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Sample records for amorphous biophotonic nanostructure

  1. Self-assembly of amorphous biophotonic nanostructures by phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, Eric R.; Noh, Heeso; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Cao, Hui; Prum, Richard O.

    2009-04-23

    Some of the most vivid colors in the animal kingdom are created not by pigments, but by wavelength-selective scattering of light from nanostructures. Here we investigate quasi-ordered nanostructures of avian feather barbs which produce vivid non-iridescent colors. These {beta}-keratin and air nanostructures are found in two basic morphologies: tortuous channels and amorphous packings of spheres. Each class of nanostructure is isotropic and has a pronounced characteristic length scale of variation in composition. These local structural correlations lead to strong backscattering over a narrow range of optical frequencies and little variation with angle of incidence. Such optical properties play important roles in social and sexual communication. To be effective, birds need to precisely control the development of these nanoscale structures, yet little is known about how they grow. We hypothesize that multiple lineages of birds have convergently evolved to exploit phase separation and kinetic arrest to self-assemble spongy color-producing nanostructures in feather barbs. Observed avian nanostructures are strikingly similar to those self-assembled during the phase separation of fluid mixtures; the channel and sphere morphologies are characteristic of phase separation by spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth, respectively. These unstable structures are locked-in by the kinetic arrest of the {beta}-keratin matrix, likely through the entanglement or cross-linking of supermolecular {beta}-keratin fibers. Using the power of self-assembly, birds can robustly realize a diverse range of nanoscopic morphologies with relatively small physical and chemical changes during feather development.

  2. Electron tomography, three-dimensional Fourier analysis and colour prediction of a three-dimensional amorphous biophotonic nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Shawkey, Matthew D.; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Pálsdóttir, Hildur; Crum, John; Ellisman, Mark H.; Auer, Manfred; Prum, Richard O.

    2009-01-01

    Organismal colour can be created by selective absorption of light by pigments or light scattering by photonic nanostructures. Photonic nanostructures may vary in refractive index over one, two or three dimensions and may be periodic over large spatial scales or amorphous with short-range order. Theoretical optical analysis of three-dimensional amorphous nanostructures has been challenging because these structures are difficult to describe accurately from conventional two-dimensional electron microscopy alone. Intermediate voltage electron microscopy (IVEM) with tomographic reconstruction adds three-dimensional data by using a high-power electron beam to penetrate and image sections of material sufficiently thick to contain a significant portion of the structure. Here, we use IVEM tomography to characterize a non-iridescent, three-dimensional biophotonic nanostructure: the spongy medullary layer from eastern bluebird Sialia sialis feather barbs. Tomography and three-dimensional Fourier analysis reveal that it is an amorphous, interconnected bicontinuous matrix that is appropriately ordered at local spatial scales in all three dimensions to coherently scatter light. The predicted reflectance spectra from the three-dimensional Fourier analysis are more precise than those predicted by previous two-dimensional Fourier analysis of transmission electron microscopy sections. These results highlight the usefulness, and obstacles, of tomography in the description and analysis of three-dimensional photonic structures. PMID:19158016

  3. Structural Diversity of Self-Assembled Iridescent Arthropod Biophotonic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saranathan, Vinod Kumar; Prum, Richard O.

    2015-03-01

    Many organisms, especially arthropods, produce vivid interference colors using diverse mesoscopic (100-350 nm) integumentary biophotonic nanostructures that are increasingly being investigated for technological applications. Despite a century of interest, we lack precise structural knowledge of many biophotonic nanostructures and mechanisms controlling their development, when such knowledge can open novel biomimetic routes to facilely self-assemble tunable, multi-functional materials. Here, we use synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy to characterize the photonic nanostructure of 140 iridescent integumentary scales and setae from 127 species of terrestrial arthropods in 85 genera from 5 orders. We report a rich nanostructural diversity, including triply-periodic bicontinuous networks, close-packed spheres, inverse columnar, perforated lamellar, and disordered sponge-like morphologies, commonly observed as stable phases of amphiphilic surfactants, block copolymer, and lyotropic lipid-water systems. Diverse arthropod lineages appear to have independently evolved to utilize the self-assembly of infolding bilayer membranes to develop biophotonic nanostructures that span the phase-space of amphiphilic morphologies, but at optical length scales.

  4. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  5. Structural Diversity of Arthropod Biophotonic Nanostructures Spans Amphiphilic Phase-Space

    SciTech Connect

    Saranathan, Vinod Kumar; Seago, Ainsley E.; Sandy, Alec; Narayanan, Suresh; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Cao, Hui; Osuji, Chinedum O.; Prum, Richard Owen

    2015-05-04

    Many organisms, especially arthropods, produce vivid interference colors using diverse mesoscopic (100-350 nm) integumentary biophotonic nanostructures that are increasingly being investigated for technological applications. Despite a century of interest, precise structural knowledge of many biophotonic nanostructures and the mechanisms controlling their development remain tentative, when such knowledge can open novel biomimetic routes to facilely self-assemble tunable, multifunctional materials. Here, we use synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy to characterize the photonic nanostructure of 140 integumentary scales and setae from ~127 species of terrestrial arthropods in 85 genera from 5 orders. We report a rich nanostructural diversity, including triply periodic bicontinuous networks, close-packed spheres, inverse columnar, perforated lamellar, and disordered spongelike morphologies, commonly observed as stable phases of amphiphilic surfactants, block copolymer, and lyotropic lipid-water systems. Diverse arthropod lineages appear to have independently evolved to utilize the self-assembly of infolding lipid-bilayer membranes to develop biophotonic nanostructures that span the phase-space of amphiphilic morphologies, but at optical length scales.

  6. Structural Diversity of Arthropod Biophotonic Nanostructures Spans Amphiphilic Phase-Space.

    PubMed

    Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Seago, Ainsley E; Sandy, Alec; Narayanan, Suresh; Mochrie, Simon G J; Dufresne, Eric R; Cao, Hui; Osuji, Chinedum O; Prum, Richard O

    2015-06-10

    Many organisms, especially arthropods, produce vivid interference colors using diverse mesoscopic (100-350 nm) integumentary biophotonic nanostructures that are increasingly being investigated for technological applications. Despite a century of interest, precise structural knowledge of many biophotonic nanostructures and the mechanisms controlling their development remain tentative, when such knowledge can open novel biomimetic routes to facilely self-assemble tunable, multifunctional materials. Here, we use synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy to characterize the photonic nanostructure of 140 integumentary scales and setae from ∼127 species of terrestrial arthropods in 85 genera from 5 orders. We report a rich nanostructural diversity, including triply periodic bicontinuous networks, close-packed spheres, inverse columnar, perforated lamellar, and disordered spongelike morphologies, commonly observed as stable phases of amphiphilic surfactants, block copolymer, and lyotropic lipid-water systems. Diverse arthropod lineages appear to have independently evolved to utilize the self-assembly of infolding lipid-bilayer membranes to develop biophotonic nanostructures that span the phase-space of amphiphilic morphologies, but at optical length scales.

  7. Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.; BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-01-27

    Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-C) films grown on silicon using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) is correlated to both growth energetic and film thickness. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity probe both the topological nature of 3- and 4-fold coordinated carbon atom bonding and the topographical clustering of their distributions within a given film. In general, increasing the energetic of PLD growth results in films becoming more ``diamondlike'', i.e. increasing mass density and decreasing optical absorbance. However, these same properties decrease appreciably with thickness. The topology of carbon atom bonding is different for material near the substrate interface compared to material within the bulk portion of an a-C film. A simple model balancing the energy of residual stress and the free energies of resulting carbon topologies is proposed to provide an explanation of the evolution of topographical bonding clusters in a growing a-C film.

  8. Domain morphology, boundaries, and topological defects in biophotonic gyroid nanostructures of butterfly wing scales

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Andrej; Boucheron, Leandra; Dietze, Sebastian H.; Jensen, Katharine E.; Vine, David; McNulty, Ian; Dufresne, Eric R.; Prum, Richard O.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Shpyrko, Oleg G.

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms in nature have evolved sophisticated cellular mechanisms to produce photonic nanostructures and, in recent years, diverse crystalline symmetries have been identified and related to macroscopic optical properties. However, because we know little about the distributions of domain sizes, the orientations of photonic crystals, and the nature of defects in these structures, we are unable to make the connection between the nanostructure and its development and functionality. We report on nondestructive studies of the morphology of chitinous photonic crystals in butterfly wing scales. Using spatially and angularly resolved x-ray diffraction, we find that the domains are highly oriented with respect to the whole scale, indicating growth from scale boundaries. X-ray coherent diffractive imaging reveals two types of crystalline domain interfaces: abrupt changes between domains emerging from distinct nucleation sites and smooth transitions with edge dislocations presumably resulting from internal stresses during nanostructure development. Our study of the scale structure reveals new aspects of photonic crystal growth in butterfly wings and shows their similarity to block copolymer materials. It opens new avenues to exploration of fundamental processes underlying the growth of biological photonic nanostructures in a variety of species. PMID:27386575

  9. Relative contributions of pigments and biophotonic nanostructures to natural color production: a case study in budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) feathers.

    PubMed

    D'Alba, Liliana; Kieffer, Leah; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2012-04-15

    Understanding the mechanistic bases of natural color diversity can provide insight into its evolution and inspiration for biomimetic optical structures. Metazoans can be colored by absorption of light from pigments or by scattering of light from biophotonic nanostructures, and these mechanisms have largely been treated as distinct. However, the interactions between them have rarely been examined. Captive breeding of budgerigars (Aves, Psittacidae, Melopsittacus undulatus) has produced a wide variety of color morphs spanning the majority of the spectrum visible to birds, including the ultraviolet, and thus they have been used as examples of hypothesized structure-pigment interactions. However, empirical data testing these interactions in this excellent model system are lacking. Here we used ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, light and electron microscopy, pigment extraction experiments and optical modeling to examine the physical bases of color production in seven budgerigar morphs, including grey and chromatic (purple to yellow) colors. Feathers from all morphs contained quasi-ordered air-keratin 'spongy layer' matrices, but these were highly reduced and irregular in grey and yellow feathers. Similarly, all feathers but yellow and grey had a layer of melanin-containing melanosomes basal to the spongy layer. The presence of melanosomes likely increases color saturation produced by spongy layers whereas their absence may allow increased expression of yellow colors. Finally, extraction of yellow pigments caused some degree of color change in all feathers except purple and grey, suggesting that their presence and contribution to color production is more widespread than previously thought. These data illustrate how interactions between structures and pigments can increase the range of colors attainable in birds and potentially in synthetic systems.

  10. Double scattering of light from Biophotonic Nanostructures with short-range order.

    PubMed

    Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng Fatt; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Prum, Richard O; Mochrie, Simon G J; Dufresne, Eric R; Cao, Hui

    2010-05-24

    We investigate the physical mechanism for color production by isotropic nanostructures with short-range order in bird feather barbs. While the primary peak in optical scattering spectra results from constructive interference of singly-scattered light, many species exhibit secondary peaks with distinct characteristic. Our experimental and numerical studies show that these secondary peaks result from double scattering of light by the correlated structures. Without an analog in periodic or random structures, such a phenomenon is unique for short-range ordered structures, and has been widely used by nature for non-iridescent structural coloration.

  11. Double scattering of light from Biophotonic Nanostructures with short-range order

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng Fatt; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Prum, Richard O.; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Cao, Hui

    2010-07-28

    We investigate the physical mechanism for color production by isotropic nanostructures with short-range order in bird feather barbs. While the primary peak in optical scattering spectra results from constructive interference of singly-scattered light, many species exhibit secondary peaks with distinct characteristic. Our experimental and numerical studies show that these secondary peaks result from double scattering of light by the correlated structures. Without an analog in periodic or random structures, such a phenomenon is unique for short-range ordered structures, and has been widely used by nature for non-iridescent structural coloration.

  12. Fossilized Biophotonic Nanostructures Reveal the Original Colors of 47-Million-Year-Old Moths

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Maria E.; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Orr, Patrick J.; Wedmann, Sonja; Noh, Heeso; Cao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Structural colors are generated by scattering of light by variations in tissue nanostructure. They are widespread among animals and have been studied most extensively in butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera), which exhibit the widest diversity of photonic nanostructures, resultant colors, and visual effects of any extant organism. The evolution of structural coloration in lepidopterans, however, is poorly understood. Existing hypotheses based on phylogenetic and/or structural data are controversial and do not incorporate data from fossils. Here we report the first example of structurally colored scales in fossil lepidopterans; specimens are from the 47-million-year-old Messel oil shale (Germany). The preserved colors are generated by a multilayer reflector comprised of a stack of perforated laminae in the scale lumen; differently colored scales differ in their ultrastructure. The original colors were altered during fossilization but are reconstructed based upon preserved ultrastructural detail. The dorsal surface of the forewings was a yellow-green color that probably served as a dual-purpose defensive signal, i.e. aposematic during feeding and cryptic at rest. This visual signal was enhanced by suppression of iridescence (change in hue with viewing angle) achieved via two separate optical mechanisms: extensive perforation, and concave distortion, of the multilayer reflector. The fossils provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for the function of structural color in fossils and demonstrate the feasibility of reconstructing color in non-metallic lepidopteran fossils. Plastic scale developmental processes and complex optical mechanisms for interspecific signaling had clearly evolved in lepidopterans by the mid-Eocene. PMID:22110404

  13. Unusually High and Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity in Amorphous Silicon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonshin; Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C; Cui, Shuang; Chen, Renkun

    2017-02-02

    Amorphous Si (a-Si) nanostructures are ubiquitous in numerous electronic and optoelectronic devices. Amorphous materials are considered to possess the lower limit to the thermal conductivity (κ), which is ∼1 W·m(-1) K(-1) for a-Si. However, recent work suggested that κ of micrometer-thick a-Si films can be greater than 3 W·m(-1) K(-1), which is contributed to by propagating vibrational modes, referred to as "propagons". However, precise determination of κ in a-Si has been elusive. Here, we used structures of a-Si nanotubes and suspended a-Si films that enabled precise in-plane thermal conductivity (κ∥) measurement within a wide thickness range of 5 nm to 1.7 μm. We showed unexpectedly high κ∥ in a-Si nanostructures, reaching ∼3.0 and 5.3 W·m(-1) K(-1) at ∼100 nm and 1.7 μm, respectively. Furthermore, the measured κ∥ is significantly higher than the cross-plane κ on the same films. This unusually high and anisotropic thermal conductivity in the amorphous Si nanostructure manifests the surprisingly broad propagon mean free path distribution, which is found to range from 10 nm to 10 μm, in the disordered and atomically isotropic structure. This result provides an unambiguous answer to the century-old problem regarding mean free path distribution of propagons and also sheds light on the design and performance of numerous a-Si based electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  14. Amorphous nanostructuralization in HOPG by 1014 W cm-2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NISHIMURA, Yasuhiko; KITAGAWA, Yoneyoshi; MORI, Yoshitaka; ISHII, Katsuhiro; HANAYAMA, Ryohei; AZUMA, Hirozumi; HIOKI, Tatsumi; NISHI, Teppei; MOTOHIRO, Tomoyoshi; KOMEDA, Osamu; SEKINE, Takashi; SATO, Nakahiro; KURITA, Takashi; KAWASHIMA, Toshiyuki; KAN, Hirofumi; SUNAHARA, Atsushi; SENTOKU, Yasuhiko; MIURA, Eisuke

    2016-05-01

    This reports provide an amorphous nanostructuralization technique on the surface modification in Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) by using a femtosecond laser. We showed, for the first time, that the surface of HOPG is changed to the amorphous nanostructuralization graphite by using a femtosecond laser-driven compression technique. Our results also suggest that the HOPG surface is changed until the deeper area from the surface by the laser-driven shock wave. A single shot of a femtosecond laser beam (1.27 ∼ 1.33×1014 Wcm∼2 in intensity, with 2 mm-diameter, and 110 fs in pulse width) is irradiated under the vacuum ambience onto a 2 mm-thick of HOPG. The calculated impact pressures on a sample was 8.3 ∼ 8.7 GPa. Crystal structure in the HOPG were analyzed using a Raman spectroscopy and an X-ray diffraction, those analyzing depth from the surface were 50 nm and 350 μm, respectively.

  15. PREFACE: Ultrafast biophotonics Ultrafast biophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Min; Reid, Derryck; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2010-08-01

    The use of light to explore biology can be traced to the first observations of tissue made with early microscopes in the mid-seventeenth century, and has today evolved into the discipline which we now know as biophotonics. This field encompasses a diverse range of activities, each of which shares the common theme of exploiting the interaction of light with biological material. With the rapid advancement of ultrafast optical technologies over the last few decades, ultrafast lasers have increasingly found applications in biophotonics, to the extent that the distinctive new field of ultrafast biophotonics has now emerged, where robust turnkey ultrafast laser systems are facilitating cutting-edge studies in the life sciences to take place in everyday laboratories. The broad spectral bandwidths, precision timing resolution, low coherence and high peak powers of ultrafast optical pulses provide unique opportunities for imaging and manipulating biological systems. Time-resolved studies of bio-molecular dynamics exploit the short pulse durations from such lasers, while other applications such as optical coherence tomography benefit from the broad optical bandwidths possible by using super-continuum generation and additionally allowing for high speed imaging with speeds as high as 47 000 scans per second. Continuing progress in laser-system technology is accelerating the adoption of ultrafast techniques across the life sciences, both in research laboratories and in clinical applications, such as laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) eye surgery. Revolutionizing the field of optical microscopy, two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has enabled higher spatial resolution with improved depth penetration into biological specimens. Advantages of this nonlinear optical process include: reduced photo-interactions, allowing for extensive imaging time periods; simultaneously exciting multiple fluorescent molecules with only one excitation wavelength; and

  16. Amorphous mixed-metal hydroxide nanostructures for advanced water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y. Q.; Liu, X. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2016-02-01

    The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec-1, while no deactivation is detected in the CV testing even up to 30 000 cycles, which suggests the promising application of these amorphous nanomaterials in electrochemical oxidation. Meanwhile, the distinct catalytic activities among these amorphous Ni-Fe hydroxide nanostructures prompts us to take notice of the composition of the alloy hydroxides/oxides when studying their catalytic properties, which opens an avenue for the rational design and controllable preparation of such amorphous nanomaterials as advanced OER electrocatalysts.The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec-1, while no deactivation is detected in the CV

  17. Microwave absorption properties of amorphous iron nanostructures fabricated by a high-yield method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Zuo, Yalu; Yao, Yuelin; Xi, Li; Du, Jihong; Wang, Jianbo; Xue, Desheng

    2013-04-01

    Amorphous Fe nanoparticles and a nanonecklace were synthesized at room temperature by an aqueous reduction procedure, which provided a simple and potential method for volume production of ferromagnetic materials. The morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The amorphism of Fe nanoparticles and the nanonecklace was confirmed by x-ray diffraction and electron diffraction patterns in transmission electron microscopy. The complex permittivity and permeability behaviour of amorphous iron nanoparticles/paraffin wax (NPPW) and nanonecklace/paraffin wax (NCPW) composites was investigated in 0.1-18 GHz by a coaxial method. The strongest reflection loss values of NPPW and NCPW calculated from permittivity and permeability reached -53.2 dB and -47.8 dB at 6.4 GHz and 4.6 GHz with matching thicknesses of 2.4 mm and 2.3 mm, respectively. Moreover, the frequency ranges of microwave absorption exceeding 90% were around 4.9-8.8 GHz and 3.7-6.1 GHz for NPPW and NCPW, respectively. Comparing the microwave absorption property with crystallized Fe nanostructures, we may conclude that the relatively high resistivity and low permittivity of amorphous Fe nanostructures are favourable for impedance matching, and consequently result in the attracting microwave absorption property of amorphous Fe nanostructures. Thus, amorphous iron nanoparticles and the nanonecklace prepared by a high-yield method have great potential to be a highly efficient microwave absorber.

  18. Amorphous mixed-metal hydroxide nanostructures for advanced water oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y Q; Liu, X Y; Yang, G W

    2016-03-07

    The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec(-1), while no deactivation is detected in the CV testing even up to 30 000 cycles, which suggests the promising application of these amorphous nanomaterials in electrochemical oxidation. Meanwhile, the distinct catalytic activities among these amorphous Ni-Fe hydroxide nanostructures prompts us to take notice of the composition of the alloy hydroxides/oxides when studying their catalytic properties, which opens an avenue for the rational design and controllable preparation of such amorphous nanomaterials as advanced OER electrocatalysts.

  19. Nanostructure formation by dynamic densification and recrystallization of amorphous Ti-Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counihan, P. J.; Crawford, A.; Thadhani, N. N.

    1998-07-01

    Dynamic densification was used to consolidate mechanically amorphized Ti-Si alloy powders, using a 3-capsule, plate-impact, gas-gun loading system at velocities of 300 and 500 m/s. The recovered amorphous compacts were subsequently annealed above the crystallization temperature. A single-phase nano-structured (50-90 nm) Ti5Si3 compound was produced, as revealed by TEM and XRD analysis. In this paper, the influence of dynamic densification on the crystallization behavior of amorphous Ti-Si, and the formation of nano-crystals will be discussed.

  20. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  1. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  2. Amorphous and nanostructured silica and aluminosilicate spray-dried microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todea, M.; Turcu, R. V. F.; Frentiu, B.; Tamasan, M.; Mocuta, H.; Ponta, O.; Simon, S.

    2011-08-01

    Amorphous silica and aluminosilicate microspheres with diameters in the 0.1-20 μm range were produced by spray drying method. SEM, TEM and AFM images showed the spherical shape of the obtained particles. Based on thermal analysis data, several heat treatments have been applied on the as-prepared samples in order to check the amorphous state stability of the microspheres and to develop nanosized crystalline phases. As-prepared microspheres remain amorphous up to 1400 °C. By calcination at 1400 °C, cristobalite type nanocrystals are developed on silica sample, while in aluminosilicate sample first are developed mullite type nanocrystals and only after prolonged treatment are developed also cristobalite type nanocrystals. 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR results show that the local order around aluminum and silicon atoms strongly depend on the thermal history of the microspheres.

  3. A field effect glucose sensor with a nanostructured amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O network.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaosong; Li, Yajuan; Herman, Gregory S

    2016-11-03

    Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) field effect transistors (FETs) are a promising technology for a wide range of electronic applications. Herein, we fabricated and characterized FETs with a nanostructured IGZO network as a sensing transducer. The IGZO was patterned using colloidal lithography and electrohydrodynamic printing, where an 8 μm wide nanostructured close-packed hexagonal IGZO network was obtained. Electrical characterization of the nanostructured IGZO network FET demonstrated a drain-source current on-off ratio of 6.1 × 10(3) and effective electron mobilities of 3.6 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The nanostructured IGZO network was functionalized by aminosilane groups with cross-linked glucose oxidase. The devices demonstrated a decrease in drain-source conductance and a more positive VON with increasing glucose concentration. These changes are ascribed to the acceptor-like surface states associated with positively charged aminosilane groups attached to the nanostructured IGZO surface. Continuous monitoring of the drain-source current indicates a stepwise and fully reversible response to glucose concentrations with a short response time. The specific catalytic reaction between the GOx enzyme and glucose eliminates interference from acetaminophen/ascorbic acid. We demonstrate that nanostructured IGZO FETs have improved sensitivity compared to non-nanostructured IGZO for sensing glucose and can be potentially extended to other biosensor technologies.

  4. Effects of heating time on the growth and behavior of amorphous carbon nanostructures from ferrocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiqul Islam, Md; Rashid, A. K. M. B.; Ferdous, Md; Shafiul Azam, Md

    2017-05-01

    Heating time is one of the crucial factors in various methods employed for the synthesis of carbon nanostructures (CNSs) from ferrocene. However, the effects of heating time on the growth and morphology of the nanostructured materials has not been well explored yet, particularly for amorphous carbon. Herein, we investigate how the variation of heating time impacts the growth of CNSs by carrying out the reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride in a solvent free condition at 250 °C. Several different forms of carbon nanostructures yielded from this reaction at 25 min (CNS-25), 30 min (CNS-30), 35 min (CNS-35) and 40 min (CNS-40) were analyzed by means of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) coupled with energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The final product CNS-40 was washed several times with concentrated hydrochloric acid solution to remove the impurities and then characterized by the means of similar techniques. FTIR spectra of all the nanostructures confirmed the presence of several functional groups such as C  =  C, C-O and -OH etc, which are common in carbonaceous nanostructures. However, the FESEM images obtained are significantly different and suggest a gradual growth of the carbon nanostructures ending up with long carbon nanotubes after 40 min. No absorption peak in the visible region of the UV-Vis spectra of the final product confirms the amorphous nature, which is also supported by XRD of the synthesized nanotube. Moreover, a noteworthy redshift in the UV-Vis peaks reflecting a huge increase in length and diameter of the nanostructures indicates the maximum longitudinal growth of the carbon nanotubes occurs during 35 min to 40 min.

  5. Quantum dots for biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ken-Tye

    2012-01-01

    This theme issue provides an excellent collection of reviews and original research articles on the study of various bioconjugated quantum dot formulations for diagnostics and therapy applications using biophotonic imaging and sensing approaches.

  6. Nanostructuring of GeTiO amorphous films by pulsed laser irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Teodorescu, Valentin Serban; Ghica, Cornel; Maraloiu, Adrian Valentin; Vlaicu, Mihai; Kuncser, Andrei; Stavarache, Ionel; Lepadatu, Ana M; Scarisoreanu, Nicu Doinel; Andrei, Andreea; Ion, Valentin; Dinescu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Laser pulse processing of surfaces and thin films is a useful tool for amorphous thin films crystallization, surface nanostructuring, phase transformation and modification of physical properties of thin films. Here we show the effects of nanostructuring produced at the surface and under the surface of amorphous GeTiO films through laser pulses using fluences of 10–30 mJ/cm2. The GeTiO films were obtained by RF magnetron sputtering with 50:50 initial atomic ratio of Ge:TiO2. Laser irradiation was performed by using the fourth harmonic (266 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser-induced nanostructuring results in two effects, the first one is the appearance of a wave-like topography at the film surface, with a periodicity of 200 nm and the second one is the structure modification of a layer under the film surface, at a depth that is related to the absorption length of the laser radiation. The periodicity of the wave-like relief is smaller than the laser wavelength. In the modified layer, the Ge atoms are segregated in spherical amorphous nanoparticles as a result of the fast diffusion of Ge atoms in the amorphous GeTiO matrix. The temperature estimation of the film surface during the laser pulses shows a maximum of about 500 °C, which is much lower than the melting temperature of the GeTiO matrix. GeO gas is formed at laser fluences higher than 20 mJ/cm2 and produces nanovoids in the laser-modified layer at the film surface. A glass transition at low temperatures could happen in the amorphous GeTiO film, which explains the formation of the wave-like topography. The very high Ge diffusivity during the laser pulse action, which is characteristic for liquids, cannot be reached in a viscous matrix. Our experiments show that the diffusivity of atomic and molecular species such as Ge and GeO is very much enhanced in the presence of the laser pulse field. Consequently, the fast diffusion drives the formation of amorphous Ge nanoparticles through the segregation of Ge

  7. Nanostructuring of GeTiO amorphous films by pulsed laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Valentin Serban; Ghica, Cornel; Maraloiu, Adrian Valentin; Vlaicu, Mihai; Kuncser, Andrei; Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia; Stavarache, Ionel; Lepadatu, Ana M; Scarisoreanu, Nicu Doinel; Andrei, Andreea; Ion, Valentin; Dinescu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Laser pulse processing of surfaces and thin films is a useful tool for amorphous thin films crystallization, surface nanostructuring, phase transformation and modification of physical properties of thin films. Here we show the effects of nanostructuring produced at the surface and under the surface of amorphous GeTiO films through laser pulses using fluences of 10-30 mJ/cm(2). The GeTiO films were obtained by RF magnetron sputtering with 50:50 initial atomic ratio of Ge:TiO2. Laser irradiation was performed by using the fourth harmonic (266 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser-induced nanostructuring results in two effects, the first one is the appearance of a wave-like topography at the film surface, with a periodicity of 200 nm and the second one is the structure modification of a layer under the film surface, at a depth that is related to the absorption length of the laser radiation. The periodicity of the wave-like relief is smaller than the laser wavelength. In the modified layer, the Ge atoms are segregated in spherical amorphous nanoparticles as a result of the fast diffusion of Ge atoms in the amorphous GeTiO matrix. The temperature estimation of the film surface during the laser pulses shows a maximum of about 500 °C, which is much lower than the melting temperature of the GeTiO matrix. GeO gas is formed at laser fluences higher than 20 mJ/cm(2) and produces nanovoids in the laser-modified layer at the film surface. A glass transition at low temperatures could happen in the amorphous GeTiO film, which explains the formation of the wave-like topography. The very high Ge diffusivity during the laser pulse action, which is characteristic for liquids, cannot be reached in a viscous matrix. Our experiments show that the diffusivity of atomic and molecular species such as Ge and GeO is very much enhanced in the presence of the laser pulse field. Consequently, the fast diffusion drives the formation of amorphous Ge nanoparticles through the segregation of Ge atoms

  8. Comparison of microstructure and magnetic properties of 3% Si-steel, amorphous and nanostructure Finemet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, M.; Rahmani, Kh.; Amiri Kerahroodi, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a comparison of microstructure and magnetic properties of polycrystalline 3%Si-steel, amorphous and nano-crystalline alloy Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 (known as Finemet). Si-steels are industrially produced by casting, hot and cold rolling, annealing and coating. Samples of thin amorphous ribbons were prepared by the planar flow casting (PFC) method. Nano-crystalline samples are obtained after annealing in vacuum furnace at 560 °C for 1 h. The structure of specimens was investigated by XRD, SEM and FE-SEM. Also, magnetic properties were measured using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results showed that, hysteresis losses in as-quenched and nano-crystalline ribbons were by 94.75% and 96.06% less than 3%Si-steel, respectively. After the heat treatment of amorphous specimens, hysteresis area was decreased by 25% in comparison with heat treated specimen. This decreasing is occurred due to the formation of Fe3Si nanostructure with size of 10-17 nm and removing segregation after heat treatment.

  9. Synthesis of bulk nanostructured aluminum containing in situ crystallized amorphous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhihui

    5083 Al containing in situ crystallized Al85Ni10La 5 amorphous particles (10% and 20% in volume fraction) was synthesized through a powder metallurgy route consisting of cold isostatic pressing, degassing and hot extrusion. The nanostructured 5083 Al powders (grain size ˜28 nm) were produced through mechanical milling in liquid nitrogen. The Al 85Ni10La5 powders were produced via gas atomization using helium gas and the fraction in the size range of <500 mesh (<25 mum), which appeared to be fully amorphous on the basis of X-ray diffraction studies, was isolated for further investigation. The amorphous Al85Ni10La5 alloy exhibited a glass transition at ˜259°C (at a heating rate of 40°C/min) and nanoscale crystallites (< 100 nm) with an equiaxed morphology formed during the subsequent crystallization reactions. At temperatures higher than 283°C, only the equilibrium phases Al, Al3Ni and Al11La 3 were formed. An unusually high nucleation density (1021-22 /m3) was recorded in the crystallization process. The copious nucleation sites were rationalized from the presence of quenched-in Al nuclei, which were evidenced by isothermal calorimetric tracing (235°C) and a direct HRTEM observation of the amorphous Al85Ni10La 5 powders. The feasibility of preparation of nanocrystalline/amorphous particles via melt spinning followed by ball milling was also studied. In the as-extruded composites, the amorphous Al85Ni10 La5 particles underwent complete crystallization resulting in a grain size of 100 ˜ 200 nm; the 5083 Al matrix had a grain size around 200 nm in the fine-grained region interspersed by coarse-grained region with a grain size of 600 ˜ 1500 nm. A metallurgical bond formed between the 5083 Al matrix and Al85Ni10La5 particles showing a grain-boundary-like interface. The compressive fracture strength of the as-extruded 10% and 20% Al85Ni10La5 composites were determined to be 1025 MPa and 837 MPa, respectively. The influence of secondary processing, i.e., swaging

  10. Fabrication of single-crystalline plasmonic nanostructures on transparent and flexible amorphous substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Tomohiro; Mori, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Suzaki, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Kenzo

    2017-02-01

    A new experimental technique is developed for producing a high-performance single-crystalline Ag nanostructure on transparent and flexible amorphous substrates for use in plasmonic sensors and circuit components. This technique is based on the epitaxial growth of Ag on a (001)-oriented single-crystalline NaCl substrate, which is subsequently dissolved in ultrapure water to allow the Ag film to be transferred onto a wide range of different substrates. Focused ion beam milling is then used to create an Ag nanoarray structure consisting of 200 cuboid nanoparticles with a side length of 160 nm and sharp, precise edges. This array exhibits a strong signal and a sharp peak in plasmonic properties and Raman intensity when compared with a polycrystalline Ag nanoarray.

  11. Fabrication of ZnO photonic amorphous diamond nanostructure from parrot feathers for modulated photoluminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengli; Yu, Ke; Liao, Na; Yin, Haihong; Lou, Lei; Yu, Qian; Liao, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2011-12-01

    A ZnO photonic amorphous diamond nanostructure was successfully synthesised using a feather barb of the Rosy-Faced Lovebird as supporting template via a facile sol-gel process. Different from ordered structures, an isotropic PBG around 500 nm was evidenced from reflectance spectra and an optical metallurgical microscopy image, which overlaps with the visible emission peak of ZnO. As a result, the inhibition of visible emission inside the PBG and the enhancement of UV emission at the PBG edges have both been observed, which is independent from the incident angle. Moreover, the rapid thermal annealing can also help improve the crystallinity of ZnO and raise the UV/visible emission ratio without affecting the structure. These results can be very useful for the study of the modification of the optical emission properties of ZnO and other semiconductor materials as well as research on ZnO random lasing.

  12. Fabrication of ZnO photonic amorphous diamond nanostructure from parrot feathers for modulated photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengli; Yu, Ke; Liao, Na; Yin, Haihong; Lou, Lei; Yu, Qian; Liao, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2011-12-01

    A ZnO photonic amorphous diamond nanostructure was successfully synthesised using a feather barb of the Rosy-Faced Lovebird as supporting template via a facile sol-gel process. Different from ordered structures, an isotropic PBG around 500 nm was evidenced from reflectance spectra and an optical metallurgical microscopy image, which overlaps with the visible emission peak of ZnO. As a result, the inhibition of visible emission inside the PBG and the enhancement of UV emission at the PBG edges have both been observed, which is independent from the incident angle. Moreover, the rapid thermal annealing can also help improve the crystallinity of ZnO and raise the UV/visible emission ratio without affecting the structure. These results can be very useful for the study of the modification of the optical emission properties of ZnO and other semiconductor materials as well as research on ZnO random lasing.

  13. Fabrication of single-crystalline plasmonic nanostructures on transparent and flexible amorphous substrates

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tomohiro; Mori, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Suzaki, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Kenzo

    2017-01-01

    A new experimental technique is developed for producing a high-performance single-crystalline Ag nanostructure on transparent and flexible amorphous substrates for use in plasmonic sensors and circuit components. This technique is based on the epitaxial growth of Ag on a (001)-oriented single-crystalline NaCl substrate, which is subsequently dissolved in ultrapure water to allow the Ag film to be transferred onto a wide range of different substrates. Focused ion beam milling is then used to create an Ag nanoarray structure consisting of 200 cuboid nanoparticles with a side length of 160 nm and sharp, precise edges. This array exhibits a strong signal and a sharp peak in plasmonic properties and Raman intensity when compared with a polycrystalline Ag nanoarray. PMID:28216626

  14. Coherent fiber supercontinuum for biophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Biophotonics and nonlinear fiber optics have traditionally been two independent fields. Since the discovery of fiber-based supercontinuum generation in 1999, biophotonics applications employing incoherent light have experienced a large impact from nonlinear fiber optics, primarily because of the access to a wide range of wavelengths and a uniform spatial profile afforded by fiber supercontinuum. However, biophotonics applications employing coherent light have not benefited from the most well-known techniques of supercontinuum generation for reasons such as poor coherence (or high noise), insufficient controllability, and inadequate portability. Fortunately, a few key techniques involving nonlinear fiber optics and femtosecond laser development have emerged to overcome these critical limitations. Despite their relative independence, these techniques are the focus of this review, because they can be integrated into a low-cost portable biophotonics source platform. This platform can be shared across many different areas of research in biophotonics, enabling new applications such as point-of-care coherent optical biomedical imaging. PMID:24358056

  15. Coherent fiber supercontinuum for biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A

    2013-09-01

    Biophotonics and nonlinear fiber optics have traditionally been two independent fields. Since the discovery of fiber-based supercontinuum generation in 1999, biophotonics applications employing incoherent light have experienced a large impact from nonlinear fiber optics, primarily because of the access to a wide range of wavelengths and a uniform spatial profile afforded by fiber supercontinuum. However, biophotonics applications employing coherent light have not benefited from the most well-known techniques of supercontinuum generation for reasons such as poor coherence (or high noise), insufficient controllability, and inadequate portability. Fortunately, a few key techniques involving nonlinear fiber optics and femtosecond laser development have emerged to overcome these critical limitations. Despite their relative independence, these techniques are the focus of this review, because they can be integrated into a low-cost portable biophotonics source platform. This platform can be shared across many different areas of research in biophotonics, enabling new applications such as point-of-care coherent optical biomedical imaging.

