns, the model assumes that Cr(VI) reduction is carried out directly by fermentative bacteria that convert lactate into acetate and propionate. The evolution to complete lactate fermentation and Cr(VI) reduction took place over a week's time and simulations were used to determine an estimate for a lower limit of the rate of chromate reduction by calibration with the flow-through column experimental results. In spite of sulfate being added to these columns, sulfate reduction proceeded at a slow rate and was not well

  16. Crystallization characteristics of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) in ammonium carbonate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tae-Joon, Kim; Kyung-Chai, Jeong; Jin-Ho, Park; In-Soon, Chang; Cheong-Song, Choi

    1994-05-01

    Ammonium carbonate solutions with an excessive amount of NH 3 were produced in a commercial AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) conversion plant. In this study the AUC crystals, precipitated with uranyl nitrate and ammonium carbonate solutions prepared in the laboratory, were characterized to determine the feasibility of recycling ammonium carbonate solution. The AUC crystals were easily agglomerated with the increasing concentration of CO 32- and mole ratio of {NH 4+}/{CO 32-} in ammonium carbonate solution. Effects of a mixing system for the solution in the AUC crystallizer and the feed location of the solution on the agglomeration of AUC crystals were also studied along with the effects of agglomerated AUC powders on UO 2 powders. Finally, the feasibility of manufacturing UO 2 fuel with a sintered pellet density of 10.52 g/cm 3, using the AUC powders generated in this experiment, was demonstrated.

  17. Calcium sulphate in ammonium sulphate solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, E.C.

    1905-01-01

    Calcium sulphate, at 25?? C., is two-thirds as soluble in dilute (o.i mol per liter) and twice as soluble in concentrated (3 mois per liter) ammonium sulphate solution as in water. The specific electric conductivity of concentrated ammonium sulphate solutions is lessened by saturating with calcium sulphate. Assuming that dissociation of ammonium sulphate takes place into 2NH4?? and SO4" and of calcium sulphate into Ca and SO4" only, and that the conductivity is a measure of such dissociation, the solubility of calcium sulphate in dilute ammonium sulphate solutions is greater than required by the mass-law. The conductivity of the dilute mixtures may be accurately calculated by means of Arrhenius' principle of isohydric solutions. In the data obtained in these calculations, the concentration of non-dissociated calcium sulphate decreases with increasing ammonium sulphate. The work as a whole is additional evidence of the fact that we are not yet in possession of all the factors necessary for reconciling the mass-law to the behavior of electrolytes. The measurements above described were made in the chemical laboratory of the University of Michigan.

  18. Stable suspension for Vi-agglutination tests

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Koji; Shimojo, Hiroto

    1953-01-01

    Two methods of preparing a stable suspension for Vi-agglutination tests are discussed. Both maintain Vi-agglutinability and O-inagglutinability after storage at 37°C for 6 months, and the second also maintains the Vi-capsule-staining property. The first method involves the addition of 0.5% CaCl2 to a heavy saline Vi-suspension, while in the second a similar suspension is treated with an 0.2% solution of chrome alum. PMID:20603972

  19. Molybdenum(VI) salts convert the xanthine oxidoreductase apoprotein into the active enzyme in mouse L929 fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Falciani, F; Terao, M; Goldwurm, S; Ronchi, A; Gatti, A; Minoia, C; Li Calzi, M; Salmona, M; Cazzaniga, G; Garattini, E

    1994-01-01

    The mouse L929 fibroblastic cell line presents low, but detectable, levels of the mRNA encoding xanthine oxidoreductase under basal conditions, and it responds to type I and type II interferons by inducing the expression of the transcript [Falciani, Ghezzi, Terao, Cazzaniga, and Garattini (1992) Biochem. J. 285, 1001-1008]. This cell line, however, does not show any detectable amount of xanthine oxidoreductase enzymic activity, either before or after treatment with the cytokines. Molybdenum(VI) salts, in the millimolar range, are capable of activating xanthine oxidoreductase in L929 cells both under basal conditions and after treatment with interferon-alpha. The increase is observed in mouse L929 as well as in clones derived from it, but not in many other human and mouse cell lines. The induction observed in L929 cells is post-translational in nature and it is insensitive to cycloheximide, indicating that the molybdenum ion converts a pool of inactive xanthine oxidoreductase apoenzyme into its holoenzymic form. When grown in the absence of sodium molybdate, the L929 cell line has undetectable intracellular levels of the molybdenum cofactor, since the cell extracts are unable to complement the nitrate reductase defect of the nit-1 mutant of Neurospora crassa. L929 cells grown in the presence of millimolar concentrations of sodium molybdate, however, become competent to complement the nit-1 defect. L929 cells accumulate molybdenum ion inside the intracellular compartment as efficiently as TEnd cells, a mouse endothelial cell line that expresses xanthine oxidoreductase activity both under basal conditions and after treatment with interferon-gamma, suggesting that L929 cells have a defect in one or more of the metabolic steps leading to the synthesis of the molybdenum cofactor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8129733

  20. Immune suppression induced by Vi capsular polysaccharide is overcome by Vi-DT conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Yoon, Yeon Kyung; Kothari, Sudeep; Kim, Deok Ryun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Kothari, Neha; Lee, Eugene; Park, Tai Hyun; Carbis, Rodney

    2012-02-01

    The influence pre-exposure of mice to Vi capsular polysaccharide, purified from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi, on the subsequent immune response induced by a Vi-diphtheria toxoid (Vi-DT) conjugate was evaluated. Vi induced low anti Vi IgG titers with the dominant subclass being IgG3. The Vi-DT conjugate induced high titers of anti Vi IgG with the dominant subclass being IgG1 but with considerable quantities of IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3. Priming of mice with Vi suppressed the response to a subsequent dose of conjugate and the suppression was overcome by a second dose of conjugate. Priming with conjugate prevented suppression of the anti Vi response and subsequent dosing with Vi raised titers back to previous levels but did not boost to new higher levels. The anti DT IgG response to one dose of conjugate was relatively strong and protracted and continued to rise for 12 weeks, compared to the response to one dose of DT which was poor and peaked at two weeks. The prolonged anti DT response was most likely due to the slow release of DT from the conjugate lattice as it degrades within the mouse resulting in a continuous stimulation of the immune response. The presence of increasing amounts of un-conjugated Vi, up to 50%, administered with the conjugate resulted in increasingly higher levels of both anti Vi and anti DT. Larger amounts of un-conjugated Vi inhibited the anti Vi response. These findings have implications for vaccine quality and a limit for un-conjugated polysaccharide should not exceed 50% and from a vaccine program perspective if the results presented here translate to humans then a Vi conjugate, once it becomes available, should replace Vi polysaccharide vaccines.

  1. Neptunium(vi) chain and neptunium(vi/v) mixed valence cluster complexes.

    PubMed

    Cornet, Stéphanie M; Häller, L Jonas L; Sarsfield, Mark J; Collison, David; Helliwell, Madeleine; May, Iain; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas

    2009-02-28

    The synthesis of [Np(VI)O(2)Cl(2)(thf)](n) offers the potential for more detailed exploration of neptunyl(vi) chemistry, while the synthesis of the mixed valence cluster complex [{Np(VI)O(2)Cl(2)}{Np(V)O(2)Cl(thf)(3)}(2)] allows molecular neptunyl(v) 'cation-cation' interactions to be probed.

  2. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-07-16

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 {+-} 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

  3. [Occupational exposure to chromium(VI) compounds].

    PubMed

    Skowroń, Jolanta; Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)) on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI) compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV) for chromium(VI) of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL) document chromium(VI) concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2-14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI) compounds expressed in Cr(VI) of 0.01 mg Cr(VI)/m3; is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1-6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity.

  4. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase interactions with decaniobate, decavanadate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate.

    PubMed

    Fraqueza, Gil; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H; Aureliano, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    Over the last few decades there has been increasing interest in oxometalate and polyoxometalate applications to medicine and pharmacology. This interest arose, at least in part, due to the properties of these classes of compounds as anti-cancer, anti-diabetic agents, and also for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, among others. However, our understanding of the mechanism of action would be improved if biological models could be used to clarify potential toxicological effects in main cellular processes. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles, containing a large amount of Ca(2+)-ATPase, an enzyme that accumulates calcium by active transport using ATP, have been suggested as a useful model to study the effects of oxometalates on calcium homeostasis. In the present article, it is shown that decavanadate, decaniobate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate, all inhibited SR Ca(2+)-ATPase, with the following IC(50) values: 15, 35, 50, 400 μM and 45 mM, respectively. Decaniobate (Nb(10)), is the strongest P-type enzyme inhibitor, after decavanadate (V(10)). Atomic-absorption spectroscopy (AAS) analysis, indicates that decavanadate binds to the protein with a 1:1 decavanadate:Ca(2+)-ATPase stoichiometry. Furthermore, V(10) binds with similar extension to all the protein conformations, which occur during calcium translocation by active transport, namely E1, E1P, E2 and E2P, as analysed by AAS. In contrast, it was confirmed that the binding of monomeric vanadate (H(2)VO(4)(2-); V(1)) to the calcium pump is favoured only for the E2 and E2P conformations of the ATPase, whereas no significant amount of vanadate is bound to the E1 and E1P conformations. Scatchard plot analysis, confirmed a 1:1 ratio for decavanadate-Ca(2+)-ATPase, with a dissociation constant, k(d) of 1 μM(-1). The interaction of decavanadate V(10)O(28)(6-) (V(10)) with Ca(2+)-ATPase is prevented by the isostructural and isoelectronic decaniobate Nb(10)O(28)(6-) (Nb(10)), whereas no significant effects were

  5. A new staining and evaluating procedure for protein gel electropherograms based on the pyrogallol red-molybdate complex.

    PubMed

    Csiba, A; Szécsényi-Nagy, L

    1989-01-01

    A new method is reported for staining and evaluating gel electropherograms of proteins. With pyrogallol red-molybdate reagent the gel-embedded proteins are transformed into a derivative of blue colour. After destaining, the blue-coloured proteins are well visible against a colourless background and can be quantified by densitometry with high reliability. The quantity of the coloured protein is directly proportional to the height of peaks in the densitogram. Colour intensity is concentration dependent. The measurement range of serum albumin was 1 to 50 micrograms/tube and 10 to 100 micrograms/slab in polyacrylamide gel disc electrophoresis and agar gel electrophoresis, respectively.

  6. Design and stabilisation of a high area iron molybdate surface for the selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Stephanie; Brookes, Catherine; Bowker, Michael; Gibson, Emma K; Wells, Peter P

    2016-07-04

    The performance of Mo-enriched, bulk ferric molybdate, employed commercially for the industrially important reaction of the selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde, is limited by a low surface area, typically 5-8 m(2) g(-1). Recent advances in the understanding of the iron molybdate catalyst have focused on the study of MoOx@Fe2O3 (MoOx shell, Fe2O3 core) systems, where only a few overlayers of Mo are present on the surface. This method of preparing MoOx@Fe2O3 catalysts was shown to support an iron molybdate surface of higher surface area than the industrially-favoured bulk phase. In this research, a MoOx@Fe2O3 catalyst of even higher surface area was stabilised by modifying a haematite support containing 5 wt% Al dopant. The addition of Al was an important factor for stabilising the haematite surface area and resulted in an iron molybdate surface area of ∼35 m(2) g(-1), around a 5 fold increase on the bulk catalyst. XPS confirmed Mo surface-enrichment, whilst Mo XANES resolved an amorphous MoOx surface monolayer supported on a sublayer of Fe2(MoO4)3 that became increasingly extensive with initial Mo surface loading. The high surface area MoOx@Fe2O3 catalyst proved amenable to bulk characterisation techniques; contributions from Fe2(MoO4)3 were detectable by Raman, XAFS, ATR-IR and XRD spectroscopies. The temperature-programmed pulsed flow reaction of methanol showed that this novel, high surface area catalyst (3ML-HSA) outperformed the undoped analogue (3ML-ISA), and a peak yield of 94% formaldehyde was obtained at ∼40 °C below that for the bulk Fe2(MoO4)3 phase. This work demonstrates how core-shell, multi-component oxides offer new routes for improving catalytic performance and understanding catalytic activity.

  7. Sodium molybdate prevents hypertension and vascular prostanoid imbalance in fructose-overloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Peredo, H A; Andrade, V; Donoso, A S; Lee, H J; Puyó, A M

    2013-10-01

    (1) Fructose (F) overload produces elevated blood pressure (BP), hyperglycaemia, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, resembling human metabolic syndrome. Previously, we found altered vascular prostanoid (PR) production in this model. (2) Sodium molybdate (Mo), as well as sodium tungstate, causes insulin-like effects and normalizes plasma glucose levels in streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. We studied the effects of Mo on BP, metabolic parameters and release of PR from the mesenteric vascular bed (MVB) in F-overloaded rats. (3) Four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were analysed: Control, tap water to drink; F, F solution 10% W/V to drink; CMo, Mo 100 mg kg day(-1) and FMo, both treatments. After 9 weeks, the animals were killed and MVBs removed and the released PRs measured. (4) F increased BP, glycemia, triglyceridemia and insulinemia. Mo treatment prevented the increases in BP and glycemia, but did not modify triglyceridemia or insulinemia. In addition, Mo decreased BP in controls. (5) Prostaglandins (PG) F2 alpha and E2, PG 6-ketoF1 alpha and thromboxane (TX) B2 , as well as inactive metabolites of prostacyclin (PGI2 ) and TXA2 were detected. F decreased the production of vasodilator PRs PGI2 and PGE2 in MVB. Mo prevented these alterations and increased PGE2 in controls. Vasoconstrict or PRs PGF2 alpha and TXA2 release was not modified. (6) Mo treatment, beyond its known lowering effect on glycemia, prevents the reduction in the vascular release of vasodilator PR observed in this model. This could be one of the mechanisms by which Mo avoids the increase in BP caused by F overload in the rat.

  8. The formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase isoenzymes in Methanobacterium wolfei and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum: induction of the molybdenum isoenzyme by molybdate and constitutive synthesis of the tungsten isoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Hochheimer, A; Hedderich, R; Thauer, R K

    1998-10-01

    Formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase catalyzes the first step in methane formation from CO2 in methanogenic archaea. Methanobacterium wolfei and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum have been shown to contain two isoenzymes, a tungsten-containing isoenzyme (Fwd) and a molybdenum-containing isoenzyme (Fmd). We report here that in both thermophilic organisms the encoding genes are organized in a highly conserved fwdHFGDACB tungsten operon and in an fmdECB molybdenum operon. In both organisms, the tungsten isoenzyme was found to be constitutively transcribed, whereas the transcription of the molybdenum operon was induced by molybdate. Induction by molybdate was not significantly affected by tungstate.

  9. Paramagnetic properties of triple molybdates CsNa5M3(MoO4)6 (M = Ni, Co, Mn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkerin, S. N.; Uporov, S. A.; Yudin, V. N.; Solodovnikov, S. F.; Zolotova, E. S.; Tolkacheva, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    The static magnetization of CsNa5M3(MoO4)6 single phase molybdates, where M = Co, Ni, and Mn, is measured at 4-300 K in magnetic fields of up to 20 kOe. It is shown that the materials are paramagnetic. Magnetization as a function of temperature is described using the Curie-Weiss law. The intrinsic magnetic moments of the phases are found to be 9.759 (Co), 6.958 (Ni), and 12.203 Bohr magnetons for manganese molybdates. It is concluded that the charge state of Co, Ni, and Mn cations in the compounds is +2.

  10. The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher

    2013-06-01

    The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

  11. Intelsat VI - A continuing evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. B.; Braverman, D. J.

    1984-11-01

    Design, launch, and performance features of the Intelsat VI satellite scheduled for 1986 launch are described. The spacecraft will operated with SS/TDMA techniques and six antenna beams, weigh 23 kg at the beginning of life, carry 80,000 half-circuits, and will be borne aloft by either the STS or Ariane 4. The communications equipment will include Cand K-band receivers, 14/11 GHz upconverters, traveling wave tube amplifiers, and 50 input and output filters. Total interconnectivity will be present for all uplinks and downlinks, which will issue spot and shaped beam coverage of the hemisphere. Satellite power is to be supplied by solar panels furnishing 2 kW continuously and eclipse power is to be drawn from two 44 Ah NiH batteries. Orbit maintenance and attitude control are assigned to six 22 N thrusters.

  12. Molybdenum(VI) speciation in sulfidic waters: Stability and lability of thiomolybdates

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, B.E.; Helz, G.R.

    2000-04-01

    Molybdenum in sedimentary rocks and sediments has evoked interest as a paleo-environmental indicator of reducing conditions. This application demands better understanding of Mo deposition mechanisms and in turn, requires improved knowledge of Mo speciation in anaerobic natural waters. In sulfidic solution, molybdate undergoes sulfidation in four steps that conserve Mo{sup VI} and lead to tetrathiomolybdate. Equilibrium constants and rate constants have been measured by UV-visible spectroscopy. The monothio to trithio-intermediates have negligible stability fields. If H{sub 2}S(aq) increases slowly enough to maintain near-equilibrium conditions, a sharp switch will occur from MoO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} to MoS{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} at {approximately}11 {micro}M H{sub 2}S(aq) (298 K, 1 atm). Sulfide actuation of the switch depends on a{sub H2S}{sup 4}, so a {approximately}3-fold change in a{sub H2S} produces a {approximately}100-fold change in MoO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}/MoS{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Conversion of the predominant anion from a hard to a soft base alters Mo's geochemical behavior, increasing its susceptibility to scavenging. Because each successive sulfidation reaction is {approximately}1 order of magnitude slower than the previous one, dithio- {r_reversible} trithio- and trithio {r_reversible} tetrathiomolybdate equilibria might not be achieved in seasonally or intermittently sulfidic waters. In such environments, unstable mixtures of intermediate thiomolybdates can predominate, contradicting thermodynamic predictions. The sulfidation reactions are acid catalyzed. Anoxic sediment porewaters, which are enriched relative to overlying waters in Broensted acids, will promote conversion of molybdate to thiomolybdates. This may account for observations that Mo deposition in euxinic environments occurs often by diagenetic pathways rather than by water column scavenging. Slow hydrolysis and oxidation of MoS{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} suggests that it could serve a reservoir

  13. 21 CFR 573.170 - Ammonium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) The additive is manufactured by the reaction of 99.5 percent ammonia gas and 99 percent formic acid in...) To assure safe use of the additive, in addition to the other information required by the Federal Food... labeled as containing ammonium formate. (d) To assure safe use of the additive, in addition to the...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: Category of food Maximum level of use in food (as served) (percent) Functional use Confections, frostings... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium alginate. 184.1133 Section 184.1133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  15. Diamond Head Revisited with Ammonium Dichromate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrigoni, Edward

    1981-01-01

    The classroom demonstration using ammonium dichromate to simulate a volcanic eruption can be modified into a more dramatic and accurate representation of the geologic processes involved in the formation of a volcanic crater. The materials, demonstration setup, safety procedures, and applications to instruction are presented. (Author/WB)

  16. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-34-9) is the ammonium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae..., § 170.3(n)(9) of this chapter 0.4 Stabilizer, thickener, § 170.3(o)(28) of this chapter. Fats and...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-34-9) is the ammonium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae..., § 170.3(n)(9) of this chapter 0.4 Stabilizer, thickener, § 170.3(o)(28) of this chapter. Fats and...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: Category of food Maximum level of use in food (as served) (percent) Functional use Confections, frostings... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium alginate. 184.1133 Section 184.1133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE... practice. The affirmation of this ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium bicarbonate. 184.1135 Section...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium hydroxide. 184.1139 Section 184.1139...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium sulfate. 184.1143 Section 184.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing...

  3. 21 CFR 573.170 - Ammonium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) The additive is manufactured by the reaction of 99.5 percent ammonia gas and 99 percent formic acid in...) To assure safe use of the additive, in addition to the other information required by the Federal Food... labeled as containing ammonium formate. (d) To assure safe use of the additive, in addition to the...

  4. 21 CFR 573.170 - Ammonium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) The additive is manufactured by the reaction of 99.5 percent ammonia gas and 99 percent formic acid in...) To assure safe use of the additive, in addition to the other information required by the Federal Food... labeled as containing ammonium formate. (d) To assure safe use of the additive, in addition to the...

  5. 21 CFR 573.170 - Ammonium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... is manufactured by the reaction of 99.5 percent ammonia gas and 99 percent formic acid in a... safe use of the additive, in addition to the other information required by the Federal Food, Drug, and... ammonium formate. (d) To assure safe use of the additive, in addition to the other information required...

  6. Measurement of dissolved reactive phosphorus in water with polyquaternary ammonium salt as a binding agent in diffusive gradients in thin-films technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Zhang, Meng-Han; Gu, Jia-Li; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jian-Rong

    2014-12-17

    Diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) sampler with a polyquaternary ammonium salt (PQAS) aqueous solution as a binding phase and a dialysis membrane as a diffusive phase (PQAS DGT) was developed for the measurement of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in water. The performance of PQAS DGT was not dependent upon pH 3-10 and ionic strength from 1 × 10(-4) to 1 mol L(-1). The effective binding capacity of PQAS DGT containing 2.0 mL of 0.050 mol L(-1) PQAS solution was estimated as 9.9 μg cm(-2). The measurement of DRP in a synthetic solution by PQAS DGT over a 48 h deployment period demonstrated high consistency with the concentration of DRP in the synthetic solution measured directly by the ammonium molybdate spectrophotometric method. Field deployments of PQAS DGT samplers allowed for accurate measurement of the DRP concentration in situ. The advantages of PQAS DGT include no requirement of the elution steps and direct concentration measurements of the binding phase.

  7. PRN 88-2: Clustering of Quaternary Ammonium Compounds

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Notice announces that EPA has clustered the Quaternary Ammonium Compounds into four groups for the purpose of testing chemicals to build a database that will support continued registration of the entire family of quaternary ammonium compounds

  8. Contribution of ammonium ions to the lethality and antimetamorphic effects of ammonium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Goleman, Wanda L; Carr, James A

    2006-04-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) is a widespread military waste product in the United States and is a potent thyroid function disruptor in all vertebrates tested thus far. To determine the relative contribution of ammonium ions to the toxicity of AP, we exposed embryonic and larval Xenopus laevis to various concentrations of sodium perchlorate (SP) or ammonium chloride (AC). Ammonium perchlorate was significantly more lethal than SP; 5-d LC50s were 83 and 2,780 mg/L, respectively. To determine whether ammonium ions contribute to the antithyroid effects of AP, we exposed embryonic and larval X. laevis to two sublethal, environmentally relevant concentrations of AP or identical concentrations of AC or SP. At the smaller concentration, only AP delayed metamorphosis and reduced hindlimb growth. Sodium perchlorate and AP, but not AC, prevented metamorphosis and reduced hindlimb growth at the greater concentration. Although AP was slightly more effective in reducing outward manifestations of thyroid disruption, both perchlorate salts, unlike AC, caused profound histopathologic changes in the thyroid. Exposure to the higher concentration of either perchlorate salt produced a feminizing effect, resulting in a skewed sex ratio. We conclude that ammonium ions contribute significantly to the toxicity of AP but not to the direct antithyroid effects of perchlorate.

  9. Selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) in waters using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weldy, Effie; Wolff, Chloe; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    From 2000 through 2011, there were 14 criminal cases of violations of the Clean Water Act involving the discharge of chromium, a toxic heavy metal, into drinking and surface water sources. As chromium(VI), a potential carcinogen present in the environment, represents a significant safety concern, it is currently the subject of an EPA health risk assessment. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of this species is highly desired. This study reports the analysis of chromium(VI) in water samples by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) following its reduction and complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The reduction and subsequent complexation produce a characteristic [Cr(III)O]-PDC complex which can be detected as a protonated ion of m/z 507 in the positive ion mode. The detection is selective to chromium(VI) under acidic pH, even in the presence of chromium(III) and other metal ions, providing high specificity. Different water samples were examined, including deionized, tap, and river waters, and sensitive detection was achieved. In the case of deionized water, quantification over the concentration range of 3.7 to 148ppb gave an excellent correlation coefficient of 0.9904 using the enhanced MS mode scan. Using the single-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode (monitoring the characteristic fragmentation of m/z 507 to m/z 360), the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.25ppb. The LOD of chromium(VI) for both tap and river water samples was determined to be 2.0ppb. A preconcentration strategy using simple vacuum evaporation of the aqueous sample was shown to further improve the ESI signal by 15 fold. This method, with high sensitivity and selectivity, should provide a timely solution for the real-world analysis of toxic chromium(VI).

