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Sample records for ammonium molybdate vi

  1. Polymerization and photochromism of ammonium molybdate in porous glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, V. N.; Borisov, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    Modification of porous glass (PG) plates is carried out by impregnation with aqueous solutions of ammonium molybdate (NH4)2MoO4 with subsequent removal of water at 120°C. A long-wavelength shift of absorption spectra upon accumulation of the salt in PG indicates polymerization of MoO 4 2- anions at low concentrations of the encapsulated salt. Photochromism manifests itself as the anionic forms in PG become larger. UV irradiation of the modified plates causes enhancement of continuous absorption in the visible range. The proposed mechanism of photoreduction of the polianions in PG involves the removal of oxygen atoms from the bridging-Mo-O-Mo-bonds and stabilization of the colored forms by means of conjugation of the electrons released from the 4 d-levels of pentavalent molybdenum.

  2. Control of post-harvest decay of apples by pre-harvest and post-harvest application of ammonium molybdate.

    PubMed

    Nunes, C; Usall, J; Teixidó, N; Ochoa de Eribe, X O; Viñas, I

    2001-12-01

    Ammonium molybdate was tested as a potential fungicide for use in apples (cv Golden Delicious) against blue and grey mould, important post-harvest diseases of pome fruits. In tests in vivo at 20 degrees C, ammonium molybdate (15 mM) reduced lesion diameters of Penicillium expansum, Botrytis cinerea and Rhizopus stolonifer by 84%, 88% and 100% respectively. When apples treated with ammonium molybdate were stored at 1 degree C for three months, a significant reduction in severity and incidence of P expansum and B cinerea was observed in both years of study (1998 and 1999). In the second year of the experiment the reduction in disease severity was greater than 88% for both pathogens, and the level of control was similar to, or greater than, that observed with the fungicide imazalil. When ammonium molybdate was applied as a pre-harvest treatment, a significant reduction in blue mould decay was observed after three months in cold storage. In vitro, ammonium molybdate greatly inhibited spore germination of P expansum and B cinerea, although better inhibition was obtained against grey mould. Ammonium dimolybdate, sodium molybdate and potassium molybdate were also tested in vitro in comparison with ammonium molybdate as inhibitors of spore germination, but only ammonium molybdate inhibited spore germination by more than 50%.

  3. Study of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference in the selenium determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium background correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela

    2002-02-01

    The use of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference when measuring selenium by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) with deuterium background correction was evaluated. Ammonium molybdate did not produce a selenium thermal stabilization; however, the presence of ammonium molybdate decreased the phosphate interference. The study was carried out with mussel acid digests and mussel slurries. Pd-Mg(NO 3) 2 was used as a chemical modifier at optimum concentrations of 300 and 250 mg l -1, respectively, yielding optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 and 2100 °C, respectively. A yellow solid (ammonium molybdophosphate) was obtained when adding ammonium molybdate to mussel acid digest solutions. This precipitate can be removed after centrifugation prior to ETAAS determination. Additionally, studies on the sampling of the solid ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) together with the liquid phase, as a slurry, were also developed. The volatilization of the solid AMP was not reached at temperatures lower than 2500 °C. By this way, phosphate, as AMP, is not present in the vapor phase at the atomization temperature (2100 °C), yielding a reduction of the spectral interference by phosphate. The proposed method was validated analyzing three reference materials of marine origin (DORM-1, DOLT-1 and TORT-1). Good agreement with the certified selenium contents was reached for all cases.

  4. Characterization of arsenic (V) and arsenic (III) in water samples using ammonium molybdate and estimation by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sounderajan, Suvarna; Udas, A C; Venkataramani, B

    2007-10-01

    Arsenic (V) is known to form heteropolyacid with ammonium molybdate in acidic aqueous solutions, which can be quantitatively extracted into certain organic solvents. In the present work, 12-molybdoarsenic acid extracted in butan-1-ol is used for quantification of As (V). Total arsenic is estimated by converting arsenic (III) to arsenic (V) by digesting samples with concentrated nitric acid before extraction. Concentration of As (III) in the sample solutions could be calculated by the difference in total arsenic and arsenic (V). The characterization of arsenic was carried out by GFAAS using Pd as modifier. Optimization of the experimental conditions and instrumental parameters was investigated in detail. Recoveries of (90-110%) were obtained in the spiked samples. The detection limit was 0.2 microg l(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace amount of arsenic (III) and arsenic (V) in process water samples. PMID:17761387

  5. Vanadate, molybdate and tungstate for orthomolecular medicine.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, J

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies indicate that oxyanions, such as vanadate (V) or vanadyl (IV), cause insulin-like effects on rats by stimulating the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Tungstate (VI) and molybdate (VI) show the same effects on rat adipocytes and hepatocytes. Results of uncontrolled trials on volunteers accumulated in Japan also suggest that tungstate effectively regulates diabetes mellitus without detectable side effects. Since these oxyanions naturally exist in organisms, oxyanion therapy, the oral administration of vanadate, vanadyl, molybdate, or tungstate, can be considered to be orthomolecular medicine. Therefore, these oxyanions may provide a viable alternative to chemotherapy. Many diseases in addition to diabetes mellitus might also be treated since the implication of these results is that tyrosine kinases are involved in a variety of diseases. PMID:7815975

  6. Propane-1,2-di­ammonium chromate(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Trabelsi, Sonia; Essid, Manel; Roisnel, Thierry; Rzaigui, Mohamed; Marouani, Houda

    2014-01-01

    In the title mol­ecular salt, (C3H12N2)[CrO4], each chromate anion accepts six N—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds from nearby propane-1,2-di­ammonium cations. Three of the four O atoms of the chromate anion accept these bonds; the remaining Cr—O bond length is notably shorter than the others. In the crystal, the anions and cations stack in layers lying parallel to (100): the hydrogen-bonding pattern leads to a three-dimensional network. PMID:24764949

  7. Removal of As(V), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from aqueous environments by poly(acrylonitril-co-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride)-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Dudu, Tuba Ersen; Sahiner, Mehtap; Alpaslan, Duygu; Demirci, Sahin; Aktas, Nahit

    2015-09-15

    Cationic poly(Acrylonitril-co-Acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl Ammonium Chloride) (p(AN-co-APTMACl)) hydrogels in bulk were synthesized by using acrylonitrile (AN) and 3-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (APTMACl) as monomers. The prepared hydrogels were exposed to amidoximation reaction to replace hydrophobic nitrile groups with hydrophilic amidoxime groups that have metal ion binding ability. Those replacements were increased the hydrogels absorption capacity for As(V) and Cr(VI). Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms equations were utilized to obtain the best-fitted isotherm model for the absorption of the ions at different metal ion concentrations. The absorption data of As(V) ion were fitted well to Freundlich isotherm while those of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) ions were fitted well to Langmuir isotherm. The maximum absorption of poly(3-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (p(APTMACl)) and amid-p(AN-co-APTMACl) macro gels were 22.39 mg and 21.83 mg for As(V), and 30.65 mg and 18.16 mg for Cr(VI) ion per unit gram dried gel, respectively. Kinetically, the absorption behaviors of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions were fitted well to a pseudo 2nd-order kinetic model and those of As(V) ions were fitted well to a pseudo 1st order kinetic model.

  8. Influence of ammonium availability on expression of nifD and amtB genes during biostimulation of a U(VI) contaminated aquifer: implications for U(VI) removal and monitoring the metabolic state of Geobacteraceae

    SciTech Connect

    Mouser, Paula J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, Hila; Holmes, Dawn E.; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2009-03-25

    The influence of ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the physiological status of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by 2 orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 ?M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences suggested that ammonium may have been one factor influencing the community composition prior to acetate amendment with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species with higher ammonium and Dechloromonas species dominating at the site with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to acetate concentrations rather than ammonium levels. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium transporter gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during uranium reduction. The abundance of amtB was inversely correlated to ammonium levels, whereas nifD transcript levels were similar across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB transcript expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of subsurface Geobacter species. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical and physiological interactions at the field scale in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes during bioremediation.

  9. Comparative study of the synthesis of layered transition metal molybdates

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.; Gomez-Aviles, A.; Gardner, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-01-15

    Mixed metal oxides (MMOs) prepared by the mild thermal decomposition of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) differ in their reactivity on exposure to aqueous molybdate containing solutions. In this study, we investigate the reactivity of some T-Al containing MMOs (T=Co, Ni, Cu or Zn) towards the formation of layered transition metal molybdates (LTMs) possessing the general formula AT{sub 2}(OH)(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O, where A=NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Na{sup +} or K{sup +}. The phase selectivity of the reaction was studied with respect to the source of molybdate, the ratio of T to Mo and the reaction pH. LTMs were obtained on reaction of Cu-Al and Zn-Al containing MMOs with aqueous solutions of ammonium heptamolybdate. Rehydration of these oxides in the presence of sodium or potassium molybdate yielded a rehydrated LDH phase as the only crystalline product. The LTM products obtained by the rehydration of MMO precursors were compared with LTMs prepared by direct precipitation from the metal salts in order to study the influence of preparative route on their chemical and physical properties. Differences were noted in the composition, morphology and thermal properties of the resulting products. - Graphical abstract: Mixed metal oxides (MMOs) derived from layered double hydroxide precursors differ in their reactivity on exposure to aqueous molybdate containing solutions. We investigate the influence of the molybdate source, the rehydration pH and the ratio of T/Mo on the reactivity of some T-Al containing MMOs (T=Co, Ni, Cu or Zn) towards the formation of layered transition metal molybdates of general formula AT{sub 2}(OH)(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O (where A{sup +}=NH{sub 4}{sup +}, K{sup +} or Na{sup +}).

  10. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, S. A.; Shukor, M. Y.; Shamaan, N. A.; Mac Cormack, W. P.; Syed, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  11. Molybdate reduction to molybdenum blue by an Antarctic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S A; Shukor, M Y; Shamaan, N A; Mac Cormack, W P; Syed, M A

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo⁶⁺ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  12. Heterogeneous photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) in UV-irradiated titania suspensions: Effect of protons, ammonium ions, and other interfacial aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Chenthamarakshan, C.R.; Rajeshwar, K.; Wolfrum, E.J.

    2000-03-21

    Heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions in UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} suspensions are comprised of two conjugate reaction pathways involving the photogenerated electrons and holes, respectively. The role of the hole reaction pathway in the dynamics of the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) is a major focus of this study. It is shown that proton supply plays a crucial role in this reduction reaction. Thus, the Cr(VI) photoreduction kinetics switch from first order to zero order as the proton concentration is systematically increased in the aqueous suspensions. Ammonium ions are also shown to exert a dramatic accelerating influence on Cr(VI) reduction in media of initial pH6. This new observation is rationalized by considering that these species act as hole scavengers. The consequent improvement in quantum yield combines with the facile proton generation upon NH{sub 4}{sup +} photooxidation, to result in the observed rate enhancement. Other interfacial aspects (i.e. adsorption) are also discussed.

  13. Method for controlling corrosion using molybdate compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Boffardi, B.P.; Rey, S.P.

    1989-01-17

    A method is described for inhibiting corrosion in an aqueous system comprising adding to the system an effective amount of a corrosion inhibiting composition comprising: (a) a molybdate ion source; and (b) a water-soluble component selected from the group consisting of polymaleic anhydride; amine adducts of polymaleic anhydride; polymers prepared by polymerizing maleic anhydride with dimethyl diallyl ammonium chloride or homologs thereof; polymers prepared from 50-70%, by weight, acrylic acid or methacrylic acid, 10-40%, by weight, 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropyl sulfonic acid or 2-methyacrylamido-2-methylpropyl sulfonic acid and 10-30%, by weight, of a polyalkyleneoxide compound; salts of the above described polymers; phosphonates selected from the group consisting of 2-phosnphonobutane-1,2,4 tricarboxylic acid and hydroxyphosphono acetic acid; phosphino carboxylic acids; polyphosphoric acid and polyhydroxy esters of polyphosphoric acid; wherein the weight of (a):(b), on an active basis, ranges from about 10:1 to about 1:10.

  14. Mechanism of formation of. gamma. -bismuth molybdate

    SciTech Connect

    Kustova, G.N.; Yurchenko, E.N.; Odegova, G.V.; Lazarenko, T.P.; Tarasova, D.V.; Aleshina, G.I.

    1986-04-01

    Infrared and Raman spectroscopic methods were used to study the mechanism of the formation of a Bi-Mo catalyst. X-ray-amorphous Bi/sub 2/MoO/sub 6/ is formed upon precipitation from solutions of bismuth nitrate and ammonium heptamolybdate at pH 2, which, after removal of the NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ side product by filtration and heating, crystallizes to the ..gamma..-phase. The presence of NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ causes a change in the nature of the solid-phase transformations upon heat treatment leading to decomposition of Bi/sub 2/MoO/sub 6/ into the ..cap alpha..-molybdate and a basic bismuth salt which react upon a further increase in temperature to form the ..gamma..-phase. This difference in the generation process leads to a change in the state of the catalyst surface.

  15. Cr(VI) sorption behavior from aqueous solutions onto polymeric microcapsules containing a long-chain quaternary ammonium salt: kinetics and thermodynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Barassi, Giancarlo; Valdés, Andrea; Araneda, Claudio; Basualto, Carlos; Sapag, Jaime; Tapia, Cristián; Valenzuela, Fernando

    2009-12-15

    This work studies the adsorption of Cr(VI) ions from an aqueous acid solution on hydrophobic polymeric microcapsules containing a long-chain quaternary ammonium salt-type extractant immobilized in their pore structure. The microcapsules were synthesized by adding the extractant Aliquat 336 during the in situ radical copolymerization of the monomers styrene (ST) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA). The microcapsules, which had a spherical shape with a rough surface, behaved as efficient adsorbents for Cr(VI) at the tested temperatures. The results of kinetics experiments carried out at different temperatures showed that the adsorption process fits well to a pseudo-second-order with an activation energy of 82.7 kJ mol(-1), confirming that the sorption process is controlled by a chemisorption mechanism. Langmuir's isotherms were found to represent well the experimentally observed sorption data. Thermodynamics parameters, namely, changes in standard free energy (DeltaG(0)), enthalpy (DeltaH(0)), and entropy (DeltaS(0)), are also calculated. The results indicate that the chemisorption process is spontaneous and exothermic. The entropy change value measured in this study shows that metal adsorbed on microcapsules leads to a less chaotic system than a liquid-liquid extraction system.

  16. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxo complexes in solution, inorganic analogues to crown-ethers. Part 2. Complex formation in the tetramethyl ammonium-, Li(+)-, Na(+)- and K(+)-uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate systems.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Szabó, Zoltán; Vallet, Valerie; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-10-01

    The constitution and equilibrium constants of ternary uranyl(vi) peroxide carbonate complexes [(UO2)p(O2)q(CO3)r](2(p-q-r)) have been determined at 0 °C in 0.50 M MNO3, M = Li, K, and TMA (tetramethyl ammonium), ionic media using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data; (17)O NMR data were used to determine the number of complexes present. The formation of cyclic oligomers, "[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]n", n = 4, 5, 6, with different stoichiometries depending on the ionic medium used, suggests that Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and TMA ions act as templates for the formation of uranyl peroxide rings where the uranyl-units are linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) bridged peroxide-ions. The templating effect is due to the coordination of the M(+)-ions to the uranyl oxygen atoms, where the coordination of Li(+) results in the formation of Li[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]4(7-), Na(+) and K(+) in the formation of Na/K[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) complexes, while the large tetramethyl ammonium ion promotes the formation of two oligomers, TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-). The NMR spectra demonstrate that the coordination of Na(+) in the five- and six-membered oligomers is significantly stronger than that of TMA(+); these observations suggest that the templating effect is similar to the one observed in the synthesis of crown-ethers. The NMR experiments also demonstrate that the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is slow on the (17)O chemical shift time-scale, while the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) and Na[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is fast. There was no indication of the presence of large clusters of the type identified by Burns and Nyman (M. Nyman and P. C. Burns, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 7314-7367) and possible reasons for this and the implications for the synthesis of large clusters are briefly discussed.

  17. In vivo molybdate inhibition of sulfate transfer to porphyridium capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Ramus, J

    1974-12-01

    Active transport of exogenous sulfate into log phase cells of Porphyridium aerueineum followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and the apparent Km for sulfate transport is approximately 2.5 x 10(-6)m. Molybdate, also a group VI anion, is a competitive inhibitor of sulfate transport, and the inhibition is freely reversible. Once in the cell, molybdate depresses the rate of sulfate pool utilization by blocking sulfate transfer to polysaccharides destined for secretion to the cell surface. Specifically, molybdate inhibits the formation of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate and in turn the formation of adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate, the activated donor for sulfate transfer reactions. Combined with the previous identification of adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate, this is taken as evidence that the adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate/adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate enzymatic sequence for sulfate activation and sulfate donor reactions is operating in Porphyridium. Thiosulfate is utilized as effectively as sulfate as both a sulfur source for growth and polysaccharide synthesis.

  18. Crystal structure of the heptamolybdate(VI) (paramolybdate) ion, [Mo7O24]6-, in the ammonium and potassium tetrahydrate salts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T.; Gatehouse, B.M.; Leverett, P.

    1975-01-01

    The crystal structures of the isomorphous salts MI6 [Mo7O24],4H2O (M = NH4 or K) have been refined by three-dimensional X-ray diffraction methods. Unit cell dimensions of these monoclinic compounds, space group P21/C with Z = 4, are, ammonium salt: a = 8.3934 ?? 0.0008, b = 36.1703 ?? 0.0045, c = 10.4715 ?? 0.0011 A??, ?? = 115.958?? ?? 0.008??; and potassium salt: a = 8.15 ?? 0.02, b = 35.68 ?? 0.1, c = 10.30 ?? 0.02 A??, ?? = 115.2?? ?? 02??. By use of multiple Weissenberg patterns, 8197 intensity data (Mo-K?? radiation) for the ammonium compound and 2178 (Cu-K?? radiation) for the potassium compound were estimated visually and used to test and refine Lindqvist's proposed structure in the space group P21/c. Lindqvist's structure was confirmed and the full matrix least-squares isotropic refinement led to R 0.076 (ammonium) 0.120 (potassium), with direct unambiguous location of the cations and water molecules in the potassium compound.

  19. Activation energies to characterize ease of removal of various kinds of oxygen from bismuth molybdate

    SciTech Connect

    Dadyburjor, D.B.; Ruckenstein, E.

    1980-06-01

    Calculations by the method of minimum energy paths showed that oxygen(-2) anions are more easily displaced from molybdenum(VI) or from the layer between molybdenum and bismuth than from bismuth(III) of a 2:1 bismuth molybdate (Bi/sub 2/MoO/sub 6/). However, available experimental evidence suggests that the oxygen of the bismuth layer is active in the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons; apparently the presence of the hydrocarbon decreases the energy barrier required for transfer of the oxygen anion, and anion vacancies generated, e.g., in a prereduction of the catalyst, also decrease the energy barrier.

  20. Quantifying Temporal Autocorrelations for the Expression of Geobacter species mRNA Gene Transcripts at Variable Ammonium Levels during in situ U(VI) Bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouser, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to develop decision-making tools for the prediction and optimization of subsurface bioremediation strategies, we must be able to link the molecular-scale activity of microorganisms involved in remediation processes with biogeochemical processes observed at the field-scale. This requires the ability to quantify changes in the in situ metabolic condition of dominant microbes and associate these changes to fluctuations in nutrient levels throughout the bioremediation process. It also necessitates a need to understand the spatiotemporal variability of the molecular-scale information to develop meaningful parameters and constraint ranges in complex bio-physio-chemical models. The expression of three Geobacter species genes (ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrogen fixation (nifD), and a housekeeping gene (recA)) were tracked at two monitoring locations that differed significantly in ammonium (NH4+) concentrations during a field-scale experiment where acetate was injected into the subsurface to simulate Geobacteraceae in a uranium-contaminated aquifer. Analysis of amtB and nifD mRNA transcript levels indicated that NH4+ was the primary form of fixed nitrogen during bioremediation. Overall expression levels of amtB were on average 8-fold higher at NH4+ concentrations of 300 μM or more than at lower NH4+ levels (average 60 μM). The degree of temporal correlation in Geobacter species mRNA expression levels was calculated at both locations using autocorrelation methods that describe the relationship between sample semi-variance and time lag. At the monitoring location with lower NH4+, a temporal correlation lag of 8 days was observed for both amtB and nifD transcript patterns. At the location where higher NH4+ levels were observed, no discernable temporal correlation lag above the sampling frequency (approximately every 2 days) was observed for amtB or nifD transcript fluctuations. Autocorrelation trends in recA expression levels at both locations indicated that

  1. Antimony promoted bismuth cerium molybdate catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brazdil, J.F.; Glaeser, L.C.; Grasselli, R.K.

    1990-05-01

    This patent describes an improvement in antimony-promoted bismuth cerium molybdate whereby the tendency of the catalyst to lose efectiveness over time is significantly reduced. This patent describes new catalysts which are also useful in other oxidation-type reactions such as the oxidation of acrolein and methacrolein to produce the corresponding unsaturated aldehydes and acids and the oxydehydrogenation of various olefins such as isoamylenes to produce the corresponding diolefins such as isoprene.

  2. Study of multiphasic molybdate-based catalysts. II. Synergy effect between bismuth molybdates and mixed iron and cobalt molybdates in mild oxidation of propene

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, J.M.M.; Ponceblanc, H.; Coudurier, G.; Vedrine, J.C. ); Herrmann, J.M. )

    1993-08-01

    Results are reported concerning the synergy effect observed in the oxidation of propene to acrolein over bismuth and mixed iron and cobalt molybdates. The pure bismuth, iron, and cobalt molybdates and mixed cobalt and iron molybdates (solid solutions) have been prepared and individually tested as catalysts. Mechanical mixtures of these phases have been prepared and tested as catalysts. All the catalysts have been characterized before and after the catalytic reaction by several techniques such as ESR, XPS, EDX-STEM, TEM, XRD, and Moessbauer and UV spectroscopies. The synergy effect observed is tentatively explained as due to the deposition on the large bismuth molybdate particles of smaller mixed iron and cobalt molybdate particles with spreading of the bismuth molybdate over the latter particles. It is proposed that the Fe[sub x]Co[sub 1-x]MoO[sub 4] phase plays the role of the fast electron conducting material which enhances the electron mobility and the efficiency of the redox mechanism, the active and selective phase being the overlying bismuth molybdate compounds. 27 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Acquisition and role of molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pederick, Victoria G; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ween, Miranda P; Begg, Stephanie L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO4 (2-)). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition.

  4. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  5. Light deflection in gadolinium molybdate ferroelastic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniorowski, Piotr; Bornarel, Jean

    2000-02-01

    The deflection of a He-Ne light beam by polydomain gadolinium molybdate (GMO) crystals has been studied with respect to incidence angle icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i on the sample at room temperature. The A and B deflected beams do not cross each other during the icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i variation, in contrast to results and calculations previously published. The model using the Fresnel equation confirms this result. The model presented is more accurate for numerical calculation than that using the Huygens construction.

  6. Simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in welding fume alkaline extracts by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ščančar, Janez; Berlinger, Balázs; Thomassen, Yngvar; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    CRM 545, Cr(VI) in welding dust loaded on a filter. Good agreement between determined and reported certified values was obtained. For molybdate, tungstate and vanadate the assessment of accuracy was performed by spiking welding fume filters. Good recoveries for all investigated species (98-101%) confirmed the accuracy of the analytical procedure. PMID:26003707

  7. Simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in welding fume alkaline extracts by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ščančar, Janez; Berlinger, Balázs; Thomassen, Yngvar; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    CRM 545, Cr(VI) in welding dust loaded on a filter. Good agreement between determined and reported certified values was obtained. For molybdate, tungstate and vanadate the assessment of accuracy was performed by spiking welding fume filters. Good recoveries for all investigated species (98-101%) confirmed the accuracy of the analytical procedure.

  8. An attempt to prepare nonchromate, self-healing protective films containing molybdate on iron

    SciTech Connect

    Aramaki, K.

    1999-11-01

    Preparation of a nonchromate, self-healing protective film on an Fe surface was attempted. A protective film of 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane ([C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O]{sub 3} Si[CH{sub 2}]{sub 2} Si[OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}]{sub 3}) polymer containing a fine powder of ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate ([NH{sub 4}]{sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24} {center{underscore}dot} 4H{sub 2}O) was prepared on a surface of Fe electrode passivated in aerated 0.1-M sodium molybdate (Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}). The protective ability of this film was examined on the covered electrode in an aerated 0.1-M sodium chloride (NaCl) solution at 30 C by polarization measurement. The protection efficiency (P) of the film was significantly high, 99.0%. After the electrode coated with the film was scratched with a knife edge, the self-healing ability of the film was estimated on the electrode in the NaCl solution by polarization measurement. The P value of the film on the scratched electrode was still high, 98.8%. The anodic process of Fe corrosion markedly was suppressed by the formation of a passive film at the scratched surface with molybdate ion (MoO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) incorporated in the polymer film, resulting in a self-healing activity of the film.

  9. Aggregate stability of silicon dioxide hydrosols modified by molybdates

    SciTech Connect

    Valyukhov, A.A.; Frolov, Y.G.; Nazarov, V.V.

    1986-03-01

    Modification of the surface of silica hydrosol by molybdates changes the relationship between structural and electrostatic contributions to the disjoining pressure, which maintains the aggregate stability of the sol.

  10. Ammonium methacrylate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium methacrylate ; CASRN 16325 - 47 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcin

  11. Ammonium sulfamate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium sulfamate ; CASRN 7773 - 06 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  12. Ammonium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium acetate ; CASRN 631 - 61 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  13. Molybdate binding by ModA, the periplasmic component of the Escherichia coli mod molybdate transport system.

    PubMed

    Imperial, J; Hadi, M; Amy, N K

    1998-03-13

    ModA, the periplasmic-binding protein of the Escherichia coli mod transport system was overexpressed and purified. Binding of molybdate and tungstate to ModA was found to modify the UV absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of the protein. Titration of these changes showed that ModA binds molybdate and tungstate in a 1:1 molar ratio. ModA showed an intrinsic fluorescence emission spectrum attributable to its three tryptophanyl residues. Molybdate binding caused a conformational change in the protein characterized by: (i) a shift of tryptophanyl groups to a more hydrophobic environment; (ii) a quenching (at pH 5.0) or enhancement (at pH 7.8) of fluorescence; and (iii) a higher availability of tryptophanyl groups to the polar quencher acrylamide. The tight binding of molybdate did not allow an accurate estimation of the binding constants by these indirect methods. An isotopic binding method with 99MoO42- was used for accurate determination of KD (20 nM) and stoichiometry (1:1 molar ratio). ModA bound tungstate with approximately the same affinity, but did not bind sulfate or phosphate. These KDs are 150- to 250-fold lower than those previously reported, and compatible with the high molybdate transport affinity of the mod system. The affinity of ModA for molybdate was also determined in vivo and found to be similar to that determined in vitro.

  14. Interaction of sodium molybdate with the thyroid hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Faure, R; Dussault, J H

    1990-03-01

    The 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) binding activity of solubilized nuclear proteins from rat liver was decreased when molybdate (10 mM) was present in the incubation medium in the absence of thiol reagents. The equilibrium affinity constant was reduced by 40%. The rate of degradation of T3-receptor complexes at 37 degrees C remained unchanged, but when the extracts were further reincubated in the presence of beta-mercaptoethanol, molybdate had a protective effect after 5 h incubation at 37 degrees C. In contrast, the thyroxine (T4) binding activity was not affected by heating at 37 degrees C or by molybdate. Ion-exchange chromatography confirmed the existence of a molybdate-receptor interaction: the T3-receptor complexes shifted from elution at 0.22 to 0.20 M NaCl with the progressive appearance of a small leader peak, whereas the T4-receptor complexes eluted in a large and split peak (0.22-0.4 M NaCl). The destabilizing effect on T3 binding induced by exogenous dephosphorylation is more efficiently reversed by beta-mercaptoethanol when the extracts were pretreated by molybdate. In controls, the loss of saturable T3 binding activity was recovered by 50% at a 10 mM concentration of beta-mercaptoethanol, but in the presence of molybdate, the loss of T3 binding activity was recovered by 50% at a 5 mM concentration of beta-mercaptoethanol. This molybdate-receptor interaction is similar to that with nuclear receptor models in term of (i) stabilization of hormone binding, (ii) dependency on a thiol, and (iii) reversibility of the destabilizing effect by exogenous dephosphorylation.

  15. Study of multiphasic molybdate-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ponceblanc, H.; Millet, J.M.M.; Coudurier, G.; Vedrine, J.C. ); Herrmann, J.M. )

    1993-08-01

    The electrical conductivity of a series of iron-cobalt molybdates has been measured at 370[degrees]C, as a function of the iron content. An important increase of the electrical conductivity occurred when small amounts of iron were substituted for cobalt. This takes place because iron is partially in the 3+ oxidation state. This species, which is stabilized into the CoMoO[sub 4] structure, creates a valence induction effect which is responsible for the drastic variation of the electrical conductivity with compounds whose iron content ranges from 0 to 20%. UV spectroscopy allows the authors to propose that the ferric species involved in this valence induction phenomenon are those giving rise to the intervalence charge transfer between iron cations (Fe[sup 2+]-O-Fe[sup 3+]). By contrast, ESR spectroscopy is silent for such a phenomenon (too short relaxation time) and shows two typical Fe[sup 3+] (d[sup 5] ion) spectra for Fe[sup 3+] engaged either in a different manner in the solid solution (strongly distorted octahedral site) or a given compound such as Fe[sub 2](MoO[sub 4])[sub 3] observed at high iron content. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Molybdate adsorption from steel slag eluates by subsoils.

    PubMed

    Matern, K; Rennert, T; Mansfeldt, T

    2013-11-01

    Steel slags are industrial by-products which are generated in large amounts worldwide, e.g. 150-230×10(6) Mg in 2012, and which are partly used for construction. Molybdenum (Mo) can be added during steel processing in order to harden the steel. The objective of this study was to evaluate the adsorption behaviour of molybdate (MoO4(2-)) from slag eluates in subsoils. Molybdate batch adsorption experiments were carried out with eluates obtained from two different kinds of steel slags (i) LD slag (Linz-Donawitz operation, LDS) and (ii) electric arc furnace slag (EAF) to assess the risk that may arise from the contamination of groundwater by the leaching of molybdate. Six different subsoils were chosen in order to provide a wide range of chemical properties (pH 4.0-7.6; dithionite-extractable Fe 0.73-14.7 g kg(-1)). Molybdate adsorption experiments were carried out at the pH of the steel slag eluates (pH 11-12) as well as at pH values adjusted to the soil pH. The data were evaluated with the Freundlich equation. Molybdate adsorption exhibited a maximum near pH 4 for steel slag eluates adjusted to the soil pH, and decreased rapidly with increasing pH until adsorption was virtually zero at pH>11. Adsorption was greater for soils with high amounts of dithionite-extractable Fe oxides. The extent and behaviour of molybdate adsorption from both eluates was similar. After a reaction time of 24h, the pH of the EAF slag eluate was lower than that of the LD steel slag eluate, which was caused by different acid buffer capacities. Some soils were able to decrease the pH of the EAF slag eluates by about 4 pH units, enhancing the adsorption of molybdate. Transport simulations indicated that molybdate discharge is low in acidic soils.

  17. From yellow to black: dramatic changes between cerium(IV) and plutonium(IV) molybdates.

    PubMed

    Cross, Justin N; Duncan, Patrick M; Villa, Eric M; Polinski, Matthew J; Babo, Jean-Marie; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Booth, Corwin H; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2013-02-20

    Hydrothermal reactions of CeCl(3) and PuCl(3) with MoO(3) and Cs(2)CO(3) yield surprisingly different results. Ce(3)Mo(6)O(24)(H(2)O)(4) crystallizes as bright yellow plates (space group C2/c, a = 12.7337(7) Å, b = 22.1309(16) Å, c = 7.8392(4) Å, β = 96.591(4)°, V = 2194.6(2) Å(3)), whereas CsPu(3)Mo(6)O(24)(H(2)O) crystallizes as semiconducting black-red plates (space group C2/c, a = 12.633(5) Å, b = 21.770(8) Å, c = 7.743(7) Å, β = 96.218(2)°, V = 2117(2) Å(3)). The topologies of the two compounds are similar, with channel structures built from disordered Mo(VI) square pyramids and (RE)O(8) square antiprisms (RE = Ce(IV), Pu(IV)). However, the Pu(IV) compound contains Cs(+) in its channels, while the channels in Ce(3)Mo(6)O(24)(H(2)O)(4) contain water molecules. Disorder and an ambiguous oxidation state of Mo lead to the formula CsPu(3)Mo(6)O(24)(H(2)O), where one Mo site is Mo(V) and the rest are Mo(VI). X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) experiments were performed to investigate the source of the black color of CsPu(3)Mo(6)O(24)(H(2)O). These experiments revealed Pu to be tetravalent, while the strong pre-edge absorption from the distorted molybdate anions leaves the oxidation state ambiguous between Mo(V) and Mo(VI). PMID:23360299

  18. Sulfiding of cobalt molybdate catalysts: characterization by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, G.L.; Cheng, C.P.

    1984-02-01

    In situ laser Raman spectroscopic studies of the sulfiding of cobalt molybdate hydrodesulfurization catalysts were performed. Sulfiding in 10% H/sub 2/S/H/sub 2/ at 400/sup 0/C resulted in the formation of stable MoS/sub 2/ structures after 2h. However, the Raman spectra indicated that small crystallites or surface layers of perhaps distorted MoS/sub 2/ were present. Stepwise sulfiding of samples to 150, 250, and 350/sup 0/C permitted intermediate stages of sulfiding to be examined. Differences were observed for the relative rates of reduction versus sulfur incorporation for CoMoO/sub 4/, Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/, MoO/sub 3/, and aggregated or polymeric molybdate phases. Cobalt tended to increase the extent of reduction of the catalyst. A previously described model is extended to include the role of cobalt.

  19. Some thermochemical studies of cesium uranate, molybdate and chromate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, O. K.; Sundaresan, M.; Tangri, R. P.; Kalyanaraman, R.; Schumacher, G.

    1985-02-01

    The present paper deals with studies on vaporisation of cesium monouranate and enthalpies of formation of cesium molybdate and cesium chromate. Vaporization studies of cesium monouranate using Knudsen cell in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometer at the temperature range of 1000-1573 K have indicated that at a temperature above 1223 K it decomposes to cesium polyuranate and cesium vapour. Cesium ion current vs temperature graphs have been plotted. The slope has thus been experimentally found to be -4.1 × 10 4 which compares well with the calculated value of the temperature co-efficient of the decomposition reaction. The enthalpies of formation of cesium molybdate and cesium chromate have been determined by static bomb calorimetry by reacting cesium carbonate with respective oxide in ultra pure oxygen.

  20. One-step synthesis of bismuth molybdate catalysts via flame spray pyrolysis for the selective oxidation of propylene to acrolein.

    PubMed

    Schuh, K; Kleist, W; Høj, M; Trouillet, V; Jensen, A D; Grunwaldt, J-D

    2014-12-18

    Flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) of Bi(III)- and Mo(VI)-2-ethylhexanoate dissolved in xylene resulted in various nanocrystalline bismuth molybdate phases depending on the Bi/Mo ratio. Besides α-Bi2Mo3O12 and γ-Bi2MoO6, FSP gave direct access to the metastable β-Bi2Mo2O9 phase with high surface area (19 m(2) g(-1)). This phase is normally only obtained at high calcination temperatures (>560 °C) resulting in lower surface areas. The β-phase was stable up to 400 °C and showed superior catalytic performance compared to α- and γ-phases in selective oxidation of propylene to acrolein at temperatures relevant for industrial applications (360 °C). PMID:25350295

  1. Synthesis of silver molybdate clusters driven by laser-annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Brechignac, C.; Cahuzac, Ph.; Kebaili, N.; Lando, A.; Masson, A.; Schmidt, M.

    2004-11-15

    The synthesis of silver rich molybdate clusters is achieved by laser induced chemical reaction of coadsorbed MoO{sub 3} and O{sub 2} molecules on free silver clusters. The reactants MoO{sub 3} and/or O{sub 2} molecules condensed at low temperature (77 K-175 K) on free silver clusters. Then, the silver clusters together with their adsorbed molecules are flashed either ionized with a discharge or ionized and heated by a laser. Then they are cooled down by evaporation. The synthesized chemical compounds are analyzed by a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer. If only one type of reactant is adsorbed on the cluster, only one oxide molecule is stabilized on the metallic core after the heating and cooling cycle. On the contrary, the coadsorption of the two types of molecules MoO{sub 3} and O{sub 2} on Ag{sub n}{sup +}, at 77 K, leads to complex aggregates that transform, after laser heating, into a molybdate rich metal clusters. These synthesized species cool down by evaporating silver atoms showing evidence of a binary oxide that is more stable than the metallic core. Moreover we demonstrate that for small size molybdate clusters, a stoichiometric composition may differ from the bulk one.

  2. Catalytic oxidation of propylene--7. Use of temperature programmed reoxidation to characterize. gamma. -bismuth molybdate

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, T.; Lin, T.T.; Keulks, G.W.

    1980-03-01

    Temperature-programed reoxidation of propylene-reduced ..gamma..-Bi/sub 2/MoO/sub 6/ revealed a low-temperature peak (LTP) at 158/sup 0/C and a high-temperature peak (HTP) at 340/sup 0/C. Auger spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction of reduced and partially or completely reoxidized bismuth molybdate showed that at the LTP, molybdenum(IV) is oxidized to molybdenum(VI) and bismuth, from the metallic state to an oxidation state between zero and three, and that the HTP is associated with the complete oxidation of bismuth to bismuth(III). Activity tests for propylene oxidation showed lower acrolein formation on the catalyst, on which only the LTP was reoxidized than on catalysts on which both peaks were reoxidized. The reoxidation kinetics of the catalyst under conditions corresponding to the LTP showed an activation energy of 22.9 kcal/mole below 170/sup 0/C and near zero above 170/sup 0/C; the break in the Arrhenius plot of reoxidation of the catalyst under conditions corresponding to the HTP was at 400/sup 0/C, with activation energies of 46 kcal/mole at lower and near zero at higher temperatures. Propylene oxidation was apparently rate-limited by the HTP reoxidation process below 400/sup 0/C and by allylic hydrogen abstraction above 400/sup 0/C.

  3. Lithium vanado(V)molybdate(VI), Li[VMoO6

    PubMed Central

    Ezzine Yahmed, Safa; Nasri, Rawia; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Brannerite-type Li[VMoO6] has been synthesized by a solid state reaction route. The V and Mo atoms statistically occupy the same site with mirror symmetry and are octa­hedrally surrounded by O atoms. The framework is two-dimensional and is built up from edge-sharing (V,Mo)O6 octa­hedra forming (VMoO6)∞ layers that run parallel to the (001) plane. Li+ ions are situated in position with symmetry 2/m in the inter­layer space. The bond-valence analysis reveals that the Li+ ionic conductivity is along the [010] and [110] directions, and shows that this material may have inter­esting conduction properties. This simulation proposes a model of the lithium conduction pathways. PMID:24426977

  4. Lithium vanado(V)molybdate(VI), Li[VMoO6].

    PubMed

    Ezzine Yahmed, Safa; Nasri, Rawia; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Brannerite-type Li[VMoO6] has been synthesized by a solid state reaction route. The V and Mo atoms statistically occupy the same site with mirror symmetry and are octa-hedrally surrounded by O atoms. The framework is two-dimensional and is built up from edge-sharing (V,Mo)O6 octa-hedra forming (VMoO6)∞ layers that run parallel to the (001) plane. Li(+) ions are situated in position with symmetry 2/m in the inter-layer space. The bond-valence analysis reveals that the Li(+) ionic conductivity is along the [010] and [110] directions, and shows that this material may have inter-esting conduction properties. This simulation proposes a model of the lithium conduction pathways.

  5. Decomposition of molybdate-hexamethylenetetramine complex: One single source route for different catalytic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chouzier, Sandra; Czeri, Tivadar; Roy-Auberger, Magalie; Pichon, Christophe; Geantet, Christophe; Vrinat, Michel; Afanasiev, Pavel

    2011-10-15

    Decomposition of ammonium heptamolybdate-hexamethylentetramine (HMTA) complex (HMTA){sub 2}(NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}.2H{sub 2}O was studied as a function of treatment conditions in the range 300-1173 K. The evolution of solid products during decomposition was studied by thermal analysis and in situ EXAFS. Depending on the nature of the gas used for treatment, single phases of highly dispersed nitrides Mo{sub 2}N, carbide Mo{sub 2}C, or oxide MoO{sub 2} can be obtained. The nature of the products obtained was explained by qualitative thermodynamical considerations. Morphology of the solids considerably depends on such preparation parameters as temperature and mass velocity of the gas flow. For the nitride-based materials, catalytic activity was evaluated in the model thiophene HDS reaction. It was demonstrated that NH{sub 3}-treated samples showed better catalytic activity than N{sub 2}-treated ones due to cleaner surface and better morphology. Transmission microscopy, XRD and XPS studies showed that MoS{sub 2} is formed on the surface during HDS reaction or sulfidation with H{sub 2}S. Optimized nitride-derived catalysts showed mass activity several times higher than unsupported MoS{sub 2} or MoS{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reference catalyst. - Graphical Abstract: Depending on the conditions, decomposition of molybdate-HTMA complex yields highly dispersed molybdenum nitride, carbide or oxide. Research Highlights: > Decomposition of molybdate-HTMA complex yields highly dispersed Mo{sub 2}N, Mo{sub 2}C or MoO{sub 2}. > In situ EXAFS shows formation of common amorphous product MoC{sub x}N{sub y}O{sub z} at 673 K. > Crystalline Mo{sub 2}N with surface area near 200 m{sup 2}/g was obtained at 823 K. > High mass activity in thiophene HDS was observed.

  6. [Affinity of the elements in group VI of the periodic table to tumors and organs].