  16. Thermally induced transformations of amorphous carbon nanostructures fabricated by electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Dhaval D; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Kim, Songkil; Fedorov, Andrei G; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2011-03-01

    We studied the thermally induced phase transformations of electron-beam-induced deposited (EBID) amorphous carbon nanostructures by correlating the changes in its morphology with internal microstructure by using combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution confocal Raman microscopy. These carbon deposits can be used to create heterogeneous junctions in electronic devices commonly known as carbon-metal interconnects. We compared two basic shapes of EBID deposits: dots/pillars with widths from 50 to 600 nm and heights from 50 to 500 nm and lines with variable heights from 10 to 150 nm but having a constant length of 6 μm. We observed that during thermal annealing, the nanoscale amorphous deposits go through multistage transformation including dehydration and stress-relaxation around 150 °C, dehydrogenation within 150-300 °C, followed by graphitization (>350 °C) and formation of nanocrystalline, highly densified graphitic deposits around 450 °C. The later stage of transformation occurs well below commonly observed graphitization for bulk carbon (600-800 °C). It was observed that the shape of the deposits contribute significantly to the phase transformations. We suggested that this difference is controlled by different contributions from interfacial footprints area. Moreover, the rate of graphitization was different for deposits of different shapes with the lines showing a much stronger dependence of its structure on the density than the dots.

  17. Biophotonics: a European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Thierry; Cochard, Jacques; Breussin, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the present work is to determine the opportunities and challenges for Biophotonics business development in Europe for the next five years with a focus on sensors and systems: for health diagnostics and monitoring; for air, water and food safety and quality control. The development of this roadmap was initiated and supported by EPIC (The European Photonics Industry Consortium). We summarize the final roadmap data: market application segments and trends, analysis of the market access criteria, analysis of the technology trends and major bottlenecks and challenges per application.

  18. Laser technologies in biophotonics

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkatov, A N; Priezzhev, A V; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2012-05-31

    This and the following issues of Quantum Electronics comprise articles reflecting the state of the art of laser technologies both currently applied and promising for application in biomedical research. Rapid development of biophotonics that we witness nowadays is due to a number of factors. These include the new results in basic studies of the interaction of laser radiation with biological tissues and cells, essential progress in the field of development of means for delivery, detection and imaging of optical radiation, and implementation of novel computer- and nanotechnologies.

  19. Biophotonics applied to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Faupel, Michel; Bonenfant, Débora; Schindler, Patrick; Bertrand, Eric; Mueller, Dieter; Stoeckli, Markus; Bitsch, Francis; Rohner, Tatiana; Staab, Dieter; Van Oostrum, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Since the completion of the human genome sequencing, our understanding of gene and protein function and their involvement in physiopathological states has increased dramatically, partly due to technological developments in photonics. Photonics is a very active area where new developments occur on a weekly basis, while established tools are adapted to fulfill the needs of other disciplines like genomics and proteomics. Biophotonics emerged at the interface of photonics and biology as a very straightforward and efficient approach to observe and manipulate living systems. In this chapter, we review the current applications of photonics and imaging to proteomics from 2D gels analysis to molecular imaging.

  20. Glucose oxidase-loaded amorphous FeNi-Pt fan-shaped nanostructures and their electrochemical behaviors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Wen, Ming; Wu, Qingsheng

    2013-11-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOD) loaded amorphous FeNi-Pt fan-shaped nanostructures with the average length of ∼ 7 μm have been synthesized for improving the electrochemical activity of enzyme electrode materials. The electrochemical oxidation of glucose solution has been successfully facilitated using FeNi-Pt fan-shaped nanostructures to load GOD due to their fan-shaped constitution and amorphous nanostructure. Chitosan could provide better response of nanostructure electrode than nafion. Compared with glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified by chitosan/Fe(40)Ni(40)-Pt(20)/GOD/GCE (GOD-loaded Fe(40)Ni(40)-Pt(20) nanoalloys using chitosan as immobilization-agent), chitosan/Fe(45)Ni(45)-Pt(10)/GOD/GCE presents smaller oxidation and reduction peak potential separation at 0.2912 V. No any electrochemical response can be observed when FeNi-Pt was absent in this electrode system. Additionally, a group of parallel experiments were tested when chitosan was changed to nafion. When Fe(40)Ni(40)-Pt(20) nanostructure was employed to the electrode system, the oxidation and reduction peaks potentials were -0.7341 V and -0.4943 V, respectively, with a peak potential separation of 0.3371 V.

  1. Management in biophotonics and biotechnologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meglinski, I. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2005-10-01

    Biophotonics, one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas, offers vast potential for changing traditional approaches to meeting many critical needs in medicine, biology, pharmacy, food, health care and cosmetic industries. Follow the market trends we developed new MSc course Management in Biophotonics and Biotechnologies (MBB) that provide students of technical disciplines with the necessary training, education and problem-solving skills to produce professionals and managers who are better equipped to handle the challenges of modern science and business in biophotonics and biotechnology. A major advantage of the course is that it provides skills not currently available to graduates in other Master programs.

  2. Statistical analysis of biophoton image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Susheng

    1998-08-01

    A photon count image system has been developed to obtain the ultra-weak bioluminescence image. The photon images of some plant, animal and human hand have been detected. The biophoton image is different from usual image. In this paper three characteristics of biophoton image are analyzed. On the basis of these characteristics the detected probability and detected limit of photon count image system, detected limit of biophoton image have been discussed. These researches provide scientific basis for experiments design and photon image processing.

  3. Specialized project in biophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Martin, Agueda L.; Sastriques-Silva, Pedro O.; Martinez-Fundora, Julia N.; Augier Calderin, Angel G.; Lopez-Cepero, Xonia

    2000-06-01

    As science advances, it is more evident the necessity of a health interdisciplinary approach in Medicine. In the case of medical applications of light, the knowledge of the use of dispositives, equipment, diagnostic and treatment means, as well as the bases for the use of this update technologies is required. At the present moment, the outstanding work of specialized professionals of different profiles requires personnel with high professional formation in keeping with the latest trends in science and technology. The authors present here an Specialized Project in Biophotonics, with the aim of increasing the professional preparation of university graduates with an ample profile--physicists and engineers--who work in Biomedical Optics, thus contributing to the specialized formation of medic and paramedic personnel. The course is structured into six-subject-modules and into two phases. As to the basic professional formation, each one attending this course, will select between two variants of the Basic Formation Postgraduate Course: Anatomy and Physiology, Physical Bioenergetics, Clinic Bioenergetics; or Physics in Medicine, Optics and Applied Information Theory, depending on the student's professional profile. In the second phase, the General Formation Postgraduate Course: Biomedical Optics, Optical Bioenergetics and Laser in Medicine.

  4. BioPhotonics Workstation: a university tech transfer challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew; Tauro, Sandeep; Palima, Darwin

    2011-10-01

    Conventional optical trapping or tweezing is often limited in the achievable trapping range because of high numerical aperture and imaging requirements. To circumvent this, we are developing a next generation BioPhotonics Workstation platform that supports extension modules through a long working distance geometry. This geometry provides three dimensional and real time manipulation of a plurality of traps facilitating precise control and a rapid response in all sorts of optical manipulation undertakings. We present ongoing research and development activities for constructing a compact next generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in three-dimensional studies on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and new materials.

  5. Intrinsic nanostructural domains: Possible origin of weaklinkless superconductivity in the quenched reaction product of Mg and amorphous B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Prabhakar, O.; Tan, T. T.; Sun, C. Q.; Wang, X. L.; Soltanian, S.; Horvat, J.; Dou, S. X.

    2002-07-01

    Smooth modulation structure of Mg-B alloy in the quenched reaction product of Mg and amorphous B was studied. It indicates that the MgB2 formed possibly in spinodal decomposition, thus resulting in MgB2 nanodomains. It was found that the nanodomains with small angle boundaries of atomic-scale width were distributed within the subgrains that constitute the clusters in MgB2 grains. This nanostructural characteristic may be intrinsic in the quenched reaction product of Mg and amorphous B. It makes the nanodomain boundaries not act as barriers to the current percolation path, thus exhibiting no weak-link problem in the MgB2.

  6. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mughal, A; El Demellawi, J K; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-12-14

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material's luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon.

  7. The toxicological mode of action and the safety of synthetic amorphous silica-a nanostructured material.

    PubMed

    Fruijtier-Pölloth, Claudia

    2012-04-11

    Synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), in the form of pyrogenic (fumed), precipitated, gel or colloidal SAS, has been used in a wide variety of industrial and consumer applications including food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical products for many decades. Based on extensive physico-chemical, ecotoxicology, toxicology, safety and epidemiology data, no environmental or health risks have been associated with these materials if produced and used under current hygiene standards and use recommendations. With internal structures in the nanoscale size range, pyrogenic, precipitated and gel SAS are typical examples of nanostructured materials as recently defined by the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO). The manufacturing process of these SAS materials leads to aggregates of strongly (covalently) bonded or fused primary particles. Weak interaction forces (van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonding, physical adhesion) between aggregates lead to the formation of micrometre (μm)-sized agglomerates. Typically, isolated nanoparticles do not occur. In contrast, colloidal SAS dispersions may contain isolated primary particles in the nano-size range which can be considered nano-objects. The size of the primary particle resulted in the materials often being considered as "nanosilica" and in the inclusion of SAS in research programmes on nanomaterials. The biological activity of SAS can be related to the particle shape and surface characteristics interfacing with the biological milieu rather than to particle size. SAS adsorbs to cellular surfaces and can affect membrane structures and integrity. Toxicity is linked to mechanisms of interactions with outer and inner cell membranes, signalling responses, and vesicle trafficking pathways. Interaction with membranes may induce the release of endosomal substances, reactive oxygen species, cytokines and chemokines and thus induce inflammatory responses. None of the SAS forms, including colloidal nano-sized particles, were shown

  8. Fullerene nanostructure-induced excellent mechanical properties in hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Junyan; He, Deyan

    2007-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were deposited by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition. The structure of as-prepared films, characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectra, and x-ray photoelectron spectra, is considered as nanocomposite thin films with C60 and fullerene crystalline nanoparticles embedded in amorphous sp2 and sp3 carbon matrices. The high hardness and high elastic recovery of as-prepared films are attributed to the unique structure that C60 and fullerene nanocrystalline grains (soft) dispersed in amorphous carbon phase (hard) to form a network structure, which restrains the dislocation migration, assists the stress relaxation, and hence, enhances the mechanical properties of the films.

  9. Biophoton Emission Induced by Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kawano, Shinya; Hidaka, Yoshiki; Hara, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Ultraweak biophoton emission originates from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are produced in mitochondria as by-products of cellular respiration. In healthy cells, the concentration of ROS is minimized by a system of biological antioxidants. However, heat shock changes the equilibrium between oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, that is, a rapid rise in temperature induces biophoton emission from ROS. Although the rate and intensity of biophoton emission was observed to increase in response to elevated temperatures, pretreatment at lower high temperatures inhibited photon emission at higher temperatures. Biophoton measurements are useful for observing and evaluating heat shock. PMID:25153902

  10. Biophoton emission induced by heat shock.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kawano, Shinya; Hidaka, Yoshiki; Hara, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Ultraweak biophoton emission originates from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are produced in mitochondria as by-products of cellular respiration. In healthy cells, the concentration of ROS is minimized by a system of biological antioxidants. However, heat shock changes the equilibrium between oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, that is, a rapid rise in temperature induces biophoton emission from ROS. Although the rate and intensity of biophoton emission was observed to increase in response to elevated temperatures, pretreatment at lower high temperatures inhibited photon emission at higher temperatures. Biophoton measurements are useful for observing and evaluating heat shock.

  11. Biophoton emission of human body.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S; Popp, F A

    2003-05-01

    For the first time systematic measurements of the "ultraweak" photon emission of the human body (biophotons) have been performed by means of a photon detector device set up in darkness. About 200 persons have been investigated. In a particular case one person has been examined daily over several months. It turned out that this biophoton emission reflects, (i) the left-right symmetry of the human body; (ii) biological rhythms such as 14 days, 1 month, 3 months and 9 months; (iii) disease in terms of broken symmetry between left and right side; and (iv) light channels in the body, which regulate energy and information transfer between different parts. The results show that besides a deeper understanding of health, disease and body field, this method provides a new powerful tool of non-invasive medical diagnosis in terms of basic regulatory functions of the body.

  12. Nanostructure Formation by Dynamic Densification and Recrystallization of Amorphous Ti-Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counihan, P. J.; Thadhani, N. N.

    1997-07-01

    Dynamic densification was used to consolidate mechanically amorphized Ti-Si alloy powders. A 3-capsule, plate-impact, gas-gun loading system was used to densify the powders at impact velocities of 300 and 500 m/s. The recovered compacts were observed to retain the amorphous structure as evidenced by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission microscopy (TEM) analysis. The densified material was subsequently annealed at various temperatures (above the crystallization temperature) to produce a nanocrystalline Ti_5Si3 microstructure. TEM and XRD analysis revealed retention of a nano-grain microstructure (< 100 nm) in the crystallized compacts. In this presentation the influence of dynamic densification on the crystallization of the amorphous compound and retention of the nano-scale grain size in the crystallized compacts will be discussed.

  13. Properties of biophotons and their theoretical implications.

    PubMed

    Popp, Fritz-Albert

    2003-05-01

    The word "biophotons" is used to denote a permanent spontaneous photon emission from all living systems. It displays a few up to some hundred photons/(s x cm2) within the spectral range from at least 260 to 800 nm. It is closely linked to delayed luminescence (DL) of biological tissues which describes the long term and ultra weak reemission of photons after exposure to light illumination. During relaxation DL turns continuously into the steady state biophoton emission, where both, DL and biophoton emission exhibit mode coupling over the entire spectrum and a Poissonian photo count distribution. DL is representing excited states of the biophoton field. The physical properties indicate that biophotons originate from fully coherent and sometimes even squeezed states. The physical analysis provides thermodynamic and quantum optical interpretation, in order to understand the biological impacts of biophotons. Biological phenomena like intracellular and intercellular communication, cell growth and differentiation, interactions among biological systems (like "Gestaltbildung" or swarming), and microbial infections can be understood in terms of biophotons. "Biophotonics", the corresponding field of applications, provide a new powerful tool for assessing the quality of food (like freshness and shelf life), microbial infections, environmental influences and for substantiating medical diagnosis and therapy.

  14. Structure and optical function of amorphous photonic nanostructures from avian feather barbs: a comparative small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis of 230 bird species

    PubMed Central

    Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Forster, Jason D.; Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng-Fatt; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Cao, Hui; Dufresne, Eric R.; Prum, Richard O.

    2012-01-01

    Non-iridescent structural colours of feathers are a diverse and an important part of the phenotype of many birds. These colours are generally produced by three-dimensional, amorphous (or quasi-ordered) spongy β-keratin and air nanostructures found in the medullary cells of feather barbs. Two main classes of three-dimensional barb nanostructures are known, characterized by a tortuous network of air channels or a close packing of spheroidal air cavities. Using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and optical spectrophotometry, we characterized the nanostructure and optical function of 297 distinctly coloured feathers from 230 species belonging to 163 genera in 51 avian families. The SAXS data provided quantitative diagnoses of the channel- and sphere-type nanostructures, and confirmed the presence of a predominant, isotropic length scale of variation in refractive index that produces strong reinforcement of a narrow band of scattered wavelengths. The SAXS structural data identified a new class of rudimentary or weakly nanostructured feathers responsible for slate-grey, and blue-grey structural colours. SAXS structural data provided good predictions of the single-scattering peak of the optical reflectance of the feathers. The SAXS structural measurements of channel- and sphere-type nanostructures are also similar to experimental scattering data from synthetic soft matter systems that self-assemble by phase separation. These results further support the hypothesis that colour-producing protein and air nanostructures in feather barbs are probably self-assembled by arrested phase separation of polymerizing β-keratin from the cytoplasm of medullary cells. Such avian amorphous photonic nanostructures with isotropic optical properties may provide biomimetic inspiration for photonic technology. PMID:22572026

  15. Label-Free Direct Electronic Detection of Biomolecules with Amorphous Silicon Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lund, John; Mehta, Ranjana; Parviz, Babak A.

    2007-01-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of a nano-scale sensor made of amorphous silicon for the label-free, electronic detection of three classes of biologically important molecules: ions, oligonucleotides, and proteins. The sensor structure has an active element which is a 50 nm wide amorphous silicon semicircle and has a total footprint of less than 4 μm2. We demonstrate the functionalization of the sensor with receptor molecules and the electronic detection of three targets: H+ ions, short single-stranded DNAs, and streptavidin. The sensor is able to reliably distinguish single base-pair mismatches in 12 base long strands of DNA and monitor the introduction and identification of straptavidin in real-time. The versatile sensor structure can be readily functionalized with a wide range of receptor molecules and is suitable for integration with high-speed electronic circuits as a post-process on an integrated circuit chip. PMID:17292148

  16. Label-free direct electronic detection of biomolecules with amorphous silicon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lund, John; Mehta, Ranjana; Parviz, Babak A

    2006-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of a nano-scale sensor made of amorphous silicon for the label-free, electronic detection of three classes of biologically important molecules: ions, oligonucleotides, and proteins. The sensor structure has an active element which is a 50 nm wide amorphous silicon semicircle and has a total footprint of less than 4 microm2. We demonstrate the functionalization of the sensor with receptor molecules and the electronic detection of three targets: H(+) ions, short single-stranded DNAs, and streptavidin. The sensor is able to reliably distinguish single base-pair mismatches in 12 base long strands of DNA and monitor the introduction and identification of straptavidin in real-time. The versatile sensor structure can be readily functionalized with a wide range of receptor molecules and is suitable for integration with high-speed electronic circuits as a post-process on an integrated circuit chip.

  17. Speculations about Bystander and Biophotons

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Mothersill and many others during the last hundred years have shown that cells and now whole animals may communicate with each other by electromagnetic waves called biophotons. This would explain the source of the bystander phenomena. These ultra-weak photons are coherent, appear to originate and concentrate in DNA of the cell nucleus and rapidly carry large amounts of data to each cell and to the trillions of other cells in the human body. The implications of such a possibility can be wonderfully important. PMID:25552952

  18. Enhanced chemical sensing in the visible and near-UV utilizing amorphous, nanostructured photonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbey, Sonja; Srinivasan, Aarthi; Chalasani, Taraveni; Lifante, Gines; Manoharan, Krishna; Whaley, Ralph

    2011-04-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on the development and analysis of integrated photonic chemical sensors in the IR and near-IR regions, there has been relatively little work done in the visible and near-UV mostly due to the substantial absorption of group-IV and III-V materials in that wavelength range. This work focuses on the design of novel, nanoscale photonic architectures and materials for the application of enhanced chemical sensing in these wavelength regions. Specifically, this project uses ammonia (NH3) and titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) as the study analytes and focuses on platforms composed of amorphous zinc oxide (a-ZnO) and amorphous hafnium dioxide (a-HfO2). Having an effective bandgap of 3.37 eV and 5.8 eV, respectively, and grown by rf sputtering on a wide variety of substrates at low temperature, a-ZnO and a-HfO2 are highly compatible with standard photonic device fabrication processes. Utilizing a low optical overlap mode (LOOM) architecture, in which only 1 percent of the optical mode resides in the core region, we predict a markedly higher sensitivity than conventional evanescent wave sensors - between 5X and 50X depending on polarization and host environment.

  19. 2.5 D Transrotational Microcrystals and Nanostructures Revealed by TEM in Crystallizing Amorphous Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Vladimir

    2015-03-01

    Unexpected transrotational microcrystals can be grown in thin 10-100 nm amorphous films. Crystals of different morphology (from nanowhiskers to spherulites, complex textures) and chemical nature (oxides, chalcogenides, metals and alloys) grown in thin films prepared by various methods are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We use primarily our TEM bend-contour method and SAED (HREM, AFM are also performed). The phenomenon resides in strong (up to 300 degrees/ μm) regular internal bending of crystal lattice planes in a growing crystal. It can be traced inside TEM in situ. Usual translation is complicated by slight regular rotation of the crystal unit cell (transrotation) most prominent at the mesoscale. Different geometries of transrotation of positive and negative curvature are revealed. Transrotational crystal resembles ideal single crystal enclosed in a curved space. It can be also considered similar to hypothetical endless 2.5 D analogy of MW nanotube/nano-onion halves. Transrotation is strongly increasing as the film gets thinner in the range 100-15 nm. Transrotations supplement dislocations and disclinations. New transrotational nanocrystalline model of amorphous state is proposed. Support of Ministry of Higher Education and Science is acknowledged.

  20. Electrochemical treatment of domestic wastewater using boron-doped diamond and nanostructured amorphous carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Daghrir, Rimeh; Drogui, Patrick; Tshibangu, Joel; Delegan, Nazar; El Khakani, My Ali

    2014-05-01

    The performance of the electrochemical oxidation process for efficient treatment of domestic wastewater loaded with organic matter was studied. The process was firstly evaluated in terms of its capability of producing an oxidant agent (H2O2) using amorphous carbon (or carbon felt) as cathode, whereas Ti/BDD electrode was used as anode. Relatively high concentrations of H2O2 (0.064 mM) was produced after 90 min of electrolysis time, at 4.0 A of current intensity and using amorphous carbon at the cathode. Factorial design and central composite design methodologies were successively used to define the optimal operating conditions to reach maximum removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color. Current intensity and electrolysis time were found to influence the removal of COD and color. The contribution of current intensity on the removal of COD and color was around 59.1 and 58.8%, respectively, whereas the contribution of treatment time on the removal of COD and color was around 23.2 and 22.9%, respectively. The electrochemical treatment applied under 3.0 A of current intensity, during 120 min of electrolysis time and using Ti/BDD as anode, was found to be the optimal operating condition in terms of cost/effectiveness. Under these optimal conditions, the average removal rates of COD and color were 78.9 ± 2 and 85.5 ± 2 %, whereas 70% of total organic carbon removal was achieved.

  1. Biophotons Contribute to Retinal Dark Noise.

    PubMed

    Li, Zehua; Dai, Jiapei

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of dark noise in retinal photoreceptors resulted in a long-lasting controversy over its origin and the underlying mechanisms. Here, we used a novel ultra-weak biophoton imaging system (UBIS) to detect biophotonic activity (emission) under dark conditions in rat and bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) retinas in vitro. We found a significant temperature-dependent increase in biophotonic activity that was completely blocked either by removing intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+) together or inhibiting phosphodiesterase 6. These findings suggest that the photon-like component of discrete dark noise may not be caused by a direct contribution of the thermal activation of rhodopsin, but rather by an indirect thermal induction of biophotonic activity, which then activates the retinal chromophore of rhodopsin. Therefore, this study suggests a possible solution regarding the thermal activation energy barrier for discrete dark noise, which has been debated for almost half a century.

  2. Nanostructured and amorphous-like tungsten films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellasega, D.; Merlo, G.; Conti, C.; Bottani, C. E.; Passoni, M.

    2012-10-01

    An experimental investigation of nanostructured, micrometer-thick, tungsten films deposited by pulsed laser deposition is presented. The films are compact and pore-free, with crystal grain sizes ranging from 14 nm to less than 2 nm. It is shown how, by properly tailoring deposition rate and kinetic energy of ablated species, it is possible to achieve a detailed and separate control of both film morphology and structure. The role of the main process parameters, He background pressure, laser fluence, and energy, is elucidated. In contrast with W films produced with other PVD techniques, β-phase growth is avoided and the presence of impurities and contaminants, like oxygen, is not correlated with film structure. These features make these films interesting for the development of coatings with improved properties, like increased corrosion resistance and enhanced diffusion barriers.

  3. High-strength and high-ductility nanostructured and amorphous metallic materials.

    PubMed

    Kou, Hongning; Lu, Jian; Li, Ying

    2014-08-20

    The development of materials with dual properties of high strength and high ductility has been a constant challenge since the foundation of the materials science discipline. The rapid progress of nanotechnology in recent decades has further brought this challenge to a new era. This Research News highlights a few newly developed strategies to optimize advanced nanomaterials and metallic glasses with exceptional dual mechanical properties of high strength and high ductility. A general concept of strain non-localization is presented to describe the role of multiscale (i.e., macroscale, microscale, nanoscale, and atomic scale) heterogeneities in the ductility enhancement of materials reputed to be intrinsically brittle, such as nanostructured metallic materials and bulk metallic glasses. These nanomaterials clearly form a new group of materials that display an extraordinary relationship between yield strength and the uniform elongation with the same chemical composition. Several other examples of nanomaterials such as those reinforced by nanoprecipitates will also be described.

  4. Dual-Layer Nanostructured Flexible Thin-Film Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells with Enhanced Light Harvesting and Photoelectric Conversion Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yinyue; Xu, Zhen; Yu, Dongliang; Lu, Linfeng; Yin, Min; Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Hao, Yuying; Fan, Zhiyong; Cui, Yanxia; Li, Dongdong

    2016-05-04

    Three-dimensional (3-D) structures have triggered tremendous interest for thin-film solar cells since they can dramatically reduce the material usage and incident light reflection. However, the high aspect ratio feature of some 3-D structures leads to deterioration of internal electric field and carrier collection capability, which reduces device power conversion efficiency (PCE). Here, we report high performance flexible thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells with a unique and effective light trapping scheme. In this device structure, a polymer nanopillar membrane is attached on top of a device, which benefits broadband and omnidirectional performances, and a 3-D nanostructure with shallow dent arrays underneath serves as a back reflector on flexible titanium (Ti) foil resulting in an increased optical path length by exciting hybrid optical modes. The efficient light management results in 42.7% and 41.7% remarkable improvements of short-circuit current density and overall efficiency, respectively. Meanwhile, an excellent flexibility has been achieved as PCE remains 97.6% of the initial efficiency even after 10 000 bending cycles. This unique device structure can also be duplicated for other flexible photovoltaic devices based on different active materials such as CdTe, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), organohalide lead perovskites, and so forth.

  5. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films on steel balls and Si substrates: Nanostructural evolutions and their trigging tribological behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongfu; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xingkai; Shi, Jing; Gao, Kaixiong; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Junyan

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we prepared hydrogenated amorphous carbon films on steel balls and Si substrates (steel ball- and Si substrate-films) with different deposition time, and discussed their carbon nanostructural evolutions and tribological behaviors. The steel ball-film structure started to be graphite-like structure and then gradually transformed into fullerene-like (FL) structure. The Si substrate-film structure began in FL structure and kept it through the thickness. The difference may be result from the competition between high starting substrate temperature after additional nitriding applied on the steel balls (its supply power is higher than that in the film deposition), and relaxation of compressive stress from energized ion bombardment in film deposition process. The FL structural film friction couples could achieve ultra-low friction in open air. In particular, the Si substrate-film with 3 h, against the steel ball-film with 2 h and 3 h, exhibited super-low friction (∼0.009) and superlong wear life (∼5.5 × 105 cycles). Our result could widen the superlubricity scope from previously high load and velocity, to middle load and velocity.

  6. Biophoton Emission:. Experimental Background and Theoretical Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Fritz-Albert; Gu, Qiao; Li, Ke-Hsueh

    Biophoton emission is a general phenomenon of living systems. It concerns a weak photon radiation from a few to some hundred photons per second, per square centimeter surface area, at least within the spectral region from 200 to 800 nm. The results indicate that biophoton emission can be assigned to a coherent field within living organisms, its functions being intra and intercellular regulation and communication. This review deals with some central results and their interpretation.

  7. Microspherical resonators for biophotonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenci, M.; Calzolai, R.; Cosi, F.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Righini, G. C.

    2006-02-01

    Nowadays biological sensing is representing a very active area of research due to the many possible applications in environmental control, food testing, pharmaceutical screening, and genetic analysis. A particular need exists for miniature biosensors for the detection of proteins, DNA, toxins and, more generally, infectious agents. Several optical techniques have proven to be quite effective, and biophotonics is a continuously growing discipline. Here we provide a quick overview of the recent progresses in the development of optical biosensors based on resonant cavities constituted by dielectric microspheres, where light propagation occurs through whispering-gallery modes (WGMs). The effect of any perturbation to the optical resonance structure of a microsphere is such that a very high sensitivity can be achieved.

  8. Biophotons as neural communication signals demonstrated by in situ biophoton autography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Wang, Chao; Dai, Jiapei

    2010-03-01

    Cell to cell communication by biophotons has been demonstrated in plants, bacteria, animal neutrophil granulocytes and kidney cells. Whether such signal communication exists in neural cells is unclear. By developing a new biophoton detection method, called in situ biophoton autography (IBA), we have investigated biophotonic activities in rat spinal nerve roots in vitro. We found that different spectral light stimulation (infrared, red, yellow, blue, green and white) at one end of the spinal sensory or motor nerve roots resulted in a significant increase in the biophotonic activity at the other end. Such effects could be significantly inhibited by procaine (a regional anaesthetic for neural conduction block) or classic metabolic inhibitors, suggesting that light stimulation can generate biophotons that conduct along the neural fibers, probably as neural communication signals. The mechanism of biophotonic conduction along neural fibers may be mediated by protein-protein biophotonic interactions. This study may provide a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of neural communication, the functions of the nervous system, such as vision, learning and memory, as well as the mechanisms of human neurological diseases.

  9. Biophoton emission from the right and left hands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chunho; Jung, Hyun-Hee; Woo, Won M.; Soh, Kwang-Sup; Yoon, Gilwon

    2002-09-01

    Spontaneous ultraweak photon (biophoton) emissions from hands are measured for healthy subjects. The data provide basic reference information for diagnostic application of biophoton emission. The overall average of biophoton emissions from the hands is 226.4 +/- 14.3 counts per second. The asymmetry of the biophoton emission rates between the left and the right hands could be significant for both western and oriental diagnosis.

  10. The safety of nanostructured synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) as a food additive (E 551).

    PubMed

    Fruijtier-Pölloth, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Particle sizes of E 551 products are in the micrometre range. The typical external diameters of the constituent particles (aggregates) are greater than 100 nm. E 551 does not break down under acidic conditions such as in the stomach, but may release dissolved silica in environments with higher pH such as the intestinal tract. E 551 is one of the toxicologically most intensively studied substances and has not shown any relevant systemic or local toxicity after oral exposure. Synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) meeting the specifications for use as a food additive (E 551) is and has always been produced by the same two production methods: the thermal and the wet processes, resulting in E 551 products consisting of particles typically in the micrometre size range. The constituent particles (aggregates) are typically larger than 100 nm and do not contain discernible primary particles. Particle sizes above 100 nm are necessary for E 551 to fulfil its technical function as spacer between food particles, thus avoiding the caking of food particles. Based on an in-depth review of the available toxicological information and intake data, it is concluded that the SAS products specified for use as food additive E 551 do not cause adverse effects in oral repeated-dose studies including doses that exceed current OECD guideline recommendations. In particular, there is no evidence for liver toxicity after oral intake. No adverse effects have been found in oral fertility and developmental toxicity studies, nor are there any indications from in vivo studies for an immunotoxic or neurotoxic effect. SAS is neither mutagenic nor genotoxic in vivo. In intact cells, a direct interaction of unlabelled and unmodified SAS with DNA was never found. Differences in the magnitude of biological responses between pyrogenic and precipitated silica described in some in vitro studies with murine macrophages at exaggerated exposure levels seem to be related to interactions with cell culture proteins

  11. Quantum dots as biophotonics tools.

    PubMed

    Cesar, Carlos L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of quantum dots (QDs) physics, applications, and perspectives. The main advantage of QDs over bulk semiconductors is the fact that the size became a control parameter to tailor the optical properties of new materials. Size changes the confinement energy which alters the optical properties of the material, such as absorption, refractive index, and emission bands. Therefore, by using QDs one can make several kinds of optical devices. One of these devices transforms electrons into photons to apply them as active optical components in illumination and displays. Other devices enable the transformation of photons into electrons to produce QDs solar cells or photodetectors. At the biomedical interface, the application of QDs, which is the most important aspect in this book, is based on fluorescence, which essentially transforms photons into photons of different wavelengths. This chapter introduces important parameters for QDs' biophotonic applications such as photostability, excitation and emission profiles, and quantum efficiency. We also present the perspectives for the use of QDs in fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), so useful in modern microscopy, and how to take advantage of the usually unwanted blinking effect to perform super-resolution microscopy.

  12. Photo-induced oxidation and amorphization of trigonal tellurium: A means to engineer hybrid nanostructures and explore glass structure under spatial confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Vasileiadis, Thomas; Yannopoulos, Spyros N.

    2014-09-14

    Controlled photo-induced oxidation and amorphization of elemental trigonal tellurium are achieved by laser irradiation at optical wavelengths. These processes are monitored in situ by time-resolved Raman scattering and ex situ by electron microscopies. Ultrathin TeO₂ films form on Te surfaces, as a result of irradiation, with an interface layer of amorphous Te intervening between them. It is shown that irradiation, apart from enabling the controllable transformation of bulk Te to one-dimensional nanostructures, such as Te nanotubes and hybrid core-Te/sheath-TeO₂ nanowires, causes also a series of light-driven (athermal) phase transitions involving the crystallization of the amorphous TeO₂ layers and its transformation to a multiplicity of crystalline phases including the γ-, β-, and α-TeO₂ crystalline phases. The kinetics of the above photo-induced processes is investigated by Raman scattering at various laser fluences revealing exponential and non-exponential kinetics at low and high fluence, respectively. In addition, the formation of ultrathin (less than 10 nm) layers of amorphous TeO₂ offers the possibility to explore structural transitions in 2D glasses by observing changes in the short- and medium-range structural order induced by spatial confinement.

  13. Feature issue introduction: biophotonic materials and applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang-Sup; Andraud, Chantal; Tamada, Kaoru; Sokolov, Konstantin; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Zheng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Biophotonics can be defined as the interplay of light and biological matter. The percolation of new optical technology into the realm of biology has literally shed new light into the inner workings of biological systems. This has revealed new applications for optics in biology. In a parallel trend, biomolecules have been investigated for their optical applications. Materials are playing a central role in the development of biophotonics. New materials, fabrication methods, and structures are enabling new biosensors, contrast agents, imaging strategies, and assay methods. Similarly, biologic materials themselves can be used in photonic devices. In this context, two open-access, rapid-publication journals from The Optical Society of America (OSA), Optical Materials Express and Biomedical Optics Express, will publish a joint feature issue covering advances in biophotonics materials. PMID:27231644

  14. Feature issue introduction: biophotonic materials and applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Sup; Andraud, Chantal; Tamada, Kaoru; Sokolov, Konstantin; Kotz, Kenneth T; Zheng, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Biophotonics can be defined as the interplay of light and biological matter. The percolation of new optical technology into the realm of biology has literally shed new light into the inner workings of biological systems. This has revealed new applications for optics in biology. In a parallel trend, biomolecules have been investigated for their optical applications. Materials are playing a central role in the development of biophotonics. New materials, fabrication methods, and structures are enabling new biosensors, contrast agents, imaging strategies, and assay methods. Similarly, biologic materials themselves can be used in photonic devices. In this context, two open-access, rapid-publication journals from The Optical Society of America (OSA), Optical Materials Express and Biomedical Optics Express, will publish a joint feature issue covering advances in biophotonics materials.

  15. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide. PMID:23140103

  16. A biophotonics course for freshman honors students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinaro, Marco; Shackelford, James F.

    2005-10-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology CBST) is collaborating with the Integrated Studies Honors Program (ISHP) at UC Davis to provide an introductory course to some of the top students in the freshman class. The course, IST 8A (Shedding Light on Life), was offered for the first time in Spring 2004 for the 2003-2004 ISHP class. A second offering was provided in Winter 2005 for the 2004-2005 ISHP class. This course is successfully increasing the educational, research, and training opportunities in the emerging field of biophotonics for high-achieving undergraduates at UC Davis.