  10. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    PubMed

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  11. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): comparison of microbial community structure.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mónica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogério; Santos, Erika; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-04-15

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L(-1) U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L(-1) Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  12. Simulation of the inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a two-compartment upflow bioreactor subjected to molybdate injection.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, E B; de Andrade Lima, L R P

    2016-08-01

    Souring of oil fields during secondary oil recovery by water injection occurs mainly due to the action of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) adhered to the rock surface in the vicinity of injection wells. Upflow packed-bed bioreactors have been used in petroleum microbiology because of its similarity to the oil field near the injection wells or production. However, these reactors do not realistically describe the regions near the injection wells, which are characterized by the presence of a saturated zone and a void region close to the well. In this study, the hydrodynamics of the two-compartment packing-free/packed-bed pilot bioreactor that mimics an oil reservoir was studied. The packed-free compartment was modeled using a continuous stirred tank model with mass exchange between active and stagnant zones, whereas the packed-bed compartment was modeled using a piston-dispersion-exchange model. The proposed model adequately represents the hydrodynamic of the packed-free/packed-bed bioreactor while the simulations provide important information about the characteristics of the residence time distribution (RTD) curves for different sets of model parameters. Simulations were performed to represent the control of the sulfate-reducing bacteria activity in the bioreactor with the use of molybdate in different scenarios. The simulations show that increased amounts of molybdate cause an effective inhibition of the souring sulfate-reducing bacteria activity.

  13. Redetermination of the crystal structure of 3,5-di-methyl-pyrazolium β-octa-molybdate tetra-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Amarante, Tatiana R; Gonçalves, Isabel S; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, (C5H9N2)4[Mo8O26]·4H2O, was reported previously from a room-temperature data collection from which only the metal atoms could be refined anisotropically [FitzRoy et al. (1989 ▸). Inorg. Chim. Acta, 157, 187-194]. The current redetermination at 180 (2) K models all the non-H atoms with anisotropic displacement parameters and fully describes the supra-molecular N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen-bonded network connecting the 3,5-di-methyl-pyrazolium cations, the water mol-ecules of crystallization and the β-octa-molybdate anion. All H atoms involved in the three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network could be located from difference Fourier maps, with the exception of those of one disordered water mol-ecule, firstly seen in this structural report [refined over two distinct locations with site-occupancy factors of 0.65 (2) and 0.35 (2)]. The complete β-octa-molybdate anion is generated by a crystallographic inversion centre.

  14. Electricity production coupled to ammonium in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Kan, Jinjun; Wang, Yanbing; Huang, Yuelong; Mansfeld, Florian; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2009-05-01

    The production of electricity from ammonium was examined using a rotating-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC). The addition of ammonium chloride, ammonium sulfate, or ammonium phosphate (monobasic) resulted in electricity generation, while adding sodium chloride, nitrate, or nitrite did not cause any increase in current production. The peak current increased with increasing amount of ammonium addition up to 62.3 mM of ammonium chloride, suggesting that ammonium was involved in electricity generation either directly as the anodic fuel or indirectly as substrates for nitrifiers to produce organic compounds for heterotrophs. Adding nitrate or nitrite with ammonium increased current production compared to solely ammonium addition. Using 16S rRNA-linked molecular analyses, we found ammonium-oxidizing bacteria and denitrifying bacteria on both the anode and cathode electrodes, whereas no anammox bacteria were detected. The dominant ammonium-oxidizing bacteria were closely related to Nitrosomonas europaea. The present MFC achieved an ammonium removal efficiency of 49.2 +/- 5.9 or 69.7 +/- 3.6%, depending on hydraulic retention time, but exhibited a very low Coulombic efficiency.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1141b - Ammonium phosphate, dibasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium phosphate, dibasic. 184.1141b Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1141b Ammonium phosphate, dibasic. (a) Ammonium phosphate, dibasic ((NH4)2HPO4, CAS Reg. No. 7783-28-0) is manufactured by reacting ammonia with...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1141a - Ammonium phosphate, monobasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium phosphate, monobasic. 184.1141a Section... SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1141a Ammonium phosphate, monobasic. (a) Ammonium phosphate, monobasic (NH4H2PO4, CAS Reg. No. 7722-76-1) is manufactured by reacting ammonia...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1141b - Ammonium phosphate, dibasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate, dibasic. 184.1141b Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1141b Ammonium phosphate, dibasic. (a) Ammonium phosphate, dibasic ((NH4)2HPO4, CAS Reg. No. 7783-28-0) is manufactured by reacting ammonia with...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1141b - Ammonium phosphate, dibasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate, dibasic. 184.1141b Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1141b Ammonium phosphate, dibasic. (a) Ammonium phosphate, dibasic ((NH4)2HPO4, CAS Reg. No. 7783-28-0) is manufactured by reacting ammonia with...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1141b - Ammonium phosphate, dibasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate, dibasic. 184.1141b Section 184.1141b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... as GRAS § 184.1141b Ammonium phosphate, dibasic. (a) Ammonium phosphate, dibasic ((NH4)2HPO4, CAS...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1141a - Ammonium phosphate, monobasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate, monobasic. 184.1141a Section... SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1141a Ammonium phosphate, monobasic. (a) Ammonium phosphate, monobasic (NH4H2PO4, CAS Reg. No. 7722-76-1) is manufactured by reacting ammonia...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1141a - Ammonium phosphate, monobasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate, monobasic. 184.1141a Section 184.1141a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1141a Ammonium phosphate, monobasic. (a) Ammonium phosphate, monobasic...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1141a - Ammonium phosphate, monobasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate, monobasic. 184.1141a Section... SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1141a Ammonium phosphate, monobasic. (a) Ammonium phosphate, monobasic (NH4H2PO4, CAS Reg. No. 7722-76-1) is manufactured by reacting ammonia...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1141b - Ammonium phosphate, dibasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate, dibasic. 184.1141b Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1141b Ammonium phosphate, dibasic. (a) Ammonium phosphate, dibasic ((NH4)2HPO4, CAS Reg. No. 7783-28-0) is manufactured by reacting ammonia with...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1141a - Ammonium phosphate, monobasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate, monobasic. 184.1141a Section... SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1141a Ammonium phosphate, monobasic. (a) Ammonium phosphate, monobasic (NH4H2PO4, CAS Reg. No. 7722-76-1) is manufactured by reacting ammonia...

  5. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food additive, quaternary ammonium chloride combination, may be safely used in food in accordance with...

  6. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food additive, quaternary ammonium chloride combination, may be safely used in food in accordance with...

  7. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food additive, quaternary ammonium chloride combination, may be safely used in food in accordance with...

  8. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food additive, quaternary ammonium chloride combination, may be safely used in food in accordance with...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10302 - Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10302 Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as zinc ammonium phosphate (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10302 - Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10302 Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as zinc ammonium phosphate (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10302 - Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10302 Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as zinc ammonium phosphate (PMN...

  12. 21 CFR 172.430 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 172.430 Section 172.430... ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.430 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in food in accordance with the...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10511 - Quaternary ammonium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium salts (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10511 Quaternary ammonium salts (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium salts (PMNs P-07-320, P-07-321, P-07-322, P-07-323, and P-07-324) are subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10511 - Quaternary ammonium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium salts (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10511 Quaternary ammonium salts (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium salts (PMNs P-07-320, P-07-321, P-07-322, P-07-323, and P-07-324) are subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10430 - Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10430 Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium salt (PMN P-97-823) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10430 - Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10430 Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium salt (PMN P-97-823) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  19. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  20. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  2. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  3. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  4. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  6. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  7. 78 FR 32690 - Certain Ammonium Nitrate From Ukraine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... COMMISSION Certain Ammonium Nitrate From Ukraine Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... antidumping duty order on certain ammonium nitrate from Ukraine would be likely to lead to continuation or... Publication 4396 (May 2013), entitled Certain Ammonium Nitrate from Ukraine: Investigation No....

  8. 40 CFR 721.10582 - Quaternary ammonium compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium compound (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10582 Quaternary ammonium compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium compound (PMN P-10-571) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10591 - Tertiary ammonium compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tertiary ammonium compound (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10591 Tertiary ammonium compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium compound (PMN P-11-110) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10582 - Quaternary ammonium compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium compound (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10582 Quaternary ammonium compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium compound (PMN P-10-571) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10591 - Tertiary ammonium compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tertiary ammonium compound (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10591 Tertiary ammonium compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium compound (PMN P-11-110) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  12. Mechanism of Selective Ammoxidation of Propene to Acrylonitrile on Bismuth Molybdates from Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Pudar, Sanja; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A

    2010-08-25

    In order to understand the mechanism for selective ammoxidation of propene to acrylonitrile by bismuth molybdates, we report quantum mechanical studies (using the B3LYP flavor of density functional theory) for the various steps involved in converting the allyl-activated intermediate to acrylonitrile over molybdenum oxide (using a Mo3O9 cluster model) under conditions adjusted to describe both high and low partial pressures of NH3 in the feed. We find that the rate-determining step in converting of allyl to acrylonitrile at all feed partial pressures is the second hydrogen abstraction from the nitrogen-bound allyl intermediate (Mo-NH-CH2-CH=CH2) to form Mo-NH=CH-CH=CH2). We find that imido groups (Mo=NH) have two roles: (1) a direct effect on H abstraction barriers, H abstraction by an imido moiety is (~8 kcal/mol) more favorable than abstraction by an oxo moiety (Mo=O), and (2) an indirect effect, the presence of spectator imido groups decreases the H abstraction barriers by an additional ~15 kcal/mol. Therefore, at higher NH3 pressures (which increases the number of Mo=NH groups), the second H abstraction barrier decreases significantly, in agreement with experimental observations that propene conversion is higher at higher partial pressures of NH3. At high NH3 pressures we find that the final hydrogen abstraction has a high barrier [ΔHfourth-ab = 31.6 kcal/mol compared to ΔHsecond-ab = 16.4 kcal/mol] due to formation of low Mo oxidation states in the final state. However, we find that reoxidizing the surface prior to the last hydrogen abstraction leads to a significant reduction of this barrier to ΔHfourth-ab = 15.9 kcal/mol, so that this step is no longer rate determining. Therefore, we conclude that reoxidation during the reaction is necessary for facile conversion of allyl to

  13. Comparative Analysis of Urinary Total Proteins by Bicinchoninic Acid and Pyrogallol Red Molybdate Methods

    PubMed Central

    Bhongir, Aparna Varma; Karra, Madhulatha; Beedu, Sashidhar Rao

    2015-01-01

    Background The concentration of total proteins in urine is a good index of renal function, but its determination is found to be unreliable. The pyrogallol red molybdate (PRM) method for urine total proteins is being widely used in most of the hospitals because of its high sensitivity, better precision and its practicability. Bicinchoninic acid method (BCA) is also used for protein estimation and there have been no studies comparing this method with the PRM method in human urine samples. BCA method overestimates the urinary protein concentration in the presence of interfering substances. After removing the interfering substances present in the human urine samples the results of BCA method were compared with the PRM method. Aim The purpose of the study is to identify whether the results of urine total proteins by BCA method are comparable to PRM method and can be used as an alternative to the PRM method. Setting and Design This is a cross-sectional study done on fresh urine specimens from the hospital laboratory, covering a wide range of protein concentrations. Material and Methods Fresh urine specimens covering a wide range of protein concentrations (urine dipstick: nil, trace, 1+, 2+ and ≥ 3+) of 36 patients were analysed by both the methods. Statistical Analysis Imprecision was determined by repeated analysis study and Inaccuracy was assessed by comparing the results of the patient’s urine samples by both the methods using correlation plots, Bland and Altman, and Passing and Bablok regression analyses. Results The coefficient of variation and mean (SD) for the BCA method were 4.6% and 799.1 (882.5) mg/L and for the PRM method were 5.1% and 802.1 (911.9) mg/L. The Pearson correlation coefficient, r was 0.93 (p < 0.0001). Method agreement studies showed no significant constant and proportional bias between both the methods. Conclusion In urine which is subjected to removal of interfering substances, the BCA results are comparable to PRM method. PMID:26435938

  14. Oxyanion selectivity in sulfate and molybdate transport proteins: an ab initio/CDM study.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Lim, Carmay

    2004-08-25

    A striking feature of sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) and molybdate (MoO(4)(2-)) transport proteins, such as SBP and ModA, which specifically bind SO(4)(2-) and MoO(4)(2-), respectively, is their ability to discriminate very similar anions with the same net charge, geometry, and hydrogen-bonding properties. Here, we determine to what extent (1) oxyanion-solvent interactions, (2) oxyanion-amino acid interactions, and (3) the anion-binding pocket sizes of the cognate protein contribute to the anion selectivity process in SO(4)(2-) and MoO(4)(2-) transport proteins by computing the free energies for replacing SO(4)(2-) with MoO(4)(2)(-)/WO(4)(2-) in model SO(4)(2-)-binding sites of varying degrees of solvent exposure using a combined quantum mechanical/continuum dielectric approach. The calculations reveal that MoO(4)(2-) transport proteins, such as ModA, specifically bind MoO(4)(2-)/WO(4)(2-) but not SO(4)(2-), mainly because the desolvation penalty of MoO(4)(2-)/WO(4)(2-) is significantly less than that of SO(4)(2-) and, to a lesser extent, because the large and rigid cavity in these proteins attenuates ligand interactions with SO(4)(2-), as compared to MoO(4)(2-). On the other hand, SO(4)(2-) transport proteins prefer SO(4)(2-) to MoO(4)(2-)/WO(4)(2-) because the small anion-binding pocket characteristic of these proteins inhibits binding of the larger MoO(4)(2-) and WO(4)(2-) anions. The calculations also help to explain the absence of positively charged Lys/Arg side chains in the anion-binding sites of SBP and ModA. During evolution, these transport proteins may have excluded cationic ligands from their binding sites because, on one hand, Lys/Arg do not contribute to the selectivity of the binding pocket and, on the other, they substantially stabilize the complex between the oxyanion and protein ligands, which in turn would prohibit the rapid release of the bound oxyanion at a certain stage during the transport process.

  15. Extended Analysis of Mo VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlén, B.; Rahimullah, K.; Tauheed, A.; Chaghtai, M. S. Z.

    1985-09-01

    The analysis of the RbI-like spectrum Mo VI has been extended to include a total of some 110 classified lines and 44 energy levels belonging to the one-electron configurations 4s24p6(1S) nl with n ranging up to 9 and l up to 7. The analysis is based on recordings of vacuum spark spectra made at Lund in the region 230-2350 Å, complemented by a list of lines from 2193 to 6336 Å observed and identified by Romanov and Striganov in a Penning type arc discharge. The one-electron level system is partly mixed with core-excited configurations, not treated in the present paper. Especially the nf series is strongly perturbed by 4s24p54d2, and an anomalous behaviour of the ng series is explained by interaction with the 2G term of 4s4p64d2. The ionization limit, derived from 6h, 7i and 8k by means of the polarization formula, is found to be 555 132 ± 2 cm-1.

  16. II-VI widegap superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, T.; Yamada, Y.; Endoh, Y.; Nozue, Y.; Mullins, J. T.; Ohno, T.; Masumoto, Y.; Takeda, S.

    We review our recent results of the excitonic properties in ZnSeZnS and Cd xZn 1-xSZnS strained-layer superlattices (SLSs). The most important physical insights in the II-VI widegap superlattices are to understand the relationship between the optical properties of quasi-two-dimensional exciton and strain because the well layer frequently receives biaxial compression or tension. The strain thus causes the significant shifts of the bandgap and splitting of the valence band. Semi-quantative calculations lead to an expectation that ZnSeZnS SLS always exhibits a type I band lineup within 100 Å thicknesses of the ZnSe well at a constant ZnS barrier width of several tens angstrom. This is in good agreement with the experimental results of exciton absorption and its luminescence excitation spectra. The Cd 0.3Zn 0.7SZnS SLSs with a range of well widths can produce intense excitonic emissions around 3.4 eV at room temperature due to the quantum confinement of excitons in the ternary CdZnS well. In order to elucidate localisation and relaxation processes of excitons, we have for the first time reported a multiple-LO-phonon emission process in the excitation spectra. The electric-field studies suggest that the concomitant decrease in intensity and the energy downshift of the exciton line may originate from the quantum confined Stark effect.

  17. Decomposition of free chlorine with tertiary ammonium.

    PubMed

    Katano, Hajime; Uematsu, Kohei; Tatsumi, Hirosuke; Tsukatani, Toshihide

    2010-01-01

    The reaction of free chlorine with tertiary ammonium or amine compounds in aqueous solution was studied by the amperometry at a rotating Pt-disk electrode. The amperometric method can be applied to follow the concentration of free chlorine (c(Cl)) even in the presence of chloramine species. By addition of mono- and dibutylammonium to the solution containing free chlorine, the step-like decrease in c(Cl) was observed, indicating the rapid formation of the stable chloramine species. By addition of tributylammonium, the c(Cl) was decreased exponentially to nearly zero even if the free chlorine was present initially in excess. The c(Cl)-t curves can be explained by tributylammonium-species-catalyzed decomposition of free chlorine to chloride ion. The catalytic decomposition was observed also with the tertiary-ammonium-based anion-exchange resins. Furthermore, the anion-exchange resins exhibited the decomposition of not only free chlorine but also chloramines in water.

  18. Detonation Properties of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wätterstam, A.; Östmark, H.; Helte, A.; Karlsson, S.

    1999-06-01

    Ammonium Dinitramide, ADN, has a potential as an oxidizer for underwater high explosives. Pure ADN has a large reaction-zone length and shows a strong non-ideal behaviour. The work presented here is an extension of previous work.(Sensitivity and Performance Characterization of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN). Presented at 11th International Detonation Symposium, Snowmass, CO, 1998.) Experiments for determining the detonation velocity as a function of inverse charge radius and density, reaction-zone length and curvature, and the detonation pressure are presented. Measurements of pressure indicates that no, or weak von-Neumann spike exists, suggesting an immediate chemical decomposition. Experimental data are compared with predicted using thermochemical codes and ZND-theory.

  19. Ammonium chloride poisoning in chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Levene, Donald L.; Knight, Allan

    1974-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a long history of renal stone disease and urinary tract infection presented to the emergency room with exhaustion and air hunger. Laboratory data confirmed profound metabolic acidosis. Unduly large quantities of bicarbonate and potassium were required for correction of the deficits. She had been taking 6 g daily of ammonium chloride as a urine-acidifying agent for a period of six months in addition to agents directed against urinary tract infection. The combination of impaired renal function and effective hydrogen ion loading resulted in profound systemic acidosis. The metabolic derangements associated with the administration of ammonium chloride and its use as a therapeutic agent are discussed. PMID:4850503

  20. Corrosion and repairs of ammonium carbamate decomposers

    SciTech Connect

    De Romero, M.F.; Galban, J.P.

    1996-05-01

    Corrosion-erosion problems occurred in the carbon steel base metal of the ammonium carbamate decomposers in an urea extraction process lined with type 316L (UNS S31603) urea grade stainless steel. The cladding was replaced by weld overlay using a semiautomatic gas metal arc welding process. The first layer was alloy 25%Cr-15%Ni-2%Mo (UNS W30923); the second layer was alloy 25%Cr-22%Ni-2%Mo (UNS W31020).

  1. PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF AMMONIUM URANIUM FLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, A.S.; Mooney, R.B.

    1953-08-25

    This patent relates to the preparation of ammonium uranium fluoride. The process comprises adding a water soluble fluoride to an aqueous solution of a uranous compound containing an ammonium salt, and isolating the resulting precipitate. This patent relates to the manufacture of uranium tetnafluoride from ammonium uranium fluoride, NH/sub 4/UF/sub 5/. Uranium tetrafluoride is prepared by heating the ammonium uranium fluoride to a temperature at which dissociation occurs with liberation of ammonium fluoride. Preferably the process is carried out under reduced pressure, or in a current of an inert gas.

  2. Oxidation of ammonium sulfite in aqueous solutions using ozone technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    How to deal with unstable ammonium sulfite, the byproduct of flue gas desulfuration by ammonia absorption methods, has been a difficult problem in recent years. Oxidation of ammonium sulfite in aqueous solutions using ozone produced by a surface discharge system was investigated in the paper. The oxidation efficiency of ammonium sulfite by ozone and traditional air aeration were compared, and the factors including ozone concentration, gas flow rate, initial concentration of ammonium sulfite solution and reaction temperature were discussed. The results show that the oxidation efficiency of ammonium sulfite by ozone technology reached nearly 100% under the optimum conditions, which had a significant increase compared with that by air aeration.

  3. Rheology of water ices V and VI

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the mechanical strength (??) of pure water ices V and VI under steady state deformation conditions. Constant displacement rate compressional tests were conducted in a gas apparatus at confining pressures from 400 250 K. Ices V and VI are thus Theologically distinct but by coincidence have approximately the same strength under the conditions chosen for these experiments. To avoid misidentification, these tests are therefore accompanied by careful observations of the occurrences and characteristics of phase changes. One sample each of ice V and VI was quenched at pressure to metastably retain the high-pressure phase and the acquired deformation microstructures; X ray diffraction analysis of these samples confirmed the phase identification. Surface replicas of the deformed and quenched samples suggest that ice V probably deforms largely by dislocation creep, while ice VI deforms by a more complicated process involving substantial grain size reduction through recrystallization.

  4. XAS investigations of Fe(VI).

    SciTech Connect

    Kemner, K. M.; Kelly, S. D.; Orlandini, K. A.; Tsapin, A. I.; Goldfeld, M. G.; Perfiliev, Y. D.; Nealson, K. H.; Environmental Research; APS-USR; Jet Propulsion Lab.; Moscow State Univ.

    2001-03-01

    Recent attention has been given to a reexamination of results from the early Viking missions to Mars that suggested the presence of one or more strong oxidants in Martian soil. Since Fe is one of the main constituents of the Martian surface and Fe(VI) is known to be a highly reactive, strong oxidant, we have made XANES and EXAFS measurements of Fe(II), Fe(III), Fe(IV), and Fe(VI) in solid and solution forms. Results from these studies indicate a pre-edge XANES feature from Fe(VI) samples similar to that commonly seen from Cr(VI) samples. Results of first shell analysis indicate a linear relationship between the Fe-O bond length and Fe valence state.

  5. Equation of State of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, David L.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Stahl, David B.

    2009-12-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is a widely used fertilizer and mining explosive. AN is commonly used in ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO), which is a mixture of explosive-grade AN prills and fuel oil in a 94:6 ratio by weight. ANFO is a non-ideal explosive with measured detonation velocities around 4 km/s. The equation of state properties and known initiation behavior of neat AN are limited. We present the results of a series of gas gun-driven plate impact experiments on pressed neat ammonium nitrate at 1.72 g/cm3. No evidence of initiation was observed under shock loading to 22 GPa. High pressure x-ray diffraction experiments in diamond anvil cells provided insight into the high pressure phase behavior over the same pressure range (to 25 GPa), as well as a static isotherm at ambient temperature. From the isotherm and thermodynamic properties at ambient conditions, a preliminary unreacted equation of state (EOS) has been developed based on the Murnaghan isotherm and Helmholtz formalism [1], which compares favorably with the available experimental Hugoniot data on several densities of AN.