    PubMed

    Ando, A; Hisada, K; Ando, I

    1976-10-01

    In order to investigate the tumor affinity radioisotopes, chromium (51Cr), molybdenum (99Mo), tungsten (181W), selenium (75Se) and tellurium (127mTe)--the elements of group VI in the periodic table--were examined, using the rats which were subcutaneously transplanted with Yoshida sarcoma. Seven preprarations, sodium chromate (Na251CrO4), chromium chloride (51CrCl3), normal ammonium molybdate ((NH4)299MoO7), sodium tungstate (Na2181WO4), sodium selenate (Na275SeO4), sodium selenite (Na275SeO3) and tellurous acid (H2127mTeO3) were injected intravenously to each group of tumor bearing rats. These rats were sacrificed at various periods after injection of each preparation: 3 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours in all preparations. The radioactivities of the tumor, blood, muscle, liver, kidney and spleen were measured by a well-type scintillation counter, and retention values (in every tissue including the tumor) were calculated in percent of administered dose per g-tissue weight. All of seven preparations did not have any affinity for malignant tumor. Na251CrO4 and H2127mTeO3 had some affinity for the kidneys, and Na275SeO3 had some affinity for the liver. Na2181WO4 and (NH4)299MoO4 disappeared very rapidly from the blood and soft tissue, and about seventy-five percent of radioactivity was excreted in urine within first 3 hours.

  7. Corrosion study of stainless steel SS304L in molten molybdates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usami, T.; Uruga, K.; Tsukada, T.; Miura, Y.; Komamine, S.; Ochi, E.

    2016-04-01

    Depending on operating conditions of the vitrification process of high-level liquid waste, molten salt mainly composed of sodium and molybdenum can be generated, and poured into stainless steel canisters. In this work, the possible reaction between the molten molybdate and stainless steel was investigated using multi-component molybdate and simple Na2MoO4 - MoO3 molybdate. In the experiments using multi-component molybdates, no significant reaction is observed between the mixed molybdates and the stainless steel specimens at 700 °C in 4 h. The reaction rate of the stainless steel with the multi-component molybdate increases in proportion to exp(-1/T). The depth of the most reacted area is about 300 μm even at 1000 °C, and was much smaller than the 6 mm thickness of the canister. In the simple Na2MoO4 - MoO3 molybdate, the reaction rate was proportional to the MoO3 concentration. The essence of the reaction is oxidation of metals by Mo6+ - > Mo4+. Part of the reaction product mainly composed of Fe is dissolved into the molybdate, while the other part mainly composed of Cr sloughs and forms a banded layer.

  8. Poly[di­ammonium [di­aqua­(μ7-benzene-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexa­carboxyl­ato)tetra­oxido­diuranium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Cantos, Paula M.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Uranyl-carboxyl­ate hybrid materials dominate the catalog of uranyl compounds owing in part to the affinity between COO− functional groups and UO2 2+. Polycarboxyl­ate organic ligands may present a degree of steric hindrance and could thus influence the resulting uranyl topology. Single crystals of the title compound, {(NH4)2[(UO2)2(C12O12)(H2O)2]}n, were synthesized hydro­thermally as a result of reacting uranyl nitrate with benzene-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexa­carb­oxy­lic acid (mellitic acid). The structure is comprised of a single unique monomeric uranyl cation adopting a penta­gonal bipyramidal geometry. The uranyl coordination sphere is composed of four O atoms originating from one half of a fully deprotonated mellitic acid ligand and a single water mol­ecule. The observed axial U—O bonds display an average distance of 1.765 (8) Å, whereas equatorial O atoms are found at an average distance of 2.40 (5) Å. All uranium–oxygen bond lengths are in good agreement with literature values. Furthermore, the coordin­ation between the uranyl penta­gonal bipyramids and the mellitic acid anion constructs a three-dimensional anionic framework which is charge-balanced with ammonium cations. Additional stabilization of the structure is provided by O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonding inter­actions between the components. PMID:24826103

  9. Dielectric and conducting behaviour of polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Want, Basharat; Zahoor Ahmad, Bhat; Bhat, Bilal Hamid

    2014-09-01

    Polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate spherulites have been obtained by using gel diffusion technique and characterized by different physio-chemical techniques. The surfaces of these spherulites are composed of nano-rod with an average diameter of about 80 nm. At room temperature the initial crystal structure is triclinic, space group P1. Thermal studies suggested a phase transition occurring in holmium octa-molybdate crystals at about 793 K. The electrical properties of the system have been studied as a function of frequency and temperature in the ranges of 20 Hz-3 MHz and 290-570 K, respectively. A giant dielectric constant and two loss peaks have been observed in the permittivity formalism. The conducting behaviour of the material is also discussed. The conductivity was found to be 1572 μ Ω-1 m-1 at room temperature and 3 MHz frequency. The conductivity of the polycrystalline material was attributed to the fact that it arises due to the migration of defects on the oxygen sub-lattice. Impedance studies were also performed in the frequency domain to infer the bulk and grain boundary contributions to the overall electric response of the material. The electrical responses have been attributed to the grain, grain-boundary, and interfacial effects.

  10. Suppression of interference in the AAS determination of chromium by use of ammonium bifluoride.

    PubMed

    Purushottam, A; Naidu, P P; Lal, S S

    1973-07-01

    Addition of 1% of ammonium bifluoride successfully suppresses interference by diverse ions in the atomic-absorption determination of chromium(VI). If the sample solutions also contain chromium(III) addition of 1% of ammonium bifluoride and 0.2% of sodium sulphate is recommended for the suppression.

  11. Role of Molybdate and Other Transition Metals in the Accumulation of Protochelin by Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Anthony S.; Page, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Both molybdate and iron are metals that are required by the obligately aerobic organism Azotobacter vinelandii to survive in the nutrient-limited conditions of its natural soil environment. Previous studies have shown that a high concentration of molybdate (1 mM) affects the formation of A. vinelandii siderophores such that the tricatecholate protochelin is formed to the exclusion of the other catecholate siderophores, azotochelin and aminochelin. It has been shown previously that molybdate combines readily with catecholates and interferes with siderophore function. In this study, we found that the manner in which each catecholate siderophore interacted with molybdate was consistent with the structure and binding potential of the siderophore. The affinity that each siderophore had for molybdate was high enough that stable molybdo-siderophore complexes were formed but low enough that the complexes were readily destabilized by Fe3+. Thus, competition between Fe3+ and molybdate did not appear to be the primary cause of protochelin accumulation; in addition, we determined that protochelin accumulated in the presence of vanadate, tungstate, Zn2+, and Mn2+. We found that all five of these metal ions partially inhibited uptake of 55Fe-protochelin and 55Fe-azotochelin complexes. Also, each of these metal ions partially inhibited the activity of ferric reductase, an enzyme important in the deferration of ferric siderophores. Our results suggest that protochelin accumulates in the presence of molybdate because protochelin uptake and conversion into its component parts, azotochelin and aminochelin, are inhibited by interference with ferric reductase. PMID:10742245

  12. Molybdate/phosphate composite conversion coating on magnesium alloy surface for corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Zhiyi; Zhu, Jin; Qiu, Cheng; Liu, Yali

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, a new conversion coating—molybdate/phosphate (Mo/P) coating on magnesium alloy was prepared and investigated by electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and salt-water immersion experiments, respectively. The results demonstrated that the Mo/P coating contained composite phases, which were consisted of metaphosphate as well as molybdate oxide with an "alveolate-crystallized" structure. The composite Mo/P conversion coating had better corrosion resistance performance than molybdate (Mo) coating, and even had almost comparable corrosion protection for Mg alloy to the traditional chromate-based coating.

  13. EFFECT OF TUNGSTATE ON THE UPTAKE AND FUNCTION OF MOLYBDATE IN AZOTOBACTER AGILIS

    PubMed Central

    Bulen, William A.

    1961-01-01

    Bulen, William A. (Charles F. Kettering Foundation, Yellow Springs, Ohio). Effect of tungstate on the uptake and function of molybdate in Azotobacter agilis. J. Bacteriol. 82:130–134. 1961.—The reported competitive inhibition of molybdate by tungstate was investigated in an effort to elucidate molybdenum functions associated with nitrogen fixation by Azotobacter agilis (A. vinelandii). Growth, respiration, and N215-incorporation experiments with normal and molybdenum-deficient cells indicated that tungstate inhibits the uptake of molybdate but does not compete with the metabolically functional molybdenum of cells metabolizing N2. Neither a molybdenum requirement nor a tungstate inhibition was observed with cells metabolizing urea. PMID:16561910

  14. Syntheses, crystal structures and biological relevance of glycolato and S-lactato molybdates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhao-Hui; Hou, Shu-Ya; Cao, Ze-Xing; Wan, Hui-Lin; Ng, Seik-Weng

    2004-06-01

    Glycolato and S-lactato complexes containing the dioxomolybdenum(VI) moiety have been synthesized for studies on the role of the alpha-hydroxycarboxylato anion in the iron molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase. The ligands in these complexes, vis K2[MoO2(glyc)2].H2O (H2glyc=glycolic acid, C2H4O3) (1) and (Na2[MoO2(S-lact)2])3.13H2O (H2lact=lactic acid, C3H6O3) (2) chelate through their alpha-alkoxyl and alpha-carboxyl oxygen atoms. In contrast, octanuclear K6[(MoO2)8(glyc)6(Hglyc)2].10H2O (3) formed by the reduction of the glycolato complex (1), features three different ligand binding modes: (i) non-bridging and bridging bidentate coordination of alpha-alkoxyl and alpha-carboxyl groups, and (ii) bidentate bridging using alpha-carboxyl group, leaving the alpha-alkoxyl group free. The octanuclear skeleton shows strong metal-metal interactions. The coordination modes in (1) and (2) mimic that of homocitrate to the iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) of nitrogenase. The bidentate coordination of alpha-alkoxyl and alpha-carboxyl groups shows that bond of alpha-carboxyl group to Mo is less susceptible to the oxidation state of molybdenum compared with the Mo-alpha-alkoxyl bond. This is supported by the dinuclear coordination of alpha-carboxyl group with free alpha-alkoxyl group in glycolato molybdate(V) (3).

  15. Elucidation of molybdosilicate complexes in the molybdate yellow method by ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mariko; Abe, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Miho

    2015-01-01

    The formation of molybdosilicate in the molybdate yellow method is elucidated by ESI-MS. Polymeric silicic acids were hydrolyzed to monomers, and molybdosilicates with a Keggin structure were formed. Each step of the formation reaction of molybdosilicate from molybdic and silicic acids between pH 1 and 2 was clarified by ESI-MS at the molecular level. In a solution below pH 0.5, the polymers of the molybdic acids were decomposed because of the high concentration of sulfuric acid. Excess sulfuric acid prevented the formation of molybdosilicate. Thus, none of the silicic acids reacted to form molybdosilicate at this pH, despite the presence of silicic acid and sulfate ions in the solution. Above pH 2, the condensation of molybdic acids occurred to form α-molybdosilicate. ESI-MS provides information on the formation of molybdosilicate and the individual reaction species present in the reaction mixture.

  16. The structures and properties of the new two-dimensional inorganic–organic hybrid materials based on the molybdate chains

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Na; Mu, Bao; Cao, Xinyu; Huang, Rudan

    2014-09-15

    A series of inorganic organic hybrid materials based on polyoxometalates(POMs), namely, [M{sup II}(HL){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][Mo{sup VI}{sub 6}O{sub 20}] [M=Co (1), Ni (2), Cu (3), Zn (4)], [Mn{sup IV}L{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][Mo{sup VI}{sub 6}O{sub 20}] (5), and (HL){sub 3}PMO{sub 12}O{sub 40} (6) [L=3-(4-pyridyl)pyrazole], have been synthesized. The compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The results from single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicate that 1–5 are isostructural. It is worth noting that the polyanions are bridged by Mo–O–Mo to form 1D inorganic chains, which are further connected via M ions to form 2D nets. In compound 6, the ligands are used as the positive ions to balance the charge of the compound. Moreover, the magnetic properties of compound 5 have also been investigated in detail. - Graphical abstract: In complex 1, The Co ion is six coordinated by four oxygen atoms from two Mo{sub 6}O{sub 20} and two water molecules, and two N atoms from two different ligand. It is noticeable that there is an one-dimensional chain molybdate, which is combined by O–Mo–O, then the chain parallel with each other, the Mo{sub 6} anion acts as a bidentate ligand providing O7 atoms to bridge CoII ions to form a 2D inorganic layer. Finally every nets become 3D structure by hydrogen bond. - Highlights: • Novel inorganic–organic hybrid materials have been prepared. • Compounds 1–5 contain the 1D molybdate chains composed of (MoO{sub 6}) octahedra. • The 1D chains parallel with each other to form a 2D inorganic layer.

  17. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  18. In vivo detection of molybdate-binding proteins using a competition assay with ModE in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kuper, Jochen; Meyer zu Berstenhorst, Sonja; Vödisch, Bernd; Mendel, Ralf R; Schwarz, Günter; Boxer, David H

    2003-01-21

    Molybdenum is an important trace element as it forms the essential part of the active site in all molybdenum-containing enzymes. We have designed an assay for the in vivo detection of molybdate binding to proteins in Escherichia coli. The assay is based on (i). the molybdate-dependent transcriptional regulation of the moa operon by the ModE protein, and (ii). the competition for molybdate between ModE and other molybdate-binding proteins in the cytoplasm of E. coli. We were able to verify in vivo molybdate binding to three different bacterial proteins that are known to bind molybdate. This sensitive in vivo system allows the testing of different proteins for molybdate binding under in vivo conditions and will facilitate the identification of other cellular factors needed for molybdate binding. As a first example, we examined the eukaryotic protein Cnx1 that is involved in the last step of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis in plants, and show that it is able to compete with ModE for molybdate in a molybdopterin-dependent fashion.

  19. Identification of a new gene, molR, essential for utilization of molybdate by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J H; Wendt, J C; Shanmugam, K T

    1990-01-01

    A mutation in a new gene, molR, prevented the synthesis in Escherichia coli of molybdoenzymes, including the two formate dehydrogenase isoenzymes, nitrate reductase and trimethylamine-N-oxide reductase. This phenotype was suppressed by supplementing the media with molybdate. Thus, the molR mutant was phenotypically similar to previously described chlD mutants, thought to be defective in molybdate transport. The molR gene is located at 65.3 min in the E. coli chromosome, in contrast to the chlD gene, which maps at 17 min and thus can be readily distinguished. The molR gene is also cotransducible with a hitherto unidentified gene essential for the production of 2-oxoglutarate from isocitrate, designated icdB (located at 66 min). The molR mutant strain SE1100 also failed to produce the hydrogenase component of formate hydrogenlyase (HYD3) in molybdate-unsupplemented media. The amount of molybdate required by strain SE1100 for the production of parental levels of formate hydrogenlyase activity was dependent on the growth medium. In Luria-Bertani medium, this value was about 100 microM, and in glucose-minimal medium, 1.0 microM was sufficient. In low-sulfur medium, this value decreased to about 50 nM. The addition of sulfate or selenite increased the amount of molybdate needed for the production of formate hydrogenlyase activity. These data suggest that in the absence of the high-affinity molybdate transport system, E. coli utilizes sulfate and selenite transport systems for transporting molybdate, preferring sulfate transport over the selenite transport system. PMID:2156810

  20. Properties of the periplasmic ModA molybdate-binding protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rech, S; Wolin, C; Gunsalus, R P

    1996-02-01

    The modABCD operon, located at 17 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome, encodes the protein components of a high affinity molybdate uptake system. Sequence analysis of the modA gene (GenBank L34009) predicts that it encodes a periplasmic binding protein based on the presence of a leader-like sequence at its N terminus. To examine the properties of the ModA protein, the modA structural gene was overexpressed, and its product was purified. The ModA protein was localized to the periplasmic space of the cell, and it was released following a gentle osmotic shock. The N-terminal sequence of ModA confirmed that a leader region of 24 amino acids was removed upon export from the cell. The apparent size of ModA is 31.6 kDa as determined by gel sieve chromatography, whereas it is 22.5 kDa when examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A ligand-dependent protein mobility shift assay was devised using a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protocol to examine binding of molybdate and other anions to the ModA periplasmic protein. Whereas molybdate and tungstate were bound with high affinity (approximately 5 microM), sulfate, chromate, selenate, phosphate, and chlorate did not bind even when tested at 2 mM. A UV spectral assay revealed apparent Kd values of binding for molybdate and tungstate of 3 and 7 microM, respectively. Strains defective in the modA gene were unable to transport molybdate unless high levels of the anion were supplied in the medium. Therefore the modA gene product is essential for high affinity molybdate uptake by the cell. Tungstate interference of molybdate acquisition by the cell is apparently due in part to the high affinity of the ModA protein for this anion.

  1. Molybdate transport in a chemically complex aquifer: Field measurements compared with solute-transport model predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    A natural-gradient tracer test was conducted in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Molybdate was included in the injectate to study the effects of variable groundwater chemistry on its aqueous distribution and to evaluate the reliability of laboratory experiments for identifying and quantifying reactions that control the transport of reactive solutes in groundwater. Transport of molybdate in this aquifer was controlled by adsorption. The amount adsorbed varied with aqueous chemistry that changed with depth as freshwater recharge mixed with a plume of sewage-contaminated groundwater. Molybdate adsorption was strongest near the water table where pH (5.7) and the concentration of the competing solutes phosphate (2.3 micromolar) and sulfate (86 micromolar) were low. Adsorption of molybdate decreased with depth as pH increased to 6.5, phosphate increased to 40 micromolar, and sulfate increased to 340 micromolar. A one-site diffuse-layer surface-complexation model and a two-site diffuse-layer surface-complexation model were used to simulate adsorption. Reactions and equilibrium constants for both models were determined in laboratory experiments and used in the reactive-transport model PHAST to simulate the two-dimensional transport of molybdate during the tracer test. No geochemical parameters were adjusted in the simulation to improve the fit between model and field data. Both models simulated the travel distance of the molybdate cloud to within 10% during the 2-year tracer test; however, the two-site diffuse-layer model more accurately simulated the molybdate concentration distribution within the cloud.

  2. Directed synthesis of noncentrosymmetric molybdates using composition space analysis.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Thomas R; Stover, Adam K; Narducci Sarjeant, Amy; Ok, Kang Min; Halasyamani, P Shiv; Norquist, Alexander J

    2006-07-10

    A systematic investigation of the factors governing the reaction product composition, hydrogen bonding, and symmetry was conducted in the MoO3/3-aminoquinuclidine/H2O system. Composition space analysis was performed through 36 individual reactions under mild hydrothermal conditions using racemic 3-aminoquinuclidine. Single crystals of three new compounds, [C7H16N2][Mo3O10] x H2O, [C7H16N2]2[Mo8O26] x H2O, and [C7H16N2]2[Mo8O26] x 4 H2O, were grown. The relative phase stabilities for these products are dependent upon the reactant mole fractions in the initial reaction gel. This phase stability information was used to direct the synthesis of two new noncentrosymmetric compounds, using either (S)-(-)-3-aminoquinuclidine dihydrochloride or (R)-(+)-3-aminoquinuclidine dihydrochloride. [(R)-C7H16N2]2[Mo8O26] and [(S)-C7H16N2]2[Mo8O26] both crystallize in the noncentrosymmetric space group P2(1) (No. 4), which has the polar crystal class 2 (C2). The second-harmonic generation activities were measured on sieved powders. The structure-directing properties of the molybdate components in each compound were determined using bond valence sums. The structures of all five compounds were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. PMID:16813416

  3. Structural and spectral investigation of terbium molybdate nanophosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Kamal P.; Vimal, G.; Biju, P. R.; Joseph, Cyriac; Unnikrishnan, N. V.; Ittyachen, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Terbium molybdate nanophosphors were synthesized through a facile sol-gel route. The structure of the phosphors was characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the structure of the nanophosphor gradually changes from monoclinic to orthorhombic phase as heated from 700 to 900 °C. High resolution transmission electron microscopy, SAED and EDS were also employed to characterize the size, crystallinity and composition of the samples. Detailed spectroscopic investigations were carried out by Judd-Ofelt analysis based on UV-Visible-NIR absorption and emission spectra. The luminescence spectra suggest that phosphors with orthorhombic structure have better luminescence properties than the monoclinic structure. The phosphors showed intense green emission under near-UV excitation due to the energy transfer from the host lattice to Tb3+ ions. The CIE coordinates suggest enhanced color purity for green emission and short fluorescence decay values proposes the suitability for LED applications. These phosphors can be applied as promising candidates for blue and near-UV excited WLEDs.

  4. Partial oxidation of methane on supported potassium molybdate

    SciTech Connect

    Erdohelyi, A.; Fodor, K.; Solymosi, F.

    1997-03-01

    The partial oxidation of methane to formaldehyde was studied on K{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}, deposited on various supports, in a fixed-bed continuous-flow reactor at 860-923 K using O{sub 2} as oxidant. The catalysts were characterized by Raman and XPS spectroscopies. It was found that the composition of molybdates deposited by impregnation depended sensitively on the pH value of the slurry containing the support. At low pH values a significant amount of K{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7} was formed. The product distribution of the oxidation reaction was markedly influenced by the nature of the support. The highest activity was measured for magnesia-supported catalyst. In this case, however, only the complete oxidation of methane occurred. Formaldehyde, in a larger quantity, was produced on silica-supported catalyst containing a greater amount of K{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7} and on K{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}/ZSM-5. It was observed that at very low oxygen content, {approximately}0.1%, the reaction pathway of methane conversion was basically different: in this case the main hydrocarbon products were ethylene, ethane, and benzene. Formaldehyde was not detected. A possible mechanism for the reaction of methane is discussed. 37 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; Vith nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy ... mononeuropathy VI is damage to the sixth cranial (skull) nerve. This nerve, also called the abducens nerve, helps ...

  6. Infrared band intensities in ammonium hydroxide and ammonium salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sethna, P. P.; Downing, H. D.; Pinkley, L. W.; Williams, D.

    1978-01-01

    We have applied Kramers-Kronig analysis to reflection spectra to determine the optical constants of ammonium hydroxide and of aqueous solutions of ammonium chloride and bromide. From considerations of the absorption indices k(nu) we conclude that ammonium hydroxide consists of a solution of NH3 in water, in which NH3 molecules are hydrogen bonded to neighboring water molecules. The spectrum of ammonium hydroxide differs from the spectra of ammonium salts, in which bands characteristic of NH4(+) ions are prominent. The existence of ammonium hydroxide as an aerosol in planetary atmospheres is briefly discussed

  7. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC Transporter HI1470/71 through Its Cognate Molybdate Periplasmic Binding Protein, MolA

    SciTech Connect

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C.; Pinkett, Heather W.

    2014-10-02

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB{sub 2}C{sub 2} (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The {approx}100 {mu}M binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus.

  8. Protection of aluminium foil AA8021 by molybdate-based conversion coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chang-Sheng; Lv, Zhong-Fei; Zhu, Ye-Ling; Xu, Shi-Ai; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    A quick method for surface treatment of aluminium foil with environment-friendly and effective molybdate-based coating was developed in this study. Aluminium foil samples were treated with molybdate-based solution. The microstructure and composition of the resulting molybdate-based conversion coatings were explored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS). We found that the molybdate-based conversion coating was composed mainly of MoO3, (MoO3)x(P2O5)y and Al2(MoO4)3 compounds. Furthermore, corrosion resistance of the treated aluminium foil was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. Our results show that all of the aluminium foils with molybdate-based conversion coatings have much better corrosion resistance than bare aluminium foil. Notably, the sample treated at 40 °C exhibited the best corrosion resistance. The new method is very suitable for continuous processing.

  9. Carminic acid modified anion exchanger for the removal and preconcentration of Mo(VI) from wastewater.

    PubMed

    El-Moselhy, Medhat Mohamed; Sengupta, Arup K; Smith, Ryan

    2011-01-15

    Removal and preconcentration of Mo(VI) from water and wastewater solutions was investigated using carminic acid modified anion exchanger (IRA743). Various factors influencing the adsorption of Mo(VI), e.g. pH, initial concentration, and coexisting oxyanions were studied. Adsorption reached equilibrium within <10 min and was independent of initial concentration of Mo(VI). Studies were performed at different pH values to find the pH at which maximum adsorption occurred and was determined to be at a pH between 4.0 and 6.0. The Langmuir adsorption capacity (q(max)) was found to be 13.5mg Mo(VI)/g of the adsorbent. The results showed that modification of IRA743 with carminic acid is suitable for the removal of Mo(VI), as molybdate, from water and wastewater samples. The concentration of Mo(VI) was determined spectrophotometrically using bromopyrogallol red as a complexation reagent. This allows the determination of Mo(VI) in the range 1.0-100.0 μg/mL. The obtained material was subjected to efficient regeneration. PMID:20943315

  10. Aquatic acute toxicity assessments of molybdenum (+VI) to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Wei; Liang, Chenju; Yeh, Hui-Ju

    2016-03-01

    Generally, molybdenum (Mo) metals in the environment are very rare, but wastewater discharges from industrial processes may contain high concentrations of Mo, which has the potential to contaminate water or soil if not handled properly. In this study, the impact of three common compounds of hexavalent Mo (sodium molybdate (Na2MoO4‧2H2O), ammonium molybdate ((NH4)6Mo7O24‧4H2O) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3)) in an aquatic system were assessed based on 48-h exposure acute toxicity to Daphnia magna (D. magna). The LC50 toxicities for associated conjugate ions including Na(+), Cl(-), SO4(2-), and NH4(+) were determined. Furthermore, the LC50 values for the three forms of hexavalent Mo were determined, and the acute toxicities of the Mo forms were found to follow the order: (NH4)6Mo7O24‧4H2O > MoO3 > Na2MoO4‧2H2O in solution. (NH4)6Mo7O24‧4H2O exhibited the lowest LC50 of 43.3 mg L(-1) (corresponding to 23.5 mg Mo L(-1)) among the three molybdenum salts. The research confirmed that the toxicity of molybdenum in the aquatic system is highly dependent on the form of molybdenum salts used, and is also associated with the influence of the background water quality.

  11. 70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM NITRATE IN STORAGE. APRIL 18, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  12. Behavior of silver molybdate at high-pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, A.K.; Nithya, R.; Misra, Sunasira; Yagi, Takehiko

    2012-12-15

    Behavior of cubic spinel phase of Ag{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} is investigated at high pressure using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The P-V data are fitted to a third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state using a value of B{sub 0}=113 GPa and B Prime {sub 0}=4. The compound is also found to exhibit a phase transition around 5 GPa to a tetragonal structure and the two phases are found to coexist over a range of pressures. Raman spectra exhibit dramatic changes across the phase transition. Increase of X-ray background scattering and broadening of the Raman peaks associated with MoO{sub 4} tetrahedral ions in the high pressure phase suggest evolution of positional disorder. However, no evidence of pressure-induced amorphization was found up to 47 GPa. - Graphical abstract: Evolution of the integrated intensity of all the diffraction peaks between 12 and 18 degree 2{theta} as a function of pressure. The rapid decrease of the intensity suggests evolution of positional disorder in the high-pressure tetragonal phase. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First in-situ X-ray diffraction and Raman study of cubic silver molybdate at high pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Commencement of a structural transition to a tetragonal phase is found at 2.3 GPa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The high-pressure phase is found to have positional disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bulk modulus of 113 GPa is obtained from the equation of state.

  13. Luminescence and electrical behavior of lead molybdate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Parchur, A. K.; Rai, S. B.; Singh, P.

    2013-02-01

    We report our investigation on photoluminescence and electrical behavior of lead molybdate (PbMoO4) nanoparticles by spanning the solvent of reaction medium. The PbMoO4 nanoparticles were prepared in different solvents like ethylene glycol (EG), dimethyl sulfonic acid (DMSO) and 50% EG + 50% DMSO at room temperature. The crystallite size and strain acting on nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study and microstructure was studied by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The average crystallite sizes and strain were found to be ˜22, 24 and 25 nm and ˜0.0028, 0.0039 and 0.0048 for EG, DMSO and EG+DMSO solvents, respectively. The XRD peak corresponding to (112) were found to shift to lower angle by 0.02° for DMSA solvent as compared to EG. This confirmed the lattice expansion in the unit cell. The particle sizes measured from TEM measurements were found to be slightly greater than that obtained from XRD analysis. The photoluminescence (PL) measurements were carried out by using 266 nm Nd-YAG laser excitation (Mo-O CTB). The samples depicted strong BLUE color. The order of emission intensity in the samples was obtained in EG+DMSO > DMSO > EG order. This may be related to the formation of [MoO4] and [PbO8] clusters in PbMoO4 host. The electrical conductivity study were carried out for these samples and from this study, we concluded that the conduction mechanism in this system were polaronic in nature.

  14. Optical filtering and luminescence property of some molybdates prepared by combustion synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, P. J.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2014-10-15

    As an important class of lanthanide inorganic compounds, rare earth ions doped molybdates have gained much attention due to their attractive luminescence and structural properties, supporting various promising applications as phosphor materials in the fields such as white light-emitting diodes, optical fibers, biolabel, lasers, and so on. The molybdate family has promising trivalent cation conducting properties and most of the optical properties result from electron transitions of the 4f shell, which are greatly affected by the composition and structures of rare-earth compounds. In this paper we report the molybdate CaMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} for red SSL and Bi{sub 1.4}Y{sub 0.6}MoO{sub 6}, Y{sub 6}MoO{sub 12} for optical filtering, prepared by one step combustion synthesis.

  15. Metal molybdate nanorods as non-precious electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tian; Zhang, Lieyu

    2015-12-01

    Development of non-precious electrocatalysts with applicable electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is important to fulfill broad-based and large-scale applications of metal/air batteries and fuel cells. Herein, nickel and cobalt molybdates with uniform nanorod morphology are synthesized using a facile one-pot hydrothermal method. The ORR activity of the prepared metal molybdate nanorods in alkaline media are investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and chronoamperomety in rotating disk electrode (RDE) techniques. The present study suggests that the prepared metal molybdate nanorods exhibit applicable electrocatalytic activities towards the ORR in alkaline media, promising the applications as non-precious cathode in fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  16. Glufosinate-ammonium

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Glufosinate - ammonium ; CASRN 77182 - 82 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarci

  17. Mo enrichment in black shale and reduction of molybdate by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Barton, L. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Lower Cambrian Black shale in Zunyi area of Guizhou Province, Southern China contains significant amount of Mo, As, and sulfide minerals. Additionally, Mo and sulfides are closely associated with organic matter of kerogen. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show pyrite micro-crystals and Mo-As-S-bearing carbon (kerogen). High-resolution TEM image shows that Mo-rich areas are Mo-sulfide (molybdenite) layers that form poorly crystalline structures in organic carbon matrix. X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS) indicate composition from the pyrite and the Mo-rich area. The black shale is very unique because of its high Mo concentration. One possible mechanism for enriching Mo from paleo-seawater is the involvement of SRB. Molybdate is an essential trace element required by biological systems including the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB); however, detrimental consequences may occur if molybdate is present in high concentrations in the environment. We followed the growth of Desulfovibrio gigas ATCC 19364, D. vulgaris Hildenborough, D. desulfuricans DSM 642, and D. desulfuricans DSM 27774 in media containing sub-lethal levels of molybdate and observed a red-brown color in the culture fluid. Spectral analysis of the culture fluid revealed absorption peaks at 467 nm, 395 nm and 314 nm and this color is proposed to be a molybdate-sulfide complex. Reduction of molybdate with the formation of molybdate disulfide occurs in the periplasm D. gigas and D. desulfuricans DSM 642. From these results we suggest that the occurrence of poorly crystalline Mo-sulfides in black shale may be a result from SRB reduction and selective enrichment of Mo in paleo-seawater. We suggest that similar SRB mechanism could cause the Mo enrichment in a ~ 2.5 billion years old late Archean McRae Shale, which is related to the great oxidation event of early earth atmosphere.

  18. Study of the redox properties of bismuth-molybdate and uranium-antimonate catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Pujalt, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidation/reduction properties of various bismuth molybdates, molybdenum trioxide, bismuth oxide, uranium antimonate, and iron antimonate have been studied in an effort to correlate them to their catalytic properties. The temperature at which ..gamma..-phase bismuth molybdate is prereduced plays an important role in the behavior the catalyst exhibits under reoxidation conditions. The overall behavior of ..gamma..-phase bismuth molybdate under catalytic conditions may be divided into two temperature regimes: below 360/sup 0/C the catalyst shows a higher rate of propylene adsorption than product desorption, and above 360/sup 0/C where produced desorption is dominant. This temperature is the same at which the Arrhenius plot for the reaction has a break. Several reduction of ..gamma..-bismuth molybdate results in the formation of clusters of bismuth metal and crystallites of molybdenum dioxide. This is irreversible. The reoxidation of the bismuth molybdate catalysts shows the presence of two oxygen incorporation temperatures. The ratios of the areas under these peaks are not the same for the three catalysts. Uranium antimonate shows a lesser degree of lattice oxygen participation. During several reduction the catalyst decomposes partially and an excess of antimony is evident. The isothermal reduction profiles of the catalysts permitted their classification into either of two reduction models: (A) ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, ..gamma..-phase bismuth molybdates, molybdenum trioxide, bismuth oxide, and the equimolar mixture follow the nucleation model, (B) uranium antimonate, and iron antimonate following the shrinking sphere model. These models have been correlated to certain characteristics of these catalysts. Group A catalysts show a high degree of lattice oxygen participation (migration of bulk oxygen to surface nuclei). In contrast in group B catalysts only a few layers of oxygen are peeled off during catalysis.

  19. Molybdic acid ionisation under hydrothermal conditions to 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minubayeva, Z.; Seward, T. M.

    2010-08-01

    This UV spectrophotometric study was aimed at providing precise, experimentally derived thermodynamic data for the ionisation of molybdic acid (H 2MoO 4) from 30 to 300 °C and at equilibrium saturated vapour pressures. The determination of the equilibrium constants and associated thermodynamic parameters were facilitated by spectrophotometric measurements using a specially designed high temperature optical Ti-Pd flow-through cell with silica glass windows. The following van't Hoff isochore equations describe the temperature dependence of the first and second ionisation constants of molybdic acid up to 300 °C:

  20. The Molybdate-Responsive Escherichia coli ModE Transcriptional Regulator Coordinates Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase (napFDAGHBC) Operon Expression with Nitrate and Molybdate Availability

    PubMed Central

    McNicholas, Paul M.; Gunsalus, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the Escherichia coli napFDAGHBC operon (also known as aeg46.5), which encodes the periplasmic molybdoenzyme for nitrate reduction, is increased in response to anaerobiosis and further stimulated by the addition of nitrate or to a lesser extent by nitrite to the cell culture medium. These changes are mediated by the transcription factors Fnr and NarP, respectively. Utilizing a napF-lacZ operon fusion, we demonstrate that napF gene expression is impaired in strain defective for the molybdate-responsive ModE transcription factor. This control abrogates nitrate- or nitrite-dependent induction during anaerobiosis. Gel shift and DNase I footprinting analyses establish that ModE binds to the napF promoter with an apparent Kd of about 35 nM at a position centered at −133.5 relative to the start of napF transcription. Although the ModE binding site sequence is similar to other E. coli ModE binding sites, the location is atypical, because it is not centered near the start of transcription. Introduction of point mutations in the ModE recognition site severely reduced or abolished ModE binding in vitro and conferred a modE phenotype (i.e., loss of molybdate-responsive gene expression) in vivo. In contrast, deletion of the upstream ModE region site rendered napF expression independent of modE. These findings indicate the involvement of an additional transcription factor to help coordinate nitrate- and molybdate-dependent napF expression by the Fnr, NarP, NarL, and ModE proteins. The upstream ModE regulatory site functions to override nitrate control of napF gene expression when the essential enzyme component, molybdate, is limiting in the cell environment. PMID:12029041

  1. Intercalation-controlled cyclodehydration of sorbitol in water over layered-niobium-molybdate solid acid.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuya; Furusato, Shogo; Takagaki, Atsushi; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Kikuchi, Ryuji; Oyama, S Ted

    2014-03-01

    Layered niobium molybdate (HNbMoO6 ) was used in the aqueous-phase dehydration of sorbitol and was found to exhibit remarkable selectivity toward its monomolecular-dehydrated intermediate 1,4-sorbitan. This was attributed to the selective intercalation of sorbitol within the interlayers with strong Brønsted acid sites.

  2. The molybdate-binding protein (ModA) of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Balan, Andrea; Santacruz, Carolina P; Moutran, Alexandre; Ferreira, Rita C C; Medrano, Francisco J; Pérez, Carlos A; Ramos, Carlos H I; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2006-12-01

    The modABC operon of phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. citri) encodes a putative ABC transporter involved in the uptake of the molybdate and tungstate anions. Sequence analyses showed high similarity values of ModA orthologs found in X. campestris pv. campestris (X. campestris) and Escherichia coli. The X. citri modA gene was cloned in pET28a and the recombinant protein, expressed in the E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain, purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The purified protein remained soluble and specifically bound molybdate and tungstate with K(d) 0.29+/-0.12 microM and 0.58+/-0.14 microM, respectively. Additionally binding of molybdate drastically enhanced the thermal stability of the recombinant ModA as compared to the apoprotein. This is the first characterization of a ModA ortholog expressed by a phytopathogen and represents an important tool for functional, biochemical and structural analyses of molybdate transport in Xanthomonas species.

  3. An analysis of the binding of repressor protein ModE to modABCD (molybdate transport) operator/promoter DNA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Grunden, A M; Self, W T; Villain, M; Blalock, J E; Shanmugam, K T

    1999-08-20

    Expression of the modABCD operon in Escherichia coli, which codes for a molybdate-specific transporter, is repressed by ModE in vivo in a molybdate-dependent fashion. In vitro DNase I-footprinting experiments identified three distinct regions of protection by ModE-molybdate on the modA operator/promoter DNA, GTTATATT (-15 to -8; region 1), GCCTACAT (-4 to +4; region 2), and GTTACAT (+8 to +14; region 3). Within the three regions of the protected DNA, a pentamer sequence, TAYAT (Y = C or T), can be identified. DNA-electrophoretic mobility experiments showed that the protected regions 1 and 2 are essential for binding of ModE-molybdate to DNA, whereas the protected region 3 increases the affinity of the DNA to the repressor. The stoichiometry of this interaction was found to be two ModE-molybdate per modA operator DNA. ModE-molybdate at 5 nM completely protected the modABCD operator/promoter DNA from DNase I-catalyzed hydrolysis, whereas ModE alone failed to protect the DNA even at 100 nM. The apparent K(d) for the interaction between the modA operator DNA and ModE-molybdate was 0.3 nM, and the K(d) increased to 8 nM in the absence of molybdate. Among the various oxyanions tested, only tungstate replaced molybdate in the repression of modA by ModE, but the affinity of ModE-tungstate for modABCD operator DNA was 6 times lower than with ModE-molybdate. A mutant ModE(T125I) protein, which repressed modA-lac even in the absence of molybdate, protected the same region of modA operator DNA in the absence of molybdate. The apparent K(d) for the interaction between modA operator DNA and ModE(T125I) was 3 nM in the presence of molybdate and 4 nM without molybdate. The binding of molybdate to ModE resulted in a decrease in fluorescence emission, indicating a conformational change of the protein upon molybdate binding. The fluorescence emission spectra of mutant ModE proteins, ModE(T125I) and ModE(Q216*), were unaffected by molybdate. The molybdate-independent mutant Mod

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sucha, V.; Elsass, F.; Eberl, D.D.; Kuchta, L'.; Madejova, J.; Gates, W.P.; Komadel, P.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic gel and glass of illitic composition, natural kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite were used as starting materials for hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite. Ammonium illite was prepared from synthetic gel by hydrothermal treatment at 300??C. The onset of crystallization began within 3 h, and well-crystallized ammonium illite appeared at 24 h. Increasing reaction time (up to four weeks) led to many illite layers per crystal. In the presence of equivalent proportions of potassium and ammonium, the gel was transformed to illite with equimolar contents of K and NH4. In contrast, synthesis using glass under the same conditions resulted in a mixture of mixed-layer ammonium illite-smectite with large expandability and discrete illite. Hydrothermal treatments of the fine fractions of natural kaolinite and illite-smectite produced ammonium illite from kaolinite but the illite-smectite remained unchanged.

  5. The Escherichia coli modE gene: effect of modE mutations on molybdate dependent modA expression.

    PubMed

    McNicholas, P M; Chiang, R C; Gunsalus, R P

    1996-11-15

    The Escherichia coli modABCD operon, which encodes a high-affinity molybdate uptake system, is transcriptionally regulated in response to molybdate availability by ModE. Here we describe a highly effective enrichment protocol, applicable to any gene with a repressor role, and establish its application in the isolation of transposon mutations in modE. In addition we show that disruption of the ModE C-terminus abolishes derepression in the absence of molybdate, implying this region of ModE controls the repressor activity. Finally, a mutational analysis of a proposed molybdate binding motif indicates that this motif does not function in regulating the repressor activity of ModE.

  6. Anion-exchange sorption of molybdate and germanate

    SciTech Connect

    Kislinskaya, G.E.; Denisova, T.I.; Sheka, I.A.

    1983-07-20

    Interest in sorption of molybdenum and germanium from salt solutions is prompted by industrial requirements related to purification of such solutions and also to extraction of these elements from various industrial liquors.In order to identify the ionic forms of molybdenum and germanium having the highest sorption activity and to determine the optimal conditions for extraction of these elements from solutions with high electrolyte contents, we studied the states of molybdenum(VI) and germanium(IV) in solutions of sodium chloride in various concentrations, and sorption of these elements by strongly basic macroporous anion-exchange resins and by iron and aluminum hydroxides in relation to the pH, concentrations of the elements, and time of contact between the solution and the sorbent. Examination of literature data shows that the molecular and ionic states of these elements in the presence of high salt concentrations have been studied mainly in acidic solutions and at higher molybdenum and germanium concentrations. However, for selection of a method of removal of molybdenum and germanium from production liquors it is also necessary to have analogous information on their states when present in microconcentrations over wide ranges of pH.