  17. Quantum coherence of biophotons and living systems.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, R P

    2003-05-01

    Coherence is a property of the description of the system in the classical framework in which the subunits of a system act in a cooperative manner. Coherence becomes classical if the agent causing cooperation is discernible otherwise it is quantum coherence. Both stimulated and spontaneous biophoton signals show properties that can be attributed to the cooperative actions of many photon-emitting units. But the agents responsible for the cooperative actions of units have not been discovered so far. The stimulated signal decays with non-exponential character. It is system and situation specific and sensitive to many physiological and environmental factors. Its measurable holistic parameters are strength, shape, relative strengths of spectral components, and excitation curve. The spontaneous signal is non-decaying with the probabilities of detecting various number of photons to be neither normal nor Poisson. The detected probabilities in a signal of Parmelia tinctorum match with probabilities expected in a squeezed state of photons. It is speculated that an in vivo nucleic acid molecule is an assembly of intermittent quantum patches that emit biophoton in quantum transitions. The distributions of quantum patches and their lifetimes determine the holistic features of biophoton signals, so that the coherence of biophotons is merely a manifestation of the coherence of living systems.

  18. Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology (CBST).

    PubMed

    Chuang, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology (CBST) is the only center in the country funded by the National Science Foundation and devoted to the study of light and radiant energy in biology and medicine. Our consortium of 10 world-class academic institutions and research laboratories is comprised of physical and life scientists, physicians and engineers - along with industry participants, educators and community leaders - working together to bring biophotonics to the forefront of mainstream science. The three main arms of CBST are (1) Science and Technology, (2) Education, and (3) Knowledge Transfer. The research sponsored by the center focuses on critical themes that are expected to have significant impact on current biomedical science and technology. Projects include the development of new methods in optical microscopy that work well beyond the diffraction limit; ultrafast, high-intensity X-ray lasers to resolve the structure of single biomolecules, and new devices and sensors for minimally - or noninvasive medical applications. CBST is developing a new curriculum, along with training materials, internships and research fellowships to introduce biophotonics to students and teachers at all educational levels. Finally, the knowledge transfer component of CBST is seeking to catalyze the rapid growth of biophotonics as a new technology sector by supplying intellectual capital and tools to stimulate the growth of new products and new companies. By coupling the center's biophotonics research projects with industry partners and sponsors, a unique R&D environment is created to expand the use of photons in the development of life sciences, bioengineering and health care.

  19. Anomalous Biophoton Emission during Germination Process of Red Bean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Shoichi; Mitani, Tomohiko; Fujikawa, Masahiro

    1993-03-01

    Spontaneous biophoton emission was investigated for the germination and the growth process of a red bean seed. The growth process of the root of a red bean after germination was statistically investigated for a total of 2000 seeds whose average root growth dynamics was well described by a simple logistic equation. Strong biophoton emission was observed at two inflection points of the logistic curve. Namely, when maximum acceleration of the root growth occurred, maximum biophoton emission was observed.

  20. Biophoton detection as a novel technique for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Motohiro; Kobayashi, Masaki; Takayama, Mariko; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ishida, Takanori; Ohnuki, Kohji; Moriya, Takuya; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2004-08-01

    Biophoton emission is defined as extremely weak light that is radiated from any living system due to its metabolic activities, without excitation or enhancement. We measured biophoton images of tumors transplanted in mice with a highly sensitive and ultra-low noise CCD camera system. Cell lines employed for this study were AH109A, TE4 and TE9. Biophoton images of each tumor were measured 1 week after carcinoma cell transplantation to estimate the tumor size at week 1 and the biophoton intensity. Some were also measured at 2 and 3 weeks to compare the biophoton distribution with histological findings. We achieved sequential biophoton imaging during tumor growth for the first time. Comparison of microscopic findings and biophoton intensity suggested that the intensity of biophoton emission reflects the viability of the tumor tissue. The size at week 1 differed between cell lines, and the biophoton intensity of the tumor was correlated with the tumor size at week 1 (correlation coefficient 0.73). This non-invasive and simple technique has the potential to be used as an optical biopsy to detect tumor viability.

  1. Biophoton distress flares signal the onset of the hypersensitive reaction.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, John W

    2005-07-01

    Detection of biophoton emission, a natural bioluminescence, has emerged as a non-destructive method to mark the onset of the hypersensitive resistance reaction in Arabidopsis, bean and tomato. Rapid biophoton emission in Arabidopsis requires an intact R-gene signalling network and increased levels of cytosolic calcium and nitric oxide. The burst of biophotons precedes macroscopic symptoms by several hours and its timing is characteristic for specific gene-for-gene interactions. The ability to monitor biophoton emission from whole plants in real time should allow detailed dissection of plant defence responses.

  2. Ideal pseudocapacitive performance of the Mn oxide anodized from the nanostructured and amorphous Mn thin film electrodeposited in BMP-NTf 2 ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jeng-Kuei; Huang, Chiung-Hui; Tsai, Wen-Ta; Deng, Ming-Jay; Sun, I.-Wen

    A novel electrochemical route to prepare the Mn oxide with ideal pseudocapacitive performance is successfully proposed in this study. In n-butylmethylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfony)imide (BMP-NTf 2) ionic liquid, a nanostructured and amorphous Mn film could be electrodeposited on a Ni substrate. The metallic Mn films were then anodized in Na 2SO 4 aqueous solution by the potentiostatic, galvanostatic, and cyclic voltammetric methods and transformed to Mn oxides. It was confirmed that the different anodization courses would cause variations in the material characteristics of the prepared Mn oxides and therefore in their pseudocapacitive performance. The Mn oxide anodized by the cyclic voltammetric method showed the most promising specific capacitance of 402 F g -1; moreover, its capacitance retained ratio after 500 charge-discharge cycles was as high as 94%.

  3. An introduction to human biophoton emission.

    PubMed

    Wijk, Roeland Van; Wijk, Eduard P A Van

    2005-04-01

    Biophoton emission is the spontaneous emission of ultraweak light emanating from all living systems, including man. The emission is linked to the endogenous production of excited states within the living system. The detection and characterisation of human biophoton emission has led to suggestions that it has potential future applications in medicine. An overview is presented of studies on ultraweak photon emission (UPE, biophotons) from the human whole body. Electronic searches of Medline, PsychLit, PubMed and references lists of relevant review articles and books were used to establish the literature database. Articles were then analysed for their main experimental setup and results. The, mostly, single case studies have resulted in a collection of observations. The collection presents information on the following fields of research: (1) influence of biological rhythms, age, and gender on emission, (2) the intensity of emission and its left-right symmetry in health and disease, (3) emission from the perspective of Traditional Chinese and Korean Medicine, (4) emission in different consciousness studies, (5) procedures for analysis of the photon signal from hands, (6) detection of peroxidative processes in the skin. Of each article the main findings are presented in a qualitative manner, quantitative data are presented where useful, and the technological or methodological limitations are discussed. Photon emission recording techniques have reached a stage that allows resolution of the signal in time and space. The published material is presented and includes aspects like spatial resolution of intensity, its relation to health and disease, the aspect of colour, and methods for analysis of the photon signal. The limited number of studies only allows first conclusions about the implications and significance of biophotons in relation to health and disease, or to mental states, or acupuncture. However, with the present data we consider that further research in the field

  4. Sulfur-Doped Porphyrinic Carbon Nanostructures Synthesized with Amorphous MoS2 for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction in an Acidic Medium.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Suk; Han, Sang-Beom; Kwak, Da-Hee; Lee, Gyu-Ho; Choi, In-Ae; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Ma, Kyeng-Bae; Kim, Min-Cheol; Kwon, Hye-Jin; Park, Kyung-Won

    2017-05-22

    To develop doped carbon nanostructures as non-precious metal cathode catalysts, nanocomposites were synthesized by using SBA-15 and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)porphyrin-iron(III) chloride with different ratios of amorphous MoS2 precursor. From various analyses, it was found that, during pyrolysis at 900 °C under an N2 atmosphere, the amorphous MoS2 precursor decomposed into Mo and S, facilitating the formation of graphene sheet-like carbon with MoC and doping of sulfur in the carbon. In the nanocomposite formed from 10 wt % MoS2 precursor (denoted as Mo/S/PC-10), most of the MoS2 was decomposed, thus forming S-doped carbon, which was grown on the MoC phase without crystalline MoS2 . Furthermore, Mo/S/PC-10 exhibited better performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (specific activity of 1.23 mA cm(-2) at 0.9 V and half-wave potential of 0.864 V) than a commercial Pt catalyst, owing to a heteroatom-doped carbon nanostructure with a fairly high specific surface area. In the polarization curve of the unit-cell performance measured at 80 °C under ambient pressure, Mo/S/PC-10 as a cathode catalyst exhibited an optimal power density of 314 mW cm(-2) and a current density of 280 mA cm(-2) at 0.6 V. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Electronic structure and phase composition of dielectric interlayers in multilayer amorphous nanostructure [(CoFeB)60C40/SiO2]200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domashevskaya, E. P.; Builov, N. S.; Terekhov, V. A.; Barkov, K. A.; Sitnikov, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    The multilayer amorphous nanostructure [(CoFeB)60C40/SiO2]200 of alternating composite and dielectric layers was obtained by ion-beam sputtering on a rotating pyroceramic substrate of two targets, one of which was a Co40Fe40B20 metal alloy plate with graphite inserts. The dielectric interlayers of SiO2 were sputtered from a quartz plate (second target). The thicknesses of bilayers of the multilayered nanostructure (MNS) (6 nm), consisting of metal-carbon composite layers (CoFeB)60C40 approximately 4 nm in thickness and a silicon oxide dielectric interlayers with a thickness of approximately 2 nm, were determined by small-angle diffraction. The results of experimental layer-by-layer study without destroying the MNS by ultrasoft X-ray spectroscopy (USXES) showed a significant deviation of the stoichiometric composition of the dielectric interlayers from stoichiometry sputtered quartz towards decreasing oxygen concentration with the formation of SiO1.3 suboxide. As a result of simulation of the Si L 2,3 spectra of silicon using reference spectra of known phases, the concentration of the silicon suboxide phase in the amorphous dielectric interlayers reaches about half of the interlayer content, the second half of which is accounted for SiO 2 dioxide. A "shielding" effect of carbon in the metal layers is manifested in the absence of silicide formation at the interfaces of the multilayer structure under study and should help to increase the anisotropy of their electromagnetic properties.

  6. A near-frictionless and extremely elastic hydrogenated amorphous carbon film with self-assembled dual nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Jun; Hao, Junying; Zheng, Jianyun; Gong, Qiuyu; Liu, Weimin

    2012-09-04

    A highly crosslinking network combined with a fullerene-like structure is disclosed in a hydrogenated amorphous carbon film. The very soft carbon film exhibits super-low friction and excellent wear resistance even under a Hertzian contact pressure comparable to its hardness under vacuum, which is an extraordinary tribological behavior in the filed of solid lubrication films or coatings.

  7. Enhanced photocurrent in thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells via shape controlled three-dimensional nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Hilali, Mohamed M; Yang, Shuqiang; Miller, Mike; Xu, Frank; Banerjee, Sanjay; Sreenivasan, S V

    2012-10-12

    In this paper, we have explored manufacturable approaches to sub-wavelength controlled three-dimensional (3D) nano-patterns with the goal of significantly enhancing the photocurrent in amorphous silicon solar cells. Here we demonstrate efficiency enhancement of about 50% over typical flat a-Si thin-film solar cells, and report an enhancement of 20% in optical absorption over Asahi textured glass by fabricating sub-wavelength nano-patterned a-Si on glass substrates. External quantum efficiency showed superior results for the 3D nano-patterned thin-film solar cells due to enhancement of broadband optical absorption. The results further indicate that this enhanced light trapping is achieved with minimal parasitic absorption losses in the deposited transparent conductive oxide for the nano-patterned substrate thin-film amorphous silicon solar cell configuration. Optical simulations are in good agreement with experimental results, and also show a significant enhancement in optical absorption, quantum efficiency and photocurrent.

  8. Micro/nanostructures formation by femtosecond laser surface processing on amorphous and polycrystalline Ni60Nb40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Edwin; Tsubaki, Alfred; Zuhlke, Craig A.; Wang, Meiyu; Bell, Ryan; Lucis, Michael J.; Anderson, Troy P.; Alexander, Dennis R.; Gogos, George; Shield, Jeffrey E.

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond laser surface processing is a technology that can be used to functionalize many surfaces, imparting specialized properties such as increased broadband optical absorption or superhydrophilicity/superhydrophobicity. In this study, two unique classes of surface structures, below surface growth (BSG) and above surface growth (ASG) mounds, were formed by femtosecond laser surface processing on amorphous and polycrystalline Ni60Nb40 with two different grain sizes. Cross sectional imaging of these mounds revealed thermal evidence of the unique formation processes for each class of surface structure. BSG mounds formed on all three substrates using the same laser parameters had similar surface morphology. The microstructures in the mounds were unaltered compared with the substrate before laser processing, suggesting their formation was dominated by preferential valley ablation. ASG mounds had similar morphology when formed on the polycrystalline Ni60Nb40 substrates with 100 nm and 2 μm grain size. However, the ASG mounds had significantly wider diameter and higher peak-to-valley heights when the substrate was amorphous Ni60Nb40. Hydrodynamic melting was primarily responsible for ASG mound formation. On amorphous Ni60Nb40 substrates, the ASG mounds are most likely larger due to lower thermal diffusivity. There was clear difference in growth mechanism of femtosecond laser processed BSG and ASG mounds, and grain size does not appear to be a factor.

  9. Oncologic applications of biophotonics: prospects and problems.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, N K; Chandra, S; Mathew, T L

    2001-01-01

    The understanding of various intrinsic photobiophysical processes has prompted researchers to develop different types of biodevices for health care. In the recent past, because of extensive contributions from various groups in the field of biophotonics, several important biomedical applications are emerging in the fields of both diagnostics and therapy. In this brief review, we discuss a few specific applications related to early detection and characterization of premalignant and malignant lesions using optical spectroscopic techniques, namely, fluorescence and Raman, and in management of cancer, the emerging scene of photodynamic therapy.

  10. Identical particle model on biophoton emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. C.; Liu, Songhao; Popp, Fritz A.; Tang, Ao-Qing

    1996-09-01

    Biophoton emission (PE) method is a non-invasive way revealing biophysical interactions in living tissues. Since its mechanism is not very clear, its acceptance is limited. Gu has presented the quantum theory on biophoton emission according to the Dicke model. However, the Dicke model does not apply to biological system. In this paper, we studied PE by using the identical particle model, the interaction of identical particles by quantum chemistry, as well as the transition of the system interacting with radiation by the time quantum theory on radiation-matter interaction put forward by the first author and his cooperators. It was shown that the identical particles form coherent states, the photon emission probability of the superradiant state is a liner function of N and N2, and the one of the subradiant state is zero. In other words, the photon emission intensity represents the coherent states of the identical particle system. The linear relationship of N and N2 agrees with the PE experiment results on early drosophila embryos. The research on the cell division cycle showed that the superradiant states correspond to the late S phase. This is why PE can be used to differentiate human tumor tissues from normal ones. We also studied induced PE.

  11. Left-right asymmetry of biophoton emission from hemiparesis patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun-Hee; Woo, Won-Myung; Yang, Joon-Mo; Choi, Chunho; Lee, Jonghan; Yoon, Gilwon; Yang, Jong S; Lee, Sungmuk; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2003-05-01

    Left-right biophoton asymmetry from the palm and the dorsum of hands from 7 Korean hemiparesis patients were studied. There is a strong tendency that the left-hemiparesis patients emit more biophotons from the right than the left hands, while the right-hemiparesis patient emits more from the left hand. Acupuncture treatment reduces dramatically the left-right asymmetry of biophoton emission rates. However there is no systematic difference for the patients in the emission rates from the palm and the dorsum of hands.

  12. Biophoton emission from fingernails and fingerprints of living human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jin; Nam, Kyung Woon; Shin, Hak-Soo; Lee, Sung Muk; Yang, Jong Soo; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2002-01-01

    Biophotons emitted from the center of fingernails and fingerprints from living humans are measured for twenty healthy subjects. We devised a dark box with a photo multiplier tube (H6180-01, Hamamatsu, Japan) whose spectral range is 300 nm to approximately 650 nm and a mount with a light-receiving hole of diameter 8 mm such that biophotons from the small circular area of nail or print of each finger are detected. Significantly more biophotons are emitted from fingernail than fingerprint for each finger of every subject. For thumb the average biophoton emission rate is 23.0 +/- 4.5 counts per second, and 17.2 +/- 2.0 counts per second from the nail, and print, respectively. There is a slight tendency that the little finger emits less than the other fingers. But some fingers emit far stronger than others, and it depends upon each individual subject which finger emits strongest.

  13. Role of Inelastic Electron–Phonon Scattering in Electron Transport through Ultra-Scaled Amorphous Phase Change Material Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Xu, Xu; Anantram, M.P.

    2014-09-01

    The electron transport through ultra-scaled amorphous phase change material (PCM) GeTe is investigated by using ab initio molecular dynamics, density functional theory, and non-equilibrium Green’s function, and the inelastic electron–phonon scattering is accounted for by using the Born approximation. It is shown that, in ultra-scaled PCM device with 6 nm channel length, < 4 % of the energy carried by the incident electrons from the source is transferred to the atomic lattice before reaching the drain, indicating that the electron transport is largely elastic. Our simulation results show that the inelastic electron–phonon scattering, which plays an important role to excite trapped electrons in bulk PCM devices, exerts very limited influence on the current density value and the shape of current–voltage curve of ultra-scaled PCM devices. The analysis reveals that the Poole–Frenkel law and the Ohm’s law, which are the governing physical mechanisms of the bulk PCM devices, cease to be valid in the ultra-scaled PCM devices.

  14. Reflectivity of the gyroid biophotonic crystals in the ventral wing scales of the Green Hairstreak butterfly, Callophrys rubi.

    PubMed

    Michielsen, K; De Raedt, H; Stavenga, D G

    2010-05-06

    We present a comparison of the computer simulation data of gyroid nanostructures with optical measurements (reflectivity spectra and scattering diagrams) of ventral wing scales of the Green Hairstreak butterfly, Callophrys rubi. We demonstrate that the omnidirectional green colour arises from the gyroid cuticular structure grown in the domains of different orientation. We also show that this three-dimensional structure, operating as a biophotonic crystal, gives rise to various polarization effects. We briefly discuss the possible biological utility of the green coloration and polarization effects.

  15. Nonlinear response of biophoton emission to external perturbations.

    PubMed

    Gu, Q; Popp, F A

    1992-12-01

    By considering an exciplex system consisting of collective molecules in interaction with both the 'pumping' fields and the biophoton fields, the two-level exciplex model and the three-level exciplex model are presented. They are useful for the investigation of the quasi-stationary behaviour of biophoton emission, and biophoton emission as a dynamic process in the presence of external perturbations. Our theoretical results predict a series of nonlinear effects, such as chaos, fractal behaviour, and non-equilibrium phase transition. These effects characterize the coherence nature of living systems. In our approaches, there are two important quantities f and x, which can be used to mark the working points of the two-level and three-level exciplex systems. All the influences of external perturbations on the exciplex systems, e.g. change of temperature, the addition of agents, exposure to light, etc., can be interpreted as shifts of the working points of the systems, leading to a diversity of nonlinear response of biophoton emission. In addition, the agreements of the theoretical results and the corresponding experimental observations on biophoton emission from biological systems in the presence of external perturbations are demonstrated.

  16. Ultraweak biophoton emission imaging of transplanted bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Amano, T; Kobayashi, M; Devaraj, B; Usa, M; Inaba, H

    1995-01-01

    Biophoton emission or spontaneous ultraweak light emission has been observed from almost all living organisms, with intensities ranging from 10(-19) to 10(-16) W/cm2. The measurement of biophoton emission offers the attractive possibility of noninvasive monitoring of the underlying physiological function of a living system. In the present study, ultraweak biophoton emission from mice with transplanted bladder cancer was detected by a two-dimensional photon-counting system. Photon counts were observed to be 1.51-4.73 times higher from the regions of untreated tumor than from normal regions. Our study suggests that this novel technique may be applicable to the diagnosis of superficial tumors.

  17. Development of a biophotonics option within a photonics technology degree program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellman, Joel; Vasan, Srini; Hall, Robert; Goodwin, Don; Matthews, Dennis; Molinaro, Marco; Shackelford, James F.

    2005-10-01

    Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute (TVI) has developed a collaboration with the National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology (CBST) headquartered at the University of California, Davis in order to develop a transportable biophotonics curriculum for community colleges. A "Biophotonics Option" has been developed within the well-established Photonics Technology Degree program at TVI, centered on two elective courses ("Introduction to Biophotonics" and "Biophotonics Applications"). In addition, TVI is a part of the "Albuquerque Model" that involves exposure to photonics education from the middle school level through graduate education at the University of New Mexico.

  18. Biophotonics: Optical Science and Engineering for the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xun; van Wijk, Roeland

    It is now well established that all living systems emit a weak but permanent photon flux in the visible and ultraviolet range. This biophoton emission is correlated with many, if not all, biological and physiological functions. There are indications of a hitherto-overlooked information channel within the living system. Biophotons may trigger chemical reactivity in cells, growth control, differentiation and intercellular communication, i.e. biological rhythms. The basic experimental and theoretical framework as well as the technical problems and the wide field of applications in the biotechnical, biomedical engineering, engineering, medicine, pharmacology, environmental science and basic science fields are presented in this book.

  19. Effect of exogenous hydrogen peroxide on biophoton emission from radish root cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospísil, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Biophotons spontaneously emitted from radish root cells were detected using highly sensitive photomultiplier tube. Freshly isolated radish root cells exhibited spontaneous photon emission of about 4 counts s(-1). Addition of hydrogen peroxide to the cells caused significant enhancement in biophoton emission to about 500 counts s(-1). Removal of molecular oxygen using glucose/glucose oxidase system and scavengering of reactive oxygen species by reducing agents such are sodium ascorbate and cysteine completely diminished biophoton emission. Spectral analysis of the hydrogen peroxide-induced biophoton emission indicates that biophotons are emitted mainly in green-red region of the spectra. The data provided by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping technique showed that formation of singlet oxygen observed after addition of H2O2 correlates with enhancement in biophoton emission. These observations provide direct evidence that singlet oxygen is involved in biophoton emission from radish root cells. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of exercises on biophoton emission of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Laager, Frédéric; Park, Sang-Hyun; Yang, Joon-Mo; Song, Wook; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2008-03-01

    Using two photomultiplier tubes (PMT), we measured the biophoton emission of the left and right wrists simultaneously. The subjects performed hand-grip exercises with both hands, during the measurements. We found a slow increase of the emission rates during the exercises, rising in average from 51.6 cps (counts per second) to 72.3 cps and an immediate decrease after the ending of the exercises. Simultaneous measurement of the skin temperature near the wrist using a thermocouple showed steady increase of temperature even after the ending of the exercises. Thus we demonstrated manifestly that the biophoton has no correlation with body temperature changes. We proposed a hypothesis to account the increase of the biophoton due to muscular activity. The oxygen used by the respiratory chain is the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and therefore must be one of the biophoton sources. To flesh out this hypothesis we compared our data to heart beat rates and oxygen consumption values measured while doing the same type of exercises.

  1. New master program in management in biophotonics and biotechnologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meglinski, I. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2006-08-01

    We develop new graduate educational highly interdisciplinary program that will be useful for addressing problems in worldwide biotechnologies and related biomedical industries. This Master program called Management in Biophotonics and Biotechnologies provides students with the necessary training, education and problem-solving skills to produce managers who are better equipped to handle the challenges of modern business in modern biotechnologies. Administered jointly by Cranfield University (UK) and Saratov State University, Russia) graduates possess a blend of engineering, biotechnologies, business and interpersonal skills necessary for success in industry. The Master courses combine a regular year program in biophotonics & biotechnologies disciplines with the core requirements of a Master degree. A major advantage of the program is that it will provide skills not currently available to graduates in any other program, and it will give the graduates an extra competitive edge for getting a job then.

  2. Nano-Biophotonics: new tools for chemical nano-analytics

    PubMed Central

    Huser, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Summary The nondestructive chemical analysis of biological processes in the crowded intracellular environment, at cellular membranes, and between cells with a spatial resolution well beyond the diffraction limit is made possible through Nano-Biophotonics. A number of sophisticated schemes employing nanoparticles, nano-apertures, or shaping of the probe volume in the far field have significantly extended our knowledge about lipid rafts, macromolecular complexes, i.e. chromatin, vesicles, and cellular organelles, and their interactions and trafficking within the cell. Here, I review some of the most recent developments in Nano-Biophotonics that already are or soon will become relevant to the analysis of intracellular processes. The pros and cons of the various techniques will be discussed and an outlook of their prospects for the near future will be provided. PMID:18786651

  3. Nano-biophotonics: new tools for chemical nano-analytics.

    PubMed

    Huser, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The nondestructive chemical analysis of biological processes in the crowded intracellular environment, at cellular membranes, and between cells with a spatial resolution well beyond the diffraction limit is made possible through Nano-Biophotonics. A number of sophisticated schemes employing nanoparticles, nano-apertures, or shaping of the probe volume in the far field have significantly extended our knowledge about lipid rafts, macromolecular complexes, such as chromatin, vesicles, and cellular organelles, and their interactions and trafficking within the cell. Here, I review some of the most recent developments in Nano-Biophotonics that already are or soon will become relevant to the analysis of intracellular processes. The pros and cons of the various techniques will be discussed and an outlook of their prospects for the near future will be provided.

  4. Biological electric fields and rate equations for biophotons.

    PubMed

    Alvermann, M; Srivastava, Y N; Swain, J; Widom, A

    2015-04-01

    Biophoton intensities depend upon the squared modulus of the electric field. Hence, we first make some general estimates about the inherent electric fields within various biosystems. Generally, these intensities do not follow a simple exponential decay law. After a brief discussion on the inapplicability of a linear rate equation that leads to strict exponential decay, we study other, nonlinear rate equations that have been successfully used for biosystems along with their physical origins when available.

  5. Biophoton emission in synchronously developing population of early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu-Ming; Ho, Mae-Wan; Bolton, John P.; Milani, Marziale; Costato, Michele; Musumeci, Francesco

    1996-11-01

    Ultraweak biophoton emission has been recorded in synchronously developing populations of early Drosophila embryos. On being stimulated briefly with white light within the first 40 minutes of development, a new kind of luminescence is observed in the form of superdelayed, intense flashes. We assume that the initial light stimulation sets up some kind of coherent interaction inside the system and develop a phenomenological number-phase-angle model to give a general interpretation of the superdelayed radiation patterns.

  6. Biophoton signal transmission and processing in the brain.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rendong; Dai, Jiapei

    2014-10-05

    The transmission and processing of neural information in the nervous system plays a key role in neural functions. It is well accepted that neural communication is mediated by bioelectricity and chemical molecules via the processes called bioelectrical and chemical transmission, respectively. Indeed, the traditional theories seem to give valuable explanations for the basic functions of the nervous system, but difficult to construct general accepted concepts or principles to provide reasonable explanations of higher brain functions and mental activities, such as perception, learning and memory, emotion and consciousness. Therefore, many unanswered questions and debates over the neural encoding and mechanisms of neuronal networks remain. Cell to cell communication by biophotons, also called ultra-weak photon emissions, has been demonstrated in several plants, bacteria and certain animal cells. Recently, both experimental evidence and theoretical speculation have suggested that biophotons may play a potential role in neural signal transmission and processing, contributing to the understanding of the high functions of nervous system. In this paper, we review the relevant experimental findings and discuss the possible underlying mechanisms of biophoton signal transmission and processing in the nervous system.

  7. Spatiotemporal Imaging of Glutamate-Induced Biophotonic Activities and Transmission in Neural Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rendong; Dai, Jiapei

    2014-01-01

    The processing of neural information in neural circuits plays key roles in neural functions. Biophotons, also called ultra-weak photon emissions (UPE), may play potential roles in neural signal transmission, contributing to the understanding of the high functions of nervous system such as vision, learning and memory, cognition and consciousness. However, the experimental analysis of biophotonic activities (emissions) in neural circuits has been hampered due to technical limitations. Here by developing and optimizing an in vitro biophoton imaging method, we characterize the spatiotemporal biophotonic activities and transmission in mouse brain slices. We show that the long-lasting application of glutamate to coronal brain slices produces a gradual and significant increase of biophotonic activities and achieves the maximal effect within approximately 90 min, which then lasts for a relatively long time (>200 min). The initiation and/or maintenance of biophotonic activities by glutamate can be significantly blocked by oxygen and glucose deprivation, together with the application of a cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor (sodium azide), but only partly by an action potential inhibitor (TTX), an anesthetic (procaine), or the removal of intracellular and extracellular Ca2+. We also show that the detected biophotonic activities in the corpus callosum and thalamus in sagittal brain slices mostly originate from axons or axonal terminals of cortical projection neurons, and that the hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau leads to a significant decrease of biophotonic activities in these two areas. Furthermore, the application of glutamate in the hippocampal dentate gyrus results in increased biophotonic activities in its intrahippocampal projection areas. These results suggest that the glutamate-induced biophotonic activities reflect biophotonic transmission along the axons and in neural circuits, which may be a new mechanism for the processing of neural

  8. Spatiotemporal imaging of glutamate-induced biophotonic activities and transmission in neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rendong; Dai, Jiapei

    2014-01-01

    The processing of neural information in neural circuits plays key roles in neural functions. Biophotons, also called ultra-weak photon emissions (UPE), may play potential roles in neural signal transmission, contributing to the understanding of the high functions of nervous system such as vision, learning and memory, cognition and consciousness. However, the experimental analysis of biophotonic activities (emissions) in neural circuits has been hampered due to technical limitations. Here by developing and optimizing an in vitro biophoton imaging method, we characterize the spatiotemporal biophotonic activities and transmission in mouse brain slices. We show that the long-lasting application of glutamate to coronal brain slices produces a gradual and significant increase of biophotonic activities and achieves the maximal effect within approximately 90 min, which then lasts for a relatively long time (>200 min). The initiation and/or maintenance of biophotonic activities by glutamate can be significantly blocked by oxygen and glucose deprivation, together with the application of a cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor (sodium azide), but only partly by an action potential inhibitor (TTX), an anesthetic (procaine), or the removal of intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+). We also show that the detected biophotonic activities in the corpus callosum and thalamus in sagittal brain slices mostly originate from axons or axonal terminals of cortical projection neurons, and that the hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau leads to a significant decrease of biophotonic activities in these two areas. Furthermore, the application of glutamate in the hippocampal dentate gyrus results in increased biophotonic activities in its intrahippocampal projection areas. These results suggest that the glutamate-induced biophotonic activities reflect biophotonic transmission along the axons and in neural circuits, which may be a new mechanism for the processing of neural

  9. 77 FR 19744 - Advanced BioPhotonics, Inc., Advanced Viral Research Corp., Brantley Capital Corp., Brilliant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Advanced BioPhotonics, Inc., Advanced Viral Research Corp., Brantley Capital Corp., Brilliant... information concerning the securities of Advanced BioPhotonics, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic...

  10. Biophoton emission in a squeezed state from a sample of Parmelia tinctorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, R. P.

    2004-02-01

    The probabilities of detecting different number of photons in a bin are measured in spontaneous biophoton signals emitted by the dry and wet states of a sample of lichen species Parmelia tinctorum. The parameters of quantum squeezed states describing biophoton signals are estimated. The parameters have weak dependence on bin size.

  11. Classical analysis of time behavior of radiation fields associated with biophoton signals.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Kim, Daeyeoul; Menouar, Salah; Sever, Ramazan; Abdalla, M Sebawe

    2016-04-29

    Propagation of photon signals in biological systems, such as neurons, accompanies the production of biophotons. The role of biophotons in a cell deserves special attention because it can be applied to diverse optical systems. This work has been aimed to investigate the time behavior of biophoton signals emitted from living systems in detail, by introducing a Hamiltonian that describes the process. The ratio of the energy loss during signal dissipation will also be investigated. To see the adiabatic properties of the biophoton signal, we introduced an adiabatic invariant of the system according to the method of its basic formulation. The energy of the released biophoton dissipates over time in a somewhat intricate way when t is small. However, after a sufficient long time, it dissipates in proportion (1+λ_0t)^2 to where λ_0 is a constant that is relevant to the degree of dissipation. We have confirmed that the energy of the biophoton signal oscillates in a particular way while it dissipates. This research clarifies the characteristics of radiation fields associated with biophotons on the basis of Hamiltonian dynamics which describes phenomenological aspects of biophotons signals.

  12. Biophotonic imaging: lighting the way for chem/bio detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripp, Steven; Jegier, Patricia; Lopes, Nicholas

    2009-05-01

    Biophotonic imaging is a versatile and powerful tool, that when combined with living microbial bioreporters, can be applied in diagnostic technologies for sensitive, nondestructive, real-time monitoring of chemical and biological targets. Bioreporters, consisting of bacteria as well as the viruses (bacteriophage) that infect them, can be genetically engineered to emit visible light upon interaction with a specific chemical or biological entity. By interfacing these bioreporters with imaging cameras or miniaturized integrated circuit microluminometers, fully standalone detection units are formed that can be deployed for intelligent distributed multi-target chem/bio monitoring.

  13. Light forces the pace: optical manipulation for biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David James; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2010-01-01

    The biomedical sciences have benefited immensely from photonics technologies in the last 50 years. This includes the application of minute forces that enable the trapping and manipulation of cells and single molecules. In terms of the area of biophotonics, optical manipulation has made a seminal contribution to our understanding of the dynamics of single molecules and the microrheology of cells. Here we present a review of optical manipulation, emphasizing its impact on the areas of single-molecule studies and single-cell biology, and indicating some of the key experiments in the fields.

  14. Biophoton imaging: a nondestructive method for assaying R gene responses.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Mark; Mehta, Monaz; Grant, Murray

    2005-02-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) proteins of the nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat class are responsible for pathogen recognition and activation of defense signaling networks leading to the hypersensitive response (HR). Genetically, R-protein signaling appears to be integrated through a limited set of common downstream components. However, the timing of development of visible HR is unique to individual R proteins. By utilizing the phenomena of ultraweak photon emission from leaves undergoing an incompatible interacttion, a powerful nondestructive and facile assay is described to compare timing of defense responses elicited by different R proteins. We demonstrate that ultraweak photon emission, or "biophoton generation," is demonstrated to be associated with hypersensitive cell death. Biophoton emission requires an intact R signaling network and increases in cytosolic calcium and nitric oxide, but elevated reactive oxygen species are not necessary. Importantly, the assay is robust and applicable to a range of incompatible interactions in various plant species. The ability to assay R responses nondestructively in real time and a chosen genetic background makes this technique amenable to subtle genetic dissection of plant defense responses.

  15. Hollow fiber: a biophotonic implant for live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre, Oscar F.; Holton, Mark D.; Summers, Huw D.; Smith, Paul J.; Errington, Rachel J.

    2009-02-01

    The technical objective of this study has been to design, build and validate biocompatible hollow fiber implants based on fluorescence with integrated biophotonics components to enable in fiber kinetic cell based assays. A human osteosarcoma in vitro cell model fiber system has been established with validation studies to determine in fiber cell growth, cell cycle analysis and organization in normal and drug treated conditions. The rationale for implant development have focused on developing benchmark concepts in standard monolayer tissue culture followed by the development of in vitro hollow fiber designs; encompassing imaging with and without integrated biophotonics. Furthermore the effect of introducing targetable biosensors into the encapsulated tumor implant such as quantum dots for informing new detection readouts and possible implant designs have been evaluated. A preliminary micro/macro imaging approach has been undertaken, that could provide a mean to track distinct morphological changes in cells growing in a 3D matrix within the fiber which affect the light scattering properties of the implant. Parallel engineering studies have showed the influence of the optical properties of the fiber polymer wall in all imaging modes. Taken all together, we show the basic foundation and the opportunities for multi-modal imaging within an in vitro implant format.