  6. Phase diagram of ammonium perchlorate: Raman spectroscopic constrains at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-06-01

    We present the pressure-temperature (PT) induced physical and chemical transformations in ammonium perchlorates (APs) up to 50 GPa and 450 °C, using diamond anvil cells and confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy, which provide new constraints for the phase diagram of AP. The results show spectral evidences for three new polymorphs (III, IV, and VI) of AP, in addition to two previously known phases (I and II), at various PT conditions with varying degrees of hydrogen bonding and lack of strong spectral evidence for previously known high-temperature cubic phase (phase V). Upon further heating, AP chemically decomposes to N2, N2O, and H2O. The present phase diagram is, therefore, in sharp contrast to the previous one, underscoring a rich polymorphism, a large stability field for solids, and a replacement of the melt with a decomposition line.

  7. ORNL fission product release tests VI-6

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Lee, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The ORNL fission product release tests investigate release and transport of the major fission products from high-burnup fuel under LWR accident conditions. The two most recent tests (VI-4 and VI-5) were conducted in hydrogen. In three previous tests in this series (VI-1, VI-2, and VI-3), which had been conducted in steam, the oxidized Zircaloy cladding remained largely intact and acted as a barrier to steam reaction with the UO{sub 2}. Test VI-6 was designed to insure significant oxidation of the UO{sub 2} fuel, which has been shown to enhance release of certain fission products, especially molybdenum and ruthenium. The BR3 fuel specimen used in test VI-6 will be heated in hydrogen to 2300 K; the Zircaloy cladding is expected to melt and runoff at {approximately}2150 K. Upon reaching the 2300 K test temperature, the test atmosphere will be changed to steam, and that temperature will be maintained for 60 min, with the three collection trains being operated for 2-, 18-, and 40-min periods. The releases of {sup 85}Kr and {sup 137}Cs will be monitored continuously throughout the test. Posttest analyses of the material collected on the three trains will provide results on the release and transport of Mo, Ru, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, and Eu as a function of time at 2300 K. Continuous monitoring of the hydrogen produced during the steam atmosphere period at high temperature will provide a measure of the oxidation rate of the cladding and fuel. Following delays in approval of the safety documentation and in decontamination of the hot cell and test apparatus, test VI-6 will be conducted in late May.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  13. Sorption studies on Cr (VI) removal from aqueous solution using cellulose grafted with acrylonitrile monomer.

    PubMed

    Hajeeth, T; Sudha, P N; Vijayalakshmi, K; Gomathi, T

    2014-05-01

    Graft copolymerization of acrylonitrile on to cellulosic material derived from sisal fiber can be initiated effectively with ceric ammonium nitrate. The grafting conditions were optimized by changing the concentration of initiator and monomer. The change in crystallinity of the grafted polymeric samples was concluded from the XRD patterns. The prepared cellulose grafted acrylonitrile copolymer was used as an adsorbent to remove Cr (VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The efficiency of the adsorbent was identified from the variation in the percentage of adsorption with contact time, adsorbent dose and pH. From the observed results it was evident that the adsorption of metal ions increases with the increase in contact time and metal ion concentration. An optimum pH was found to be 5.0 for the removal of Cr (VI) from the aqueous solution. The results of the Langmuir, Freundlich, and pseudo first- and second-order studies revealed that the adsorption was found to fit well with Freundlich isotherm and follows pseudo second-order kinetics. From the above results, it was concluded that the cellulose-g-acrylonitrile copolymer was found to be an efficient adsorbent for the removal of Cr (VI) from aqueous waste generated from industries.

  14. Ammonium Ion Currents in the Squid Giant Axon

    PubMed Central

    Binstock, Leonard; Lecar, Harold

    1969-01-01

    Voltage-clamp studies on intact and internally perfused squid giant axons demonstrate that ammonium can substitute partially for either sodium or potassium. Ammonium carries the early transient current with 0.3 times the permeability of sodium and it carries the delayed current with 0.3 times the potassium permeability. The conductance changes observed in voltage clamp show approximately the same time course in ammonium solutions as in the normal physiological solutions. These ammonium ion permeabilities account for the known effects of ammonium on nerve excitability. Experiments with the drugs tetrodotoxin (TTX) and tetraethyl ammonium chloride (TEA) demonstrate that these molecules block the early and late components of the current selectively, even when both components are carried by the same ion, ammonium. PMID:5767336

  15. Structure of the human annexin VI gene

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.D.; Moss, S.E.; Davies, A.; Crumpton, M.J.

    1994-03-29

    The authors report the structure of the human annexin VI gene and compare the intron-exon organization with the known structures of the human annexin I and II genes. The gene is {approximately}60 kbp long and contains 26 exons. Consistent with the published annexin VI cDNA sequence, the genomic sequence at the 3{prime} end does not contain a canonical polyadenylation signal. The genomic sequence upstream of the transcription start site contains TATAA and CAAT motifs. The spatial organization of the exons does not reveal any obvious similarities between the two halves of the annexin VI gene. Comparison of the intron-exon boundary positions of the annexin VI gene with those of annexins I and II reveals that within the repeated domains the break points are perfectly conserved except for exon 8, which is one codon smaller in annexin II. The corresponding point in the second half of annexin VI is represented by two exons, exons 20 and 21. The latter exon is alternatively spliced, giving rise to two annexin VI isoforms that differ with respect to a 6-amino acid insertion at the start of repeat 7. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of aqueous cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.K.; Rivera, W.; Smith, J.O.; O`Brien, B.

    1998-09-01

    The rates of oxidation of cyanide with Fe(VI) were measured as a function of pH and temperature. The reaction was found to be first order for each reactant. The rates decrease with increasing pH. The energy of activation was found to be 38.9 {+-} 1.0 kJ mol{sup {minus}1} at pH 9.0. The removal of cyanide by oxidation with Fe(VI) was studied at pH 7.5, 9.0, and 12.0. Fe(VI) removal efficiency was greater at pH 9.0 than at pH 7.5 and 12.0. At pH 9.0, Fe(VI) molar consumption was nearly equal to that of oxidized cyanide. Cyanate and nitrite ions were identified as the products of the reaction at pH 7.5. The experiments indicated 1:1 stoichiometric conversion of cyanide to nitrite ion at pH 9.0 and 12.0. Experiments were conducted to test the Fe(VI) removal efficiency of cyanide in electroplating rinsewater. The results indicate that Fe(VI) has the potential to serve as a reliable and safe oxidative treatment for removing cyanide in wastewater effluent.

  17. Characterization of Amoeba proteus myosin VI immunoanalog.

    PubMed

    Dominik, Magdalena; Kłopocka, Wanda; Pomorski, Paweł; Kocik, Elzbieta; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2005-07-01

    Amoeba proteus, the highly motile free-living unicellular organism, has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion and intracellular actin-based-only trafficking remain poorly understood. A search for myosin motors responsible for vesicular transport in these giant cells resulted in detection of 130-kDa protein interacting with several polyclonal antibodies against different tail regions of human and chicken myosin VI. This protein was binding to actin in the ATP-dependent manner, and immunoprecipitated with anti-myosin VI antibodies. In order to characterize its possible functions in vivo, its cellular distribution and colocalization with actin filaments and dynamin II during migration and pinocytosis were examined. In migrating amoebae, myosin VI immunoanalog localized to vesicular structures, particularly within the perinuclear and sub-plasma membrane areas, and colocalized with dynamin II immunoanalog and actin filaments. The colocalization was even more evident in pinocytotic cells as proteins concentrated within pinocytotic pseudopodia. Moreover, dynamin II and myosin VI immunoanalogs cosedimented with actin filaments, and were found on the same isolated vesicles. Blocking endogenous myosin VI immunoanalog with anti-myosin VI antibodies inhibited the rate of pseudopodia protrusion (about 19% decrease) and uroidal retraction (about 28% decrease) but did not affect cell morphology and the manner of cell migration. Treatment with anti-human dynamin II antibodies led to changes in directionality of amebae migration and affected the rate of only uroidal translocation (about 30% inhibition). These results indicate that myosin VI immunoanalog is expressed in protist Amoeba proteus and may be involved in vesicle translocation and cell locomotion.

  18. Molecular orientation of molybdate ions adsorbed on goethite nanoparticles revealed by polarized in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davantès, Athénaïs; Lefèvre, Grégory

    2016-11-01

    The speciation of species adsorbed on nanoparticles is a major concern for several fields, as environmental pollution and remediation, surface functionalization, or catalysis. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) was amongst the rare methods able to give in situ information about the geometry of surface complexes on nanoparticles. A new possibility using this technique is illustrated here with the MoO42 -/goethite system. Using deuterated goethite to avoid spectral interferences, adsorption of molybdate ions on a spontaneous oriented film of nanoparticles has been followed using a polarized infrared beam. From the decomposition of spectra in the x, y and z directions, a monodentate surface complex on the {101} faces has been found as the most probable geometry. This result demonstrates that polarized ATR-IR allows to characterize in more details adsorption mode at the atomic scale, in comparison with usual ATR-IR spectroscopy.

  19. Influence of drying conditions of zirconium molybdate gel on performance of (99m)Tc gel generator.

    PubMed

    Davarpanah, M R; Attar Nosrati, S; Fazlali, M; Kazemi Boudani, M; Khoshhosn, H; Ghannadi Maragheh, M

    2009-10-01

    (99m)Tc can be produced from (99)Mo/(99m)Tc gel generators. These gels are part of the generator and the (99)Mo/(99m)Tc gel generator performance is directly related with gel structure. In this work a series of zirconium molybdate gels have been synthesized and dried under different conditions and characterized using thermal analysis (TGA, DTA), SEM, XRD and porosity measurements. It is found that the water content of the gel determines the structure porosity which allows the diffusion of the (99m)TcO(4)(-) ions inside the gel and was directly connected with performance of the (99)Mo/(99m)Tc gel generators. Drying conditions of the gel is as an important factor that influence water content and physical-chemical properties of this gel and must be carefully studied to optimize the properties of the gel generators.

  20. Luminescence properties of alkali europium double tungstates and molybdates AEuM/sub 2/O/sub 8/

    SciTech Connect

    van Vliet, J.P.M.; Blasse, G.; Brixner, L.H.

    1988-09-01

    The luminescence properties of AEuW/sub 2/O/sub 8/ and AEuMo/sub 2/O/sub 8/ (A/sup +/ = alkali metal ion) are reported. These properties depend on the crystal structure type. Vibronic coupling between the electronic transitions of the Eu/sup 3 +/ ion and the vibrational transitions of the tungstate of molybdate group is observed. The concentration quenching of the Eu/sup 3 +/ luminescence is weak. The analysis of the Eu/sup 3 +/ decay curves points to energy migration and shows the two-dimensionality of the Eu/sup 3 +/ sublattice in KEuMo/sub 2/O/sub 8/ and the one-dimensionality of the Eu/sup 3 +/ sublattice in KEuW/sub 2/O/sub 8/ and RbEuW/sub 2/O/sub 8/.

  1. Flow-through Column Experiments and Modeling of Microbially Mediated Cr(VI) Reduction at Hanford 100H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Molins, S.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Steefel, C.; Nico, P. S.; Han, R.

    2010-12-01

    Microbially mediated Cr(VI) reduction at the Hanford 100H area was investigated by flow-through column experiments. Three separate experiments were conducted to promote microbial activities associated with denitrification, iron and sulfate reduction, respectively. Replicate columns packed with natural sediments from the site under anaerobic environment were injected with 5mM Lactate as the electron donor and 5 μM Cr(VI) in all experiments. Sulfate and nitrate solutions were added to act as the main electron acceptors in the respective experiments, while iron columns relied on the indigenous sediment iron (and manganese) oxides as electron acceptors. Column effluent solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS to monitor the microbial consumption/conversion of lactate and the associated Cr(VI) reduction. Biogeochemical reactive transport modeling was performed to gain further insights into the reaction mechanisms and Cr(VI) bioreduction rates. All experimental columns showed a reduction of the injected Cr(VI). Columns under denitrifying conditions showed the least Cr(VI) reduction at early stages (<60 days) compared to columns run under other experimental conditions, but became more active over time, and ultimately showed the most consistent Cr(VI) reduction. A strong correlation between denitrification and Cr(VI) reduction processes was observed and was in agreement with the results obtained in batch experiments with a denitrifying bacterium isolated from the Hanford site. The accumulation of nitrite does not appear to have an adverse effect on Cr(VI) reduction rates. Reactive transport simulations indicated that biomass growth completely depleted influent ammonium, and called for an additional source of N to account for the measured reduction rates. Iron columns were the least active with undetectable consumption of the injected lactate, slowest cell growth, and the smallest change in Cr(VI) concentrations during the course of the experiment. In contrast, columns

  2. Effect of chlorate, molybdate, and shikimic acid on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in aerobic and anaerobic cultures.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Christy E; Beier, Ross C; Hume, Michael E; Horrocks, Shane M; Casey, Thomas A; Caton, Joel S; Nisbet, David J; Smith, David J; Krueger, Nathan A; Anderson, Robin C

    2010-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine factors that affect sensitivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to sodium chlorate (5mM). In our first experiment, cultures grown without chlorate grew more rapidly than those with chlorate. An extended lag before logarithmic growth was observed in anaerobic but not aerobic cultures containing chlorate. Chlorate inhibition of growth during aerobic culture began later than that observed in anaerobic cultures but persisted once inhibition was apparent. Conversely, anaerobic cultures appeared to adapt to chlorate after approximately 10h of incubation, exhibiting rapid compensatory growth. In anaerobic chlorate-containing cultures, 20% of total viable counts were resistant to chlorate by 6h and had propagated to 100% resistance (>10(9)CFU mL(-1)) by 24h. In the aerobic chlorate-containing cultures, 12.9% of colonies had detectable resistance to chlorate by 6h, but only 1% retained detectable resistance at 24h, likely because these cultures had opportunity to respire on oxygen and were thus not enriched via the selective pressure of chlorate. In another study, treatment with shikimic acid (0.34 mM), molybdate (1mM) or their combination had little effect on aerobic or anaerobic growth of Salmonella in the absence of added chlorate. As observed in our earlier study, chlorate resistance was not detected in any cultures without added chlorate. Chlorate resistant Salmonella were recovered at equivalent numbers regardless of treatment after 8h of aerobic or anaerobic culture with added chlorate; however, by 24h incubation chlorate sensitivity was completely restored to aerobic but not anaerobic cultures treated with shikimic acid or molybdate but not their combination. Results indicate that anaerobic adaptation of S. Typhimurium to sodium chlorate during pure culture is likely due to the selective propagation of low numbers of cells exhibiting spontaneous resistance to chlorate and this resistance is not reversible by

  3. Protective mechanism of sodium molybdate against the acute toxicity of cadmium in rats. II. Prevention of cytoplasmic acidification.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, T; Yokota, T; Fukuchi, M; Tatsumoto, H; Yamane, Y

    1991-10-01

    In order to clarify the protective mechanism of sodium molybdate against the acute toxicity of cadmium chloride in rat, the effect of in vivo sodium molybdate pretreatment on the cytotoxic action of cadmium in isolated hepatocytes was studied. The cytosolic pH of hepatocytes isolated from untreated rats immediately decreased with incubation in either neutral Hank's balanced salt solution (HBS), pH 7.4, containing 5 microM cadmium chloride minimum or acidic HBS (pH 7.1, 6.8, 6.5, and 6.2). The presence of 5 microM cadmium in HBS adjusted to pH 7.1 aggravated cytosolic acidification induced by the acidic medium alone. Cell viability of hepatocytes incubated in HBS at pH 6.2 was significantly reduced as compared to that of control cells in HBS at pH 7.4, but the presence of cadmium in the acidic HBS had no aggravating action against such a toxic action of the acidic medium although cellular uptake of the metal in the medium increased, as compared to that in HBS at pH 7.4. Molybdenum pretreatment alleviated cytoplasmic acidification induced by the treatment with HBS at pH 7.4 or 7.1 containing cadmium or by extracellular acid load without cadmium. This pretreatment also prevented the loss of cell viability induced by the treatment with HBS at pH 6.2 but could not attenuate that when cadmium was present in the medium. These facts suggest that molybdenum pretreatment alleviated the acute toxicity of cadmium in rat by preventing cytoplasmic acidification caused by the harmful metal.

  4. Synergetic effect of potassium molybdate and benzotriazole on the CMP of ruthenium and copper in KIO4-based slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jie; Wang, Tongqing; Mei, Hegeng; Zhou, Wenbin; Lu, Xinchun

    2014-11-01

    Although there are substantial studies on chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) processes of ruthenium (Ru) as a barrier layer in periodate-based slurries, little is known about the passivation mechanism of inhibitors and the galvanic corrosion mechanism of Cu. In this study, the synergetic effect of benzotriazole (BTA) and potassium molybdate (K2MoO4) on the polishing performance of Ru and Cu in KIO4-based slurry was investigated. The galvanic corrosion of Cu in a Cu-Ru coupled system was studied from a completely different perspective. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with other measurements was used to reveal the synergetic passivation mechanism of BTA and K2MoO4. The results show that the galvanic corrosion of Cu is strongly mitigated in the presence of both BTA and K2MoO4. Based on the data, it was regarded that the adsorbed MoO42- not only modified the surface structure of Ru and Cu, but also supported the adsorption of BTA passivation film. Also, it was found that insoluble salts were deposited into the gaps of the passivation film, which improved the compactness of the molybdate-BTA film. The CMP tests showed that the selectivity of the material removal rate of Cu to Ru can be evidently improved in the presence of BTA and K2MoO4. The increase of oxidizer content and the reduction of polishing down force could help to further decrease the MRR selectivity between Cu and Ru.

  5. Polymeric Quaternary Ammonium Compounds: Versatile Antimicrobial Materials.

    PubMed

    Zubris, Deanna L; Minbiole, Kevin P C; Wuest, William M

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (polyQACs) comprise a broad class of materials with applications in medical implants, food processing, and surface sanitizing, amongst many others. These polymeric substances are especially promising due to their potent antibacterial activity and limited hemolytic toxicity. In particular, many polyQACs have superior therapeutic indices and a lower likelihood of developing antibacterial resistance in comparison to their monomers, making them ideal materials for wound dressings, catheters, and other biomedical applications. This review outlines the history and development, previous successes, current state of the research, and future directions of polyQACs in society.

  6. Mild ammonium stress increases chlorophyll content in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Zabala, Joseba; González-Murua, Carmen; Marino, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) and ammonium (NH4(+)) are the main forms of nitrogen available in the soil for plants. Excessive NH4(+) accumulation in tissues is toxic for plants and exclusive NH4(+)-based nutrition enhances this effect. Ammonium toxicity syndrome commonly includes growth impairment, ion imbalance and chlorosis among others. In this work, we observed high intraspecific variability in chlorophyll content in 47 Arabidopsis thaliana natural accessions grown under 1 mM NH4(+) or 1 mM NO3(-) as N-source. Interestingly, chlorophyll content increased in every accession upon ammonium nutrition. Moreover, this increase was independent of ammonium tolerance capacity. Thus, chlorosis seems to be an exclusive effect of severe ammonium toxicity while mild ammonium stress induces chlorophyll accumulation.

  7. Cr(VI) adsorption from electroplating plating wastewater by chemically modified coir pith.

    PubMed

    Suksabye, Parinda; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2012-07-15

    Coir pith samples were chemically modified by grafting with acrylic acid for the removal of Cr(VI) from electroplating wastewater. The presence of acrylic acid on the coir pith surface was verified by a scanning electron microscope with an electron dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TG). The carbonyl groups (C==O) from the carboxylic acids (COOH) increased on the coir pith surface after grafting with acrylic acid. In addition, the thermal stability of the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith also improved. The optimum conditions for grafting the acrylic acid on the coir pith consisted of 2 M acrylic acid and 0.00125 M ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN, as an initiator). The maximum Cr(VI) removal (99.99 ± 0.07%) was obtained with the following conditions: a 1.3% (w/v) dosage of acrylic acid-grafted coir pith, a system pH of 2, a contact time of 22 h, a temperature of 30 °C, a particle size of <150 μm and an initial Cr(VI) of 1,171 mg l(-1). At system pH of 2, Cr(VI) in the HCrO(4)(-) form can be adsorbed with acrylic acid-grafted coir pith via an electrostatic attraction. The adsorption isotherm of 2 M acrylic acid-grafted coir pith exhibited a good fit with the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of the 2 M acrylic acid-grafted coir pith was 196.00 mg Cr(VI) g(-1) adsorbent, whereas for coir pith without grafting, the maximum Cr(VI) removal was 165.00 mg Cr(VI) g(-1) adsorbent. The adsorption capacity of the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith for Cr(VI) was higher compared to the original coir pith. This result was due to the enhancement of the carbonyl groups on the coir pith surface that may have involved the mechanism of chromium adsorption. The X-ray absorption near edged structure (XANES) and desorption studies suggested that most of the Cr(III) that presented on the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith was due to the Cr(VI) being reduced to Cr(III) on the adsorbent surface. FTIR

  8. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, H; Gopi, M; Arumugam, A

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate.

  9. Singular Instantons and Painlevé VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñiz Manasliski, Richard

    2016-06-01

    We consider a two parameter family of instantons, which is studied in [Sadun L., Comm. Math. Phys. 163 (1994), 257-291], invariant under the irreducible action of SU_2 on S^4, but which are not globally defined. We will see that these instantons produce solutions to a one parameter family of Painlevé VI equations (P_VI}) and we will give an explicit expression of the map between instantons and solutions to P_{VI}. The solutions are algebraic only for that values of the parameters which correspond to the instantons that can be extended to all of S^4. This work is a generalization of [Muñiz Manasliski R., Contemp. Math., Vol. 434, Amer. Math. Soc., Providence, RI, 2007, 215-222] and [Muñiz Manasliski R., J. Geom. Phys. 59 (2009), 1036-1047, arXiv:1602.07221], where instantons without singularities are studied.

  10. Reassimilation of ammonium in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Betti, Marco; García-Calderón, Margarita; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; Credali, Alfredo; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Estivill, Guillermo; Repčák, Miroslav; Vega, José M; Galván, Francisco; Márquez, Antonio J

    2014-10-01

    This review summarizes the most recent results obtained in the analysis of two important metabolic pathways involved in the release of internal sources of ammonium in the model legume Lotus japonicus: photorespiratory metabolism and asparagine breakdown mediated by aparaginase (NSE). The use of photorespiratory mutants deficient in plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) enabled us to investigate the transcriptomics and metabolomic changes associated with photorespiratory ammonium accumulation in this plant. The results obtained indicate the existence of a coordinate regulation of genes involved in photorespiratory metabolism. Other types of evidence illustrate the multiple interconnections existing among the photorespiratory pathway and other processes such as intermediate metabolism, nodule function, and secondary metabolism in this plant, all of which are substantially affected in GS2-deficient mutants because of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Finally, the importance of asparagine metabolism in L. japonicus is highlighted because of the fact that asparagine constitutes the vast majority of the reduced nitrogen translocated between different organs of this plant. The different types of NSE enzymes and genes which are present in L. japonicus are described. There is a particular focus on the most abundant K(+)-dependent LjNSE1 isoform and how TILLING mutants were used to demonstrate by reverse genetics the importance of this particular isoform in plant growth and seed production.