  7. Synthesis and spectroscopy of new plutonium(III) and -(IV) molybdates: comparisons of electronic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cross, Justin N; Cary, Samantha K; Stritzinger, Jared T; Polinski, Matthew J; Albrecht Schmitt, Thomas E

    2014-03-17

    Synthesis of a plutonium(III) molybdate bromide, PuMoO4Br(H2O), has been accomplished using hydrothermal techniques in an inert-atmosphere glovebox. The compound is green in color, which is in stark contrast to the typical blue color of plutonium(III) complexes. The unusual color arises from the broad charge transfer (CT) spanning from approximately 300 to 500 nm in the UV-vis-near-IR spectra. Repeating the synthesis with an increase in the reaction temperature results in the formation of a plutonium(IV) molybdate, Pu3Mo6O24(H2O)2, which also has a broad CT band and red-shifted f-f transitions. Performing an analogous reaction with neodymium produced a completely different product, [Nd(H2O)3][NdMo12O42]·2H2O, which is built of Silverton-type polyoxometallate clusters.

  8. The surface of iron molybdate catalysts used for the selective oxidation of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Benjamin R.; Pudge, Geoffrey J. F.; Bugler, Keith G.; Rushby, Alice V.; Kondrat, Simon; Bartley, Jonathan; Golunski, Stanislaw; Taylor, Stuart H.; Gibson, Emma; Wells, Peter. P.; Brookes, Catherine; Bowker, Michael; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-06-01

    The oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde is a major chemical process carried out catalytically and iron molybdate is one of the major catalysts for this process. In this paper we explore the nature of the active and selective surfaces of iron molybdate catalysts and show that the effective catalysts comprise molybdenum rich surfaces. We conclude that it is therefore important to maximise the surface area of these active catalysts and to this end we have studied catalysts made using a new physical grinding method with oxalic acid. For super-stoichiometric materials (Fe:Mo = 1:2.2) the reaction data show that physical mixing produces effective catalysts, possibly offering an improvement over the conventional co-precipitation method.

  9. Characterization of ligno-cellulosic materials bleached with oxo-diperoxo-molybdates.

    PubMed

    Sîrghie, Cecilia; Bodescu, Adina-Maria; Botar, Alexandru; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Munteanu, Florentina-Daniela

    2013-10-15

    A newly effective system was used to bleach ligno-cellulosic textile materials. This system is based on two different newly synthesized natrium oxo-diperoxo molybdates, Na2[MoO (O2)2(C2O4)] and Na2[MoO (O2)2(C6H6O7)]. These two compounds were characterized by means of cyclic voltammetry, and the bleached fabrics were fully characterized by measuring their whiteness index, percent loss in fabric weight and the content of lignin in the fabric. The obtained results revealed that good whiteness index of the bleached linen-cotton fabrics (50% linen and 50% cotton) and low content of lignin could be obtained by soaking the fabric for 55 min at 90 °C in a solution containing 3.5% of molybdate complex and 3.5% H2O2.

  10. 2-Bromoethanesulfonate, sulfate, molybdate, and ethanesulfonate inhibit anaerobic dechlorination of polychlorobiphenyls by pasteurized microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, D. |; Quensen, J.F. III; Boyd, S.A.; Tiedje, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Dechlorination of (PCB Aroclor 1242) by pasteurized microorganisms was inhibited by 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES), sulfate, molybdate, and ethanesulfonate. Consumption of these anions and production of sulfide from BES were detected. The inhibition could not be relieved by hydrogen. Taken together these results suggest that pattern M dechlorination is mediated by spore-forming sulfidogenic bacteria. These results also suggest that BES may inhibit anaerobic dechlorination by nonmethanogens by more than one mechanism.

  11. Effect of chlorate, molybdate, and shikimic acid on Salmonella Typhimurium in aerobic and anaerobic cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to examine the effects of shikimic acid (60 µg/mL) and(or) molybdate (1 mM) on the sensitivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to sodium chlorate (5 mM) during anaerobic (90% N2:5% CO2:5% H2) or aerobic growth in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 5 mM...

  12. Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Mouser, Paula J; N'Guessan, A Lucie; Elifantz, Hila; Holmes, Dawn E; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Long, Philip E; Lovley, Derek R

    2009-06-15

    The influence of ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the physiological status of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by 2 orders of magnitude (< 4 to 400 microM) across th study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences suggested that ammonium may have been one factor influencing the community composition prior to acetate amendment with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species with higher ammonium and Dechloromonas species dominating at the site with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to acetate concentrations rather than ammonium levels. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium transporter gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during uranium reduction. The abundance of amtB was inversely correlated to ammonium levels, whereas nifD transcript levels were similar across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB transcript expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of subsurface Geobacter species. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical and physiological interactions at the field scale in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes during bioremediation.

  13. Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Mouser, P.J.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Elifantz, H.; Holmes, D.E.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-04-01

    The impact of ammonium availability on microbial community structure and the physiological status and activity of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by as much as two orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 {micro}M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that ammonium influenced the composition of the microbial community prior to acetate addition with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species at the site with the highest ammonium, and Dechloromonas species dominating at sites with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added, and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to the concentration of acetate that was delivered to each location rather than the amount of ammonium available in the groundwater. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium importer gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during in situ uranium reduction, and that the abundance of amtB transcripts was inversely correlated to ammonium levels across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression by subsurface Geobacter species are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of Geobacter species in subsurface environments during bioremediation. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical/physiological interactions at the field scale, in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes.

  14. Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Mouser, Paula; N'guessan, Lucie A.; Elifantz, H.; Holmes, Dawn; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2009-06-15

    The influence of ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the physiological status of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by two orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 μM) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences suggested that ammonium may have been one factor influencing the community composition prior to acetate amendment with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species with higher ammonium and Dechloromonas species dominating at the site with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added, and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI)-reduction appeared to be more related to acetate concentrations rather than ammonium levels. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium transporter gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during uranium reduction. The abundance of amtB was inversely correlated to ammonium levels whereas nifD transcript levels were similar across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB transcript expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of subsurface Geobacter species and. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical/physiological interactions at the field scale, in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes during bioremediation.

  15. Ultrasensitive Visual Sensing of Molybdate Based on Enzymatic-like Etching of Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyang; Chen, Zhaopeng; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-08-25

    Here, we have developed a novel approach to the visual detection of molybdate with high sensitivity and selectivity in aqueous media based on the combination of catalytic formation of iodine and iodine-mediated etching of gold nanorods. In weak acid solution, like peroxidase, molybdate can catalyze the reaction between H2O2 and I(-) to produce I2, a moderate oxidant, which then etches gold nanorods preferentially along the longitudinal direction in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide. The etching results in the longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance extinction peak shifts to short wavelength, accompanied by a color change from blue to red. Under optimal conditions, this sensor exhibits good sensitivity with a detection limit of 1.0 nM. The approach is highlighted by its high selectivity and tolerance to interference, which enables the sensor to detect molybdate directly in real samples, such as tap water, drinking water, and seawater. In addition, perhaps the proposed sensing strategy can be also used for other targets that can selectively regulate the formation of I2 under given conditions. PMID:26226196

  16. Effect of solid-phase amorphization on the spectral characteristics of europium-doped gadolinium molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmurak, S. Z.; Kiselev, A. P.; Kurmasheva, D. M.; Red'Kin, B. S.; Sinitsyn, V. V.

    2010-05-01

    A method is proposed for detecting spectral characteristics of optically inactive molybdates of rare-earth elements by their doping with rare-earth ions whose luminescence lies in the transparency region of all structural modifications of the sample. Gadolinium molybdate is chosen as the object of investigations, while europium ions are used as an optically active and structurally sensitive admixture. It is shown that after the action of a high pressure under which gadolinium molybdate passes to the amorphous state, the spectral characteristics of Gd1.99Eu0.01(MoO4)3 (GMO:Eu) change radically; namely, considerable line broadening is observed in the luminescence spectra and the luminescence excitation spectra, while the long-wave threshold of optical absorption is shifted considerably (by approximately 1.1 eV) towards lower energies. It is found that by changing the structural state of GMO:Eu by solid-state amorphization followed by annealing, the spectral characteristics of the sample can be purposefully changed. This is extremely important for solving the urgent problem of designing high-efficiency light-emitting diodes producing “white” light.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of amorphous MoS2nanofiber bundles via acidification of ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    MoS2nanofiber bundles have been prepared by hydrothermal method using ammonium molybdate with sulfur source in acidic medium and maintained at 180 °C for several hours. The obtained black crystalline products are characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The PXRD pattern of the sample can be readily indexed as hexagonal 2H-MoS2. FTIR spectrum of the MoS2shows the band at 480 cm−1corresponds to the γas(Mo-S). SEM/TEM images of the samples exhibit that the MoS2nanofiber exist in bundles of 120–300 nm in diameter and 20–25 μm in length. The effects of temperature, duration and other experimental parameters on the morphology of the products are investigated. PMID:21794187

  18. Ferrate(VI): green chemistry oxidant for degradation of cationic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Eng, Yong Yong; Sharma, Virender K; Ray, Ajay K

    2006-06-01

    Iron in its familiar form exists in the +2 and +3 oxidation states, however, higher oxidation state of iron +6, ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O(4)(2-)) can be obtained. The high oxidation power of ferrate(VI) can be utilized in developing cleaner ("greener") technology for remediation processes. This paper demonstrates the unique property of ferrate(VI) to degrade almost completely the cationic surfactant, cetylpyridinium chloride (C(5)H(5)N(+)(CH(2))(15)CH(3).H(2)O Cl(-), CPC). The Rate law for the oxidation of CPC by ferrate(VI) at pH 9.2 was found to be: -d[Fe(VI)]/dt = k[Fe(VI)][CPC](2). Ferrate(VI) oxidizes CPC within minutes and molar consumption of ferrate(VI) was nearly equal to the oxidized CPC. The decrease in total organic carbon (TOC) from CPC was more than 95%; suggesting mineralization of CPC to carbon dioxide. Ammonium ion was the other product of the oxidation. This is the first report in which Fe(VI)O(4)(2-) ion opens the pyridine ring and mineralizes the aliphatic chain of the organic molecule giving inorganic ions. PMID:16303166

  19. Myosin VI: a multifunctional motor.

    PubMed

    Lister, I; Roberts, R; Schmitz, S; Walker, M; Trinick, J; Veigel, C; Buss, F; Kendrick-Jones, J

    2004-11-01

    Myosin VI moves towards the minus end of actin filaments unlike all the other myosins so far studied, suggesting that it has unique properties and functions. Myosin VI is present in clathrin-coated pits and vesicles, in membrane ruffles and in the Golgi complex, indicating that it has a wide variety of functions in the cell. To investigate the cellular roles of myosin VI, we have identified a variety of myosin VI-binding partners and characterized their interactions. As an alternative approach, we have studied the in vitro properties of intact myosin VI. Previous studies assumed that myosin VI existed as a dimer but our biochemical characterization and electron microscopy studies reveal that myosin VI is a monomer. Using an optical tweezers force transducer, we showed that monomeric myosin VI is a non-processive motor with a large working stroke of 18 nm. Potential roles for myosin VI in cells are discussed. PMID:15493988

  20. High performance ammonium nitrate propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, F. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A high performance propellant having greatly reduced hydrogen chloride emission is presented. It is comprised of: (1) a minor amount of hydrocarbon binder (10-15%), (2) at least 85% solids including ammonium nitrate as the primary oxidizer (about 40% to 70%), (3) a significant amount (5-25%) powdered metal fuel, such as aluminum, (4) a small amount (5-25%) of ammonium perchlorate as a supplementary oxidizer, and (5) optionally a small amount (0-20%) of a nitramine.

  1. Solubility of the Sodium and Ammonium Salts of Oxalic Acid in Water with Ammonium Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Buttke, Lukas G; Schueller, Justin R; Pearson, Christian S; Beyer, Keith D

    2016-08-18

    The solubility of the sodium and ammonium salts of oxalic acid in water with ammonium sulfate present has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray crystallography, and infrared spectroscopy. The crystals that form from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium hydrogen oxalate were determined to be sodium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate under low ammonium sulfate conditions and ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate under high ammonium sulfate conditions. Crystals from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium oxalate were determined to be ammonium oxalate monohydrate under moderate to high ammonium sulfate concentrations and sodium oxalate under low ammonium sulfate concentrations. It was also found that ammonium sulfate enhances the solubility of the sodium oxalate salts (salting in effect) and decreases the solubility of the ammonium oxalate salts (salting out effect). In addition, a partial phase diagram for the ammonium hydrogen oxalate/water system was determined.

  2. Solubility of the Sodium and Ammonium Salts of Oxalic Acid in Water with Ammonium Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Buttke, Lukas G; Schueller, Justin R; Pearson, Christian S; Beyer, Keith D

    2016-08-18

    The solubility of the sodium and ammonium salts of oxalic acid in water with ammonium sulfate present has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray crystallography, and infrared spectroscopy. The crystals that form from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium hydrogen oxalate were determined to be sodium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate under low ammonium sulfate conditions and ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate under high ammonium sulfate conditions. Crystals from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium oxalate were determined to be ammonium oxalate monohydrate under moderate to high ammonium sulfate concentrations and sodium oxalate under low ammonium sulfate concentrations. It was also found that ammonium sulfate enhances the solubility of the sodium oxalate salts (salting in effect) and decreases the solubility of the ammonium oxalate salts (salting out effect). In addition, a partial phase diagram for the ammonium hydrogen oxalate/water system was determined. PMID:27482644

  3. Purification of molybdenum oxide, growth and characterization of medium size zinc molybdate crystals for the LUMINEU program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlegel, V. N.; Berge, L.; Boiko, R. S.; Chapellier, M.; Chernyak, D. M.; Coron, N.; Danevich, F. A.; Decourt, R.; Degoda, V. Ya.; Devoyon, L.; Drillien, A.; Dumoulin, L.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gros, M.; Herve, S.; Ivanov, I. M.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kogut, Ya. P.; Koskas, F.; Loidl, M.; Magnier, P.; Makarov, E. P.; Mancuso, M.; de Marcillac, P.; Marnieros, S.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Nasonov, S. G.; Navick, X. F.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Paul, B.; Penichot, Y.; Pessina, G.; Plantevin, O.; Poda, D. V.; Redon, T.; Rodrigues, M.; Strazzer, O.; Tenconi, M.; Torres, L.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vasiliev, Ya. V.; Velazquez, M.; Viraphong, O.; Zhdankov, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    The LUMINEU program aims at performing a pilot experiment on neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo using radiopure ZnMoO4 crystals operated as scintillating bolometers. Growth of high quality radiopure crystals is a complex task, since there are no commercially available molybdenum compounds with the required levels of purity and radioactive contamination. This paper discusses approaches to purify molybdenum and synthesize compound for high quality radiopure ZnMoO4 crystal growth. A combination of a double sublimation (with addition of zinc molybdate) with subsequent recrystallization in aqueous solutions (using zinc molybdate as a collector) was used. Zinc molybdate crystals up to 1.5 kg were grown by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique, their optical, luminescent, diamagnetic, thermal and bolometric properties were tested.

  4. Chromium(VI)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chromium ( VI ) ; CASRN 18540 - 29 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  5. ESL VI Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flander, Leonard

    This curriculum guide for English as a Second Language (ESL) Level VI is the sixth of six in a Guam Community College ESL project series. The other five guides, a companion teacher's guide and pre- and post-tests are available separately (see note). The entire project centers around the Peabody Kits P, Level P, Level 1, Level 2, Level 3, and the…

  6. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes/titanium molybdate nanocomposite and assessment of its photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sneha; Singh, Braj Raj; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have synthesized carbon nanotubes/titanium molybdate nanocomposite (CNT@Tm-NC), the structural, optical, thermal and dielectric properties of the as synthesized CNT@Tm-NC were studied. The XRD analysis ensures that CNT@Tm-NC has the nanostructure structure and confirmed that the titanium molybdate nanoparticles (NPs) were successfully incorporated in the CNT matrix. The thermal analysis (TGA) exhibited an enhanced thermal stability of the CNT@Tm-NC as compare with CNT owing to the strong interaction between the titanium molybdate NPs and CNT matrix. The energy band gaps as calculated through the Tauc relation were found to be higher in the CNT@Tm-NC. The impedance, dielectric constants (ɛ‧, ɛ‧‧), dielectric loss (tan δ) and AC conductivity (σac) were studied as the function of frequency, which have been explained by 'Maxwell Wagner Model'. Moreover, CNT@Tm-NC exhibited the promising photocatalytic activity for the photo-decoloration of the methyl orange (MO) dye under UV light irradiation. Results also showed protection of photo-decoloration of the MO dye by the disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate dehydrate (EDTA-Na2; C10H14N2Na2O8ṡ2H2O) (hole scavenger) and tert-butyl alcohol (C4H10O) (radical scavenger) clearly suggested the implication of reactive oxygen species in the photocatalytic activity of CNT@Tm-NC. It is encouraging to conclude that CNT@Tm-NC bears the potential of it is applications in photocatalysis.

  7. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators.

  8. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators. PMID:27196733

  9. Analysis of solid solutions stability in scheelite-type molybdates and tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, V.D.; Reznitskikh, O.G.; Velikodnyi, Yu.A.; Patrusheva, T.A.; Sivtsova, O.V.

    2011-10-15

    Mutual solubility of bivalent metal molybdates and tungstates with scheelite structure was theoretically estimated by calculating formation enthalpies and the maximal decomposition temperatures of solid solutions at different temperatures. The theoretical stability of continuous solid solutions in binary systems of bivalent metal molybdates and tungstates was found to be higher than reported literature data. After cooling down continuous substitution solid solution should remain in following systems: CaMoO{sub 4}-CdMoO{sub 4}, SrMoO{sub 4}-MMoO{sub 4} (M=Ba, Pb), BaMoO{sub 4}-PbMoO{sub 4}, SrWO{sub 4}-MWO{sub 4} (M=Ca, Pb), and BaWO{sub 4}-PbWO{sub 4}. There is a probability that at room temperature in systems CaMoO{sub 4}-SrMoO{sub 4,} CaWO{sub 4}-PbWO{sub 4}, and BaWO{sub 4}-SrWO{sub 4} the single homogeneity region may decompose to limited solid solutions. It was shown experimentally that a continuous series of scheelite-structure solid solutions M{sub 1-x}M{sup I}{sub x}TO{sub 4} can be formed via citrate synthesis at temperatures below 500 deg. S. - Graphical abstract: Calculated boundaries of solid solutions in BaWO{sub 4}-CaWO{sub 4} (1) and PbMoO{sub 4}-CaMoO{sub 4} (2) systems. Highlights: > Stability of solid solutions molybdates and tungstates has been investigated. > The ionic model for isovalent substitutions was used. > In 'polyhedral substitution model' enthalphies of mixing were calculated. > Most of the examined series of solid solutions is stable at room temperatures. > Solid solutions M{sub 1-x}M{sup I}{sub x}Mo(W)O{sub 4} (x=0-1) were formed via citrate synthesis below 500 S.

  10. Electrical and mechanical properties of ZnO doped silver-molybdate glass-nanocomposite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Ranadip; Roy, Debasish; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2016-05-01

    Zno doped silver-molybdate glass-nanocomposites, 0.3 Ag2O - 0.7 [0.075 ZnO - 0.925 MoO3] have been prepared by melt-quenching method. Ionic conductivity of these glass-nanocomposites has been measured in wide temperature and frequency windows. Vicker's hardness methods have been employed to study micro-hardness of the as-prepared samples. Heat-treated counterparts for this glass-nanocomposites system has been analyzed in different temperature to observe the changes in conductivity as well as micro-hardness for that system.

  11. The chronic toxicity of molybdate to freshwater organisms. I. Generating reliable effects data.

    PubMed

    De Schamphelaere, K A C; Stubblefield, W; Rodriguez, P; Vleminckx, K; Janssen, C R

    2010-10-15

    The European Union regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical substances (REACH) (EC, 2006) requires the characterization of the chronic toxicity of many chemicals in the aquatic environment, including molybdate (MoO(4)(2-)). Our literature review on the ecotoxicity of molybdate revealed that a limited amount of reliable chronic no observed effect concentrations (NOECs) for the derivation of a predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) existed. This paper presents the results of additional ecotoxicity experiments that were conducted in order to fulfill the requirements for the derivation of a PNEC by means of the scientifically most robust species sensitivity distribution (SSD) approach (also called the statistical extrapolation approach). Ten test species were chronically exposed to molybdate (added as sodium molybdate dihydrate, Na(2)MoO(4)·2H(2)O) according to internationally accepted standard testing guidelines or equivalent. The 10% effective concentrations (EC10, expressed as measured dissolved molybdenum) for the most sensitive endpoint per species were 62.8-105.6 (mg Mo)/L for Daphnia magna (21day-reproduction), 78.2 (mg Mo)/L for Ceriodaphnia dubia (7day-reproduction), 61.2-366.2 (mg Mo)/L for the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (72h-growth rate), 193.6 (mg Mo)/L for the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus (48h-population growth rate), 121.4 (mg Mo)/L for the midge Chironomus riparius (14day-growth), 211.3 (mg Mo)/L for the snail Lymnaea stagnalis (28day-growth rate), 115.9 (mg Mo)/L for the frog Xenopus laevis (4day-larval development), 241.5 (mg Mo)/L for the higher plant Lemna minor (7day-growth rate), 39.3 (mg Mo)/L for the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas (34day-dry weight/biomass), and 43.2 (mg Mo)/L for the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (78day-biomass). These effect concentrations are in line with the few reliable data currently available in the open literature. The data presented in this study can

  12. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation for treatment of ammonium-rich wastewaters*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Zheng, Ping; Tang, Chong-jian; Jin, Ren-cun

    2008-01-01

    The concept of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) is presently of great interest. The functional bacteria belonging to the Planctomycete phylum and their metabolism are investigated by microbiologists. Meanwhile, the ANAMMOX is equally valuable in treatment of ammonium-rich wastewaters. Related processes including partial nitritation-ANAMMOX and completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) have been developed, and lab-scale experiments proved that both processes were quite feasible in engineering with appropriate control. Successful full-scale practice in the Netherlands will accelerate application of the process in future. This review introduces the microbiology and more focuses on application of the ANAMMOX process. PMID:18500782

  13. TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

    1958-06-10

    The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

  14. Sonochemical Process for the Preparation of Novel Calcium Zinc Molybdate Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanvase, B. A.; Kadam, V. B.; Rode, T. D.; Jadhao, P. R.

    2015-06-01

    The present work deals with the use of sonochemical and conventional mixing process for the preparation of calcium zinc molybdate (CZM) nanoparticles using calcium chloride and sodium zinc molybdate as a precursor material without addition of any emulsifying agent. This new process is useful to control the size and shape of the CZM nanoparticles. The formed product was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The formation of CZM was confirmed through XRD, FTIR and elemental analysis. The pH and conductivity results show that sonochemical process takes less time compared to conventional process for the preparation of CZM nanoparticles. The use of sonochemical process during the preparation of CZM nanoparticles results in reduction of the size and nearly the cubic shape is obtained due to the improved solute transfer rate, rapid nucleation, and formation of a large number of nuclei in the presence of cavitation.

  15. Intelsat VI antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, M. F.; Lane, S. O.; Taormina, F. A.

    The antenna system design of a series of five new communications satellites known as Intelsat VI is described in detail. Each satellite will utilize 50 transponders operating in the C and K band portions of the frequency spectrum. The transponders are interconnectible using either static switch matrices or a network which provides satellite switched time division multiple access capability. The antenna coverages, characteristics, and special design features are shown and discussed.

  16. Benzylic Ammonium Ylide Mediated Epoxidations

    PubMed Central

    Roiser, Lukas; Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-01-01

    A high yielding synthesis of stilbene oxides using ammonium ylides has been developed. It turned out that the amine leaving group plays a crucial role as trimethylamine gives higher yields than DABCO or quinuclidine. The amine group also influences the diastereoselectivity, and detailed DFT calculations to understand the key parameters of these reactions have been carried out. PMID:27766017

  17. Effect of chlorate, molybdate, and shikimic acid on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in aerobic and anaerobic cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorate is a bactericide that has potential as a pre-slaughter feed additive to improve food safety of meat products. The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of chlorate (5mM), molybdate (1 mM), and shikimate (0.34 mM) on the growth and chlorate-resistance of Salmonella enterica ...

  18. Crystallization, data collection and phasing of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    SciTech Connect

    Santacruz, C. P.; Balan, A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.; Barbosa, J. A. R. G.

    2006-03-01

    The molybdate-binding protein (ModA) from X. axonopodis pv. citri was crystallized with sodium molybdate in the presence of PEG or sulfate. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å and belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1,} with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ModA protein is the ABC periplasmic binding component responsible for the capture of molybdate. The protein was crystallized with sodium molybdate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of PEG or sulfate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is in progress.

  19. Simple, rapid and effective preservation and reactivation of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacterium "Candidatus Brocadia sinica".

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Oshiki, Mamoru; Okabe, Satoshi

    2014-06-15

    It is still the biggest challenge to secure enough seeding biomass for rapid start-up of full-scale (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) anammox processes due to slow growth. Preservation of active anammox biomass could be one of the solutions. In this study, biomass of anammox bacterium, "Candidatus Brocadia sinica", immersed in various nutrient media were preserved at -80 °C, 4 °C and room temperature. After 45, 90 and 150 days of preservation, specific anammox activity (SAA) of the preserved anammox biomass was determined by measuring (29)N2 production rate and transcription levels of hzsA gene encoding hydrazine synthase alpha subunit. Storage in nutrient medium containing 3 mM of molybdate at room temperature with periodical (every 45 days) supply of NH4(+) and NO2(-) was proved to be the most effective storage technique for "Ca. Brocadia sinica" biomass. Using this preservation condition, 96, 92 and 65% of the initial SAA was sustained after 45, 90 and 150 days of storage, respectively. Transcription levels of hzsA gene in biomass correlated with the SAA (R(2) = 0.83), indicating it can be used as a genetic marker to evaluate the anammox activity of preserved biomass. Furthermore, the 90-day-stored biomass was successfully reactivated by immobilizing in polyvinyl alcohol (6%, w/v) and sodium alginate (2%, w/v) gel and then inoculated to up-flow column reactors. Total nitrogen removal rates rapidly increased to 7 kg-N m(-3) d(-1) within 35 days of operation. Based on these results, the room temperature preservation with molybdate addition is simple, cost-effective and feasible at a practical scale, which will accelerate the practical use of anammox process for wastewater treatment.

  20. Simple, rapid and effective preservation and reactivation of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacterium "Candidatus Brocadia sinica".

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Oshiki, Mamoru; Okabe, Satoshi

    2014-06-15

    It is still the biggest challenge to secure enough seeding biomass for rapid start-up of full-scale (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) anammox processes due to slow growth. Preservation of active anammox biomass could be one of the solutions. In this study, biomass of anammox bacterium, "Candidatus Brocadia sinica", immersed in various nutrient media were preserved at -80 °C, 4 °C and room temperature. After 45, 90 and 150 days of preservation, specific anammox activity (SAA) of the preserved anammox biomass was determined by measuring (29)N2 production rate and transcription levels of hzsA gene encoding hydrazine synthase alpha subunit. Storage in nutrient medium containing 3 mM of molybdate at room temperature with periodical (every 45 days) supply of NH4(+) and NO2(-) was proved to be the most effective storage technique for "Ca. Brocadia sinica" biomass. Using this preservation condition, 96, 92 and 65% of the initial SAA was sustained after 45, 90 and 150 days of storage, respectively. Transcription levels of hzsA gene in biomass correlated with the SAA (R(2) = 0.83), indicating it can be used as a genetic marker to evaluate the anammox activity of preserved biomass. Furthermore, the 90-day-stored biomass was successfully reactivated by immobilizing in polyvinyl alcohol (6%, w/v) and sodium alginate (2%, w/v) gel and then inoculated to up-flow column reactors. Total nitrogen removal rates rapidly increased to 7 kg-N m(-3) d(-1) within 35 days of operation. Based on these results, the room temperature preservation with molybdate addition is simple, cost-effective and feasible at a practical scale, which will accelerate the practical use of anammox process for wastewater treatment. PMID:24726991

  1. 21 CFR 582.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1135 Ammonium bicarbonate. (a) Product. Ammonium bicarbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1137 Ammonium carbonate. (a) Product. Ammonium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1139 Ammonium hydroxide. (a) Product. Ammonium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1135 Ammonium bicarbonate. (a) Product. Ammonium bicarbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1139 Ammonium hydroxide. (a) Product. Ammonium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding practice....

  7. 21 CFR 582.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1137 Ammonium carbonate. (a) Product. Ammonium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding practice....

  9. 21 CFR 556.375 - Maduramicin ammonium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... residues of maduramicin ammonium in chickens as follows: (a) A tolerance for maduramicin ammonium (marker... concentration of marker residues in the target tissue used to monitor for total drug residues in the...

  10. Sasse Modeling of First Cycle Neptunium (VI) Recovery Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J. E.

    2006-04-01

    A flowsheet has been proposed to separate neptunium from solutions in H-Canyon Tanks 16.4, 12.5, and 11.7 in the First Cycle solvent extraction banks, in which cerium(IV) (Ce(IV)) serves as an agent to oxidize neptunium to neptunium(VI) (Np(VI)). A SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction) spreadsheet model indicates that the proposed flowsheet is a feasible method for separating neptunium and uranium from sulfates, thorium, and other metal impurities. The proposed flowsheet calls for stripping the sulfates, thorium, and other metal impurities into the 1AW stream and extracting and then stripping the neptunium and uranium into the 1BP stream. SASSE predicts that separation of thorium from the other actinides can be accomplished with actinide losses of 0.01% or less. It is assumed that other metal impurities such as iron, aluminum, and fission products will follow the thorium into 1AW. Due to an organic/aqueous distribution coefficient that is close to one, SASSE predicts that plutonium(VI) (Pu(VI)) is split between the A Bank and B Bank aqueous output streams, with 27% going to 1AW and 73% going to 1BP. An extrapolated distribution coefficient based on unvalidated Ce(IV) distribution measurements at a single nitrate concentration and a comparison with thorium(IV) (Th(IV)) distributions indicates that Ce(IV) could reflux in 1B Bank. If the Ce(IV) distribution coefficient is lower than would be predicted by this single point extrapolation, but still higher than the distribution coefficient for Th(IV), then Ce(IV) would follow Np(VI) and uranium(VI) (U(VI)) into 1BP. The SASSE model was validated using data from a 1964 oxidizing flowsheet for the recovery of Np(VI) in Second Cycle. For the proposed flowsheet to be effective in recovering neptunium, the addition of approximately 0.025 M ceric ammonium nitrate (Ce(NH4)2(NO3)6) to both the 1AF and 1AS streams is required to stabilize the neptunium in the +6

  11. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in chlorine is dissolved in water and then... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 556.375 - Maduramicin ammonium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... residues of maduramicin ammonium in chickens as follows: (a) A tolerance for maduramicin ammonium (marker residue) in chickens is 0.38 parts per million in fat (target tissue). A tolerance refers to the... animals. (b) The safe concentrations for total maduramicin ammonium residues in uncooked edible...

  18. 21 CFR 556.375 - Maduramicin ammonium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... residues of maduramicin ammonium in chickens as follows: (a) A tolerance for maduramicin ammonium (marker residue) in chickens is 0.38 parts per million in fat (target tissue). A tolerance refers to the... animals. (b) The safe concentrations for total maduramicin ammonium residues in uncooked edible...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium bicarbonate. 582.1135 Section 582.1135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1135 Ammonium bicarbonate. (a) Product. Ammonium bicarbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 582.1143 Section 582.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium carbonate. 582.1137 Section 582.1137 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1137 Ammonium carbonate. (a) Product. Ammonium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 582.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium hydroxide. 582.1139 Section 582.1139 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1139 Ammonium hydroxide. (a) Product. Ammonium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 582.7133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium alginate. 582.7133 Section 582.7133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Ammonium alginate. (a) Product. Ammonium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 21 CFR 582.7133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium alginate. 582.7133 Section 582.7133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Ammonium alginate. (a) Product. Ammonium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  6. Extraction of urea and ammonium ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmi, R. T.; Husted, R. R.; Schulz, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Water purification system keeps urea and ammonium ion concentration below toxic limits in recirculated water of closed loop aquatic habitat. Urea is first converted to ammonium ions and carbon dioxide by enzygmatic action. Ammonium ions are removed by ion exchange. Bioburden is controlled by filtration through 0.45 micron millipore filters.

  7. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  8. Application of green seaweed biomass for MoVI sorption from contaminated waters. Kinetic, thermodynamic and continuous sorption studies.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, Fernando A; Medeot, Anabela C; González, Juan C; Sala, Luis F; Bellú, Sebastián E

    2015-05-15

    Spongomorpha pacifica biomass was evaluated as a new sorbent for Mo(VI) removal from aqueous solution. The maximum sorption capacity was found to be 1.28×10(6)±1×10(4) mg kg(-1) at 20°C and pH 2.0. Sorption kinetics and equilibrium studies followed pseudo-first order and Langmuir adsorption isotherm models, respectively. FTIR analysis revealed that carboxyl and hydroxyl groups were mainly responsible for the sorption of Mo(VI). SEM images show that morphological changes occur at the biomass surface after Mo(VI) sorption. Activation parameters and mean free energies obtained with Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm model demonstrate that the mechanism of sorption process was chemical sorption. Thermodynamic parameters demonstrate that the sorption process was spontaneous, endothermic and the driven force was entropic. The isosteric heat of sorption decreases with surface loading, indicating that S. pacifica has an energetically non-homogeneous surface. Experimental breakthrough curves were simulated by Thomas and modified dose-response models. The bed depth service time (BDST) model was employed to scale-up the continuous sorption experiments. The critical bed depth, Z0 was determined to be 1.7 cm. S.pacifica biomass showed to be a good sorbent for Mo(VI) and it can be used in continuous treatment of effluent polluted with molybdate ions.

  9. Application of green seaweed biomass for MoVI sorption from contaminated waters. Kinetic, thermodynamic and continuous sorption studies.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, Fernando A; Medeot, Anabela C; González, Juan C; Sala, Luis F; Bellú, Sebastián E

    2015-05-15

    Spongomorpha pacifica biomass was evaluated as a new sorbent for Mo(VI) removal from aqueous solution. The maximum sorption capacity was found to be 1.28×10(6)±1×10(4) mg kg(-1) at 20°C and pH 2.0. Sorption kinetics and equilibrium studies followed pseudo-first order and Langmuir adsorption isotherm models, respectively. FTIR analysis revealed that carboxyl and hydroxyl groups were mainly responsible for the sorption of Mo(VI). SEM images show that morphological changes occur at the biomass surface after Mo(VI) sorption. Activation parameters and mean free energies obtained with Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm model demonstrate that the mechanism of sorption process was chemical sorption. Thermodynamic parameters demonstrate that the sorption process was spontaneous, endothermic and the driven force was entropic. The isosteric heat of sorption decreases with surface loading, indicating that S. pacifica has an energetically non-homogeneous surface. Experimental breakthrough curves were simulated by Thomas and modified dose-response models. The bed depth service time (BDST) model was employed to scale-up the continuous sorption experiments. The critical bed depth, Z0 was determined to be 1.7 cm. S.pacifica biomass showed to be a good sorbent for Mo(VI) and it can be used in continuous treatment of effluent polluted with molybdate ions. PMID:25660712

  10. Controllable synthesis and characterization of cadmium molybdate octahedral nanocrystals by coprecipitation method

    SciTech Connect

    Shahri, Zahra; Sobhani, Azam; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: CdMoO{sub 4} nanocrystals have been synthesized via coprecipitation method by using Cd(Sal){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}·4H{sub 2}O as starting materials in water. Effects of temperature, reaction time, solvent, surfactant, cadmium and molybdate sources were investigated to reach optimum condition. It was found that particle size, morphology and phase of the final products could be greatly influenced via these parameters. - Highlights: • A facile coprecipitation method was successfully employed to prepare CdMoO{sub 4}. • The effects of some parameters were investigated. • PEG600, PVP, SDS and CTAB were used as surfactant. • Optimum condition for preparation CdMoO{sub 4} nanocrystals was investigated. - Abstract: Cadmium molybdate (CdMoO{sub 4}) nanocrystals have been successfully synthesized via coprecipitation method by using Cd(Sal){sub 2} (Sal = salicylidene) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}·4H{sub 2}O as starting materials in water as solvent. Effects of temperature, reaction time, solvent, surfactant and cadmium source were investigated to reach optimum condition. It was found that particle size, morphology and phase of the final products could be greatly influenced via these parameters. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  11. Characterization of Molybdate Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to investigate the corrosion inhibiting properties of newly developed proprietary molybdate conversion coatings on aluminum alloy 2024-T3 under immersion in aerated 5% (w/w) NaCl. Corrosion potential and EIS measurements were gathered for six formulations of the coating at several immersion times for two weeks. Nyquist as well as Bode plots of the data were obtained. The conversion-coated alloy panels showed an increase in the corrosion potential during the first 24 hours of immersion that later subsided and approached a steady value. Corrosion potential measurements indicated that formulations A, D, and F exhibit a protective effect on aluminum 2024-T3. The EIS spectra of the conversion-coated alloy were characterized by an impedance that is higher than the impedance of the bare alloy at all the immersion times. The low frequency impedance, Z(sub lf) (determined from the value at 0.05 Hz) for the conversion-coated alloy was higher at all the immersion times than that of the bare panel. This indicates improvement of corrosion resistance with addition of the molybdate conversion coating. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the presence of cracks in the coating and the presence of cubic crystals believed to be calcium carbonate. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the test panels revealed the presence of high levels of aluminum, oxygen, and calcium but did not detect the presence of molybdenum on the test panels. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated the presence of less than 0.01 atomic percent molybdenum on the surface of the coating.

  12. Lasing properties of new Nd 3+-doped tungstate, molybdate, and fluoride materials under selective optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, Jan; Jelínkova, Helena; Basiev, Tolstoban T.; Doroschenko, Maxim E.; Ivleva, Ludmila I.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Zverev, Peter G.

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative efficiencies of new Nd 3+-doped laser active/Raman - tungstate, molybdate, and fluoride - materials (SrWO 4, PbWO 4, BaWO 4, SrMoO 4, PbMoO 4, SrF II, and LaF 3) under selective longitudinal optical pumping by the alexandrite (~750nm), or diode (~800nm) laser. Crystals with various length, orientations and active ions concentrations were tested. To optimize the output of the tested lasers a set of input dichroic and output dielectric mirrors with different reflectivities were used. For realized lasers operating at pulsed free-running regime, threshold energy, slope efficiency, emission wavelength, and radiation polarization were determined. For each crystal, fluorescence lifetime and absorption coefficient under given pumping were established. The slope efficiency in case of Nd 3+:PbMoO 4 laser at wavelength 1054nm was measured to be 54.3% with total efficiency of 46% which is the best result obtained for all new tested crystals. For Nd 3+ doped SrWO 4, PbWO 4, and BaWO 4 crystals simultaneous laser and self-Raman emission were demonstrated in Q-switched regime. Thus newly proposed laser Raman crystals demonstrate high efficiency for Nd 3+ laser oscillations comparable with well known and widely used Nd:KGW crystal. Further improvement in the quality of tungstate and molybdate type crystals should result in further increase in lasing efficiency at 1.06μm wavelength. Self Raman frequency conversion of Nd 3+-laser oscillations in these crystals should result in high efficient pulse shortening, high peak power and new wavelengths in 1.2-1.5μm wavelength region.

  13. From Spin Glass to Spin Liquid Ground States in Pyrochlore Molybdates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Lucy

    Magnetic pyrochlores continue to generate intense interest due to the wealth of interesting behaviours that they can display as a result of their highly frustrated nature. Here we will present our study of the molybdate pyrochlore Lu2Mo2O7, which contains non-magnetic Lu3+ and an antiferromagnetic network of corner-sharing tetrahedra of Mo4+ 4d2 S = 1 ions. Magnetic susceptibility data show that Lu2Mo2O7 enters an unconventional spin glass state at Tf ~ 16 K that displays a quadratic dependence of the low temperature magnetic heat capacity, akin to that observed for its well-studied sister compound Y2Mo2O7. This spin glass transition is also clearly marked in our inelastic (CNCS, SNS) and diffuse elastic magnetic (D7, ILL) neutron scattering data. Furthermore, we will show that it is possible to topochemically substitute the oxide, O2-, ions within Lu2Mo2O7 for nitride, N3-, to produce an oxynitride molybdate pyrochlore of composition Lu2Mo2O5N2. Magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm that strong antiferromagnetic correlations persist within the oxynitride, which contains Mo5+ 4d1 S =1/2 ions and is thus a prime candidate to host exotic quantum spin liquid behavior. We will discuss how the enhanced quantum spin fluctuations in Lu2Mo2O5N2 appear to suppress the spin freezing transition observed in its parent oxide and instead support the formation of a gapless spin liquid phase that displays a linear dependence of the low temperature magnetic heat capacity.