  16. A novel method of assessing carcinoma cell proliferation by biophoton emission.

    PubMed

    Takeda, M; Tanno, Y; Kobayashi, M; Usa, M; Ohuchi, N; Satomi, S; Inaba, H

    1998-05-15

    Changes in the emission intensities of ultraweak biophoton emission during the cell proliferation of human carcinoma cell culture (TE9 cell line) were detected using a highly sensitive and low noise measurement apparatus coupled with a flow culture system. In the sampling period of 93 h, the biophoton emission intensity from the culture followed a similar course as that of the growth curve. Spectral analysis of the biophoton emission from the cell culture demonstrated a significant peak at around 530 nm. Our results suggest that the emission intensity mainly depends on the cell population and that this noninvasive technique has a potential role in cancer diagnosis.

  17. The spectrum of courses offered by the Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology (CBST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinaro, Marco; Shackelford, James F.

    2007-06-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology CBST) provides a number of short to full-length courses on the subject of biophotonics. A middle school summer camp and various versions of multi-year high school courses are currently in progress. Two courses define a Biophotonics Option within the Photonics Technology Degree Program at the Central New Mexico Community College. CBST also collaborates with the Integrated Studies Honors Program (ISHP) at UC Davis to provide an introductory course to some of the top students in the freshman class. Advanced undergraduate and graduate courses are provided at UC Davis and sister institutions within CBST.

  18. Estimation of the number of biophotons involved in the visual perception of a single-object image: biophoton intensity can be considerably higher inside cells than outside.

    PubMed

    Bókkon, I; Salari, V; Tuszynski, J A; Antal, I

    2010-09-02

    Recently, we have proposed a redox molecular hypothesis about the natural biophysical substrate of visual perception and imagery [1,6]. Namely, the retina transforms external photon signals into electrical signals that are carried to the V1 (striatecortex). Then, V1 retinotopic electrical signals (spike-related electrical signals along classical axonal-dendritic pathways) can be converted into regulated ultraweak bioluminescent photons (biophotons) through redox processes within retinotopic visual neurons that make it possible to create intrinsic biophysical pictures during visual perception and imagery. However, the consensus opinion is to consider biophotons as by-products of cellular metabolism. This paper argues that biophotons are not by-products, other than originating from regulated cellular radical/redox processes. It also shows that the biophoton intensity can be considerably higher inside cells than outside. Our simple calculations, within a level of accuracy, suggest that the real biophoton intensity in retinotopic neurons may be sufficient for creating intrinsic biophysical picture representation of a single-object image during visual perception. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biophotonics and immune responses-Highlights from a new SPIE photonics west conference (BIOS 2006).

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei R; Huang, Zheng

    2006-09-01

    This report summarizes some highlights from the "Biophotonics and Immune Responses", a new 2006 SPIE Photonics West Biomedical Optics (BIOS 2006) Conference. Some exciting recent progresses in host immune responses elicited by photodynamic therapy and other novel phototherapies are discussed.

  20. Year-long biophoton measurements: normalized frequency count analysis and seasonal dependency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun-Hee; Yang, Joon-Mo; Woo, Won-Myung; Choi, Chunho; Yang, Jong-Soo; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2005-02-01

    Biophoton emissions from three healthy human subjects were measured for 52 weeks. The active nature of dorsal hands and personal discernable patterns in palmar hands were investigated through frequency count analysis of biophoton emission rates. Also, the seasonal dependency of biophoton emission rates from human hands was studied and we found that emission rates were lowest in autumn. There was a reversion of relative emission rates from the palms and the dorsa depending upon the season. The emission rates from the palms remain rather stable throughout the year, but those from the dorsa vary widely depending upon the season. These features of biophoton emission rates were considered in light of the diagnostic view of traditional Chinese medicine.

  1. Emission of mitochondrial biophotons and their effect on electrical activity of membrane via microtubules.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, Majid; Tuszynski, Jack A; Bókkon, István; Cifra, Michal; Sardar, Peyman; Salari, Vahid

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we argue that, in addition to electrical and chemical signals propagating in the neurons of the brain, signal propagation takes place in the form of biophoton production. This statement is supported by recent experimental confirmation of photon guiding properties of a single neuron. We have investigated the interaction of mitochondrial biophotons with microtubules from a quantum mechanical point of view. Our theoretical analysis indicates that the interaction of biophotons and microtubules causes transitions/fluctuations of microtubules between coherent and incoherent states. A significant relationship between the fluctuation function of microtubules and alpha-EEG diagrams is elaborated on in this paper. We argue that the role of biophotons in the brain merits special attention. © Imperial College Press

  2. Biophoton emission of a lichen species Parmelia tinctorum.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, R P

    2003-05-01

    The properties of biophoton signals emitted by samples of lichen species P. tinctorum are investigated. The shape of a light induced signal is determined from 5 ms onwards using successively the bin resolution of 1, 10 and 100 ms; 1000 measurements in successive bins are made at each resolution. The measurement of the shape is repeated at various temperatures in the range (1 degree-40 degrees C) in steps of 1 degree C. It is found that a biophoton signal is very sensitive to temperature and different portions of the signal show different sensitivity. The temperature dependence of the decaying part is even qualitatively different from that of the non-decaying part. The signal responds to temperature changes of 0.1 degrees C in less than 1 ms. The effect of monochromatic stimulation on the strengths of the signal and its red, blue and green spectral components are determined in the wavelength range (400-700) nm in steps of 10 nm. The signal and its broad spectral components have similar excitation curves. The relative strength of spectral component appears independent of the stimulating wavelength. The shape of the decaying portion of the signal and its red, blue and green components is also determined. The character of decay in all four cases is non-exponential. The measurements with various interference filters spanning the entire visible region are made with the bin size of 20 s. These measurements are qualitative because of large fluctuations but suggest that the spectral components of a biophoton signal are distributed in the entire visible region. The probabilities of detecting different number of photons in the non-decaying portion are determined by making 30,000 measurements in each set with the bin size of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 700 ms. The probabilities determine the parameters of a squeezed state of light--the magnitude of its displacement parameter is different but the phase of its displacement parameter and its squeezing parameter are same for

  3. Development of a biophotonics technician-training program: directions for the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shackelford, James F.; Gellman, Joel; Vasan, Srini; Hall, Robert A.; Goodwin, Don E.; Molinaro, Marco; Matthews, Dennis

    2005-06-01

    Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute (TVI) is collaborating with the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology (CBST) headquartered at the University of California, Davis in order to develop a biophotonics curriculum for community colleges nationwide. TVI began the formal collaboration to bring about critically needed training and education that will ultimately create new jobs and employment opportunities in the field of biophotonics. "Biophotonics" is the science of generating and harnessing light to detect, image and manipulate biological materials. CBST chose TVI as a partner because of the Institute's current high-level photonics and biotechnology programs. In addition, TVI is a part of the "Albuquerque Model" that involves exposure to photonics education from the middle school level through graduate education at the University of New Mexico. Three middle schools feed into the West Mesa High School Photonics Academy, whose students then move on to TVI for advanced training. CBST brings together scientists, industry, educators and the community to research and develop applications for biophotonics. Roughly 100 researchers-including physical scientists, life scientists, physicians and engineers from UC Davis, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, UC Berkeley, UC San Francisco, Alabama A&M University, Stanford University, University of Texas at San Antonio, Fisk University and Mills College-are collaborating in this rapidly developing area of research. Applications of biophotonics range from using light to image or selectively treat tumors, to sequencing DNA and identifying single biomolecules within cells.

  4. Solid hemoglobin-polymer phantoms for evaluation of biophotonic systems.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyounguk; Pfefer, T Joshua; Chen, Yu

    2015-09-15

    Stable tissue phantoms that incorporate the spectral absorption properties of hemoglobin would benefit a wide range of biophotonic technologies. Toward this end, we have developed and validated a novel polymer material incorporating hemoglobin. Our solid hemoglobin-polymer (SHP) material is fabricated by mixing liquid silicone base with a hemoglobin solution, followed by sonication and low temperature curing. The optical properties of samples were determined over 450-1000 nm using the inverse adding-doubling method and the Beer-Lambert law. Measurements indicated SHP optical stability over four months. Near-infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging measurements of SHP samples were performed to demonstrate the utility of this approach. SHP materials have the potential to improve tissue-simulating phantoms used for development, evaluation, and standardization of optical devices for oximetry and other applications.

  5. High index contrast polymer waveguide platform for integrated biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Halldorsson, Jennifer; Arnfinnsdottir, Nina B; Jonsdottir, Asta B; Agnarsson, Björn; Leosson, Kristjan

    2010-07-19

    We present detailed characterization of a unique high-index-contrast integrated optical polymer waveguide platform where the index of the cladding material is closely matched to that of water. Single-mode waveguides designed to operate across a large part of the visible spectrum have been fabricated and waveguide properties, including mode size, bend loss and evanescent coupling have been modeled using effective-index approximation, finite-element and finite-difference time domain methods. Integrated components such as directional couplers for wavelength splitting and ring resonators for refractive-index or temperature sensing have been modeled, fabricated and characterized. The waveguide platform described here is applicable to a wide range of biophotonic applications relying on evanescent-wave sensing or excitation, offering a high level of integration and functionality. The technology is biocompatible and suitable for wafer-level mass production.

  6. Generation of multiple Bessel beams for a biophotonics workstation.

    PubMed

    Cizmár, T; Kollárová, V; Tsampoula, X; Gunn-Moore, F; Sibbett, W; Bouchal, Z; Dholakia, K

    2008-09-01

    We present a simple method using an axicon and spatial light modulator to create multiple parallel Bessel beams and precisely control their individual positions in three dimensions. This technique is tested as an alternative to classical holographic beam shaping commonly used now in optical tweezers. Various applications of precise control of multiple Bessel beams are demonstrated within a single microscope giving rise to new methods for three-dimensional positional control of trapped particles or active sorting of micro-objects as well as "focus-free" photoporation of living cells. Overall this concept is termed a 'biophotonics workstation' where users may readily trap, sort and porate material using Bessel light modes in a microscope.

  7. Biophotonics in diagnosis and modeling of tissue pathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Makropoulou, M.; Drakaki, E.

    2008-12-01

    Biophotonics techniques are applied to several fields in medicine and biology. The laser based techniques, such as the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and the optical coherence tomography (OCT), are of particular importance in dermatology, where the laser radiation could be directly applied to the tissue target (e.g. skin). In addition, OCT resolves architectural tissue properties that might be useful as tumour discrimination parameters for skin as well as for ocular non-invasive visualization. Skin and ocular tissues are complex multilayered and inhomogeneous organs with spatially varying optical properties. This fact complicates the quantitative analysis of the fluorescence and/or light scattering spectra, even from the same tissue sample. To overcome this problem, mathematical simulation is applied for the investigation of the human tissue optical properties, in the visible/infrared range of the spectrum, resulting in a better discrimination of several tissue pathologies. In this work, we present i) a general view on biophotonics applications in diagnosis of human diseases, ii) some specific results on laser spectroscopy techniques, as LIF measurements, applied in arterial and skin pathologies and iii) some experimental and theoretical results on ocular OCT measurements. Regarding the LIF spectroscopy, we examined the autofluorescence properties of several human skin samples, excised from humans undergoing biopsy examination. A nitrogen laser was used as an excitation source, emitting at 337 nm (ultraviolet excitation). Histopathology examination of the samples was also performed, after the laser spectroscopy measurements and the results from the spectroscopic and medical analysis were compared, to differentiate malignancies, e.g. basal cell carcinoma tissue (BCC), from normal skin tissue. Regarding the OCT technique, we correlated human data, obtained from patients undergoing OCT examination, with Monte Carlo simulated cornea and retina tissues

  8. Introducing biophotonics to first year undergraduates in science and non-science majors: approaches and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinaro, Marco; Shackelford, James

    2010-08-01

    Engaging students in photonics can be challenging as the field appears lesser known compared to standard majors offered at US Colleges and Universities. At the University of California Davis we teach a well-received introductory biophotonics course that attracts 20-25 honors freshman students yearly. The 40-hour course attracts science, engineering, and humanities majors alike. The course is a basic interdisciplinary exploration of the intersection of biology, physics, medicine, optics and technology with light. In addition to an overview of biophotonics, class participants do hands-on experiments, practice peer-review, interact with biophotonics scientists, and carry out projects to communicate biophotonics to others.

  9. Human high intelligence is involved in spectral redshift of biophotonic activities in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Niting; Li, Zehua; Xiao, Fangyan; Dai, Jiapei

    2016-01-01

    Human beings hold higher intelligence than other animals on Earth; however, it is still unclear which brain properties might explain the underlying mechanisms. The brain is a major energy-consuming organ compared with other organs. Neural signal communications and information processing in neural circuits play an important role in the realization of various neural functions, whereas improvement in cognitive function is driven by the need for more effective communication that requires less energy. Combining the ultraweak biophoton imaging system (UBIS) with the biophoton spectral analysis device (BSAD), we found that glutamate-induced biophotonic activities and transmission in the brain, which has recently been demonstrated as a novel neural signal communication mechanism, present a spectral redshift from animals (in order of bullfrog, mouse, chicken, pig, and monkey) to humans, even up to a near-infrared wavelength (∼865 nm) in the human brain. This brain property may be a key biophysical basis for explaining high intelligence in humans because biophoton spectral redshift could be a more economical and effective measure of biophotonic signal communications and information processing in the human brain. PMID:27432962

  10. Human high intelligence is involved in spectral redshift of biophotonic activities in the brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Niting; Li, Zehua; Xiao, Fangyan; Dai, Jiapei

    2016-08-02

    Human beings hold higher intelligence than other animals on Earth; however, it is still unclear which brain properties might explain the underlying mechanisms. The brain is a major energy-consuming organ compared with other organs. Neural signal communications and information processing in neural circuits play an important role in the realization of various neural functions, whereas improvement in cognitive function is driven by the need for more effective communication that requires less energy. Combining the ultraweak biophoton imaging system (UBIS) with the biophoton spectral analysis device (BSAD), we found that glutamate-induced biophotonic activities and transmission in the brain, which has recently been demonstrated as a novel neural signal communication mechanism, present a spectral redshift from animals (in order of bullfrog, mouse, chicken, pig, and monkey) to humans, even up to a near-infrared wavelength (∼865 nm) in the human brain. This brain property may be a key biophysical basis for explaining high intelligence in humans because biophoton spectral redshift could be a more economical and effective measure of biophotonic signal communications and information processing in the human brain.

  11. Left-right and Yin-Yang balance of biophoton emission from hands.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joon-mo; Choi, Chunho; Hyun-hee; Woo, Won-myung; Yi, Seung-ho; Soh, Kwang-sup; Yang, Jong Soo; Choi, C

    2004-01-01

    Yearlong measurements of biophotons from palm and back of hand of three healthy people were performed. The detection of biophoton was done with two photomultiplier tubes whose spectral range was from 300 nm to 650 nm. The measurement was done on a circular area of diameter 46 mm whose centers were at the acupuncture point Laogong (PC8) of a palm and the mid-point of a back, respectively. The emission rates from the dorsa showed strong seasonal dependence which is consistent with the active nature of Yang meridians, while the palm sides show less seasonal dependence as they belong to the passive Yin meridians. This could be quantified simply by the standard deviations from the yearly average: They were 47.6 counts per second (cps), 66.1 cps and 66.0 cps from the dorsa, and 23.8 cps, 29.7 cps and 30.4 cps from the palms of subject 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Biophoton emission revealed qualitative individual tendencies: The subjects 1 and 2 emitted more strongly from the left dorsa, while the subject 3 from the right dorsum. The left-right balance of biophoton emission was well kept for normal people, which is in contrast with the severe imbalance for some stroke patients. Thus biophoton measurement has a diagnostic potential that encourages more studies.

  12. Ultrasound-aided high-resolution biophotonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2003-10-01

    We develop novel biophotonic imaging for early-cancer detection, a grand challenge in cancer research, using nonionizing electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves. Unlike ionizing x-ray radiation, nonionizing electromagnetic waves such as optical waves are safe for biomedical applications and reveal new contrast mechanisms and functional information. For example, our spectroscopic oblique-incidence reflectometry can detect skin cancers based on functional hemoglobin parameters and cell nuclear size with 95% accuracy. Unfortunately, electromagnetic waves in the nonionizing spectral region do not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as do x-rays. Consequently, high-resolution tomography based on nonionizing electromagnetic waves alone, as demonstrated by our Mueller optical coherence tomography, is limited to superficial tissue imaging. Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, furnishes good imaging resolution but has poor contrast in early-stage tumors and has strong speckle artifacts as well. We developed ultrasound-mediated imaging modalities by combining electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves synergistically. The hybrid modalities yield speckle-free electromagnetic-contrast at ultrasonic resolution in relatively large biological tissue. In ultrasound-modulated (acousto)-optical tomography, a focused ultrasonic wave encodes diffuse laser light in scattering biological tissue. In photo-acoustic (thermo-acoustic) tomography, a low-energy laser (RF) pulse induces ultrasonic waves in biological tissue due to thermoelastic expansion.

  13. Noninvasive biophotonic imaging for studies of infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Andreu, Nuria; Zelmer, Andrea; Wiles, Siouxsie

    2011-01-01

    According to World Health Organization estimates, infectious organisms are responsible for approximately one in four deaths worldwide. Animal models play an essential role in the development of vaccines and therapeutic agents but large numbers of animals are required to obtain quantitative microbiological data by tissue sampling. Biophotonic imaging (BPI) is a highly sensitive, nontoxic technique based on the detection of visible light, produced by luciferase-catalysed reactions (bioluminescence) or by excitation of fluorescent molecules, using sensitive photon detectors. The development of bioluminescent/fluorescent microorganisms therefore allows the real-time noninvasive detection of microorganisms within intact living animals. Multiple imaging of the same animal throughout an experiment allows disease progression to be followed with extreme accuracy, reducing the number of animals required to yield statistically meaningful data. In the study of infectious disease, the use of BPI is becoming widespread due to the novel insights it can provide into established models, as well as the impact of the technique on two of the guiding principles of using animals in research, namely reduction and refinement. Here, we review the technology of BPI, from the instrumentation through to the generation of a photonic signal, and illustrate how the technique is shedding light on infection dynamics in vivo. PMID:20955395

  14. Biophotons from stressed and dying organisms: toxicological aspects.

    PubMed

    Sławinski, Janusz

    2003-05-01

    Cells and organisms exposed to detrimental and toxic substances show different responses in photon emission dependent on amount, kind and exposure time of toxin as well as on the organism investigated. Radical reaction-generating substances and dehydrating, lipid dissolving and protein denaturating toxins which do not induce direct chemiluminescence resulting from reactive oxygen species were applied. Lethal doses of toxins and stress factors such as osmotics and temperature evoke increase in the intensity of photon emission resulting from a rapid and irreversible perturbation of homeostasis. Bacterial and fungal toxins that elicit hypersensitive death of plant cells or defense response correlated with photon emission are also briefly discussed. Collective molecular interactions contribute to the photon-generating degradative processes in stressed and dying organisms. The measurements of biophoton signals and analysis of their parameters are used to elucidate the possible mechanisms of the toxin-organism interaction and the resistance of organisms. Toxicological perspectives of the use of these sensitive and rapid measurements as a part of direct toxicity assessment are discussed.

  15. Biophoton research in blood reveals its holistic properties.

    PubMed

    Voeikov, V L; Asfaramov, R; Bouravleva, E V; Novikov, C N; Vilenskaya, N D

    2003-05-01

    Monitoring of spontaneous and luminophore amplified photon emission (PE) from non-diluted human blood under resting conditions and artificially induced immune reaction revealed that blood is a continuous source of biophotons indicating that it persists in electronically excited state. This state is pumped through generation of electron excitation produced in reactive oxygen species (ROS) reactions. Excited state of blood and of neutrophil suspensions (primary sources of ROS in blood) is an oscillatory one suggesting of interaction between individual sources of electron excitation. Excited state of blood is extremely sensitive to the tiniest fluctuations of external photonic fields but resistant to temperature variations as reflected in hysteresis of PE in response to temperature variations. These data suggest that blood is a highly cooperative non-equilibrium and non-linear system, whose components unceasingly interact in time and space. At least in part this property is provided by the ability of blood to store energy of electron excitation that is produced in course of its own normal metabolism. From a practical point of view analysis of these qualities of blood may be a basement of new approach to diagnostic procedures.

  16. Efficient detection of internal infestation in wheat based on biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weiya; Jiao, Keke; Liang, Yitao; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    In the process of grain storage, there are many losses of grain quantity and quality for the sake of insects. As a result, it is necessary to find a rapid and economical method for detecting insects in the grain. The paper innovatively proposes a model of detecting internal infestation in wheat by combining pattern recognition and BioPhoton Analytical Technology (BPAT). In this model, the spontaneous ultraweak photons emitted from normal and insect-contaminated wheat are firstly measured respectively. Then, position, distribution and morphological characteristics can be extracted from the measuring data to construct wheat feature vector. Backpropagation (BP) neural network based on genetic algorithm is employed to take decision on whether wheat kernel has contaminated by insects. The experimental results show that the proposed model can differentiate the normal wheat from the insect-contaminated one at an average accuracy of 95%. The model can also offer a novel thought for detecting internal infestation in the wheat. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optics and biophotonics of nanoparticles with a plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Khlebtsov, N G

    2008-06-30

    A brief review of the state of the art in theoretical and experimental studies of the optical properties of metal particles with dipole and multipole plasmon resonances is presented. Metal spheres, nanorods, spherical and elliptic metal nanoshells are considered. The tuning of plasmon resonances of nanoparticles by varying their size, shape, structure, and dielectric environment is described. A large amount of spectrophotometric data on dimensional characteristics of gold colloidal particles is critically analysed and a new calibration of the dependence of their average size on the extinction plasmon resonance wavelength is proposed. A drastic difference between gold and silver colloids in the region of small deviations of their form from spherical is discussed. An example of the excess over not only the Rayleigh limit for the scattering depolarisation factor for dielectric needles (1/3) but also over the plasmon-resonance limit for metal thin rods (3/4) is presented for the first time. The multipole properties of nanorods and universal linear wavelength scaling of multipole resonances are considered depending on the axial ratio of nanoparticles. The outlook for modern trends in biomedical applications of nanoparticles with plasmon resonances is discussed. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  18. Biophotonic patterns of optical interactions between fish eggs and embryos.

    PubMed

    Beloussov, L V; Burlakov, A B; Louchinskaia, N N

    2003-05-01

    The optical (non-substantial) interactions between various biological samples have been evident in a number of cases mainly by the effects on their functional activity and developmental patterns. However, the mechanisms of these interactions have remained obscure. Effect of optical interaction has been observed on the intensity and Fourier patterns of biophoton emission of fish embryos. We demonstrate that: (1) the short-term optical interactions are accompanied by a gradual decrease of a total emission intensity of the interacting batches; (2) this effect is spread laterally to that part of a batch which does not have any direct optical contacts with its partner; and (3) the long-term optical contacts lead to a mutual exchange of spectral characteristics of interacting batches in which the total spectral density values are reversed (often with an overshoot). The reversal rate depends upon the developmental distance between the optical partners and the initial differences of their spectral characteristics. The results are discussed in terms of a sub-radiance and Le Chatelier principle.

  19. Biophotonics for imaging and cell manipulation: quo vadis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mirsini; Kotsifaki, Domna G.; Tsigaridas, Giorgos

    2016-01-01

    As one of the major health problems for mankind is cancer, any development for the early detection and effective treatment of cancer is crucial to saving lives. Worldwide, the dream for the anti-cancer procedure of attack is the development of a safe and efficient early diagnosis technique, the so called "optical biopsy". As early diagnosis of cancer is associated with improved prognosis, several laser based optical diagnostic methods were developed to enable earlier, non-invasive detection of human cancer, as Laser Induced Fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFs), Diffuse Reflectance spectroscopy (DRs), confocal microscopy, and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Among them, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging is considered to be a useful tool to differentiate healthy from malignant (e.g. basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma) skin tissue. If the demand is to perform imaging in sub-tissular or even sub-cellular level, optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy have enabled the visualization of molecular events underlying cellular processes in live cells, as well as the manipulation and characterization of microscale or even nanoscale biostructures. In this work, we will present the latest advances in the field of laser imaging and manipulation techniques, discussing some representative experimental data focusing on the 21th century biophotonics roadmap of novel diagnostic and therapeutical approaches. As an example of a recently discussed health and environmental problem, we studied both experimentally and theoretically the optical trapping forces exerted on yeast cells and modified with estrogen-like acting compounds yeast cells, suspended in various buffer media.

  20. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  1. Squeezed state description of spectral decompositions of a biophoton signal [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, R. P.

    2005-04-01

    The shape of decaying part and photo count distribution of non-decaying part are determined in 21 spectral decompositions of a biophoton signal obtained from interference and long pass filters. A new framework that considers biophoton signal as an evolving quantum state of a frequency stable damped harmonic oscillator is used for the description of shape and photo count distribution. Shape is specified by four decay parameters and photo count distribution by four squeezed state parameters. These parameters are determined in spectral decompositions. Three parameters are situation specific and five parameters appear system specific.

  2. Intranuclear biophotonics by smart design of nuclear-targeting photo-/radio-sensitizers co-loaded upconversion nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenpei; Shen, Bo; Bu, Wenbo; Zheng, Xiangpeng; He, Qianjun; Cui, Zhaowen; Ni, Dalong; Zhao, Kuaile; Zhang, Shengjian; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-11-01

    Biophotonic technology that uses light and ionizing radiation for positioned cancer therapy is a holy grail in the field of biomedicine because it can overcome the systemic toxicity and adverse side effects of conventional chemotherapy. However, the existing biophotonic techniques fail to achieve the satisfactory treatment efficacy, which remains a big challenge for clinical implementation. Herein, we develop a novel theranostic technique of "intranuclear biophotonics" by the smart design of a nuclear-targeting biophotonic system based on photo-/radio-sensitizers covalently co-loaded upconversion nanoparticles. These nuclear-targeting biophotonic agents can not only generate a great deal of multiple cytotoxic reactive oxygen species in the nucleus by making full use of NIR/X-ray irradiation, but also produce greatly enhanced intranuclear synergetic radio-/photodynamic therapeutic effects under the magnetic/luminescent bimodal imaging guidance, which may achieve the optimal efficacy in treating radio-resistant tumors. We anticipate that the highly effective intranuclear biophotonics will contribute significantly to the development of biophotonic techniques and open new perspectives for a variety of cancer theranostic applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Growth of biophotonic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC #43888) within rumen fluid media

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of biophotonic microbes can allow researchers to gain a better understanding of mechanisms utilized by bacteria to grow and colonize within the ruminant gastrointestinal tract, thus allowing the investigation of how stress management and nutrition impact pathogen shedding in ruminants. Howev...

  4. Lab-on-a-chip biophotonics: its application to assisted reproductive technologies

    PubMed Central

    Lai, David; Smith, Gary D.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    With the benefits of automation, sensitivity and precision, microfluidics has enabled complex and otherwise tedious experiments. Lately, lab-on-a-chip (LOC) has proven to be a useful tool for enhancing non-invasive assisted reproductive technology (ART). Non-invasive gamete and embryo assessment has largely been through periodic morpohological assessment using optical microscopy and early LOC ART was the same. As we realize that morphological assessment is a poor indication of gamete or embryo health, more advanced biophotonics has emerged in LOC ART to assay for metabolites or gamete separation via optoelectrical tweezers. Off-chip, even more advanced biophotonics with broad spectrum analysis of metabolites and secretomes has been developed that show even higher accuracy to predicting reproductive potential. The integration of broad spectrum metabolite analysis into LOC ART is an exciting future that merges automation and sensitivity with the already highly accurate and strong predictive power of biophotonics. Integration of LOC with simple biophotonics [35]. Currently most advanced LOC requires a large amount of supporting equipment, limiting its integration into complex photonics. Progress in implementation of microfluidic operations without the addition of supporting equipment will make LOC integration with highly complex photonics practical. PMID:22700221

  5. Genomic instantiation of consciousness in neurons through a biophoton field theory.

    PubMed

    Cacha, Lleuvelyn A; Poznanski, Roman R

    2014-06-01

    A theoretical framework is developed based on the premise that brains evolved into sufficiently complex adaptive systems capable of instantiating genomic consciousness through self-awareness and complex interactions that recognize qualitatively the controlling factors of biological processes. Furthermore, our hypothesis assumes that the collective interactions in neurons yield macroergic effects, which can produce sufficiently strong electric energy fields for electronic excitations to take place on the surface of endogenous structures via alpha-helical integral proteins as electro-solitons. Specifically the process of radiative relaxation of the electro-solitons allows for the transfer of energy via interactions with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules to induce conformational changes in DNA molecules producing an ultra weak non-thermal spontaneous emission of coherent biophotons through a quantum effect. The instantiation of coherent biophotons confined in spaces of DNA molecules guides the biophoton field to be instantaneously conducted along the axonal and neuronal arbors and in-between neurons and throughout the cerebral cortex (cortico-thalamic system) and subcortical areas (e.g., midbrain and hindbrain). Thus providing an informational character of the electric coherence of the brain - referred to as quantum coherence. The biophoton field is realized as a conscious field upon the re-absorption of biophotons by exciplex states of DNA molecules. Such quantum phenomenon brings about self-awareness and enables objectivity to have access to subjectivity in the unconscious. As such, subjective experiences can be recalled to consciousness as subjective conscious experiences or qualia through co-operative interactions between exciplex states of DNA molecules and biophotons leading to metabolic activity and energy transfer across proteins as a result of protein-ligand binding during protein-protein communication. The biophoton field as a conscious field is

  6. Development and applications of new technology for two-dimensional space-time characterization and correlation analysis of ultraweak biophoton information.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Devaraj, B; Usa, M; Tanno, Y; Takeda, M; Inaba, H

    1996-01-01

    We describe the spatial distribution and temporal correlation analysis of ultraweak biophoton emission based on photoelectron pulse time series and position measurement techniques. Experimental results on the spatio-temporal variation of biophoton emission from soybean seedlings after physical and chemical stimulation to the root tip are analyzed. Our results suggest the potential usefulness of this technique to quantify the transmission mechanisms of biological signals in the living system by measuring the biophoton emission.

  7. Amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1984-01-01

    An improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  8. Thermal transport in amorphous materials: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingert, Matthew C.; Zheng, Jianlin; Kwon, Soonshin; Chen, Renkun

    2016-11-01

    Thermal transport plays a crucial role in performance and reliability of semiconductor electronic devices, where heat is mainly carried by phonons. Phonon transport in crystalline semiconductor materials, such as Si, Ge, GaAs, GaN, etc, has been extensively studied over the past two decades. In fact, study of phonon physics in crystalline semiconductor materials in both bulk and nanostructure forms has been the cornerstone of the emerging field of ‘nanoscale heat transfer’. On the contrary, thermal properties of amorphous materials have been relatively less explored. Recently, however, a growing number of studies have re-examined the thermal properties of amorphous semiconductors, such as amorphous Si. These studies, which included both computational and experimental work, have revealed that phonon transport in amorphous materials is perhaps more complicated than previously thought. For instance, depending on the type of amorphous materials, thermal transport occurs via three types of vibrations: propagons, diffusons, and locons, corresponding to the propagating, diffusion, and localized modes, respectively. The relative contribution of each of these modes dictates the thermal conductivity of the material, including its magnitude and its dependence on sample size and temperature. In this article, we will review the fundamental principles and recent development regarding thermal transport in amorphous semiconductors.

  9. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  10. Engineered nanomaterials for biophotonics applications: improving sensing, imaging, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    West, Jennifer L; Halas, Naomi J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in chemistry and physics are providing an expanding array of nanostructured materials with unique and powerful optical properties. These nanomaterials provide a new set of tools that are available to biomedical engineers, biologists, and medical scientists who seek new tools as biosensors and probes of biological fluids, cells, and tissue chemistry and function. Nanomaterials are also being used to develop optically controlled devices for applications such as modulated drug delivery as well as optical therapeutics. This review discusses applications that have been successfully demonstrated using nanomaterials including semiconductor nanocrystals, gold nanoparticles, gold nanoshells, and silver plasmon resonant particles.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Luminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon (ap-Si) Nanoparticles via unconventional Stain Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchalala, M. R.; El-Demellawi, J. K.; Mughal, A. J.; Chaieb, S.

    2016-10-01

    Starting from crystalline silicon we synthesised bright suspensions of amorphous porous silicon nanoparticles through unconventional stain etching. Upon excitation with UV light, this novel nanostructured material gives rise to an intense red photoluminescence (PL) which resembles that of some silicon nanostructures. We studied the properties of the prepared nanoparticles using a number of cutting-edge characterization techniques such as TEM, SEM and EDX. The complete crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition, confirmed by the morphological studies, seems fortuitous.

  12. Imaging of biophoton emission from electrostimulated skin acupuncture point jg4: effect of light enhancers.

    PubMed

    Slawinski, Janusz; Gorski, Zbigniew

    2008-05-01

    Using an ultrasensitive CCD camera, an extremely low light intensity from the acupuncture-sensitive point JG4 at the left hand was recorded. As the intensity of the light was very weak and the time of electrostimulation exceeded the recommended period, the quality of biophoton images was poor. Chemiluminescent and fluorescent hydrophilic, hydrophobic and amphyphilic molecular probes were used to: (i) ensure penetration of probes into skin, (ii) enhance the intensity of BP emission, (iii) shorten time and (iv) obtain information about mechanisms of biophotons generation in EAP-sensitive points and channels. The results obtained partially fulfilled expectations and indicate on the necessity to elaborate special techniques of probes deposition on the skin.

  13. Enhancement of biophoton emission of prostate cancer cells by Ag nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hossu, Marius; Ma, Lun; Zou, Xiaoju; Chen, Wei

    Ultraweak intrinsic bioluminescence of cancer cell is a noninvasive method of assessing bioenergetic status of the investigated cells. This weak biophoton emission generated by prostate cancer cells (PC3) was measured in the presence of Ag nanoparticles and its correlation with singlet oxygen production was investigated. The comparison between nanoparticles concentration, bioluminescence intensity, and cell survival showed that Ag nanoparticles do not significantly affect cell survival at used concentration but they increase cell bioluminescent processes. It was also confirmed that singlet oxygen contributes to biophoton emission, that Ag nanoparticles increase this contribution, and that there are secondary mechanisms independent of singlet oxygen by which Ag nanoparticles contribute to increased cellular bioluminescence, possibly through plasmon resonance enhancement of intrinsic fluorescence.

  14. Jasmonic acid induced protein response to biophoton emissions and flooding stress in soybean.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-02-05

    Biophoton emissions were elevated by the exogenous plant hormone application such as jasmonic (JA) and salicylic acid (SA). To reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying flooding stress responses in soybean treated with JA and SA, biophoton emissions from plants were quantified in combination with proteomic analyses. Furthermore, treatment with exogenous JA inhibited lateral root growth and markedly reduced root weight. Out of 649 proteins identified in the JA- and JA/SA-treated plants, 44 were unique to JA-treated plants, 403 were unique to JA/SA-treated plants, and 202 were shared between the groups. These proteins were involved in stress, signaling, degradation, glycolysis, fermentation, and hormone metabolism. The abundances of glutathione-S-transferase, alanine aminotransferase, and malate dehydrogenase were decreased; however, the activities of these enzymes were increased. In contrast, the abundance and activity of monodehydroascorbate reductase increased in the roots of plants treated with JA and SA under flooding stress. This suggests that the quantity of lateral roots, total root mass, and free radicals generated during oxidation and reduction reactions and reactive oxygen species scavenging largely contribute to biophoton emission. Furthermore, monodehydroascorbate reductase, which is involved in detoxification and controlling hydrogen peroxide levels, may protect plant cells against oxidative damage during flooding. To understand the source of biophoton emission and molecular mechanism by the application of jasmonic and salicylic acid under flooding conditions in soybean plants, the label-free quantitative techniques were performed in roots. Root lengths and weights were significantly reduced by the effect of jasmonic and salicylic acid while it inhibited growth of the lateral roots in normal conditions using the jasmonic acid. Finally, identified proteins were functionally annotated by MAPMAN software application; that were assigned to different

  15. Modern trends in biophotonics for clinical diagnosis and therapy to solve unmet clinical needs.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    This contribution covers recent original research papers in the biophotonics field. The content is organized into main techniques such as multiphoton microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, optical coherence tomography and photoacoustic tomography, and their applications in the context of fluid, cell, tissue and skin diagnostics. Special attention is paid to vascular and blood flow diagnostics, photothermal and photodynamic therapy, tissue therapy, cell characterization, and biosensors for biomarker detection. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Lab-on-a-chip biophotonics: its application to assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Lai, David; Smith, Gary D; Takayama, Shuichi

    2012-08-01

    With the benefits of automation, sensitivity and precision, microfluidics has enabled complex and otherwise tedious experiments. Lately, lab-on-a-chip (LOC) has proven to be a useful tool for enhancing non-invasive assisted reproductive technology (ART). Non-invasive gamete and embryo assessment has largely been through periodic morpohological assessment using optical microscopy and early LOC ART was the same. As we realize that morphological assessment is a poor indication of gamete or embryo health, more advanced biophotonics has emerged in LOC ART to assay for metabolites or gamete separation via optoelectrical tweezers. Off-chip, even more advanced biophotonics with broad spectrum analysis of metabolites and secretomes has been developed that show even higher accuracy to predicting reproductive potential. The integration of broad spectrum metabolite analysis into LOC ART is an exciting future that merges automation and sensitivity with the already highly accurate and strong predictive power of biophotonics. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Early Detection of Salt Stress Damage by Biophotons in Red Bean Seedling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohya, Tomoyuki; Kurashige, Hideaki; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kai, Shoichi

    2000-06-01

    The optical detection of the stress damage to plants by NaCl solutions was attempted during germination of a seed and growth of a root. We compared the photon intensity of red beans before and after NaCl treatment and found that the photon intensity after NaCl treatment decreased as the NaCl concentration increased. For the saturated NaCl concentration (4.5 M), however, the observed photon intensity drastically increased, and the simultaneous destruction of cell membranes was observed. The intensity of biophoton emission from red beans showed characteristic change with salt concentrations. When the salt stress was applied to the red beans at an early growth stage, their root elongations were suppressed and photon intensity from the root decreased. This was not the case for the root at the late stage. This shows that biophoton intensity due to salt stress depends on not only NaCl concentration but also the growth stage of the plant. We may conclude that the extent of damage to roots by salt stress can be evaluated from biophoton response.