  11. Ammonium nitrate: a promising rocket propellant oxidizer

    PubMed

    Oommen; Jain

    1999-06-30

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is extensively used in the area of fertilizers and explosives. It is present as the major component in most industrial explosives. Its use as an oxidizer in the area of propellants, however, is not as extensive as in explosive compositions or gas generators. With the growing demand for environmental friendly chlorine free propellants, many attempts have been made of late to investigate oxidizers producing innocuous combustion products. AN, unlike the widely used ammonium perchlorate, produces completely ecofriendly smokeless products. Besides, it is one of the cheapest and easily available compounds. However, its use in large rocket motors is restricted due to some of its adverse characteristics like hygroscopicity, near room temperature phase transformation involving a volume change, and low burning rate (BR) and energetics. The review is an attempt to consolidate the information available on the various issues pertaining to its use as a solid propellant oxidizer. Detailed discussions on the aspects relating to phase modifications, decomposition chemistry, and BR and energetics of AN-based propellants, are presented. To make the review more comprehensive brief descriptions of the history, manufacture, safety, physical and chemical properties and various other applications of the salt are also included. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. Safety Testing of Ammonium Nitrate Based Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jason; Lappo, Karmen; Phelan, James; Peterson, Nathan; Gilbert, Don

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN)/ammonium nitrate based explosives have a lengthy documented history of use by adversaries in acts of terror. While historical research has been conducted on AN-based explosive mixtures, it has primarily focused on detonation performance while varying the oxygen balance between the oxidizer and fuel components. Similarly, historical safety data on these materials is often lacking in pertinent details such as specific fuel type, particle size parameters, oxidizer form, etc. A variety of AN-based fuel-oxidizer mixtures were tested for small-scale sensitivity in preparation for large-scale testing. Current efforts focus on maintaining a zero oxygen-balance (a stoichiometric ratio for active chemical participants) while varying factors such as charge geometry, oxidizer form, particle size, and inert diluent ratios. Small-scale safety testing was conducted on various mixtures and fuels. It was found that ESD sensitivity is significantly affected by particle size, while this is less so for impact and friction. Thermal testing is in progress to evaluate hazards that may be experienced during large-scale testing.

  13. Evidence for ammonium-bearing minerals in Ceres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, T. V. V.; Clark, R. N.; Calvin, W. M.; Sherman, D. M.; Swayze, G. A.; Brown, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    Evidence for ammonium-bearing minerals was found on the surface of the largest asteroid Ceres. The presence of ammonium-bearing clays suggests that Ceres has experienced a period of alteration by substantial amounts of an ammonium-bearing fluid. The presence of the ammonium-bearing clays does not preclude Ceres maintaining a volatile inventory in the core or in a volatile-rich zone at some distance below the surface. Telescopic observations of Ceres, using the 3.0 meter NASA Infrared telescope facility prompted this reevaluation of its surface mineralogy.

  14. 76 FR 60593 - Title VI; Proposed Circular

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Federal Transit Administration Title VI; Proposed Circular AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA... Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has placed in the docket and on its Web site, proposed guidance in... locations will be ADA- and transit-accessible. For details about the exact location of each...

  15. Data testing of ENDF/B-VI

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    A number of the fast reactor and thermal reactor benchmarks have been analyzed using nuclear data from ENDF/B-VI Release 2. Data were prepared with the NJOY nuclear data processing system in MATXS and ACE formats. Transport calculations were preformed with ONEDANT and TWODANT using transport tables prepared by the TRANSX code and with the MCNP Monte Carlo code.

  16. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... anticipated future exposure to chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of... them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (g) of this... respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (g) of this section to achieve the...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this section... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this section... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  1. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... anticipated future exposure to chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of... them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (g) of this... respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (g) of this section to achieve the...

  2. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... anticipated future exposure to chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of... them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (g) of this... respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (g) of this section to achieve the...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this section... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... anticipated future exposure to chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of... them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (g) of this... respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (g) of this section to achieve the...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... anticipated future exposure to chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of... them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (g) of this... respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (g) of this section to achieve the...

  7. Antifungal activity of gemini quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Obłąk, Ewa; Piecuch, Agata; Krasowska, Anna; Luczyński, Jacek

    2013-12-14

    A series of gemini quaternary ammonium chlorides and bromides with various alkyl chain and spacer lengths was synthesized. The most active compounds against fungi were chlorides with 10 carbon atoms within the hydrophobic chain. Among these compounds were few with no hemolytic activity at minimal inhibitory concentrations. None of the tested compounds were cytotoxic and mutagenic. Cationic gemini surfactants poorly reduced the adhesion of microorganisms to the polystyrene plate, but inhibited the filamentation of Candida albicans. One of the tested compounds eradicated C. albicans and Rodotorula mucilaginosa biofilm, what could be important in overcoming catheter-associated infections. It was also shown that gemini surfactants enhanced the sensitivity of C. albicans to azoles and polyenes, thus they might be potentially used in combined therapy against fungi.

  8. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND RELATED STATUTES-IMPLEMENTATION AND REVIEW PROCEDURES § 200.7 FHWA Title VI policy. It is the policy of the FHWA to ensure compliance with Title VI of the...

  9. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND RELATED STATUTES-IMPLEMENTATION AND REVIEW PROCEDURES § 200.7 FHWA Title VI policy. It is the policy of the FHWA to ensure compliance with Title VI of the...

  10. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salts (PMNs P-93-725 and P-93-726) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  11. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salts (PMNs P-93-725 and P-93-726) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  12. THE MASS ACCOMMODATION COEFFICIENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE AEROSOL. (R823514)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mass transfer rate of pure ammonium nitrate between the aerosol and gas phases was
    quantified experimentally by the use of the tandem differential mobility analyzer/scanning mobility
    particle sizer (TDMA/SMPS) technique. Ammonium nitrate particles 80-220 nm in diameter<...

  13. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity....

  14. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity....

  15. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity....

  16. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity....

  17. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity....

  18. 40 CFR 180.473 - Glufosinate ammonium; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... measuring the sum of glufosinate ammonium, butanoic acid, 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl) monoammonium...-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)propanoic acid, expressed as 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)butanoic acid equivalents... below is to be determined by measuring the sum of glufosinate ammonium, butanoic acid,...

  19. 40 CFR 180.473 - Glufosinate ammonium; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium (butanoic acid, 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl...-propionic acid, expressed as 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)butanoic acid equivalents, in or on the... ammonium, butanoic acid, 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)-, monoammonium salt and its metabolite,...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1140 - Ammonium citrate, dibasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1140 Ammonium citrate, dibasic. (a) Ammonium citrate, dibasic ((NH4)2HC6H5O7, CAS Reg. No. 3012-65-5) is the diammonium salt of citric acid. It is prepared by partially neutralizing citric acid with ammonia. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1140 - Ammonium citrate, dibasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1140 Ammonium citrate, dibasic. (a) Ammonium citrate, dibasic ((NH4)2HC6H5O7, CAS Reg. No. 3012-65-5) is the diammonium salt of citric acid. It is prepared by partially neutralizing citric acid with ammonia. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salts (PMNs P-93-725 and P-93-726) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  3. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salts (PMNs P-93-725 and P-93-726) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  4. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salts (PMNs P-93-725 and P-93-726) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  5. Racer (Ammonium Nonanoate) weed control evaluation for onions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Racer has been labeled as a herbicide for food use and is currently under consideration as an organic herbicide for organically grown food crops. The main component (40%) of Racer is ammonium nonanoate (ammonium pelargonate), which occurs in nature and primarily formed from biodegradation of higher...

  6. 46 CFR 148.220 - Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. 148.220 Section... § 148.220 Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and... nitrate and containing a maximum of 0.4 percent total added combustible material or containing a...

  7. 46 CFR 148.220 - Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. 148.220 Section... § 148.220 Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and... nitrate and containing a maximum of 0.4 percent total added combustible material or containing a...

  8. 46 CFR 148.220 - Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. 148.220 Section... § 148.220 Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and... nitrate and containing a maximum of 0.4 percent total added combustible material or containing a...

  9. 46 CFR 148.220 - Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. 148.220 Section... § 148.220 Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and... nitrate and containing a maximum of 0.4 percent total added combustible material or containing a...

  10. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... compound. 721.655 Section 721.655 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compound. 721.655 Section 721.655 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  12. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... compound. 721.655 Section 721.655 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... compound. 721.655 Section 721.655 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compound. 721.655 Section 721.655 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  15. 75 FR 14082 - Ammonium Salts of Fatty Acids (C8

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Ammonium Salts of Fatty Acids (C 8 -C 18 Saturated); Exemption from the... fatty acids (C 8 -C 18 saturated) applied pre- and post-harvest on all raw agricultural commodities when... eliminates the need to establish a maximum permissible level for residues of ammonium salts of fatty acids...

  16. Shock wave synthesis of amino acids from solutions of ammonium formate and ammonium bicarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chizuka; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Sekine, Toshimori; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of life's building blocks, such as amino acids and nucleobases, on the prebiotic Earth was a critical step for the beginning of life. Reduced species with low mass, such as ammonia, amines, or carboxylic acids, are potential precursors for these building blocks of life. These precursors may have been provided to the prebiotic ocean by carbonaceous chondrites and chemical reactions related to meteorite impacts on the early Earth. The impact of extraterrestrial objects on Earth occurred more frequently during this period than at present. Such impacts generated shock waves in the ocean, which have the potential to progress chemical reactions to form the building blocks of life from reduced species. To simulate shock-induced reactions in the prebiotic ocean, we conducted shock-recovery experiments on ammonium bicarbonate solution and ammonium formate solution at impact velocities ranging from 0.51 to 0.92 km/s. In the products from the ammonium formate solution, several amino acids (glycine, alanine, ß-alanine, and sarcosine) and aliphatic amines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, and butylamine) were detected, although yields were less than 0.1 mol % of the formic acid reactant. From the ammonium bicarbonate solution, smaller amounts of glycine, methylamine, ethylamine, and propylamine were formed. The impact velocities used in this study represent minimum cases because natural meteorite impacts typically have higher velocities and longer durations. Our results therefore suggest that shock waves could have been involved in forming life's building blocks in the ocean of prebiotic Earth, and potentially in aquifers of other planets, satellites, and asteroids.

  17. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND RELATED... ensure compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; 49 CFR part 21; and related statutes...

  18. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND RELATED... ensure compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; 49 CFR part 21; and related statutes...

  19. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND RELATED... ensure compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; 49 CFR part 21; and related statutes...

  20. Control of ammonium assimilation in Rhizobium 32H1.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, R A

    1978-01-01

    The symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium sp. 32H1 is a specialized ammonium producer during symbiosis. However, during free-living growth, Rhizobium 32H1 assimilates ammonium very poorly. Two pathways of ammonium assimilation exist in enteric bacteria. One is mediated by glutamate dehydrogenase, and the other is mediated by glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase. The former pathway is altogether inoperative in Rhizobium 32H1; the latter pathway operates at a slow rate and is under strict negative control by ammonium itself. Rhizobium 32H1 glutamine synthetase activity is modulated by both repression-derepression and reversible adenylylation. For a biochemical process lacking an alternative pathway, such a regulatory pattern exacerbates the very process. This suggests that Rhizobium 32H1 restricts its own ammonium assimilation to maximize the contribution of fixed nitrogen to the host plant during symbiosis. PMID:27498

  1. Assimilation of ammonium and nitrate nitrogen by bean plants

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, R.J. ); Chaillou, S.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F. ); Mariotti, A. )

    1989-04-01

    Enhanced growth is often observed in plants growing on combined ammonium and nitrate nutrition. The physiological basis for such enhancement was examined by exposing non-nodulated bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants to {sup 15}N-labeled, 1.0 mM N solutions containing 0, 33, 67 or 100% of the N as ammonium, the balance being nitrate. Maximal total N uptake and biomass production were attained by plants receiving 33% ammonium. A higher proportion of incoming ammonium than nitrate was incorporated into root protein. This was accompanied by increased partitioning of plant biomass to roots. It was concluded that as a consequence of greater N metabolism in the root under mixed ammonium and nitrate nutrition, the root became a more active sink for photosynthate. Concurrently, the augmented supply of N to the shoot enhanced net photosynthesis as reflected in increased plant biomass.

  2. U(VI) reduction to mononuclear U(VI) by desulfitobacterium spp.

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, K. E.; Boyanov, M. I.; Thomas, S. H.; Wu, Q.; Kemner, K. M.; Loffler, F. E.

    2010-06-15

    The bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) affects uranium mobility and fate in contaminated subsurface environments and is best understood in Gram-negative model organisms such as Geobacter and Shewanella spp. This study demonstrates that U(VI) reduction is a common trait of Gram-positive Desulfitobacterium spp. Five different Desulfitobacterium isolates reduced 100 {mu}M U(VI) to U(IV) in <10 days, whereas U(VI) remained soluble in abiotic and heat-killed controls. U(VI) reduction in live cultures was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis. Interestingly, although bioreduction of U(VI) is almost always reported to yield the uraninite mineral (UO{sub 2}), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in the Desulfitobacterium cultures was not UO{sub 2}. The EXAFS data indicated that the U(IV) product was a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms closely surrounded by light element shells. This atomic arrangement likely results from inner-sphere bonds between U(IV) and C/N/O- or P/S-containing ligands, such as carbonate or phosphate. The formation of a distinct U(IV) phase warrants further study because the characteristics of the reduced material affect uranium stability and fate in the contaminated subsurface.

  3. ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-12-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given.

  4. Hybrid organic-inorganic crystals based on ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and ammonium salicylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, A. P.; Salo, V. I.; Puzikov, V. M.; Babenko, G. N.; Roshal, A. D.; Tkachenko, V. F.

    2011-11-01

    ADP-NH 4Sal hybrid crystals are grown from aqueous solutions. The influence of the acidity of the mixed solution on the conditions of co-crystallization of the components is studied. The spectral and scintillation characteristics are determined. Co-crystallization of ammonium salicylate (NH 4Sal) and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP, NH 4H 2PO 4) is shown to be feasible, the structure of the doping addition being defined by the solution рН. In basic and weak acidic media the hybrid crystals ADP:NH 4Sal are formed in which salicylate anions are located in the interplanar space between the {110}-type planes in the lattice of ADP. The luminescence spectra contain an emission band maximum with λ max=360 nm. In acidic solutions there are ADP:HSal crystals in which salicylic acid molecules captured by the growth macrosteps are located in the interplanar space of the prismatic {100} and pyramidal {101} growth sectors. The luminescence band undergoes bathochromic shift to λmax=400 nm. The sensitivity of ADP:NH 4Sal scintillation crystals to fast neutrons depends on the concentration of ammonium salicylate in ADP matrix. The highest neutron sensitivity is characteristic of the co-doped ADP:NH 4Sal/Tl scintillation crystals.

  5. Electro-enhanced hollow fiber membrane liquid phase microextraction of Cr(VI) oxoanions in drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Chanthasakda, Nattaporn; Nitiyanontakit, Sira; Varanusupakul, Pakorn

    2016-02-01

    Hollow fiber membrane liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) of metal oxoanions was studied using an ionic carrier enhanced by the application of an electric field (electro-enhanced HF-LPME). The Cr(VI) oxoanion was used as the model. The transportation of Cr(VI) oxoanions across the supported liquid membrane (SLM) was explored via the ion-exchange process and electrokinetic migration. The type of SLM, type of acceptor solution, extraction time, electric potential, and stirring rate were investigated and optimized using MilliQ water. Electro-enhanced HF-LPME provided a much higher enrichment factor compared to conventional HF-LPME (no electric potential) for the same extraction time. A mixture of an anion exchange carrier (methyltrialkyl-ammonium chloride, Aliquat 336) in the SLM facilitated the transportation of Cr(VI) oxoanions. The SLM that gave the best performance was 1-heptanol mixed with 5% Aliquat 336 with 1M NaOH as the acceptor. Linearity was obtained in the working range of 3-15 µg L(-1) Cr(VI) (R(2)>0.99) at 30 V with a 5 min extraction time. The limit of detection was below 5 µg L(-1). The relative standard deviation was less than 12%. The method was applied to drinking water samples. The recoveries of spiked Cr(VI) in drinking water samples were in the range of 96-101% based on the matrix-matched calibration curves. The method was limited to samples containing low levels of ions due to the occurrence of electrolysis. The type of SLM, particularly regarding its resistance, should be tuned to control this problematic phenomenon.

  6. Evaluate and Characterize Mechanisms Controlling Transport, Fate, and Effects of Army Smokes in the Aerosol Wind Tunnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    then cooled to room temperature. Two milliliter of molybdate reagent (10-3 M ammonium molybdate in 0.6 M sulfuric acid ) and 1 ml of ascorbic acid ...reagent (0.1M ascorbic acid in 5% acetone) were added, and 2.22 N4 the samples were vortexed and heated for 15 minutes at 80°C. The samples were cooled...then- acid hydrolyzed and the resultant phosphate reacted to form a heteropoly blue complex with Mo(V-VI), detected at 660 nm. Using a water bath at

  7. 76 FR 49449 - Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... Nitrate From the Russian Federation AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration... duty investigation on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'') from the Russian... and the ITC instituted a second sunset review of the ammonium nitrate suspended investigation....

  8. 76 FR 23569 - Termination of the Suspension Agreement on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Nitrate From the Russian Federation and Notice of Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY: Import Administration... (``AD'') Investigation on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate from the Russian Federation (``the... determine whether imports of solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'') from Russia...

  9. O VI Emission from the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robin L.

    2004-01-01

    This project's primary goal was to examine the Local Bubble, a large hot bubble surrounding the solar neighborhood. In order to do this, we observed the 1032 and 1038 A resonance line emission from O VI in the bubble and used the,results to comment on models for the Local Bubble and its embedded clouds. In order to maximize the signal to noise of our spectrum, we combined the awarded guest investigator observation with unpublished FUSE In Orbit Checkout observations. The resulting spectrum was sufficiently good as to enable us to place tight 2 sigma upper limits on the intensities of the 1032 and the 1038 A resonance lines. We also measured or placed upper limits on the other cosmic lines in the bandpass, including C III and C II. These are the first known ultraviolet emission line measurements and/or upper limits for the gas in the Local Bubble (as opposed to gas anywhere along long lines of sight). With the O VI upper limits, we were able to quantitatively evaluate competing theories for the origins of the Local Bubble. The upper limits are well below those expected in the Breitschwerdt model (which proposes that during its its early development, the Local Bubble rapidly expanded beyond its nascent cloud and, as a result, is now vastly underionized). The upper limits on the O VI resonance line doublet intensity and the measurement of the C III intensity, garnered from this project, combined with measurements of the O VI column density, garnered from another project, are so far below the predictions, that they make a good case for eliminating the Breitschwerdt model from the field of possibilities. Thus, instead of being vastly underionized, the Local Bubble is near ionizational equilibrium. In addition, the upper limits challenge the other well-known model for the Local Bubble. In that model, the Local Bubble was blown by a series of supernova explosions and winds and contains a myriad of evaporating clouds. The intensity of the O VI resonance line doublet

  10. Molten-salt synthesis and composition-dependent luminescent properties of barium tungsto-molybdate-based solid solution phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-Hong, He; Zhao-Lian, Ye; Ming-Yun, Guan; Ning, Lian; Jian-Hua, Sun

    2016-02-01

    Pr3+-activated barium tungsto-molybdate solid solution phosphor Ba(Mo1-zWz)O4:Pr3+ is successfully fabricated via a facile molten-salt approach. The as-synthesized microcrystal is of truncated octahedron and exhibits deep-red-emitting upon blue light excitation. Powder x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy techniques are utilized to investigate the formation of solid solution phosphor. The luminescence behaviors depend on the resulting composition of the microcrystals with fixed Pr3+-doping concentration, while the host lattices remain in a scheelite structure. The forming solid solution via the substitution of [WO4] for [MoO4] can significantly enhance its luminescence, which may be due to the fact that Ba(Mo1-zWz)O4:Pr3+ owns well-defined facets and uniform morphologies. Owing to its properties of high phase purity, well-defined facets, highly uniform morphologies, exceptional chemical and thermal stabilities, and stronger emission intensity, the resulting solid solution phosphor is expected to find potential applications in phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Project supported by the Construction Fund for Science and Technology Innovation Group from Jiangsu University of Technology, China, the Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Environment Monitoring and Pollution Control, China (Grant No. KHK1409), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21373103).

  11. Network structure of molybdate glasses by neutron and X-ray diffraction and reverse Monte Carlo modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, M.; Svab, E.; Krezhov, K.

    2016-09-01

    Rare-earth molybdate glasses have been prepared by rapid quench technique, the network structure was investigated by neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction. For data evaluation the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique was applied to obtain a possible 3dimensional network configuration, which is consistent with the experimental data. From the modelling the partial atomic correlation functions giJ(r) and the coordination number distributions CNij have been revealed. Formation of MoO4 (55%) and MoO6 (25%) units was established for the binary 90MoO3-10Nd2O3 glass. The B-O first neighbour distribution show a relatively broad first neighbour distance at 1.40A, the average coordination numbers show the presents of trigonal BO3 and tetrahedral BO4 groups. For 50MoO3-25Nd2O3-25B2O3 sample mixed MoO4-BO4 and MoO4-BO3 linkages form pronounced intermediate-range order.

  12. Lasing properties of selectively pumped Raman-active Nd{sup 3+}-doped molybdate and tungstate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Basiev, Tasoltan T; Doroshenko, Maxim E; Ivleva, Lyudmila I; Osiko, Vyacheslav V; Kosmyna, M B; Komar', V K; Sulc, J; Jelinkova, H

    2006-08-31

    The lasing efficiency of Nd{sup 3+} ions is studied in laser materials capable of self-Raman frequency conversion. The lasing properties of tungstate and molybdate crystals with the scheelite structure (SrWO{sub 4}, BaWO{sub 4}, PbWO{sub 4}, SrMoO{sub 4}, PbMoO{sub 4}) activated with neodymium ions are investigated upon longitudinal pumping by a 750-nm alexandrite laser or a 800-nm diode laser. The slope lasing efficiency obtained for a Nd{sup 3+}:PbMoO{sub 4} laser emitting at 1054 nm is 54.3% for the total lasing efficiency of 46%, which is the best result for all the crystals with the scheelite structure studied so far. The simultaneous Q-switched lasing and self-Raman frequency conversion were demonstrated in neodymium-doped SrWO{sub 4}, PbWO{sub 4}, and BaWO{sub 4} crystals. (papers devoted to the 90th anniversary of a.m.prokhorov)

  13. Synthesis, structural and spectroscopic properties of acentric triple molybdate Cs2NaBi(MoO4)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, A. A.; Atuchin, V. V.; Solodovnikov, S. F.; Solodovnikova, Z. A.; Krylov, A. S.; Maximovskiy, E. A.; Molokeev, M. S.; Oreshonkov, A. S.; Pugachev, A. M.; Khaikina, E. G.

    2015-05-01

    New ternary molybdate Cs2NaBi(MoO4)3 is synthesized in the system Na2MoO4-Cs2MoO4-Bi2(MoO4)3. The structure of Cs2NaBi(MoO4)3 of a new type is determined in noncentrosymmetric space group R3c, a=10.6435(2), c=40.9524(7) Å, V=4017.71(13) Å3, Z=12 in anisotropic approximation for all atoms taking into account racemic twinning. The structure is completely ordered, Mo atoms are tetrahedrally coordinated, Bi(1) and Bi(2) atoms are in octahedra, and Na(1) and Na(2) atoms have a distorted trigonal prismatic coordination. The Cs(1) and Cs(2) atoms are in the framework cavities with coordination numbers 12 and 10, respectively. No phase transitions were found in Cs2NaBi(MoO4)3 up to the melting point at 826 K. The compound shows an SHG signal, I2w/I2w(SiO2)=5 estimated by the powder method. The vibrational properties are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, and 26 narrow lines are measured.

  14. High-temperature behavior of dicesium molybdate Cs2MoO4: Implications for fast neutron reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallez, Gilles; Raison, Philippe E.; Smith, Anna L.; Clavier, Nicolas; Dacheux, Nicolas

    2014-07-01

    Dicesium molybdate (Cs2MoO4)'s thermal expansion and crystal structure have been investigated herein by high temperature X ray diffraction in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy. This first crystal-chemical insight at high temperature is aimed at predicting the thermostructural and thermomechanical behavior of this oxide formed by the accumulation of Cs and Mo fission products at the periphery of nuclear fuel rods in sodium-cooled fast reactors. Within the temperature range of the fuel's rim, Cs2MoO4 becomes hexagonal P63/mmc, with disordered MoO4 tetrahedra and 2D distribution of Cs-O bonds that makes thermal axial expansion both large (50≤αl≤70 10-6 °C-1, 500-800 °C) and highly anisotropic (αc-αa=67×10-6 °C-1, hexagonal form). The difference with the fuel's expansion coefficient is of potential concern with respect to the cohesion of the Cs2MoO4 surface film and the possible release of cesium radionuclides in accidental situations.