  14. Leveling effects of ammonium salts on thermal stabilities of polyethylene glycols.

    PubMed

    Xia, Juan; Song, Le Xin; Liu, Wei; Teng, Yue

    2013-10-28

    In this work, the thermal stabilities of a series of polyethylene glycols (PEG 4000, 6000 and 10000) were investigated after compositing with different kinds of inorganic salts, such as ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate (AMT), NH4VO3, (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, Na2SO4, Na2MoO4. It was first observed that all the ammonium salts exerted leveling effects for the thermal stabilities of the PEGs. In other words, the presence of the ammonium salts caused the occurrence of the maximum decomposition rates of the PEGs with the same repeat sequence but different chain lengths at almost the same temperatures. Leveling effects were defined by three parameters: leveling spans, leveling degrees and dispersion degrees of leveling. Further experiments revealed that leveling effects also occur in similar types of polymers: polypropylene glycols (PPG 2000, 3000 and 4000). A series of independent experiments including Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, conductivity and field-emission scanning electron microscopy were performed to explore the origin of leveling effects. We consider that the interaction between inorganic ions and polymer molecules and the Hofmeister effect of ions in solution are two important factors affecting the stability of salt–polymer composites, because they can contribute to decrease the interaction between the polymer chains, leading to changes in the conformation and pyrolysis mode of polymers. We believe that the finding of leveling effects would be significant for both basic and applied research of soft matter. PMID:26029781

  15. Determination of ammonium and organic bound nitrogen by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jaber, A M Y; Mehanna, N A; Sultan, S M

    2009-06-15

    The continuous flow sample introduction technique with a hydride generator system in conjunction with an inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICP-AES-HG), is used in this study for quantitative determination of ammonium and organic bound nitrogen in aqueous and solid samples. Ammonia vapor released from ammonium salt after treatment with concentrated NaOH is transferred by argon to plasma for detection at 174.273 nm using axial argon plasma mode. The calibration curves were linear within a range of 25-1000 mg L(-1)N as ammonium molybdate with correlation coefficients of better than 0.99 and limits of detection of about 10-25mg L(-1)N. The percent recovery of N (25-500 mg L(-1)N) in soft (distilled) water and high salt content (1.7 mol L(-1) NaCl) matrices was found to be in the range of about 97-102% with %RSD in the range of 4.6-0.62. The sensitivity, limit of detection, and blank contribution from the atmospheric nitrogen, were tremendously improved in this method compared with the available ICP-AES spray chamber counterpart. Furthermore, the ICP-AES-HG method gave results for real samples (soil, fertilizer, waste water) containing about 50-1800 mg L(-1)N in good agreement with those obtained by the standard Kjeldahl method. No statistical differences at the 95% confidence level on applying the t-test were observed between the values obtained by the two methods. Thus, the ICP-AES-HG method is reliable and faster than the conventional tedious Kjeldahl method, superior to the ICP-AES spray chamber method, and almost free from matrix interference which is usually a critical factor in atomic emission spectroscopic techniques.

  16. Non-destructive analysis of didymium and praseodymium molybdate crystals using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. K.; Joseph, Daisy; Pandita, Sanjay; Kotru, P. N.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of didymium (Di) and praseodymium molybdate crystals were carried out using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The assigned empirical chemical formulae of the composites were tested and verified by the EDXRF technique by estimating experimental major elemental concentration ratios. On the Basis of these ratios, the established formulae for some of the composite materials have been verified and suggestions made for their refinement. Non-destructive technique used in this analysis enables to retain the original crystal samples and makes rapid simultaneous scan of major elements such as La, Pr, Ned and Mo as well as impurities such as Ce. Absence of samarium(Sm) in the spectrum during analysis of didymium molybdate crystals indicated an incomplete growth of mixed rare earth single crystal. These crystals (e.g.,Di) are shown to be of modified stoichiometry with Ce as trace impurity.

  17. Formation of gas-phase. pi. -allyl radicals from propylene over bismuth oxide and. gamma. -bismuth molybdate catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Martir, W.; Lunsford, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Gas-phase ..pi..-allyl radicals were produced when propylene reacted over Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and ..gamma..-bismuth molybdate catalysts at 723 K. The pressure in the catalyst zone was varied between 5 x 10/sup -3/ and 1 torr. The radicals were detected by EPR spectroscopy together with a matrix isolation technique in which argon was used as the diluent. The matrix was formed on a sapphire rod at 12 K which was located 33-cm downstream from the catalyst. Bismuth oxide was more effective in the production of gas-phase allyl radicals than ..gamma..-bismuth molybdate. By contrast ..cap alpha..-bismuth molybdate was ineffective in forming allyl radicals and MoO/sub 3/ acted as a sink for radicals which were produced elsewhere in the system. Comparison of the ..pi..-allyl radical and the stable product concentrations over Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ revealed that gas-phase radical recombination reactions served as a major pathway for the formation of 1,5-hexadiene. Addition of small amounts of gas-phase oxygen increased the concentration of allyl radicals, and at greater oxygen levels allyl peroxy radicals were detected. Because of the effect of temperature on the equilibrium between allyl and allyl peroxy radicals, the latter product must be formed in the cooler part of the system.

  18. Surface properties of AZ91 magnesium alloy after PEO treatment using molybdate salts and low current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzato, Luca; Brunelli, Katya; Napolitani, Enrico; Magrini, Maurizio; Dabalà, Manuele

    2015-12-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process is a recently developed electrochemical method used to produce on the surface of various metals oxide ceramic coatings that improve corrosion and wear properties of the substrate. In this work, PEO process was applied on AZ91 magnesium alloy using low current densities (0.05 A/cm2) and an alkaline solution of silicates with different concentrations of sodium molybdate (0.3-3 g/l). The effect of the low current densities of process and of molybdate salts on the corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied with potentiodynamic polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in chloride and sulfate environment. The morphology, the phases and the chemical composition of the coatings were examined using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EDS, X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The corrosion properties of the PEO coated samples were remarkably improved if compared with the uncoated samples. The addition of sodium molybdate, in determinate conditions, had a positive effect on the characteristics of the coatings in terms of corrosion resistance.

  19. Ammonium assmilation in spruce ectomycorrhizas

    SciTech Connect

    Chalot, M.; Brun, A.; Botton, B. ); Stewart, G. )

    1990-05-01

    Assimilation of labelled NH{sub 4}{sup +} into amino acids has been followed in ectomycorrhizal roots of spruce. Over an 18 h period of NH{sub 4}{sup +} feeding, Gln, Glu and Ala became the most abundant amino acids. Gln was also the most highly labelled amino acid during the experiment, followed by Glu and Ala. This result indicates that Gln synthesis is an important ammonium utilization reaction in spruce mycorrhizas. Addition of MSX to NH{sub 4}{sup +} fed mycorrhizas caused an inhibition of Gln accumulation with a corresponding increase in Glu, Ala and Asn levels. The supply of MSX induced a sharp diminution of {sup 15}N enrichment in both amino and amido groups of glutamine. In contrast, the {sup 15}N incorporation into Glu and derivatives (Ala and Asp) remained very high. This study demonstrates that the fungal glutamate dehydrogenase is quite operative in spruce ectomycorrhizas since it is able to sustain ammonium assimilation when glutamine synthetase is inhibited.

  20. Structural study of ammonium metatungstate

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Joel B. Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2008-08-15

    Several techniques have been used to study the structure of the Keggin-type polyoxometalate salt ammonium metatungstate (AMT)-(NH{sub 4}){sub 6}[H{sub 2}W{sub 12}O{sub 40}]*nH{sub 2}O, a potential fuel cell catalyst. The dehydrated salt is comprised of a mixture of crystallites of different unit cells in a centered eutactic cubic configuration, with an average unit cell of a{approx_equal}12.295. Varied orientations of the Keggin ions in the cubic arrangement create the differences, and orientational variation within each unit cell size represents an energy well. Progressive hydration of each crystallite leads to expansion of the lattice, with the degree of expansion depending on the locations of the water added in relation to the Keggin ion, which is influenced by cation location and hydrogen bonding. The structural hypothesis is supported by electron diffraction of single and multicrystal samples, by powder density measurements, X-ray powder diffraction studies, synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction, and a priori structural modeling studies. Based on the structure, projected active site densities are compared with nanostructured platinum catalysts for fuel cell application. - Graphical abstract: The structure of ammonium metatungstate powders are highly dependent on hydration and POM molecule rotation, with cation and hydrogen bonding forces directing a mixture of structures that have been studied with bulk and single-crystal methods. The illustration shows Monte Carlo simulated anion structural disorder for the fully dehydrated form of the title compound.

  1. Phase Diagram of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often been subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood - resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety, in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN, in different chemical environments, at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 15 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 673 K. The present study has been supported by the U.S. DHS under Award Number 2008-ST-061-ED0001.

  2. Use of molybdate as novel complex-forming selector in the analysis of polyhydric phenols by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Polásek, Miroslav; Petriska, Ivan; Pospísilová, Marie; Jahodár, Ludek

    2006-03-15

    Molybdate was examined as a complex-forming additive to the CE background electrolytes (BGE) to affect the selectivity of separation of polyhydric phenols such as flavonoids (apigenin, hyperoside, luteolin, quercetin and rutin) and hydroxyphenylcarboxylic acids (ferulic, caffeic, p-coumaric and chlorogenic acid). Effects of the buffer concentrations and pH and the influence of molybdate concentration on the migration times of the analytes were investigated. In contrast to borate (which is a buffering and complex-forming agent generally used in CE at pH > or =9) molybdate forms more stable complexes with aromatic o-dihydroxy compounds and hence the complex-formation effect is observed at considerably lower pH. Model mixtures of cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid were separated with 25 mM morpholinoethanesulfonic acid of pH 5.4 (adjusted with Tris) containing 0.15 mM sodium molybdate as the BGE (25 kV, silica capillary effective length 45 cm x 0.1mm I.D., UV-vis detection at 280 nm). With 25 mM 2-hydroxy-3-[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinyl]propanesulphonic acid/Tris of pH* 7.4 containing 2mM sodium molybdate in aqueous 25% (v/v) methanol as the BGE mixtures of all the above mentioned flavonoids, p-coumaric acid and chlorogenic acid could be separated (the same capillary as above, UV-vis detection at 263 nm). The calibration curves (analyte peak area versus concentration) were rectilinear (r>0.998) for approximately 8-35 microg/ml of an analyte (with 1-nitroso-2-naphthol as internal standard). The limit of quantification values ranged between 1.1 mg l(-1) for p-coumaric acid and 2.8 mg l(-1) for quercetin. The CE method was employed for the assay of flavonoids in medicinal plant extracts. The R.S.D. values ranged between 0.9 and 4.7% (n=3) when determining luteolin (0.08%) and apigenin (0.92%) in dry Matricaria recutita flowers and rutin (1.03%) and hyperoside (0.82%) in dry Hypericum perforatum haulm. The recoveries were >96%. PMID

  3. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  4. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  5. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  6. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  7. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  8. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO-AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N2, N2O, and H2O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV' transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  9. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO-AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N2, N2O, and H2O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV' transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  10. New double molybdate Na9Fe(MoO4)6: Synthesis, structure, properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, Aleksandra A.; Solodovnikov, Sergey F.; Basovich, Olga M.; Solodovnikova, Zoya A.; Belov, Dmitry A.; Pokholok, Konstantin V.; Gudkova, Irina A.; Stefanovich, Sergey Yu.; Lazoryak, Bogdan I.; Khaikina, Elena G.

    2013-09-01

    A new double molybdate Na9Fe(MoO4)6 was synthesized using solid state reactions and studied with X-ray powder diffraction, second harmonic generation (SHG) technique, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray fluorescence analysis, Mössbauer and dielectric impedance spectroscopy. Single crystals of Na9Fe(MoO4)6 were obtained and its structure was solved (the space group R3¯, a=14.8264(2), c=19.2402(3) Å, V=3662.79(9) Å3, Z=6, R=0.0132). The structure is related to that of sodium ion conductor II-Na3Fe2(AsO4)3. The basic structure units are polyhedral clusters composed of central FeО6 octahedron sharing edges with three Na(1)О6 octahedra. The clusters share common vertices with bridging МоО4 tetrahedra to form an open 3D framework where the cavities are occupied by Na(2) and Na(3) atoms. The compound melts incongruently at 904.7±0.2 K. Arrhenius type temperature dependence of electric conductivity σ has been registered in solid state (σ=6.8×10-2 S сm-1 at 800 K), thus allowing considering Na9Fe(MoO4)6 as a new sodium ion conductor.

  11. Black lead molybdate nanoparticles: Facile synthesis and photocatalytic properties responding to visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Weimin; Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Keke; Ma, Xiaodan; Hao, Yaming; Qian, Xuefeng

    2015-02-01

    Black lead molybdate (PbMoO4) nanoparticles were first synthesized by the glycol-solvothermal method. Phase, morphology, crystal lattice, and specific surface of products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller nitrogen adsorption-desorption, respectively. Results revealed that the as-synthesized PbMoO4 nanoparticles are the scheelite-type tetragonal structure with 30-50 nm in size. Also, glycol played a dual function in present synthetic system: solvent and surface modification agent. Optical properties reveal glycol-modification on the surface of PbMoO4 nanoparticles can generate new energy level between the original conduction band and valence band, leading to better absorption of visible light and the black appearance. Photocatalytic experimental results demonstrate that black PbMoO4 nanoparticles synthesized in glycol medium have pretty visible-light-responsive photocatalytic degradation performance on methylene blue and phenol solution. Reaction mechanism investigations show that the excellent photocatalytic activities of black PbMoO4 nanoparticles derive from the novel energy band structure, smaller size, and larger specific surface area. Hence one can see that black PbMoO4 nanoparticles are a type of visible-light-responsive photocatalysts with excellent photocatalytic activities and potentially applied prospects in dye wastewater treatment and environmental protection. Meanwhile, the present work provides an innovative strategy for adjusting the energy band structure of wide band-gap semiconductors.

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of reaction between silver molybdate and mercuric iodide in solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, M.A.; Rafiuddin

    1987-05-01

    The kinetics and the mechanism of the reaction between silver molybdate and mercuric iodide were studied in the solid state by X-ray, chemical analysis, and electrical conductivity measurements. This is a multistep reaction where Ag/sub 2/HgI/sub 4/ is formed as an intermediate. In an equimolar mixture of Ag/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/ and HgI/sub 2/, AgI an HgMoO/sub 4/ are formed, whereas in a 1:2 molar mixture Ag/sub 2/HgI/sub 4/ and HgMoO/sub 4/ are formed. The data for lateral diffusion best fit the equation X/sup n/ = kt, where X is the product thickness, t is time, and k and n are constants. This is a multistep solid state ionic reaction initiated by the diffusion of HgI/sub 2/ molecules as such and not through counterdiffusion of cations.

  13. Removal of molybdate anions from water by adsorption on zeolite-supported magnetite.

    PubMed

    Verbinnen, Bram; Block, Chantal; Hannes, Dries; Lievens, Patrick; Vaclavikova, Miroslava; Stefusova, Katarina; Gallios, Georgios; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2012-09-01

    Industrial wastewater may contain high molybdenum concentrations, making treatment before discharge necessary. In this paper, the removal of molybdate anions from water is presented, using clinoptilolite zeolite coated with magnetite nanoparticles. In batch experiments the influence of pH, ionic strength, possible interfering (oxy)anions, temperature and contact time is investigated. Besides determination of kinetic parameters and adsorption isotherms, thermodynamic modeling is performed to get better insight into the adsorption mechanism; molybdenum is assumed to be adsorbed as a FeOMoO2(OH).2H2O inner-sphere complex. At the optimum pH of 3, the adsorption capacity is around 18 mg molybdenum per gram adsorbent. The ionic strength of the solution has no influence on the adsorption capacity. Other anions, added to the molybdenum solution in at least a tenfold excess, only have a minor influence on the adsorption of molybdenum, with the exception of phosphate. Adsorption increases when temperature is increased. It is demonstrated that the adsorbent can be used to remove molybdenum from industrial wastewater streams, and that the limitations set by the World Health Organization (residual concentration of 70 microg/l Mo) can easily be met.

  14. Kinetics and characterization of bismuth molybdate catalysts. 1. A gradientless partial oxidation reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burban, P.M.; Schuit, G.C.A.; Bicschoff, K.B. ); Koch, T.A. Du Pont Experimental Station, Wilmington, DE )

    1990-12-01

    A gradientless laboratory fixed bed reactor was designed for studying the partial oxidation of 1-butene to 1,3-butadiene over bismuth-molybdate catalysts. By dilution of the catalyst bed with inert silicon carbide, axial catalyst bed temperature gradients were routinely reduced to 2 K or less over the temperature range 650-740 K for the exothermic model reaction. A systematic experimental procedure was developed and used to show that potential transport 'disguises' did not significantly influence the intrinsic rate of butadiene formation measured under both integral and differential conditions. For one Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} catalyst system, rate of butadiene formation data over the temperature range 700-740 K were fit to pseudo first-order (in butene) kinetics. Analytical solutions of the governing equations describing fixed bed reactor transport disguises for first-order catalytic reactions were used to confirm that the reactor operated in a near gradientless fashion, in agreement with experiment.

  15. Biodegradation of rocket propellant waste, ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqvi, S. M. Z.; Latif, A.

    1975-01-01

    The short term effects of ammonium perchlorate on selected organisms were studied. A long term experiment was also designed to assess the changes incurred by ammonium perchlorate on the nitrogen and chloride contents of soil within a period of 3 years. In addition, an attempt was made to produce methane gas from anaerobic fermentation of the aquatic weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

  16. 76 FR 46907 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation FR Federal Register HMR Hazardous Materials Regulations HMT Hazardous... ``Secure Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Program'' on October 29, 2008. See 73 FR 64280. The ANPRM solicited... interacting with state and local governments regarding ammonium nitrate security. ] See 73 FR 64280,...

  17. 21 CFR 573.170 - Ammonium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.170 Ammonium formate. The food additive, partially ammonium formate, may be safely used in...) To assure safe use of the additive, in addition to the other information required by the Federal...

  18. 21 CFR 573.170 - Ammonium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.170 Ammonium formate. The food additive, partially ammonium formate, may be safely used in...) To assure safe use of the additive, in addition to the other information required by the Federal...

  19. 21 CFR 573.170 - Ammonium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.170 Ammonium formate. The food additive, partially ammonium formate, may be safely used in...) To assure safe use of the additive, in addition to the other information required by the Federal...

  20. 21 CFR 573.170 - Ammonium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.170 Ammonium formate. The food additive, ammonium formate, may be safely used in the... safe use of the additive, in addition to the other information required by the Federal Food, Drug,...

  1. 21 CFR 558.340 - Maduramicin ammonium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maduramicin ammonium. 558.340 Section 558.340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... for Use in Animal Feeds § 558.340 Maduramicin ammonium. (a) Approvals. Type A medicated articles:...

  2. Evolution of Electrogenic Ammonium Transporters (AMTs).

    PubMed

    McDonald, Tami R; Ward, John M

    2016-01-01

    The ammonium transporter gene family consists of three main clades, AMT, MEP, and Rh. The evolutionary history of the AMT/MEP/Rh gene family is characterized by multiple horizontal gene transfer events, gene family expansion and contraction, and gene loss; thus the gene tree for this family of transporters is unlike the organismal tree. The genomes of angiosperms contain genes for both electrogenic and electroneutral ammonium transporters, but it is not clear how far back in the land plant lineage electrogenic ammonium transporters occur. Here, we place Marchantia polymorpha ammonium transporters in the AMT/MEP/Rh phylogeny and we show that AMTs from the liverwort M. polymorpha are electrogenic. This information suggests that electrogenic ammonium transport evolved at least as early as the divergence of bryophytes in the land plant lineage. PMID:27066024

  3. Evolution of Electrogenic Ammonium Transporters (AMTs)

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Tami R.; Ward, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The ammonium transporter gene family consists of three main clades, AMT, MEP, and Rh. The evolutionary history of the AMT/MEP/Rh gene family is characterized by multiple horizontal gene transfer events, gene family expansion and contraction, and gene loss; thus the gene tree for this family of transporters is unlike the organismal tree. The genomes of angiosperms contain genes for both electrogenic and electroneutral ammonium transporters, but it is not clear how far back in the land plant lineage electrogenic ammonium transporters occur. Here, we place Marchantia polymorpha ammonium transporters in the AMT/MEP/Rh phylogeny and we show that AMTs from the liverwort M. polymorpha are electrogenic. This information suggests that electrogenic ammonium transport evolved at least as early as the divergence of bryophytes in the land plant lineage. PMID:27066024

  4. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  5. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  6. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  7. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  8. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  9. The nucleation kinetics of ammonium metavanadate precipitated by ammonium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guangchao; Sun, Zhaohui; Xian, Yong; Jing, Han; Chen, Haijun; Yin, Danfeng

    2016-05-01

    The nucleation kinetics of ammonium metavanadate (NH4VO3) was investigated under conditions of the simulated process for precipitation of NH4VO3 from the vanadium-containing solution. Induction periods for the nucleation of NH4VO3 were experimentally determined as a function of supersaturation at temperatures from 30 to 45 °C. Using the classical nucleation theory, the interfacial tension between NH4VO3 and supersaturated solution, the nucleation rate and critical radius of nucleus for the homogeneous nucleation of NH4VO3 were estimated. With temperature increasing, the calculated interfacial tension gradually decreased from 29.78 mJ/m2 at 30 °C to 23.66 mJ/m2 at 45 °C. The nucleation rate was found to proportionally increase but the critical radius of nucleus exponentially decreased, with increase in supersaturation ratio at a constant temperature. The activation energy for NH4VO3 nucleation was obtained from the relationship between temperature and induction period, ranging from 79.17 kJ/mol at S=25 to 115.50 kJ/mol at S=15. FT-IR and Raman spectrum indicated that the crystals obtained in the precipitation process were NH4VO3.

  10. 40 CFR 721.4095 - Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4095 Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides. (a... generically as quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides (PMNs...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4095 - Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4095 Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides. (a... generically as quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides (PMNs...

  12. Ammonium and attachment of Rhodopirellula baltica.

    PubMed

    Frank, Carsten S; Langhammer, Philipp; Fuchs, Bernhard Maximilian; Harder, Jens

    2011-05-01

    A dimorphic life cycle has been described for the planctomycete Rhodopirellula baltica SH1(T), with juvenile motile, free-swimming cells and adult sessile, attached-living cells. However, attachment as a response to environmental factors was not investigated. We studied the response of R. baltica to nitrogen limitation. In batch cultures, ammonium limitation coincided with a dominance of free-swimming cells and a low number of aggregates. Flow cytometry revealed a quantitative shift with increasing ammonium availability, from single cells towards attached cells in large aggregates. During growth of R. baltica on glucose and ammonium in chemostats, an ammonium addition caused a macroscopic change of the growth behaviour, from homogeneous growth in the liquid phase to a biofilm on the borosilicate glass wall of the chemostat vessel. Thus, an ammonium limitation-a carbon to nitrogen supply ratio of 30:1-sustained free-living growth without aggregate formation. A sudden increase in ammonium supply induced sessile growth of R. baltica. These observations reveal a response of Rhodopirellula baltica cells to ammonium: they abandon the free-swimming life, attach to particles and form biofilms. PMID:21340506

  13. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-07

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO–AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV{sup ′} transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  14. Surface Raman excitation and enhancement profiles for chromate, molybdate, and tungstate on colloidal silver

    SciTech Connect

    Feilchenfeld, H.; Siiman, O.

    1986-05-08

    The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) excitation profiles of chromate, molybdate, and tungstate ions on colloidal silver were obtained by using excitation wavelengths between 457.9 and 676.4 nm. The intensity of the strongest SERS band between 800 and 900 cm/sup -1/, assignable to nu/sub s/(M-O), was in each case referenced to the 1020-cm/sup -1/ band of the internal standard, methanol, in silver hydrosols. These relative SERS intensities were compared against similar intensity ratios for each oxo anion in solution and then appropriately scaled for the concentration of MO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ in solution and on the surface of the silver particles in the sols. Peak SERS enhancements occurred at 560 nm for CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and at 600 nm for both MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. The latter peak positions matched the secondary absorption band maxima that originate from aggregates of silver particles in the sols. The numerical values of the SERS enhancements were 5 x 10/sup 4/-l x 10/sup 5/ for CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, 9 x 10/sup 5/ for MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and about 2 x 10/sup 5/ for WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ on colloidal silver. The somewhat lower SERS enhancements for the chromophoric adsorbate, CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, which adsorbs maximally at 370 nm in aqueous solution, are attributed to a lower degree of aggregation for the sols with added CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, rather than to partial quenching of its resonant excited state on the heavy metal (silver) surface. 34 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  15. Sodium molybdate prevents hypertension and vascular prostanoid imbalance in fructose-overloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Peredo, H A; Andrade, V; Donoso, A S; Lee, H J; Puyó, A M

    2013-10-01

    (1) Fructose (F) overload produces elevated blood pressure (BP), hyperglycaemia, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, resembling human metabolic syndrome. Previously, we found altered vascular prostanoid (PR) production in this model. (2) Sodium molybdate (Mo), as well as sodium tungstate, causes insulin-like effects and normalizes plasma glucose levels in streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. We studied the effects of Mo on BP, metabolic parameters and release of PR from the mesenteric vascular bed (MVB) in F-overloaded rats. (3) Four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were analysed: Control, tap water to drink; F, F solution 10% W/V to drink; CMo, Mo 100 mg kg day(-1) and FMo, both treatments. After 9 weeks, the animals were killed and MVBs removed and the released PRs measured. (4) F increased BP, glycemia, triglyceridemia and insulinemia. Mo treatment prevented the increases in BP and glycemia, but did not modify triglyceridemia or insulinemia. In addition, Mo decreased BP in controls. (5) Prostaglandins (PG) F2 alpha and E2, PG 6-ketoF1 alpha and thromboxane (TX) B2 , as well as inactive metabolites of prostacyclin (PGI2 ) and TXA2 were detected. F decreased the production of vasodilator PRs PGI2 and PGE2 in MVB. Mo prevented these alterations and increased PGE2 in controls. Vasoconstrict or PRs PGF2 alpha and TXA2 release was not modified. (6) Mo treatment, beyond its known lowering effect on glycemia, prevents the reduction in the vascular release of vasodilator PR observed in this model. This could be one of the mechanisms by which Mo avoids the increase in BP caused by F overload in the rat.

  16. Sorption of uranium(VI) ions from hydrochloric acid and ammonium chloride solutions by anion exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Pakholkov, V.S.; Denisova, L.A.; Rychkov, V.N.; Kurnosenko, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    The sorption of macroscopic quantities of uranium from solutions of UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ containing HCl and NH/sub 4/Cl in concentrations from 0.0 to 6.0 M by the AV-17 x 8, AV-16G, EDE-10P, AN-31, AN-2F, AN22, and AN-251 anion exchangers has been investigated under static conditions. The sorption isotherms are described by an equation similar to Freundlich's equation: K/sub d/ = K tilde x C/sub eq/sup 1/z/ or log K/sub d/ = log K tilde + 1/z x log C/sub eq/. Equations describing the dependence of the sorbability (or K/sub d/) on the equilibrium concentration of uranium in the solution have been obtained with the aid of the least-squares method. Conclusions regarding the chemistry of the exchange of uranium ions on anion exchangers in chloride solutions have been drawn on the basis of the UV spectra of the original solutions and the IR spectra of the ion exchangers obtained in this work, as well as the established general laws governing sorption.

  17. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: a potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    very small fraction of the total solid phase Cr, they are a potentially important source for Cr(VI) to groundwater. Enhanced groundwater recharge through the vadose zone due to irrigation could carry Cr(VI) from the vadose zone to the groundwater and may be the mechanism responsible for the correlation observed between elevated Cr(VI) and NO3- source concentrations in previously published data for valley groundwaters. Incubation of a valley subsoil showed a Cr(VI) production rate of 24 μg kg−1 a−1 suggesting that field Cr(VI) concentrations could be regenerated annually. Increased Cr(VI) production rates in H+-amended soil incubations indicate that soil acidification processes such as nitrification of ammonium in fertilizers could potentially increase the occurrence of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater. Thus, despite the natural origin of the Cr, Cr(VI) generation in the Sacramento Valley soils and sediments has the potential to be influenced by human activities.

  18. Collagen VI related muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, A; Bushby, K

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI (COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3) cause Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), two conditions which were previously believed to be completely separate entities. BM is a relatively mild dominantly inherited disorder characterised by proximal weakness and distal joint contractures. UCMD was originally described as an autosomal recessive condition causing severe muscle weakness with proximal joint contractures and distal hyperlaxity. Here we review the clinical phenotypes of BM and UCMD and their diagnosis and management, and provide an overview of the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of collagen VI related disorders. PMID:16141002

  19. Evaluation of the bioremoval of Cr(VI) and TOC in biofilters under continuous operation using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Leles, Daniela M A; Lemos, Diego A; Filho, Ubirajara C; Romanielo, Lucienne L; de Resende, Miriam M; Cardoso, Vicelma L

    2012-06-01

    In the present study, the bioremoval of Cr(VI) and the removal of total organic carbon (TOC) were achieved with a system composed by an anaerobic filter and a submerged biofilter with intermittent aeration using a mixed culture of microorganisms originating from contaminated sludge. In the aforementioned biofilters, the concentrations of chromium, carbon, and nitrogen were optimized according to response surface methodology. The initial concentration of Cr(VI) was 137.35 mg l(-1), and a bioremoval of 85.23% was attained. The optimal conditions for the removal of TOC were 4 to 8 g l(-1) of sodium acetate, >0.8 g l(-1) of ammonium chloride and 60 to 100 mg l(-1) of Cr(VI). The results revealed that ammonium chloride had the strongest effect on the TOC removal, and 120 mg l(-1) of Cr(VI) could be removed after 156 h of operation. Moreover, 100% of the Cr(VI) and the total chromium content of the aerobic reactor output were removed, and TOC removals of 80 and 87% were attained after operating the anaerobic and aerobic reactors for 130 and 142 h, respectively. The concentrations of cells in both reactors remained nearly constant over time. The residence time distribution was obtained to evaluate the flow through the bioreactors.

  20. Biodegradation of rocket propellent waste, ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqui, S. M. Z.

    1975-01-01

    The impact of the biodegradation rate of ammonium perchlorate on the environment was studied in terms of growth, metabolic rate, and total biomass of selected animal and plant species. Brief methodology and detailed results are presented.

  1. Electrochemically and bioelectrochemically induced ammonium recovery.

    PubMed

    Gildemyn, Sylvia; Luther, Amanda K; Andersen, Stephen J; Desloover, Joachim; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-01-22

    Streams such as urine and manure can contain high levels of ammonium, which could be recovered for reuse in agriculture or chemistry. The extraction of ammonium from an ammonium-rich stream is demonstrated using an electrochemical and a bioelectrochemical system. Both systems are controlled by a potentiostat to either fix the current (for the electrochemical cell) or fix the potential of the working electrode (for the bioelectrochemical cell). In the bioelectrochemical cell, electroactive bacteria catalyze the anodic reaction, whereas in the electrochemical cell the potentiostat applies a higher voltage to produce a current. The current and consequent restoration of the charge balance across the cell allow the transport of cations, such as ammonium, across a cation exchange membrane from the anolyte to the catholyte. The high pH of the catholyte leads to formation of ammonia, which can be stripped from the medium and captured in an acid solution, thus enabling the recovery of a valuable nutrient. The flux of ammonium across the membrane is characterized at different anolyte ammonium concentrations and currents for both the abiotic and biotic reactor systems. Both systems are compared based on current and removal efficiencies for ammonium, as well as the energy input required to drive ammonium transfer across the cation exchange membrane. Finally, a comparative analysis considering key aspects such as reliability, electrode cost, and rate is made. This video article and protocol provide the necessary information to conduct electrochemical and bioelectrochemical ammonia recovery experiments. The reactor setup for the two cases is explained, as well as the reactor operation. We elaborate on data analysis for both reactor types and on the advantages and disadvantages of bioelectrochemical and electrochemical systems.

  2. Protostars and Planets VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, Henrik; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Henning, Thomas

    star and planet formation. They are used by students to dive into new topics, and they are much valued by experienced researchers as a comprehensive overview of the field with all its interactions. We hope that you will enjoy reading (and learning from) this book as much as we do. The organization of the Protostars and Planets conference was carried out in close collaboration between the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and the Center for Astronomy of the University Heidelberg, with generous support from the German Science Foundation. This volume is a product of effort and care by many people. First and foremost, we want to acknowledge the 250 contributing authors, as it is only due to their expertise and knowledge that such a comprehensive review compendium in all its depth and breadth is possible. The Protostars and Planets VI conference and this volume was a major undertaking, with support and contributions by many people and institutions. We like to thank the members of the Scientific Advisory Committee who selected the 38 teams and chapters out of more than 120 submitted proposals. Similarly, we are grateful to the reviewers, who provided valuable input and help to the chapter authors. The book would also not have been possible without the great support of Renée Dotson and other staff from USRA’s Lunar and Planetary Institute, who handled the detailed processing of all manuscripts and the production of the book, and of Allyson Carter and other staff from the University of Arizona Press. We are also grateful to Richard Binzel, the General Editor of the Space Science Series, for his constant support during the long process, from the original concept to this final product. Finally, we would like to express a very special thank you to the entire conference local organizing committee, and in particular, Carmen Cuevas and Natali Jurina, for their great commitment to the project and for a very fruitful and enjoyable collaboration.

  3. Effects of Molybdate, Tungstate, and Selenium Compounds on Formate Dehydrogenase and Other Enzyme Systems in Escherichia coli1

    PubMed Central

    Enoch, Harry G.; Lester, Robert L.

    1972-01-01

    The role of selenium and molybdenum in the metabolism of Escherichia coli was explored by growing cells in a simple salts medium and examining the metabolic consequences of altering the concentration of molybdenum and selenium compounds in the medium. The addition of tungstate increased the molybdate deficiency of this medium, as reflected by lowered levels of enzyme systems previously recognized to require compounds of molybdenum and selenium for their formation [formate-dependent oxygen reduction, formate dehydrogenase (FDH) (EC 1.2.2.1), and nitrate reductase (EC 1.9.6.1)]. The requirement for selenium and molybdenum appears to be unique to the enzymes of formate and nitrate metabolism since molybdate- and selenite-deficient medium had no effect on the level of several dehydrogenase and oxidase systems, for which the electron donors were reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, succinate, d- or l-lactate, and glycerol. In addition, no effect was observed on the growth rate or cell yield with any carbon source tested (glucose, glycerol, dl-lactate, acetate, succinate, and l-malate) when the medium was deficient in molybdenum and selenium. dl-Selenocystine was about as effective as selenite in stimulating the formation of formate dehydrogenase, whereas dl-selenomethionine was only 1% as effective. In aerobic cells, an amount of FDH was formed such that 3,200 or 3,800 moles of formate were oxidized per min per mole of added selenium (added as dl-selenocystine or selenite, respectively). PMID:4555402

  4. Intensification of ultrasound-assisted process for the preparation of spindle-shape sodium zinc molybdate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bhanvase, B A; Patel, M A; Sonawane, S H; Pandit, A B

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, sodium zinc molybdate (SZM) nanoparticles were prepared using conventional and an innovative ultrasound assisted co-precipitation of sodium molybdate, zinc oxide and HNO3 at different temperatures. Prepared product was characterized by XRD, TEM, FT-IR, particle size distribution (PSD), TGA and DTA techniques. TEM analysis shows the spindle-shaped morphology of the formed SZM nanoparticles. The average particle size of SZM nanoparticles is found to be lower in case of sonochemical method (78.3 nm) compared to conventional method (340.2 nm) which is attributed to faster solute transfer rate due to ultrasonic irradiation leading to rapid nucleation and restricted growth of SZM nanoparticles. Further, the kinetics of synthesis of SZM nanoparticles are studied using the sonochemical method at different operating temperature and conventional method at 80°C. It is shown that the rate of reaction is significantly faster at 40°C compared to other temperatures and also conventional method. This can be attributed to intense cavity collapse at lower temperature (low vapour pressure) compared to higher temperature (high vapour pressure) of the reaction mixture.

  5. Simulation of the inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a two-compartment upflow bioreactor subjected to molybdate injection.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, E B; de Andrade Lima, L R P

    2016-08-01

    Souring of oil fields during secondary oil recovery by water injection occurs mainly due to the action of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) adhered to the rock surface in the vicinity of injection wells. Upflow packed-bed bioreactors have been used in petroleum microbiology because of its similarity to the oil field near the injection wells or production. However, these reactors do not realistically describe the regions near the injection wells, which are characterized by the presence of a saturated zone and a void region close to the well. In this study, the hydrodynamics of the two-compartment packing-free/packed-bed pilot bioreactor that mimics an oil reservoir was studied. The packed-free compartment was modeled using a continuous stirred tank model with mass exchange between active and stagnant zones, whereas the packed-bed compartment was modeled using a piston-dispersion-exchange model. The proposed model adequately represents the hydrodynamic of the packed-free/packed-bed bioreactor while the simulations provide important information about the characteristics of the residence time distribution (RTD) curves for different sets of model parameters. Simulations were performed to represent the control of the sulfate-reducing bacteria activity in the bioreactor with the use of molybdate in different scenarios. The simulations show that increased amounts of molybdate cause an effective inhibition of the souring sulfate-reducing bacteria activity. PMID:27126499

  6. A structural and thermodynamic basis for the catalytic behavior of single phase and multiphase bismuth cerium molybdate ammoxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brazdil, J.F.; Glaeser, L.C.; Grasselli, R.K.; Teller, R.G.

    1983-09-01

    The vast majority of fundamental studies of metal oxide selective oxidation catalysts have been performed with single phase systems. These investigations established the basic tenents of the redox mechanism of selective oxidation and ammoxidation catalysis. By comparison, structural and kinetic investigations of multiphase oxide catalysts are less numerous because of the inherent difficulties in understanding the relative contributions of separate phases to the catalytic behavior of the composite catalyst. Some attempts have been made in the past to understand the complex chemistry of multiphase catalysts and additional important insights have been realized more recently. However, a clear understanding of the most significant catalytic interactions between individual phases of a multiphase multicomponent redox catalyst is still lacking. In an effort to provide an understanding and a physical basis for the observed synergism in multiphase oxide catalysts, the structural and chemical features which dictate the catalytic behavior of bismuth cerium molybdate catalysts were assessed. Bismuth cerium molybdates are known to be active catalysts for the selective oxidation and ammoxidation of olefins. Compositions with superior catalytic performance have been identified in both the single phase and two phase regions of the Bi/sub 2/(MoO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ - Ce/sub 2/(MoO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ phase diagram. Hence, this catalyst system serves as a useful model for determining key structural and thermodynamic aspects of the catalytic behavior of multicomponent single phase and multiphase redox catalysts.

  7. 21 CFR 172.430 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 172.430 Section 172.430... CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.430 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in... human consumption so that the level of iron ammonium citrate does not exceed 25 parts per million...

  8. 21 CFR 172.430 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron ammonium citrate. 172.430 Section 172.430 Food... Anticaking Agents § 172.430 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in food in... consumption so that the level of iron ammonium citrate does not exceed 25 parts per million (0.0025...

  9. 21 CFR 573.560 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 573.560 Section 573.560... Additive Listing § 573.560 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in animal feed... consumption so that the level of iron ammonium citrate does not exceed 25 parts per million (0.0025...

  10. 21 CFR 573.560 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 573.560 Section 573.560... Additive Listing § 573.560 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in animal feed... consumption so that the level of iron ammonium citrate does not exceed 25 parts per million (0.0025...

  11. 21 CFR 172.430 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 172.430 Section 172.430... CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.430 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in... human consumption so that the level of iron ammonium citrate does not exceed 25 parts per million...

  12. 21 CFR 172.430 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 172.430 Section 172.430... CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.430 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in... human consumption so that the level of iron ammonium citrate does not exceed 25 parts per million...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1296 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Ferric ammonium citrate (iron (III) ammonium citrate) is prepared by the reaction of ferric hydroxide with citric...

  14. Kinetics and characterization of bismuth molybdate catalysts. 2. Reaction studies over various bimolybdates

    SciTech Connect

    Burban, P.M.; Schuit, G.C.A.; Bischoff, K.B. ); Koch, T.A. Du Pont Experimental Station, Wilmington, DE )

    1990-12-01

    The model reaction, 1-butene to 1,3-butadiene, was studied over various compositions of unsupported bismuth molybdates to rank the catalysts' reactivities. The authors confirmed that {gamma}-Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} doped with bismuth to yield a surface Bi/Mo > 2.0 is unselective: selective catalyst species need a few mole% excess MoO{sub 3}. All catalysts with a surface Bi/Mo {le} 1.5 show selectivities to butadiene greater than 95%. As the amount of MoO{sub 3} increases, reducing the surface Bi/Mo ratio, the activity increases down to Bi/Mo = 1.5, then remains constant down to Bi/Mo = 1, and then decreases steadily down to Bi/Mo = 2/3. Characteristics of the partial oxidation catalysis change drastically going from {gamma}-Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} to {alpha}-Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 12}catalysts. For the model reaction, Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} + 4% MoO{sub 3}exhibits an E{alpha} = 40 kJ/mol(9.5 kcal/mol) at temperatures above 673 K. This catalyst is completely poisoned by its product butadiene below 673 K, while the inhibition is lifted above this temperature. The authors suggest that the pores of this catalyst, estimated to be 24 nm in diameter, become filled with polybutadiene; the heat of butadiene adsorption was estimated to be 375 kJ/mol. In contrast, {alpha}-Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 12} is not inhibited by butadiene, and has a lower activity (even calculated per unit surface) with an activation energy of 93 kJ/mol over the entire temperature range 660-713 K, studied. The authors propose models which describe two distinct ensemble effects operative in determining the kinetics over selective {gamma}-Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} and {alpha}-Bi{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} catalysts.

  15. Biological reduction of uranium coupled with oxidation of ammonium by Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 under iron reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Emily R; Huang, Shan; Jaffé, Peter R

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the possibility of links between the biological immobilization of uranium (U) and ammonium oxidation under iron (Fe) reducing conditions. The recently-identified Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 (ATCC, PTA-122488) derives energy from ammonium oxidation coupled with Fe reduction. This bacterium has been found in various soil and wetland environments, including U-contaminated wetland sediments. Incubations of Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 with nontronite, an Fe(III)-rich clay, and approximately 10 µM U indicate that these bacteria can use U(VI) in addition to Fe(III) as an electron acceptor in the presence of ammonium. Measurements of Fe(II) production and ammonium oxidation support this interpretation. Concentrations of approximately 100 µM U were found to entirely inhibit Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 activity. These results suggest that natural sites of active ammonium oxidation under Fe reducing conditions by Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 could be hotspots of U immobilization by bioreduction. This is the first report of biological U reduction that is not coupled to carbon oxidation.