  18. Biophoton emission of MDCK cell with hydrogen peroxide and 60 Hz AC magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Cheun, B S; Yi, S H; Baik, K Y; Lim, J K; Yoo, J S; Shin, H W; soh, K S

    2007-10-01

    We studied biophoton characteristics of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells under the influence of H2O2 by employing a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a fluorescence microscope. H2O2 was used for producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the measurement. Images from a fluorescence microscope show an increase of photon intensity emitted from the sample due to H2O2. By using a PMT we measured quantitative change in biophoton emission with application of H2O2 to the MDCK cell culture, found that the increase of the biophoton is dependent upon the amount of H2O2. The agreement between the results of the PMT and the fluorescence microscope suggests the possibility of quantitative measurement of the influence of ROS on living tissue or cell. In addition we applied a 60 HzAC magnetic field on the cells to investigate the change in reaction between MDCK cell and ROS. It showed that a decay of chemiluminescence intensity has taken a different path following exposure to the magnetic field. As a result, the PMT measurement might be considered as a useful tool for studying biochemical characteristics in relation to ROS.

  19. Superhydrophilic nanostructure

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Zormpa, Vasileia; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-05-12

    An embodiment of a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are formed into porous clusters. The porous clusters are formed into aggregate clusters. An embodiment of an article of manufacture includes the superhydrophilic nanostructure on a substrate. An embodiment of a method of fabricating a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes applying a solution that includes nanoparticles to a substrate. The substrate is heated to form aggregate clusters of porous clusters of the nanoparticles.

  20. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  1. Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial Proteins in Biophoton Emission in Roots of Soybean Plants under Flooding Stress.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-05-01

    To understand the mechanism of biophoton emission, ROS and mitochondrial proteins were analyzed in soybean plants under flooding stress. Enzyme activity and biophoton emission were increased in the flooding stress samples when assayed in reaction mixes specific for antioxidant enzymes and reactive oxygen species; although the level of the hydroxyl radicals was increased at day 4 (2 days of flooding) compared to nonflooding at day 4, the emission of biophotons did not change. Mitochondria were isolated and purified from the roots of soybean plants grown under flooding stress by using a Percoll gradient, and proteins were analyzed by a gel-free proteomic technique. Out of the 98 mitochondrial proteins that significantly changed abundance under flooding stress, 47 increased and 51 decreased at day 4. The mitochondrial enzymes fumarase, glutathione-S-transferase, and aldehyde dehydrogenase increased at day 4 in protein abundance and enzyme activity. Enzyme activity and biophoton emission decreased at day 4 by the assay of lipoxygenase under stress. Aconitase, acyl CoA oxidase, succinate dehydrogenase, and NADH ubiquinone dehydrogenase were up-regulated at the transcription level. These results indicate that oxidation and peroxide scavenging might lead to biophoton emission and oxidative damage in the roots of soybean plants under flooding stress.

  2. Highly sensitive determination of transient generation of biophotons during hypersensitive response to cucumber mosaic virus in cowpea.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Sasaki, Kensuke; Enomoto, Masaru; Ehara, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is one mechanism of the resistance of plants to pathogen infection. It involves the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which have crucial roles in signal transduction or as toxic agents leading to cell death. Often, ROS generation is accompanied by an ultraweak photon emission resulting from radical reactions that are initiated by ROS through the oxidation of living materials such as lipids, proteins, and DNA. This photon emission, referred to as 'biophotons', is extremely weak, but, based on the technique of photon counting imaging, a system has been developed to analyse the spatiotemporal properties of photon emission. Using this system, the dynamics of photon emission which might be associated with the oxidative burst, which promotes the HR, have been determined. Here, the transient generation of biophotons is demonstrated during the HR process in cowpea elicited by cucumber mosaic virus. The distinctive dynamics in spatiotemporal properties of biophoton emission during the HR expression on macroscopic and microscopic levels are also described. This study reveals the involvement of ROS generation in biophoton emission in the process of HR through the determination of the inhibitory effect of an antioxidant (Tiron) on biophoton emission.

  3. Neutron irradiation and high temperature effects on amorphous Fe-based nano-coatings on steel - A macroscopic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, N.; Zhong, Z.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Gill, S.; Camino, F.; Şavklıyıldız, İ.; Akdoğan, E. K.

    2017-06-01

    The study revealed that loss of ductility in an amorphous Fe-alloy coating on a steel substrate composite structure was essentially prevented from occurring, following radiation with modest neutron doses of ∼2 × 1018 n/cm2. At the higher neutron dose of ∼2 × 1019, macroscopic stress-strain analysis showed that the amorphous Fe-alloy nanostructured coating, while still amorphous, experienced radiation-induced embrittlement, no longer offering protection against ductility loss in the coating-substrate composite structure. Neutron irradiation in a corrosive environment revealed exemplary oxidation/corrosion resistance of the amorphous Fe-alloy coating, which is attributed to the formation of the Fe2B phase in the coating. To establish the impact of elevated temperatures on the amorphous-to-crystalline transition in the amorphous Fe-alloy, electron microscopy was carried out which confirmed the radiation-induced suppression of crystallization in the amorphous Fe-alloy nanostructured coating.

  4. Theory of amorphous ices

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2014-01-01

    We derive a phase diagram for amorphous solids and liquid supercooled water and explain why the amorphous solids of water exist in several different forms. Application of large-deviation theory allows us to prepare such phases in computer simulations. Along with nonequilibrium transitions between the ergodic liquid and two distinct amorphous solids, we establish coexistence between these two amorphous solids. The phase diagram we predict includes a nonequilibrium triple point where two amorphous phases and the liquid coexist. Whereas the amorphous solids are long-lived and slowly aging glasses, their melting can lead quickly to the formation of crystalline ice. Further, melting of the higher density amorphous solid at low pressures takes place in steps, transitioning to the lower-density glass before accessing a nonequilibrium liquid from which ice coarsens. PMID:24858957

  5. Capturing structure and function in an embryonic heart with biophotonic tools

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga H.; Gu, Shi; Ford, Matthew R.; Peterson, Lindsy M.; Ma, Pei; Wang, Yves T.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Disturbed cardiac function at an early stage of development has been shown to correlate with cellular/molecular, structural as well as functional cardiac anomalies at later stages culminating in the congenital heart defects (CHDs) that present at birth. While our knowledge of cellular and molecular steps in cardiac development is growing rapidly, our understanding of the role of cardiovascular function in the embryo is still in an early phase. One reason for the scanty information in this area is that the tools to study early cardiac function are limited. Recently developed and adapted biophotonic tools may overcome some of the challenges of studying the tiny fragile beating heart. In this chapter, we describe and discuss our experience in developing and implementing biophotonic tools to study the role of function in heart development with emphasis on optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT can be used for detailed structural and functional studies of the tubular and looping embryo heart under physiological conditions. The same heart can be rapidly and quantitatively phenotyped at early and again at later stages using OCT. When combined with other tools such as optical mapping (OM) and optical pacing (OP), OCT has the potential to reveal in spatial and temporal detail the biophysical changes that can impact mechanotransduction pathways. This information may provide better explanations for the etiology of the CHDs when interwoven with our understanding of morphogenesis and the molecular pathways that have been described to be involved. Future directions for advances in the creation and use of biophotonic tools are discussed. PMID:25309451

  6. Special issue on Laser Biophotonics, dedicated to the seventieth birthday of V.V. Tuchin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priezzhev, A. V.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.

    2014-07-01

    Prominent Researcher and Educator, Honoured Scientist of the Russian Federation, Professor Valery V. Tuchin celebrated his seventieth birthday this year. V.V. Tuchin heads the Department of Optics and Biophotonics at N.G. Chernyshevsky Saratov State University and the Laboratory of Laser Diagnostics of Technical and Living Systems at the Institute of Precise Mechanics and Control of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He is a Vice-President of the Russian Photobiology Society. V.V. Tuchin is widely known for his achievements in optics of biological tissues, in developing methods of optical and laser measurements in biomedicine and nanobiophotonics, and in many other fields.

  7. Nonlinear enhancement of spontaneous biophoton emission of sweet potato by silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hossu, Marius; Ma, Lun; Chen, Wei

    2010-04-02

    Ultraweak biophoton emission of cutting-injured sweet potato is enhanced by the incubation with Ag nanoparticles in a nonlinear way. The late peak of the emission after the cutting injury is amplified as much as 15 times, while only little amplification was identified for the emission measured immediately after the cutting. The effect requires the presence of nutritive media to support the active metabolic processes and is also affected by the timing of the addition of the Ag nanoparticles. Proposed mechanisms of reactive oxygen species generation and energy resonance transfer are discussed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  9. Tritium in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Kosteski, T.; O`Leary, S.K.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.; Kherani, N.P.; Shmadya, W.

    1996-12-31

    Preliminary results on infrared and luminescence measurements of tritium incorporated amorphous silicon are reported. Tritium is an unstable isotope that readily substitutes hydrogen in the amorphous silicon network. Due to its greater mass, bonded tritium is found to introduce new stretching modes in the infrared spectrum. Inelastic collisions between the beta particles, produced as a result of tritium decay, and the amorphous silicon network, results in the generation of excess electron-hole pairs. Radiative recombination of these carriers is observed.

  10. Nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Philip

    2001-03-01

    Nanostructured materials may be defined as those materials whose structural elements - clusters, crystallites or molecules - have dimensions in the 1 to 100 nm range. The explosion in both academic and industrial interest in these materials over the past decade arises from the remarkable variations in fundamental electrical, optical and magnetic properties that occur as one progresses from an `infinitely extended' solid to a particle of material consisting of a countable number of atoms. This review details recent advances in the synthesis and investigation of functional nanostructured materials, focusing on the novel size-dependent physics and chemistry that results when electrons are confined within nanoscale semiconductor and metal clusters and colloids. Carbon-based nanomaterials and nanostructures including fullerenes and nanotubes play an increasingly pervasive role in nanoscale science and technology and are thus described in some depth. Current nanodevice fabrication methods and the future prospects for nanostructured materials and nanodevices are discussed.

  11. Nanostructures and mesoscopic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, W.P. . Dept. of Physics); Reed, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: nanostructure fabrication; ballistic transport and coherence; low-dimensional tunneling; electron correlation and coulomb blockade; nanostructure arrays and collective effects; theory and modeling of nanostructures; optical properties of nanostructures; and new systems.

  12. Femtosecond laser crystallization of amorphous Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Kürüm, Ulaş; Yaglioglu, H. Gul; Elmali, Ayhan; Aydinli, Atilla

    2011-06-01

    Ultrafast crystallization of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) in ambient has been studied. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition grown a-Ge was irradiated with single femtosecond laser pulses of various durations with a range of fluences from below melting to above ablation threshold. Extensive use of Raman scattering has been employed to determine post solidification features aided by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. Linewidth of the Ge optic phonon at 300 cm-1 as a function of laser fluence provides a signature for the crystallization of a-Ge. Various crystallization regimes including nanostructures in the form of nanospheres have been identified.

  13. Femtosecond laser crystallization of amorphous Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Salihoglu, Omer; Aydinli, Atilla; Kueruem, Ulas; Gul Yaglioglu, H.; Elmali, Ayhan

    2011-06-15

    Ultrafast crystallization of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) in ambient has been studied. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition grown a-Ge was irradiated with single femtosecond laser pulses of various durations with a range of fluences from below melting to above ablation threshold. Extensive use of Raman scattering has been employed to determine post solidification features aided by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. Linewidth of the Ge optic phonon at 300 cm{sup -1} as a function of laser fluence provides a signature for the crystallization of a-Ge. Various crystallization regimes including nanostructures in the form of nanospheres have been identified.

  14. Dynamic biophotonics: female squid exhibit sexually dimorphic tunable leucophores and iridocytes.

    PubMed

    DeMartini, Daniel G; Ghoshal, Amitabh; Pandolfi, Erica; Weaver, Aaron T; Baum, Mary; Morse, Daniel E

    2013-10-01

    Loliginid squid use tunable multilayer reflectors to modulate the optical properties of their skin for camouflage and communication. Contained inside specialized cells called iridocytes, these photonic structures have been a model for investigations into bio-inspired adaptive optics. Here, we describe two distinct sexually dimorphic tunable biophotonic features in the commercially important species Doryteuthis opalescens: bright stripes of rainbow iridescence on the mantle just beneath each fin attachment and a bright white stripe centered on the dorsal surface of the mantle between the fins. Both of these cellular features are unique to the female; positioned in the same location as the conspicuously bright white testis in the male, they are completely switchable, transitioning between transparency and high reflectivity. The sexual dimorphism, location and tunability of these features suggest that they may function in mating or reproduction. These features provide advantageous new models for investigation of adaptive biophotonics. The intensely reflective cells of the iridescent stripes provide a greater signal-to-noise ratio than the adaptive iridocytes studied thus far, while the cells constituting the white stripe are adaptive leucophores--unique biological tunable broadband scatterers containing Mie-scattering organelles activated by acetylcholine, and a unique complement of reflectin proteins.

  15. Biophotonic low-coherence sensors with boron-doped diamond thin layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milewska, D.; Karpienko, K.; Sobaszek, M.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2016-03-01

    Low-coherence sensors using Fabry-Perot interferometers are finding new applications in biophotonic sensing, especially due to the rapid technological advances in the development of new materials. In this paper we discuss the possibility of using boron-doped nanodiamond layers to protect mirror in a Fabry-Perot interferometer. A low-coherence sensor using Fabry-Perot interferometer with a boron-doped nanodiamond (B-NCD) thin protective layer has been developed. B-NCD layers with different boron doping level were investigated. The boron level, expressed as the boron to carbon (/[C]) ratio in the gas phase, was: 0, 2000, 5000 or 10000 ppm. B-NCD layers were grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The sensing Fabry-Perot interferometer, working in the reflective mode, was connected to the source and to the optical processor by single-mode fibers. Superluminescent diodes with Gaussian spectral density were used as sources, while an optical spectrum analyzer was used as an optical processor. The design of the sensing interferometer was optimized to attain the maximum interference contrast. The experiment has shown that B-NCD thin layers can be successfully used in biophotonic sensors.

  16. Porphysome nanovesicles generated by porphyrin bilayers for use as multimodal biophotonic contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, Jonathan F.; Jin, Cheng S.; Huynh, Elizabeth; Jin, Honglin; Kim, Chulhong; Rubinstein, John L.; Chan, Warren C. W.; Cao, Weiguo; Wang, Lihong V.; Zheng, Gang

    2011-04-01

    Optically active nanomaterials promise to advance a range of biophotonic techniques through nanoscale optical effects and integration of multiple imaging and therapeutic modalities. Here, we report the development of porphysomes; nanovesicles formed from self-assembled porphyrin bilayers that generated large, tunable extinction coefficients, structure-dependent fluorescence self-quenching and unique photothermal and photoacoustic properties. Porphysomes enabled the sensitive visualization of lymphatic systems using photoacoustic tomography. Near-infrared fluorescence generation could be restored on dissociation, creating opportunities for low-background fluorescence imaging. As a result of their organic nature, porphysomes were enzymatically biodegradable and induced minimal acute toxicity in mice with intravenous doses of 1,000 mg kg-1. In a similar manner to liposomes, the large aqueous core of porphysomes could be passively or actively loaded. Following systemic administration, porphysomes accumulated in tumours of xenograft-bearing mice and laser irradiation induced photothermal tumour ablation. The optical properties and biocompatibility of porphysomes demonstrate the multimodal potential of organic nanoparticles for biophotonic imaging and therapy.

  17. Low-bandgap biophotonic nanoblend: a platform for systemic disease targeting and functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Hun; Cho, Min Ju; Cheong, Oug Jae; Jang, Woo-Dong; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Lee, Sangyoup; Choi, Dong Hoon; Prasad, Paras N; Kim, Sehoon

    2015-01-01

    Photonic nanomaterials have found wide applications in theranostics. We introduce here a design of all-organic photonic nanoparticles, different from traditional ones, in which we utilize nanoblend of a low-bandgap π-conjugated polymer (LB-CP) and polystyrene as the photonic core, surrounded by an FDA-approved polymeric surfactant. This design provides capability for efficient deep tissue imaging using highly penetrating near-infrared (NIR) excitation and emission of LB-CP and also allows us to incorporate a NIR phosphorescent oxygen-sensitive dye in the core to serve as a dual-emissive probe for hypoxia imaging. These biophotonic nanoblend (BNB) particles (∼20 nm in diameter) show facile blood circulation, efficient disease targeting and minimal liver filtration as well as sustained renal excretion in the intravenously administered mouse models, as noninvasively visualized by the NIR emission signals. In diseased mouse models, pathological tissue deoxygenation at hypoxic sites was successfully detected with ratiometric spectral information. We also show that our nanoformulation exhibits no apparent toxicity, thus serving as a versatile biophotonics platform for diagnostic imaging.

  18. Biophoton detection and low-intensity light therapy: a potential clinical partnership.

    PubMed

    Tafur, Joseph; Van Wijk, Eduard P A; Van Wijk, Roeland; Mills, Paul J

    2010-02-01

    Low-intensity light therapy (LILT) is showing promise in the treatment of a wide variety of medical conditions. Concurrently, our knowledge of LILT mechanisms continues to expand. We are now aware of LILT's potential to induce cellular effects through, for example, accelerated ATP production and the mitigation of oxidative stress. In clinical use, however, it is often difficult to predict patient response to LILT. It appears that cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) state may play a central role in determining sensitivity to LILT and may help explain variability in patient responsiveness. In LILT, conditions associated with elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, e.g. diabetic hyperglycemia, demonstrate increased sensitivity to LILT. Consequently, assessment of tissue redox conditions in vivo may prove helpful in identifying responsive tissues. A noninvasive redox measure may be useful in advancing investigation in LILT and may one day be helpful in better identifying responsive patients. The detection of biophotons, the production of which is associated with cellular redox state and the generation of ROS, represents just such an opportunity. In this review, we will present the case for pursuing further investigation into the potential clinical partnership between biophoton detection and LILT.

  19. Biophoton Detection and Low-Intensity Light Therapy: A Potential Clinical Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Van Wijk, Eduard P.A.; Van Wijk, Roeland; Mills, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Low-intensity light therapy (LILT) is showing promise in the treatment of a wide variety of medical conditions. Concurrently, our knowledge of LILT mechanisms continues to expand. We are now aware of LILT's potential to induce cellular effects through, for example, accelerated ATP production and the mitigation of oxidative stress. In clinical use, however, it is often difficult to predict patient response to LILT. It appears that cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) state may play a central role in determining sensitivity to LILT and may help explain variability in patient responsiveness. In LILT, conditions associated with elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, e.g. diabetic hyperglycemia, demonstrate increased sensitivity to LILT. Consequently, assessment of tissue redox conditions in vivo may prove helpful in identifying responsive tissues. A noninvasive redox measure may be useful in advancing investigation in LILT and may one day be helpful in better identifying responsive patients. The detection of biophotons, the production of which is associated with cellular redox state and the generation of ROS, represents just such an opportunity. In this review, we will present the case for pursuing further investigation into the potential clinical partnership between biophoton detection and LILT. PMID:19754267

  20. Biophoton interaction in biological systems: evidence of photonic info-energy transfer? (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creath, Katherine; Schwartz, Gary E.

    2005-08-01

    Photons are continuously absorbed and emitted by all living cells. A possible means of releasing energy when an electron changes energy states during a biochemical reaction is via biophoton emission. An example of energy transfer in biological systems is the process of photosynthesis. Biophoton emission has also been proposed as one possible mechanism responsible for intra- and intercellular communication (information transfer) as well as for regulation of biological and biochemical functions within cells and living systems. Measurements by other researchers of this emission have shown it has the properties of coherent light and is measurable from the UV through the near IR. Experimental evidence gathered by various researchers since the 1920's indicates that light plays an important role in certain biological functions and processes. Through a series of experiments we have observed resonance effects between plant parts measured using a highly sensitive, low noise, cooled CCD in total darkness in a light-tight chamber. Dynamical systems theory offers a plausible explanation for resonance effects we have observed. The role of photonic interaction at the systemic level in biological systems has received relatively little attention. Yet, a better understanding of these processes would help us in deciphering the nature and role of light in biological systems.

  1. New Generation Cadmium-Free Quantum Dots for Biophotonics and Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gaixia; Zeng, Shuwen; Zhang, Butian; Swihart, Mark T; Yong, Ken-Tye; Prasad, Paras N

    2016-10-12

    This review summarizes recent progress in the design and applications of cadmium-free quantum dots (Cd-free QDs), with an emphasis on their role in biophotonics and nanomedicine. We first present the features of Cd-free QDs and describe the physics and emergent optical properties of various types of Cd-free QDs whose applications are discussed in subsequent sections. Selected specific QD systems are introduced, followed by the preparation of these Cd-free QDs in a form useful for biological applications, including recent advances in achieving high photoluminescence quantum yield (PL QY) and tunability of emission color. Next, we summarize biophotonic applications of Cd-free QDs in optical imaging, photoacoustic imaging, sensing, optical tracking, and photothermal therapy. Research advances in the use of Cd-free QDs for nanomedicine applications are discussed, including drug/gene delivery, protein/peptide delivery, image-guided surgery, diagnostics, and medical devices. The review then considers the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of Cd-free QDs and summarizes current studies on the in vitro and in vivo toxicity of Cd-free QDs. Finally, we provide perspectives on the overall current status, challenges, and future directions in this field.

  2. Effect of Amorphisation on the Thermal Properties of Nanostructured Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Termentzidis, Konstantinos; Verdier, Maxime; Lacroix, David

    2017-02-01

    The majority of the silicon devices contain amorphous phase and amorphous/crystalline interfaces which both considerably affect the transport of energy carriers as phonons and electrons. In this article, we investigate the impact of amorphous phases (both amorphous silicon and amorphous SiO2) of silicon nanoporous membranes on their thermal properties via molecular dynamics simulations. We show that a small fraction of amorphous phase reduces dramatically the thermal transport. One can even create nanostructured materials with subamorphous thermal conductivity, while keeping an important crystalline fraction. In general, the a-SiO2 shell around the pores reduces the thermal conductivity by a factor of five to ten compared to a-Si shell. The phonon density of states for several systems is also given to give the impact of the amorphisation on the phonon modes.

  3. Proteins involved in biophoton emission and flooding-stress responses in soybean under light and dark conditions.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-02-01

    To know the molecular systems basically flooding conditions in soybean, biophoton emission measurements and proteomic analyses were carried out for flooding-stressed roots under light and dark conditions. Photon emission was analyzed using a photon counter. Gel-free quantitative proteomics were performed to identify significant changes proteins using the nano LC-MS along with SIEVE software. Biophoton emissions were significantly increased in both light and dark conditions after flooding stress, but gradually decreased with continued flooding exposure compared to the control plants. Among the 120 significantly identified proteins in the roots of soybean plants, 73 and 19 proteins were decreased and increased in the light condition, respectively, and 4 and 24 proteins were increased and decreased, respectively, in the dark condition. The proteins were mainly functionally grouped into cell organization, protein degradation/synthesis, and glycolysis. The highly abundant lactate/malate dehydrogenase proteins were decreased in flooding-stressed roots exposed to light, whereas the lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme was increased in both light and dark conditions. Notably, however, specific enzyme assays revealed that the activities of these enzymes and biophoton emission were sharply increased after 3 days of flooding stress. This finding suggests that the source of biophoton emission in roots might involve the chemical excitation of electron or proton through enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation and reduction reactions. Moreover, the lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme may play important roles in responses in flooding stress of soybean under the light condition and as a contributing factor to biophoton emission.

  4. Exosomes are released by bystander cells exposed to radiation-induced biophoton signals: Reconciling the mechanisms mediating the bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Le, Michelle; Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; McNeill, Fiona E; Seymour, Colin B; Rainbow, Andrew J; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2017-01-01

    The objective of our study was to explore a possible molecular mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) biophotons could elicit bystander responses in reporter cells and resolve the problem of seemingly mutually exclusive mechanisms of a physical UV signal & a soluble factor-mediated bystander signal. The human colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116 p53 +/+, was directly irradiated with 0.5 Gy tritium beta particles to induce ultraviolet biophoton emission. Bystander cells were not directly irradiated but were exposed to the emitted UV biophotons. Medium was subsequently harvested from UV-exposed bystander cells. The exosomes extracted from this medium were incubated with reporter cell populations. These reporter cells were then assayed for clonogenic survival and mitochondrial membrane potential with and without prior treatment of the exosomes with RNase. Clonogenic cell survival was significantly reduced in reporter cells incubated with exosomes extracted from cells exposed to secondarily-emitted UV. These exosomes also induced significant mitochondrial membrane depolarization in receiving reporter cells. Conversely, exosomes extracted from non-UV-exposed cells did not produce bystander effects in reporter cells. The treatment of exosomes with RNase prior to their incubation with reporter cells effectively abolished bystander effects in reporter cells and this suggests a role for RNA in mediating the bystander response elicited by UV biophotons and their produced exosomes. This study supports a role for exosomes released from UV biophoton-exposed bystander cells in eliciting bystander responses and also indicates a reconciliation between the UV-mediated bystander effect and the bystander effect which has been suggested in the literature to be mediated by soluble factors.

  5. Exosomes are released by bystander cells exposed to radiation-induced biophoton signals: Reconciling the mechanisms mediating the bystander effect

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; McNeill, Fiona E.; Seymour, Colin B.; Rainbow, Andrew J.; Mothersill, Carmel E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of our study was to explore a possible molecular mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) biophotons could elicit bystander responses in reporter cells and resolve the problem of seemingly mutually exclusive mechanisms of a physical UV signal & a soluble factor-mediated bystander signal. Methods The human colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116 p53 +/+, was directly irradiated with 0.5 Gy tritium beta particles to induce ultraviolet biophoton emission. Bystander cells were not directly irradiated but were exposed to the emitted UV biophotons. Medium was subsequently harvested from UV-exposed bystander cells. The exosomes extracted from this medium were incubated with reporter cell populations. These reporter cells were then assayed for clonogenic survival and mitochondrial membrane potential with and without prior treatment of the exosomes with RNase. Results Clonogenic cell survival was significantly reduced in reporter cells incubated with exosomes extracted from cells exposed to secondarily-emitted UV. These exosomes also induced significant mitochondrial membrane depolarization in receiving reporter cells. Conversely, exosomes extracted from non-UV-exposed cells did not produce bystander effects in reporter cells. The treatment of exosomes with RNase prior to their incubation with reporter cells effectively abolished bystander effects in reporter cells and this suggests a role for RNA in mediating the bystander response elicited by UV biophotons and their produced exosomes. Conclusion This study supports a role for exosomes released from UV biophoton-exposed bystander cells in eliciting bystander responses and also indicates a reconciliation between the UV-mediated bystander effect and the bystander effect which has been suggested in the literature to be mediated by soluble factors. PMID:28278290

  6. Amorphous alumina coatings: processing, structure and remarkable barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Samélor, Diane; Lazar, Ana-Maria; Aufray, Maëlenn; Tendero, Claire; Lacroix, Loïc; Béguin, Jean-Denis; Caussat, Brigitte; Vergnes, Hugues; Alexis, Joël; Poquillon, Dominique; Pébère, Nadine; Gleizes, Alain; Vahlas, Constantin

    2011-09-01

    Amorphous aluminium oxide coatings were processed by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD); their structural characteristics were determined as a function of the processing conditions, the process was modelled considering appropriate chemical kinetic schemes, and the properties of the obtained material were investigated and were correlated with the nanostructure of the coatings. With increasing processing temperature in the range 350 degrees C-700 degrees C, subatmospheric MOCVD of alumina from aluminium tri-isopropoxide (ATI) sequentially yields partially hydroxylated amorphous aluminium oxides, amorphous Al2O3 (415 degrees C-650 degrees C) and nanostructured gamma-Al2O3 films. A numerical model for the process allowed reproducing the non uniformity of deposition rate along the substrate zone due to the depletion of ATI. The hardness of the coatings prepared at 350 degrees C, 480 degrees C and 700 degrees C is 6 GPa, 11 GPa and 1 GPa, respectively. Scratch tests on films grown on TA6V titanium alloy reveal adhesive and cohesive failures for the amorphous and nanocrystalline ones, respectively. Alumina coating processed at 480 degrees C on TA6V yielded zero weight gain after oxidation at 600 degrees C in lab air. The surface of such low temperature processed amorphous films is hydrophobic (water contact angle 106 degrees), while the high temperature processed nanocrystalline films are hydrophilic (48 degrees at a deposition temperature of 700 degrees C). It is concluded that amorphous Al2O3 coatings can be used as oxidation and corrosion barriers at ambient or moderate temperature. Nanostructured with Pt or Ag nanoparticles, they can also provide anti-fouling or catalytic surfaces.

  7. One-Dimensional Peptide Nanostructure Templated Growth of Iron Phosphate Nanostructures for Lithium-Ion Battery Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Susapto, Hepi Hari; Kudu, O Ulas; Garifullin, Ruslan; Yılmaz, Eda; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-07-13

    Template-directed synthesis of nanomaterials can provide benefits such as small crystalline size, high surface area, large surface-to-volume ratio, and structural stability. These properties are important for shorter distance in ion/electron movement and better electrode surface/electrolyte contact for energy storage applications. Here nanostructured FePO4 cathode materials were synthesized by using peptide nanostructures as a template inspired by biomineralization process. The amorphous, high surface area FePO4 nanostructures were utilized as a cathode for lithium-ion batteries. Discharge capacity of 155 mAh/g was achieved at C/20 current rate. The superior properties of biotemplated and nanostructured amorphous FePO4 are shown compared to template-free crystalline FePO4.

  8. Trehalose amorphization and recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Sussich, Fabiana; Cesàro, Attilio

    2008-10-13

    The stability of the amorphous trehalose prepared by using several procedures is presented and discussed. Amorphization is shown to occur by melting (T(m)=215 degrees C) or milling (room temperature) the crystalline anhydrous form TRE-beta. Fast dehydration of the di-hydrate crystalline polymorph, TRE-h, also produces an amorphous phase. Other dehydration procedures of TRE-h, such as microwave treatment, supercritical extraction or gentle heating at low scan rates, give variable fractions of the polymorph TRE-alpha, that undergo amorphization upon melting (at lower temperature, T(m)=130 degrees C). Additional procedures for amorphization, such as freeze-drying, spray-drying or evaporation of trehalose solutions, are discussed. All these procedures are classified depending on the capability of the undercooled liquid phase to undergo cold crystallization upon heating the glassy state at temperatures above the glass transition temperature (T(g)=120 degrees C). The recrystallizable amorphous phase is invariably obtained by the melt of the polymorph TRE-alpha, while other procedures always give an amorphous phase that is unable to crystallize above T(g). The existence of two different categories is analyzed in terms of the transformation paths and the hypothesis that the systems may exhibit different molecular mobilities.

  9. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  10. Biophotonic ring resonator for ultrasensitive detection of DMMP as a simulant for organophosphorus agents.

    PubMed

    Bonnot, Karine; Cuesta-Soto, Francisco; Rodrigo, Manuel; Varriale, Antonio; Sanchez, Nuria; D'Auria, Sabato; Spitzer, Denis; Lopez-Royo, Francisco

    2014-05-20

    Combining photonic integrated circuits with a biologically based sensing approach has the ability to provide a new generation of portable and low-cost sensor devices with a high specificity and sensitivity for a number of applications in environmental monitoring, defense, and homeland security. We report herein on the specific biosensing under continuous air flow of DMMP, which is commonly used as a simulant and a precursor for the synthesis of Sarin. The proposed technology is based on the selective recognition of the targeted DMMP molecule by specifically modified proteins immobilized on photonic structures. The response of the biophotonic structures shows a high stability and accuracy over 3 months, allowing for the detection in diluted air of DMMP at concentration as low as 35 μg/m(3) (6.8 ppb) in less than 15 min. The performance of the developed technology satisfies most current homeland and military security requirements.

  11. Design of rotation ellipsoidal cavity for detecting ultra-weak biophoton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; He, Xiang; Dong, Da-xing; Lin, You-yi

    2006-02-01

    The ultra-weak photon emission is an intrinsic and spontaneous process in biological objects without any external excitation and is referred to as "biophoton emission". This paper reports the design of the rotation ellipsoidal cavity that was used in detecting ultra-weak photon emission from biological objects. The cavity can assemble the photons from biological sample at one focal plane of the rotation ellipsoidal cavity to the photomultiplier tube at another. The paper discusses the mathematical model of the cavity and the efficiency of collecting photons with the cavity. The measuring results for biological sample are given. The results are shown that the efficiency of collecting photons for the system with the cavity is evidently raised.

  12. Coincidence of biophoton emission by wheat seedlings during simultaneous, transcontinental germination tests.

    PubMed

    Gallep, Cristiano M; Moraes, Thiago A; Dos Santos, Samuel R; Barlow, Peter W

    2013-06-01

    Measurements of spontaneous ultra-weak light (biophoton) emission from native Brazilian and German wheat seedlings in three simultaneous series of germination tests are presented, two run in Germany and one in Brazil. Seedlings in both countries presented semi-circadian rhythms of emission that were in accordance with the local lunisolar gravimetric tidal acceleration, as did seeds which had been transported from Brazil to Germany. The simultaneity of the photon emission patterns in all tests argues for the lunisolar tide and its rhythmic variations as regulators of the natural rhythm of photon emission. However, seedlings from seed samples transported from Brazil to Germany showed, in addition, a temporary disturbance within the emission periodicity which may indicate a possible short-term acclimatization to the new location.

  13. Ultraweak biophoton emission of new and aged rice seeds during early imbibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wengli; Xing, Da; Tang, Yonghong

    2000-10-01

    The characters of ultra-weak biophoton emission (UBE) of rice seeds during the initial imbibition period (0-1 hour) were observed with high sensitive single-photon-counting equipment. The results showed that the shorter the seed store time, the higher the intensity and the increase rate of the UBE in the early imbibition period (0-10 minus). It was concluded that the store time of rice seeds could be judged from their UBE characters during the early imbibition period, which might be a way to examine new and aged seeds. In addition, there were differences in rise rate, peak value and attenuation tendency of UBE among new seeds of different strains during the early imbibition period. It indicated that such characters of UBE might be quantitative indexes to identify new rice seeds.

  14. Biophoton Emission Due to Drought Injury in Red Beans: Possibility of Early Detection of Drought Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohya, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Satoshi; Kawabata, Ryuzou; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kai, Shoichi

    2002-07-01

    We study biophoton emission from red beans (Vigna angularis) during germination and seedling stages under drought stress. Strong photon emission is observed at the root apex when the beans are subjected to the dry condition. The spatial distribution of the emission is broader than that of emission due to the application of strong salt stress reported previously [T. Ohya et al.: Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 39 (2000) 3696]. When they are rewatered, strong photon emission from them is again observed. As their drought damage is weaker, the intensity of the photon emission is weaker. Photon emission from damaged roots indicates their physiological response to external stress, that is, photon emission intensity measurement is useful for detecting physiological changes and evaluating the degrees of such changes before serious damage takes place without any invasion and destruction.