  15. Effective ammonium removal by anaerobic oxidation in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Dipak A; Ghangrekar, Makarand M

    2015-01-01

    Dual-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs), made of clayware cylinder, were operated at different chemical oxygen demands: ammonium-nitrogen (COD:NH4+) ratio (1:1, 10:1 and 5:1) under batch mode for simultaneous removal of ammonia and organic matter from wastewater. Ammonium-N removal efficiencies of 63-32.66% were obtained for COD:NH4+ ratio of 1:10, respectively. Average COD removal efficiencies demonstrated by these MFCs were about 88%; indicating effective use of MFCs for treatment of wastewater containing organic matter and high ammonia concentration. MFCs operated with COD:NH4+ ratio of 10:1 produced highest volumetric power density of 752.88 mW/m3. The ammonium-N removal slightly increased when microbes were exposed to only ammonium as a source of electron when organic source was not supplemented. When this MFC was operated with imposed potential on cathode and without aeration in the cathode chamber, oxidation of ammonium ions at a faster rate confirmed anaerobic oxidation. During the non-turnover condition of cyclic voltammetry, MFC operated with COD:NH4+ ratio of 10:1 gave higher oxidative and reductive currents than MFC operated with COD:NH4+ ratio of 1:1 due to higher redox species. Successful application of such an anammox process for ammonium oxidation in MFCs will be useful for treatment of wastewater containing higher ammonium concentration and harvesting energy in the form of electricity.

  16. Population of Nitrifying Bacteria and Nitrification in Ammonium Saturated Clinoptilolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J.

    1999-01-01

    As humans begin to spend longer periods of time in space, plants will be incorporated into life support systems. Ammonium saturated clinoptilolite is one plant growth substrate but a balance between ammonium and nitrate is needed. A laboratory study was conducted to determine effects of nitrifying bacteria on ammonium concentrations and kinetics of nitrification. Columns containing clinoptilolite substrate amended with nitrifying bacteria obtained from soil enrichment were analyzed weekly for a 90 day period. The enrichment culture initially contained 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria and 1 x 10(exp 2) nitrite oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate. Populations of ammonium oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 6) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 3) per gram of substrate. The nitrification rate was approximately 0.25mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Experiments were also conducted to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in a clinoptilolite substrate used to grow wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Seventy days following the initial inoculation with an unknown number of commercial nitrifying bacteria, 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate were present. The number of nitrite oxidizing bacteria was between 1 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) per gram of substrate as measured by the most probable number method. Nitrification rates were approximately 0.20mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Clinoptilolite readily exchanged sufficient concentrations of ammonium to support nitrifying bacteria and they survived well in this medium.

  17. Final Technical Report -- GEO-VI - USGEO

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Leonard

    2009-11-30

    Representatives of US earth observations departments and agencies, other participating governments, NGOs and civil society participated in the Sixth Plenary Meeting of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO-VI), hosted by the United States in Washington, DC on November 17 and 18, 2009. The meeting was held in the Atrium Ballroom of the Ronald Reagan International Trade Center. Exhibitions of international Earth observation technology and programs were held concurrently in the same venue. A number of GEO committee meetings and side events were held in conjunction with the GEO-VI Plenary, including the GEO-IGOS Symposium on Earth observation science and applications, the GEOSS in the Americas Forum on Coastal Zones, and separate meetings of the GEO Communities of Practice on Carbon, Health, and Air Quality.

  18. Proceedings of Minnowbrook Workshops I to VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    This DVD collection includes the complete proceedings of Minnowbrook Workshops I through VI. Titles include Minnowbrook I - 1993 Workshop on End-Stage Boundary Layer Transition (NASA/CP-2007-214667, CASI ID 20070038942), Minnowbrook II - 1997 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition in Turbomachines (NASA/CP-1998-206958, CASI ID 19980206205), Minnowbrook III - 2000 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flow (NASA/CP-2001-210888, CASI ID 20020067662), Minnowbrook IV - 2003 Workshop on Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows (NASA TM-2004-212913, CASI ID 20040121174), Minnowbrook V - 2006 Workshop on Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery (NASA/CP-2006-214484, CASI ID 20070024781), and Minnowbrook VI - 2009 Workshop on Flow Physics and Control for Internal and External Aerodynamics (NACA/CP-2010-216112, CASI ID 20100018557).

  19. Benign recurrent VI nerve palsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Bixenman, W W; von Noorden, G K

    1981-01-01

    The case of a child with six documented episodes of benign recurrent unilateral VI nerve palsy between the ages of 2 1/2 months and 3 years is presented. Despite the recognized self-limiting course of this disorder, its possible evolution into a comitant esotropia makes close follow-up mandatory. The practical aspects of management including maintenance occlusion therapy are stressed as well as the need for prompt surgical intervention once the acquired stabismus has become stabilized. The etiology of benign VI nerve palsy of childhood may have the same immunological basis as other cases of para-infectious neuropathy. This isolated postinfective cranial mononeuropathy easily blends into the continuum of neurological involvement seen with the Landry-Guillian-Barre syndrome. With recovery from the initial episode, the abducens nerve may have become predisposed to recurrent inflammatory episodes and recurrent loss of function. Most often these recurrences are triggered by febrile illnesses of childhood.

  20. HalleyVI - a station for science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Mike; Tuplin, Karl

    2013-04-01

    There has been a research station at Halley in Antarctica (75°35'S, 26°34'W) since 1956. Halley has a long and successful scientific record, notably the discovery of the Ozone Hole and significant contributions to areas as diverse as Geology and Space physics. Halley is located on a floating and flowing iceshelf with constant surface accumulation. These conditions have resulted in the necessary regular rebuilding of the station and HalleyVI has just been completed. Halley VI has been fully scientifically operational since Feb 2012. The station supports a chemical and turbulence clean area, an electromagnetic quiet zone, an area for radars, and flexible facilities on the station to support a wide variety of science activities. This presentation outlines the major features of the new station, its current scientific activities, and the facilities that allow the hosting of a wide variety of scientific experiments.

  1. Diagnostic and treatment strategies in mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    PubMed Central

    Vairo, Filippo; Federhen, Andressa; Baldo, Guilherme; Riegel, Mariluce; Burin, Maira; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, which lead to deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme ASB. This enzyme is important for the breakdown of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, which accumulate in body tissues and organs of MPS VI patients. The storage of GAGs (especially dermatan sulfate) causes bone dysplasia, joint restriction, organomegaly, heart disease, and corneal clouding, among several other problems, and reduced life span. Despite the fact that most cases are severe, there is a spectrum of severity and some cases are so attenuated that diagnosis is made late in life. Although the analysis of urinary GAGs and/or the measurement of enzyme activity in dried blood spots are useful screening methods, the diagnosis is based in the demonstration of the enzyme deficiency in leucocytes or fibroblasts, and/or in the identification of pathogenic mutations in the ARSB gene. Specific treatment with enzyme replacement has been available since 2005. It is safe and effective, bringing measurable benefits and increased survival to patients. As several evidences indicate that early initiation of therapy may lead to a better outcome, newborn screening is being considered for this condition, and it is already in place in selected areas where the incidence of MPS VI is increased. However, as enzyme replacement therapy is not curative, associated therapies should be considered, and research on innovative therapies continues. The management of affected patients by a multidisciplinary team with experience in MPS diseases is highly recommended. PMID:26586959

  2. Ammonium Hydrosulfide and Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R.; Chanover, N.; Simon, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The color and composition of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) has been debated for more than a century. While there are numerous hypotheses for the origin of Jupiter's GRS, recent work suggests that the GRS's color could originate from multiple components (Carlson et al., 2012; Simon et al., submitted). In light of this, we have recently begun conducting in situ laboratory experiments that test whether ammonium hydrosulfide, NH4SH, or its radiation decomposition products contribute to the GRS spectrum. In this presentation, we will discuss some of our most recent results, where we have studied the stability of NH4SH samples as a function of temperature using infrared and mass spectrometry. Funding for this work has been provided by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres and Outer Planets Research programs. ReferencesCarlson, R. W., K. H. Baines, M. S. Anderson, G. Filacchione. Chromophores from photolyzed ammonia reacting with acetylene: Application to Jupiter's Great Red Spot, DPS, 44, 2012. Simon, A. A., J. Legarreta, F. Sanz-Requena, S. Perez-Hoyos, E. Garcia-Melendo, R. W. Carlson. Spectral Comparison and Stability of Red Regions on Jupiter. J. Geophys. Res. - Planets, submitted.

  3. Combustion of ammonium and hydrazine azides

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelzang, A.E.; Egorshev, V.Y.; Sinditsky, V.P.; Kolesov, B.I. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports that steady-state combustion of ammonium azide (AA) and hydrazne azide (HA) was studied in a window constant-pressure bomb over a pressure range of 0.1-36 MPa. HA burns three to four times faster than AA over the whole pressure range. The temperature distribution in the combustion wave of AA and HA was measured using 5-{mu}m-thick {pi}-shaped tungsten-rhenium tape thermocouples. The combustion temperature of both compounds is 240-430 K higher than the temperature calculated for the thermodynamically equilibrium composition of the combustion products due to the presence of large amounts of ammonia (0.97 and 0.87 mol per AA and HA mole, respectively). The burning surface is formed via dissociation of the salts into hydrazoic acid HN{sub 3} and the parent base. The growth of the surface temperature with pressure is determined by the dissociation enthalpy of the slats. The burning rate of these compounds is determined by heat release in the gas phase.

  4. Aerosol isotopic ammonium signatures over the remote Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. T.; Jickells, T. D.; Baker, A. R.; Marca, A.; Johnson, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    We report aerosol ammonium 15N signatures for samples collected from research cruises on the South Atlantic and Caribbean using a new high sensitivity method. We confirm a pattern of isotopic signals from generally light (δ15N -5 to -10‰), for aerosols with very low (<2 nmol m-3) ammonium concentrations from the remote high latitude ocean, to generally heavier values (δ15N +5 to +10‰), for aerosols collected in temperate and tropical latitudes and with higher ammonium concentrations (>2 nmol m-3). We discuss whether this reflects a mixing of aerosols from two end-members (polluted continental and remote marine emissions), or isotopic fractionation during aerosol transport.

  5. Antimicrobial Polymeric Materials with Quaternary Ammonium and Phosphonium Salts

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Huining; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric materials containing quaternary ammonium and/or phosphonium salts have been extensively studied and applied to a variety of antimicrobial-relevant areas. With various architectures, polymeric quaternary ammonium/phosphonium salts were prepared using different approaches, exhibiting different antimicrobial activities and potential applications. This review focuses on the state of the art of antimicrobial polymers with quaternary ammonium/phosphonium salts. In particular, it discusses the structure and synthesis method, mechanisms of antimicrobial action, and the comparison of antimicrobial performance between these two kinds of polymers. PMID:25667977

  6. Formation and stabilization of anionic metal complexes in concentrated aqueous quaternary ammonium salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, F.L.; Hwang, L.L.Y.; Ronca, N.; Solomon, N.A.; Steigman, J.

    1985-02-04

    Anionic complexes of transition metals were stabilized in aqueous solutions containing high concentrations of various short-chain quaternary ammonium salts. Compounds with longer paraffin chains were effective in much less concentrated solution. Complex ions were detected spectrophotometrically. FeCl/sub 4//sup -/, which is usually formed in concentrated HCl, was the predominant Fe(III) complex in 30 m choline chloride containing only 0.12 M HCl. A yellow transitory Tc(VII) chloro-addition intermediate, formed in the reduction of TcO/sub 4//sup -/ by concentrated HCl, was stabilized when the solution also contained 25 m choline chloride. Its spectrum, as well as the isolation of an already known Tc(VII) bipyridyl complex, is reported. Concentrated organic electrolytes also stabilized Tc(V) oxide halides against disproportionation and Tc(IV) hexahalides against hydrolysis. Halochromates of Cr(VI) were formed and stabilized in dilute acid containing quaternary ammonium salts. Their UV spectra showed the well-resolved vibronic fine structure associated with the symmetric chromium-to-oxygen charge-transfer band. It is known that these progressions are resolved in aprotic solvents, but not in aqueous acidic solution alone, and that the loss of fine structure in aqueous media is due to hydrogen bonding. The stabilization of anionic metal complexes and the resolution of vibronic structure in halochromates are probably consequences of water-structure-enforced ion paring. The present work suggests that the water molecules in immediate contact with the complex anions are more strongly hydrogen bonded to each other than to the complex. 21 references, 4 figures.

  7. Few-layer III-VI and IV-VI 2D semiconductor transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Liu, Mei; Kumar, Rajesh; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang C.; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Gao, Xuan

    Since the discovery of atomically thin graphene, a large variety of exfoliable 2D materials have been thoroughly explored for their exotic transport behavior and promises in technological breakthroughs. While most attention on 2D materials beyond graphene is focused on transition metal-dichalcogenides, relatively less attention is paid to layered III-VI and IV-VI semiconductors such as InSe, SnSe etc which bear stronger potential as 2D materials with high electron mobility or thermoelectric figure of merit. We will discuss our recent work on few-layer InSe 2D field effect transistors which exhibit carrier mobility approaching 1000 cm2/Vs and ON-OFF ratio exceeding 107 at room temperature. In addition, the fabrication and device performance of transistors made of mechanically exfoliated multilayer IV-VI semiconductor SnSe and SnSe2 will be discussed.

  8. Nitrogen removal with the anaerobic ammonium oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ziye; Lotti, Tommaso; van Loosdrecht, Mark; Kartal, Boran

    2013-08-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria convert ammonium to N2 with nitrite as the terminal electron acceptor in the absence of O2. Nitritation-anammox bioreactors provide a cost-effective and environment-friendly alternative to conventional nitrification/denitrification nitrogen removal systems. Currently, this process is only applied for ammonium removal from wastewater with high ammonium load and temperature. Nevertheless, recent results obtained with laboratory-scale bioreactors suggest new possible routes of application of the Nitritation-anammox technology including (1) municipal wastewater treatment, removal of (2) methane in combination with nitrite-reducing methane-oxidizing bacteria, (3) nitrate coupled to organic acid oxidation and (4) nitrogen oxides. The current review summarizes the state-of-the-art of the application of Nitritation-anammox systems and discusses the possibilities of utilizing these recent results for wastewater treatment.

  9. Direct esterification of ammonium salts of carboxylic acids

    DOEpatents

    Halpern, Yuval

    2003-06-24

    A non-catalytic process for producing esters, the process comprising reacting an ammonium salt of a carboxylic acid with an alcohol and removing ammonia from the reaction mixture. Selectivities for the desired ester product can exceed 95 percent.

  10. High-affinity ammonium transporters and nitrogen sensing in mycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Javelle, Arnaud; André, Bruno; Marini, Anne Marie; Chalot, Michel

    2003-02-01

    Most terrestrial plants live in mutualistic symbiosis with root-infecting mycorrhizal fungi. This association requires a molecular dialogue between the two partners. However, the nature of the chemical signals that induce hyphal differentiation are not well characterized and the mechanisms for signal reception are still unknown. In addition to its role in ammonium scavenging, the Mep2 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been proposed to act as an ammonium sensor that is essential for pseudohyphal differentiation in response to ammonium limitation. We propose that the high-affinity ammonium transporters from mycorrhizal fungi act in a similar manner to sense the environment and induce, via as-yet-unidentified signal transduction cascades, the switch in the mode of fungal growth observed during the formation of mycorrhiza.

  11. Deliquescence behavior of organic/ammonium sulfate aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Sarah D.; Wise, Matthew E.; Cushing, Melinda; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2002-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that tropospheric aerosols composed of internal mixtures of organics with sulfates are quite common with the organic composing up to 50% of the particle mass. The influences of the organics on the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol are not known. In this paper, we report the solubility of a series of dicarboxylic acids in saturated ammonium sulfate solution as a function of temperature. We also report the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of the pure dicarboxylic acids and of mixtures of dicarboxylic acids with ammonium sulfate. For the systems studied, we find that the presence of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids caused deliquescence to occur at a lower relative humidity (RH) than pure ammonium sulfate. In contrast, the less soluble dicarboxylic acids had no measurable effect on the deliquescence relative humidity of ammonium sulfate.

  12. The effect of ammonium sulfate injection on peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, J; Mackinnon, S E; Langer, J C; Hertl, M C; Hunter, D A; Tarasidis, G

    1997-08-01

    Local anesthetic drugs with prolonged nerve-block effect would have clinical application for postoperative or neuromatous pain relief. This study evaluated the possibility of peripheral nerve neurotoxicity by injection of 10 percent ammonium sulfate. Both intrafascicular and extrafascicular injection of 10 percent ammonium sulfate were tested in the rat sciatic nerve model. One percent lidocaine HCl, 5 percent phenol, and normal saline were similarly injected for comparison. Using histologic studies and motor function evaluation with walking-track analysis, 10 percent ammonium sulfate was found to be neurotoxic when it is injected intrafascicularly; however, extrafascicular injection of this drug did not cause significant nerve injury. The neurotoxicity of the 10 percent ammonium sulfate solution was intermediate between the neurotoxicity of 0.1 percent lidocaine hydrochloride and the marked neurotoxicity of 5 percent phenol solution.

  13. Chemical Advisory - Solid Ammonium Nitrate (AN) Storage, Handling and Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Advisory contains information on recent and past accidents involving AMMONIUM NITRATE (commonly referred to as AN), on the hazards of AN, how to manage these hazards, and appropriate steps for community emergency planning and proper emergency response.

  14. 40 CFR 180.473 - Glufosinate ammonium; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)butanoic acid, in or on the commodity. Commodity Parts per... ammonium, 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)butanoic acid monoammonium salt, and its metabolite, 3-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)propionic acid, calculated as the stoichiometric equivalent of...

  15. 40 CFR 180.473 - Glufosinate ammonium; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)butanoic acid, in or on the commodity. Commodity Parts per... ammonium, 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)butanoic acid monoammonium salt, and its metabolite, 3-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)propionic acid, calculated as the stoichiometric equivalent of...

  16. Formation of urea and guanidine by irradiation of ammonium cyanide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.

    1972-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of ammonium cyanide yield urea, cyanamide and guanidine when exposed to sunlight or an unfiltered 254 nm ultraviolet source. The prebiotic significance of these results is discussed.

  17. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  18. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  19. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  20. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  1. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  2. Redox potentials in ammonium nitrate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ngameni, E.; Ammaa, B.B.; Wandji, R.; Bessiere, J.

    1995-03-01

    The redox potentials of M{sup n+}/M (M{sup n+} = Cu{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Sn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Ag{sup +}, Zn{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}), M{sup n+}/M {sup (n{minus}m)+} (Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+}, Fe(CN){sub 6}3{minus}/Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4{minus}}), and AgX/Ag, X{sup {minus}} (X = Cl, Br, and I) have been measured in aqueous solutions of ammonium nitrate (1--14 M). The variation of salvation of ions, characterized by the solvent transfer coefficient f{sup tr}, is calculated from the normal redox potentials of the systems. For all the cases, the potential of the ferricinium/ferrocene system (Fe{sup +}/Fc) is used as a reference of potential. It appears as a general trend that when the concentration of salt increases from 1 to 14 M, the potentials of the systems vary slightly, indicating weak interactions between these solutes and the salt. The examined ions can be classified into two groups: those that are less solvated as the concentration of NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} increases (CU{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, I{sup {minus}}) and those that are more solvated, (Pb{sup 2+}, Ag{sup +}, Hg{sup 2+}, Sn{sup 2+}). The solubility constants of the AgX salts in the H{sub 2}O + NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} mixtures are also calculated.

  3. Analytical techniques for determining bound ammonium

    SciTech Connect

    Altaner, S.P.; Krohn, M.D

    1985-01-01

    Ammonium (NH/sub 4//sup +/) has been found to substitute for alkali cations in feldspars, micas, smectites, and alunites several Hg/Au-bearing hot springs deposits and volcanogenic stratabound Pb/Zn deposits. The authors compared four analytical techniques for determining the NH/sub 4//sup +/ content in rocks from these types of deposit and in synthetic NH/sub 4//sup +/-bearing feldspars, micas, and alunites: 1) X-ray diffraction (XRD), 2) mid- and 3) near-infrared spectroscopy (MIR and NIR) and 4) ion chromatography (IC). MIR analysis of synthetic minerals indicates that 7 ..mu..m band depth depends upon mineral type but that, for a given mineral, band depth is directly proportional to NH/sub 4//sup +/ concentration. NIR reflectance spectroscopy gives a rapid qualitative determination of NH/sub 4//sup +/ and allows positive field identification of NH/sub 4//sup +/. 4) IC gives a measure of the percent of NH/sub 4//sup +/ substitution by determining NH/sub 4//sup +/, K/sup +/, and Na/sup +/ concentrations. The procedure involves sample dissolution by HCl and HF in a microwave oven followed by separation and detection by an ion chromatograph. They estimate the detection limits of these analytical techniques for NH/sub 4//sup +/ concentration to be: XRD, 10-20% NH/sub 4//sup +/; MIR, 1-5% NG/sub 4//sup +/; and IC, <1% NH/sub 4//sup +/. Determination of NH/sub 4//sup +/ abundance in rocks will help to delineate the relationship of NH/sub 4//sup +/-bearing minerals to mineralization in ore deposits and promises to be an excellent method for prospecting.

  4. The regulation of ammonium translocation in plants.

    PubMed

    Schjoerring, J K; Husted, S; Mäck, G; Mattsson, M

    2002-04-01

    Much controversy exists about whether or not NH(+)(4) is translocated in the xylem from roots to shoots. In this paper it is shown that such translocation can indeed take place, but that interference from other metabolites such as amino acids and amines may give rise to large uncertainties about the magnitude of xylem NH(+)(4) concentrations. Elimination of interference requires sample stabilization by, for instance, formic acid or methanol. Subsequent quantification of NH(+)(4) should be done by the OPA-fluorometric method at neutral pH with 2-mercaptoethanol as the reducing agent since this method is sensitive and reliable. Colorimetric methods based on the Berthelot reaction should never be used, as they are prone to give erroneous results. Significant concentrations of NH(+)(4), exceeding 1 mM, were measured in both xylem sap and leaf apoplastic solution of oilseed rape and tomato plants growing with NO(-)(3) as the sole N source. When NO(-)(3) was replaced by NH(+)(4), xylem sap NH(+)(4) concentrations increased with increasing external concentrations and with time of exposure to NH(+)(4). Up to 11% of the translocated N was constituted by NH(+)(4). Glutamine synthetase (GS) incorporates NH(+)(4) into glutamine, but root GS activity and expression were repressed when high levels of NH(+)(4) were supplied. Ammonium concentrations measured in xylem sap sampled just above the stem base were highly correlated with NH(+)(4) concentrations in apoplastic solution from the leaves. Young leaves tended to have higher apoplastic NH(+)(4) concentrations than older non-senescing leaves. The flux of NH(+)(4) (concentration multiplied by transpirational water flow) increased with temperature despite a decline in xylem NH(+)(4) concentration. Retrieval of leaf apoplastic NH(+)(4) involves both high and low affinity transporters in the plasma membrane of mesophyll cells. Current knowledge about these transporters and their regulation is discussed.