  16. Calcium sulphate in ammonium sulphate solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, E.C.

    1905-01-01

    Calcium sulphate, at 25?? C., is two-thirds as soluble in dilute (o.i mol per liter) and twice as soluble in concentrated (3 mois per liter) ammonium sulphate solution as in water. The specific electric conductivity of concentrated ammonium sulphate solutions is lessened by saturating with calcium sulphate. Assuming that dissociation of ammonium sulphate takes place into 2NH4?? and SO4" and of calcium sulphate into Ca and SO4" only, and that the conductivity is a measure of such dissociation, the solubility of calcium sulphate in dilute ammonium sulphate solutions is greater than required by the mass-law. The conductivity of the dilute mixtures may be accurately calculated by means of Arrhenius' principle of isohydric solutions. In the data obtained in these calculations, the concentration of non-dissociated calcium sulphate decreases with increasing ammonium sulphate. The work as a whole is additional evidence of the fact that we are not yet in possession of all the factors necessary for reconciling the mass-law to the behavior of electrolytes. The measurements above described were made in the chemical laboratory of the University of Michigan.

  17. Summary report of session VI

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2002-08-19

    This report gives a brief review of the presentations in Session VI of the Ecloud'02 Workshop and summarizes the major points during the discussions. Some points (e.g., the critical mass phenomenon) are not conclusive and even controversial. But it has been agreed that further investigations are warranted. The topic of Session VI in the Ecloud'02 workshop is ''Discussions of future studies, collaborations and possible solutions.'' Half of the session is devoted to presentations, another half to discussions. This report will focus on the latter. There are six presentations: (1) R. Macek, Possible cures to the e-cloud problem; (2) G. Rumolo, Driving the electron-cloud instability by an electron cooler; (3) U. Iriso Ariz, RF test benches for electron-cloud studies; (4) F. Caspers, Stealth clearing electrodes; (5) F. Ruggiero, Future electron-cloud studies at CERN; and (6) E. Perevedentsev, Beam-beam and transverse impedance model.

  18. Directional Mechanosensing in Myosin VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yubo; Tehver, Riina

    2013-03-01

    Myosin is a family of versatile motor proteins that perform various tasks, such as organelle transport, anchoring and cell deformation. Although the general mechanism of the motors has been fairly well established, details on dynamic aspects like force response of the motor, and force propagation are yet to be fully understood. In this poster, we present the response of the ATP binding region to force exerted on the tail domain in order to test the proposed tension-dependent gating mechanism of myosin VI processive motion. We employed the Self-Organized Polymer model in a computer simulation to explore the effect. Current results show that the ATP binding domain of myosin VI indeed exhibits tension dependence - both structurally and dynamically.

  19. The ammonium sulfate inhibition of human angiogenin.

    PubMed

    Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Tsirkone, Vicky G; Dossi, Kyriaki; Kassouni, Aikaterini G; Liggri, Panagiota G V; Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Stravodimos, George A; Balatsos, Nikolaos A A; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigate the inhibition of human angiogenin by ammonium sulfate. The inhibitory potency of ammonium sulfate for human angiogenin (IC50 = 123.5 ± 14.9 mm) is comparable to that previously reported for RNase A (119.0 ± 6.5 mm) and RNase 2 (95.7 ± 9.3 mm). However, analysis of two X-ray crystal structures of human angiogenin in complex with sulfate anions (in acidic and basic pH environments, respectively) indicates an entirely distinct mechanism of inhibition. While ammonium sulfate inhibits the ribonucleolytic activity of RNase A and RNase 2 by binding to the active site of these enzymes, sulfate anions bind only to peripheral substrate anion-binding subsites of human angiogenin, and not to the active site. PMID:27483019

  20. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-07-16

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 {+-} 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

  1. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution.

    PubMed

    Drisdell, Walter S; Saykally, Richard J; Cohen, Ronald C

    2009-11-10

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 +/- 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly. PMID:19861551

  2. Supercritical water oxidation of ammonium picrate

    SciTech Connect

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Mills, B.E.; Brown, B.G.

    1994-11-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of using supercritical water oxidation to destroy ammonium picrate. Analyses of reactor effluent composition at various temperatures, residence times, and oxidant concentrations were used to design an improved reactor configuration for achieving destruction with minimum corrosion. The engineering evaluation reactor, a room-sized laboratory scale reactor, was reconfigured to incorporate this design change. Destruction of ammonium picrate with minimized corrosion was demonstrated on this reconfigured reactor. Factors that must be considered in scaling up to pilot plant size are discussed.

  3. Eutectic composite explosives containing ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Stinecipher, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    The eutectic of ammonium nitrate (AN), the ammonium salt of 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole was prepared and its sensitivity and performance were studied. It was found that this AN formulation was unusual in that it performed ideally at small diameter, which indicated that it was a monomolecular explosive. Sensitivity tests included type 12 impact, Henkin thermal and wedge tests, and performance tests included rate stick/plate dent, cylinder, and aquarium tests. Results were compared with calculations, standard explosives, and another eutectic, ethylendiamine dinitrate (EDD)/AN.

  4. Molecular orientation of molybdate ions adsorbed on goethite nanoparticles revealed by polarized in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davantès, Athénaïs; Lefèvre, Grégory

    2016-11-01

    The speciation of species adsorbed on nanoparticles is a major concern for several fields, as environmental pollution and remediation, surface functionalization, or catalysis. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) was amongst the rare methods able to give in situ information about the geometry of surface complexes on nanoparticles. A new possibility using this technique is illustrated here with the MoO42 -/goethite system. Using deuterated goethite to avoid spectral interferences, adsorption of molybdate ions on a spontaneous oriented film of nanoparticles has been followed using a polarized infrared beam. From the decomposition of spectra in the x, y and z directions, a monodentate surface complex on the {101} faces has been found as the most probable geometry. This result demonstrates that polarized ATR-IR allows to characterize in more details adsorption mode at the atomic scale, in comparison with usual ATR-IR spectroscopy.

  5. Modeling of Cr(VI) Bioreduction Under Fermentative and Denitrifying Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Steefel, C.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    The mechanisms of bioreductive immobilization of Cr(VI) were investigated by reactive transport modeling of a set of flow-through column experiments performed using natural Hanford 100H aquifer sediment. The columns were continuously eluted with 5 μM Cr(VI), 5 mM lactate as the electron donor, and selected electron acceptors (tested individually). Here we focus on the two separate experimental conditions that showed the most removal of Cr(VI) from solution: fermentation and denitrification. In each case, a network of enzymatic and abiotic reaction pathways was considered to interpret the rate of chromate reduction. The model included biomass growth and decay, and thermodynamic limitations on reaction rates, and was constrained by effluent concentrations measured by IC and ICP-MS and additional information from bacterial isolates from column effluent. Under denitrifying conditions, Cr(VI) reduction was modeled as co-metabolic with nitrate reduction based on experimental observations and previous studies on a denitrifying bacterium derived from the Hanford 100H aquifer. The reactive transport model results supported this interpretation of the reaction mechanism and were used to quantify the efficiency of the process. The models results also suggest that biomass growth likely relied on a nitrogen source other than ammonium (e.g. nitrate). Under fermentative conditions and based on cell suspension studies performed on a bacterial isolate from the columns, the model assumes that Cr(VI) reduction is carried out directly by fermentative bacteria that convert lactate into acetate and propionate. The evolution to complete lactate fermentation and Cr(VI) reduction took place over a week's time and simulations were used to determine an estimate for a lower limit of the rate of chromate reduction by calibration with the flow-through column experimental results. In spite of sulfate being added to these columns, sulfate reduction proceeded at a slow rate and was not well

  6. Diamond Head Revisited with Ammonium Dichromate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrigoni, Edward

    1981-01-01

    The classroom demonstration using ammonium dichromate to simulate a volcanic eruption can be modified into a more dramatic and accurate representation of the geologic processes involved in the formation of a volcanic crater. The materials, demonstration setup, safety procedures, and applications to instruction are presented. (Author/WB)

  7. 21 CFR 558.340 - Maduramicin ammonium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR USE IN ANIMAL FEEDS Specific New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds § 558.340 Maduramicin ammonium. (a) Approvals. Type A medicated articles:...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... this chapter. (e) Prior sanctions for this ingredient different from the uses established in this... is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with ammonium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets.../federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. (c) The ingredient is used as a...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... this chapter. (e) Prior sanctions for this ingredient different from the uses established in this... is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with ammonium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets.../federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. (c) The ingredient is used as a...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... this chapter. (e) Prior sanctions for this ingredient different from the uses established in this... is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with ammonium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets.../federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. (c) The ingredient is used as a...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... this chapter. (e) Prior sanctions for this ingredient different from the uses established in this... is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with ammonium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets.../federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. (c) The ingredient is used as a...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sanctions for this ingredient different from the uses established in this section do not exist or have been... neutralization of sulfuric acid with ammonium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (c) The ingredient is used as a dough strengthener as defined in §...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: Category of food Maximum level of use in food (as served) (percent) Functional use Confections, frostings... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium alginate. 184.1133 Section 184.1133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  14. 76 FR 70366 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Department previously announced a series of public meetings on the same topic on October 2, 2011 (see 76 FR... public comment on August 3, 2011. See 73 FR 64280 (advance notice of proposed rulemaking); 76 FR 46908... SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 31 RIN 1601-AA52 Ammonium Nitrate Security Program...

  15. 76 FR 62311 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... FR 64280 (advance notice of proposed rulemaking); 76 FR 46908 (notice of proposed rulemaking...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 31 RIN 1601-AA52 Ammonium Nitrate Security.... SUMMARY: The National Protection and Programs Directorate of the Department of Homeland Security...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the...) of this chapter. (2) The ingredient is used in food at levels not to exceed current good... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the...) of this chapter. (2) The ingredient is used in food at levels not to exceed current good... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the... defined in § 170.3(o)(32) of this chapter. (2) The ingredient is used in food at levels not to exceed... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium bicarbonate. 184.1135 Section...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the... water additive complying with § 173.310 of this chapter. (2) The ingredient is used in food at levels... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium hydroxide. 184.1139 Section 184.1139...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the...) of this chapter. (2) The ingredient is used in food at levels not to exceed current good... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the... water additive complying with § 173.310 of this chapter. (2) The ingredient is used in food at levels... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium hydroxide. 184.1139 Section 184.1139...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the... water additive complying with § 173.310 of this chapter. (2) The ingredient is used in food at levels... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium hydroxide. 184.1139 Section 184.1139...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the...) of this chapter. (2) The ingredient is used in food at levels not to exceed current good... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the... water additive complying with § 173.310 of this chapter. (2) The ingredient is used in food at levels... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium hydroxide. 184.1139 Section 184.1139...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: Category of food Maximum level of use in food (as served) (percent) Functional use Confections, frostings... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium alginate. 184.1133 Section 184.1133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  6. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ...)). Background The Commission instituted this review on March 1, 2011 (76 FR 11273) and determined on June 6, 2011 that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 34749, June 14, 2011). The Commission transmitted... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the...

  7. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 -- 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a dust free, manufactured microgravity EVA environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 -- 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 -- 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of International Space Station (ISS)-based EVA tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected periodically throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the

  8. Myosin VI: cellular functions and motor properties.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rhys; Lister, Ida; Schmitz, Stephan; Walker, Matthew; Veigel, Claudia; Trinick, John; Buss, Folma; Kendrick-Jones, John

    2004-01-01

    Myosin VI has been localized in membrane ruffles at the leading edge of cells, at the trans-Golgi network compartment of the Golgi complex and in clathrin-coated pits or vesicles, indicating that it functions in a wide variety of intracellular processes. Myosin VI moves along actin filaments towards their minus end, which is the opposite direction to all of the other myosins so far studied (to our knowledge), and is therefore thought to have unique properties and functions. To investigate the cellular roles of myosin VI, we identified various myosin VI binding partners and are currently characterizing their interactions within the cell. As an alternative approach, we have expressed and purified full-length myosin VI and studied its in vitro properties. Previous studies assumed that myosin VI was a dimer, but our biochemical, biophysical and electron microscopic studies reveal that myosin VI can exist as a stable monomer. We observed, using an optical tweezers force transducer, that monomeric myosin VI is a non-processive motor which, despite a relatively short lever arm, generates a large working stroke of 18 nm. Whether monomer and/or dimer forms of myosin VI exist in cells and their possible functions will be discussed. PMID:15647169

  9. Myosin VI: cellular functions and motor properties.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rhys; Lister, Ida; Schmitz, Stephan; Walker, Matthew; Veigel, Claudia; Trinick, John; Buss, Folma; Kendrick-Jones, John

    2004-12-29

    Myosin VI has been localized in membrane ruffles at the leading edge of cells, at the trans-Golgi network compartment of the Golgi complex and in clathrin-coated pits or vesicles, indicating that it functions in a wide variety of intracellular processes. Myosin VI moves along actin filaments towards their minus end, which is the opposite direction to all of the other myosins so far studied (to our knowledge), and is therefore thought to have unique properties and functions. To investigate the cellular roles of myosin VI, we identified various myosin VI binding partners and are currently characterizing their interactions within the cell. As an alternative approach, we have expressed and purified full-length myosin VI and studied its in vitro properties. Previous studies assumed that myosin VI was a dimer, but our biochemical, biophysical and electron microscopic studies reveal that myosin VI can exist as a stable monomer. We observed, using an optical tweezers force transducer, that monomeric myosin VI is a non-processive motor which, despite a relatively short lever arm, generates a large working stroke of 18 nm. Whether monomer and/or dimer forms of myosin VI exist in cells and their possible functions will be discussed. PMID:15647169

  10. Technology for processing ammonium rhodanide of coking plants into high-purity ammonium thiocyanate and thiourea

    SciTech Connect

    Urakaev, F.K.

    2009-04-15

    The regularities of the reversible reaction of isomerization of ammonium thiocyanate (NH{sub 4}NCS) into thiourea (NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CS, and the reverse reaction, were analyzed. An ecologically clean and highly efficient method for the extraction, purification, separation, and production of isomers from the coal byproduct ammonium thiocyanate was developed based on the measured volatilities of NH{sub 4}NCS and (NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CS.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10302 - Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10302 Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as zinc ammonium phosphate (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10302 - Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10302 Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as zinc ammonium phosphate (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10302 - Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10302 Zinc ammonium phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as zinc ammonium phosphate (PMN...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  18. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  19. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  20. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  2. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  3. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  4. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  5. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.655 - Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.655 Ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound. (a) Chemical... as an ethoxylated alkyl quaternary ammonium compound (PMN P-96-573) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10591 - Tertiary ammonium compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tertiary ammonium compound (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10591 Tertiary ammonium compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium compound (PMN P-11-110) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10591 - Tertiary ammonium compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tertiary ammonium compound (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10591 Tertiary ammonium compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium compound (PMN P-11-110) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10582 - Quaternary ammonium compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium compound (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10582 Quaternary ammonium compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium compound (PMN P-10-571) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10582 - Quaternary ammonium compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium compound (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10582 Quaternary ammonium compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium compound (PMN P-10-571) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  13. 21 CFR 172.430 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 172.430 Section 172.430... ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.430 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in food in accordance with the...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10511 - Quaternary ammonium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium salts (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10511 Quaternary ammonium salts (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium salts (PMNs P-07-320, P-07-321, P-07-322, P-07-323, and P-07-324) are subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10511 - Quaternary ammonium salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium salts (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10511 Quaternary ammonium salts (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... ammonium salts (PMNs P-07-320, P-07-321, P-07-322, P-07-323, and P-07-324) are subject to reporting...

  16. 21 CFR 573.560 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.560 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in animal feed... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 573.560 Section...

  17. 21 CFR 573.560 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.560 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in animal feed... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 573.560 Section...

  18. 21 CFR 573.560 - Iron ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.560 Iron ammonium citrate. Iron ammonium citrate may be safely used in animal feed... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron ammonium citrate. 573.560 Section...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10099 - Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10099 Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (generic). (a) Chemical... as dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (1:1) (PMN P-03-715) is subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4467 - Quaternary ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium hydroxide. 721... Substances § 721.4467 Quaternary ammonium hydroxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a quaternary ammonium...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4467 - Quaternary ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium hydroxide. 721... Substances § 721.4467 Quaternary ammonium hydroxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a quaternary ammonium...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10099 - Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10099 Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (generic). (a) Chemical... as dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (1:1) (PMN P-03-715) is subject to reporting under...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: collagen VI-related myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions collagen VI-related myopathy collagen VI-related myopathy Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders ...

  4. [Occupational exposure to chromium(VI) compounds].

    PubMed

    Skowroń, Jolanta; Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)) on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI) compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV) for chromium(VI) of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL) document chromium(VI) concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2-14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI) compounds expressed in Cr(VI) of 0.01 mg Cr(VI)/m3; is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1-6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity.

  5. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... efficient in removing mono-dispersed particles of 0.3 micrometers in diameter or larger. Historical... means that disperses chromium (VI) into the air or onto an employee's body. (iii) The employer shall... change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs,...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... efficient in removing mono-dispersed particles of 0.3 micrometers in diameter or larger. Historical... means that disperses chromium (VI) into the air or onto an employee's body. (iii) The employer shall... change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs,...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... efficient in removing mono-dispersed particles of 0.3 micrometers in diameter or larger. Historical... means that disperses chromium (VI) into the air or onto an employee's body. (iii) The employer shall... change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs,...

  8. Dissimilatory Reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) by Cellulomonas Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, William Aaron; Apel, William Arnold; Peyton, B. M.; Petersen, J. N.; Sani, R.

    2002-10-01

    The reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) was studied using three recently isolated environmental Cellulomonas sp. (WS01, WS18, and ES5) and a known Cellulomonas strain (Cellulomonas flavigena ATCC 482) under anaerobic, non-growth conditions. In all cases, these cultures were observed to reduce Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI). In 100 h, with lactate as electron donor, the Cellulomonas isolates (500 mg/l total cell protein) reduced nitrilotriacetic acid chelated Fe(III) [Fe(III)-NTA] from 5 mM to less than 2.2 mM, Cr(VI) from 0.2 mM to less than 0.001 mM, and U(VI) from 0.2 mM to less than 0.12 mM. All Cellulomonas isolates also reduced Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) in the absence of lactate, while no metal reduction was observed in either the cell-free or heat-killed cell controls. This is the first report of Cellulomonas sp. reducing Fe(III) and U(VI). Further, this is the first report of Cellulomonas spp. coupling the oxidation of lactate, or other unknown electron donors in the absence of lactate, to the reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI).

  9. Dissimilatory reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) by Cellulomonas isolates.

    PubMed

    Sani, R K; Peyton, B M; Smith, W A; Apel, W A; Petersen, J N

    2002-10-01

    The reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) was studied using three recently isolated environmental Cellulomonas sp. (WS01, WS18, and ES5) and a known Cellulomonas strain ( Cellulomonas flavigena ATCC 482) under anaerobic, non-growth conditions. In all cases, these cultures were observed to reduce Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI). In 100 h, with lactate as electron donor, the Cellulomonas isolates (500 mg/l total cell protein) reduced nitrilotriacetic acid chelated Fe(III) [Fe(III)-NTA] from 5 mM to less than 2.2 mM, Cr(VI) from 0.2 mM to less than 0.001 mM, and U(VI) from 0.2 mM to less than 0.12 mM. All Cellulomonas isolates also reduced Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) in the absence of lactate, while no metal reduction was observed in either the cell-free or heat-killed cell controls. This is the first report of Cellulomonas sp. reducing Fe(III) and U(VI). Further, this is the first report of Cellulomonas spp. coupling the oxidation of lactate, or other unknown electron donors in the absence of lactate, to the reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI).

  10. The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher

    2013-06-01

    The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

  11. [Quaternary ammonium compounds--new occupational hazards].

    PubMed

    Lipińska-Ojrzanowska, Agnieszka; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs, quats) belong to organic ionic chemical agents which display unique properties of both surfactants and disinfectants. Their wide distribution in the work environment and also in private households brings about new occupational hazards. This paper reviews reports about the health effects of QACs. QACs could play a role of sensitizers and irritants to the skin and mucous membranes. It is suspected that particular QACs can display an immunologic cross-reactivity between each other and with other chemical compounds containing ammonium ion, such as muscle relaxants widely used in anesthesia. They may promote the development of airway allergy, however, the background mechanisms are still unclear and need to be further investigated. Until now, a few cases of occupational asthma induced by QACs have been described and their involvement in contact dermatitis has been documented. The possibility of anaphylaxis due to QACs cannot be excluded as well. PMID:25812396

  12. Detonation Properties of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wätterstam, A.; Östmark, H.; Helte, A.; Karlsson, S.

    1999-06-01

    Ammonium Dinitramide, ADN, has a potential as an oxidizer for underwater high explosives. Pure ADN has a large reaction-zone length and shows a strong non-ideal behaviour. The work presented here is an extension of previous work.(Sensitivity and Performance Characterization of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN). Presented at 11th International Detonation Symposium, Snowmass, CO, 1998.) Experiments for determining the detonation velocity as a function of inverse charge radius and density, reaction-zone length and curvature, and the detonation pressure are presented. Measurements of pressure indicates that no, or weak von-Neumann spike exists, suggesting an immediate chemical decomposition. Experimental data are compared with predicted using thermochemical codes and ZND-theory.

  13. 3-Quaternary ammonium 1-carba-1-dethiacephems.

    PubMed

    Cook, G K; McDonald, J H; Alborn, W; Boyd, D B; Eudaly, J A; Indelicato, J M; Johnson, R; Kasher, J S; Pasini, C E; Preston, D A

    1989-11-01

    A series of structurally unique 1-carba-1-dethiacephems is described. The structural stability of the 1-carba-1-dethiacephem nucleus was essential for the preparation of this series of 3-quaternary ammonium carbacephems. The known p-nitrobenzyl 7 beta-(phenoxyacetamido)- 3-[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]oxy]-1-carba-1-dethia-3-cephem- 4-carboxylate served as both a quaternization substrate as well as a precursor to derivatives such as allyl 7 beta-[[2-[allyloxy)carbonyl]amino-4- thiazoly] (methoxyimino)acetyl]amino]-3-[(trifluoromethyl) sulfonyl] oxy]-1-carba-1-dethia-3-cephem-4-carboxylate. Quaternization of these enol triflates was accomplished either by dissolution in acetonitrile containing the base or by dissolution in the base, with or without warning to 50 degrees C. Bases nucleophilic enough to displace the triflate include a variety of substituted pyridines and N-methylimidazole. Deprotection then produced a very active series of 1-[7 beta-[(2-amino- 4-thiazolyl)(methoxyimino)acetyl]amino]-2-carboxy-8-oxo- 1-azabicyclo[4.2.0]oct-2-en-3-yl] quaternary ammonium hydroxide inner salts. These compounds were extremely potent antibacterials against a broad range of Gram-positive and -negative bacteria including constitutive cephalosporinase producers, such as Enterobacter cloacae. The compounds exhibit similar hydrolysis kinetics and pharmacokinetics to the analogous cephalosporin-3'-quaternary ammonium salts.

  14. Equation of State of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, David L.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Stahl, David B.

    2009-12-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is a widely used fertilizer and mining explosive. AN is commonly used in ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO), which is a mixture of explosive-grade AN prills and fuel oil in a 94:6 ratio by weight. ANFO is a non-ideal explosive with measured detonation velocities around 4 km/s. The equation of state properties and known initiation behavior of neat AN are limited. We present the results of a series of gas gun-driven plate impact experiments on pressed neat ammonium nitrate at 1.72 g/cm3. No evidence of initiation was observed under shock loading to 22 GPa. High pressure x-ray diffraction experiments in diamond anvil cells provided insight into the high pressure phase behavior over the same pressure range (to 25 GPa), as well as a static isotherm at ambient temperature. From the isotherm and thermodynamic properties at ambient conditions, a preliminary unreacted equation of state (EOS) has been developed based on the Murnaghan isotherm and Helmholtz formalism [1], which compares favorably with the available experimental Hugoniot data on several densities of AN.

  15. DETECTION OF THE AMMONIUM ION IN SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B.; Fuente, A.; Domenech, J. L.; Cueto, M.; Carrasco, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Marcelino, N.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; Pearson, J.

    2013-07-01

    We report on the detection of a narrow feature at 262816.73 MHz toward Orion and the cold prestellar core B1-bS which we attribute to the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} line of the deuterated ammonium ion, NH{sub 3}D{sup +}. The observations were performed with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope. The carrier has to be a light molecular species as it is the only feature detected over 3.6 GHz of bandwidth. The hyperfine structure is not resolved, indicating a very low value for the electric quadrupolar coupling constant of nitrogen which is expected for NH{sub 3}D{sup +} as the electric field over the N nucleus is practically zero. Moreover, the feature is right at the predicted frequency for the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} transition of the ammonium ion, 262817 {+-} 6 MHz (3{sigma}), using rotational constants derived from new infrared data obtained in our laboratory in Madrid. The estimated column density is (1.1 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. Assuming a deuterium enhancement similar to that of NH{sub 2}D, we derive N(NH{sub 4}{sup +}) {approx_equal} 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, i.e., an abundance for ammonium of a few 10{sup -11}.

  16. PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF AMMONIUM URANIUM FLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, A.S.; Mooney, R.B.

    1953-08-25

    This patent relates to the preparation of ammonium uranium fluoride. The process comprises adding a water soluble fluoride to an aqueous solution of a uranous compound containing an ammonium salt, and isolating the resulting precipitate. This patent relates to the manufacture of uranium tetnafluoride from ammonium uranium fluoride, NH/sub 4/UF/sub 5/. Uranium tetrafluoride is prepared by heating the ammonium uranium fluoride to a temperature at which dissociation occurs with liberation of ammonium fluoride. Preferably the process is carried out under reduced pressure, or in a current of an inert gas.

  17. Oxidation of ammonium sulfite in aqueous solutions using ozone technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    How to deal with unstable ammonium sulfite, the byproduct of flue gas desulfuration by ammonia absorption methods, has been a difficult problem in recent years. Oxidation of ammonium sulfite in aqueous solutions using ozone produced by a surface discharge system was investigated in the paper. The oxidation efficiency of ammonium sulfite by ozone and traditional air aeration were compared, and the factors including ozone concentration, gas flow rate, initial concentration of ammonium sulfite solution and reaction temperature were discussed. The results show that the oxidation efficiency of ammonium sulfite by ozone technology reached nearly 100% under the optimum conditions, which had a significant increase compared with that by air aeration.

  18. Study of ternary-component bismuth molybdate catalysts by /sup 18/O/sub 2/ tracer in the oxidation of propylene to acrolein

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, W.; Moro-oka, Y.; Ikawa, T.

    1981-08-01

    Participation of lattice oxide ions of ternary-component bismuth molybdate catalysts M-Bi-Mo-O (M = Ni, Co, Mg, Mn, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Pb) was investigated using the /sup 18/O/sub 2/ tracer in the selective oxidation of propylene to acrolein. The participation of the lattice oxide ions in the oxidation is prominent on every catalyst but the extent of the participation varies significantly depending on the structure of the catalyst. Only lattice oxide ions in the bismuth molybdate phase are incorporated into the oxidized products on the catalysts (M = Ni, Co, Mg, and Mn) where M have smaller ionic radius than Bi/sup 3 +/; catalyst particles are composed of a shell of bismuth molybdates and a core of MMoO/sub 4/. On the other hand, whole oxide ions in the active particles are involved in the oxidation on catalysts having a scheelite-type structure (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, and Pb) where M has a comparable ionic radius to Bi/sup 3 +/.

  19. Phase diagram of ammonium perchlorate: Raman spectroscopic constrains at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-06-01

    We present the pressure-temperature (PT) induced physical and chemical transformations in ammonium perchlorates (APs) up to 50 GPa and 450 °C, using diamond anvil cells and confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy, which provide new constraints for the phase diagram of AP. The results show spectral evidences for three new polymorphs (III, IV, and VI) of AP, in addition to two previously known phases (I and II), at various PT conditions with varying degrees of hydrogen bonding and lack of strong spectral evidence for previously known high-temperature cubic phase (phase V). Upon further heating, AP chemically decomposes to N2, N2O, and H2O. The present phase diagram is, therefore, in sharp contrast to the previous one, underscoring a rich polymorphism, a large stability field for solids, and a replacement of the melt with a decomposition line.

  20. Selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) in waters using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weldy, Effie; Wolff, Chloe; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    From 2000 through 2011, there were 14 criminal cases of violations of the Clean Water Act involving the discharge of chromium, a toxic heavy metal, into drinking and surface water sources. As chromium(VI), a potential carcinogen present in the environment, represents a significant safety concern, it is currently the subject of an EPA health risk assessment. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of this species is highly desired. This study reports the analysis of chromium(VI) in water samples by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) following its reduction and complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The reduction and subsequent complexation produce a characteristic [Cr(III)O]-PDC complex which can be detected as a protonated ion of m/z 507 in the positive ion mode. The detection is selective to chromium(VI) under acidic pH, even in the presence of chromium(III) and other metal ions, providing high specificity. Different water samples were examined, including deionized, tap, and river waters, and sensitive detection was achieved. In the case of deionized water, quantification over the concentration range of 3.7 to 148ppb gave an excellent correlation coefficient of 0.9904 using the enhanced MS mode scan. Using the single-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode (monitoring the characteristic fragmentation of m/z 507 to m/z 360), the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.25ppb. The LOD of chromium(VI) for both tap and river water samples was determined to be 2.0ppb. A preconcentration strategy using simple vacuum evaporation of the aqueous sample was shown to further improve the ESI signal by 15 fold. This method, with high sensitivity and selectivity, should provide a timely solution for the real-world analysis of toxic chromium(VI). PMID:23937937

  1. Selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) in waters using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weldy, Effie; Wolff, Chloe; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    From 2000 through 2011, there were 14 criminal cases of violations of the Clean Water Act involving the discharge of chromium, a toxic heavy metal, into drinking and surface water sources. As chromium(VI), a potential carcinogen present in the environment, represents a significant safety concern, it is currently the subject of an EPA health risk assessment. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of this species is highly desired. This study reports the analysis of chromium(VI) in water samples by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) following its reduction and complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The reduction and subsequent complexation produce a characteristic [Cr(III)O]-PDC complex which can be detected as a protonated ion of m/z 507 in the positive ion mode. The detection is selective to chromium(VI) under acidic pH, even in the presence of chromium(III) and other metal ions, providing high specificity. Different water samples were examined, including deionized, tap, and river waters, and sensitive detection was achieved. In the case of deionized water, quantification over the concentration range of 3.7 to 148ppb gave an excellent correlation coefficient of 0.9904 using the enhanced MS mode scan. Using the single-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode (monitoring the characteristic fragmentation of m/z 507 to m/z 360), the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.25ppb. The LOD of chromium(VI) for both tap and river water samples was determined to be 2.0ppb. A preconcentration strategy using simple vacuum evaporation of the aqueous sample was shown to further improve the ESI signal by 15 fold. This method, with high sensitivity and selectivity, should provide a timely solution for the real-world analysis of toxic chromium(VI).

  2. New double molybdate Na{sub 9}Fe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 6}: Synthesis, structure, properties

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, Aleksandra A.; Solodovnikov, Sergey F.; Basovich, Olga M.; Solodovnikova, Zoya A.; Belov, Dmitry A.; Pokholok, Konstantin V.; Gudkova, Irina A.; Stefanovich, Sergey Yu.; Lazoryak, Bogdan I.; Khaikina, Elena G.

    2013-09-15

    A new double molybdate Na{sub 9}Fe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 6} was synthesized using solid state reactions and studied with X-ray powder diffraction, second harmonic generation (SHG) technique, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray fluorescence analysis, Mössbauer and dielectric impedance spectroscopy. Single crystals of Na{sub 9}Fe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 6} were obtained and its structure was solved (the space group R3{sup ¯}, a=14.8264(2), c=19.2402(3) Å, V=3662.79(9) Å{sup 3}, Z=6, R=0.0132). The structure is related to that of sodium ion conductor II-Na{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}. The basic structure units are polyhedral clusters composed of central FeO{sub 6} octahedron sharing edges with three Na(1)O{sub 6} octahedra. The clusters share common vertices with bridging MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra to form an open 3D framework where the cavities are occupied by Na(2) and Na(3) atoms. The compound melts incongruently at 904.7±0.2 K. Arrhenius type temperature dependence of electric conductivity σ has been registered in solid state (σ=6.8×10{sup −2} S cm{sup −1} at 800 K), thus allowing considering Na{sub 9}Fe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 6} as a new sodium ion conductor. - Graphical abstract: A new double molybdate Na{sub 9}Fe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 6} was synthesized and structurally characterized, its physicochemical properties were studied. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A new compound Na{sub 9}Fe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 6} was synthesized as ceramics and single crystals. • Na{sub 9}Fe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 6} structure is related to that of sodium-ion conductor II-Na{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}. • Physicochemical properties of the compound were studied. • Arrhenius plot for conductivity showed 6.8×10{sup −2} S cm{sup −1} at 800 K, E{sub a}∼0.8 eV. • Thus, Na{sub 9}Fe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 6} may be considered as a new sodium ion conductor.

  3. A mechanochemical model for myosin VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehver, Riina; Jack, Amanda; Lowe, Ian

    Myosin VI is a motor protein that transports cellular cargo along actin filaments. This transport takes place as a result of a coordinated mechano-chemical cycle that is controlled by external variables including imposed force and nucleotide concentrations. We present a model that captures the different dynamic pathways that myosin VI can take in response to these variables. The results of our model for experimentally observable quantities, such as the motor velocity or run length, agree with available experimental data, and we can also make predictions beyond the tested regimes. Using the model, we study how myosin VI reacts to its environment and test its operational efficiency.

  4. Crystal structure of ammonium bis-[(pyridin-2-yl)meth-yl]ammonium dichloride.

    PubMed

    Trischler, Aaron; Oshin, Kayode; Pintauer, Tomislav

    2015-09-01

    In the title molecular salt, C12H14N3 (+)·NH4 (+)·2Cl(-), the central, secondary-amine, N atom is protonated. The bis-[(pyridin-2-yl)meth-yl]ammonium and ammonium cations both lie across a twofold rotation axis. The dihedral angles between the planes of the pyridine rings is 68.43 (8)°. In the crystal, N-H⋯N and N-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds link the components of the structure, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (010). In addition, weak C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds exist within the two-dimensional network.

  5. Crystal structure of ammonium bis­[(pyridin-2-yl)meth­yl]ammonium dichloride

    PubMed Central

    Trischler, Aaron; Oshin, Kayode; Pintauer, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    In the title molecular salt, C12H14N3 +·NH4 +·2Cl−, the central, secondary-amine, N atom is protonated. The bis­[(pyridin-2-yl)meth­yl]ammonium and ammonium cations both lie across a twofold rotation axis. The dihedral angles between the planes of the pyridine rings is 68.43 (8)°. In the crystal, N—H⋯N and N—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds link the components of the structure, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (010). In addition, weak C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds exist within the two-dimensional network. PMID:26396908

  6. Crystal structure of ammonium bis-[(pyridin-2-yl)meth-yl]ammonium dichloride.

    PubMed

    Trischler, Aaron; Oshin, Kayode; Pintauer, Tomislav

    2015-09-01

    In the title molecular salt, C12H14N3 (+)·NH4 (+)·2Cl(-), the central, secondary-amine, N atom is protonated. The bis-[(pyridin-2-yl)meth-yl]ammonium and ammonium cations both lie across a twofold rotation axis. The dihedral angles between the planes of the pyridine rings is 68.43 (8)°. In the crystal, N-H⋯N and N-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds link the components of the structure, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (010). In addition, weak C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds exist within the two-dimensional network. PMID:26396908

  7. Lasing properties of selectively pumped Raman-active Nd{sup 3+}-doped molybdate and tungstate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Basiev, Tasoltan T; Doroshenko, Maxim E; Ivleva, Lyudmila I; Osiko, Vyacheslav V; Kosmyna, M B; Komar', V K; Sulc, J; Jelinkova, H

    2006-08-31

    The lasing efficiency of Nd{sup 3+} ions is studied in laser materials capable of self-Raman frequency conversion. The lasing properties of tungstate and molybdate crystals with the scheelite structure (SrWO{sub 4}, BaWO{sub 4}, PbWO{sub 4}, SrMoO{sub 4}, PbMoO{sub 4}) activated with neodymium ions are investigated upon longitudinal pumping by a 750-nm alexandrite laser or a 800-nm diode laser. The slope lasing efficiency obtained for a Nd{sup 3+}:PbMoO{sub 4} laser emitting at 1054 nm is 54.3% for the total lasing efficiency of 46%, which is the best result for all the crystals with the scheelite structure studied so far. The simultaneous Q-switched lasing and self-Raman frequency conversion were demonstrated in neodymium-doped SrWO{sub 4}, PbWO{sub 4}, and BaWO{sub 4} crystals. (papers devoted to the 90th anniversary of a.m.prokhorov)

  8. Network structure of molybdate glasses by neutron and X-ray diffraction and reverse Monte Carlo modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, M.; Svab, E.; Krezhov, K.

    2016-09-01

    Rare-earth molybdate glasses have been prepared by rapid quench technique, the network structure was investigated by neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction. For data evaluation the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique was applied to obtain a possible 3dimensional network configuration, which is consistent with the experimental data. From the modelling the partial atomic correlation functions giJ(r) and the coordination number distributions CNij have been revealed. Formation of MoO4 (55%) and MoO6 (25%) units was established for the binary 90MoO3-10Nd2O3 glass. The B-O first neighbour distribution show a relatively broad first neighbour distance at 1.40A, the average coordination numbers show the presents of trigonal BO3 and tetrahedral BO4 groups. For 50MoO3-25Nd2O3-25B2O3 sample mixed MoO4-BO4 and MoO4-BO3 linkages form pronounced intermediate-range order.

  9. Synthesis, structural and spectroscopic properties of acentric triple molybdate Cs2NaBi(MoO4)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, A. A.; Atuchin, V. V.; Solodovnikov, S. F.; Solodovnikova, Z. A.; Krylov, A. S.; Maximovskiy, E. A.; Molokeev, M. S.; Oreshonkov, A. S.; Pugachev, A. M.; Khaikina, E. G.

    2015-05-01

    New ternary molybdate Cs2NaBi(MoO4)3 is synthesized in the system Na2MoO4-Cs2MoO4-Bi2(MoO4)3. The structure of Cs2NaBi(MoO4)3 of a new type is determined in noncentrosymmetric space group R3c, a=10.6435(2), c=40.9524(7) Å, V=4017.71(13) Å3, Z=12 in anisotropic approximation for all atoms taking into account racemic twinning. The structure is completely ordered, Mo atoms are tetrahedrally coordinated, Bi(1) and Bi(2) atoms are in octahedra, and Na(1) and Na(2) atoms have a distorted trigonal prismatic coordination. The Cs(1) and Cs(2) atoms are in the framework cavities with coordination numbers 12 and 10, respectively. No phase transitions were found in Cs2NaBi(MoO4)3 up to the melting point at 826 K. The compound shows an SHG signal, I2w/I2w(SiO2)=5 estimated by the powder method. The vibrational properties are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, and 26 narrow lines are measured.

  10. Characterisation of heterogeneous molybdate and chromate phase assemblages in model nuclear waste glasses by multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Greer, Brandon J; Kroeker, Scott

    2012-05-28

    A series of sodium borosilicate glasses containing cesium, molybdenum, and chromium was prepared to investigate the partitioning of chromium amongst the glass and phase-separated crystalline molybdates. The precipitates were examined by (133)Cs, (23)Na, and (95)Mo MAS NMR, revealing a phase assemblage consisting of Na(2)MoO(4), Na(2)MoO(4)·2H(2)O, Cs(2)MoO(4), Cs(2)CrO(4), CsNaMoO(4)·2H(2)O, and Cs(3)Na(MoO(4))(2). (133)Cs MAS NMR indicates random substitution of Cr into the Mo sites of Cs(3)Na(MoO(4))(2) and provides a quantitative assessment of Cr incorporation. The sample compositions were verified by various analytical techniques and highlight the centrality of NMR in the identification and quantification of heterogeneous crystalline composites, including sensitivity to cationic substitution. The observation and facile interconversion of hydrated phases invites careful consideration of these materials for nuclear waste disposal.

  11. Molten-salt synthesis and composition-dependent luminescent properties of barium tungsto-molybdate-based solid solution phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-Hong, He; Zhao-Lian, Ye; Ming-Yun, Guan; Ning, Lian; Jian-Hua, Sun

    2016-02-01

    Pr3+-activated barium tungsto-molybdate solid solution phosphor Ba(Mo1-zWz)O4:Pr3+ is successfully fabricated via a facile molten-salt approach. The as-synthesized microcrystal is of truncated octahedron and exhibits deep-red-emitting upon blue light excitation. Powder x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy techniques are utilized to investigate the formation of solid solution phosphor. The luminescence behaviors depend on the resulting composition of the microcrystals with fixed Pr3+-doping concentration, while the host lattices remain in a scheelite structure. The forming solid solution via the substitution of [WO4] for [MoO4] can significantly enhance its luminescence, which may be due to the fact that Ba(Mo1-zWz)O4:Pr3+ owns well-defined facets and uniform morphologies. Owing to its properties of high phase purity, well-defined facets, highly uniform morphologies, exceptional chemical and thermal stabilities, and stronger emission intensity, the resulting solid solution phosphor is expected to find potential applications in phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Project supported by the Construction Fund for Science and Technology Innovation Group from Jiangsu University of Technology, China, the Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Environment Monitoring and Pollution Control, China (Grant No. KHK1409), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21373103).

  12. High-temperature behavior of dicesium molybdate Cs2MoO4: Implications for fast neutron reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallez, Gilles; Raison, Philippe E.; Smith, Anna L.; Clavier, Nicolas; Dacheux, Nicolas

    2014-07-01

    Dicesium molybdate (Cs2MoO4)'s thermal expansion and crystal structure have been investigated herein by high temperature X ray diffraction in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy. This first crystal-chemical insight at high temperature is aimed at predicting the thermostructural and thermomechanical behavior of this oxide formed by the accumulation of Cs and Mo fission products at the periphery of nuclear fuel rods in sodium-cooled fast reactors. Within the temperature range of the fuel's rim, Cs2MoO4 becomes hexagonal P63/mmc, with disordered MoO4 tetrahedra and 2D distribution of Cs-O bonds that makes thermal axial expansion both large (50≤αl≤70 10-6 °C-1, 500-800 °C) and highly anisotropic (αc-αa=67×10-6 °C-1, hexagonal form). The difference with the fuel's expansion coefficient is of potential concern with respect to the cohesion of the Cs2MoO4 surface film and the possible release of cesium radionuclides in accidental situations.