  15. Image observation of ultraweak biophoton emission from animal wound tissue and tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yonghong; Tang, Yonghong; Zhong, Xueyun; Tan, Shici; Xing, Da

    1999-09-01

    No clear image of Ultraweak Biophoton Emission (UBE) from animal has been reported so far. With the detection system equipped with a back-illuminated cooled CCD (-60 degree(s)C), we have clearly observed UBE images of the wound tissues and the tumor tissues with long exposure time. The intensity of UBE from the wound tissue or the tumor tissue is higher than that from normal tissues. We proposed that the increase of UBE from wound response is the result from defense mechanism of body in which white blood cells' respiration burst is involved, the UBE from transplanted cancer tissue is related to the disorder of metabolism because of the malignant growth and multiplication of tumor cells. Non- invasive diagnosis might be realized in medicine by this technique following the further improvement of sensitivity of the detector.

  16. Biophotonics Master studies: teaching and training experience at University of Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis

    2007-06-01

    Two-year program for Master's studies on Biophotonics (Biomedical Optics) has been originally developed and carried out at University of Latvia since 1995. The Curriculum contains basic subjects like Fundamentals of Biomedical Optics, Medical Lightguides, Anatomy and Physiology, Lasers and Non-coherent Light Sources, Basic Physics, etc. Student laboratories, special English Terminology and Laboratory-Clinical Praxis are also involved as the training components, and Master project is the final step for the degree award. Life-long learning is supported by several E-courses and an extensive short course for medical laser users "Lasers and Bio-optics in Medicine". Recently a new inter-university European Social Fund project was started to adapt the program accordingly to the Bologna Declaration guidelines.

  17. Shaping the light transmission through a multimode optical fibre: complex transformation analysis and applications in biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Čižmár, Tomáš; Dholakia, Kishan

    2011-09-26

    We present a powerful approach towards full understanding of laser light propagation through multimode optical fibres and control of the light at the fibre output. Transmission of light within a multimode fibre introduces randomization of laser beam amplitude, phase and polarization. We discuss the importance of each of these factors and introduce an experimental geometry allowing full analysis of the light transmission through the multimode fibre and subsequent beam-shaping using a single spatial light modulator. We show that using this approach one can generate an arbitrary output optical field within the accessible field of view and range of spatial frequencies given by fibre core diameter and numerical aperture, respectively, that contains over 80% of the total available power. We also show that this technology has applications in biophotonics. As an example, we demonstrate the manipulation of colloidal microparticles. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. Aqueous phase synthesis of CdTe quantum dots for biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ken-Tye; Law, Wing-Cheung; Roy, Indrajit; Jing, Zhu; Huang, Huijie; Swihart, Mark T; Prasad, Paras N

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years, CdTe quantum dots have been demonstrated as powerful probes for biophotonics applications. The aqueous phase synthesis technique remains the best approach to make high quality CdTe QDs in a single-pot process. CdTe QDs prepared directly in the aqueous phase can have quantum yield as high as 80%. In addition, the surface of CdTe QDs prepared using the aqueous phase technique is functionalized with reactive groups that enable them to be directly conjugated with specific ligands for targeted delivery and sensing. In this contribution, we review recent progress in fabricating aqueous CdTe QDs and exploiting their optical properties in novel approaches to biomedical imaging and sensing applications. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Growth Control and Biophoton Radiation by Plant Hormones in Red Bean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Shoichi; Moriya, Tomoyuki; Fujimoto, Tokio

    1995-12-01

    The growth kinetics of seeds of red beans ( Phaseolus angularis ) was investigated by externally adding various hormones (gibberellin (GA3)), abscisic acid (ABA) and indole acetic acid (IAA)) during germination. For root growth of red beans, GA3 always acted as an activator while ABA as an inhibitor. IAA was both an activator and an inhibitor depending on its concentration. Root growth could be described by a stochastic logistic equation. The hormone concentration dependences of coefficients of the equation were determined. The hormone influences on biophoton radiation were also investgated. With GA3, the intensity of spontaneous bioluminescence increased with time and showed two strong radiation periods, in which strong localization of bioluminescence was induced. However with ABA and IAA, weaker bioluminescences were observed. The location of the strong radiation induced by GA3 was determined as the growing point near a root cap, by use of a two-dimensional photon counting system.

  20. Amorphous pharmaceutical solids.

    PubMed

    Vranić, Edina

    2004-07-01

    Amorphous forms are, by definition, non-crystalline materials which possess no long-range order. Their structure can be thought of as being similar to that of a frozen liquid with the thermal fluctuations present in a liquid frozen out, leaving only "static" structural disorder. The amorphous solids have always been an essential part of pharmaceutical research, but the current interest has been raised by two developments: a growing attention to pharmaceutical solids in general, especially polymorphs and solvates and a revived interest in the science of glasses and the glass transition. Amorphous substances may be formed both intentionally and unintentionally during normal pharmaceutical manufacturing operations. The properties of amorphous materials can be exploited to improve the performance of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but these properties can also give rise to unwanted effects that need to be understood and managed in order for the systems to perform as required.

  1. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  2. Butterfly gyroid nanostructures as a time-frozen glimpse of intracellular membrane development

    PubMed Central

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Apeleo Zubiri, Benjamin; Klatt, Michael A.; Butz, Benjamin; Fischer, Michael G.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Spiecker, Erdmann; Steiner, Ullrich; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E.

    2017-01-01

    The formation of the biophotonic gyroid material in butterfly wing scales is an exceptional feat of evolutionary engineering of functional nanostructures. It is hypothesized that this nanostructure forms by chitin polymerization inside a convoluted membrane of corresponding shape in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, this dynamic formation process, including whether membrane folding and chitin expression are simultaneous or sequential processes, cannot yet be elucidated by in vivo imaging. We report an unusual hierarchical ultrastructure in the butterfly Thecla opisena that, as a solid material, allows high-resolution three-dimensional microscopy. Rather than the conventional polycrystalline space-filling arrangement, a gyroid occurs in isolated facetted crystallites with a pronounced size gradient. When interpreted as a sequence of time-frozen snapshots of the morphogenesis, this arrangement provides insight into the formation mechanisms of the nanoporous gyroid material as well as of the intracellular organelle membrane that acts as the template. PMID:28508050

  3. Detecting presence of cardiovascular disease through mitochondria respiration as depicted through biophotonic emission

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Nancy R.; Hank, Nicole C.; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria, play an important role in the cardiovascular system. Furthermore, oxidative metabolism of mitochondria comprised of biophoton emissions, are linked to ROS and oxidative stress. In this review we investigated the association between the ability of ClearViewTM system (ClearView) to indicate the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease through mitochondria respiration as depicted through biophotonic emission. Methods and results One hundred and ninety-five out of the three hundred and fifty-three human subjects enrolled in this prospective, single site study had at least one cardiovascular related diagnosis. Measurements with ClearView consisted of scanning all 10 fingers twice. Images were captured through the ClearView software and analyzed to produce a scale that indicates the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease. The association of ClearView's ability to indicate the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease with a physician's diagnosis was assessed using odds ratios (OR) and area under ROC curve (AUC). Adjusting for age, OR of ClearView measurements conducted with capacitive barrier was 3.44 (95%CI: 2.13, 5.55) and the OR without the capacitive barrier was 2.15 (95%CI: 1.42, 3.23). The OR in men were 5.91 (95%CI: 2.35, 14.85) and 2.88 (95%CI: 1.38, 6.01), adjusting for age and corresponding to with and without capacitive barrier. The OR in women were 3.50 (95%CI: 1.86, 6.59) and 2.09 (95%CI: 1.20, 3.64) with and without capacitive barrier. AUCs for measurements with capacitive barrier were >0.90. Conclusion ClearView detected the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease independent of other conditions. PMID:26722839

  4. Detecting presence of cardiovascular disease through mitochondria respiration as depicted through biophotonic emission.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Nancy R; Hank, Nicole C; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria, play an important role in the cardiovascular system. Furthermore, oxidative metabolism of mitochondria comprised of biophoton emissions, are linked to ROS and oxidative stress. In this review we investigated the association between the ability of ClearViewTM system (ClearView) to indicate the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease through mitochondria respiration as depicted through biophotonic emission. One hundred and ninety-five out of the three hundred and fifty-three human subjects enrolled in this prospective, single site study had at least one cardiovascular related diagnosis. Measurements with ClearView consisted of scanning all 10 fingers twice. Images were captured through the ClearView software and analyzed to produce a scale that indicates the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease. The association of ClearView's ability to indicate the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease with a physician's diagnosis was assessed using odds ratios (OR) and area under ROC curve (AUC). Adjusting for age, OR of ClearView measurements conducted with capacitive barrier was 3.44 (95%CI: 2.13, 5.55) and the OR without the capacitive barrier was 2.15 (95%CI: 1.42, 3.23). The OR in men were 5.91 (95%CI: 2.35, 14.85) and 2.88 (95%CI: 1.38, 6.01), adjusting for age and corresponding to with and without capacitive barrier. The OR in women were 3.50 (95%CI: 1.86, 6.59) and 2.09 (95%CI: 1.20, 3.64) with and without capacitive barrier. AUCs for measurements with capacitive barrier were >0.90. ClearView detected the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease independent of other conditions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  6. Reversible crystalline-amorphous phase transformation in Si nanosheets with lithi-/delithiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Min; Cho, Jae-Hyun; Ha, Jung Hoon; Kim, Hae-Sik; Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Jaejun; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Cho, Byung-Won; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2017-06-01

    Silicon (Si) has a large theoretical capacity of 4200 mAhg-1 and has great potential as a high-performance anode material for Li ion batteries (LIBs). Meanwhile, nanostructures can exploit the potential of Si and, accordingly, many zero-dimensional (0D) and one-dimensional (1D) Si nanostructures have been studied. Herein, we report on two-dimensional (2D) Si nanostructures, Si nanosheets (SiNSs), as anodes for LIBs. These 2D Si nanostructures, with a thickness as low 5 nm and widths of several micrometers, show reversible crystalline-amorphous phase transformations with the lithi-/delithiation by the dimensionality of morphology and large surface area. The reversible crystalline-amorphous phase transformation provides a structural stability of Li+ insertions and makes SiNSs promising candidates for reliable high-performance LIBs anode materials.

  7. Mechanics of Metals with Grain Sizes Approaching the Amorphous Limit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-31

    technique employing reverse- pulse currents. This technique led to nanostructured alloys in bulk form, with grain sizes as large as 200 nm (which is...various concentrations of W to the structure. Employing Monte Carlo techniques , we evolved the structure to chemical equilibrium. We found that W...polycrystalline and amorphous states in this manner. With this model we rationalized our experimental data from electrodeposited specimens. 4. We

  8. Characterisation of amorphous and nanocrystalline molecular materials by total scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, Simon J.L.; Dykhne, Timur; Juhás, Pavol; Boin, Emil; Taylor, Ryan; Florence, Alastair J.; Shankland, Kenneth

    2010-09-17

    The use of high-energy X-ray total scattering coupled with pair distribution function analysis produces unique structural fingerprints from amorphous and nanostructured phases of the pharmaceuticals carbamazepine and indomethacin. The advantages of such facility-based experiments over laboratory-based ones are discussed and the technique is illustrated with the characterisation of a melt-quenched sample of carbamazepine as a nanocrystalline (4.5 nm domain diameter) version of form III.

  9. Laser biophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Priezzhev, A. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This issue of Quantum Electronics presents the papers that reflect the state-of-the-art of laser technologies used in biomedical studies and medical practice. Among the new technologies, one can note the methods of correlation and Doppler spectroscopy, as well as THz spectroscopy, in which biologically significant molecules are characterised by specific resonances. The latter topic is considered in the paper by Nazarov et al., where the dielectric function of aqueous solutions of glucose and albumin is studied using pulsed THz spectroscopy.

  10. Sub-amorphous thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline silicon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Matthew C; Kwon, Soonshin; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos; Xiang, Jie; Chen, Renkun

    2015-04-08

    Thermal transport behavior in nanostructures has become increasingly important for understanding and designing next generation electronic and energy devices. This has fueled vibrant research targeting both the causes and ability to induce extraordinary reductions of thermal conductivity in crystalline materials, which has predominantly been achieved by understanding that the phonon mean free path (MFP) is limited by the characteristic size of crystalline nanostructures, known as the boundary scattering or Casimir limit. Herein, by using a highly sensitive measurement system, we show that crystalline Si (c-Si) nanotubes (NTs) with shell thickness as thin as ∼5 nm exhibit a low thermal conductivity of ∼1.1 W m(-1) K(-1). Importantly, this value is lower than the apparent boundary scattering limit and is even about 30% lower than the measured value for amorphous Si (a-Si) NTs with similar geometries. This finding diverges from the prevailing general notion that amorphous materials represent the lower limit of thermal transport but can be explained by the strong elastic softening effect observed in the c-Si NTs, measured as a 6-fold reduction in Young's modulus compared to bulk Si and nearly half that of the a-Si NTs. These results illustrate the potent prospect of employing the elastic softening effect to engineer lower than amorphous, or subamorphous, thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline nanostructures.

  11. Metallic glass nanostructures: fabrication, properties, and applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lianci; Hasan, Molla; Kumar, Golden

    2014-02-21

    Remarkable progress has been made in fabrication and characterization of metal nanostructures because of their crucial role in energy conversion, nanophotonics, nanoelectronics, and biodiagnostics. Less emphasis has been placed on the synthesis of nanostructures from metallic alloys, which are better suited than elemental metals for certain applications such as fuel-cell catalysts. The main challenges in fabrication of alloy nanostructures are controlling their chemical stoichiometry, crystal structures, and shapes because of anisotropic nucleation and growth rates. These limitations can be overcome by using metallic glasses (amorphous metal alloys) which are isotropic and provide additional control handles through their tunable compositions and degree of crystallinity. Here, we review the recent developments in fabrication and characterization of metallic glass (MG) nanostructures. The focus is on sub-micron structures synthesized by unconventional thermoplastic techniques. A concept of self-assembly is introduced for fashioning functional structures using MG nanostructures as building blocks. The article concludes with a brief discussion about unique properties and prospective applications of MG nanostructures.

  12. Towards practical implementation of biophotonics-based solutions for cost-effective monitoring of food quality control (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meglinski, Igor; Popov, Alexey; Bykov, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Biophotonics-based diagnostic and imaging modalities have been widely used in various applications associated with the non-invasive imaging of the internal structure of a range biological media from a range of cells cultures to biological tissues. With the fast growing interest in food securities there remains strong demand to apply reliable and cost effective biophotonics-based technologies for rapid screening of freshness, internal defects and quality of major agricultural products. In current presentation the results of application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and encapsulated optical bio-sensors for quantitative assessment of freshness of agricultural products, such as meat and sea foods, are presented, and their further perspectives are discussed.

  13. A Novel Nanofabrication Technique of Silicon-Based Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lingkuan; He, Xiaobin; Gao, Jianfeng; Li, Junjie; Wei, Yayi; Yan, Jiang

    2016-11-01

    A novel nanofabrication technique which can produce highly controlled silicon-based nanostructures in wafer scale has been proposed using a simple amorphous silicon (α-Si) material as an etch mask. SiO2 nanostructures directly fabricated can serve as nanotemplates to transfer into the underlying substrates such as silicon, germanium, transistor gate, or other dielectric materials to form electrically functional nanostructures and devices. In this paper, two typical silicon-based nanostructures such as nanoline and nanofin have been successfully fabricated by this technique, demonstrating excellent etch performance. In addition, silicon nanostructures fabricated above can be further trimmed to less than 10 nm by combing with assisted post-treatment methods. The novel nanofabrication technique will be expected a new emerging technology with low process complexity and good compatibility with existing silicon integrated circuit and is an important step towards the easy fabrication of a wide variety of nanoelectronics, biosensors, and optoelectronic devices.

  14. A Novel Nanofabrication Technique of Silicon-Based Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingkuan; He, Xiaobin; Gao, Jianfeng; Li, Junjie; Wei, Yayi; Yan, Jiang

    2016-12-01

    A novel nanofabrication technique which can produce highly controlled silicon-based nanostructures in wafer scale has been proposed using a simple amorphous silicon (α-Si) material as an etch mask. SiO2 nanostructures directly fabricated can serve as nanotemplates to transfer into the underlying substrates such as silicon, germanium, transistor gate, or other dielectric materials to form electrically functional nanostructures and devices. In this paper, two typical silicon-based nanostructures such as nanoline and nanofin have been successfully fabricated by this technique, demonstrating excellent etch performance. In addition, silicon nanostructures fabricated above can be further trimmed to less than 10 nm by combing with assisted post-treatment methods. The novel nanofabrication technique will be expected a new emerging technology with low process complexity and good compatibility with existing silicon integrated circuit and is an important step towards the easy fabrication of a wide variety of nanoelectronics, biosensors, and optoelectronic devices.

  15. Formation of amorphous materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable amorphous or fine crystalline materials are formed by solid state reactions by diffusion of a metallic component into a solid compound or by diffusion of a gas into an intermetallic compound. The invention can be practiced on layers of metals deposited on an amorphous substrate or by intermixing powders with nucleating seed granules. All that is required is that the diffusion of the first component into the second component be much faster than the self-diffusion of the first component. The method is practiced at a temperature below the temperature at which the amorphous phase transforms into one or more crystalline phases and near or below the temperature at which the ratio of the rate of diffusion of the first component to the rate of self-diffusion is at least 10.sup.4. This anomalous diffusion criteria is found in many binary, tertiary and higher ordered systems of alloys and appears to be found in all alloy systems that form amorphous materials by rapid quenching. The method of the invention can totally convert much larger dimensional materials to amorphous materials in practical periods of several hours or less.

  16. The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in protein molecules in living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in bio-tissues were studied using Pang's theory of bio-energy transport, in which the energy spectra of protein molecules are obtained from the discrete dynamic equation. From the energy spectra, it was determined that the protein molecules could both radiate and absorb bio-photons with wavelengths of <3 μm and 5-7 μm, consistent with the energy level transitions of the excitons. These results were consistent with the experimental data; this consisted of infrared absorption data from collagen, bovine serum albumin, the protein-like molecule acetanilide, plasma, and a person's finger, and the laser-Raman spectra of acidity I-type collagen in the lungs of a mouse, and metabolically active Escherichia coli. We further elucidated the mechanism responsible for the non-thermal biological effects produced by the infrared light absorbed by the bio-tissues, using the above results. No temperature rise was observed; instead, the absorbed infrared light promoted the vibrations of amides as well the transport of the bio-energy from one place to other in the protein molecules, which changed their conformations. These experimental results, therefore, not only confirmed the validity of the mechanism of bio-photon emission, and the newly developed theory of bio-energy transport mentioned above, but also explained the mechanism and properties of the non-thermal biological effects produced by the absorption of infrared light by the living systems.

  17. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  18. Structural Amorphous Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Thompson, J. R.; Porter, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist’s dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed.

  19. Lightweight Beryllium Free Nanostructured Nanostructured Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Plasma Processes, Inc. Lightweight Beryllium Free Nanostructured Composites SBIR Contract DASG60-02-P-41 Phase I Final Report 1/15/03 Submitted by...Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Lightweight Beryllium Free Nanostructured Nanostructured Composites Contract

  20. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  1. Disorder-induced amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Li, Mo

    1997-03-01

    Many crystalline materials undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition when subjected to energetic particle irradiation at low temperatures. By focusing on the mean-square static atomic displacement as a generic measure of chemical and topological disorder, we are led quite naturally to a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion as a conceptual framework for a unified thermodynamic approach to solid-state amorphizing transformations. In its simplest form, the generalized Lindemann criterion assumes that the sum of the static and dynamic mean-square atomic displacements is constant along the polymorphous melting curve so that c-a transformations can be understood simply as melting of a critically-disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature where the supercooled liquid can persist indefinitely in a configurationally-frozen state. Evidence in support of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion for amorphization is provided by a large variety of experimental observations and by molecular dynamics simulations of heat-induced melting and of defect-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds.

  2. Amorphous semiconductor solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A solar cell comprising a back electrical contact, amorphous silicon semiconductor base and junction layers and a top electrical contact includes in its manufacture the step of heat treating the physical junction between the base layer and junction layer to diffuse the dopant species at the physical junction into the base layer.

  3. Shockwave Consolidation of Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Taylor, Patrick; Nemir, David

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology based thermoelectric materials are considered attractive for developing highly efficient thermoelectric devices. Nano-structured thermoelectric materials are predicted to offer higher ZT over bulk materials by reducing thermal conductivity and increasing electrical conductivity. Consolidation of nano-structured powders into dense materials without losing nanostructure is essential towards practical device development. Using the gas atomization process, amorphous nano-structured powders were produced. Shockwave consolidation is accomplished by surrounding the nanopowder-containing tube with explosives and then detonating. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth. We have been successful in generating consolidated nano-structured bismuth telluride alloy powders by using the shockwave technique. Using these consolidated materials, several types of thermoelectric power generating devices have been developed. Shockwave consolidation is anticipated to generate large quantities of nanostructred materials expeditiously and cost effectively. In this paper, the technique of shockwave consolidation will be presented followed by Seebeck Coefficient and thermal conductivity measurements of consolidated materials. Preliminary results indicate a substantial increase in electrical conductivity due to shockwave consolidation technique.

  4. Investigation on dynamics of red blood cells through their behavior as biophotonic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, Pasquale; Merola, Francesco; Miccio, Lisa; Mugnano, Martina; Ferraro, Pietro

    2016-12-01

    The possibility to adopt biological matter as photonic optical elements can open scenarios in biophotonics research. Recently, it has been demonstrated that a red blood cell (RBC) can be seen as an optofluidic microlens by showing its imaging capability as well as its focal tunability. Moreover, correlation between an RBC's morphology and its behavior as a refractive optical element has been established and its exploitation for biomedical diagnostic purposes has been foreseen. In fact, any deviation from the healthy RBC morphology can be seen as additional aberration in the optical wavefront passing through the cell. By this concept, accurate localization of focal spots of RBCs can become very useful in the blood disorders identification. We investigate the three-dimensional positioning of such focal spots over time for samples with two different osmolarity conditions, i.e., when they assume discocyte and spherical shapes, respectively. We also demonstrate that a temporal variation of an RBC's focal points along the optical axis is correlated to the temporal fluctuations in the RBC's thickness maps. Furthermore, we show a sort of synchronization of the whole erythrocytes ensemble.

  5. Infrared Thermography-based Biophotonics: Integrated Diagnostic Technique for Systemic Reaction Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainer, Boris G.; Morozov, Vitaly V.

    A peculiar branch of biophotonics is a measurement, visualisation and quantitative analysis of infrared (IR) radiation emitted from living object surfaces. Focal plane array (FPA)-based IR cameras make it possible to realize in medicine the so called interventional infrared thermal diagnostics. An integrated technique aimed at the advancement of this new approach in biomedical science and practice is described in the paper. The assembled system includes a high-performance short-wave (2.45-3.05 μm) or long-wave (8-14 μm) IR camera, two laser Doppler flowmeters (LDF) and additional equipment and complementary facilities implementing the monitoring of human cardiovascular status. All these means operate synchronously. It is first ascertained the relationship between infrared thermography (IRT) and LDF data in humans in regard to their systemic cardiovascular reactivity. Blood supply real-time dynamics in a narcotized patient is first visualized and quantitatively represented during surgery in order to observe how the general hyperoxia influences thermoregulatory mechanisms; an abrupt increase in temperature of the upper limb is observed using IRT. It is outlined that the IRT-based integrated technique may act as a take-off runway leading to elaboration of informative new methods directly applicable to medicine and biomedical sciences.

  6. Cyclable Condensation and Hierarchical Assembly of Metastable Reflectin Proteins, the Drivers of Tunable Biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Levenson, Robert; Bracken, Colton; Bush, Nicole; Morse, Daniel E

    2016-02-19

    Reversible changes in the phosphorylation of reflectin proteins have been shown to drive the tunability of color and brightness of light reflected from specialized cells in the skin of squids and related cephalopods. We show here, using dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and fluorescence analyses, that reversible titration of the excess positive charges of the reflectins, comparable with that produced by phosphorylation, is sufficient to drive the reversible condensation and hierarchical assembly of these proteins. The results suggest a two-stage process in which charge neutralization first triggers condensation, resulting in the emergence of previously cryptic structures that subsequently mediate reversible, hierarchical assembly. The extent to which cyclability is seen in the in vitro formation and disassembly of complexes estimated to contain several thousand reflectin molecules suggests that intrinsic sequence- and structure-determined specificity governs the reversible condensation and assembly of the reflectins and that these processes are therefore sufficient to produce the reversible changes in refractive index, thickness, and spacing of the reflectin-containing subcellular Bragg lamellae to change the brightness and color of reflected light. This molecular mechanism points to the metastability of reflectins as the centrally important design principle governing biophotonic tunability in this system. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Cyclable Condensation and Hierarchical Assembly of Metastable Reflectin Proteins, the Drivers of Tunable Biophotonics*

    PubMed Central

    Levenson, Robert; Bracken, Colton; Bush, Nicole; Morse, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Reversible changes in the phosphorylation of reflectin proteins have been shown to drive the tunability of color and brightness of light reflected from specialized cells in the skin of squids and related cephalopods. We show here, using dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and fluorescence analyses, that reversible titration of the excess positive charges of the reflectins, comparable with that produced by phosphorylation, is sufficient to drive the reversible condensation and hierarchical assembly of these proteins. The results suggest a two-stage process in which charge neutralization first triggers condensation, resulting in the emergence of previously cryptic structures that subsequently mediate reversible, hierarchical assembly. The extent to which cyclability is seen in the in vitro formation and disassembly of complexes estimated to contain several thousand reflectin molecules suggests that intrinsic sequence- and structure-determined specificity governs the reversible condensation and assembly of the reflectins and that these processes are therefore sufficient to produce the reversible changes in refractive index, thickness, and spacing of the reflectin-containing subcellular Bragg lamellae to change the brightness and color of reflected light. This molecular mechanism points to the metastability of reflectins as the centrally important design principle governing biophotonic tunability in this system. PMID:26719342

  8. Biophotonic effect of diode laser irradiance on tensile strength of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lau, Pik Suan; Bidin, Noriah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Nassir, Zaleha; Bahktiar, Hazri

    2015-04-01

    Low-energy laser irradiance at certain wavelengths is able to stimulate the tissue bio-reaction and enhance the healing process. Collagen deposition is one of the important aspects in healing process because it can increase the strength of the skin. This study was designed to examine the biophotonic effect of irradiance on collagen production of diabetic wound in rat model. The tensile strength of skin was employed as a parameter to describe the wound. Diabetic rat models were induced by streptozotocin via intravenous injection. Skin-breaking strength was measured using an Instron tensile test machine. The experimental animals were treated with 808-nm diode laser at two different powers-0.1 and 0.5 W/cm(2)-and 30, 60, and 120 s for each session. The tensile strength was optimized after treated with high-power diode laser. The photostimulation effect was revealed by accelerated healing process and enhanced tensile strength of wound. Laser photostimulation on tensile strength in diabetic wound suggests that such therapy facilitates collagen production in diabetic wound healing.

  9. Transmission matrix of a scattering medium and its applications in biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonseok; Choi, Wonjun; Choi, Youngwoon; Yoon, Changhyeong; Choi, Wonshik

    2015-05-18

    A conventional lens has well-defined transfer function with which we can form an image of a target object. On the contrary, scattering media such as biological tissues, multimode optical fibers and layers of disordered nanoparticles have highly complex transfer function, which makes them impractical for the general imaging purpose. In recent studies, we presented a method of experimentally recording the transmission matrix of such media, which is a measure of the transfer function. In this review paper, we introduce two major applications of the transmission matrix: enhancing light energy delivery and imaging through scattering media. For the former, we identified the eigenchannels of the transmission matrix with large eigenvalues and then coupled light to those channels in order to enhance light energy delivery through the media. For the latter, we solved matrix inversion problem to reconstruct an object image from the distorted image by the scattering media. We showed the enlargement of the numerical aperture of imaging systems with the use of scattering media and demonstrated endoscopic imaging through a single multimode optical fiber working in both reflectance and fluorescence modes. Our approach will pave the way of using scattering media as unique optical elements for various biophotonics applications.

  10. Anomalous hopping conduction in nanocrystalline/amorphous composites and amorphous semiconductor thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakalios, James; Bodurtha, Kent

    Composite nanostructured materials consisting of nanocrystals (nc) embedded within a thin film amorphous matrix can exhibit novel opto-electronic properties. Composite films are synthesized in a dual-chamber co-deposition PECVD system capable of producing nanocrystals of material A and embedding then within a thin film matrix of material B. Electronic conduction in composite thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) containing nc-germanium or nc-silicon inclusions, as well as in undoped a-Si:H, does not follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence, but rather is better described by an anomalous hopping expression (exp[-(To/T)3/4) , as determined from the ``reduced activation energy'' proposed by Zabrodskii and Shlimak. This temperature dependence has been observed in other thin film resistive materials, such as ultra-thin disordered films of Ag, Bi, Pb and Pd; carbon-black polymer composites; and weakly coupled Au and ZnO quantum dot arrays. There is presently no accepted theoretical understanding of this expression. The concept of a mobility edge, accepted for over four decades, appears to not be necessary to account for charge transport in amorphous semiconductors. Supported by NSF-DMR and the Minnesota Nano Center.

  11. Enhancement in optical absorption of silicon fibrous nanostructure produced using femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Sivakumar, M.; Tan, Bo

    2009-07-20

    Fibrous nanostructures are proposed for the application of solar cell. Irradiation of silicon surface with a few hundred femtosecond laser pulses of fluence 13 kJ/m{sup 2} at 13 MHz pulse frequency in air atmosphere results in the formation of fibrous nanostructure layer on the treated surface that leads to a significant decrease in the reflection of visible radiation. For the visible wavelength, the decreased reflection is a result of the nature of the nanostructure. The Raman peak shift in the irradiated surface confirms that the surface is changed to amorphous silicon due to fibrous nanostructure formation.

  12. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  13. Atomic-Scale Imprinting into Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo; Li, Rui; Simon, Georg; Kinser, Emely; Liu, Ze; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Chao; Singer, Jonathan; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan

    Nanoimprinting by thermoplastic forming (TPF) has attracted significant attention in recent years due to its promise of low-cost fabrication of nanostructured devices. Usually performed using polymers, amorphous metals have been identified as a material class that might be even better suited for nanoimprinting due to a combination of mechanical properties and processing ability. Commonly referred to as metallic glasses, their featureless atomic structure suggests that there may not be an intrinsic size limit to the material's ability to replicate a mold. To study this hypothesis, we demonstrate atomic-scale imprinting into amorphous metals by TPF under ambient conditions. Atomic step edges of a SrTiO3 (STO) single crystal used as mold were successfully imprinted into Pt-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high fidelity. Terraces on the BMG replicas possess atomic smoothness with sub-Angstrom roughness that is identical to the one measured on the STO mold. Systematic studies revealed that the quality of the replica depends on the loading rate during imprinting, that the same mold can be used multiple times without degradation of mold or replicas, and that the atomic-scale features on as-imprinted BMG surfaces has impressive long-term stability (months).

  14. Amorphous metallic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan; Veazey, Chris; Johnson, William L.

    2003-01-01

    The bulk glass forming alloy Pd43Ni10Cu27P20 is processed into a low-density amorphous metallic foam. Pd43Ni10Cu27P20 is mixed with hydrated B2O3, which releases gas at elevated temperature and/or low pressure. Very homogeneous foams are achieved due to the high viscosity of the alloy even at its liquidus temperature. By processing at the liquidus temperature and decreasing the pressure to 10-2 mbar, well-distributed bubbles expand to foam the material. Foam densities as low as 1.4×103 kg/m3 were obtained, corresponding to a bubble volume fraction of 84%. The bubble diameter ranges between 2×10-4 and 1×10-3 m. Thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry confirms the amorphous nature of the foam. Furthermore, it reveals that the foam's thermal stability is comparable to the bulk material.

  15. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  16. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  17. Defects in Amorphous Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    this map with a similar plot of the experimental data. An experimental deformation data map for Pd-based amorphous al- loys is shown in fig. 10. In the...Masumoto. I Mat. Sci. 12 (1977) 1927, [IgI T M Ha.es. J. W Allen. J. Tauc . B. C. Giessen and J. J. Hauser. Phys. Re. Lett. 41 i197s) 1282 [191 J

  18. Advanced biosensing methodologies developed for evaluating performance quality and safety of emerging biophotonics technologies and medical devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilev, Ilko K.; Walker, Bennett; Calhoun, William; Hassan, Moinuddin

    2016-03-01

    Biophotonics is an emerging field in modern biomedical technology that has opened up new horizons for transfer of state-of-the-art techniques from the areas of lasers, fiber optics and biomedical optics to the life sciences and medicine. This field continues to vastly expand with advanced developments across the entire spectrum of biomedical applications ranging from fundamental "bench" laboratory studies to clinical patient "bedside" diagnostics and therapeutics. However, in order to translate these technologies to clinical device applications, the scientific and industrial community, and FDA are facing the requirement for a thorough evaluation and review of laser radiation safety and efficacy concerns. In many cases, however, the review process is complicated due the lack of effective means and standard test methods to precisely analyze safety and effectiveness of some of the newly developed biophotonics techniques and devices. There is, therefore, an immediate public health need for new test protocols, guidance documents and standard test methods to precisely evaluate fundamental characteristics, performance quality and safety of these technologies and devices. Here, we will overview our recent developments of novel test methodologies for safety and efficacy evaluation of some emerging biophotonics technologies and medical devices. These methodologies are based on integrating the advanced features of state-of-the-art optical sensor technologies and approaches such as high-resolution fiber-optic sensing, confocal and optical coherence tomography imaging, and infrared spectroscopy. The presentation will also illustrate some methodologies developed and implemented for testing intraocular lens implants, biochemical contaminations of medical devices, ultrahigh-resolution nanoscopy, and femtosecond laser therapeutics.

  19. Matched filtering Generalized Phase Contrast using binary phase for dynamic spot- and line patterns in biophotonics and structured lighting.

    PubMed

    Bañas, Andrew; Aabo, Thomas; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2013-01-28

    This work discusses the use of matched filtering Generalized Phase Contrast (mGPC) as an efficient and cost-effective beam shaper for applications such as in biophotonics, optical micromanipulation, microscopy and two-photon polymerization. The theoretical foundation of mGPC is described as a combination of Generalized Phase Contrast and phase-only correlation. Such an analysis makes it convenient to optimize an mGPC system for different setup conditions. Results showing binary-only phase generation of dynamic spot arrays and line patterns are presented.

  20. The Stabilization of Amorphous Zopiclone in an Amorphous Solid Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Milne, Marnus; Liebenberg, Wilna; Aucamp, Marique

    2015-10-01

    Zopiclone is a poorly soluble psychotherapeutic agent. The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize an amorphous form of zopiclone as well as the characterization and performance of a stable amorphous solid dispersion. The amorphous form was prepared by the well-known method of quench-cooling of the melt. The solid dispersion was prepared by a solvent evaporation method of zopiclone, polyvinylpyrrolidone-25 (PVP-25), and methanol, followed by freeze-drying. The physico-chemical properties and stability of amorphous zopiclone and the solid dispersion was studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hot-stage microscopy (HSM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), solubility, and dissolution studies. The zopiclone amorphous solid-state form was determined to be a fragile glass; it was concluded that the stability of the amorphous form is influenced by both temperature and water. Exposure of amorphous zopiclone to moisture results in rapid transformation of the amorphous form to the crystalline dihydrated form. In comparison, the amorphous solid dispersion proved to be more stable with increased aqueous solubility.

  1. Development of bio-photonic sensor based on laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chan Kyu

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been shown to be potentially useful for identifying microorganisms in real time. It is a selective and sensitive technique because the excitation is performed at one wavelength while the emission is monitored at longer wavelengths so that background from the excitation source can be eliminated. This specialized optical property of LIF can be applied to development of an optical sensor capable of quickly, non-invasively, and quantitatively probing complex biochemical transformations in microorganisms. Various bio-photonic optical fiber sensors based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy were developed as diagnostic tools for microorganisms. In the first phase, the enhancement of the sensitivity and selectivity of the optical sensor system focused on diagnosis of human breast cancer cell lines and Azotobacter vinelandii (an aerobic soil-dwelling organism). Auto-fluorescence spectra from human breast cancer cell lines and Azotobacter vinelandii corresponding to different growth environments were investigated. Then, the study has expanded to include the use of gold nanoparticles for specific DNA detection. The use of gold nanoparticles opens a door into construction of a compact, highly specific, inexpensive and user-friendly optical fiber senor for specific DNA detection. An optical fiber laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) sensor based has been developed to detect single-strand (ss) DNA hybridization at the femtomolar level. Effects of various experimental parameters and configuration were investigated in order to optimize sensor performance and miniaturize sensor size. Key words. Laser induced fluorescence, human breast cancer cell lines, Azotobacter vinelandii, DNA, gold nanoparticles.