  5. Crystal structure of cyclo-hexyl-ammonium thio-cyanate.

    PubMed

    Bagabas, Abdulaziz A; Alhoshan, Sultan B; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Chidan Kumar, C S; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2015-01-01

    In the title salt, C6H11NH3 (+)·SCN(-), the cyclo-hexyl-ammonium ring adopts a slightly distorted chair conformation. The ammonium group occupies an equatorial position to minimize 1,3 and 1,5 diaxial inter-actions. In the crystal, the components are linked by N-H⋯N and N-H⋯S hydrogen-bonding inter-actions, resulting in a three-dimensional network.

  6. Localized corrosion of stainless steels in ammonium chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Forsen, O.; Aromaa, J.; Tavi, M.; Virtanen, J.

    1997-05-01

    Ammonium chloride deposition is a well-known problem in oil refining. When these deposits form in a moist environment, they are corrosive to carbon steel. When unexpected corrosion problems are faced, the material is often changed to alloys like stainless steels (SS). Electrochemical measurements were used to study the corrosion resistance of SS in ammonium chloride environments with different chloride contents and at different temperatures.

  7. Safety assessment of ammonium hectorites as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2013-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 4 ammonium hectorite compounds used in cosmetics: disteardimonium hectorite, dihydrogenated tallow benzylmonium hectorite, stearalkonium hectorite, and quaternium-18 hectorite. These ingredients function in cosmetics mainly as nonsurfactant suspending agents. The Panel reviewed available animal and human data and concluded that these ammonium hectorite compounds were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.

  8. Role of anions and reaction conditions in the preparation of uranium(VI), neptunium(VI), and plutonium(VI) borates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuao; Villa, Eric M; Diwu, Juan; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2011-03-21

    U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) borates with the formula AnO(2)[B(8)O(11)(OH)(4)] (An = U, Np, Pu) have been prepared via the reactions of U(VI) nitrate, Np(VI) perchlorate, or Pu(IV) or Pu(VI) nitrate with molten boric acid. These compounds are all isotypic and consist of a linear actinyl(VI) cation, AnO(2)(2+), surrounded by BO(3) triangles and BO(4) tetrahedra to create an AnO(8) hexagonal bipyramidal environment. The actinyl bond lengths are consistent with actinide contraction across this series. The borate anions bridge between actinyl units to create sheets. Additional BO(3) triangles and BO(4) tetrahedra extend from the polyborate layers and connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional chiral framework structure. UV-vis-NIR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the hexavalent oxidation state in all three compounds. Bond-valence parameters are developed for Np(VI).

  9. Role of Anions and Reaction Conditions in the Preparation of Uranium(VI), Neptunium(VI), and Plutonium(VI) Borates

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-02-03

    U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) borates with the formula AnO2[B8O11(OH)4] (An = U, Np, Pu) have been prepared via the reactions of U(VI) nitrate, Np(VI) perchlorate, or Pu(IV) or Pu(VI) nitrate with molten boric acid. These compounds are all isotypic and consist of a linear actinyl(VI) cation, AnO22+, surrounded by BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedra to create an AnO8 hexagonal bipyramidal environment. The actinyl bond lengths are consistent with actinide contraction across this series. The borate anions bridge between actinyl units to create sheets. Additional BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedra extend from the polyborate layers and connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional chiral framework structure. UV-vis-NIR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the hexavalent oxidation state in all three compounds. Bond-valence parameters are developed for Np(VI).

  10. Sorption of aromatic ionizable organic compounds to montmorillonites modified by hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium and polydiallyldimethyl ammonium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huaizhou; Wan, Yuqiu; Li, Hui; Zheng, Shourong; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2011-01-01

    Environmental residues of aromatic ionizable organic compounds (AIOCs) have received considerable attention due to their potential human health and ecological risks. The main objective of this study was to investigate the key factors and mechanisms controlling sorption of a series of anionic and zwitterionic AIOCs (two aromatic sulfonates, 4-methyl-2,6-dinitrophenol, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and tannic acid) to montmorillonites modified with hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA) and polydiallyldimethyl ammonium (PDADMA). Compared with naphthalene (a nonpolar and nonionic solute), all AIOCs showed stronger sorption (the sorbent-to-solution distribution coefficient was in the order of 10-10 L kg) to the two organoclays in spite of the much lower hydrophobicity, indicating the predominance of electrostatic interaction in sorption. The proposed electrostatic mechanism of the tested AIOCs was supported by the pH dependency of sorption to the two organoclays. The two organoclays manifested weaker sorption affinity but faster sorption kinetics for bulky AIOCs than commercial activated carbon, resulting from the high accessibility of sorption sites in the open, ordered clay interlayer. The findings of this study highlight the potential of using HDTMA- and PDADMA-exchanged montmorillonites as effective sorbents for AIOCs in water and wastewater treatments.

  11. Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Ammonium Perchlorate and of an Ammonium-Perchlorate-Based Composite Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H2O, O2, Cl2, N2O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200(micro) diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20(micro) diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH3 + HClO4 followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  12. Thermal storage in ammonium alum/ammonium nitrate eutectic for solar space heating

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, D.Y.; Jotshi, C.K.; Klausner, J.F.; Hsieh, C.K.; Srinivasan, N.

    1995-10-01

    Ammonium alum and ammonium nitrate in the weight ratio of 1:1 forms a eutectic that melts at 53 C and crystallizes at 48 C. The latent heat of fusion of this eutectic was found to be 215 kJ/kg. Its enthalpy as measured by drop calorimetry was found to be 287 kJ/kg in the temperature range of 24--65 C, which is 1.67 times greater than water (172.2 kJ/kg) and 8.75 times greater than rock (32.8 kJ/kg). Upon several heating/cooling cycles, phase separation was observed. However, by adding 5% attapulgite clay to this eutectic mixture, phase separation was prevented. This eutectic was encapsulated in 0.0254m diameter HDPE hollow balls and subjected to about 1,100 heating/cooling cycles in the temperature range between 25 and 65 C. At the end of these cycles, the decrease in enthalpy was found to be 5%. A scale model of the heat storage unit was fabricated to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of this eutectic encapsulated in HDPE balls. The thermal extraction efficiency of the system was measured with the recirculation of hot air during charging and was found to be in the range of 85--98%.

  13. The thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate and of an ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-03-24

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200{micro} diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20{micro} diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH{sub 3} + HClO{sub 4} followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  14. The ground water ammonium sorption onto Croatian and Serbian clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Siljeg, Mario; Foglar, Lucija; Kukucka, Miroslav

    2010-06-15

    The removal of ammonium from the Valpovo region ground water (VGW) with the use of natural clinoptilolite samples from the Donje Jesenje deposit (Croatia) and the Zlatokop deposit in Vranjska Banja (Serbia) was studied. The natural Serbian (SZ) and Croatian zeolites (CZ) were transformed to the Na-form (Na-CZ and Na-SZ) in order to increase the exchange capacity of zeolite. The CZ and SZ theoretic ammonium sorption capacities were 24.24 mg NH(4)(+)/g CZ and 32.55 mg NH(4)(+)/g SZ, respectively. The application of natural and Na-form of clinoptilolite for efficient removal of ammonium ions from VGW was further investigated. For that purpose, the four "filter guard" vessels filled with zeolite samples were set in parallel in the ground water purification pilot plant. The complete ammonium removal, with the use of SZ and Na-SZ was achieved during 20 h. After having observed saturation of clinoptilolite, the samples were regenerated with the use of 2 mol/L NaCl, and reused for determination of ammonium sorption efficiency. The regenerated samples showed to be still very efficient for NH(4)(+) removal and, in addition, the SZ was shown as superior for ammonium removal in comparison to the CZ.

  15. Removal of ammonium from municipal landfill leachate using natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhihong; Wang, Jiawen; Sun, Lingyu; Zhang, Daobin; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Ammonium ion-exchange performance of the natural zeolite was investigated in both batch and column studies. The effects of zeolite dosage, contact time, stirring speed and pH on ammonium removal were investigated in batch experiments. The result showed that ammonium removal efficiency increased with an increase in zeolite dosage from 25 to 150 g/L, and an increase in stirring speed from 200 to 250 r/min. But further increase in zeolite dosage and stirring speed would result in an unpronounced increase of ammonium removal. The optimal pH for the removal of ammonium was found as 7.1. In the column studies, the effect of flow rate was investigated, and the total ammonium removal percentage during 180 min operation time decreased with the flow rate though the ion-exchange capacity varied to a very small extent with the flow rate ranging from 4 to 9 mL/min. The spent zeolite was regenerated by sodium chloride solution and the ammonia removal capacity of zeolite changed little or even increased after three regeneration cycles.

  16. Nitric oxide controls nitrate and ammonium assimilation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Ocaña-Calahorro, Francisco; Llamas, Angel; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    Nitrate and ammonium are major inorganic nitrogen sources for plants and algae. These compounds are assimilated by means of finely regulated processes at transcriptional and post-translational levels. In Chlamydomonas, the expression of several genes involved in high-affinity ammonium (AMT1.1, AMT1.2) and nitrate transport (NRT2.1) as well as nitrate reduction (NIA1) are downregulated by ammonium through a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. At the post-translational level, nitrate/nitrite uptake and nitrate reductase (NR) are also inhibited by ammonium, but the mechanisms implicated in this regulation are scarcely known. In this work, the effect of NO on nitrate assimilation and the high-affinity ammonium uptake was addressed. NO inhibited the high-affinity uptake of ammonium and nitrate/nitrite, as well as the NR activity, in a reversible form. In contrast, nitrite reductase and glutamine synthetase activities were not affected. The in vivo and in vitro studies suggested that NR enzyme is inhibited by NO in a mediated process that requires the cell integrity. These data highlight a role of NO in inorganic nitrogen assimilation and suggest that this signalling molecule is an important regulator for the first steps of the pathway.

  17. Modification of Sargassum angustifolium by molybdate during a facile cultivation for high-rate phosphate removal from wastewater: structural characterization and adsorptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Saberzadeh Sarvestani, Firozeh; Esmaeili, Hossein; Ramavandi, Bahman

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a new and facile approach for molybdate loading in the brown algae of Sargassum angustifolium is introduced. The molybdate ions were entered into the algae body during a short cultivation to produce algae-Mo as a novel adsorbent for eliminating phosphate ions from synthetic and real wastewaters. Results of the surface analysis showed that molybdate loading onto the algae was successfully performed. Herein, basic variables, such as initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, phosphate concentration, and temperature, were investigated in detail to assess the phosphate adsorption performance of algae-Mo. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted our acquired experimental kinetic data most appropriately, in comparison to the use of a pseudo-first-order model. The Langmuir model appeared to fit the adsorption data more desirably than that of Freundlich and Dubnin-Radushkevich models, with a maximum phosphate adsorption capacity of 149.25 mg/g at 25 °C. The finding of the thermodynamic study revealed that the phosphate adsorption onto algae-Mo was spontaneous, feasible, and endothermic in nature. The study on Mo(2+) ions leaching strongly suggested that the risk of Mo(2+) leakage during phosphate adsorption was negligible at a wide pH range of 3-9. The adsorption efficiency attained was 53.4% at the sixth cycle of reusability. Two real wastewaters with different qualities were successfully treated by the algae-Mo, suggesting that the algae-Mo could be ordered for practical wastewater treatment.

  18. Decavanadate, decaniobate, tungstate and molybdate interactions with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase: quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation by vanadate but does not reverse ATPase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fraqueza, Gil; Batista de Carvalho, Luís A E; Marques, M Paula M; Maia, Luisa; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H; Aureliano, Manuel

    2012-11-07

    Recently we demonstrated that the decavanadate (V(10)) ion is a stronger Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor than other oxometalates, such as the isoelectronic and isostructural decaniobate ion, and the tungstate and molybdate monomer ions, and that it binds to this protein with a 1 : 1 stoichiometry. The V(10) interaction is not affected by any of the protein conformations that occur during the process of calcium translocation (i.e. E1, E1P, E2 and E2P) (Fraqueza et al., J. Inorg. Biochem., 2012). In the present study, we further explore this subject, and we can now show that the decaniobate ion, [Nb(10) = Nb(10)O(28)](6-), is a useful tool in deducing the interaction and the non-competitive Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibition by the decavanadate ion [V(10) = V(10)O(28)](6-). Moreover, decavanadate and vanadate induce protein cysteine oxidation whereas no effects were detected for the decaniobate, tungstate or molybdate ions. The presence of the antioxidant quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation, but not ATPase inhibition, by vanadate or decavanadate. Definitive V(IV) EPR spectra were observed for decavanadate in the presence of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, indicating a vanadate reduction at some stage of the protein interaction. Raman spectroscopy clearly shows that the protein conformation changes that are induced by V(10), Nb(10) and vanadate are different from the ones induced by molybdate and tungstate monomer ions. Here, Mo and W cause changes similar to those by phosphate, yielding changes similar to the E1P protein conformation. The putative reduction of vanadium(V) to vanadium(IV) and the non-competitive binding of the V(10) and Nb(10) decametalates may explain the differences in the Raman spectra compared to those seen in the presence of molybdate or tungstate. Putting it all together, we suggest that the ability of V(10) to inhibit the Ca(2+)-ATPase may be at least in part due to the process of vanadate reduction and associated protein cysteine oxidation. These

  19. Origin of “memory glass” effect in pressure-amorphized rare-earth molybdate single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Willinger, Elena; Sinitsyn, Vitaly; Khasanov, Salavat; Redkin, Boris; Shmurak, Semeon; Ponyatovsky, Eugeny

    2015-02-15

    The memory glass effect (MGE) describes the ability of some materials to recover the initial structure and crystallographic orientation after pressure-induced amorphization (PIA). In spite of numerous studies the nature and underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not clear. Here we report investigations of MGE in β′-Eu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} single crystal samples subjected to high pressure amorphization. Using the XRD and TEM techniques we carried out detailed analysis of the structural state of high pressure treated single crystal samples as well as structural transformations due to subsequent annealing at atmospheric pressure. The structure of the sample has been found to be complex, mainly amorphous, however, the amorphous medium contains evenly distributed nanosize inclusions of a paracrystalline phase. The inclusions are highly correlated in orientation and act as “memory units” in the MGE. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of pressure-induced amorphization and “memory glass” effect in rare-earth molybdate single crystals. The XRD and TEM measurements have revealed the presence of the residual identically oriented paracrystalline nanodomains in the pressure-amorphized state. These domains preserve the information about initial structure and orientation of the sample. They act as memory units and crystalline seeds during transformation of the amorphous phase back to the starting single crystalline one. - Highlights: • Pressure-amorphized Eu{sub 2}(MoO4){sub 3} single crystals were studied ex-situ by XRD and TEM. • Tiny residual crystalline inclusions were found in amorphous matrix of sample. • The inclusions keep in memory the parent crystal structure and orientation. • The inclusions account for “memory glass” effect in rare-earth molibdates.

  20. Non-Specific Root Transport of Nutrient Gives Access to an Early Nutritional Indicator: The Case of Sulfate and Molybdate.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Anne; Sorin, Elise; Etienne, Philippe; Diquélou, Sylvain; Koprivova, Anna; Kopriva, Stanislav; Arkoun, Mustapha; Gallardo, Karine; Turner, Marie; Cruz, Florence; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Under sulfur (S) deficiency, crosstalk between nutrients induced accumulation of other nutrients, particularly molybdenum (Mo). This disturbed balanced between S and Mo could provide a way to detect S deficiency and therefore avoid losses in yield and seed quality in cultivated species. Under hydroponic conditions, S deprivation was applied to Brassica napus to determine the precise kinetics of S and Mo uptake and whether sulfate transporters were involved in Mo uptake. Leaf contents of S and Mo were also quantified in a field-grown S deficient oilseed rape crop with different S and N fertilization applications to evaluate the [Mo]:[S] ratio, as an indicator of S nutrition. To test genericity of this indicator, the [Mo]:[S] ratio was also assessed with other cultivated species under different controlled conditions. During S deprivation, Mo uptake was strongly increased in B. napus. This accumulation was not a result of the induction of the molybdate transporters, Mot1 and Asy, but could be a direct consequence of Sultr1.1 and Sultr1.2 inductions. However, analysis of single mutants of these transporters in Arabidopsis thaliana suggested that other sulfate deficiency responsive transporters may be involved. Under field conditions, Mo content was also increased in leaves by a reduction in S fertilization. The [Mo]:[S] ratio significantly discriminated between the plots with different rates of S fertilization. Threshold values were estimated for the hierarchical clustering of commercial crops according to S status. The use of the [Mo]:[S] ratio was also reliable to detect S deficiency for other cultivated species under controlled conditions. The analysis of the leaf [Mo]:[S] ratio seems to be a practical indicator to detect early S deficiency under field conditions and thus improve S fertilization management.

  1. Non-Specific Root Transport of Nutrient Gives Access to an Early Nutritional Indicator: The Case of Sulfate and Molybdate

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Philippe; Diquélou, Sylvain; Koprivova, Anna; Kopriva, Stanislav; Arkoun, Mustapha; Gallardo, Karine; Turner, Marie; Cruz, Florence; Yvin, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Under sulfur (S) deficiency, crosstalk between nutrients induced accumulation of other nutrients, particularly molybdenum (Mo). This disturbed balanced between S and Mo could provide a way to detect S deficiency and therefore avoid losses in yield and seed quality in cultivated species. Under hydroponic conditions, S deprivation was applied to Brassica napus to determine the precise kinetics of S and Mo uptake and whether sulfate transporters were involved in Mo uptake. Leaf contents of S and Mo were also quantified in a field-grown S deficient oilseed rape crop with different S and N fertilization applications to evaluate the [Mo]:[S] ratio, as an indicator of S nutrition. To test genericity of this indicator, the [Mo]:[S] ratio was also assessed with other cultivated species under different controlled conditions. During S deprivation, Mo uptake was strongly increased in B. napus. This accumulation was not a result of the induction of the molybdate transporters, Mot1 and Asy, but could be a direct consequence of Sultr1.1 and Sultr1.2 inductions. However, analysis of single mutants of these transporters in Arabidopsis thaliana suggested that other sulfate deficiency responsive transporters may be involved. Under field conditions, Mo content was also increased in leaves by a reduction in S fertilization. The [Mo]:[S] ratio significantly discriminated between the plots with different rates of S fertilization. Threshold values were estimated for the hierarchical clustering of commercial crops according to S status. The use of the [Mo]:[S] ratio was also reliable to detect S deficiency for other cultivated species under controlled conditions. The analysis of the leaf [Mo]:[S] ratio seems to be a practical indicator to detect early S deficiency under field conditions and thus improve S fertilization management. PMID:27870884

  2. Crystal structures of deuterated sodium molybdate dihydrate and sodium tungstate dihydrate from time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Fortes, A Dominic

    2015-07-01

    Time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data have been measured from ∼90 mol% deuterated isotopologues of Na2MoO4·2H2O and Na2WO4·2H2O at 295 K to a resolution of sin (θ)/λ = 0.77 Å(-1). The use of neutrons has allowed refinement of structural parameters with a precision that varies by a factor of two from the heaviest to the lightest atoms; this contrasts with the X-ray based refinements where precision may be > 20× poorer for O atoms in the presence of atoms such as Mo and W. The accuracy and precision of inter-atomic distances and angles are in excellent agreement with recent X-ray single-crystal structure refinements whilst also completing our view of the hydrogen-bond geometry to the same degree of statistical certainty. The two structures are isotypic, space-group Pbca, with all atoms occupying general positions, being comprised of edge- and corner-sharing NaO5 and NaO6 polyhedra that form layers parallel with (010) inter-leaved with planes of XO4 (X = Mo, W) tetra-hedra that are linked by chains of water mol-ecules along [100] and [001]. The complete structure is identical with the previously described molybdate [Capitelli et al. (2006 ▸). Asian J. Chem. 18, 2856-2860] but shows that the purported three-centred inter-action involving one of the water mol-ecules in the tungstate [Farrugia (2007 ▸). Acta Cryst. E63, i142] is in fact an ordinary two-centred 'linear' hydrogen bond.

  3. Crystal structures of deuterated sodium molybdate dihydrate and sodium tungstate dihydrate from time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, A. Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data have been measured from ∼90 mol% deuterated isotopologues of Na2MoO4·2H2O and Na2WO4·2H2O at 295 K to a resolution of sin (θ)/λ = 0.77 Å−1. The use of neutrons has allowed refinement of structural parameters with a precision that varies by a factor of two from the heaviest to the lightest atoms; this contrasts with the X-ray based refinements where precision may be > 20× poorer for O atoms in the presence of atoms such as Mo and W. The accuracy and precision of inter­atomic distances and angles are in excellent agreement with recent X-ray single-crystal structure refinements whilst also completing our view of the hydrogen-bond geometry to the same degree of statistical certainty. The two structures are isotypic, space-group Pbca, with all atoms occupying general positions, being comprised of edge- and corner-sharing NaO5 and NaO6 polyhedra that form layers parallel with (010) inter­leaved with planes of XO4 (X = Mo, W) tetra­hedra that are linked by chains of water mol­ecules along [100] and [001]. The complete structure is identical with the previously described molybdate [Capitelli et al. (2006 ▸). Asian J. Chem. 18, 2856–2860] but shows that the purported three-centred inter­action involving one of the water mol­ecules in the tungstate [Farrugia (2007 ▸). Acta Cryst. E63, i142] is in fact an ordinary two-centred ‘linear’ hydrogen bond. PMID:26279871

  4. 40 CFR 418.40 - Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ammonium nitrate subcategory. 418.40 Section 418.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Ammonium Nitrate Subcategory § 418.40 Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of ammonium...

  5. 76 FR 39847 - Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation; Final Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... International Trade Administration Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation; Final... investigation on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'') from the Russian Federation... duty investigation and issued an antidumping duty order on ammonium nitrate from Russia. On the...

  6. 77 FR 65532 - Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice of Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... International Trade Administration Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice... the antidumping duty order on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (ammonium nitrate) from the... ammonium nitrate from Russia. On May 29, 2012, the Department published a notice of initiation of...

  7. 40 CFR 418.40 - Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ammonium nitrate subcategory. 418.40 Section 418.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Ammonium Nitrate Subcategory § 418.40 Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of ammonium...

  8. 40 CFR 418.40 - Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ammonium nitrate subcategory. 418.40 Section 418.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Ammonium Nitrate Subcategory § 418.40 Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of ammonium...

  9. 40 CFR 418.40 - Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ammonium nitrate subcategory. 418.40 Section 418.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Ammonium Nitrate Subcategory § 418.40 Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of ammonium...

  10. 40 CFR 418.40 - Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ammonium nitrate subcategory. 418.40 Section 418.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Ammonium Nitrate Subcategory § 418.40 Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of ammonium...

  11. Ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and enhanced spectrophotometric determination of molybdenum (VI) in water and plant leaves samples by FO-LADS.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, Maysam; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2011-02-01

    A new simple and rapid ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME) has been applied to preconcentrate trace levels of molybdenum (VI) as a prior step to its enhanced determination by fiber optic-linear array detection spectrophotometry (FO-LADS). In this method, a small amount of [Hmim][Tf(2)N] (1-hexyl-3-methylimmidazolium bis (trifluormethylsulfonyl) imid) as an extraction solvent was applied to extract molybdenum - pyrogallol red complex, which was formed in an aqueous solution in the presence of N-cetyl-N-N-N-trimethyl ammonium chloride as a sensitizing agent. Under optimum conditions, enhancement factor, detection limit and relative standard deviation (n=5, for 30 μg L(-1) of molybdenum (VI)) in 10 mL water sample were 72.6, 1.43 μg L(-1) and 2.8%, respectively.