  13. Review: Mechanisms of ammonium toxicity and the quest for tolerance.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Raquel; Ariz, Idoia; Cruz, Cristina; Moran, Jose Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Ammonium sensitivity of plants is a worldwide problem, constraining crop production. Prolonged application of ammonium as the sole nitrogen source may result in physiological and morphological disorders that lead to decreased plant growth and toxicity. The main causes of ammonium toxicity/tolerance described until now include high ammonium assimilation by plants and/or low sensitivity to external pH acidification. The various ammonium transport-related components, especially the non-electrogenic influx of NH3 (related to the depletion of (15)N) and the electrogenic influx of NH4(+), may contribute to ammonium accumulation, and therefore to NH3 toxicity. However, this accumulation may be influenced by increasing K(+) concentration in the root medium. Recently, new insights have been provided by "omics" studies, leading to a suggested involvement of GDP mannose-pyrophosphorylase in the response pathways of NH4(+) stress. In this review, we highlight the cross-talk signaling between nitrate, auxins and NO, and the importance of the connection of the plants' urea cycle to metabolism of polyamines. Overall, the tolerance and amelioration of ammonium toxicity are outlined to improve the yield of ammonium-grown plants. This review identifies future directions of research, focusing on the putative importance of aquaporins in ammonium influx, and on genes involved in ammonium sensitivity and tolerance. PMID:27181951

  14. Growth Layers on Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Torgesen, J L; Jackson, R W

    1965-05-14

    Microscopic observations of growth layers and etch pits on ammonium dihydrogen phosphate crystals reveal screw dislocations on the {100} face generating elliptical spirals that change rapidly but reversibly to rectangular shape when chromium-ion impurity is added. The effects of the impurity on crystal habit are judged to be secondary to changes in the morphology of the growth layers. No sources of growth are observed on the {101} faces; the layers spread inward from the edges and at times are mutually annihilating so that, temporarily, no steps are observed. Similar behavior is recorded for the {1011} faces of NaNO(3).

  15. Speciation analysis of tellurium by solid-phase extraction in the presence of ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunhai; Cai, Qiantao; Guo, Zhong-Xian; Yang, Zhaoguang; Khoo, Soo Beng

    2003-05-01

    Under acidic conditions tellurium(IV) formed a complex with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC). The tellurium(IV) complex was completely retained on a non-polar Isolute silica-based octadecyl (C(18)) sorbent-containing solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge, while the uncomplexed Te(VI) passed through the cartridge and remained as a free species in the solution. Only partial Te(IV) was retained on the SPE cartridge for samples without addition of APDC. On the basis of different retention behaviours of the complexed Te(IV) and uncomplexed Te(VI), a simple and highly sensitive method is proposed for the determination of total tellurium and Te(VI) by SPE separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection. The Te(IV) concentration was calculated as the difference between total tellurium and Te(VI) concentrations. The detection limit (3 sigma) is 3 ng L(-1) tellurium. Factors affecting the separation and detection of tellurium species were investigated. Coexisting ions did not show significant interferences with the Te(IV)-APDC complex retention and the subsequent ICP-MS detection of Te. The method has been successfully applied to the tellurium speciation analysis in waters with spiked recoveries for Te(IV) and Te(VI) of 86.0-108% and 87.1-97.4%, respectively.

  16. ETS-VI multibeam satellite communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Makoto; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Ohtomo, Isao

    1989-10-01

    The fixed and mobile satellite communications systems of the Japanese Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI) are described. The system requirements are outlined along with the system configuration. The ETS-VI multibeam system employs three frequency bands. When used for Ka-band fixed communications, it covers the Japanese main islands with thirteen 0.3-degree-wide spot beam. Four of the beams are active for ETS-VI. When used for S-band mobile communications, five beams cover the area within 200 nautical miles from the Japanese coast. The C-band beam for fixed communications covers the central area of the Japanese main islands with a single beam. The onboard antenna system is described along with the transponders and their associated onboard systems. A discussion of the system technology follows, covering the TDMA transmisssion system, the relay function, rainfall compensation, and the antenna and propagation performance.

  17. Rheology of water ices V and VI

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the mechanical strength (??) of pure water ices V and VI under steady state deformation conditions. Constant displacement rate compressional tests were conducted in a gas apparatus at confining pressures from 400 250 K. Ices V and VI are thus Theologically distinct but by coincidence have approximately the same strength under the conditions chosen for these experiments. To avoid misidentification, these tests are therefore accompanied by careful observations of the occurrences and characteristics of phase changes. One sample each of ice V and VI was quenched at pressure to metastably retain the high-pressure phase and the acquired deformation microstructures; X ray diffraction analysis of these samples confirmed the phase identification. Surface replicas of the deformed and quenched samples suggest that ice V probably deforms largely by dislocation creep, while ice VI deforms by a more complicated process involving substantial grain size reduction through recrystallization.

  18. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  3. 19 CFR Annex Vi to Part 351 - Countervailing Investigations Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Countervailing Investigations Timeline VI Annex VI to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VI Annex VI to Part 351—Countervailing Investigations Timeline ER19MY97.000...

  4. 19 CFR Annex Vi to Part 351 - Countervailing Investigations Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Countervailing Investigations Timeline VI Annex VI to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VI Annex VI to Part 351—Countervailing Investigations Timeline ER19MY97.000...

  5. [Achievement of Sulfate-Reducing Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Reactor Started with Nitrate-Reducting Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-chuan; Yuan, Lin-jiang; Zhou, Guo-biao; Li, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The transformation of nitrite-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation to sulfate-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an UASB was performed and the changes in microbial community were studied. The result showed that the sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation process was successfully accomplished after 177 days' operation. The removal rate of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were up to 58. 9% and 15. 7%, the removing load of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were 74. 3 mg.(L.d)-1 and 77. 5 mg.(L.d)-1 while concentration of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate of influent were 130 mg.(L.d)-1 and 500 mg.(L.d)-1, respectively. The lost nitrogen and sulphur was around 2 in molar ratio. The pH value of the effluent was lower than that of the influent. Instead of Candidatus brocadia in nitrite reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation granular sludge, Bacillus benzoevorans became the dominant species in sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation sludge. The dominant bacterium in the two kinds of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process is different. Our results imply that the two anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes are carried out by different kind of bacterium.

  6. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of aqueous cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.K.; Rivera, W.; Smith, J.O.; O`Brien, B.

    1998-09-01

    The rates of oxidation of cyanide with Fe(VI) were measured as a function of pH and temperature. The reaction was found to be first order for each reactant. The rates decrease with increasing pH. The energy of activation was found to be 38.9 {+-} 1.0 kJ mol{sup {minus}1} at pH 9.0. The removal of cyanide by oxidation with Fe(VI) was studied at pH 7.5, 9.0, and 12.0. Fe(VI) removal efficiency was greater at pH 9.0 than at pH 7.5 and 12.0. At pH 9.0, Fe(VI) molar consumption was nearly equal to that of oxidized cyanide. Cyanate and nitrite ions were identified as the products of the reaction at pH 7.5. The experiments indicated 1:1 stoichiometric conversion of cyanide to nitrite ion at pH 9.0 and 12.0. Experiments were conducted to test the Fe(VI) removal efficiency of cyanide in electroplating rinsewater. The results indicate that Fe(VI) has the potential to serve as a reliable and safe oxidative treatment for removing cyanide in wastewater effluent.

  7. Mild ammonium stress increases chlorophyll content in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Zabala, Joseba; González-Murua, Carmen; Marino, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) and ammonium (NH4(+)) are the main forms of nitrogen available in the soil for plants. Excessive NH4(+) accumulation in tissues is toxic for plants and exclusive NH4(+)-based nutrition enhances this effect. Ammonium toxicity syndrome commonly includes growth impairment, ion imbalance and chlorosis among others. In this work, we observed high intraspecific variability in chlorophyll content in 47 Arabidopsis thaliana natural accessions grown under 1 mM NH4(+) or 1 mM NO3(-) as N-source. Interestingly, chlorophyll content increased in every accession upon ammonium nutrition. Moreover, this increase was independent of ammonium tolerance capacity. Thus, chlorosis seems to be an exclusive effect of severe ammonium toxicity while mild ammonium stress induces chlorophyll accumulation.

  8. Utilization of by-product ammonium sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, J.L.

    1992-12-31

    Sulfur is generally referred to as a secondary plant nutrients but it actually ranks in importance with nitrogen and phosphorous in protein synthesis. It is also an integral part of vitamins and enzymes essential to life. Soils in many areas of the world today are deficient in sulfur and soil sulfur reserves are being rapidly depleted. To address growing agronomic needs for sulfur, TVA`s National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) has been committed to development of technologies to produce low-cost sulfur-containing fertilizers since the mid 1970`s. In the late 1970`s and early 1980`s, NFERC developed and demonstrated a 29-0-0-5S urea-ammonium sulfate (UAS) suspension. In 1984, NFERC developed and later patented a new family of nitrogen-sulfur (NS) suspensions to replace the earlier UAS suspension with more versatile, better quality products made by a simpler, more economical process. NFERC`s current endeavors involve development of technologies for successful utilization of low-quality, by-product ammonium sulfate (AS) in the fertilizer industry, which is the subject of this paper. NFERC`s current focus on utilization of by-product AS centers around the economic and environmental aspects of these technologies as the primary rationale for development, since the needs for sulfur in soils is now generally well known and sulfur application is common and now charged for in many areas.

  9. Utilization of by-product ammonium sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur is generally referred to as a secondary plant nutrients but it actually ranks in importance with nitrogen and phosphorous in protein synthesis. It is also an integral part of vitamins and enzymes essential to life. Soils in many areas of the world today are deficient in sulfur and soil sulfur reserves are being rapidly depleted. To address growing agronomic needs for sulfur, TVA's National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) has been committed to development of technologies to produce low-cost sulfur-containing fertilizers since the mid 1970's. In the late 1970's and early 1980's, NFERC developed and demonstrated a 29-0-0-5S urea-ammonium sulfate (UAS) suspension. In 1984, NFERC developed and later patented a new family of nitrogen-sulfur (NS) suspensions to replace the earlier UAS suspension with more versatile, better quality products made by a simpler, more economical process. NFERC's current endeavors involve development of technologies for successful utilization of low-quality, by-product ammonium sulfate (AS) in the fertilizer industry, which is the subject of this paper. NFERC's current focus on utilization of by-product AS centers around the economic and environmental aspects of these technologies as the primary rationale for development, since the needs for sulfur in soils is now generally well known and sulfur application is common and now charged for in many areas.

  10. Ammonium nitrate: a promising rocket propellant oxidizer

    PubMed

    Oommen; Jain

    1999-06-30

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is extensively used in the area of fertilizers and explosives. It is present as the major component in most industrial explosives. Its use as an oxidizer in the area of propellants, however, is not as extensive as in explosive compositions or gas generators. With the growing demand for environmental friendly chlorine free propellants, many attempts have been made of late to investigate oxidizers producing innocuous combustion products. AN, unlike the widely used ammonium perchlorate, produces completely ecofriendly smokeless products. Besides, it is one of the cheapest and easily available compounds. However, its use in large rocket motors is restricted due to some of its adverse characteristics like hygroscopicity, near room temperature phase transformation involving a volume change, and low burning rate (BR) and energetics. The review is an attempt to consolidate the information available on the various issues pertaining to its use as a solid propellant oxidizer. Detailed discussions on the aspects relating to phase modifications, decomposition chemistry, and BR and energetics of AN-based propellants, are presented. To make the review more comprehensive brief descriptions of the history, manufacture, safety, physical and chemical properties and various other applications of the salt are also included. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. Reassimilation of ammonium in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Betti, Marco; García-Calderón, Margarita; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; Credali, Alfredo; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Estivill, Guillermo; Repčák, Miroslav; Vega, José M; Galván, Francisco; Márquez, Antonio J

    2014-10-01

    This review summarizes the most recent results obtained in the analysis of two important metabolic pathways involved in the release of internal sources of ammonium in the model legume Lotus japonicus: photorespiratory metabolism and asparagine breakdown mediated by aparaginase (NSE). The use of photorespiratory mutants deficient in plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) enabled us to investigate the transcriptomics and metabolomic changes associated with photorespiratory ammonium accumulation in this plant. The results obtained indicate the existence of a coordinate regulation of genes involved in photorespiratory metabolism. Other types of evidence illustrate the multiple interconnections existing among the photorespiratory pathway and other processes such as intermediate metabolism, nodule function, and secondary metabolism in this plant, all of which are substantially affected in GS2-deficient mutants because of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Finally, the importance of asparagine metabolism in L. japonicus is highlighted because of the fact that asparagine constitutes the vast majority of the reduced nitrogen translocated between different organs of this plant. The different types of NSE enzymes and genes which are present in L. japonicus are described. There is a particular focus on the most abundant K(+)-dependent LjNSE1 isoform and how TILLING mutants were used to demonstrate by reverse genetics the importance of this particular isoform in plant growth and seed production.

  12. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, H.; Gopi, M.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate. PMID:25484533

  13. Stability and economics of solar ponds using ammonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of ammonium salts in salt gradient solar ponds eliminates the environmental problems associated with NaCl by incorporating the salt discharge from the solar pond into the fertilizer cycle of an agricultural system. An examination of thermophysical properties of several ammonium salts suggests that both ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate can provide hydrodynamic stability equivalent to NaCl. The cost of the fertilizer salt is based on the real interest for holding the fertilizer in inventory. Costs are independent of the rate at which the salt is cycled through the pond, which makes desirable a maintenance scheme that minimizes the thickness of the upper convecting zone.

  14. Evidence for ammonium-bearing minerals in Ceres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, T. V. V.; Clark, R. N.; Calvin, W. M.; Sherman, D. M.; Swayze, G. A.; Brown, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    Evidence for ammonium-bearing minerals was found on the surface of the largest asteroid Ceres. The presence of ammonium-bearing clays suggests that Ceres has experienced a period of alteration by substantial amounts of an ammonium-bearing fluid. The presence of the ammonium-bearing clays does not preclude Ceres maintaining a volatile inventory in the core or in a volatile-rich zone at some distance below the surface. Telescopic observations of Ceres, using the 3.0 meter NASA Infrared telescope facility prompted this reevaluation of its surface mineralogy.

  15. Flow-through Column Experiments and Modeling of Microbially Mediated Cr(VI) Reduction at Hanford 100H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Molins, S.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Steefel, C.; Nico, P. S.; Han, R.

    2010-12-01

    Microbially mediated Cr(VI) reduction at the Hanford 100H area was investigated by flow-through column experiments. Three separate experiments were conducted to promote microbial activities associated with denitrification, iron and sulfate reduction, respectively. Replicate columns packed with natural sediments from the site under anaerobic environment were injected with 5mM Lactate as the electron donor and 5 μM Cr(VI) in all experiments. Sulfate and nitrate solutions were added to act as the main electron acceptors in the respective experiments, while iron columns relied on the indigenous sediment iron (and manganese) oxides as electron acceptors. Column effluent solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS to monitor the microbial consumption/conversion of lactate and the associated Cr(VI) reduction. Biogeochemical reactive transport modeling was performed to gain further insights into the reaction mechanisms and Cr(VI) bioreduction rates. All experimental columns showed a reduction of the injected Cr(VI). Columns under denitrifying conditions showed the least Cr(VI) reduction at early stages (<60 days) compared to columns run under other experimental conditions, but became more active over time, and ultimately showed the most consistent Cr(VI) reduction. A strong correlation between denitrification and Cr(VI) reduction processes was observed and was in agreement with the results obtained in batch experiments with a denitrifying bacterium isolated from the Hanford site. The accumulation of nitrite does not appear to have an adverse effect on Cr(VI) reduction rates. Reactive transport simulations indicated that biomass growth completely depleted influent ammonium, and called for an additional source of N to account for the measured reduction rates. Iron columns were the least active with undetectable consumption of the injected lactate, slowest cell growth, and the smallest change in Cr(VI) concentrations during the course of the experiment. In contrast, columns

  16. Characterization of Amoeba proteus myosin VI immunoanalog.

    PubMed

    Dominik, Magdalena; Kłopocka, Wanda; Pomorski, Paweł; Kocik, Elzbieta; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2005-07-01

    Amoeba proteus, the highly motile free-living unicellular organism, has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion and intracellular actin-based-only trafficking remain poorly understood. A search for myosin motors responsible for vesicular transport in these giant cells resulted in detection of 130-kDa protein interacting with several polyclonal antibodies against different tail regions of human and chicken myosin VI. This protein was binding to actin in the ATP-dependent manner, and immunoprecipitated with anti-myosin VI antibodies. In order to characterize its possible functions in vivo, its cellular distribution and colocalization with actin filaments and dynamin II during migration and pinocytosis were examined. In migrating amoebae, myosin VI immunoanalog localized to vesicular structures, particularly within the perinuclear and sub-plasma membrane areas, and colocalized with dynamin II immunoanalog and actin filaments. The colocalization was even more evident in pinocytotic cells as proteins concentrated within pinocytotic pseudopodia. Moreover, dynamin II and myosin VI immunoanalogs cosedimented with actin filaments, and were found on the same isolated vesicles. Blocking endogenous myosin VI immunoanalog with anti-myosin VI antibodies inhibited the rate of pseudopodia protrusion (about 19% decrease) and uroidal retraction (about 28% decrease) but did not affect cell morphology and the manner of cell migration. Treatment with anti-human dynamin II antibodies led to changes in directionality of amebae migration and affected the rate of only uroidal translocation (about 30% inhibition). These results indicate that myosin VI immunoanalog is expressed in protist Amoeba proteus and may be involved in vesicle translocation and cell locomotion.

  17. Education and Title VI. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office for Civil Rights (ED), Washington, DC.

    The Office for Civil Rights (OCR), in the U.S. Department of Education, is a law enforcement agency charged with enforcing the federal civil rights laws, one of which is Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VI protects people from discrimination based on race, color, or national origin in programs or activities that receive federal…

  18. Origin of “memory glass” effect in pressure-amorphized rare-earth molybdate single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Willinger, Elena; Sinitsyn, Vitaly; Khasanov, Salavat; Redkin, Boris; Shmurak, Semeon; Ponyatovsky, Eugeny

    2015-02-15

    The memory glass effect (MGE) describes the ability of some materials to recover the initial structure and crystallographic orientation after pressure-induced amorphization (PIA). In spite of numerous studies the nature and underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not clear. Here we report investigations of MGE in β′-Eu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} single crystal samples subjected to high pressure amorphization. Using the XRD and TEM techniques we carried out detailed analysis of the structural state of high pressure treated single crystal samples as well as structural transformations due to subsequent annealing at atmospheric pressure. The structure of the sample has been found to be complex, mainly amorphous, however, the amorphous medium contains evenly distributed nanosize inclusions of a paracrystalline phase. The inclusions are highly correlated in orientation and act as “memory units” in the MGE. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of pressure-induced amorphization and “memory glass” effect in rare-earth molybdate single crystals. The XRD and TEM measurements have revealed the presence of the residual identically oriented paracrystalline nanodomains in the pressure-amorphized state. These domains preserve the information about initial structure and orientation of the sample. They act as memory units and crystalline seeds during transformation of the amorphous phase back to the starting single crystalline one. - Highlights: • Pressure-amorphized Eu{sub 2}(MoO4){sub 3} single crystals were studied ex-situ by XRD and TEM. • Tiny residual crystalline inclusions were found in amorphous matrix of sample. • The inclusions keep in memory the parent crystal structure and orientation. • The inclusions account for “memory glass” effect in rare-earth molibdates.

  19. Unsteady growth of ammonium chloride dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, L. M.; Terentiev, P. S.; Soboleva, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Growth of ammonium chloride dendrites from aqueous solution is experimentally investigated. The growth rate υ and the radius ρ of curvature of branches are measured as a function of the relative supersaturation Δ for steady and unsteady growth conditions. It is shown that the experimental results are quantitatively described by the dependences ρ=a/Δ+b, υ=сΔ2, where the factors for primary branches are a=(1.3±0.2)·10-7 m, b=(2.5±0.4)·10-7 m, and c=(2.2±0.3)·10-4 m/s. The factor c is found to be approximately 7 times smaller for the side branches than that for the primary branches.

  20. Unsteady growth of ammonium chloride dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, L. M.; Terentiev, P. S.; Soboleva, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Growth of ammonium chloride dendrites from aqueous solution is experimentally investigated. The growth rate υ and the radius ρ of curvature of branches are measured as a function of the relative supersaturation Δ for steady and unsteady growth conditions. It is shown that the experimental results are quantitatively described by the dependences ρ=a/Δ+b, υ=cΔ2, where the factors for primary branches are a=(1.3±0.2)·10-7 m, b=(2.5±0.4)·10-7 m, and c=(2.2±0.3)·10-4 m/s. The factor c is found to be approximately 7 times smaller for the side branches than that for the primary branches.

  1. Optical properties of trigonal single crystals (Yb,Tm)Al{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} grown from fluxes based on the bismuth and lithium molybdates

    SciTech Connect

    Temerov, V. L. Sokolov, A. E.; Sukhachev, A. L.; Bovina, A. F.; Edel'man, I. S.; Malakhovskii, A. V.

    2008-12-15

    The conditions for synthesis of Yb{sub x}Tm{sub 1-x}Al{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 1.0) single crystals from fluxes based on bismuth trimolybdate Bi{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} and lithium molybdate Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} are investigated. It is proposed to grow them by the group method on seeds. The polarized optical absorption spectra are measured for two mutually orthogonal linear polarizations at temperatures of 100 and 300 K.

  2. Duration of Vi antibodies in participants vaccinated with Typhim Vi (Typhoid Vi polysaccharide vaccine) in an area not endemic for typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Froeschle, James E; Decker, Michael D

    2010-02-10

    After a single injection of Typhim Vi (typhoid Vi polysaccharide vaccine), serum antibody concentrations were monitored for 3 years in 37 adults who resided where typhoid fever was not endemic. Anti-Vi antibody concentrations declined progressively during the study, to levels that support the current US recommendation for revaccination every 2 years.

  3. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... color additive ferric ammonium citrate consists of complex chelates prepared by the interaction...

  4. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... color additive ferric ammonium citrate consists of complex chelates prepared by the interaction...

  5. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... color additive ferric ammonium citrate consists of complex chelates prepared by the interaction...

  6. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... color additive ferric ammonium citrate consists of complex chelates prepared by the interaction...

  7. Hydrothermal oxidation of organic wastes using reclaimed ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Proesmans, P.I.; Luan, L.; Buelow, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate is being studied as an alternative for ammonium perchlorate as an oxidizing agent in Department of Defense 1.1 and 1.3 rocket propellants. Use of ammonium nitrate would eliminate the HCl produced by ammonium perchlorate upon thermal decomposition. To stabilize the ammonium nitrate, which suffers from phase instability, potassium dinitramide (KDN) is added. This increased use of ammonium nitrate will ultimately create a need for environmentally responsible processes to reuse ammonium nitrate extracted from demilitarized rocket motors. Ammonium Nitrate was investigated as an oxidizing agent for methanol, acetic acid and phenol. High removal of organic, ammonia and nitrate was achieved at stoichiometric concentrations. The oxidation of ammonia by nitrate was much faster than the oxidation of either methanol or acetic acid. Phenol, however, was in strong competition with ammonia for the oxidizer (nitrate). Nitrogen products included N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2{sup {minus}}} as well as toxic NO and trace amounts of NO{sub 2}. Carbon products were CO{sub 2}, HCO{sub 3{sup {minus}}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, and CO.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10430 - Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10430 Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tetra...

  9. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl phosphonate...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10430 - Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10430 Tetra alkyl ammonium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tetra...

  11. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl phosphonate...

  12. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl phosphonate...

  13. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl phosphonate...

  14. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165 Section 172.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6070 - Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. 721... Substances § 721.6070 Alkyl phosphonate ammonium salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl phosphonate...

  16. 40 CFR 180.473 - Glufosinate ammonium; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium (butanoic acid, 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl...-propionic acid, expressed as 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)butanoic acid equivalents, in or on the... ammonium, butanoic acid, 2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)-, monoammonium salt and its metabolite,...

  17. THE MASS ACCOMMODATION COEFFICIENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE AEROSOL. (R823514)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mass transfer rate of pure ammonium nitrate between the aerosol and gas phases was
    quantified experimentally by the use of the tandem differential mobility analyzer/scanning mobility
    particle sizer (TDMA/SMPS) technique. Ammonium nitrate particles 80-220 nm in diameter<...

  18. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165 Section 172.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  19. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165 Section 172.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  20. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165 Section 172.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  1. 46 CFR 148.220 - Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. 148.220 Section... § 148.220 Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and... nitrate and containing a maximum of 0.4 percent total added combustible material or containing a...

  2. 46 CFR 148.220 - Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. 148.220 Section... § 148.220 Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and... nitrate and containing a maximum of 0.4 percent total added combustible material or containing a...

  3. 46 CFR 148.220 - Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. 148.220 Section... § 148.220 Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and... nitrate and containing a maximum of 0.4 percent total added combustible material or containing a...

  4. Hybrid organic-inorganic crystals based on ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and ammonium salicylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, A. P.; Salo, V. I.; Puzikov, V. M.; Babenko, G. N.; Roshal, A. D.; Tkachenko, V. F.

    2011-11-01

    ADP-NH 4Sal hybrid crystals are grown from aqueous solutions. The influence of the acidity of the mixed solution on the conditions of co-crystallization of the components is studied. The spectral and scintillation characteristics are determined. Co-crystallization of ammonium salicylate (NH 4Sal) and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP, NH 4H 2PO 4) is shown to be feasible, the structure of the doping addition being defined by the solution рН. In basic and weak acidic media the hybrid crystals ADP:NH 4Sal are formed in which salicylate anions are located in the interplanar space between the {110}-type planes in the lattice of ADP. The luminescence spectra contain an emission band maximum with λ max=360 nm. In acidic solutions there are ADP:HSal crystals in which salicylic acid molecules captured by the growth macrosteps are located in the interplanar space of the prismatic {100} and pyramidal {101} growth sectors. The luminescence band undergoes bathochromic shift to λmax=400 nm. The sensitivity of ADP:NH 4Sal scintillation crystals to fast neutrons depends on the concentration of ammonium salicylate in ADP matrix. The highest neutron sensitivity is characteristic of the co-doped ADP:NH 4Sal/Tl scintillation crystals.

  5. Assimilation of ammonium and nitrate nitrogen by bean plants

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, R.J. ); Chaillou, S.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F. ); Mariotti, A. )

    1989-04-01

    Enhanced growth is often observed in plants growing on combined ammonium and nitrate nutrition. The physiological basis for such enhancement was examined by exposing non-nodulated bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants to {sup 15}N-labeled, 1.0 mM N solutions containing 0, 33, 67 or 100% of the N as ammonium, the balance being nitrate. Maximal total N uptake and biomass production were attained by plants receiving 33% ammonium. A higher proportion of incoming ammonium than nitrate was incorporated into root protein. This was accompanied by increased partitioning of plant biomass to roots. It was concluded that as a consequence of greater N metabolism in the root under mixed ammonium and nitrate nutrition, the root became a more active sink for photosynthate. Concurrently, the augmented supply of N to the shoot enhanced net photosynthesis as reflected in increased plant biomass.

  6. O VI absorption in interstellar cloud surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Jenkins, E. B.; Songaila, A.; York, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The velocity profiles of O VI absorption lines of 24 stars, observed in early Copernicus surveys, have been compared with the line profiles of Si III (1206.51 A) and N II (1083.99 A). The velocity structures of the O VI lines appear to be correlated with those of the material in the lower ionization stages. It is argued that the O VI absorption arises in the coronal gas of the conductive interface between hot gas, responsible for extended, soft X-ray emission, and cooler interstellar clouds. The velocity broadening of both sets of lines is attributed to motions of the cloud surfaces induced by pressure fluctuations in the interstellar medium.

  7. Seroprevalence of anti Vi antibodies and immunogenicity of Typhim Vi vaccine in children.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Divya; Faridi, M M A; Aggarwal, Anju; Kaur, Iqbal

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study was carried out on 250 children between 6 months to 5 years of age to determine seroprevalence of anti Vi antibodies and to measure seroresponse and percent seroconversion to TyphimVi polysaccharide vaccine in children 2-5 years of age. Fifty children each were enrolled between 6 to 12 months of age (Group A), between 1- 2 years of age(Group B), between 2-3 years of age (Group C), between 3-4 years of age (Group D) and between 4-5 years of age (Group E). Anti-Vi antibody baseline titres were determined in all children. Children in Groups C to E were vaccinated with Typhim Vi vaccine. Baseline and postvaccination antibody titres were determined by ELISA. Test sera which had antibody levels >1 microg/ml were scored as seropositive. Of 250 children, 3 had base line anti-Vi antibodies >1 microg/ml. Following immunization overall seroconversion rate was 77.5% with 65.3%, 78.2% and 88% children showing seroconversion in Groups C, D and E respectively. Seroconversion was significantly more in Group E children compared to Group C (p=0.0148). There were no significant adverse reactions following vaccination. The study highlights very low prevalence of baseline anti Vi antibodies in children between 6 months and less than 5 years of age and shows high immunogenicity and safety of Typhim Vi polysaccharide vaccine in children 2-5 years of age.

  8. Diluted Magnetic Iv-Vi Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.; Pascher, H.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * MAGNETIC PROPERTIES * Susceptibility * High Field Magnetization * Spin Glass Phase * Free Carrier Induced Ferromagnetism * Magnetic Properties of Layered IV-VI Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors * CALCULATION OF LANDAU STATES: MEAN FIELD THEORY FOR IV-VI COMPOUNDS * MAGNETOTRANSPORT * OPTICAL INTERBAND TRANSITIONS * Photoluminescence Without Magnetic Field * Magnetooptical Interband Transitions * COHERENT RAMAN SCATTERING * Theory * Classical approach * Nonlinear susceptibility in semiconductors * Experimental Results and Discussion * Results: Pb1-xMnxTe * Results: Pb1-xEuxSe * Effective Electron and Hole g factors * FAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY * COMPARISON EXPERIMENT - MOLECULAR FIELD THEORY * Band and Exchange Parameters * Selection Rules * CONCLUSION * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  9. Changes in hematology, serum biochemistry, and gastrointestinal nematode infection in lambs fed sericea lespedeza with or without dietary sodium molybdate.

    PubMed

    Acharya, M; Burke, J M; Coffey, K P; Kegley, E B; Miller, J E; Huff, G R; Smyth, E; Terrill, T H; Mosjidis, J A; Rosenkrans, C

    2015-04-01

    Sericea lespedeza (SL; Lespedeza cuneata) is a legume rich in condensed tannins that can be grazed or fed to small ruminants for parasite control. Condensed tannins, a secondary plant compound in SL, may lead to unintended consequences such as changes in production. In our preliminary research, there was consistently a reduction in serum and liver concentrations of Mo. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of SL with or without Mo supplementation on changes in BW, hematology, and serum biochemistry in lambs. Thirty ram lambs weaned in May (84 ± 1.5 d of age; 27 ± 1.1 kg) were blocked by BW, breed type (full or three-fourths Katahdin), and EBV of parasite resistance and randomly assigned to be fed 900 g of alfalfa-based supplement (CON; n = 10) or SL-based supplement (n = 20) for 103 d. Supplements were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isocaloric and to meet trace mineral requirements. Within the SL diet, half of the lambs received 490 mg sodium molybdate weekly (SLMO). Body condition scores and BW were determined every 14 d and blood and feces collected to determine hematological and serum biochemical profiles and fecal egg counts (FEC). Data were analyzed using a mixed model with repeated measures and orthogonal contrasts. The white blood cell counts tended to be reduced in SL- and SLMO-fed lambs compared with CON-fed lambs (P < 0.06), which was associated with a reduction in neutrophils (P < 0.001). Red blood cell counts were also reduced in SL but not SLMO lambs compared with CON lambs (P < 0.04). There was a reduction in blood packed cell volume (P < 0.04) and serum concentrations of albumin (P < 0.001) and creatinine (P < 0.02) in both SL and SLMO lambs compared with CON lambs. Similarly, concentrations of blood urea nitrogen were reduced in both SL and SLMO lambs, but differences among dietary treatments disappeared after 42 d of feeding (treatment × day, P < 0.004). Serum concentrations of total proteins were reduced only in SLMO

  10. Changes in concentrations of trace minerals in lambs fed sericea lespedeza leaf meal pellets with or without dietary sodium molybdate.

    PubMed

    Acharya, M; Burke, J M; Coffey, K P; Kegley, E B; Miller, J E; Smyth, E; Welborn, M G; Terrill, T H; Mosjidis, J A; Rosenkrans, C

    2016-04-01

    Prolonged feeding of sericea lespedeza (SL) previously led to reduced serum concentrations of Mo, a cofactor in an enzyme complex that may be involved in weight gain. The current objective was to determine the effect of Mo supplementation on changes in serum, fecal, urine, and liver concentrations of trace minerals in lambs fed SL leaf meal pellets. Thirty ram lambs weaned in May (84 ± 1.5 d of age and 27 ± 1.1 kg; D 0) were blocked by BW, breed type (full or three-fourths Katahdin), and EBV of parasite resistance and randomly assigned to be fed 900 g/d of an alfalfa-based supplement (CON; = 10) or a SL-based supplement ( = 20) for 103 d. Supplements were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isocaloric and to meet trace mineral requirements. Within the SL group, individual lambs were administered either 5 mL water or 5 mL of water with 163.3 mg of sodium molybdate (SLMO). Serum was collected on d 28, 56, and 104; a liver sample was collected by biopsy on d 104 to determine concentrations of trace minerals. Data were analyzed using a mixed model and orthogonal contrasts. Serum concentrations of Mo increased in response to the drench and were greatest in SLMO lambs and then CON lambs and lowest in SL lambs ( < 0.001). Concentrations of Mo in the liver ( < 0.001) were similar between CON and SLMO lambs and were lower in SL lambs than other groups. Serum ( < 0.001) and liver ( = 0.013) concentrations of zinc (Zn) were reduced in both SL and SLMO lambs compared with CON lambs. Serum concentrations of cobalt (Co) increased in CON lambs compared with SL and SLMO lambs between d 0 and 56 but were similar on d 104 (diet × day, < 0.005) as with concentrations in the liver. Serum and liver concentrations of copper (Cu) were greatest ( < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively) in CON lambs followed by SL lambs and then SLMO lambs. Serum concentrations of selenium (Se) tended ( = 0.10) to be reduced in SL lambs compared with CON and SLMO lambs, but concentrations in the liver were

  11. Changes in concentrations of trace minerals in lambs fed sericea lespedeza leaf meal pellets with or without dietary sodium molybdate.

    PubMed

    Acharya, M; Burke, J M; Coffey, K P; Kegley, E B; Miller, J E; Smyth, E; Welborn, M G; Terrill, T H; Mosjidis, J A; Rosenkrans, C

    2016-04-01

    Prolonged feeding of sericea lespedeza (SL) previously led to reduced serum concentrations of Mo, a cofactor in an enzyme complex that may be involved in weight gain. The current objective was to determine the effect of Mo supplementation on changes in serum, fecal, urine, and liver concentrations of trace minerals in lambs fed SL leaf meal pellets. Thirty ram lambs weaned in May (84 ± 1.5 d of age and 27 ± 1.1 kg; D 0) were blocked by BW, breed type (full or three-fourths Katahdin), and EBV of parasite resistance and randomly assigned to be fed 900 g/d of an alfalfa-based supplement (CON; = 10) or a SL-based supplement ( = 20) for 103 d. Supplements were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isocaloric and to meet trace mineral requirements. Within the SL group, individual lambs were administered either 5 mL water or 5 mL of water with 163.3 mg of sodium molybdate (SLMO). Serum was collected on d 28, 56, and 104; a liver sample was collected by biopsy on d 104 to determine concentrations of trace minerals. Data were analyzed using a mixed model and orthogonal contrasts. Serum concentrations of Mo increased in response to the drench and were greatest in SLMO lambs and then CON lambs and lowest in SL lambs ( < 0.001). Concentrations of Mo in the liver ( < 0.001) were similar between CON and SLMO lambs and were lower in SL lambs than other groups. Serum ( < 0.001) and liver ( = 0.013) concentrations of zinc (Zn) were reduced in both SL and SLMO lambs compared with CON lambs. Serum concentrations of cobalt (Co) increased in CON lambs compared with SL and SLMO lambs between d 0 and 56 but were similar on d 104 (diet × day, < 0.005) as with concentrations in the liver. Serum and liver concentrations of copper (Cu) were greatest ( < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively) in CON lambs followed by SL lambs and then SLMO lambs. Serum concentrations of selenium (Se) tended ( = 0.10) to be reduced in SL lambs compared with CON and SLMO lambs, but concentrations in the liver were

  12. Synthesis, electrochemistry, and spectroscopic properties of six-coordinate monooxomolybdenum(VI) complexes containing tridentate Schiff base and bidentate catecholate ligands. Crystal and molecular structure of (N-salicylidene-2-aminophenolato)(naphthalene-2,3-diolato)oxomolybdenum(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, J.U.; Schultz, F.A.; Brennan, T.D.; Scheidt, W.R.

    1988-11-02

    Six-coordinate monooxomolybdenum(VI) complexes, MoO(cat)(Sap), where Sap/sup 2 -/ = the Schiff base dianion N-salicylidene-2-aminophenolate and cat/sup 2 -/ = catecholate Cat/sup 2 -/, naphthalene-2,3-diolate (Naphcat/sup 2 -/), or 3,5-di-tert-butylcatecholate (DTBcat/sup 2 -/), are prepared by reacting the Mo(VI) dimer. (MoO/sub 2/(Sap))/sub 2/, with the appropriate catechol. The products are characterized by cyclic voltammetry, mass spectrometry, and uv/vis, ir, and /sup 95/Mo NMR spectroscopy. The MoO(cat)(Sap) complexes represent the first examples of a mononuclear MoO/sup 4 +/ center with a coordination number of six. The crystal structure of the MoO-(Naphcat)(Sap) derivative is reported, confirming the six-coordinate, distorted octahedrla environment about Mo(VI). Bond angles in the coordination group deviate from the ideal value of 90/degrees/ as a consequence of the ligand bite constraints and because all four O-Mo-O angles involving the terminal oxo ligand are larger than the ideal 90/degrees/ value. MoO(cat)(Sap) complexes undergo reversible one-electronic reduction at -0.5 to -0.7 V versus Fc /sup +/0/ followed by irreversible one-electron reduction at -1.6 to -1.9 V. Reversible MoO/sup 4 +//MoO/sup 3 +/ electrochemistry is attributed to the fact that the Mo d/sub xy/orbital of MoO(cat)(Sap) can be singly occupied upon reduction to Mo(V) without unfavorable interaction with the four bonds in its equatorial plane. This contrasts with the irreversible electrochemical behavior of seven-coordinate MoO/sup 4 +/ complexes, which contain five such bonds. The /sup 95/Mo NMR chemical shift of MoO(Naphcat)(Sap) is +385 ppM versus external molybdate; this value is highly deshielded with respect to seven-coordinate MoO/sup 4 +/ and six-coordinate MoO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ complexes with O and N donors. 35 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  13. Characterization of the Salmonella paratyphi C Vi polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, E M; Schneerson, R; Egan, W M; Szu, S C; Robbins, J B

    1989-01-01

    The Vi capsular polysaccharide (Vi) is both a virulence factor and a protective antigen of Salmonella typhi; its pathogenic role for Salmonella paratyphi C is less well understood. We found no differences between the antigenic and immunogenic properties and the structure of the Vi from representative strains of S. paratyphi C, S. typhi, and Citrobacter freundii. There were, however, differences in both the amount produced per cell and the degree of association with the cell among the Vi from the three species of Enterobacteriaceae. S. paratyphi C produced less Vi than both the wild-type S. typhi and C. freundii did, and it showed the fastest release of Vi into the media. These findings may provide an explanation for the inability of the Vi to inhibit completely the agglutination of S. paratyphi C by anti-O sera. In an outbreak of enteric fever caused by S. paratyphi C, 66 of 78 isolates (85%) were Vi positive. Images PMID:2506132

  14. Population of Nitrifying Bacteria and Nitrification in Ammonium Saturated Clinoptilolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J.

    1999-01-01

    As humans begin to spend longer periods of time in space, plants will be incorporated into life support systems. Ammonium saturated clinoptilolite is one plant growth substrate but a balance between ammonium and nitrate is needed. A laboratory study was conducted to determine effects of nitrifying bacteria on ammonium concentrations and kinetics of nitrification. Columns containing clinoptilolite substrate amended with nitrifying bacteria obtained from soil enrichment were analyzed weekly for a 90 day period. The enrichment culture initially contained 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria and 1 x 10(exp 2) nitrite oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate. Populations of ammonium oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 6) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 3) per gram of substrate. The nitrification rate was approximately 0.25mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Experiments were also conducted to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in a clinoptilolite substrate used to grow wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Seventy days following the initial inoculation with an unknown number of commercial nitrifying bacteria, 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate were present. The number of nitrite oxidizing bacteria was between 1 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) per gram of substrate as measured by the most probable number method. Nitrification rates were approximately 0.20mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Clinoptilolite readily exchanged sufficient concentrations of ammonium to support nitrifying bacteria and they survived well in this medium.