  2. Quantum events of biophoton emission associated with complementary and alternative medicine therapies: a descriptive pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hossu, Marius; Rupert, Ronald

    2006-03-01

    Biophoton emission (BPE) is a quantum event characterized by a relatively stable but ultralow- rate emission of visible photons from living organisms. It has been associated with high energy processes such as: cell metabolism, growth, phagocytosis, neural activity, and oxidative stress. BPE has also been suggested to reflect the organism's global state of health as well as the response to stimulation including therapeutic interventions. If BPE changes occur as a result of various complementary and alternative medical interventions, this could prove useful to monitor both the patient's response to a specific treatment and global changes in their health status. This descriptive study attempts to identify BPE changes associated with three different chiropractic techniques that use different energetic approaches: mechanical, gravitational, and bioenergetic. The BPE was measured at the neck and/or the lower back of 3 asymptomatic adult male volunteers. The measurements were made before and after different chiropractic interventions. The treatment techniques included a high velocity joint manipulation with the aid of a drop table, Sacro-Occipital Technique, and Bio-Energetic Synchronization Technique. Enough time was allotted for measurements in order to differentiate between natural fluctuation of the BPE and the changes induced by the interventions. All techniques induced small (up to 20%) but statistically significant changes (p < 0.05 in one case, p < 0.001 in the other two) in the BPE. Each technique demonstrated a different pattern of BPE change that may be specific to the technique. The intensity of BPE is a noninvasive indicator of the health of the human body and is significantly altered in different ways by chiropractic interventions. Future research is necessary to explore more features of BPE and its utility as an indicator of health, as well as the theoretical and clinical significance of these findings.

  3. Quantitative assessment of biophotonic imaging system performance with phantoms fabricated by rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianting; Coburn, James; Woolsey, Nicholas; Liang, Chia-Pin; Ramella-Roman, Jessica; Chen, Yu; Pfefer, Joshua

    2014-03-01

    In biophotonic imaging, turbid phantoms that are low-cost, biologically-relevant, and durable are desired for standardized performance assessment. Such phantoms often contain inclusions of varying depths and sizes in order to quantify key image quality characteristics such as penetration depth, sensitivity and contrast detectability. The emerging technique of rapid prototyping with three-dimensional (3D) printers provides a potentially revolutionary way to fabricate these structures. Towards this goal, we have characterized the optical properties and morphology of phantoms fabricated by two 3D printing approaches: thermosoftening and photopolymerization. Material optical properties were measured by spectrophotometry while the morphology of phantoms incorporating 0.2-1.0 mm diameter channels was studied by μCT, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical microscopy. A near-infrared absorbing dye and nanorods at several concentrations were injected into channels to evaluate detectability with a near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging (HRI) system (650-1100 nm). Phantoms exhibited biologically-relevant scattering and low absorption across visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Although limitations in resolution were noted, channels with diameters of 0.4 mm or more could be reliably fabricated. The most significant problem noted was the porosity of phantoms generated with the thermosoftening-based printer. The aforementioned three imaging methods provided a valuable mix of insights into phantom morphology and may also be useful for detailed structural inspection of medical devices fabricated by rapid prototyping, such as customized implants. Overall, our findings indicate that 3D printing has significant potential as a method for fabricating well-characterized, standard phantoms for medical imaging modalities such as HRI.

  4. Synthesis of quenchable amorphous diamond

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Zhidan; Yang, Liuxiang; Zeng, Qiaoshi; ...

    2017-08-22

    Diamond owes its unique mechanical, thermal, optical, electrical, chemical, and biocompatible materials properties to its complete sp3-carbon network bonding. Crystallinity is another major controlling factor for materials properties. Although other Group-14 elements silicon and germanium have complementary crystalline and amorphous forms consisting of purely sp3 bonds, purely sp3-bonded tetrahedral amorphous carbon has not yet been obtained. In this letter, we combine high pressure and in situ laser heating techniques to convert glassy carbon into “quenchable amorphous diamond”, and recover it to ambient conditions. Our X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments on the recovered sample andmore » computer simulations confirm its tetrahedral amorphous structure and complete sp3 bonding. This transparent quenchable amorphous diamond has, to our knowledge, the highest density among amorphous carbon materials, and shows incompressibility comparable to crystalline diamond.« less

  5. Field Emission and Nanostructure of Carbon Films

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, V.I.; Lowndes, D.H.; Baylor, L.R.

    1999-11-29

    The results of field emission measurements of various forms of carbon films are reported. It is shown that the films nanostructure is a crucial factor determining the field emission properties. In particular, smooth, pulsed-laser deposited amorphous carbon films with both high and low sp3 contents are poor field emitters. This is similar to the results obtained for smooth nanocrystalline, sp2-bonded carbon films. In contrast, carbon films prepared by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HE-CVD) exhibit very good field emission properties, including low emission turn-on fields, high emission site density, and excellent durability. HF-CVD carbon films were found to be predominantly sp2-bonded. However, surface morphology studies show that these films are thoroughly nanostructured, which is believed to be responsible for their promising field emission properties.

  6. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, R. A.

    1991-08-01

    Divided roughly into two parts, the book describes the physical properties and device applications of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The first section is concerned with the atomic and electronic structure, and covers growth defects and doping and defect reactions. The emphasis is on the optical and electronic properties that result from the disordered structure. The second part of the book describes electronic conduction, recombination, interfaces, and multilayers. The special attribute of a-Si:H which makes it useful is the ability to deposit the material inexpensively over large areas, while retaining good semiconducting properties, and the final chapter discusses various applications and devices.

  7. Ultrasound-Mediated Biophotonic Imaging: A Review of Acousto-Optical Tomography and Photo-Acoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews two types of ultrasound-mediated biophotonic imaging–acousto-optical tomography (AOT, also called ultrasound-modulated optical tomography) and photo-acoustic tomography (PAT, also called opto-acoustic or thermo-acoustic tomography)–both of which are based on non-ionizing optical and ultrasonic waves. The goal of these technologies is to combine the contrast advantage of the optical properties and the resolution advantage of ultrasound. In these two technologies, the imaging contrast is based primarily on the optical properties of biological tissues, and the imaging resolution is based primarily on the ultrasonic waves that either are provided externally or produced internally, within the biological tissues. In fact, ultrasonic mediation overcomes both the resolution disadvantage of pure optical imaging in thick tissues and the contrast and speckle disadvantages of pure ultrasonic imaging. In our discussion of AOT, the relationship between modulation depth and acoustic amplitude is clarified. Potential clinical applications of ultrasound-mediated biophotonic imaging include early cancer detection, functional imaging, and molecular imaging. PMID:15096709

  8. Biophotonic endoscopy: a review of clinical research techniques for optical imaging and sensing of early gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Sergio; Siersema, Peter D.; Stamp, Gordon W. H.; Thillainayagam, Andrew V.

    2015-01-01

    Detection, characterization, and staging constitute the fundamental elements in the endoscopic diagnosis of gastrointestinal diseases, but histology still remains the diagnostic gold standard. New developments in endoscopic techniques may challenge histopathology in the near future. An ideal endoscopic technique should combine a wide-field, “red flag” screening technique with an optical contrast or microscopy method for characterization and staging, all simultaneously available during the procedure. In theory, biophotonic advances have the potential to unite these elements to allow in vivo “optical biopsy.” These techniques may ultimately offer the potential to increase the rates of detection of high risk lesions and the ability to target biopsies and resections, and so reduce the need for biopsy, costs, and uncertainty for patients. However, their utility and sensitivity in clinical practice must be evaluated against those of conventional histopathology. This review describes some of the most recent applications of biophotonics in endoscopic optical imaging and metrology, along with their fundamental principles and the clinical experience that has been acquired in their deployment as tools for the endoscopist. Particular emphasis has been placed on translational label-free optical techniques, such as fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), two-photon and multi-photon microscopy, second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) imaging, optical coherence tomography (OCT), diffuse reflectance, Raman spectroscopy, and molecular imaging. PMID:26528489

  9. Development of immobilized biophotonic beads consisting of Photobacterium leiognathi for the detection of heavy metals and pesticide.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Rajeev; Rastogi, Navin K; Thakur, M S

    2012-07-30

    The present communication deals with construction of immobilized robust biophotonic bead using P. leiognathi, a marine luminescent bacterium for their possible application in monitoring of environmental toxicants. Immobilization efficiency of agar, carrageenan and sodium alginate was evaluated separately in terms of luminescence response and was recorded as 30.3, 77.4 or 99.5%, respectively. Under optimized storage conditions, the luminescent response of P. leiognathi in the immobilized state was studied over a period of 30 days. These biophotonic beads were further used as a rapid and reliable optical biosensing tool for the detection of heavy metals [Hg(II), As(V) or Cd(II)] and pesticide [2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)] in water systems. The concentration range for the detection of Hg(II), As(V), Cd(II) and 2,4-D was 2-32ppm, 4-128ppm, 16-512ppm and 100-600ppm, respectively, while corresponding sensitivity threshold was 2.0ppm, 4.0ppm, 16.0ppm and 100ppm. A comparison of inhibition constant (K(d)) (or EC(20)) values indicated that the sensitivity thresholds rank as Hg(II)>As(V)>Cd(II)>2,4-D. Moreover, the time taken for the detection of heavy metals and pesticide was less than 30min. Using the bioluminescence inhibition method, the concentration of heavy metals and pesticide could be predicted.

  10. High predictive values of RBC membrane-based diagnostics by biophotonics in an integrated approach for Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Giorgia; Ferreri, Carla; Sansone, Anna; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Marzetti, Carla; Spyratou, Ellas; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Marini, Marina; Abruzzo, Provvidenza M; Bolotta, Alessandra; Ghezzo, Alessandro; Minguzzi, Renato; Posar, Annio; Visconti, Paola

    2017-08-29

    Membranes attract attention in medicine, concerning lipidome composition and fatty acid correlation with neurological diseases. Hyperspectral dark field microscopy (HDFM), a biophotonic imaging using reflectance spectra, provides accurate characterization of healthy adult RBC identifying a library of 8 spectral end-members. Here we report hyperspectral RBC imaging in children affected by Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (n = 21) compared to healthy age-matched subjects (n = 20), investigating if statistically significant differences in their HDFM spectra exist, that can comprehensively map a membrane impairment involved in disease. A significant difference concerning one end-member (spectrum 4) was found (P value = 0.0021). A thorough statistical treatment evidenced: i) diagnostic performance by the receiving operators curve (ROC) analysis, with cut-offs and very high predictive values (P value = 0.0008) of spectrum 4 for identifying disease; ii) significant correlations of spectrum 4 with clinical parameters and with the RBC membrane deficit of the omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in ASD patients; iii) by principal component analysis, very high affinity values of spectrum 4 to the factor that combines behavioural parameters and the variable "cc" discriminating cases and controls. These results foresee the use of biophotonic methodologies in ASD diagnostic panels combining with molecular elements for a correct neuronal growth.

  11. Crystalline nanostructures on Ge surfaces induced by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Xin; Facsko, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Besides conventional low efficiency lithographic techniques broad ion beam irradiation is a simple and potentially mass productive technique to fabricate nanoscale patterns on various semiconductor surfaces. The main drawback of this method is that the irradiated semiconductor surfaces are amorphized, which strongly limits the potential application of these nanostructures in electronic and optoelectronic devices. In this work we report that high-quality crystalline nanostructure patterns are formed on Ge surfaces via Ar+ irradiation at elevated temperatures. This pattern formation process resembles the pattern formation in homoepitaxy. Therefore, the process is discussed based on a 'reverse epitaxy' mechanism.

  12. The nanostructure problem

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, S.

    2010-03-22

    Diffraction techniques are making progress in tackling the difficult problem of solving the structures of nanoparticles and nanoscale materials. The great gift of x-ray crystallography has made us almost complacent in our ability to locate the three-dimensional coordinates of atoms in a crystal with a precision of around 10{sup -4} nm. However, the powerful methods of crystallography break down for structures in which order only extends over a few nanometers. In fact, as we near the one hundred year mark since the birth of crystallography, we face a resilient frontier in condensed matter physics: our inability to routinely and robustly determine the structure of complex nanostructured and amorphous materials. Knowing the structure and arrangement of atoms in a solid is so fundamental to understanding its properties that the topic routinely occupies the early chapters of every solid-state physics textbook. Yet what has become clear with the emergence of nanotechnology is that diffraction data alone may not be enough to uniquely solve the structure of nanomaterials. As part of a growing effort to incorporate the results of other techniques to constrain x-ray refinements - a method called 'complex modeling' which is a simple but elegant approach for combining information from spectroscopy with diffraction data to solve the structure of several amorphous and nanostructured materials. Crystallography just works, so we rarely question how and why this is so, yet understanding the physics of diffraction can be very helpful as we consider the nanostructure problem. The relationship between the electron density distribution in three dimensions (i.e., the crystal structure) and an x-ray diffraction pattern is well established: the measured intensity distribution in reciprocal space is the square of the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function <{rho}(r){rho}(r+r')> of the electron density distribution {rho}(r). The fact that we get the autocorrelation function

  13. Self-organized liquid-crystalline nanostructured membranes for water treatment: selective permeation of ions.

    PubMed

    Henmi, Masahiro; Nakatsuji, Koji; Ichikawa, Takahiro; Tomioka, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Yoshio, Masafumi; Kato, Takashi

    2012-05-02

    A membrane with ordered 3D ionic nanochannels constructed by in situ photopolymerization of a thermotropic liquid-crystalline monomer shows high filtration performance and ion selectivity. The nanostructured membrane exhibits water-treatment performance superior to that of an amorphous membrane prepared from the isotropic melt of the monomer. Self-organized nanostructured membranes have great potential for supplying high-quality water. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

  15. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  16. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  17. Neutron irradiation and high temperature effects on amorphous Fe-based nano-coatings on steel – A macroscopic assessment

    DOE PAGES

    Simos, N.; Zhong, Z.; Dooryhee, E.; ...

    2017-03-23

    Here, this study revealed that loss of ductility in an amorphous Fe-alloy coating on a steel substrate composite structure was essentially prevented from occurring, following radiation with modest neutron doses of ~2 x 1018 n/cm2. At the higher neutron dose of ~2 x 1019, macroscopic stress-strain analysis showed that the amorphous Fe-alloy nanostructured coating, while still amorphous, experienced radiation-induced embrittlement, no longer offering protection against ductility loss in the coating-substrate composite structure. Neutron irradiation in a corrosive environment revealed exemplary oxidation/corrosion resistance of the amorphous Fe-alloy coating, which is attributed to the formation of the Fe2B phase in the coating.more » To establish the impact of elevated temperatures on the amorphous-to-crystalline transition in the amorphous Fe-alloy, electron microscopy was carried out which confirmed the radiation-induced suppression of crystallization in the amorphous Fe-alloy nanostructured coating.« less

  18. Interface of Physics and Biology: Engineering Virus-Based Nanoparticles for Biophotonics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Virus-based nanoparticles (VNPs) have been used for a wide range of applications, spanning basic materials science and translational medicine. Their propensity to self-assemble into precise structures that offer a three-dimensional scaffold for functionalization has led to their use as optical contrast agents and related biophotonics applications. A number of fluorescently labeled platforms have been developed and their utility in optical imaging demonstrated, yet their optical properties have not been investigated in detail. In this study, two VNPs of varying architectures were compared side-by-side to determine the impact of dye density, dye localization, conjugation chemistry, and microenvironment on the optical properties of the probes. Dyes were attached to icosahedral cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) and rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) through a range of chemistries to target particular side chains displayed at specific locations around the virus. The fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the particles were determined, first using photochemical experiments on the benchtop, and second in imaging experiments using tissue culture experiments. The virus-based optical probes were found to be extraordinarily robust under ultrashort, pulsed laser light conditions with a significant amount of excitation energy, maintaining structural and chemical stability. The most effective fluorescence output was achieved through dye placement at optimized densities coupled to the exterior surface avoiding conjugated ring systems. Lifetime measurements indicate that fluorescence output depends not only on spacing the fluorophores, but also on dimer stacking and configurational changes leading to radiationless relaxation—and these processes are related to the conjugation chemistry and nanoparticle shape. For biological applications, the particles were also examined in tissue culture, from which it was found that the optical properties differed from those found on the benchtop

  19. Interface of physics and biology: engineering virus-based nanoparticles for biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Wen, Amy M; Infusino, Melissa; De Luca, Antonio; Kernan, Daniel L; Czapar, Anna E; Strangi, Giuseppe; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2015-01-21

    Virus-based nanoparticles (VNPs) have been used for a wide range of applications, spanning basic materials science and translational medicine. Their propensity to self-assemble into precise structures that offer a three-dimensional scaffold for functionalization has led to their use as optical contrast agents and related biophotonics applications. A number of fluorescently labeled platforms have been developed and their utility in optical imaging demonstrated, yet their optical properties have not been investigated in detail. In this study, two VNPs of varying architectures were compared side-by-side to determine the impact of dye density, dye localization, conjugation chemistry, and microenvironment on the optical properties of the probes. Dyes were attached to icosahedral cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) and rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) through a range of chemistries to target particular side chains displayed at specific locations around the virus. The fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the particles were determined, first using photochemical experiments on the benchtop, and second in imaging experiments using tissue culture experiments. The virus-based optical probes were found to be extraordinarily robust under ultrashort, pulsed laser light conditions with a significant amount of excitation energy, maintaining structural and chemical stability. The most effective fluorescence output was achieved through dye placement at optimized densities coupled to the exterior surface avoiding conjugated ring systems. Lifetime measurements indicate that fluorescence output depends not only on spacing the fluorophores, but also on dimer stacking and configurational changes leading to radiationless relaxation-and these processes are related to the conjugation chemistry and nanoparticle shape. For biological applications, the particles were also examined in tissue culture, from which it was found that the optical properties differed from those found on the benchtop due

  20. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  1. Bulk Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, C. C.; Langdon, T. G.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2017-09-01

    This paper will address three topics of importance to bulk nanostructured materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are defined as bulk solids with nanoscale or partly nanoscale microstructures. This category of nanostructured materials has historical roots going back many decades but has relatively recent focus due to new discoveries of unique properties of some nanoscale materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are prepared by a variety of severe plastic deformation methods, and these will be reviewed. Powder processing to prepare bulk nanostructured materials requires that the powders be consolidated by typical combinations of pressure and temperature, the latter leading to coarsening of the microstructure. The thermal stability of nanostructured materials will also be discussed. An example of bringing nanostructured materials to applications as structural materials will be described in terms of the cryomilling of powders and their consolidation.

  2. Bulk amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Archuleta, J.I.; Sickafus, K.E.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report for a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work was to develop the competency for the synthesis of novel bulk amorphous alloys. The authors researched their synthesis methods and alloy properties, including thermal stability, mechanical, and transport properties. The project also addressed the development of vanadium-spinel alloys for structural applications in hostile environments, the measurement of elastic constants and thermal expansion in single-crystal TiAl from 300 to 750 K, the measurement of elastic constants in gallium nitride, and a study of the shock-induced martensitic transformations in NiTi alloys.

  3. Radial distribution function imaging by STEM diffraction: Phase mapping and analysis of heterogeneous nanostructured glasses.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaoke; Wang, Di; Feng, Tao; Kübel, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Characterizing heterogeneous nanostructured amorphous materials is a challenging topic, because of difficulty to solve disordered atomic arrangement in nanometer scale. We developed a new transmission electron microscopy (TEM) method to enable phase analysis and mapping of heterogeneous amorphous structures. That is to combine scanning TEM (STEM) diffraction mapping, radial distribution function (RDF) analysis, and hyperspectral analysis. This method was applied to an amorphous zirconium oxide and zirconium iron multilayer system, and showed extreme sensitivity to small atomic packing variations. This approach helps to understand local structure variations in glassy composite materials and provides new insights to correlate structure and properties of glasses.

  4. Plasmonic nanostructures for the absorption enhancement of silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burford, Nathan M.

    In this work, computational investigation of plasmonic nanostructures was conducted using the commercial finite element electromagnetics solver AnsysRTM HFSS. Arrays of silver toroid nanoparticles located on the surface of an amorphous silicon thin-film absorbing layer were studied for particle sizes ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm in outer diameter. Parametric optimization by calculating an approximation of the photocurrent enhancement due to the nanoparticles was performed to determine optimal surface coverage of the nanoparticles. A comparison was made between these optimized nanotoroid arrays and optimized nanosphere arrays based on spectral absorption enhancement and potential photocurrent enhancement in an amorphous silicon absorbing layer. In addition to these nanotoroids, highly irregular nanostructures were investigated. These structures were inspired by surface structures that were observed by others in the literature to be forming during the top-down aluminum induced crystallization of amorphous silicon. A 3D model of these irregular nanostructures was studied considering the structure's material to range from pure aluminum to a weighted mix of aluminum and silicon. Absorption enhancement in the underlying silicon layer was calculated and multiple, broadband spectral resonant peaks were observed. Parallel computation based on the Message Passing Interface (MPI) of two HFSS parallelization methods was employed on the Arkansas High Performance Computing Center. A 2.6 times speedup and 34% reduction in memory requirements was achieved when using the domain decomposition scheme of the package as compared to the basic multiprocessing parallelization.

  5. Process flow to integrate nanostructures on silicon grass in surface micromachined systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehner, H.; Müller, L.; Biermann, S.; Hänschke, F.; Hoffmann, M.

    2016-10-01

    The process flow to integrate metallic nanostructures in surface micromachining processes is presented. The nanostructures are generated by evaporation of microstructured silicon grass with metal. The process flow is based on the lift-off of a thin amorphous silicon layer deposited using a CVD process. All steps feature a low temperature load beneath 120 °C and high compatibility with many materials as only well-established chemicals are used. As a result metallic nanostructures usable for optical applications can be generated as part of multilayered microsystems fabricated in surface micromachining.

  6. Containerless processing of amorphous ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1990-01-01

    The absence of gravity allows containerless processing of materials which could not otherwise be processed. High melting point, hard materials such as borides, nitrides, and refractory metals are usually brittle in their crystalline form. The absence of dislocations in amorphous materials frequently endows them with flexibility and toughness. Systematic studies of the properties of many amorphous materials have not been carried out. The requirements for their production is that they can be processed in a controlled way without container interaction. Containerless processing in microgravity could permit the control necessary to produce amorphous forms of hard materials.

  7. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  8. Wedging transfer of nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Grégory F; Calado, Victor E; Zandbergen, Henny; Vandersypen, Lieven M K; Dekker, Cees

    2010-05-12

    We report a versatile water-based method for transferring nanostructures onto surfaces of various shapes and compositions. The transfer occurs through the intercalation of a layer of water between a hydrophilic substrate and a hydrophobic nanostructure (for example, graphene flakes, carbon nanotubes, metallic nanostructures, quantum dots, etc.) locked within a hydrophobic polymer thin film. As a result, the film entrapping the nanostructure is lifted off and floats at the air-water interface. The nanostructure can subsequently be deposited onto a target substrate by the removal of the water and the dissolution of the polymeric film. We show examples where graphene flakes and patterned metallic nanostructures are precisely transferred onto a specific location on a variety of patterned substrates, even on top of curved objects such as microspheres. The method is simple to use, fast, and does not require advanced equipment.

  9. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Gold nanostructuring on Si substrate by selective electroless deposition.

    PubMed

    Bhuvana, T; Kulkarni, G U

    2007-06-01

    Gold deposition on Si(111) substrates has been carried out by electroless process from KAuCl4 in a fluorinated solution and the resulting nanostructures have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Deposition carried out under normal plating conditions produces an Au film with (111) orientation. The effect of additives such as poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) to the plating solution has been examined. While PVP induces amorphous deposition, MUA gives rise to flat (111) oriented islands. In order to produce individual nanostructures, we made use of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) as a masking agent and carried out electroless deposition with an intermittent dip in OTS. By varying the durations of dip in the two solutions, various Au nanostructures-islands, cellular networks, and nanowires are obtained.

  11. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  12. Amorphous and Ultradisperse Crystalline Materials,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The book sums up experimental and theoretical findings on amorphous and ultradisperse crystalline materials , massive and film types. Present-day... crystalline materials of metallic systems are presented. Emphasis is placed on inorganic film materials.

  13. Characterization Techniques for Amorphous Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from B-Be-Fe to Co-W-Zr' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter '2 Characterization Techniques for Amorphous Alloys' with the content:

  14. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  15. Magnetic carbon nanostructures: microwave energy-assisted pyrolysis vs. conventional pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiahua; Pallavkar, Sameer; Chen, Minjiao; Yerra, Narendranath; Luo, Zhiping; Colorado, Henry A; Lin, Hongfei; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Khasanov, Airat; Ho, Thomas C; Young, David P; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2013-01-11

    Magnetic carbon nanostructures from microwave assisted- and conventional-pyrolysis processes are compared. Unlike graphitized carbon shells from conventional heating, different carbon shell morphologies including nanotubes, nanoflakes and amorphous carbon were observed. Crystalline iron and cementite were observed in the magnetic core, different from a single cementite phase from the conventional process.

  16. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Karthik

    2011-12-01

    Silicon Photonics is quickly proving to be a suitable interconnect technology for meeting the future goals of on-chip bandwidth and low power requirements. However, it is not clear how silicon photonics will be integrated into CMOS chips, particularly microprocessors. The issue of integrating photonic circuits into electronic IC fabrication processes to achieve maximum flexibility and minimum complexity and cost is an important one. In order to minimize usage of chip real estate, it will be advantageous to integrate in three-dimensions. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is emerging as a promising material for the 3-D integration of silicon photonics for on-chip optical interconnects. In addition, a-Si:H film can be deposited using CMOS compatible low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at any point in the fabrication process allowing maximum flexibility and minimal complexity. In this thesis, we demonstrate a-Si:H as a high performance alternate platform to crystalline silicon, enabling backend integration of optical interconnects in a hybrid photonic-electronic network-on-chip architecture. High quality passive devices are fabricated on a low-loss a-Si:H platform enabling wavelength division multiplexing schemes. We demonstrate a broadband all-optical modulation scheme based on free-carrier absorption effect, which can enable compact electro-optic modulators in a-Si:H. Furthermore, we comprehensively characterize the optical nonlinearities in a-Si:H and observe that a-Si:H exhibits enhanced nonlinearities as compared to crystalline silicon. Based on the enhanced nonlinearities, we demonstrate low-power four-wave mixing in a-Si:H waveguides enabling high speed all-optical devices in an a-Si:H platform. Finally, we demonstrate a novel data encoding scheme using thermal and all-optical tuning of silicon waveguides, increasing the spectral efficiency in an interconnect link.

  17. Aqueous ultracapacitors using amorphous MnO2 and reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mery, Adrien; Ghamouss, Fouad; Autret, Cécile; Farhat, Douaa; Tran-Van, François

    2016-02-01

    Herein, synthesis and characterization of amorphous MnO2 and application in asymmetric aqueous ultracapacitors are reported. Different amorphous manganese oxide (MnO2) materials were synthesized from the reduction of KMnO4 in different media such as ethanol (EtOH) or dimethylformamide (DMF). The electrochemical behavior of amorphous MnO2, labeled MnO2-Et and MnO2-DMF, were studied by using cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic cycling in aqueous electrolyte. XRD, BET, TEM, and SEM characterizations highlighted the amorphous nature and the nanostructuration of these MnO2 materials. BET measurement established that these amorphous MnO2 are mesoporous. In addition, MnO2-Et exhibits a larger specific surface area (168 m2 g-1), a narrower pore diameters distribution with lower diameters compared to MnO2-DMF. These results are in agreement with the electrochemical results. Indeed, MnO2-Et shows a higher specific capacitance and lower impedance in aqueous K2SO4 electrolyte. Furthermore, aqueous asymmetric ultracapacitors were assembled and studied using amorphous MnO2 as positive electrode and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as negative electrode. These asymmetric systems exhibit an electrochemical stability for more than 20,000 galvanostatic cycles at current density of 1 A g-1 with an operating voltage of 2 V.

  18. Microstructure, thermal, and mechanical properties of nanostructured Cu-9.5Ni-4.0Sn-7.5P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, T. M.

    1995-04-01

    Nanostructured Cu-9.5Ni-4.0Sn-7.5P samples represent a polycrystal microstructure of nanometer-sized α-Cu and Cu3P crystallites for crystallite sizes less than 20 nm and of nanometer-sized α-Cu, Cu3P, and Ni2P crystallites for crystallite sizes greater than 20 nm. The specific heat values between 300 K and 400 K for the nanostructured sample with crystallite size of 10 nm are about 20% higher than for the amorphous sample and about 40% higher than for the coarse-grained sample. The hardness of the nanostructured sample with crystallite size of 10 nm is 30% higher than that of the amorphous sample and 110% higher than that of the coarse-grained sample. The variation in hardness with the crystallite size for the nanostructured samples follows the Hall-Petch relationship.

  19. Ultrafast pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanostructures: Structural and optical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervolaraki, M.; Komninou, Ph.; Kioseoglou, J.; Othonos, A.; Giapintzakis, J.

    2013-08-01

    Carbon nanostructured materials were obtained by high-repetition rate pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target using a train of 10-ps duration pulses at 1064 nm in different pressures of high-purity Ar gas. It is demonstrated that their microstructure and optical properties vary as a function of the argon pressure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed the existence of onion-like carbon nanostructures embedded in a matrix of amorphous carbon nanofoam for samples prepared at 300 Pa. In comparison samples prepared at 30 Pa show evidence of both onion-like and turbostratic carbon coexisting in a matrix of amorphous carbon nanofoam whereas samples prepared in vacuum are continuous films of amorphous carbon. Transient transmission spectroscopy measurements suggested that free carrier absorption is the dominant effect following photo-excitation for probing wavelengths in the range of 550-1000 nm and its magnitude varies among the materials investigated due to their different microstructures.

  20. Enhanced photocatalytic performance of TiO2-ZnO hybrid nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chun; Amini, Abbas; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Zuli; Song, Haisheng; Wang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photocatalytic properties of rational designed TiO2-ZnO hybrid nanostructures, which were fabricated by the site-specific deposition of amorphous TiO2 on the tips of ZnO nanorods. Compared with the pure components of ZnO nanorods and amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles, these TiO2-ZnO hybrid nanostructures demonstrated a higher catalytic activity. The strong green emission quenching observed from photoluminescence of TiO2-ZnO hybrid nanostructures implied an enhanced charge transfer/separation process resulting from the novel type II heterostructures with fine interfaces. The catalytic performance of annealing products with different TiO2 phase varied with the annealing temperatures. This is attributed to the combinational changes in Eg of the TiO2 phase, the specific surface area and the quantity of surface hydroxyl groups. PMID:24566978

  1. Allotropic composition of amorphous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrebov, S. G. Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.

    2007-08-15

    Using the concept of an inhomogeneous broadening of spectral lines of the basic oscillators responsible for forming the spectrum, the experimental dependences of the dispersion of the imaginary part of permittivity are analyzed for amorphous carbon. It turned out that four types of oscillators contribute to this dependence. The first three types represent the electron transitions from the energy-spectrum ground state for {pi} and {sigma} electrons of amorphous carbon to an excited state. The fourth type is related to the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by free charge carriers. The absolute values of squared plasma frequencies of oscillators are estimated, and, using them, the relative fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded atoms forming the amorphous-carbon skeleton is calculated. This estimate agrees closely with the theoretical predictions for amorphous carbon of the same density as the material under study. The dependence of the relative fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded atoms contained in amorphous hydrogenised carbon on annealing temperature is determined. The developed method is also applied to the analysis of the normalized curve for the light extinction in the interstellar medium. The contribution to the extinction of two varieties of interstellar matter is detected.

  2. Universal features of amorphous plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budrikis, Zoe; Castellanos, David Fernandez; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zaiser, Michael; Zapperi, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    Plastic yielding of amorphous solids occurs by power-law distributed deformation avalanches whose universality is still debated. Experiments and molecular dynamics simulations are hampered by limited statistical samples, and although existing stochastic models give precise exponents, they require strong assumptions about fixed deformation directions, at odds with the statistical isotropy of amorphous materials. Here, we introduce a fully tensorial, stochastic mesoscale model for amorphous plasticity that links the statistical physics of plastic yielding to engineering mechanics. It captures the complex shear patterning observed for a wide variety of deformation modes, as well as the avalanche dynamics of plastic flow. Avalanches are described by universal size exponents and scaling functions, avalanche shapes, and local stability distributions, independent of system dimensionality, boundary and loading conditions, and stress state. Our predictions consistently differ from those of mean-field depinning models, providing evidence that plastic yielding is a distinct type of critical phenomenon.

  3. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  4. Generalized melting criterion for amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, R. |; Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Meshii, M.

    1992-12-01

    We present a thermodynamic model of solid-state amorphization based on a generalization of the well-known Lindemann criterion. The original Lindemann criterion proposes that melting occurs when the root-mean-square amplitude of thermal displacement exceeds a critical value. This criterion can be generalized to include solid-state amorphization by taking into account the static displacements. In an effort to verify the generalized melting criterion, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of radiation-induced amorphization in NiZr, NiZr{sub 2}, NiTi and FeTi using embedded-atom potentials. The average shear elastic constant G was calculated as a function of the total mean-square atomic displacement following random atom-exchanges and introduction of Frenkel pairs. Results provide strong support for the generalized melting criterion.

  5. Universal features of amorphous plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Budrikis, Zoe; Castellanos, David Fernandez; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zaiser, Michael; Zapperi, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Plastic yielding of amorphous solids occurs by power-law distributed deformation avalanches whose universality is still debated. Experiments and molecular dynamics simulations are hampered by limited statistical samples, and although existing stochastic models give precise exponents, they require strong assumptions about fixed deformation directions, at odds with the statistical isotropy of amorphous materials. Here, we introduce a fully tensorial, stochastic mesoscale model for amorphous plasticity that links the statistical physics of plastic yielding to engineering mechanics. It captures the complex shear patterning observed for a wide variety of deformation modes, as well as the avalanche dynamics of plastic flow. Avalanches are described by universal size exponents and scaling functions, avalanche shapes, and local stability distributions, independent of system dimensionality, boundary and loading conditions, and stress state. Our predictions consistently differ from those of mean-field depinning models, providing evidence that plastic yielding is a distinct type of critical phenomenon. PMID:28671191

  6. Universal features of amorphous plasticity.

    PubMed

    Budrikis, Zoe; Castellanos, David Fernandez; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zaiser, Michael; Zapperi, Stefano

    2017-07-03

    Plastic yielding of amorphous solids occurs by power-law distributed deformation avalanches whose universality is still debated. Experiments and molecular dynamics simulations are hampered by limited statistical samples, and although existing stochastic models give precise exponents, they require strong assumptions about fixed deformation directions, at odds with the statistical isotropy of amorphous materials. Here, we introduce a fully tensorial, stochastic mesoscale model for amorphous plasticity that links the statistical physics of plastic yielding to engineering mechanics. It captures the complex shear patterning observed for a wide variety of deformation modes, as well as the avalanche dynamics of plastic flow. Avalanches are described by universal size exponents and scaling functions, avalanche shapes, and local stability distributions, independent of system dimensionality, boundary and loading conditions, and stress state. Our predictions consistently differ from those of mean-field depinning models, providing evidence that plastic yielding is a distinct type of critical phenomenon.

  7. Fabrication, characterization, cathodoluminescence, and field-emission properties of silica (SiO{sub 2}) nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.Q.; Onodera, H.; Sekiguchi, T.; Golberg, D.; Bando, Y.; Mori, T.

    2012-11-15

    High-quality one dimensional amorphous SiO{sub 2} nanostructures with different morphologies (nanowires and starfish-like nanostructures) are synthesized through a simple catalysis-free approach and effective thermal evaporation process. The morphologies, microstructures, and compositions of the products are investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A promising optical property (cathodoluminescence (CL) in a strong ultraviolet (UV) emission and a weak blue emission at room temperature) was detected in the as-synthesized nanostructures. Field-emission measurements show that the SiO{sub 2} nanostructures may also be a promising FE emitter candidate if we can improve the conductivity and decrease the density of the nanostructures. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple catalysis-free approach and effective thermal evaporation process Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-quality one dimensional amorphous SiO{sub 2} nanostructures Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A strong ultraviolet (UV) emission and a weak blue emission at room temperature Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A promising FE emitter's candidate.