  12. Mo (VI) reduction to molybdenum blue by Serratia marcescens strain Dr.Y9.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Shukor Mohd; Hamim, Hamdan Mohd; Anas, Othaman Mohd; Aripin, Shamaan Nor; Arif, Syed Mohd

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the isolation of a local molybdenum-reducing bacterium. The bacterium reduced molybdate or Mo(6+) to molybdenum blue (oxidation states between 5+ to 6+). Electron donors that supported cellular growth were sucrose, maltose, mannitol, fructose, glucose and starch (in decreasing order) with sucrose supporting formation of the highest amount of molybdenum blue at 10 g/l after 24 hours of static incubation. The optimum molybdate and phosphate concentrations that supported molybdate reduction were 20 and 5 mM, respectively. Molybdate reduction was optimal at 37 degrees C. The molybdenum blue produced from cellular reduction exhibited a unique absorption spectrum with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. The isolate was tentatively identified as S. marcescens strain Dr.Y9 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. No inhibition of molybdenum-reducing activity was seen using electron transport system (ETS) inhibitors such as antimycin A, 1HQNO (Hydroxyquinoline-N-Oxide), sodium azide and cyanide suggesting that the ETS of this bacterium is not the site of molybdate reduction.

  13. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zhong, Lirong; Zachara, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Uranium(VI) diffusion was investigated in a fine-grained saprolite sediment that was collected from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge site, TN, where uranium contamination in groundwater is a major environmental concern. U(VI) diffusion was studied in a diffusion cell with one cell end in contact with a large, air-equilibrated electrolyte reservoir. The pH, carbonate and U(VI) concentrations in the reservoir solution were varied to investigate the effect of solution chemical composition and uranyl speciation on U(VI) diffusion. The rates of U(VI) diffusion were evaluated by monitoring the U(VI) concentration in the reservoir solution as a function of time; and by measuring the total concentration of U(VI) extracted from the sediment as a function of time and distance in the diffusion cells. The estimated apparent rate of U(VI) diffusion varied significantly with pH with the slowest rate observed at pH 7 as a result of strong adsorptive retardation. The estimated retardation factor was generally consistent with a surface complexation model. Numerical simulations indicated that a species-based diffusion model that incorporated both aqueous and surface complexation reactions was required to describe U(VI) diffusion in the low permeability material under variable geochemical conditions. Our results implied that low permeability materials will play an important role in storing U(VI) and attenuating U(VI) plume migration at circumneutral pH conditions, and will serve as a long-term source for releasing U(VI) back to the nearby aquifer during and after aquifer decontamination.

  14. Semiconductors A(III)B(VI): Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhundov, G. A.; Abdullaev, G. B.; Guseynov, G. D.; Mekhtiyev, R. F.; Aliyeva, M. Kh.

    1993-11-01

    Semiconductors A(III) B(VI) crystallize in laminated or chain structures and contain nine valence electrons in each molecule. Connection in the layers and the chains is predominantly covalent, and Van der Waal between the layers and the chains. Calculated data of the energy spectrum of these compounds are absent, and the available experimental studies are insufficient for understanding of the zone structures. We have obtained and studied single crystals of GaS, GaSe, GaTe, InSe, and TiSe.

  15. ViSC Social Competence Program.

    PubMed

    Strohmeier, Dagmar; Hoffmann, Christine; Schiller, Eva-Maria; Stefanek, Elisabeth; Spiel, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    The ViSC Social Competence Program has been implemented in Austrian schools within the scope of a national strategy plan, Together Against Violence. The program is a primary preventive program designed for grades 5 to 8. The prevention of aggression and bullying is defined as a school development task, and the initial implementation of the program lasts one school year. The program consists of universal and specific actions that are implemented through in-school teacher training and a class project for students. The program was evaluated with a randomized intervention control group design. Data were collected from teachers and students. Results suggest that the program reduces aggression in schools.

  16. Vič Goes to Near Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merhar, Vida Kariž; Capuder, Rok; Maroševič, Timotej; Artač, Sonja; Mozer, Alenka; Štekovič, Maja

    2016-11-01

    In the school year 2012-2013 about 50 students (Fig. 1), managed by mentors (teachers from the middle school Gimnazija Vič in Ljubljana, Slovenia) created an atmospheric probe and launched it into an altitude of more than 30 km above Earth's surface. The aim of this "space expedition" was to take pictures of Earth and to measure how air pressure, the temperature, CO2 and O2 concentrations, the level of UVA and UVB radiation, and the amount of light change with altitude. There was also a yeast sample placed inside and outside of the probe. Here we report on some of the successes and failures of this endeavor.

  17. Cr(VI) reduction in continuous-flow coculture bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.T.; Chirwa, E.M.; Shen, H.

    2000-04-01

    A continuous-flow coculture bioreactor with a phenol-degrading organism, Pseudomonas putida DMP-1, and a Cr(VI)-reducing species, Escherichia coli ATCC 33456, was developed for simultaneous removal of phenol and Cr(VI). Phenol was the sole energy and carbon source added to the coculture along with a basal medium and hexavalent chromium. The coculture bioreactor was operated under three liquid detention times (0.20, 0.31, and 0.52 days) with phenol and Cr(VI) loadings ranging from 2,500 to 8,200 mg/L/day and 4.5-33.2 mg/L/day, respectively. After 279 days of continuous operation, eight quasi-steady-state operation conditions were obtained with near complete removal of phenol and Cr(VI). Elevated levels of Cr(VI) and phenol were observed in the effluent under a high influent Cr(VI) concentration (16 mg/L) or a short liquid detention time (0.20 days). The system recovered from Cr(VI) toxicity after influent Cr(VI) level was reduced. Chromium mass balance analysis revealed that nearly all of the influent Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) in the coculture bioreactor through biological activity. Spectra of UV-Vis and mass spectrometers suggested that phenol metabolites produced by P. putida were utilized by E. coli.

  18. Reductive immobilization of uranium(VI) by amorphous iron sulfide.

    PubMed

    Hua, Bin; Deng, Baolin

    2008-12-01

    Batch experiments were used to evaluate the reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) by synthesized, amorphous iron sulfide (FeS) in the anoxic environment. The tests were initiated by spiking 168.0 microM U(VI) to 0.18 g/L FeS suspensions under a CO2-free condition with pH varied from 5.99 to 10.17. The immobilization rate of U(VI) was determined by monitoring the changes of aqueous U(VI) concentration, and the reduction rate of U(VI) associated with FeS was determined by the difference between the total spiked U(VI) and the extractable amount of U(VI) by 25 mM NaHCO3 solution. The results showed that a rapid removal of U(VI) from the aqueous phase occurred within 1 h under all pH conditions accompanied by a simultaneous release of Fe(ll), whereas the reduction of U(VI) associated with FeS took hours to over a week for completion. The reduction rate was greatly increased with decreasing pH within the examined pH range. Product analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the formation of U3O8/4O9/UO2, polysulfide, and ferric iron.

  19. Ultratrace Determination of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) by Microsample Injection System Flame Atomic Spectroscopy in Drinking Water and Treated and Untreated Industrial Effluents.

    PubMed

    Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Elci, Latif; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Khan, Muhammad Irfan; Naseer, Hafiz Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Simple and robust analytical procedures were developed for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and lead (Pb(II)) by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) using microsample injection system coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (MIS-FAAS). For the current study, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol were used as chelating agent, extraction solvent, and disperser solvent, respectively. The effective variables of developed method have been optimized and studied in detail. The limit of detection of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) were 0.037 and 0.054 µg/L, respectively. The enrichment factors in both cases were 400 with 40 mL of initial volumes. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 6) were <4%. The applicability and the accuracy of DLLME were estimated by the analysis of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) in industrial effluent wastewater by standard addition method (recoveries >96%). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) at ultratrace levels in natural drinking water and industrial effluents wastewater of Denizli. Moreover, the proposed method was compared with the literature reported method.

  20. Ultratrace Determination of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) by Microsample Injection System Flame Atomic Spectroscopy in Drinking Water and Treated and Untreated Industrial Effluents

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Elci, Latif; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Khan, Muhammad Irfan; Naseer, Hafiz Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Simple and robust analytical procedures were developed for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and lead (Pb(II)) by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) using microsample injection system coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (MIS-FAAS). For the current study, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol were used as chelating agent, extraction solvent, and disperser solvent, respectively. The effective variables of developed method have been optimized and studied in detail. The limit of detection of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) were 0.037 and 0.054 µg/L, respectively. The enrichment factors in both cases were 400 with 40 mL of initial volumes. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 6) were <4%. The applicability and the accuracy of DLLME were estimated by the analysis of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) in industrial effluent wastewater by standard addition method (recoveries >96%). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) at ultratrace levels in natural drinking water and industrial effluents wastewater of Denizli. Moreover, the proposed method was compared with the literature reported method. PMID:24163779

  1. Early metabolic effects and mechanism of ammonium transport in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, A.; Pardo, J.P.; Ramirez, J.

    1987-03-01

    Studies were performed to define the effects and mechanism of NH+4 transport in yeast. The following results were obtained. Glucose was a better facilitator than ethanol-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ for ammonium transport; low concentrations of uncouplers or respiratory inhibitors could inhibit the transport with ethanol as the substrate. With glucose, respiratory inhibitors showed only small inhibitory effects, and only high concentrations of azide or trifluoromethoxy carbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone could inhibit ammonium transport. Ammonium in the free state could be concentrated approximately 200-fold by the cells. Also, the addition of ammonium produced stimulation of both respiration and fermentation; an increased rate of H+ extrusion and an alkalinization of the interior of the cell; a decrease of the membrane potential, as monitored by fluorescent cyanine; an immediate decrease of the levels of ATP and an increase of ADP, which may account for the stimulation of both fermentation and respiration; and an increase of the levels of inorganic phosphate. Ammonium was found to inhibit 86Rb+ transport much less than K+. Also, while K+ produced a competitive type of inhibition, that produced by NH4+ was of the noncompetitive type. From the distribution ratio of ammonium and the pH gradient, an electrochemical potential gradient of around -180 mV was calculated. The results indicate that ammonium is transported in yeast by a mechanism similar to that of monovalent alkaline cations, driven by a membrane potential. The immediate metabolic effects of this cation seem to be due to an increased (H+)ATPase, to which its transport is coupled. However, the carriers seem to be different. The transport system studied in this work was that of low affinity.

  2. Clinoptilolite: a possible support material for nitrifying biofilms for effective control of ammonium effluent quality?

    PubMed

    Inan, H; Beler Baykal, B

    2005-01-01

    Ammonium selective natural zeolite clinoptilolite is suggested as a possible support material for nitrifying biofilms to help improve effluent ammonium quality through its high capacity of ammonium removal in the process of ion exchange. This will especially be helpful in cases where the biofilter receives peak or variable loads routinely or occasionally. At the time of peak loads or shocks of ammonium, ion exchange capacity will provide a buffer for the effluent ammonium quality. Data to support this suggestion is presented.

  3. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of zinc-cyanide complex.

    PubMed

    Yngard, Ria; Damrongsiri, Seelawut; Osathaphan, Khemarath; Sharma, Virender K

    2007-10-01

    Zinc-cyanide complexes are found in gold mining effluents and in metal finishing rinse water. The effect of Zn(II) on the oxidation of cyanide by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O(4)(2-), Fe(VI)) was thus investigated by studying the kinetics of the reaction of Fe(VI) with cyanide present in a potassium salt of a zinc cyanide complex (K(2)Zn(CN)(4)) and in a mixture of Zn(II) and cyanide solutions as a function of pH (9.0-11.0). The rate-law for the oxidation of Zn(CN)(4)(2-) by Fe(VI) was found to be -d[Fe(VI)]/dt=k[Fe(VI)][Zn(CN)(4)(2-)](0.5). The rate constant, k, decreased with an increase in pH. The effect of temperature (15-45 degrees C) on the oxidation was studied at pH 9.0, which gave an activation energy of 45.7+/-1.5kJmol(-1). The cyanide oxidation rate decreased in the presence of the Zn(II) ions. However, Zn(II) ions had no effect on the cyanide removal efficiency by Fe(VI) and the stoichiometry of Fe(VI) to cyanide was approximately 1:1; similar to the stoichiometry in absence of Zn(II) ions. The destruction of cyanide by Fe(VI) resulted in cyanate. The experiments on removal of cyanide from rinse water using Fe(VI) demonstrated complete conversion of cyanide to cyanate.

  4. Simultaneous removal of ammonium and suspended solids in multipurpose filters.

    PubMed

    Alkas, Deniz; Baykal, Bilsen Beler; Kinaci, Cumali

    2012-06-01

    A multipurpose filter in which sand and clinoptilolite are used together as filter material is suggested for the simultaneous removal of suspended solids and ammonium in one single unit. The capacity of the clinoptilolite used was determined as 10.4 mg/g for 20 mg/l initial ammonium concentration. In addition, a packed column ion exchanger with clinoptilolite and a classical sand filter were also investigated for comparison. Ammonium and suspended solids removal rates were observed and compared for all columns. The results of the column analysis have revealed that the ammonium removal rate, which was only 20% in the sand column, was increased to 100% by replacing 50% of the sand with clinoptilolite; similarly, the suspended solids removal, which was only 17% in the clinoptilolite column, was increased to 75% by replacing 50% of the clinoptilolite with sand. As such, when ion exchange and filtration processes were carried out in a multipurpose column, high removals for both parameters could be obtained simultaneously. Multipurpose columns could be an alternative both for the upgrading of existing treatment plants or for new plants for simultaneous removal of ammonium and suspended solids, giving considerable savings in terms of land requirements.

  5. Removing ammonium from water using modified corncob-biochar.

    PubMed

    Vu, Thi Mai; Trinh, Van Tuyen; Doan, Dinh Phuong; Van, Huu Tap; Nguyen, Tien Vinh; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2017-02-01

    Ammonium pollution in groundwater and surface water is of major concern in many parts of the world due to the danger it poses to the environment and people's health. This study focuses on the development of a low cost adsorbent, specifically a modified biochar prepared from corncob. Evaluated here is the efficiency of this new material for removing ammonium from synthetic water (ammonium concentration from 10 to 100mg/L). The characteristics of the modified biochar were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) test, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that ammonium adsorption on modified biochar strongly depended on pH. Adsorption kinetics of NH4(+)-N using modified biochar followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Both Langmuir and Sips adsorption isotherm models could simulate well the adsorption behavior of ammonium on modificated biochar. The highest adsorption capacity of 22.6mg NH4(+)-N/g modified biochar was obtained when the biochar was modified by soaking it in HNO3 6M and NaOH 0.3M for 8h and 24h, respectively. The high adsorption capacity of the modified biochar suggested that it is a promising adsorbent for NH4(+)-N remediation from water.

  6. Fractionation of bamboo hemicelluloses by graded saturated ammonium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ying; Zhang, Bing; Qi, Xian-Ming; Peng, Feng; Yao, Chun-Li; Sun, Run-Cang

    2015-09-20

    The hemicelluloses were isolated with 10% KOH at 25°C from dewaxed and delignified bamboo powder. The alkali-soluble hemicelluloses from Sinocalamus affinis were fractionated by ammonium sulphate precipitation method. The bamboo alkali-soluble hemicelluloses yielded seven hemicellulosic fractions obtained at 0, 5, 15, 25, 40, 55, and 70% saturation with ammonium sulphate. It was found that the more branched hemicelluloses were precipitated at higher ammonium sulphate concentrations (55 and 70%), the more linear hemicelluloses were precipitated at lower ammonium sulphate concentrations (0, 5, 15, 25, and 40%). The molecular weights of hemicellulosic fractions become lower from 35,270 (H0) to 18,680 (H70)gmol(-1) with the increasing concentrations of saturated ammonium sulphate from 0 to 70%. Based on the FT-IR, (1)H, (13)C and 2D HSQC NMR studies, the alkali-soluble hemicelluloses were 4-O-methyl-glucuronoarabinoxylans composed of the (1→4)-linked β-d-xylopyranosyl backbone with branches at O-3 of α-L-arabinofuranosyl or at O-2 of 4-O-methyl-α-d-glucuronic acid.

  7. Loss of fine particle ammonium from denuded nylon filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Taehyoung; Ayres, Benjamin; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    Ammonium is an important constituent of fine particulate mass in the atmosphere, but can be difficult to quantify due to possible sampling artifacts. Losses of semivolatile species such as NH 4NO 3 can be particularly problematic. In order to evaluate ammonium losses from aerosol particles collected on filters, a series of field experiments was conducted using denuded nylon and Teflon filters at Bondville, IL (February 2003), San Gorgonio, CA (April 2003 and July 2004), Grand Canyon NP, AZ (May, 2003), Brigantine, NJ (November 2003), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP), TN (July-August 2004). Samples were collected over 24 h periods. Losses from denuded nylon filters ranged from 10% (monthly average) in Bondville, IL to 28% in San Gorgonio, CA in summer. Losses on individual sample days ranged from 1% to 65%. Losses tended to increase with increasing diurnal temperature and relative humidity changes and with the fraction of ambient total N(-III) (particulate NH 4++gaseous NH 3) present as gaseous NH 3. The amount of ammonium lost at most sites could be explained by the amount of NH 4NO 3 present in the sampled aerosol. Ammonium losses at Great Smoky Mountains NP, however, significantly exceeded the amount of NH 4NO 3 collected. Ammoniated organic salts are suggested as additional important contributors to observed ammonium loss at this location.

  8. Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of ammonium cationized polyethers.

    PubMed

    Nasioudis, Andreas; Heeren, Ron M A; van Doormalen, Irene; de Wijs-Rot, Nicolette; van den Brink, Oscar F

    2011-05-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts (Quats) and amines are known to facilitate the MS analysis of high molar mass polyethers by forming low charge state adduct ions. The formation, stability, and behavior upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) of adduct ions of polyethers with a variety of Quats and amines were studied by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight, quadrupole ion trap, and linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The linear ion trap instrument was part of an Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer that allowed accurate mass MS/MS measurements. The Quats and amines studied were of different degree of substitution, structure, and size. The stability of the adduct ions was related to the structure of the cation, especially the amine's degree of substitution. CID of singly/doubly charged primary and tertiary ammonium cationized polymers resulted in the neutral loss of the amine followed by fragmentation of the protonated product ions. The latter reveals information about the monomer unit, polymer sequence, and endgroup structure. In addition, the detection of product ions retaining the ammonium ion was observed. The predominant process in the CID of singly charged quaternary ammonium cationized polymers was cation detachment, whereas their doubly charged adduct ions provided the same information as the primary and tertiary ammonium cationized adduct ions. This study shows the potential of specific amines as tools for the structural elucidation of high molar mass polyethers.

  9. Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Ammonium Cationized Polyethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasioudis, Andreas; Heeren, Ron M. A.; van Doormalen, Irene; de Wijs-Rot, Nicolette; van den Brink, Oscar F.

    2011-05-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts (Quats) and amines are known to facilitate the MS analysis of high molar mass polyethers by forming low charge state adduct ions. The formation, stability, and behavior upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) of adduct ions of polyethers with a variety of Quats and amines were studied by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight, quadrupole ion trap, and linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The linear ion trap instrument was part of an Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer that allowed accurate mass MS/MS measurements. The Quats and amines studied were of different degree of substitution, structure, and size. The stability of the adduct ions was related to the structure of the cation, especially the amine's degree of substitution. CID of singly/doubly charged primary and tertiary ammonium cationized polymers resulted in the neutral loss of the amine followed by fragmentation of the protonated product ions. The latter reveals information about the monomer unit, polymer sequence, and endgroup structure. In addition, the detection of product ions retaining the ammonium ion was observed. The predominant process in the CID of singly charged quaternary ammonium cationized polymers was cation detachment, whereas their doubly charged adduct ions provided the same information as the primary and tertiary ammonium cationized adduct ions. This study shows the potential of specific amines as tools for the structural elucidation of high molar mass polyethers.

  10. Effects of bisphenol A on ammonium assimilation in soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hai; Wang, Li Hong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiao Hua

    2013-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), which is ubiquitous in the environment, is an example of an endocrine-disrupting compound (EDC). Ammonium assimilation has an important function in plant growth and development. However, insufficient information on the potential effect of BPA on ammonium assimilation in plants is available. In this study, the effects of BPA on ammonium assimilation in roots of soybean seedlings were investigated. During the stress period, 1.5 mg L(-1) of BPA improved glutamine synthetase (GS)/glutamate synthase (GOGAT) cycle and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) pathway in ammonium assimilation. The amino acid and the soluble protein contents increased in the soybeans. At 17.2 and 50.0 mg L(-1) of BPA, the GS/GOGAT cycle was inhibited and the GDH pathway was promoted. The amino acid content increased and the soluble protein content decreased. During the recovery period, the GS/GOGAT cycle and the GDH pathway recovered at 1.5 and 17.2 mg L(-1) of BPA but not at 50.0 mg L(-1) of BPA. The amino acid content continuously increased and the soluble protein content decreased compared with those in the control treatment. In summary, BPA treatment could affect the contents of soluble protein and amino acid in the soybean roots by regulating ammonium assimilation.

  11. Loss of Fine Particle Ammonium from Denuded Nylon Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Taehyoung; Ayres, Benjamin; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2006-08-01

    Ammonium is an important constituent of fine particulate mass in the atmosphere, but can be difficult to quantify due to possible sampling artifacts. Losses of semivolatile species such as NH4NO3 can be particularly problematic. In order to evaluate ammonium losses from aerosol particles collected on filters, a series of field experiments was conducted using denuded nylon and Teflon filters at Bondville, Illinois (February 2003), San Gorgonio, California (April 2003 and July 2004), Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (May, 2003), Brigantine, New Jersey (November 2003), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP), Tennessee (July–August 2004). Samples were collected over 24-hr periods. Losses from denuded nylon filters ranged from 10% (monthly average) in Bondville, Illinois to 28% in San Gorgonio, California in summer. Losses on individual sample days ranged from 1% to 65%. Losses tended to increase with increasing diurnal temperature and relative humidity changes and with the fraction of ambient total N(--III) (particulate NH4+ plus gaseous NH3) present as gaseous NH3. The amount of ammonium lost at most sites could be explained by the amount of NH4NO3 present in the sampled aerosol. Ammonium losses at Great Smoky Mountains NP, however, significantly exceeded the amount of NH4NO3 collected. Ammoniated organic salts are suggested as additional important contributors to observed ammonium loss at this location.

  12. Modeling of alkyl quaternary ammonium cations intercalated into montmorillonite lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, El Mehdi; Boughaleb, Yahia; El Gaini, Layla; Meghea, Irina; Bakasse, Mina

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► The modification of montmorillonites by three surfactants increases the basal spacing. ► The model proposed show a bilayer conformation for the surfactant ODTMA. ► The DODMA and TOMA surfactants adopt a paraffin type arrangement. ► Behavior of surfactants in interlayer space was confirmed by TGA and ATR analysis. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to study the conformation of the quaternary ammonium cations viz., octadecyl trimethyl ammonium (ODTMA), dioctadecyl dimethyl ammonium (DMDOA) and trioctadecyl methyl ammonium (TOMA) intercalated within montmorillonite. The modified montmorillonite was characterized by X-ray diffraction in small angle (SAXS), thermal analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy of attenuated total reflection (ATR). The modification of organophilic montmorillonites by the three surfactants ODTMA, DMDOA and TOMA increases the basal spacing from their respective intercalated distances of 1.9 nm, 2.6 nm and 3.4 nm respectively. The increase in the spacing due to the basic organic modification was confirmed by the results of thermal analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy (ATR), and also supported by theoretical calculations of longitudinal and transversal chain sizes of these alkyl quaternary ammonium cations.

  13. A maritime pine antimicrobial peptide involved in ammonium nutrition.

    PubMed

    Canales, Javier; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2011-09-01

    A large family of small cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is involved in the innate defence of plants against pathogens. Recently, it has been shown that AMPs may also play important roles in plant growth and development. In previous work, we have identified a gene of the AMP β-barrelin family that was differentially regulated in the roots of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) in response to changes in ammonium nutrition. Here, we present the molecular characterization of two AMP genes, PpAMP1 and PpAMP2, showing different molecular structure and physicochemical properties. PpAMP1 and PpAMP2 displayed different expression patterns in maritime pine seedlings and adult trees. Furthermore, our expression analyses indicate that PpAMP1 is the major form of AMP in the tree, and its relative abundance is regulated by ammonium availability. In contrast, PpAMP2 is expressed at much lower levels and it is not regulated by ammonium. To gain new insights into the function of PpAMP1, we over-expressed the recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and demonstrated that PpAMP1 strongly inhibited yeast growth, indicating that it exhibits antimicrobial activity. We have also found that PpAMP1 alters ammonium uptake, suggesting that it is involved in the regulation of ammonium ion flux into pine roots.