  15. Acclimation and toxicity of high ammonium concentrations to unicellular algae.

    PubMed

    Collos, Yves; Harrison, Paul J

    2014-03-15

    A literature review on the effects of high ammonium concentrations on the growth of 6 classes of microalgae suggests the following rankings. Mean optimal ammonium concentrations were 7600, 2500, 1400, 340, 260, 100 μM for Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae, Prymnesiophyceae, Diatomophyceae, Raphidophyceae, and Dinophyceae respectively and their tolerance to high toxic ammonium levels was 39,000, 13,000, 2300, 3600, 2500, 1200 μM respectively. Field ammonium concentrations <100 μM would not likely reduce the growth rate of most microalgae. Chlorophytes were significantly more tolerant to high ammonium than diatoms, prymnesiophytes, dinoflagellates, and raphidophytes. Cyanophytes were significantly more tolerant than dinoflagellates which were the least tolerant. A smaller but more complete data set was used to estimate ammonium EC₅₀ values, and the ranking was: Chlorophyceae>Cyanophyceae, Dinophyceae, Diatomophyceae, and Raphidophyceae. Ammonia toxicity is mainly attributed to NH₃ at pHs >9 and at pHs <8, toxicity is likely associated with the ammonium ion rather than ammonia. PMID:24533997

  16. Rapid speciation analysis of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Abul; Kumita, Mikio; Michigami, Yoshimasa; Islam, Tajmeri S A; Mori, Shigeru

    2005-02-01

    A simple and rapid method is developed for the simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) based on the formation of their different complexes with ammonium pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (APDC). Separation is performed using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV detection. The conditions for complex formation and speciation are determined, such as solution pH, amount of APDC, temperature, and type of mobile phase. In order to substantially reduce the analysis time, the separation is carried out without extraction of chromium-APDC complexes from the mother liquor. Under the optimum analysis conditions, the chromatograms obtained show good peak separation, and the absolute detection limits (3s) are 2.2 microg/L for Cr(VI) and 4.5 microg/L for Cr(III). The calibration curves are linear from 3 to 5000 microg/L for Cr(VI) and 5 to 3000 microg/L for Cr(III). The relative standard deviations of peak areas in five measurements using a sample solution of 200 microg/L are less than 2% for Cr(VI) and 4% for Cr(III), indicating good reproducibility for this analytical method. Furthermore, simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) is successful with the application of the proposed procedure in the synthetic wastewaters containing common heavy metal ions: Fe(III), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II). PMID:15826369

  17. Combustion of ammonium and hydrazine azides

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelzang, A.E.; Egorshev, V.Y.; Sinditsky, V.P.; Kolesov, B.I. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports that steady-state combustion of ammonium azide (AA) and hydrazne azide (HA) was studied in a window constant-pressure bomb over a pressure range of 0.1-36 MPa. HA burns three to four times faster than AA over the whole pressure range. The temperature distribution in the combustion wave of AA and HA was measured using 5-{mu}m-thick {pi}-shaped tungsten-rhenium tape thermocouples. The combustion temperature of both compounds is 240-430 K higher than the temperature calculated for the thermodynamically equilibrium composition of the combustion products due to the presence of large amounts of ammonia (0.97 and 0.87 mol per AA and HA mole, respectively). The burning surface is formed via dissociation of the salts into hydrazoic acid HN{sub 3} and the parent base. The growth of the surface temperature with pressure is determined by the dissociation enthalpy of the slats. The burning rate of these compounds is determined by heat release in the gas phase.

  18. Quaternary Ammonium Biocides: Efficacy in Application

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are among the most commonly used disinfectants. There has been concern that their widespread use will lead to the development of resistant organisms, and it has been suggested that limits should be place on their use. While increases in tolerance to QACs have been observed, there is no clear evidence to support the development of resistance to QACs. Since efflux pumps are believe to account for at least some of the increased tolerance found in bacteria, there has been concern that this will enhance the resistance of bacteria to certain antibiotics. QACs are membrane-active agents interacting with the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria and lipids of viruses. The wide variety of chemical structures possible has seen an evolution in their effectiveness and expansion of applications over the last century, including non-lipid-containing viruses (i.e., noroviruses). Selection of formulations and methods of application have been shown to affect the efficacy of QACs. While numerous laboratory studies on the efficacy of QACs are available, relatively few studies have been conducted to assess their efficacy in practice. Better standardized tests for assessing and defining the differences between increases in tolerance versus resistance are needed. The ecological dynamics of microbial communities where QACs are a main line of defense against exposure to pathogens need to be better understood in terms of sublethal doses and antibiotic resistance. PMID:25362069

  19. Subcellular localization of ammonium transporters in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Kirsten, Janet H; Xiong, Yanhua; Davis, Carter T; Singleton, Charles K

    2008-01-01

    Background With the exception of vertebrates, most organisms have plasma membrane associated ammonium transporters which primarily serve to import a source of nitrogen for nutritional purposes. Dictyostelium discoideum has three ammonium transporters, Amts A, B and C. Our present work used fluorescent fusion proteins to determine the cellular localization of the Amts and tested the hypothesis that the transporters mediate removal of ammonia generated endogenously from the elevated protein catabolism common to many protists. Results Using RFP and YFP fusion constructs driven by the actin 15 promoter, we found that the three ammonium transporters were localized on the plasma membrane and on the membranes of subcellular organelles. AmtA and AmtB were localized on the membranes of endolysosomes and phagosomes, with AmtB further localized on the membranes of contractile vacuoles. AmtC also was localized on subcellular organelles when it was stabilized by coexpression with either the AmtA or AmtB fusion transporter. The three ammonium transporters exported ammonia linearly with regard to time during the first 18 hours of the developmental program as revealed by reduced export in the null strains. The fluorescently tagged transporters rescued export when expressed in the null strains, and thus they were functional transporters. Conclusion Unlike ammonium transporters in most organisms, which import NH3/NH4+ as a nitrogen source, those of Dictyostelium export ammonia/ammonium as a waste product from extensive catabolism of exogenously derived and endogenous proteins. Localization on proteolytic organelles and on the neutral contractile vacuole suggests that Dictyostelium ammonium transporters may have unique subcellular functions and play a role in the maintenance of intracellular ammonium distribution. A lack of correlation between the null strain phenotypes and ammonia excretion properties of the ammonium transporters suggests that it is not the excretion function that

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and compounds in construction, except: (2) Exposures that occur in the application of pesticides... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and compounds in construction, except: (2) Exposures that occur in the application of pesticides... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... that occur in the application of pesticides regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency or another... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that occur in the application of pesticides regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency or another... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide...

  4. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    PubMed

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26997541

  5. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    PubMed

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... efficient in removing mono-dispersed particles of 0.3 micrometers in diameter or larger. Historical... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... (VI) from protective clothing and equipment by blowing, shaking, or any other means that...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... efficient in removing mono-dispersed particles of 0.3 micrometers in diameter or larger. Historical... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... (VI) from protective clothing and equipment by blowing, shaking, or any other means that...

  8. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this section... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this section... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  11. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this section... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chromium (VI); any history of respiratory system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin... them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of paragraph (f) of this... achieve compliance with the PEL. (f) Respiratory protection—(1) General. Where respiratory protection...

  14. [A case of ammonium urate urinary stones with anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Komori, K; Arai, H; Gotoh, T; Imazu, T; Honda, M; Fujioka, H

    2000-09-01

    A 27-year-old woman had been suffering from bulimia and habitual vomiting for about 7 years and was incidentally found to have right renal stones by computed tomography. She was referred to our hospital for the treatment of these caluculi. On admission, she presented with hypokalemia, hypochloremia and metabolic alkalosis and was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa. Following successful removal by percutaneous nephrolithotripsy and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy the stones were found to consist of pure ammonium urate. Since the urine of an anorexia nervosa patient tends to be rich in uric acid and ammonium, anorexia nervosa seems to be associated with ammonium urate urinary stones.

  15. Aerosol isotopic ammonium signatures over the remote Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. T.; Jickells, T. D.; Baker, A. R.; Marca, A.; Johnson, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    We report aerosol ammonium 15N signatures for samples collected from research cruises on the South Atlantic and Caribbean using a new high sensitivity method. We confirm a pattern of isotopic signals from generally light (δ15N -5 to -10‰), for aerosols with very low (<2 nmol m-3) ammonium concentrations from the remote high latitude ocean, to generally heavier values (δ15N +5 to +10‰), for aerosols collected in temperate and tropical latitudes and with higher ammonium concentrations (>2 nmol m-3). We discuss whether this reflects a mixing of aerosols from two end-members (polluted continental and remote marine emissions), or isotopic fractionation during aerosol transport.

  16. Antimicrobial Polymeric Materials with Quaternary Ammonium and Phosphonium Salts

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Huining; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric materials containing quaternary ammonium and/or phosphonium salts have been extensively studied and applied to a variety of antimicrobial-relevant areas. With various architectures, polymeric quaternary ammonium/phosphonium salts were prepared using different approaches, exhibiting different antimicrobial activities and potential applications. This review focuses on the state of the art of antimicrobial polymers with quaternary ammonium/phosphonium salts. In particular, it discusses the structure and synthesis method, mechanisms of antimicrobial action, and the comparison of antimicrobial performance between these two kinds of polymers. PMID:25667977

  17. 40 CFR Appendixes Vi-Vii to Part 600 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false VI Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600...

  18. 40 CFR Appendixes Vi-Vii to Part 600 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false VI Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600...

  19. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ensure compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; 49 CFR part 21; and related statutes and... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND...

  20. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ensure compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; 49 CFR part 21; and related statutes and... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND...

  1. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ensure compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; 49 CFR part 21; and related statutes and... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND...

  2. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ensure compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; 49 CFR part 21; and related statutes and... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND...

  3. Electro-enhanced hollow fiber membrane liquid phase microextraction of Cr(VI) oxoanions in drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Chanthasakda, Nattaporn; Nitiyanontakit, Sira; Varanusupakul, Pakorn

    2016-02-01

    Hollow fiber membrane liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) of metal oxoanions was studied using an ionic carrier enhanced by the application of an electric field (electro-enhanced HF-LPME). The Cr(VI) oxoanion was used as the model. The transportation of Cr(VI) oxoanions across the supported liquid membrane (SLM) was explored via the ion-exchange process and electrokinetic migration. The type of SLM, type of acceptor solution, extraction time, electric potential, and stirring rate were investigated and optimized using MilliQ water. Electro-enhanced HF-LPME provided a much higher enrichment factor compared to conventional HF-LPME (no electric potential) for the same extraction time. A mixture of an anion exchange carrier (methyltrialkyl-ammonium chloride, Aliquat 336) in the SLM facilitated the transportation of Cr(VI) oxoanions. The SLM that gave the best performance was 1-heptanol mixed with 5% Aliquat 336 with 1M NaOH as the acceptor. Linearity was obtained in the working range of 3-15 µg L(-1) Cr(VI) (R(2)>0.99) at 30 V with a 5 min extraction time. The limit of detection was below 5 µg L(-1). The relative standard deviation was less than 12%. The method was applied to drinking water samples. The recoveries of spiked Cr(VI) in drinking water samples were in the range of 96-101% based on the matrix-matched calibration curves. The method was limited to samples containing low levels of ions due to the occurrence of electrolysis. The type of SLM, particularly regarding its resistance, should be tuned to control this problematic phenomenon. PMID:26653501

  4. U(VI) reduction to mononuclear U(VI) by desulfitobacterium spp.

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, K. E.; Boyanov, M. I.; Thomas, S. H.; Wu, Q.; Kemner, K. M.; Loffler, F. E.

    2010-06-15

    The bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) affects uranium mobility and fate in contaminated subsurface environments and is best understood in Gram-negative model organisms such as Geobacter and Shewanella spp. This study demonstrates that U(VI) reduction is a common trait of Gram-positive Desulfitobacterium spp. Five different Desulfitobacterium isolates reduced 100 {mu}M U(VI) to U(IV) in <10 days, whereas U(VI) remained soluble in abiotic and heat-killed controls. U(VI) reduction in live cultures was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis. Interestingly, although bioreduction of U(VI) is almost always reported to yield the uraninite mineral (UO{sub 2}), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in the Desulfitobacterium cultures was not UO{sub 2}. The EXAFS data indicated that the U(IV) product was a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms closely surrounded by light element shells. This atomic arrangement likely results from inner-sphere bonds between U(IV) and C/N/O- or P/S-containing ligands, such as carbonate or phosphate. The formation of a distinct U(IV) phase warrants further study because the characteristics of the reduced material affect uranium stability and fate in the contaminated subsurface.

  5. ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-12-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given.

  6. Methods to Stabilize and Destabilize Ammonium Borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Thomas K.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Bowden, Mark E.; Besenbacher, Fleming; Jensen, Torben R.; Autrey, Thomas

    2013-01-21

    Ammonium borohydride, NH4BH4, has a high hydrogen content of ρm = 24.5 wt% H2 and releases 18 wt% H2 below T = 160 °C. However, the half-life of bulk NH4BH4 at ambient temperatures, ~6 h, is insufficient for practical applications. The decomposition of NH4BH4 (ABH2) was studied at variable hydrogen and argon back pressures to investigate possible pressure mediated stabilization effects. The hydrogen release rate from solid ABH2 at ambient temperatures is reduced by ~16 % upon increasing the hydrogen back pressure from 5 to 54 bar. Similar results were obtained using argon pressure and the observed stabilization may be explained by a positive volume of activation in the transition state leading to hydrogen release. Nanoconfinement in mesoporous silica, MCM-41, was investigated as alternative means to stabilize NH4BH4. However, other factors appear to significantly destabilize NH4BH4 and it rapidly decomposes at ambient temperatures into [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] (DADB) in accordance with the bulk reaction scheme. The hydrogen desorption kinetics from nanoconfined [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] is moderately enhanced as evidenced by a reduction in the DSC decomposition peak temperature of ΔT = -13 °C as compared to the bulk material. Finally, we note a surprising result, storage of DADB at temperature < -30 °C transformed, reversibly, the [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] into a new low temperature polymorph as revealed by both XRD and solid state MAS 11B MAS NMR. TA & AK are thankful for support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. A portion of the research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle.

  7. Formation of urea and guanidine by irradiation of ammonium cyanide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.

    1972-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of ammonium cyanide yield urea, cyanamide and guanidine when exposed to sunlight or an unfiltered 254 nm ultraviolet source. The prebiotic significance of these results is discussed.

  8. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... color additive ferric ammonium citrate consists of complex chelates prepared by the interaction of ferric hydroxide with citric acid in the presence of ammonia. The complex chelates occur in brown...

  9. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  10. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  12. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  13. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  14. Direct esterification of ammonium salts of carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, Yuval

    2003-06-24

    A non-catalytic process for producing esters, the process comprising reacting an ammonium salt of a carboxylic acid with an alcohol and removing ammonia from the reaction mixture. Selectivities for the desired ester product can exceed 95 percent.

  15. Seasonal patterns of ammonium regeneration from size-fractionated microheterotrophs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguer, Jean-François; L'Helguen, Stéphane; Madec, Christian; Le Corre, Pierre

    1999-11-01

    Ammonium regeneration by size-fractionated plankton was measured for 1 year at a coastal station in the shallow well-mixed waters of the western English Channel. Rates of ammonium regeneration in the <200 μm fraction varied from 0.6 to 27 nmol N l -1 h -1. On the seasonal scale, these rates were relatively low (<7 nmol N l -1 h -1) in autumn and winter, increased steadily from March to attain a maximum (27 nmol N l -1 h -1) at the end of May and thereafter decreased steadily to the seasonal minimum in December. This pattern is distinctly different from that observed in deep well-mixed waters where the peak ammonium regeneration occurs in summer (Le Corre et al., 1996, Journal of Plankton Research, 18, 355-370). Total ammonium regenerated in a year by the microheterotrophs was 15 g N m -2, equivalent to about 60% of the total nitrogen uptake. Microplankton (200-15 μm) accounted for about 50% of the regeneration measured between early spring and late summer. Percent contribution of nanoplankton to total ammonium regeneration varied considerably between the seasons, from very high (83-88%) levels in winter to very low (2-13%) levels in summer. Contribution by picoplankton (<1 μm) was high (20-45%) in summer but was less than 20% in other seasons. Ammonium regeneration in micro- and nanoplankton fractions was mainly associated with ciliates and in the picoplankton fraction with bacteria. Macrozooplankton dynamics appears to regulate ammonium regeneration by ciliates and bacteria. Low macrozooplankton biomass in spring may favour a high growth of ciliates and an associated high in ammonium regeneration. In summer, the increase in macrozooplankton may exert a grazing pressure on ciliates. This, coupled with the fact that most of the flagellates are autotrophs, would, in turn, lower the grazing pressure on the bacteria, thus favouring their development and increasing the importance of their role in ammonium regeneration. This situation, where the macrozooplankton

  16. Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Ammonium Perchlorate and of an Ammonium-Perchlorate-Based Composite Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H2O, O2, Cl2, N2O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200(micro) diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20(micro) diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH3 + HClO4 followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  17. The thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate and of an ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-03-24

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200{micro} diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20{micro} diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH{sub 3} + HClO{sub 4} followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  18. Thermal storage in ammonium alum/ammonium nitrate eutectic for solar space heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jotshi, C.K.; Hsieh, C.K.; Goswami, D.Y.; Klausner, J.F.; Srinivasan, N.

    1998-02-01

    Ammonium alum and ammonium nitrate in the weight ratio of 1:1 form a eutectic that melts at 53 C and solidifies at 48 C. The thermophysical properties of this eutectic were measured in detail and the eutectic was found to have properties desirable for energy storage for solar space heating applications. The eutectic was encapsulated in 0.0254-m diameter high-density polyethylene (HDPE) balls and packed into a cylindrical bed in a scale model for testing its heat transfer characteristics when exposed to an air flow. Test results indicate that the thermal extraction efficiency of the model was 89% with an uncertainty of {+-} 8.0%. The packed bed had a Stanton number value in close agreement with that predicted with an empirical equation for sensible heat extraction from the eutectic in the solid phase. This Stanton number was increased by about 74% for sensible heat extraction from the eutectic in the liquid phase, a phenomenon not previously reported in the literature.

  19. Thermal storage in ammonium alum/ammonium nitrate eutectic for solar space heating

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, D.Y.; Jotshi, C.K.; Klausner, J.F.; Hsieh, C.K.; Srinivasan, N.

    1995-10-01

    Ammonium alum and ammonium nitrate in the weight ratio of 1:1 forms a eutectic that melts at 53 C and crystallizes at 48 C. The latent heat of fusion of this eutectic was found to be 215 kJ/kg. Its enthalpy as measured by drop calorimetry was found to be 287 kJ/kg in the temperature range of 24--65 C, which is 1.67 times greater than water (172.2 kJ/kg) and 8.75 times greater than rock (32.8 kJ/kg). Upon several heating/cooling cycles, phase separation was observed. However, by adding 5% attapulgite clay to this eutectic mixture, phase separation was prevented. This eutectic was encapsulated in 0.0254m diameter HDPE hollow balls and subjected to about 1,100 heating/cooling cycles in the temperature range between 25 and 65 C. At the end of these cycles, the decrease in enthalpy was found to be 5%. A scale model of the heat storage unit was fabricated to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of this eutectic encapsulated in HDPE balls. The thermal extraction efficiency of the system was measured with the recirculation of hot air during charging and was found to be in the range of 85--98%.

  20. Heterogeneous reactivity of chlorine atoms with ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate particles.

    PubMed

    Ciuraru, Raluca; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2012-04-01

    In this laboratory study, model particles of ammonium sulfate (AS) and ammonium nitrate (AN) were exposed to chlorine atoms and uptake experiments were performed in a coated wall flow tube reactor coupled to a molecular beam mass spectrometer. The reactive surfaces were prepared by coating the inner surface of the reactor using two different methods: either by depositing size-selected particles on the halocarbon wax or by spray depositing thin films using a constant output atomizer. The observed uptake coefficients vary for (NH(4))(2)SO(4), ranging from γ(Cl)(AS)≈ 1 × 10(-3) for size-selected particles to γ(Cl)(AS)≈ 6 × 10(-2) for thin films prepared by spray. An uptake coefficient of γ(Cl)(AN)≈ 2.5 × 10(-3) of Cl˙ on size-selected NH(4)NO(3) particles was measured. A heterogeneous recombination of Cl atoms to from Cl(2) molecules was observed for the two surfaces. Furthermore, an ageing process was observed for AS particles, this phenomenon leading to the formation of new chlorine species on the solid substrate. PMID:22374517

  1. Stoichiometric analysis of ammonium nitrate and ammonium perchlorate with nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhar, S.; Rao, S. Venugopal; Kiran, P. Prem; Tewari, Surya P.; Kumar, G. Manoj

    2010-04-01

    We present our results on the stoichiometric analysis of ammonium nitrate (AN) and ammonium Perchlorate (AP) studied using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with nanosecond pulses. The LIBS spectra collected for AP and AN, without any gating and using a high resolution spectrometer, exhibited characteristic lines corresponding to O, N, H, C, and K. The Oxygen line at 777.38 nm and three Nitrogen lines (N1, N2, N3) at 742.54 nm, 744.64 nm, 747.12 nm were used for evaluating the Oxygen/Nitrogen ratios. The intensities were calculated using area under the peaks and normalized to their respective transition probabilities and statistical weights. The O/N1 ratios estimated from the LIBS spectra were ~4.94 and ~5.11 for AP and O/N3 ratios were ~1.64 and ~1.47 for AN obtained from two independent measurements. The intensity ratios show good agreement with the actual stoichiometric ratios - four for AP and one for AN.

  2. Safety assessment of ammonium hectorites as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2013-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 4 ammonium hectorite compounds used in cosmetics: disteardimonium hectorite, dihydrogenated tallow benzylmonium hectorite, stearalkonium hectorite, and quaternium-18 hectorite. These ingredients function in cosmetics mainly as nonsurfactant suspending agents. The Panel reviewed available animal and human data and concluded that these ammonium hectorite compounds were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.

  3. Removal of ammonium from municipal landfill leachate using natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhihong; Wang, Jiawen; Sun, Lingyu; Zhang, Daobin; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Ammonium ion-exchange performance of the natural zeolite was investigated in both batch and column studies. The effects of zeolite dosage, contact time, stirring speed and pH on ammonium removal were investigated in batch experiments. The result showed that ammonium removal efficiency increased with an increase in zeolite dosage from 25 to 150 g/L, and an increase in stirring speed from 200 to 250 r/min. But further increase in zeolite dosage and stirring speed would result in an unpronounced increase of ammonium removal. The optimal pH for the removal of ammonium was found as 7.1. In the column studies, the effect of flow rate was investigated, and the total ammonium removal percentage during 180 min operation time decreased with the flow rate though the ion-exchange capacity varied to a very small extent with the flow rate ranging from 4 to 9 mL/min. The spent zeolite was regenerated by sodium chloride solution and the ammonia removal capacity of zeolite changed little or even increased after three regeneration cycles.

  4. Removal of ammonium from municipal landfill leachate using natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhihong; Wang, Jiawen; Sun, Lingyu; Zhang, Daobin; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Ammonium ion-exchange performance of the natural zeolite was investigated in both batch and column studies. The effects of zeolite dosage, contact time, stirring speed and pH on ammonium removal were investigated in batch experiments. The result showed that ammonium removal efficiency increased with an increase in zeolite dosage from 25 to 150 g/L, and an increase in stirring speed from 200 to 250 r/min. But further increase in zeolite dosage and stirring speed would result in an unpronounced increase of ammonium removal. The optimal pH for the removal of ammonium was found as 7.1. In the column studies, the effect of flow rate was investigated, and the total ammonium removal percentage during 180 min operation time decreased with the flow rate though the ion-exchange capacity varied to a very small extent with the flow rate ranging from 4 to 9 mL/min. The spent zeolite was regenerated by sodium chloride solution and the ammonia removal capacity of zeolite changed little or even increased after three regeneration cycles. PMID:26510611

  5. Final Technical Report -- GEO-VI - USGEO

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Leonard

    2009-11-30

    Representatives of US earth observations departments and agencies, other participating governments, NGOs and civil society participated in the Sixth Plenary Meeting of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO-VI), hosted by the United States in Washington, DC on November 17 and 18, 2009. The meeting was held in the Atrium Ballroom of the Ronald Reagan International Trade Center. Exhibitions of international Earth observation technology and programs were held concurrently in the same venue. A number of GEO committee meetings and side events were held in conjunction with the GEO-VI Plenary, including the GEO-IGOS Symposium on Earth observation science and applications, the GEOSS in the Americas Forum on Coastal Zones, and separate meetings of the GEO Communities of Practice on Carbon, Health, and Air Quality.

  6. Diagnostic and treatment strategies in mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    PubMed Central

    Vairo, Filippo; Federhen, Andressa; Baldo, Guilherme; Riegel, Mariluce; Burin, Maira; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, which lead to deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme ASB. This enzyme is important for the breakdown of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, which accumulate in body tissues and organs of MPS VI patients. The storage of GAGs (especially dermatan sulfate) causes bone dysplasia, joint restriction, organomegaly, heart disease, and corneal clouding, among several other problems, and reduced life span. Despite the fact that most cases are severe, there is a spectrum of severity and some cases are so attenuated that diagnosis is made late in life. Although the analysis of urinary GAGs and/or the measurement of enzyme activity in dried blood spots are useful screening methods, the diagnosis is based in the demonstration of the enzyme deficiency in leucocytes or fibroblasts, and/or in the identification of pathogenic mutations in the ARSB gene. Specific treatment with enzyme replacement has been available since 2005. It is safe and effective, bringing measurable benefits and increased survival to patients. As several evidences indicate that early initiation of therapy may lead to a better outcome, newborn screening is being considered for this condition, and it is already in place in selected areas where the incidence of MPS VI is increased. However, as enzyme replacement therapy is not curative, associated therapies should be considered, and research on innovative therapies continues. The management of affected patients by a multidisciplinary team with experience in MPS diseases is highly recommended. PMID:26586959

  7. 40 CFR 418.40 - Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ammonium nitrate subcategory. 418.40 Section 418.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Ammonium Nitrate Subcategory § 418.40 Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of ammonium...

  8. 40 CFR 418.40 - Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ammonium nitrate subcategory. 418.40 Section 418.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Ammonium Nitrate Subcategory § 418.40 Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of ammonium...

  9. 40 CFR 418.40 - Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ammonium nitrate subcategory. 418.40 Section 418.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Ammonium Nitrate Subcategory § 418.40 Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of ammonium...

  10. 40 CFR 418.40 - Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ammonium nitrate subcategory. 418.40 Section 418.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Ammonium Nitrate Subcategory § 418.40 Applicability; description of the ammonium nitrate subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of ammonium...

  11. Interaction of uranyl molybdate with the Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}-Na{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 4} melt

    SciTech Connect

    Smolenskii, V.V.; Bove, A.L.; Martem`yanova, Z.S.

    1994-06-01

    Behavior of uranyl molybdate in molten Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}-Na{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7} salt mixture at 1073 K in air was studied using cyclic linear voltammetry and potentiometric titration techniques. Uranyl complexes of two types ([UO{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup 2{minus}} and UO{sub 3}MoO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) were shown to be formed in the solution upon the addition of UO{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}. The composition of a cathodic product was found to be determined by the molar ratio of these two complexes in the melt.

  12. PAPERS DEVOTED TO THE 90TH ANNIVERSARY OF A.M.PROKHOROV: Lasing properties of selectively pumped Raman-active Nd3+-doped molybdate and tungstate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Doroshenko, Maxim E.; Ivleva, Lyudmila I.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Kosmyna, M. B.; Komar', V. K.; Sulc, J.; Jelinkova, H.

    2006-08-01

    The lasing efficiency of Nd3+ ions is studied in laser materials capable of self-Raman frequency conversion. The lasing properties of tungstate and molybdate crystals with the scheelite structure (SrWO4, BaWO4, PbWO4, SrMoO4, PbMoO4) activated with neodymium ions are investigated upon longitudinal pumping by a 750-nm alexandrite laser or a 800-nm diode laser. The slope lasing efficiency obtained for a Nd3+:PbMoO4 laser emitting at 1054 nm is 54.3% for the total lasing efficiency of 46%, which is the best result for all the crystals with the scheelite structure studied so far. The simultaneous Q-switched lasing and self-Raman frequency conversion were demonstrated in neodymium-doped SrWO4, PbWO4, and BaWO4 crystals.

  13. EPR spectroscopy of MolB2C2-a reveals mechanism of transport for a bacterial type II molybdate importer.

    PubMed

    Rice, Austin J; Alvarez, Frances J D; Schultz, Kathryn M; Klug, Candice S; Davidson, Amy L; Pinkett, Heather W

    2013-07-19

    In bacteria, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are vital for the uptake of nutrients and cofactors. Based on differences in structure and activity, ABC importers are divided into two types. Type I transporters have been well studied and employ a tightly regulated alternating access mechanism. Less is known about Type II importers, but much of what we do know has been observed in studies of the vitamin B12 importer BtuC2D2. MolB2C2 (formally known as HI1470/71) is also a Type II importer, but its substrate, molybdate, is ∼10-fold smaller than vitamin B12. To understand mechanistic differences among Type II importers, we focused our studies on MolBC, for which alternative conformations may be required to transport its relatively small substrate. To investigate the mechanism of MolBC, we employed disulfide cross-linking and EPR spectroscopy. From these studies, we found that nucleotide binding is coupled to a conformational shift at the periplasmic gate. Unlike the larger conformational changes in BtuCD-F, this shift in MolBC-A is akin to unlocking a swinging door: allowing just enough space for molybdate to slip into the cell. The lower cytoplasmic gate, identified in BtuCD-F as "gate I," remains open throughout the MolBC-A mechanism, and cytoplasmic gate II closes in the presence of nucleotide. Combining our results, we propose a peristaltic mechanism for MolBC-A, which gives new insight in the transport of small substrates by a Type II importer.

  14. EPR Spectroscopy of MolB2C2-A Reveals Mechanism of Transport for a Bacterial Type II Molybdate Importer*♦

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Austin J.; Alvarez, Frances J. D.; Schultz, Kathryn M.; Klug, Candice S.; Davidson, Amy L.; Pinkett, Heather W.

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are vital for the uptake of nutrients and cofactors. Based on differences in structure and activity, ABC importers are divided into two types. Type I transporters have been well studied and employ a tightly regulated alternating access mechanism. Less is known about Type II importers, but much of what we do know has been observed in studies of the vitamin B12 importer BtuC2D2. MolB2C2 (formally known as HI1470/71) is also a Type II importer, but its substrate, molybdate, is ∼10-fold smaller than vitamin B12. To understand mechanistic differences among Type II importers, we focused our studies on MolBC, for which alternative conformations may be required to transport its relatively small substrate. To investigate the mechanism of MolBC, we employed disulfide cross-linking and EPR spectroscopy. From these studies, we found that nucleotide binding is coupled to a conformational shift at the periplasmic gate. Unlike the larger conformational changes in BtuCD-F, this shift in MolBC-A is akin to unlocking a swinging door: allowing just enough space for molybdate to slip into the cell. The lower cytoplasmic gate, identified in BtuCD-F as “gate I,” remains open throughout the MolBC-A mechanism, and cytoplasmic gate II closes in the presence of nucleotide. Combining our results, we propose a peristaltic mechanism for MolBC-A, which gives new insight in the transport of small substrates by a Type II importer. PMID:23709218

  15. The carburization of transition metal molybdates (MxMoO₄, M= Cu, Ni or Co) and the generation of highly active metal/carbide catalysts for CO₂ hydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Xu, Wenqian; Ramirez, Pedro J.; Stachiola, Dario; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2015-05-06

    A new approach has been tested for the preparation of metal/Mo₂C catalysts using mixed-metal oxide molybdates as precursors. Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study the reduction and carburization processes of Cu₃(MoO₄)₂(OH)₂, a-NiMoO₄ and CoMoO₄•nH₂O by thermal treatment under mixtures of hydrogen and methane. In all cases, the final product was β-Mo₂C and a metal phase (Cu, Ni, or Co), but the transition sequence varied with the different metals, and it could be related to the reduction potential of the Cu²⁺, Ni²⁺ and Co²⁺ cations inside each molybdate. The synthesized Cu/Mo₂C, Ni/Mo₂C and Co/Mo₂C catalysts were highlymore » active for the hydrogenation of CO₂. The metal/Mo₂C systems exhibited large variations in the selectivity towards methanol, methane and CnH₂n₊₂ (n > 2) hydrocarbons depending on the nature of the supported metal and its ability to cleave C-O bonds. Cu/Mo₂C displayed a high selectivity for CO and methanol production. Ni/Mo₂C and Co/Mo₂C were the most active catalysts for the activation and full decomposition of CO₂, showing high selectivity for the production of methane (Ni case) and CnH₂n₊₂ (n > 2) hydrocarbons (Co case).« less

  16. The carburization of transition metal molybdates (MxMoO₄, M= Cu, Ni or Co) and the generation of highly active metal/carbide catalysts for CO₂ hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Xu, Wenqian; Ramirez, Pedro J.; Stachiola, Dario; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2015-05-06

    A new approach has been tested for the preparation of metal/Mo₂C catalysts using mixed-metal oxide molybdates as precursors. Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study the reduction and carburization processes of Cu₃(MoO₄)₂(OH)₂, a-NiMoO₄ and CoMoO₄•nH₂O by thermal treatment under mixtures of hydrogen and methane. In all cases, the final product was β-Mo₂C and a metal phase (Cu, Ni, or Co), but the transition sequence varied with the different metals, and it could be related to the reduction potential of the Cu²⁺, Ni²⁺ and Co²⁺ cations inside each molybdate. The synthesized Cu/Mo₂C, Ni/Mo₂C and Co/Mo₂C catalysts were highly active for the hydrogenation of CO₂. The metal/Mo₂C systems exhibited large variations in the selectivity towards methanol, methane and CnH₂n₊₂ (n > 2) hydrocarbons depending on the nature of the supported metal and its ability to cleave C-O bonds. Cu/Mo₂C displayed a high selectivity for CO and methanol production. Ni/Mo₂C and Co/Mo₂C were the most active catalysts for the activation and full decomposition of CO₂, showing high selectivity for the production of methane (Ni case) and CnH₂n₊₂ (n > 2) hydrocarbons (Co case).

  17. Synthesis, structural and spectroscopic properties of acentric triple molybdate Cs{sub 2}NaBi(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, A.A.; Atuchin, V.V.; Solodovnikov, S.F.; Solodovnikova, Z.A.; Krylov, A.S.; Maximovskiy, E.A.; Molokeev, M.S.; Oreshonkov, A.S; Pugachev, A.M.; and others

    2015-05-15

    New ternary molybdate Cs{sub 2}NaBi(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} is synthesized in the system Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}–Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}–Bi{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3}. The structure of Cs{sub 2}NaBi(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} of a new type is determined in noncentrosymmetric space group R3c, a=10.6435(2), c=40.9524(7) Å, V=4017.71(13) Å{sup 3}, Z=12 in anisotropic approximation for all atoms taking into account racemic twinning. The structure is completely ordered, Mo atoms are tetrahedrally coordinated, Bi(1) and Bi(2) atoms are in octahedra, and Na(1) and Na(2) atoms have a distorted trigonal prismatic coordination. The Cs(1) and Cs(2) atoms are in the framework cavities with coordination numbers 12 and 10, respectively. No phase transitions were found in Cs{sub 2}NaBi(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} up to the melting point at 826 K. The compound shows an SHG signal, I{sub 2w}/I{sub 2w}(SiO{sub 2})=5 estimated by the powder method. The vibrational properties are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, and 26 narrow lines are measured. - Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of Cs{sub 2}NaBi(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} is defined. • The molybdate Cs{sub 2}NaBi(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} is stable up to melting point at 826 K. • Vibrational properties of Cs{sub 2}NaBi(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Early metabolic effects and mechanism of ammonium transport in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, A.; Pardo, J.P.; Ramirez, J.

    1987-03-01

    Studies were performed to define the effects and mechanism of NH+4 transport in yeast. The following results were obtained. Glucose was a better facilitator than ethanol-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ for ammonium transport; low concentrations of uncouplers or respiratory inhibitors could inhibit the transport with ethanol as the substrate. With glucose, respiratory inhibitors showed only small inhibitory effects, and only high concentrations of azide or trifluoromethoxy carbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone could inhibit ammonium transport. Ammonium in the free state could be concentrated approximately 200-fold by the cells. Also, the addition of ammonium produced stimulation of both respiration and fermentation; an increased rate of H+ extrusion and an alkalinization of the interior of the cell; a decrease of the membrane potential, as monitored by fluorescent cyanine; an immediate decrease of the levels of ATP and an increase of ADP, which may account for the stimulation of both fermentation and respiration; and an increase of the levels of inorganic phosphate. Ammonium was found to inhibit 86Rb+ transport much less than K+. Also, while K+ produced a competitive type of inhibition, that produced by NH4+ was of the noncompetitive type. From the distribution ratio of ammonium and the pH gradient, an electrochemical potential gradient of around -180 mV was calculated. The results indicate that ammonium is transported in yeast by a mechanism similar to that of monovalent alkaline cations, driven by a membrane potential. The immediate metabolic effects of this cation seem to be due to an increased (H+)ATPase, to which its transport is coupled. However, the carriers seem to be different. The transport system studied in this work was that of low affinity.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and thermal study of Rbsbnd U(IV)sbnd Mosbnd O and Rbsbnd U(VI)sbnd Mosbnd O systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskar, Meera; Sali, S. K.; Krishnan, K.; Kannan, S.

    2016-09-01

    Four novel rubidium uranium (IV) molybdate compounds, Rb4U5(MoO4)12, Rb2U(MoO4)3, Rb4U(MoO4)4 and Rb8U(MoO4)6 have been prepared by solid state route, reacting Rb2MoO4, UMoO5 and MoO3 in desired molar proportions in evacuated sealed quartz ampoules at 823 K and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis techniques. Thermal stability of the compounds was determined in helium atmosphere and oxidation behavior was studied in air using Thermogravimetric (TG) technique. The sub-solidus phase relations in Rbsbnd U(VI)sbnd Mosbnd O system were determined at 873 K in air. A pseudo-ternary phase diagram of Rb2Osbnd UO3sbnd MoO3 system was drawn on the basis of phase analysis of various phase mixtures prepared in Rbsbnd Usbnd Mosbnd O system and phase fields were established by powder X-ray diffraction. Rb2UMo2O10, Rb6UMo4O18 and Rb2U2Mo3O16 were identified during phase diagram study. Melting and thermal stability of these compounds were determined using differential thermal analysis (DTA) technique.

  20. Development of Vi conjugate - a new generation of typhoid vaccine.

    PubMed

    Szu, Shousun Chen

    2013-11-01

    Typhoid fever remains to be a serious disease burden worldwide with an estimated annual incidence about 20 million. The licensed vaccines showed moderate protections and have multiple deficiencies. Most important of all, none of the licensed typhoid vaccines demonstrated protection for children under 5 years old. These limitations impeded successful implementation of typhoid vaccination programs. To improve immunogenicity Vi was conjugated to rEPA, a recombinant exoprotein A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Vi-rEPA showed higher and longer lasting anti-Vi IgG in adults and children than Vi alone in high endemic areas. In school-age children and adults, the immunity persisted more than 8 years. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled and randomized efficacy trial in 2- to 5-year-old children, Vi-rEPA conferred 89% protective efficacy against typhoid fever and the protection lasted at least 4 years. When given concomitantly with infant routine vaccines, Vi-rEPA was safe, immunogenic and showed no interference with the routine vaccines. Vi conjugate vaccine was also attempted and successfully demonstrated by several other laboratories and manufactures. Using either rEPA or different carrier proteins, such as diphtheria or tetanus toxoid, recombinant diphtheria toxin (CRM197), the Vi conjugates synthesized was significantly more immunogenic than Vi alone. Recently, two Vi-tetanus toxoid conjugates were licensed in India for all ages, starts as young as 3 month old. This new generation of typhoid vaccine opens up a new era for typhoid prevention and elimination.

  1. Survey of O VI absorption in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A.; Pradhan, A. C.; Sujatha, N. V.; Murthy, J.

    2011-04-01

    We present a survey of interstellar O VI absorption in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) towards 70 lines of sight based on Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations. The survey covers O VI absorption in a large number of objects in different environmental conditions of the LMC. Overall, a high abundance of O VI is present in active and inactive regions of the LMC with mean log N(O VI) = 14.23 atoms cm-2. There is no correlation observed between O VI absorption and emissions from the hot gas (X-ray surface brightness) or the warm gas (Hα surface brightness). O VI absorption in the LMC is patchy and the properties are similar to that of the Milky Way (MW). In comparison to the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), O VI is lower in abundance even though SMC has a lower metallicity compared to the LMC and the MW. We present observations in 10 superbubbles of the LMC of which we detect O VI absorption in five superbubbles for the first time and the superbubbles show an excess O VI absorption of about 40 per cent compared to non-superbubble lines of sight. We have also studied the properties of O VI absorption in the 30 Doradus region. Even though O VI does not show any correlation with X-ray emission for the LMC, a good correlation between log N(O VI) and X-ray surface brightness for 30 Doradus region is present. We also find that O VI abundance decreases with increasing distance from the star cluster R136.

  2. Few-layer III-VI and IV-VI 2D semiconductor transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Liu, Mei; Kumar, Rajesh; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang C.; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Gao, Xuan

    Since the discovery of atomically thin graphene, a large variety of exfoliable 2D materials have been thoroughly explored for their exotic transport behavior and promises in technological breakthroughs. While most attention on 2D materials beyond graphene is focused on transition metal-dichalcogenides, relatively less attention is paid to layered III-VI and IV-VI semiconductors such as InSe, SnSe etc which bear stronger potential as 2D materials with high electron mobility or thermoelectric figure of merit. We will discuss our recent work on few-layer InSe 2D field effect transistors which exhibit carrier mobility approaching 1000 cm2/Vs and ON-OFF ratio exceeding 107 at room temperature. In addition, the fabrication and device performance of transistors made of mechanically exfoliated multilayer IV-VI semiconductor SnSe and SnSe2 will be discussed.

  3. Structural investigation of tetraperoxo complexes of Mo(VI) and W(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Grzywa, M.; Lasocha, W.; Rutkowska-Zbik, D.

    2009-04-15

    The family of very unstable tetraperoxo compounds has been prepared from aqueous solutions containing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and salts of Mo(VI) or W(VI). The crystal structures of Na{sub 2}[Mo(O{sub 2}){sub 4}].4H{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}[W(O{sub 2}){sub 4}].4H{sub 2}O have been determined from single-crystal data, while the crystal structures of Rb{sub 2}[Mo(O{sub 2}){sub 4}], Cs{sub 2}[Mo(O{sub 2}){sub 4}], Rb{sub 2}[W(O{sub 2}){sub 4}] and Cs{sub 2}[W(O{sub 2}){sub 4}] have been determined from powder X-ray diffraction data. The compounds were also characterised by IR spectroscopy and the number of peroxo groups was determined by titration methods. By means of the density functional theory (DFT) method, the geometry and stability of tetraperoxo complexes have been studied. Even though in all tetraperoxo complexes the central atom Mo(VI), W(VI) or V(V) is surrounded by four peroxo groups and the geometry of the [Me(O{sub 2}){sub 4}]{sup n-} anion is essentially the same, the investigated compounds differ in stability and colour and crystallise in different crystallographic systems. - Graphical abstract: The family of tetraperoxo compounds of Mo(VI) or W(VI) have been obtained. Its crystal structures from single-crystal and from powder X-ray diffraction data have been determined. The compounds were characterised by IR spectroscopy and analytical methods. By means of the density functional theory (DFT) method, the geometry and stability of tetraperoxo complexes have been studied.

  4. Role of anions and reaction conditions in the preparation of uranium(VI), neptunium(VI), and plutonium(VI) borates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuao; Villa, Eric M; Diwu, Juan; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2011-03-21

    U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) borates with the formula AnO(2)[B(8)O(11)(OH)(4)] (An = U, Np, Pu) have been prepared via the reactions of U(VI) nitrate, Np(VI) perchlorate, or Pu(IV) or Pu(VI) nitrate with molten boric acid. These compounds are all isotypic and consist of a linear actinyl(VI) cation, AnO(2)(2+), surrounded by BO(3) triangles and BO(4) tetrahedra to create an AnO(8) hexagonal bipyramidal environment. The actinyl bond lengths are consistent with actinide contraction across this series. The borate anions bridge between actinyl units to create sheets. Additional BO(3) triangles and BO(4) tetrahedra extend from the polyborate layers and connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional chiral framework structure. UV-vis-NIR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the hexavalent oxidation state in all three compounds. Bond-valence parameters are developed for Np(VI).

  5. Role of Anions and Reaction Conditions in the Preparation of Uranium(VI), Neptunium(VI), and Plutonium(VI) Borates

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-02-03

    U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) borates with the formula AnO2[B8O11(OH)4] (An = U, Np, Pu) have been prepared via the reactions of U(VI) nitrate, Np(VI) perchlorate, or Pu(IV) or Pu(VI) nitrate with molten boric acid. These compounds are all isotypic and consist of a linear actinyl(VI) cation, AnO22+, surrounded by BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedra to create an AnO8 hexagonal bipyramidal environment. The actinyl bond lengths are consistent with actinide contraction across this series. The borate anions bridge between actinyl units to create sheets. Additional BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedra extend from the polyborate layers and connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional chiral framework structure. UV-vis-NIR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the hexavalent oxidation state in all three compounds. Bond-valence parameters are developed for Np(VI).

  6. A maritime pine antimicrobial peptide involved in ammonium nutrition.

    PubMed

    Canales, Javier; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2011-09-01

    A large family of small cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is involved in the innate defence of plants against pathogens. Recently, it has been shown that AMPs may also play important roles in plant growth and development. In previous work, we have identified a gene of the AMP β-barrelin family that was differentially regulated in the roots of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) in response to changes in ammonium nutrition. Here, we present the molecular characterization of two AMP genes, PpAMP1 and PpAMP2, showing different molecular structure and physicochemical properties. PpAMP1 and PpAMP2 displayed different expression patterns in maritime pine seedlings and adult trees. Furthermore, our expression analyses indicate that PpAMP1 is the major form of AMP in the tree, and its relative abundance is regulated by ammonium availability. In contrast, PpAMP2 is expressed at much lower levels and it is not regulated by ammonium. To gain new insights into the function of PpAMP1, we over-expressed the recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and demonstrated that PpAMP1 strongly inhibited yeast growth, indicating that it exhibits antimicrobial activity. We have also found that PpAMP1 alters ammonium uptake, suggesting that it is involved in the regulation of ammonium ion flux into pine roots.

  7. Simultaneous removal of ammonium and suspended solids in multipurpose filters.

    PubMed

    Alkas, Deniz; Baykal, Bilsen Beler; Kinaci, Cumali

    2012-06-01

    A multipurpose filter in which sand and clinoptilolite are used together as filter material is suggested for the simultaneous removal of suspended solids and ammonium in one single unit. The capacity of the clinoptilolite used was determined as 10.4 mg/g for 20 mg/l initial ammonium concentration. In addition, a packed column ion exchanger with clinoptilolite and a classical sand filter were also investigated for comparison. Ammonium and suspended solids removal rates were observed and compared for all columns. The results of the column analysis have revealed that the ammonium removal rate, which was only 20% in the sand column, was increased to 100% by replacing 50% of the sand with clinoptilolite; similarly, the suspended solids removal, which was only 17% in the clinoptilolite column, was increased to 75% by replacing 50% of the clinoptilolite with sand. As such, when ion exchange and filtration processes were carried out in a multipurpose column, high removals for both parameters could be obtained simultaneously. Multipurpose columns could be an alternative both for the upgrading of existing treatment plants or for new plants for simultaneous removal of ammonium and suspended solids, giving considerable savings in terms of land requirements.

  8. Modeling of alkyl quaternary ammonium cations intercalated into montmorillonite lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, El Mehdi; Boughaleb, Yahia; El Gaini, Layla; Meghea, Irina; Bakasse, Mina

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► The modification of montmorillonites by three surfactants increases the basal spacing. ► The model proposed show a bilayer conformation for the surfactant ODTMA. ► The DODMA and TOMA surfactants adopt a paraffin type arrangement. ► Behavior of surfactants in interlayer space was confirmed by TGA and ATR analysis. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to study the conformation of the quaternary ammonium cations viz., octadecyl trimethyl ammonium (ODTMA), dioctadecyl dimethyl ammonium (DMDOA) and trioctadecyl methyl ammonium (TOMA) intercalated within montmorillonite. The modified montmorillonite was characterized by X-ray diffraction in small angle (SAXS), thermal analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy of attenuated total reflection (ATR). The modification of organophilic montmorillonites by the three surfactants ODTMA, DMDOA and TOMA increases the basal spacing from their respective intercalated distances of 1.9 nm, 2.6 nm and 3.4 nm respectively. The increase in the spacing due to the basic organic modification was confirmed by the results of thermal analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy (ATR), and also supported by theoretical calculations of longitudinal and transversal chain sizes of these alkyl quaternary ammonium cations.

  9. Prevalence of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tara A; Xing, Yangping; Lazenby, Brent; Lynch, Michael D J; Schiff, Sherry; Robertson, William D; Timlin, Robert; Lanza, Sadia; Ryan, M Cathryn; Aravena, Ramon; Fortin, Danielle; Clark, Ian D; Neufeld, Josh D

    2011-09-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria perform an important step in the global nitrogen cycle: anaerobic oxidation of ammonium and reduction of nitrite to form dinitrogen gas (N(2)). Anammox organisms appear to be widely distributed in natural and artificial environments. However, their roles in groundwater ammonium attenuation remain unclear and only limited biomarker-based data confirmed their presence prior to this study. We used complementary molecular and isotope-based methods to assess anammox diversity and activity occurring at three ammonium-contaminated groundwater sites: quantitative PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and (15)N-tracer incubations. Here we show that anammox performing organisms were abundant bacterial community members. Although all sites were dominated by Candidatus Brocadia-like sequences, the community at one site was particularly diverse, possessing four of five known genera of anammox bacteria. Isotope data showed that anammox produced up to 18 and 36% of N(2) at these sites. By combining molecular and isotopic results we have demonstrated the diversity, abundance, and activity of these autotrophic bacteria. Our results provide strong evidence for their important biogeochemical role in attenuating groundwater ammonium contamination.

  10. Loss of Fine Particle Ammonium from Denuded Nylon Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Taehyoung; Ayres, Benjamin; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2006-08-01

    Ammonium is an important constituent of fine particulate mass in the atmosphere, but can be difficult to quantify due to possible sampling artifacts. Losses of semivolatile species such as NH4NO3 can be particularly problematic. In order to evaluate ammonium losses from aerosol particles collected on filters, a series of field experiments was conducted using denuded nylon and Teflon filters at Bondville, Illinois (February 2003), San Gorgonio, California (April 2003 and July 2004), Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (May, 2003), Brigantine, New Jersey (November 2003), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP), Tennessee (July–August 2004). Samples were collected over 24-hr periods. Losses from denuded nylon filters ranged from 10% (monthly average) in Bondville, Illinois to 28% in San Gorgonio, California in summer. Losses on individual sample days ranged from 1% to 65%. Losses tended to increase with increasing diurnal temperature and relative humidity changes and with the fraction of ambient total N(--III) (particulate NH4+ plus gaseous NH3) present as gaseous NH3. The amount of ammonium lost at most sites could be explained by the amount of NH4NO3 present in the sampled aerosol. Ammonium losses at Great Smoky Mountains NP, however, significantly exceeded the amount of NH4NO3 collected. Ammoniated organic salts are suggested as additional important contributors to observed ammonium loss at this location.

  11. oxidation of americium(iii) and the stability of americium(iv) and americium(vi) in solutions of sulfuric and perchloric acids

    SciTech Connect

    Milyukova, M.S.; Litvina, M.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-07-01

    The oxidation of weighable amounts of americium in solutionsof sulfuric and perchloric acids was investigated by a spectrophotometric method. The stability of americium(IV) and (VI) in mineral acids was studied. A method was developed for the production of tetravalent americium in solutions of 0.1-3 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and 0.1-1 M HClO/sub 4/, containing potassium phosphotungstate K/sub 10/P/sub 2/W/sub 17/O/sub 61/ an an oxidizing mixture - a silver salt and ammonium persulfate.

  12. Remediation of Cr(VI) in solution using vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Xu, Xin-hua; He, Ping

    2005-06-01

    The effectiveness of vitamin C in treating Cr(VI)-contaminated water is being evaluated. Cr(VI) is an identified pollutant of some soils and groundwater. Vitamin C, an important biological reductant in humans and animals, can be used to transform Cr(VI) to essentially nontoxic Cr(III). The removal efficiency was 89% when the mass concentration of vitamin C was 80 mg/L in 60 min, and nearly 100% Cr(VI) was removed when the mass concentration was 100 mg/L. Our data demonstrated that the removal efficiency was affected by vitamin C concentration, the reaction temperature and the dissolved oxygen concentration. The reaction mechanism of Cr(VI) by vitamin C was presented. Our study opens the way to use vitamin C to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soils and groundwater.

  13. Ultratrace Determination of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) by Microsample Injection System Flame Atomic Spectroscopy in Drinking Water and Treated and Untreated Industrial Effluents

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Elci, Latif; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Khan, Muhammad Irfan; Naseer, Hafiz Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Simple and robust analytical procedures were developed for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and lead (Pb(II)) by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) using microsample injection system coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (MIS-FAAS). For the current study, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol were used as chelating agent, extraction solvent, and disperser solvent, respectively. The effective variables of developed method have been optimized and studied in detail. The limit of detection of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) were 0.037 and 0.054 µg/L, respectively. The enrichment factors in both cases were 400 with 40 mL of initial volumes. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 6) were <4%. The applicability and the accuracy of DLLME were estimated by the analysis of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) in industrial effluent wastewater by standard addition method (recoveries >96%). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) at ultratrace levels in natural drinking water and industrial effluents wastewater of Denizli. Moreover, the proposed method was compared with the literature reported method. PMID:24163779

  14. Ultrasound-assisted cloud point extraction for speciation and indirect spectrophotometric determination of chromium(III) and (VI) in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Mahdi; Daryanavard, Seyed Mosayeb

    Ultrasound-assisted cloud point extraction (UACPE) procedure was developed for speciation and indirect spectrophotometric determination of chromium(III) and (VI) in environmental water samples. The method is based on the reduction of Cr(VI) by iodide in acidic media and subsequently formation of I3- anion. The I3- formed can further react with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and induce its clouding due to formation of an ion-association complex. The formed complex was separated from solution and dissolved in ethanol for spectrophotometric measurement. Cerium(IV) ammonium sulphate was chosen as an oxidizing reagent for pre-oxidation step of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) species before the addition of iodide to the system, up to chromium in trivalent can be determined by the procedure. Experimental parameters for both spectrophotometric reaction and extraction procedure have been optimized. Under optimized conditions Cr(VI) can be determined in the range 20-400 ng mL-1 (R2 = 0.999). Detection limit, preconcentration factor and relative standard deviation were 12 ng mL-1, 20.0 and 2.2% (n = 5), respectively with 10 mL sample volumes. The proposed method has been successfully applied for determination of chromium(V) in spiked water, synthetic seawater and electroplating wastewater samples with average recoveries of 100.1, 99.4 and 99.1%, respectively.

  15. Effect of temperature on ammonium removal in Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Martínez, A; Serralta, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2015-09-01

    The effect of temperature on microalgal ammonium uptake was investigated by carrying out four batch experiments in which a mixed culture of microalgae, composed mainly of Scenedesmus sp., was cultivated under different temperatures within the usual temperature working range in Mediterranean climate (15-34 °C). Ammonium removal rates increased with temperature up to 26 °C and stabilized thereafter. Ratkowsky and Cardinal temperatures models successfully reproduced the experimental data. Optimum (31.3 °C), minimum (8.8 °C) and maximum (46.1 °C) temperatures for ammonium removal by Scenedesmus sp. under the studied conditions were obtained as model parameters. These temperature-related parameters constitute very useful information for designing and operating wastewater treatment systems using these microalgae.

  16. Exposure to common quaternary ammonium disinfectants decreases fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Melin, Vanessa E; Potineni, Haritha; Hunt, Patricia; Griswold, Jodi; Siems, Bill; Werre, Stephen R; Hrubec, Terry C

    2014-12-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are antimicrobial disinfectants commonly used in commercial and household settings. Extensive use of QACs results in ubiquitous human exposure, yet reproductive toxicity has not been evaluated. Decreased reproductive performance in laboratory mice coincided with the introduction of a disinfectant containing both alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (ADBAC) and didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC). QACs were detected in caging material over a period of several months following cessation of disinfectant use. Breeding pairs exposed for six months to a QAC disinfectant exhibited decreases in fertility and fecundity: increased time to first litter, longer pregnancy intervals, fewer pups per litter and fewer pregnancies. Significant morbidity in near term dams was also observed. In summary, exposure to a common QAC disinfectant mixture significantly impaired reproductive health in mice. This study illustrates the importance of assessing mixture toxicity of commonly used products whose components have only been evaluated individually.

  17. Exposure to common quaternary ammonium disinfectants decreases fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Vanessa E.; Potineni, Haritha; Hunt, Patricia; Griswold, Jodi; Siems, Bill; Werre, Stephen R.; Hrubec, Terry C.

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are antimicrobial disinfectants commonly used in commercial and household settings. Extensive use of QACs results in ubiquitous human exposure, yet reproductive toxicity has not been evaluated. Decreased reproductive performance in laboratory mice coincided with the introduction of a disinfectant containing both alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (ADBAC) and didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC). QACs were detected in caging material over a period of several months following cessation of disinfectant use. Breeding pairs exposed for six months to a QAC disinfectant exhibited decreases in fertility and fecundity: increased time to first litter, longer pregnancy intervals, fewer pups per litter and fewer pregnancies. Significant morbidity in near term dams was also observed. In summary, exposure to a common QAC disinfectant mixture significantly impaired reproductive health in mice. This study illustrates the importance of assessing mixture toxicity of commonly used products whose components have only been evaluated individually. PMID:25483128

  18. [The biological activity of quaternary ammonium salts (QASs)].

    PubMed

    Obłak, Ewa; Gamian, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts (QASs), especially those of cationic surfactant character, are applied as antibacterial and antifungal disinfectants. QASs affect lipid-enveloped viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), but not non-enveloped viruses. These compounds are extensively used in domestic (as ingredients of shampoos, hair conditioners), agricultural (as fungicides, pesticides, insecticides), healthcare (as medications), and industrial applications (as biocides, fabric softeners, corrosion inhibitors). The extensive use of quaternary ammonium disinfectants in recent years has led to the development of resistance in microorganisms to these drugs. Thus Staphylococcus aureus strains contain the plasmid-carrying genes qacA and qacB encoding resistance to quaternary ammonium compounds and acriflavine. The membrane proteins QacA and QacB confer multidrug resistance by exporting the compound by the proton motive force which is generated by the transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. PMID:20400784

  19. Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Mother-Liquid Radiochemical Production - 13089

    SciTech Connect

    Zherebtsov, Alexander; Dvoeglazov, Konstantine; Volk, Vladimir; Zagumenov, Vladimir; Zverev, Dmitriy; Tinin, Vasiliy; Kozyrev, Anatoly; Shamin, Dladimir; Tvilenev, Konstantin

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the work is to develop a basic technology of decomposition of ammonium nitrate stock solutions produced in radiochemical enterprises engaged in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel and fabrication of fresh fuel. It was necessary to work out how to conduct a one-step thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, select and test the catalysts for this process and to prepare proposals for recycling condensation. Necessary accessories were added to a laboratory equipment installation decomposition of ammonium nitrate. It is tested several types of reducing agents and two types of catalyst to neutralize the nitrogen oxides. It is conducted testing of modes of the process to produce condensation, suitable for use in the conversion of a new technological scheme of production. It is studied the structure of the catalysts before and after their use in a laboratory setting. It is tested the selected catalyst in the optimal range for 48 hours of continuous operation. (authors)

  20. Ammonium as a sustainable proton shuttle in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; Law, Yingyu; Cheng, Ka Yu

    2011-10-01

    This work examines a pH control method using ammonium (NH(4)(+)) as a sustainable proton shuttle in a CEM-equipped BES. Current generation was sustained by adding NH(3) or ammonium hydroxide (NH(4)OH) to the anolyte, controlling its pH at 7. Ammonium ion migration maintained the catholyte pH at approximately 9.25. Such NH(4)(+)/NH(3) migration accounted for 90±10% of the ionic flux in the BES. Reintroducing the volatilized NH(3) from the cathode into the anolyte maintained a suitable anolyte pH for sustained microbial-driven current generation. Hence, NH(4)(+)/NH(3) acted as a proton shuttle that is not consumed in the process.

  1. Aerosol isotopic ammonium signatures over the remote Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. T.; Jickells, T. D.; Baker, A. R.; Marca, A.; Johnson, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    We report aerosol ammonium 15N signatures for samples collected from research cruises on the South Atlantic and Caribbean using a new high sensitivity method. We confirm a pattern of isotopic signals from generally light (δ15N -5 to -10‰), for aerosols with very low (<2  nmol m-3) ammonium concentrations from the remote high latitude ocean, to generally heavier values (δ15N +5 to +10‰), for aerosols collected in temperate and tropical latitudes and with higher ammonium concentrations (>2  nmol m-3). We discuss whether this reflects a mixing of aerosols from two end-members (polluted continental and remote marine emissions), or isotopic fractionation during aerosol transport.

  2. Crystal structure of octa­kis­(N,N-di­methyl­formamide-κO)europium(III) tetra­cosa-μ2-oxido-dodeca­oxido-μ12-phosphato-dodeca­molybdate(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Ghandour, Yassine; Hammami, Imen; Najmudin, Shabir; Bonifácio, Cecilia; Belkhiria, Mohamed Salah

    2016-01-01

    In the title salt, [Eu(C3H7NO)8][PMo12O40], the asymmetric unit comprises one α-Keggin-type [PMo12O40]3− polyoxidometalate anion and one distorted dodeca­hedral [Eu(C3H7NO)8]3+ complex cation. In the crystal, the isolated polyoxidometalate anions are packed into hexa­gonally arranged rows extending parallel to [001]. The complex cations are situated between the rows and are linked to the neighbouring anions through weak C—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions, leading to the formation of a three-dimensional network structure. PMID:27375861

  3. Crystal structure of octa-kis-(N,N-di-methyl-formamide-κO)europium(III) tetra-cosa-μ2-oxido-dodeca-oxido-μ12-phosphato-dodeca-molybdate(VI).

    PubMed

    Ghandour, Yassine; Hammami, Imen; Najmudin, Shabir; Bonifácio, Cecilia; Belkhiria, Mohamed Salah

    2016-04-01

    In the title salt, [Eu(C3H7NO)8][PMo12O40], the asymmetric unit comprises one α-Keggin-type [PMo12O40](3-) polyoxidometalate anion and one distorted dodeca-hedral [Eu(C3H7NO)8](3+) complex cation. In the crystal, the isolated polyoxidometalate anions are packed into hexa-gonally arranged rows extending parallel to [001]. The complex cations are situated between the rows and are linked to the neighbouring anions through weak C-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter-actions, leading to the formation of a three-dimensional network structure. PMID:27375861

  4. Steady state growth of E. Coli in low ammonium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsu; Deris, Barret; Zhang, Zhongge; Hwa, Terry

    2011-03-01

    Ammonium is the preferred nitrogen source for many microorganisms. In medium with low ammonium concentrations, enteric bacteria turn on the nitrogen responsive (ntr) genes to assimilate ammonium. Two proteins in E. coli, Glutamine synthetase (GS) and the Ammonium/methylammonium transporter AmtB play crucial roles in this regard. GS is the major ammonium assimilation enzyme below 1mM of NH4 + . AmtB is an inner membrane protein that transports NH4 + across the cell membrane against a concentration gradient. In order to study ammonium uptake at low NH4 + concentration at neutral pH, we developed a microfluidic flow chamber that maintains a homogenous nutrient environment during the course of exponential cell growth, even at very low concentration of nutrients. Cell growth can be accurately monitored using time-lapse microscopy. We followed steady state growth down to micro-molar range of NH4 + for the wild type and Δ amtB strains. The wild type strain is able to maintain the growth rate from 10mM down to a few uM of NH4 + , while the mutant exhibited reduced growth below ~ 20 ~uM of NH4 + . Simultaneous characterization of the expression levels of GS and AmtB using fluorescence reporters reveals that AmtB is turned on already at 1mM, but contributes to function only below ~ 30 ~uM in the wild-type. Down to ~ 20 ~uM of NH4 + , E.~coli can compensate the loss of AmtB by GS alone.

  5. Air quality VI details environmental progress

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-31

    A report is given of the International Conference on Air Quality VI where key topics discussed were control of mercury, trace elements, sulphur trioxide and particulates. This year a separate track was added on greenhouse gas reduction, with panels on greenhouse gas policy and markets, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, and monitoring, mitigation and verification. In keynote remarks, NETL Director Carl Bauer noted that emissions have gone down since 1990 even though coal consumption has increased. The conference provided an overview of the state-of-the-science regarding key pollutants and CO{sub 2}, the corresponding regulatory environment, and the technology readiness of mitigation techniques. 1 photo.

  6. Collagen VI enhances cartilage tissue generation by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Lai, Janice H; Goodman, Stuart B; Dragoo, Jason L; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-02-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient. Current cell-based approaches for cartilage repair, including autologous chondrocytes, are limited by the paucity of cells, associated donor site morbidity, and generation of functionally inferior fibrocartilage rather than articular cartilage. Upon investigating the role of collagen VI (Col VI), a major component of the chondrocyte pericellular matrix (PCM), we observe that soluble Col VI stimulates chondrocyte proliferation. Interestingly, both adult and osteoarthritis chondrocytes respond to soluble Col VI in a similar manner. The proliferative effect is, however, strictly due to the soluble Col VI as no proliferation is observed upon exposure of chondrocytes to immobilized Col VI. Upon short Col VI treatment in 2D monolayer culture, chondrocytes maintain high expression of characteristic chondrocyte markers like Col2a1, agc, and Sox9 whereas the expression of the fibrocartilage marker Collagen I (Col I) and of the hypertrophy marker Collagen X (Col X) is minimal. Additionally, Col VI-expanded chondrocytes show a similar potential to untreated chondrocytes in engineering cartilage in 3D biomimetic hydrogel constructs. Our study has, therefore, identified soluble Col VI as a biologic that can be useful for the expansion and utilization of scarce sources of chondrocytes, potentially for autologous chondrocyte implantation. Additionally, our results underscore the importance of further investigating the changes in chondrocyte PCM with age and disease and the subsequent effects on chondrocyte growth and function.

  7. Extractive removal of chromium (VI) from industrial waste solution.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Archana; Pal, Chandana; Sahu, K K

    2008-11-30

    Extractive removal of Cr (VI) was carried out from chloride solutions using cyanex 923 mixed with kerosene. The efficiency of this extractant was studied under various experimental conditions, such as concentration of different mineral acids in the aqueous phase, concentration of cyanex 923 and Cr (VI) present in the initial aqueous feed, temperature and time of extraction, organic to aqueous (O/A) phase ratio. Percentage Cr (VI) extraction decreases with the increase in temperature at varying concentration of cyanex 923. The interference of the impurities usually associated with Cr (VI) such as Cr (III), Cu, Ni, Fe (II), Zn, Chloride and sulphate, etc., were examined under the optimized conditions and only Zn was found to interfere. Under the optimum experimental conditions 98.6-99.9% of Cr (VI) was extracted in 3-5 min at O/A of 2 with the initial feed concentration of 1g/L of Cr (VI). The extracted Cr (VI) was quantitatively stripped with 1M NaOH and the organic phase obtained after the stripping of Cr (VI) was washed with dilute HCl solution to neutralize any NaOH trapped/adhered to the solvent and then with distilled water. This regenerated solvent was reused in succeeding extraction of chromium (VI). Finally a few experiments were performed with the synthetic effluent from an electroplating industry.

  8. Mutagenic activity of quaternary ammonium salt derivatives of carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Karol; Woziwodzka, Anna; Piosik, Jacek; Podgórska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Summary This paper presents a study on a series of quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) derivatives of glucopyranosides with an elongated hydrophobic hydrocarbon chain. The new N-[6-(β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)hexyl]ammonium bromides and their O-acetyl derivatives were analyzed via 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The mutagenic activity of the newly synthesized QAS was investigated using two different techniques: The Vibrio harveyi luminescence assay and the Ames test. The obtained results support previous findings contesting QAS safety and indicate that QAS, specifically pyridinium derivatives, might be mutagenic. PMID:27559394

  9. Treatment of nevus comedonicus with ammonium lactate lotion.

    PubMed

    Milton, G P; DiGiovanna, J J; Peck, G L

    1989-02-01

    A patient with an extensive nevus comedonicus, which is associated frequently with the development of large inflammatory cysts and abscesses within the nevus, responded dramatically within 1 month to a once-daily application of 12% ammonium lactate lotion. A marked beneficial effect on the comedonal component of the nevus was noted. One inflammatory cyst has developed in an area left untreated by the patient, but none have occurred in treated areas since therapy with ammonium lactate lotion was begun. Previous treatments, which were either ineffective or of minimal effectiveness, included oral isotretinoin, topical tretinoin, salicylic acid, lactic acid, and d-tartaric acid creams.

  10. Formation of Amino Acids from Reactor Irradiated Ammonium Acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaboshi, M.; Kawai, K.; Maki, H.; Kawamoto, K.; Honda, Y.

    1982-12-01

    Ammonium acetate in various conditions was irradiated in a reactor to examine the contributions of both the reactor radiations and recoiled14C nucleis to form the biologically interesting molecules. Present investigations demonstrated that several amino acids, glycine, alanine, β-alanine and GABA, and may-be aspartic acid, serine and valine by prolonged irradiation, were formed in the aqueous solutions of ammonium acetate.14C-radioactivities were also found distributed in these amino acids. However, no special relationship between14C-radioactivity and these amino acids formed was observed.

  11. Temperature effect on nickel release in ammonium citrate.

    PubMed

    Oller, Adriana R; Cappellini, Danielle; Henderson, Rayetta G; Bates, Hudson K

    2009-09-01

    Leaching in ammonium citrate has been extensively used to assess the fraction of water-soluble nickel compounds present in nickel producing and using workplace aerosols. Leaching in ammonium citrate according to the first step of the Zatka protocol was found to overestimate the water-soluble nickel fraction by more than ten-fold compared to synthetic lung fluid (37 degrees C), when nickel carbonate and subsulfide were present. These results suggest that exposure matrices based on this method should be reexamined. Leaching studies of refinery particles are needed to further clarify this important issue. PMID:19724840

  12. Mutagenic activity of quaternary ammonium salt derivatives of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Dmochowska, Barbara; Sikora, Karol; Woziwodzka, Anna; Piosik, Jacek; Podgórska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study on a series of quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) derivatives of glucopyranosides with an elongated hydrophobic hydrocarbon chain. The new N-[6-(β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)hexyl]ammonium bromides and their O-acetyl derivatives were analyzed via (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The mutagenic activity of the newly synthesized QAS was investigated using two different techniques: The Vibrio harveyi luminescence assay and the Ames test. The obtained results support previous findings contesting QAS safety and indicate that QAS, specifically pyridinium derivatives, might be mutagenic. PMID:27559394

  13. Immunogenicity of a new Salmonella Typhi Vi polysaccharide vaccine--vax-TyVi--in Cuban school children and teenagers.

    PubMed

    Azze, Rolando Felipe Ochoa; Rodríguez, Juan Carlos Martínez; Iniesta, Mónica Ginebra; Marchena, Xenia Rosa Ferriol; Alfonso, Vivian María Rodríguez; Padrón, Franklin Tomás Sotolongo

    2003-06-20

    A randomized, controlled, double blind study was carried out in Cuban children and teenagers aged 9-13 years to evaluate the immunogenicity of vax-TyVi-Salmonella Typhi Vi polysaccharide vaccine-with respect control vaccines. Serum samples were taken before and 21 days after the immunization, and ELISA was used for the determination of antibodies to Vi polysaccharide. Subjects who received vax-TyVi and TYPHIM Vi (Pasteur-Mérieux) showed seroconversion rates of 85.61 and 78.36%, respectively. The geometric mean titer (GMT) values for Vi antibodies induced after vaccination were 6.27 microg/ml (5.40-7.38 microg/ml) and 5.97 microg/ml (5.01-7.10 microg/ml), respectively. In contrast, subjects receiving the tetanus toxoid vaccine showed 0% seroconversion.

  14. Interaction of monosaccharides and related compounds with oxocations of Mo(VI), W(VI) and U(VI) studied by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Geraldes, C.F.G.C.; Castro, M.M.C.A.; Saraiva, M.E.; Aureliano, M.; Dias, B.A.

    1988-05-01

    Proton, /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to study the complexation of Mo(VI), W(VI) and U(VI) oxocations with various aldoses, cyclic polyols and ribose-5-phosphate in aqueous solution. The aldoses D-mannose, D-lyxose and D-ribose form tridentate complexes with Mo(VI) and W(VI) at pH similarly ordered 5, via the 1,2,3-hydroxyl groups, which are cis to each other in these sugars. Other aldoses, like D-arabinose, D-glucose, D-xylose and D-galactose form weaker bidentate complexes with those ions because they can only use the 1 and 3-cis hydroxyl groups in metal binding. These bidentate interactions also take place in the binding of U(VI) to D-mannose and D-ribose, at pH similarly ordered 10. However, sugars having 1,3,5-hydroxyl groups in the cis position do not form stable chelates with these oxocations, possibly due to steric crowding. In the case of ribose-5-phosphate, the phosphate group is the exclusive binding site for the three oxocations, except for U(VI) at very basic pH (pH > 10), where the hydroxyl groups also interact with UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/.

  15. Six-fold coordinated carbon dioxide VI

    SciTech Connect

    Iota, Valentin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Klepeis, Jae-Hyun; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William; Cynn, Hyunchae

    2008-06-16

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent, whereas silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) is a covalent solid, and one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO{sub 2} transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO{sub 2} tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of an extended-solid phase of CO{sub 2}: a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO{sub 2}-II above 50 GPa at 530-650 K. Together with the previously reported CO{sub 2}-V and a-carbonia, this extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO{sub 2} (a prototypical molecular solid) and SiO{sub 2} (one of Earth's fundamental building blocks). We present a phase diagram with a limited stability domain for molecular CO{sub 2}-I, and suggest that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II, III and IV. The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the c axis in stishovite-like P4{sub 2}/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp{sup 3} hybridization.

  16. Condenser biofouling control with ferrate(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, J.; Waite, T.D.

    1982-01-01

    Biofouling is caused by bacterial growth on the walls of the condenser. The cells become attached, increase in number, secrete extracellular material and create a slime. The organic deposits attract additional deposits of organic and inorganic material. Also increases in heat transfer resistance result in less efficient condensation and therefore less backpressure to the turbine. With less vacuum in the system, the steam passes more slowly through the turbine, generating less electricity, and resulting in greater fuel consumption per unit of electrical energy produced. To reduce this extra energy generation cost, condensers must be treated to reduce biofouling. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible use of iron(VI) ferrate as an alternative to chlorine in controlling biofilm formation. The effectiveness of ferrate in controlling film growth was investigated using a model laboratory condenser system. Potassium ferrate was used in this study. Results indicate that ferrate(VI) ion appears to be an effective antifoulant. Short contact times are required for ferrate concentrations of 10/sup -5/M to maintain condenser cleanliness. (DMC)

  17. U(VI) behaviour in hyperalkaline calcite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kurt F.; Bryan, Nicholas D.; Swinburne, Adam N.; Bots, Pieter; Shaw, Samuel; Natrajan, Louise S.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.; Livens, Francis R.; Morris, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of U(VI) in hyperalkaline fluid/calcite systems was studied over a range of U(VI) concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM to 42.0 μM) and in two high pH systems, young and old synthetic cement leachate in batch sorption experiments. These systems were selected to be representative of young- (pH 13.3) and old-stage (pH 10.5) leachate evolution within a cementitious geological disposal facility. Batch sorption experiments, modelling, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, electron microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering and luminescence spectroscopy were used to define the speciation of U(VI) across the systems of study. At the lowest concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM 232U(VI)) significant U removal was observed for both old and young cement leachates, and this was successfully modelled using a first order kinetic adsorption modelling approach. At higher concentrations (>4.20 μM) in the young cement leachate, U(VI) showed no interaction with the calcite surface over an 18 month period. Small angle X-ray scattering techniques indicated that at high U concentrations (42.0 μM) and after 18 months, the U(VI) was present in a colloidal form which had little interaction with the calcite surface and consisted of both primary and aggregated particles with a radius of 7.6 ± 1.1 and 217 ± 24 Å, respectively. In the old cement leachate, luminescence spectroscopy identified two surface binding sites for U(VI) on calcite: in the system with 0.21 μM U(VI), a liebigite-like Ca2UO2(CO3)3 surface complex was identified; at higher U(VI) concentrations (0.42 μM), a second binding site of undetermined coordination was identified. At elevated U(VI) concentrations (>2.10 μM) in old cement leachate, both geochemical data and luminescence spectroscopy suggested that surface mediated precipitation was controlling U(VI) behaviour. A focused ion beam mill was used to create a section across the U(VI) precipitate-calcite interface. Transmission electron

  18. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium ferrocyanide... manufacturing practice: Oxalic acid or its salts, not more than 0.1 percent. Water soluble matter, not more than 3 percent. Water soluble cyanide, not more than 10 parts per million. Volatile matter, not more...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium ferrocyanide... manufacturing practice: Oxalic acid or its salts, not more than 0.1 percent. Water soluble matter, not more than 3 percent. Water soluble cyanide, not more than 10 parts per million. Volatile matter, not more...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium ferrocyanide... manufacturing practice: Oxalic acid or its salts, not more than 0.1 percent. Water soluble matter, not more than 3 percent. Water soluble cyanide, not more than 10 parts per million. Volatile matter, not more...

  1. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium ferrocyanide... manufacturing practice: Oxalic acid or its salts, not more than 0.1 percent. Water soluble matter, not more than 3 percent. Water soluble cyanide, not more than 10 parts per million. Volatile matter, not more...

  2. On the Presence of Fixed Ammonium in Rocks.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, F J

    1959-07-24

    From one-fourth to one-half of the nitrogen in some granite rocks, and up to two-thirds of that in some paleozoic shales, occurred as ammonium ions held within the lattice structure of silicate minerals. The results provide greater insight into the origin of the earth's atmosphere.

  3. Quaternary Ammonium Disinfectant Issues Encountered in an Environmental Services Department.

    PubMed

    Boyce, John M; Sullivan, Linda; Booker, Arica; Baker, James

    2016-03-01

    We identified several factors affecting the use of quaternary ammonium-based (Quat) disinfectant in our facility. Microfiber wipers, cotton towels, and 1 of 2 types of disposable wipes soaked in a Quat disinfectant revealed significant binding of the disinfectant. Concentrations of Quat delivered by automated disinfectant dispensers varied widely.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... citrate (iron (III) ammonium citrate) is prepared by the reaction of ferric hydroxide with citric acid... 18.5 percent iron, approximately 9 percent ammonia, and 65 percent citric acid and occurs as reddish... composed of 14.5 to 16 percent iron, approximately 7.5 percent ammonia, and 75 percent citric acid...

  5. Producing ammonium sulfate from flue gas desulfurization by-products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Bruinius, J.A.; Benig, V.; Chou, S.-F.J.; Carty, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    Emission control technologies using flue gas desulfurization (FGD) have been widely adopted by utilities burning high-sulfur fuels. However, these technologies require additional equipment, greater operating expenses, and increased costs for landfill disposal of the solid by-products produced. The financial burdens would be reduced if successful high-volume commercial applications of the FGD solid by-products were developed. In this study, the technical feasibility of producing ammonium sulfate from FGD residues by allowing it to react with ammonium carbonate in an aqueous solution was preliminarily assessed. Reaction temperatures of 60, 70, and 80??C and residence times of 4 and 6 hours were tested to determine the optimal conversion condition and final product evaluations. High yields (up to 83%) of ammonium sulfate with up to 99% purity were achieved under relatively mild conditions. The optimal conversion condition was observed at 60??C and a 4-hour residence time. The results of this study indicate the technical feasibility of producing ammonium sulfate fertilizer from an FGD by-product. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Inc.

  6. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for drug use made with ferric ammonium ferrocyanide may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring drugs. (b) Specifications... manufacturing practice: Oxalic acid or its salts, not more than 0.1 percent. Water soluble matter, not more...

  7. Residual Particle Sizes of Evaporating Droplets: Ammonium Sulfate and Aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedehi, N.; Galloway, M. M.; De Haan, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    The reactions of carbonyls like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde, with ammonium salts have been proposed as significant sources of atmospheric organic aerosol. Aerosol containing these compounds was generated in the laboratory using the Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG). The particles were completely dried before they were measured using a SMPS system. The nonvolatile fraction of the resulting aerosol was measured. The drying times were varied between two and twenty minutes, and for ammonium sulfate and glyoxal reactions, minimum residual particle sizes were reached after 3.5 minutes. Reactions of glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and methylglyoxal with ammonium sulfate appeared to have lower non-volatile fractions remaining at higher starting concentrations, suggesting that a constant 'excess volume,' likely water, was present in the residual particles that could not be evaporated even after 20 minutes of drying. These excess volumes were not observed in our previous experiments with aldehydes but no ammonium sulfate present. At the highest concentrations tested (100 uM), non-volatile fractions of aldehydes present in residual particles were 16 (±17) %, 41 (±28) %, and 17(±32) % for glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and methylglyoxal, respectively.

  8. Glufosinate and Ammonium Sulfate Inhibits Atrazine Degradation in Adapted Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The co-application of glufosinate with nitrogen fertilizers may alter atrazine co-metabolism, thereby extending the herbicide’s residual weed control in adapted soils. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of glufosinate, ammonium sulfate, and the combination of glufosinate and ammo...

  9. Destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene using ammonium peroxydisulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.; Wang, F.; Shell, T.; King, K.

    1996-07-01

    TNT was destroyed in a small batch reactor, using uncatalyzed 4 N ammonium peroxydisulfate at 95 {degrees}C. The material was destroyed below limit of detection in less that 15 minutes, indicating a formal order rate constant of 0.06 min{sup -1}. A crude estimate of scaleup rates indicates a throughput of 1 tonne/m{sup 3}-day.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1140 - Ammonium citrate, dibasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intended use. (c) In accordance with § 184.1(b)(1), the ingredient is used in food with no limitation other... safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the following current good manufacturing... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium citrate, dibasic. 184.1140 Section...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1140 - Ammonium citrate, dibasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intended use. (c) In accordance with § 184.1(b)(1), the ingredient is used in food with no limitation other... safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the following current good manufacturing... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium citrate, dibasic. 184.1140 Section...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1140 - Ammonium citrate, dibasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intended use. (c) In accordance with § 184.1(b)(1), the ingredient is used in food with no limitation other... safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the following current good manufacturing... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium citrate, dibasic. 184.1140 Section...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1140 - Ammonium citrate, dibasic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... accordance with § 184.1(b)(1), the ingredient is used in food with no limitation other than current good... human food ingredient is based upon the following current good manufacturing practice conditions of use... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium citrate, dibasic. 184.1140 Section...

  14. Electrodeposition of Californium Using Isobutanol and Aqueous Ammonium Acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoš, Milan; Boll, Rose A.; Phelps, Clarice E.; Torrico, Matthew N.; van Cleve, Shelley M.; Lewis, Benjamin E.

    2013-10-01

    Californium sources and targets are used in many applications in research and industry. Molecular deposition (commonly referred to as electrodeposition) is an experimental technique suitable for production of californium thin films. We are investigating molecular depositions using isobutanol and aqueous ammonium acetate solvents at various conditions to optimize for the best deposition efficiency and repeatability. Results of those tests will be presented.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS...

  18. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165 Section 172.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food...

  19. 46 CFR 148.220 - Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. 148.220 Section 148.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE...-sustaining decomposition. (2) (c) No fertilizer covered by this section may be transported in bulk if,...

  20. KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Stephen M

    2008-09-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of