  14. Anomalous neutron Compton scattering cross sections in ammonium hexachlorometallates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzystyniak, M.; Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.; Lerch, M.; Lalowicz, Z. T.; Szymocha, A.

    2007-03-01

    The authors have performed neutron Compton scattering measurements on ammonium hexachloropalladate (NH4)2PdCl6 and ammonium hexachlorotellurate (NH4)2TeCl6. Both substances belong to the family of ammonium metallates. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the possible role of electronic environment of a proton on the anomaly of the neutron scattering intensity. The quantity of interest that was subject to experimental test was the reduction factor of the neutron scattering intensities. In both samples, the reduction factor was found to be smaller than unity, thus indicating the anomalous neutron Compton scattering from protons. Interestingly, the anomaly decreases with decreasing scattering angle and disappears at the lowest scattering angle (longest scattering time). The dependence of the amount of the anomaly on the scattering angle (scattering time) is the same in both substances (within experimental error). Also, the measured widths of proton momentum distributions are equal in both metallates. This is consistent with the fact that the attosecond proton dynamics of ammonium cations is fairly well decoupled from the dynamics of the sublattice of the octahedral anions PdCl62- and TeCl62-, respectively. The hypothesis is put forward that proton-electron decoherence processes are responsible for the considered effect. Decoherence processes may have to do rather with the direct electronic environment of ammonium protons and not with the electronic structure of the metal-chlorine bond.

  15. U(VI) behaviour in hyperalkaline calcite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kurt F.; Bryan, Nicholas D.; Swinburne, Adam N.; Bots, Pieter; Shaw, Samuel; Natrajan, Louise S.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.; Livens, Francis R.; Morris, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of U(VI) in hyperalkaline fluid/calcite systems was studied over a range of U(VI) concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM to 42.0 μM) and in two high pH systems, young and old synthetic cement leachate in batch sorption experiments. These systems were selected to be representative of young- (pH 13.3) and old-stage (pH 10.5) leachate evolution within a cementitious geological disposal facility. Batch sorption experiments, modelling, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, electron microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering and luminescence spectroscopy were used to define the speciation of U(VI) across the systems of study. At the lowest concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM 232U(VI)) significant U removal was observed for both old and young cement leachates, and this was successfully modelled using a first order kinetic adsorption modelling approach. At higher concentrations (>4.20 μM) in the young cement leachate, U(VI) showed no interaction with the calcite surface over an 18 month period. Small angle X-ray scattering techniques indicated that at high U concentrations (42.0 μM) and after 18 months, the U(VI) was present in a colloidal form which had little interaction with the calcite surface and consisted of both primary and aggregated particles with a radius of 7.6 ± 1.1 and 217 ± 24 Å, respectively. In the old cement leachate, luminescence spectroscopy identified two surface binding sites for U(VI) on calcite: in the system with 0.21 μM U(VI), a liebigite-like Ca2UO2(CO3)3 surface complex was identified; at higher U(VI) concentrations (0.42 μM), a second binding site of undetermined coordination was identified. At elevated U(VI) concentrations (>2.10 μM) in old cement leachate, both geochemical data and luminescence spectroscopy suggested that surface mediated precipitation was controlling U(VI) behaviour. A focused ion beam mill was used to create a section across the U(VI) precipitate-calcite interface. Transmission electron

  16. Procedure for plutonium determination using Pu(VI) spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, L.F.; Temer, D.J.; Jackson, D.D.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes a simple spectrophotometric method for determining total plutonium in nitric acid solutions based on the spectrum of Pu(VI). Plutonium samples in nitric acid are oxidized to Pu(VI) with Ce(IV) and the net absorbance at the 830 nm peak is measured.

  17. 32 CFR 2003.6 - Voting (Article VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Voting (Article VI). 2003.6 Section 2003.6 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.6 Voting (Article VI). (a) Motions. When the Panel...

  18. 32 CFR 2003.6 - Voting (Article VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Voting (Article VI). 2003.6 Section 2003.6 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.6 Voting (Article VI). (a) Motions. When the Panel...

  19. Myosin VI facilitates connexin 43 gap junction accretion

    PubMed Central

    Waxse, Bennett J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we demonstrate myosin VI enrichment at Cx43 (also known as GJA1)-containing gap junctions (GJs) in heart tissue, primary cardiomyocytes and cell culture models. In primary cardiac tissue and in fibroblasts from the myosin VI-null mouse as well as in tissue culture cells transfected with siRNA against myosin VI, we observe reduced GJ plaque size with a concomitant reduction in intercellular communication, as shown by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and a new method of selective calcein administration. Analysis of the molecular role of myosin VI in Cx43 trafficking indicates that myosin VI is dispensable for the delivery of Cx43 to the cell surface and connexon movement in the plasma membrane. Furthermore, we cannot corroborate clathrin or Dab2 localization at gap junctions and we do not observe a function for the myosin-VI–Dab2 complex in clathrin-dependent endocytosis of annular gap junctions. Instead, we found that myosin VI was localized at the edge of Cx43 plaques by using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and use FRAP to identify a plaque accretion defect as the primary manifestation of myosin VI loss in Cx43 homeostasis. A fuller understanding of this derangement may explain the cardiomyopathy or gliosis associated with the loss of myosin VI. PMID:28096472

  20. Kandinsky's "Composition VI": Heideggerian Poetry in Noah's Ark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    The author will begin his investigation of Wassily Kandinsky's painting "Composition VI" with Kandinsky's own commentary on the painting. He will then turn to the analysis of Kandinsky and the "Compositions" in John Sallis's book "Shades." Using this analysis as his point of departure, the author will consider how "Composition VI" resonates with…

  1. Possible problems in ENDF/B-VI.r8

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D; Hedstrom, G

    2003-10-30

    This document lists the problems that we encountered in processing ENDF/B-VI.r8 that we suspect are problems with ENDF/B-VI.r8 itself. It also contains a comparison of linear interpolation methods. Finally, this documents proposes an alternative to the current scheme of reporting problems to the ENDF community.

  2. KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Stephen M

    2008-09-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of

  3. Enhanced microbial reduction of Cr(VI) and U(VI) by different natural organic matter fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Baohua; Chen, Jie

    2003-10-01

    Although direct microbial reduction of Cr(VI) and U(VI) is known, few studies have examined the kinetics and the underlying mechanisms of the reduction of these contaminants by different natural organic matter (NOM) fractions in the presence or absence of microorganisms. In this study, NOM was found to chemically reduce Cr(VI) at pH 3, but the reduction rates were negligible at pH ˜7. The abiotic reduction of U(VI) by NOM was not observed, possibly because of the presence of small amounts of nitrate in the reactant solution. However, all NOM fractions, particularly the soil humic acid (HA), enhanced the bioreduction of Cr(VI) or U(VI) in the presence of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. The reduction rates varied greatly among NOM fractions with different chemical and structural properties: the polyphenolic-rich NOM-PP fraction appeared to be the most reactive in abiotically reducing Cr(VI) at a low pH, but soil HA was more effective in mediating the microbial reduction of Cr(VI) and U(VI) under anaerobic, circumneutral pH conditions. These observations are attributed to an increased solubility and conformational changes of the soil HA with pH and, more importantly, its relatively high contents of polycondensed and conjugated aromatic organic moieties. An important implication of this study is that, depending on chemical and structural properties, different NOM components may play different roles in enhancing the bioreduction of Cr(VI) and U(VI) by microorganisms. Polycondensed aromatic humic materials may be particularly useful in mediating the bioreduction and rapid immobilization of these contaminant metals in soil.

  4. Ammonium as a sustainable proton shuttle in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; Law, Yingyu; Cheng, Ka Yu

    2011-10-01

    This work examines a pH control method using ammonium (NH(4)(+)) as a sustainable proton shuttle in a CEM-equipped BES. Current generation was sustained by adding NH(3) or ammonium hydroxide (NH(4)OH) to the anolyte, controlling its pH at 7. Ammonium ion migration maintained the catholyte pH at approximately 9.25. Such NH(4)(+)/NH(3) migration accounted for 90±10% of the ionic flux in the BES. Reintroducing the volatilized NH(3) from the cathode into the anolyte maintained a suitable anolyte pH for sustained microbial-driven current generation. Hence, NH(4)(+)/NH(3) acted as a proton shuttle that is not consumed in the process.

  5. Cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide assisted hydrothermal growth of hematite hollow cubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei-Wei; Yao, Jia-Liang

    2010-11-15

    Hematite hollow cubes have been prepared by forced hydrolysis of ferric chloride solutions under hydrothermal conditions. The effects of reaction time, reaction temperature and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide on the transformation process from akageneite to hematite were investigated in detail. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide was a critical factor influencing the phase transformation process of akageneite and the final morphology of the as-prepared products. With cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, hematite hollow cubes and porous spheres were obtained. Otherwise only dense cubes were observed even prolonging reaction time or increasing reaction temperature. The mechanism was proposed.

  6. Ammonium and sulfate ion release of histamine from lung fragments.

    PubMed

    Charles, J M; Menzel, D B

    1975-06-01

    In vitro studies with guinea pig lung fragments incubated with 10- to 200-mM concentrations of ammonium ion demonstrated the release of substanial quantities of histamine. Of the anions tested with ammonium ion, sulfate was the most potent, while nitrate and acetate ions were of intermediate potency and chloride was less potent. An osmotic effect is unlikely since equal concentrations of sodium chloride failed to release histamine. Isoproterenol, known to decrease anaphylactic histamine release, and acetycholine, known to increase histamine release, had no effect on the ammonium sulfate-mediated release of histamine. N-6 2'-O-Dibutyryladenosine 3',5' monophosphate (dibutyryl c-AMP) was also ineffective. These studies suggest that the inhalation irritation associated with certain sulfate and other salts, may be a function of their ability to release histamine in the presence of amonium ion.

  7. Study on mechanism of isomerization between ammonium thiocyanate and thiourea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao-Zhi; Niu, Meng-Xiao

    2016-12-01

    Application of ammonium thiocyanate that can be separated from wastewater in coking plant is limited. It may isomerize to thiourea which has widely applied in industry. However, the isomerization yield is low. Moreover, the isomerization temperature is more than 145 °C. In this paper, the isomerization was investigated. The mechanism of the isomerization was supposed based on quantum chemistry calculations. Ammonia was employed as a catalyst to lower isomerization temperature and improved the yield of thiourea in the isomerization reaction. Results of quantum chemical calculation and experiments support the supposed mechanism. The mechanism can be applied in production of thiourea from isomerization of ammonium thiocyanate. The paper suggests a useful way of resourcizing ammonium thiocyanate in wastewater.

  8. Effect of temperature on ammonium removal in Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Martínez, A; Serralta, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2015-09-01

    The effect of temperature on microalgal ammonium uptake was investigated by carrying out four batch experiments in which a mixed culture of microalgae, composed mainly of Scenedesmus sp., was cultivated under different temperatures within the usual temperature working range in Mediterranean climate (15-34 °C). Ammonium removal rates increased with temperature up to 26 °C and stabilized thereafter. Ratkowsky and Cardinal temperatures models successfully reproduced the experimental data. Optimum (31.3 °C), minimum (8.8 °C) and maximum (46.1 °C) temperatures for ammonium removal by Scenedesmus sp. under the studied conditions were obtained as model parameters. These temperature-related parameters constitute very useful information for designing and operating wastewater treatment systems using these microalgae.

  9. Exposure to common quaternary ammonium disinfectants decreases fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Vanessa E.; Potineni, Haritha; Hunt, Patricia; Griswold, Jodi; Siems, Bill; Werre, Stephen R.; Hrubec, Terry C.

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are antimicrobial disinfectants commonly used in commercial and household settings. Extensive use of QACs results in ubiquitous human exposure, yet reproductive toxicity has not been evaluated. Decreased reproductive performance in laboratory mice coincided with the introduction of a disinfectant containing both alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (ADBAC) and didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC). QACs were detected in caging material over a period of several months following cessation of disinfectant use. Breeding pairs exposed for six months to a QAC disinfectant exhibited decreases in fertility and fecundity: increased time to first litter, longer pregnancy intervals, fewer pups per litter and fewer pregnancies. Significant morbidity in near term dams was also observed. In summary, exposure to a common QAC disinfectant mixture significantly impaired reproductive health in mice. This study illustrates the importance of assessing mixture toxicity of commonly used products whose components have only been evaluated individually. PMID:25483128

  10. Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Mother-Liquid Radiochemical Production - 13089

    SciTech Connect

    Zherebtsov, Alexander; Dvoeglazov, Konstantine; Volk, Vladimir; Zagumenov, Vladimir; Zverev, Dmitriy; Tinin, Vasiliy; Kozyrev, Anatoly; Shamin, Dladimir; Tvilenev, Konstantin

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the work is to develop a basic technology of decomposition of ammonium nitrate stock solutions produced in radiochemical enterprises engaged in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel and fabrication of fresh fuel. It was necessary to work out how to conduct a one-step thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, select and test the catalysts for this process and to prepare proposals for recycling condensation. Necessary accessories were added to a laboratory equipment installation decomposition of ammonium nitrate. It is tested several types of reducing agents and two types of catalyst to neutralize the nitrogen oxides. It is conducted testing of modes of the process to produce condensation, suitable for use in the conversion of a new technological scheme of production. It is studied the structure of the catalysts before and after their use in a laboratory setting. It is tested the selected catalyst in the optimal range for 48 hours of continuous operation. (authors)

  11. Factors affecting the adsorption of chromium (VI) on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yavuz, R.; Orbak, I.; Karatepe, N.

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the adsorption behavior of chromium (VI) on two different activated carbon samples produced from Tuncbilek lignite. The effects of the initial chromium (VI) concentration (250-1000 mg/L), temperature (297-323 K) and pH (2.0-9.5) on adsorption were investigated systematically. The effectiveness of the parameters on chromium adsorption was found to be in the order of pH, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and the temperature. Increasing the pH from 2.0 to 9.5 caused a decrease in adsorption. However, the adsorption was increased by increasing the initial Cr(VI) concentration and temperature. The multilinear mathematical model was also developed to predict the Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon samples within the experimental conditions.

  12. Steady state growth of E. Coli in low ammonium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsu; Deris, Barret; Zhang, Zhongge; Hwa, Terry

    2011-03-01

    Ammonium is the preferred nitrogen source for many microorganisms. In medium with low ammonium concentrations, enteric bacteria turn on the nitrogen responsive (ntr) genes to assimilate ammonium. Two proteins in E. coli, Glutamine synthetase (GS) and the Ammonium/methylammonium transporter AmtB play crucial roles in this regard. GS is the major ammonium assimilation enzyme below 1mM of NH4 + . AmtB is an inner membrane protein that transports NH4 + across the cell membrane against a concentration gradient. In order to study ammonium uptake at low NH4 + concentration at neutral pH, we developed a microfluidic flow chamber that maintains a homogenous nutrient environment during the course of exponential cell growth, even at very low concentration of nutrients. Cell growth can be accurately monitored using time-lapse microscopy. We followed steady state growth down to micro-molar range of NH4 + for the wild type and Δ amtB strains. The wild type strain is able to maintain the growth rate from 10mM down to a few uM of NH4 + , while the mutant exhibited reduced growth below ~ 20 ~uM of NH4 + . Simultaneous characterization of the expression levels of GS and AmtB using fluorescence reporters reveals that AmtB is turned on already at 1mM, but contributes to function only below ~ 30 ~uM in the wild-type. Down to ~ 20 ~uM of NH4 + , E.~coli can compensate the loss of AmtB by GS alone.

  13. Marker for type VI secretion system effectors

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Kinch, Lisa N.; Trudgian, David C.; Guo, Xiaofeng; Klimko, John A.; Grishin, Nick V.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Orth, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria use diverse mechanisms to kill, manipulate, and compete with other cells. The recently discovered type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in bacterial pathogens and used to deliver virulence effector proteins into target cells. Using comparative proteomics, we identified two previously unidentified T6SS effectors that contained a conserved motif. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that this N-terminal motif, named MIX (marker for type six effectors), is found in numerous polymorphic bacterial proteins that are primarily located in the T6SS genome neighborhood. We demonstrate that several MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors and that they are not required for T6SS activity. Thus, we propose that MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors. Our findings allow for the identification of numerous uncharacterized T6SS effectors that will undoubtedly lead to the discovery of new biological mechanisms. PMID:24927539

  14. Superconductivity of calcium in phase VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szcze&şacute; niak, R.; Durajski, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    The properties of the superconducting state of calcium in phase VI were analyzed. By using the imaginary axis Eliashberg equations it has been shown, that the Coulomb pseudopotential reaches the high value equal to 0.215. In the considered case, the critical temperature is not properly described by the Allen-Dynes formula and it should be calculated with an use of the modified expression. In the paper the exact solutions of the Eliashberg equations on the real axis were also obtained. On this basis it was stated, that the effective potential of the electron-electron interaction is attractive for the frequencies lower or equal to the maximum phonon frequency. Then, the dimensionless parameter 2 Δ(0)/ kBTC = 4.10 was calculated. In the last step it has been proven, that the ratio of the electron effective mass to the bare electron mass is high and reaches its maximum equal to 2.36 for the critical temperature.

  15. Precipitation of phenyl and phenoxypenicillin from solutions using ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Luengo, J M

    1985-09-01

    An easy, rapid, and available method for separating 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), benzylpenicillin (penicillin G), and other related molecules from aqueous solutions or complex industrial broths is described. A high concentration of ammonium sulphate induces partially or totally the precipitation of the penicillin present in the solutions, while 6-APA, phenylacetic, and phenoxyacetic acid always remain in the supernatant. The filtration through No. 4 Pyrex glass-fiber filter or Whatman 3MM paper permits the separation of the compounds present in the supernatant from the other ones precipitated. The precipitated product was identified, in all cases, as ammonium penicillin. This method is described here for the first time.

  16. Mutagenic activity of quaternary ammonium salt derivatives of carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Karol; Woziwodzka, Anna; Piosik, Jacek; Podgórska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Summary This paper presents a study on a series of quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) derivatives of glucopyranosides with an elongated hydrophobic hydrocarbon chain. The new N-[6-(β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)hexyl]ammonium bromides and their O-acetyl derivatives were analyzed via 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The mutagenic activity of the newly synthesized QAS was investigated using two different techniques: The Vibrio harveyi luminescence assay and the Ames test. The obtained results support previous findings contesting QAS safety and indicate that QAS, specifically pyridinium derivatives, might be mutagenic. PMID:27559394

  17. Six-fold Coordinated Carbon Dioxide VI

    SciTech Connect

    Iota, V; Yoo, C; Klepeis, J; Jenei, Z

    2006-03-01

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent while silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) is a covalent solid, and represents one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO{sub 2} transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO{sub 2} tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of a new extended-solid phase of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}): a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO{sub 2}-II above 50GPa at 530-650K. Together with the previously reported CO{sub 2}-V and a-carbonia, this new extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO{sub 2}--a prototypical molecular solid, and SiO{sub 2}--one of Earth's fundamental building blocks. The phase diagram suggests a limited stability domain for molecular CO{sub 2}-I, and proposes that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II, III, and IV. The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the caxis in stishovite-like P4{sub 2}/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp{sup 3} hybridization.

  18. Effects of Ammonium and Non-Ammonium Salt Additions on Methane Oxidation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Maine Forest Soils.

    PubMed

    King, G M; Schnell, S

    1998-01-01

    Additions of ammonium and non-ammonium salts inhibit atmospheric methane consumption by soil at salt concentrations that do not significantly affect the soil water potential. The response of soils to non-ammonium salts has previously raised questions about the mechanism of ammonium inhibition. Results presented here show that inhibition of methane consumption by non-ammonium salts can be explained in part by ion-exchange reactions: cations desorb ammonium, with the level of desorption varying as a function of both the cation and anion added; differential desorption results in differential inhibition levels. Differences in the extent of inhibition among ammonium salts can also be explained in part by the effects of anions on ammonium exchange. In contrast, only minimal effects of cations and anions are observed in liquid cultures of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. The comparable level of inhibition by equinormal concentrations of NH(4)Cl and (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and the insensitivity of salt inhibition to increasing methane concentrations (from 10 to 100 ppm) are of particular interest, since both of these patterns are in contrast to results for soils. The greater inhibition of methane consumption for NH(4)Cl than (NH(4))(2)SO(4) in soils can be attributed to increased ammonium adsorption by sulfate; increasing inhibition by non-ammonium salts with increasing methane concentrations can be attributed to desorbed ammonium and a physiological mechanism proposed previously for pure cultures.

  19. Effects of Ammonium and Non-Ammonium Salt Additions on Methane Oxidation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Maine Forest Soils†

    PubMed Central

    King, G. M.; Schnell, S.

    1998-01-01

    Additions of ammonium and non-ammonium salts inhibit atmospheric methane consumption by soil at salt concentrations that do not significantly affect the soil water potential. The response of soils to non-ammonium salts has previously raised questions about the mechanism of ammonium inhibition. Results presented here show that inhibition of methane consumption by non-ammonium salts can be explained in part by ion-exchange reactions: cations desorb ammonium, with the level of desorption varying as a function of both the cation and anion added; differential desorption results in differential inhibition levels. Differences in the extent of inhibition among ammonium salts can also be explained in part by the effects of anions on ammonium exchange. In contrast, only minimal effects of cations and anions are observed in liquid cultures of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. The comparable level of inhibition by equinormal concentrations of NH4Cl and (NH4)2SO4 and the insensitivity of salt inhibition to increasing methane concentrations (from 10 to 100 ppm) are of particular interest, since both of these patterns are in contrast to results for soils. The greater inhibition of methane consumption for NH4Cl than (NH4)2SO4 in soils can be attributed to increased ammonium adsorption by sulfate; increasing inhibition by non-ammonium salts with increasing methane concentrations can be attributed to desorbed ammonium and a physiological mechanism proposed previously for pure cultures. PMID:16349485

  20. The FUSE Survey of 0 VI in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Savage, B. D.; Wakker, B. P.; Sembach, K. R.; Jenkins, E. B.; Moos, H. W.; Shull, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) program to study 0 VI in the Milky Way halo. Spectra of 100 extragalactic objects and two distant halo stars are analyzed to obtain measures of O VI absorption along paths through the Milky Way thick disk/halo. Strong O VI absorption over the velocity range from -100 to 100 km/s reveals a widespread but highly irregular distribution of O VI, implying the existence of substantial amounts of hot gas with T approx. 3 x 10(exp 5) K in the Milky Way thick disk/halo. The overall distribution of O VI is not well described by a symmetrical plane-parallel layer of patchy O VI absorption. The simplest departure from such a model that provides a reasonable fit to the observations is a plane-parallel patchy absorbing layer with an average O VI mid-plane density of n(sub 0)(O VI) = 1.7 x 10(exp -2)/cu cm, a scale height of approx. 2.3 kpc, and a approx. 0.25 dex excess of O VI in the northern Galactic polar region. The distribution of O VI over the sky is poorly correlated with other tracers of gas in the halo, including low and intermediate velocity H I, Ha emission from the warm ionized gas at approx. l0(exp 4) K, and hot X-ray emitting gas at approx. l0(exp 6) K . The O VI has an average velocity dispersion, b approx. 60 km/s and standard deviation of 15 km/s. Thermal broadening alone cannot explain the large observed profile widths. A combination of models involving the radiative cooling of hot fountain gas, the cooling of supernova bubbles in the halo, and the turbulent mixing of warm and hot halo gases is required to explain the presence of O VI and other highly ionized atoms found in the halo. The preferential venting of hot gas from local bubbles and superbubbles into the northern Galactic polar region may explain the enhancement of O VI in the North.