  8. Ultrastable Amorphous Sb2Se3 Film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Li, Yang; Huang, Quan; Wang, Bihan; Zheng, Xuerong; Ren, Yang; Yang, Wenge

    2017-08-31

    Increasing the thermostability of amorphous materials has been a long journey to improve their properties. The metastable nature of chalcogenide glasses limits their practical applications as an amorphous semiconductor in photovoltaic performance. Here, we report the formation and physical properties of ultrastable amorphous Sb2Se3 with an enhanced thermal stability compared to ordinary amorphous Sb2Se3 (ΔTx= 17 K). By in situ high temperature-high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction, the difference in structure relaxation between ordinary and ultrastable amorphous Sb2Se3 was manifested by local structure evolution. Ultrastable amorphous Sb2Se3 showed the smallest surface roughness and highest refractive index, the mechanism behind was further discussed in terms of fast molecular mobility and molecular orientation during vapor deposition. Formation of ultrastable amorphous Sb2Se3 demonstrated a promising avenue to obtain novel functional amorphous semiconductor with modulated structure and property.

  9. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  10. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  11. Chalcogenide glass nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Bradley R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; MacIsaac, Brett D.; Sundaram, S. Kamakshi

    2007-05-01

    Chalcogenide nanowires and other micro-and nano scale structures are grown on a preselected portion of on a substrate. They are amorphous and of uniform composition and can be grown by a sublimation-condensation process onto the surface of an amorphous substrate. Among other uses, these structures can be used as coatings on optical fibers, as coatings on implants, as wispering galleries, in electrochemical devices, and in nanolasers.

  12. Crystallized Silicon Nanostructures - Experimental Characterization and Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Agbo, Solomon; Sutta, Pavol; Calta, Pavel; Biswas, Rana; Pan, Bicai

    2014-07-01

    We have synthesized silicon nanocrystalline structures from thermal annealing of thin film amorphous silicon-based multilayers. The annealing procedure that was carried out in vacuum at temperatures up to 1100 °C is integrated in a X-ray diffraction (XRD) setup for real-time monitoring of the formation phases of the nanostructures. The microstructure of the crystallized films is investigated through experimental measurements combined with atomistic simulations of realistic nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) models. The multilayers consisting of uniformly alternating thicknesses of hydrogenated amorphous silicon and silicon oxide (SiO2) were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on crystalline silicon and Corning glass substrates. The crystallized structure consisting of nc-Si structures embedded in an amorphous matrix were further characterized through XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared measurements. We are able to show the different stages of nanostructure formation and how the sizes and the crystallized mass fraction can be controlled in our experimental synthesis. The crystallized silicon structures with large crystalline filling fractions exceeding 50% have been simulated with a robust classical molecular dynamics technique. The crystalline filling fractions and structural order of nc-Si obtained from this simulation are compared with our Raman and XRD measurements.

  13. Amorphous rare earth magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.; Lewis, L.H.; Panchanathan, V.

    1996-08-01

    Gas atomization (GA) processing does not generally have a high enough cooling rate to produce the initial amorphous microstructure needed to obtain optimal magnetic properties in RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B alloys. Phase separation and an underquenched microstructure result from detrimental {alpha}-Fe precipitation, and the resulting magnetic domain structure is very coarse. Additionally, there is a dramatic dependence of the magnetic properties on the cooling rate (and therefore the particle size) and the powders can be sensitive to environmental degradation. Alloy compositions designed just for GA (as opposed to melt spinning) are necessary to produce an amorphous structure that can be crystallized to result in a fine structure with magnetic properties which are independent of particle size. The addition of titanium and carbon to the melt has been found to change the solidification process sufficiently to result in an ``overquenched`` state in which most of the powder size fractions have an amorphous component. Crystallization with a brief heat treatment produces a structure which has improved magnetic properties, in part due to the ability to use compositions with higher Fe contents without {alpha}-Fe precipitation. Results from magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and x-ray analyses will be used to contrast the microstructure, domain structure, and magnetic properties of this new generation of amorphous powders with their multiphase predecessors.

  14. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-10-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system.

  15. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  16. Optical absorption in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, S.K.; Zukotynski, S.; Perz, J.M.; Sidhu, L.S.

    1996-12-31

    The role that disorder plays in shaping the form of the optical absorption spectrum of hydrogenated amorphous silicon is investigated. Disorder leads to a redistribution of states, which both reduces the Tauc gap and broadens the absorption tail. The observed relationship between the Tauc gap and the breadth of the absorption tail is thus explained.

  17. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system. PMID:27767103

  18. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    ScienceCinema

    Andy Minor

    2016-07-12

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  19. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Minor

    2008-10-16

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  20. Ion irradiation induced element-enriched and depleted nanostructures in Zr-Al-Cu-Ni metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H. C.; Liu, R. D.; Yan, L. E-mail: zhouxingtai@sinap.ac.cn; Zhou, X. T. E-mail: zhouxingtai@sinap.ac.cn; Cao, G. Q.; Wang, G.

    2015-07-21

    The microstructural evolution of a Zr-Al-Cu-Ni metallic glass induced by irradiation with Ar ions was investigated. Under ion irradiation, the Cu- and Ni-enriched nanostructures (diameter of 30–50 nm) consisted of crystalline and amorphous structures were formed. Further, Cu- and Ni-depleted nanostructures with diameters of 5–20 nm were also observed. The formation of these nanostructures can be ascribed to the migration of Cu and Ni atoms in the irradiated metallic glass.

  1. Bio-photonic detection method for morphological analysis of anthracnose disease and physiological disorders of Diospyros kaki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Moon, Byungin; Jung, Hee-Young; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2017-04-01

    The pathological and physiological defects in various types of fruits lead to large amounts of economical waste. It is well recognized that internal fruit defects due to pathological infections and physiological disorders can be effectively visualized at an initial stage of the disease using a well-known bio-photonic detection method called optical coherence tomography (OCT). This work investigates the use of OCT for identifying the morphological variations of anthracnose (bitter rot) disease infected and physiologically disordered Diospyros kaki (Asian Persimmon) fruits. An experiment was conducted using fruit samples that were carefully selected from persimmon orchards. Depth-resolved images with a high axial resolution were acquired using 850-nm-based spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system. The obtained exemplary high-resolution two-dimensional and volumetric three-dimensional images revealed complementary morphological differences between healthy and defected samples. Moreover, the obtained depth-profile analysis results confirmed the disappearance of the healthy cell layers among the healthy-infected boundary regions. Thus, the proposed method has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy of the OCT technique used in agricultural plantations.

  2. Gold nanoparticle-embedded silk protein-ZnO nanorod hybrids for flexible bio-photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Gogurla, Narendar; Kundu, Subhas C; Ray, Samit K

    2017-04-07

    Silk protein has been used as a biopolymer substrate for flexible photonic devices. Here, we demonstrate ZnO nanorod array hybrid photodetectors on Au nanoparticle-embedded silk protein for flexible optoelectronics. Hybrid samples exhibit optical absorption at the band edge of ZnO as well as plasmonic energy due to Au nanoparticles, making them attractive for selective UV and visible wavelength detection. The device prepared on Au-silk protein shows a much lower dark current and a higher photo to dark-current ratio of ∼10(5) as compared to the control sample without Au nanoparticles. The hybrid device also exhibits a higher specific detectivity due to higher responsivity arising from the photo-generated hole trapping by Au nanoparticles. Sharp pulses in the transient photocurrent have been observed in devices prepared on glass and Au-silk protein substrates due to the light induced pyroelectric effect of ZnO, enabling the demonstration of self-powered photodetectors at zero bias. Flexible hybrid detectors have been demonstrated on Au-silk/polyethylene terephthalate substrates, exhibiting characteristics similar to those fabricated on rigid glass substrates. A study of the performance of photodetectors with different bending angles indicates very good mechanical stability of silk protein based flexible devices. This novel concept of ZnO nanorod array photodetectors on a natural silk protein platform provides an opportunity to realize integrated flexible and self-powered bio-photonic devices for medical applications in near future.

  3. Bio-photonic detection method for morphological analysis of anthracnose disease and physiological disorders of Diospyros kaki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Moon, Byungin; Jung, Hee-Young; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2016-10-01

    The pathological and physiological defects in various types of fruits lead to large amounts of economical waste. It is well recognized that internal fruit defects due to pathological infections and physiological disorders can be effectively visualized at an initial stage of the disease using a well-known bio-photonic detection method called optical coherence tomography (OCT). This work investigates the use of OCT for identifying the morphological variations of anthracnose (bitter rot) disease infected and physiologically disordered Diospyros kaki (Asian Persimmon) fruits. An experiment was conducted using fruit samples that were carefully selected from persimmon orchards. Depth-resolved images with a high axial resolution were acquired using 850-nm-based spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system. The obtained exemplary high-resolution two-dimensional and volumetric three-dimensional images revealed complementary morphological differences between healthy and defected samples. Moreover, the obtained depth-profile analysis results confirmed the disappearance of the healthy cell layers among the healthy-infected boundary regions. Thus, the proposed method has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy of the OCT technique used in agricultural plantations.

  4. Optical probing of long-range spatial correlation and symmetry in complex biophotonic architectures on transparent insect wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pramod; Shamoon, Danish; Singh, Dhirendra P.; Mandal, Sudip; Singh, Kamal P.

    2015-02-01

    We experimentally probe the structural organization of complex bio-photonic architecture on transparent insect wings by a simple, non-invasive, real-time optical technique. A stable and reproducible far-field diffraction pattern in transmission was observed using collimated cw and broadband fs laser pulses. A quantitative analysis of the observed diffraction pattern unveiled long-range quasi-periodic order in the arrangement of the microstructures over mm scale. These observations agree well with the Fourier analysis of SEM images of the wing taken at various length scales. We propose a simple quantitative model based on optical diffraction by an array of non overlapping microstructures with minimal disorder which supports our experimental observations. We observed a rotation of the original diffraction profile by scanning the laser beam across the wing sample which gives direct signature of organizational symmetry in microstructure arrangements at various length scales. In addition, we report the first optical detection of reorganization in the photonic architecture on the Drosophila wings by various genetic mutations. These results have potential for the design and development of diffractive optical components for applied photonics and may open up new opportunities in biomimetic device research.

  5. Detection and treatment of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus: a pivotal challenge in translating biophotonics from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brian C

    2007-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a condition that poses high risk of developing dysplasia leading to cancer. Detection of dysplasia is a critical element in determining therapy but is extremely challenging, so that standard white-light endoscopy is used only as a means to guide biopsy. Many novel optical techniques have been aimed at this problem, including various forms of improved wide-field white-light (chromoendscopy/magnification and narrow-band) and fluorescence imaging, and "optical biopsy" techniques (diffuse reflectance, elastic light scattering, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies, confocal microendoscopy, and optical coherence tomography). While promising, either as stand-alone modalities or in combination, to date none has solved this pivotal challenge to the point of clinical adoption. Likewise, minimally invasive treatment of BE patients with dysplasia remains suboptimal, despite recent approval of photodynamic therapy for this indication. This work presents a critique and summary of each of these biophotonic technologies, and discusses the fundamental advantages and limitations of each. The future directions for this field are considered, particularly from the perspective of relying on intrinsic (endogenous) optical signatures compared with the use of exogenous contrast agents.

  6. Gold nanoparticle-embedded silk protein-ZnO nanorod hybrids for flexible bio-photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogurla, Narendar; Kundu, Subhas C.; Ray, Samit K.

    2017-04-01

    Silk protein has been used as a biopolymer substrate for flexible photonic devices. Here, we demonstrate ZnO nanorod array hybrid photodetectors on Au nanoparticle-embedded silk protein for flexible optoelectronics. Hybrid samples exhibit optical absorption at the band edge of ZnO as well as plasmonic energy due to Au nanoparticles, making them attractive for selective UV and visible wavelength detection. The device prepared on Au-silk protein shows a much lower dark current and a higher photo to dark-current ratio of ∼105 as compared to the control sample without Au nanoparticles. The hybrid device also exhibits a higher specific detectivity due to higher responsivity arising from the photo-generated hole trapping by Au nanoparticles. Sharp pulses in the transient photocurrent have been observed in devices prepared on glass and Au-silk protein substrates due to the light induced pyroelectric effect of ZnO, enabling the demonstration of self-powered photodetectors at zero bias. Flexible hybrid detectors have been demonstrated on Au-silk/polyethylene terephthalate substrates, exhibiting characteristics similar to those fabricated on rigid glass substrates. A study of the performance of photodetectors with different bending angles indicates very good mechanical stability of silk protein based flexible devices. This novel concept of ZnO nanorod array photodetectors on a natural silk protein platform provides an opportunity to realize integrated flexible and self-powered bio-photonic devices for medical applications in near future.

  7. Architectures for Nanostructured Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubloff, Gary

    2013-03-01

    Heterogeneous nanostructures offer profound opportunities for advancement in electrochemical energy storage, particularly with regard to power. However, their design and integration must balance ion transport, electron transport, and stability under charge/discharge cycling, involving fundamental physical, chemical and electrochemical mechanisms at nano length scales and across disparate time scales. In our group and in our DOE Energy Frontier Research Center (www.efrc.umd.edu) we have investigated single nanostructures and regular nanostructure arrays as batteries, electrochemical capacitors, and electrostatic capacitors to understand limiting mechanisms, using a variety of synthesis and characterization strategies. Primary lithiation pathways in heterogeneous nanostructures have been observed to include surface, interface, and both isotropic and anisotropic diffusion, depending on materials. Integrating current collection layers at the nano scale with active ion storage layers enhances power and can improve stability during cycling. For densely packed nanostructures as required for storage applications, we investigate both ``regular'' and ``random'' architectures consistent with transport requirements for spatial connectivity. Such configurations raise further important questions at the meso scale, such as dynamic ion and electron transport in narrow and tortuous channels, and the role of defect structures and their evolution during charge cycling. Supported as part of the Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DESC0001160

  8. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Daniel G; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J; Sandler, Stanley I; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2015-10-20

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein.

  9. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Daniel G.; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J.; Sandler, Stanley I.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein. PMID:26488663

  10. Amorphization and reduction of thermal conductivity in porous silicon by irradiation with swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Pascal J.; Canut, Bruno; Bluet, Jean-Marie; Lysenko, Vladimir; Gomes, Severine; Isaiev, Mykola; Burbelo, Roman; Chantrenne, Patrice; Frechette, Luc G.

    2013-07-07

    In this article, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of nanostructured porous silicon is reduced by amorphization and also that this amorphous phase in porous silicon can be created by swift (high-energy) heavy ion irradiation. Porous silicon samples with 41%-75% porosity are irradiated with 110 MeV uranium ions at six different fluences. Structural characterisation by micro-Raman spectroscopy and SEM imaging show that swift heavy ion irradiation causes the creation of an amorphous phase in porous Si but without suppressing its porous structure. We demonstrate that the amorphization of porous silicon is caused by electronic-regime interactions, which is the first time such an effect is obtained in crystalline silicon with single-ion species. Furthermore, the impact on the thermal conductivity of porous silicon is studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning thermal microscopy. The creation of an amorphous phase in porous silicon leads to a reduction of its thermal conductivity, up to a factor of 3 compared to the non-irradiated sample. Therefore, this technique could be used to enhance the thermal insulation properties of porous Si. Finally, we show that this treatment can be combined with pre-oxidation at 300 Degree-Sign C, which is known to lower the thermal conductivity of porous Si, in order to obtain an even greater reduction.

  11. Aragonite nanorods in calcium carbonate/polymer hybrids formed through self-organization processes from amorphous calcium carbonate solution.

    PubMed

    Kajiyama, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Kato, Takashi

    2014-04-24

    Nanostructured inorganic/polymer hybrid thin films comprising aragonite nanorods derived from aqueous suspensions of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) are prepared. For the formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO₃)/polymer hybrids, spincoated and annealed films of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) that function as polymer matrices are soaked in aqueous colloidal solutions dispersing ACC stabilized by poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). In the initial stage, calcite thin films form on the surface. Subsequently, aragonite crystals start to form inside the PVA matrix that contains PVA crystallites which induce aragonite nucleation. Nanostructured hybrids composed of calcite thin films consisting of nanoparticles and assembled aragonite nanorods are formed in the matrices of PVA.

  12. Amorphous Semiconductors: From Photocatalyst to Computer Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajan, Mayur

    encouraging but inconclusive. Then the method was successfully demonstrated on mesoporous TiO2SiO 2 by showing a shift in its optical bandgap. One of the special class of amorphous semiconductors is chalcogenide glasses, which exhibit high ionic conductivity even at room temperature. When metal doped chalcogenide glasses are under an electric field, they become electronically conductive. These properties are exploited in the computer memory storage application of Conductive Bridging Random Access Memory (CBRAM). CBRAM is a non-volatile memory that is a strong contender to replace conventional volatile RAMs such as DRAM, SRAM, etc. This technology has already been commercialized, but the working mechanism is still not clearly understood especially the nature of the conductive bridge filament. In this project, the CBRAM memory cells are fabricated by thermal evaporation method with Agx(GeSe 2)1-x as the solid electrolyte layer, Ag as the active electrode and Au as the inert electrode. By careful use of cyclic voltammetry, the conductive filaments were grown on the surface and the bulk of the solid electrolyte. The comparison between the two filaments revealed major differences leading to contradiction with the existing working mechanism. After compiling all the results, a modified working mechanism is proposed. SAXS is a powerful tool to characterize nanostructure of glasses. The analysis of the SAXS data to get useful information are usually performed by different programs. In this project, Irena and GIFT programs were compared by performing the analysis of the SAXS data of glass and glass ceramics samples. Irena was shown to be not suitable for the analysis of SAXS data that has a significant contribution from interparticle interactions. GIFT was demonstrated to be better suited for such analysis. Additionally, the results obtained by programs for samples with low interparticle interactions were shown to be consistent.

  13. Flexible amorphous metal films with high stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Cao, C. R.; Lu, Y. M.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-01-01

    We report the formation of amorphous Cu50Zr50 films with a large-area of more than 100 cm2. The films were fabricated by ion beam assisted deposition with a slow deposition rate at moderate temperature. The amorphous films have markedly enhanced thermal stability, excellent flexibility, and high reflectivity with atomic level smoothness. The multifunctional properties of the amorphous films are favorites in the promising applications of smart skin or wearable devices. The method of preparing highly stable amorphous metal films by tuning the deposition rate instead of deposition temperature could pave a way for exploring amorphous metal films with unique properties.

  14. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I.; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2015-12-22

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  15. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  16. Excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon on metallic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delachat, F.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Cayron, C.; Ducros, C.; Lerat, J.-F.; Emeraud, T.; Negru, R.; Huet, K.; Reydet, P.-L.

    2013-06-01

    An attempt has been made to achieve the crystallization of silicon thin film on metallic foils by long pulse duration excimer laser processing. Amorphous silicon thin films (100 nm) were deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on a commercial metallic alloy (N42-FeNi made of 41 % of Ni) coated by a tantalum nitride (TaN) layer. The TaN coating acts as a barrier layer, preventing the diffusion of metallic impurities in the silicon thin film during the laser annealing. An energy density threshold of 0.3 J cm-2, necessary for surface melting and crystallization of the amorphous silicon, was predicted by a numerical simulation of laser-induced phase transitions and witnessed by Raman analysis. Beyond this fluence, the melt depth increases with the intensification of energy density. A complete crystallization of the layer is achieved for an energy density of 0.9 J cm-2. Scanning electron microscopy unveils the nanostructuring of the silicon after laser irradiation, while cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals the crystallites' columnar growth.

  17. Comparative study of thermal conductivity in crystalline and amorphous nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juangsa, Firman Bagja; Muroya, Yoshiki; Ryu, Meguya; Morikawa, Junko; Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2017-06-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs)/polystyrene (PS) nanocomposite has been observed to have a significant decrease in thermal conductivity in terms of the SiNC fraction with unspecified factors remained unclear. In this paper, amorphous silicon nanoparticles (a-SiNPs) with a mean diameter of 6 nm and PS nanocomposites were synthesized, and their thermal conductivity, including the density and specific heat, was compared with our previous work which investigated well-crystalized SiNPs (6 nm) and PS nanocomposite. The difference between amorphous and crystalline structure is insignificant, but phonon scattering at SiNPs and PS boundary is the key influencing factor of thermal conductivity reduction. The effective thermal conductivity models for nanocomposite revealed that the thermal boundary resistance, explained by Kapitza principle, is estimated to be 4 × 10-7 m2K/W, showing the significant effect of nanostructured heterogenic surface resistance on overall heat transfer behavior. Preservation of unique properties nanoscale materials and low-cost fabrication by silicon inks process at room temperature give the promising potential of SiNPs based heat transfer management.

  18. Topological Insulators in Amorphous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwala, Adhip; Shenoy, Vijay B.

    2017-06-01

    Much of the current understanding of topological insulators, which informs the experimental search for topological materials and systems, is based on crystalline band theory, where local electronic degrees of freedom at different crystal sites hybridize with each other in ways that produce nontrivial topology. Here we provide a novel theoretical demonstration of realizing topological phases in amorphous systems, as exemplified by a set of sites randomly located in space. We show this by constructing hopping models on such random lattices whose gapped ground states are shown to possess nontrivial topological nature (characterized by Bott indices) that manifests as quantized conductances in systems with a boundary. Our study adds a new dimension, beyond crystalline solids, to the search for topological systems by pointing to the promising possibilities in amorphous solids and other engineered random systems.

  19. Topological Insulators in Amorphous Systems.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Adhip; Shenoy, Vijay B

    2017-06-09

    Much of the current understanding of topological insulators, which informs the experimental search for topological materials and systems, is based on crystalline band theory, where local electronic degrees of freedom at different crystal sites hybridize with each other in ways that produce nontrivial topology. Here we provide a novel theoretical demonstration of realizing topological phases in amorphous systems, as exemplified by a set of sites randomly located in space. We show this by constructing hopping models on such random lattices whose gapped ground states are shown to possess nontrivial topological nature (characterized by Bott indices) that manifests as quantized conductances in systems with a boundary. Our study adds a new dimension, beyond crystalline solids, to the search for topological systems by pointing to the promising possibilities in amorphous solids and other engineered random systems.

  20. Nanohole Structuring for Improved Performance of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Johlin, Eric; Al-Obeidi, Ahmed; Nogay, Gizem; Stuckelberger, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-06-22

    While low hole mobilities limit the current collection and efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic devices, attempts to improve mobility of the material directly have stagnated. Herein, we explore a method of utilizing nanostructuring of a-Si:H devices to allow for improved hole collection in thick absorber layers. This is achieved by etching an array of 150 nm diameter holes into intrinsic a-Si:H and then coating the structured material with p-type a-Si:H and a conformal zinc oxide transparent conducting layer. The inclusion of these nanoholes yields relative power conversion efficiency (PCE) increases of ∼45%, from 7.2 to 10.4% PCE for small area devices. Comparisons of optical properties, time-of-flight mobility measurements, and internal quantum efficiency spectra indicate this efficiency is indeed likely occurring from an improved collection pathway provided by the nanostructuring of the devices. Finally, we estimate that through modest optimizations of the design and fabrication, PCEs of beyond 13% should be obtainable for similar devices.

  1. Thermal decomposition of fullerene nanowhiskers protected by amorphous carbon mask

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongxuan; Wang, Chengxiang; Miyazawa, Kun’ichi; Wang, Hongxin; Masuda, Hideki; Fujita, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Fullerene nanostructures are well known for their unique morphology, physical and mechanical properties. The thermal stability of fullerene nanostructures, such as their sublimation at high temperature is also very important for studying their structures and applications. In this work, We observed fullerene nanowhiskers (FNWs) in situ with scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM) at elevated temperatures. The FNWs exhibited different stabilities with different thermal histories during the observation. The pristine FNWs were decomposed at the temperatures higher than 300 °C in a vacuum environment. Other FNWs were protected from decomposition with an amorphous carbon (aC) film deposited on the surface. Based on high spacial resolution, aC film with periodic structure was deposited by helium ion beam induced deposition (IBID) on the surface of FNWs. Annealed at the high temperature, the fullerene molecules were selectively sublimated from the FNWs. The periodic structure was formed on the surface of FNWs and observed by HIM. Monte Carlo simulation and Raman characterization proved that the morphology of the FNWs was changed by helium IBID at high temperature. This work provides a new method of fabricating artificial structure on the surface of FNWs with periodic aC film as a mask. PMID:27991498

  2. Thermal decomposition of fullerene nanowhiskers protected by amorphous carbon mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongxuan; Wang, Chengxiang; Miyazawa, Kun’Ichi; Wang, Hongxin; Masuda, Hideki; Fujita, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    Fullerene nanostructures are well known for their unique morphology, physical and mechanical properties. The thermal stability of fullerene nanostructures, such as their sublimation at high temperature is also very important for studying their structures and applications. In this work, We observed fullerene nanowhiskers (FNWs) in situ with scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM) at elevated temperatures. The FNWs exhibited different stabilities with different thermal histories during the observation. The pristine FNWs were decomposed at the temperatures higher than 300 °C in a vacuum environment. Other FNWs were protected from decomposition with an amorphous carbon (aC) film deposited on the surface. Based on high spacial resolution, aC film with periodic structure was deposited by helium ion beam induced deposition (IBID) on the surface of FNWs. Annealed at the high temperature, the fullerene molecules were selectively sublimated from the FNWs. The periodic structure was formed on the surface of FNWs and observed by HIM. Monte Carlo simulation and Raman characterization proved that the morphology of the FNWs was changed by helium IBID at high temperature. This work provides a new method of fabricating artificial structure on the surface of FNWs with periodic aC film as a mask.

  3. Self-replication: Nanostructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2017-10-01

    DNA origami nanostructures were utilized to replicate a seed pattern that resulted in the growth of populations of nanostructures. Exponential growth could be controlled by environmental conditions depending on the preferential requirements of each population.

  4. Sustained antibacterial activity from triclosan-loaded nanostructured mesoporous silicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengjia; Coffer, Jeffery L; Dorraj, Katrina; Hartman, Phil S; Loni, Armando; Canham, Leigh T

    2010-12-06

    In this work, nanostructured particles of porous silicon are demonstrated to act as an effective carrier for the sustained delivery of antibacterial agents with an enhanced inhibitory activity. Methods are described for the incorporation of significant amounts of the established antibacterial compound triclosan (Irgasan) into mesoporous silicon of varying porosities. Such materials were characterized by a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and antimicrobial assays. Assessment of antibacterial activity was carried out versus the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus as a function of time with concomitant assessment of triclosan release; significant, sustained inhibition of bacterial growth is demonstrated in the triclosan-containing porous Si for time intervals greater than 100 days. Significantly, enhanced dissolution (relative to room temperature equilibrium solubility) of the triclosan was observed for the initial 15 days of drug release, inferring some amorphization or nanostructuring by the porous Si matrix.

  5. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  6. Nebulization of nanoparticulate amorphous or crystalline tacrolimus--single-dose pharmacokinetics study in mice.

    PubMed

    Sinswat, Prapasri; Overhoff, Kirk A; McConville, Jason T; Johnston, Keith P; Williams, Robert O

    2008-08-01

    Developing a pulmonary composition of tacrolimus (TAC) provides direct access to the graft in lung transplant offering the possibility of high drug levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic characteristics of the nanostructured aggregates containing amorphous or crystalline nanoparticles of TAC produced by ultra-rapid freezing (URF). TAC and lactose (1:1 ratio; URF-TAC:LAC) and TAC alone (URF-TAC) were investigated for pulmonary delivery and compared to unprocessed TAC. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that URF-TAC was crystalline, whereas URF-TAC:LAC was amorphous. In vitro results revealed the superior physiochemical characteristics of both URF formulations compared to unprocessed TAC. The surface area of URF processed TAC was higher (25-29 m2/g) than that of the unprocessed TAC (0.53 m2/g) and subsequently enhanced dissolution rates. In addition, URF-TAC:LAC displayed the ability to supersaturate in the dissolution media to about 11 times the crystalline equilibrium solubility. Similar aerodynamic particle sizes of 2-3 microm, and fine particle fraction between 70% and 75% were found in both formulations. The local and systemic pharmacokinetic studies in mice showed similar AUC(0-24), higher Cmax, and lower Tmax for the URF-TAC:LAC compared to the URF-TAC. Nanostructured aggregates containing amorphous or crystalline nanoparticles of TAC were demonstrated to be effectively delivered via nebulization, with similar in vitro and in vivo performances.

  7. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications. PMID:26785682

  8. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-20

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 10(6) and 3.72 × 10(6) respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  9. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  10. Structure and physical properties of Fe6 O8/ba Fe6 O11 nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseri, Mahmoud; Ghasemi, Rahmat

    2016-05-01

    The thermal treatment method was employed to prepare barium hexaferrite (Fe6 O8/Ba Fe6 O11) nanostructure. This method was attempted to achieve higher homogeneity of the final product. Specimens of barium hexaferrite nanostructure were characterized by various experimental techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). X-ray diffraction results showed that there was no crystallinity in the predecessor and it had still amorphous phase. The formations of crystalline phases of barium hexaferrite nanostructures started from 673 to 973 K and the final products had different crystallite sizes ranging from 29 to 48 nm. The chemical analysis of the barium hexaferrite nanostructures was performed by energy dispersion X-ray analysis (EDXA), demonstrated that the barium hexaferrite nanostructures contained the elements of Ba, Fe, and O. The effect of calcination temperature on band gap energy was studied by UV-vis absorption spectra disclosed when calcination temperature increased, the appraised band gap energy values of the BaFe12O19 nanostructures decreased. The formed nanostructures exhibited ferromagnetic behaviors which were confirmed by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The technique of the Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was carried out at 300 K on the calcined specimens that exhibited the variation of the line-shapes of the spectra of with calcination temperature.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zaoshi

    This dissertation is focused on multimillion-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale materials. In the past decade, nanoscale materials have made significant commercial impacts, which will potentially lead to the next industrial revolution. The interest lies in the novel and promising features nanoscale materials exhibit due to their confined sizes. However, not all novel behaviors are understood or controllable. Many uncontrollable parameters, e.g. defects and dangling bonds, are known to hinder the performance of nanodevices. Solutions to these problems rely on our understanding of fundamental elements in nanoscience: isolated individual nanostructures and their assemblies. In this dissertation, we will address atomistic foundations of several problems of technological importance in nanoscience. Specifically, three basic problems are discussed: (1) embrittlement of nanocrystalline metal; (2) novel thermo-mechanical behaviors of nanowires (NWs); and (3) planar defect generation in NWs. With a scalable algorithm implemented on massively parallel computing platforms and various data mining methods, MD simulations can provide valuable insights into these problems. An essential role of sulfur segregation-induced amorphization of crystalline nickel was recently discovered experimentally, but the atomistic mechanism of the amorphization remains unexplained. Our MD simulations reveal that the large steric size of sulfur impurity causes strong sulfur-sulfur interaction mediated by lattice distortion, which leads to amorphization near the percolation threshold at the sulfur-sulfur network in nickel crystal. The generality of the mechanism due to the percolation of an impurity network is further confirmed by a model binary system. In our study of novel behaviors of semiconductor NWs, MD simulations construct a rich size-temperature `phase diagram' for the mechanical response of a zinc-oxide NW under tension. For smaller diameters and higher temperatures, novel

  12. Development of colour-producing β-keratin nanostructures in avian feather barbs

    PubMed Central

    Prum, Richard O.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Quinn, Tim; Waters, Karla

    2009-01-01

    The non-iridescent structural colours of avian feather barbs are produced by coherent light scattering from amorphous (i.e. quasi-ordered) nanostructures of β-keratin and air in the medullary cells of feather barb rami. Known barb nanostructures belong to two distinct morphological classes. ‘Channel’ nanostructures consist of β-keratin bars and air channels of elongate, tortuous and twisting forms. ‘Spherical’ nanostructures consist of highly spherical air cavities that are surrounded by thin β-keratin bars and sometimes interconnected by tiny passages. Using transmission electron microscopy, we observe that the colour-producing channel-type nanostructures of medullary β-keratin in feathers of the blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna, Psittacidae) develop by intracellular self-assembly; the process proceeds in the absence of any biological prepattern created by the cell membrane, endoplasmic reticulum or cellular intermediate filaments. We examine the hypothesis that the shape and size of these self-assembled, intracellular nanostructures are determined by phase separation of β-keratin protein from the cytoplasm of the cell. The shapes of a broad sample of colour-producing channel-type nanostructures from nine avian species are very similar to those self-assembled during the phase separation of an unstable mixture, a process called spinodal decomposition (SD). In contrast, the shapes of a sample of spherical-type nanostructures from feather barbs of six species show a poor match to SD. However, spherical nanostructures show a strong morphological similarity to morphologies produced by phase separation of a metastable mixture, called nucleation and growth. We propose that colour-producing, intracellular, spongy medullary β-keratin nanostructures develop their characteristic sizes and shapes by phase separation during protein polymerization. We discuss the possible role of capillary flow through drying of medullary cells in the development of the hollow

  13. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  14. Formation of nanostructures from colloidal solutions of silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukalin, D. A.; Tuchin, A. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Bityutskaya, L. A.

    2015-02-01

    The formation of nanostructures from colloidal solutions of amorphous silicon dioxide (SiO2) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in evaporating drops at room temperature has been studied. It is established that spherical aggregates with an average diameter of ˜2 μm and rodlike nanostructures with diameters within 250-300 nm and lengths of ˜4 μm are formed under these conditions. The mechanisms of covalent and van der Waals interaction between CNTs and SiO2 are considered in the framework of a phenomenological model of the active center of a closed CNT.

  15. Fabrication of Biocompatible, Functional, and Transparent Hybrid Films Based on Silk Fibroin and Epoxy Silane for Biophotonics.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Robson R; Cavicchioli, Maurício; Lima, Laís R; Otoni, Caio G; Barud, Hernane S; Santagneli, Silvia H; Tercjak, Agnieszka; Amaral, André C; Carvalho, Renata A; Ribeiro, Sidney J L

    2017-08-23

    In this work we explored the fabrication of flexible and transparent hybrids of silk fibroin (SF) and epoxy-modified siloxane for photonic applications. It is well-known that regenerated SF solutions can form free-standing films with high transparency. Although SF has a restricted number of chemically reactive side groups, the main issues of as-cast pristine SF films regard the high solubility into aqueous media, brittleness, and low thermal stability. The design of SF films with enhanced functionality but high transparency triggers new opportunities on a broader range of applications in biophotonics. Here we present a simple, functional, yet remarkably versatile hybrid material derived from silica sol-gel process based on SF protein and (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPTMS), an organically modified silicon-alkoxide owning a reactive terminal epoxy group. Specifically, we investigated the effect of the addition of GPTMS into SF solutions on the processability, morphology, crystallinity, and mechanical and optical properties of the resulting hybrid films. Highly transparent (ca. 90%) and flexible free-standing hybrid films were achieved. Cell viability assays revealed that the hybrid films are noncytotoxic to rat osteoblast cells even at high GPTMS content (up to 70 wt %). The hybrid films showed enhanced thermal stability and were rich in organic (epoxy) and inorganic (silanol) functional groups according to the content of GPTMS. We also evaluated the successful preparation of high-quality optical red emissive SF hybrid films by loading YVO4:Eu(3+) nanoparticles at low concentration (<5 wt %). A meaningful description of the hybrid film structure is reported from the combination of scanning electron and atomic force microscopies, vibrational spectroscopy, solid-state NMR, and X-ray diffraction analyses.

  16. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Regeneration**

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guobao; Ma, Peter X.

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in regenerative medicine, which aims to regenerate and replace lost/dysfunctional tissues or organs. Biomaterials (scaffolds) serve as temporary 3D substrates to guide neo tissue formation and organization. It is often beneficial for a scaffolding material to mimic the characteristics of extracellular matrix (ECM) at the nanometer scale and to induce certain natural developmental or/and wound healing processes for tissue regeneration applications. This article reviews the fabrication and modification technologies for nanofibrous, nanocomposite, and nanostructured drug-delivering scaffolds. ECM-mimicking nanostructured biomaterials have been shown to actively regulate cellular responses including attachment, proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition. Nano-scaled drug delivery systems can be successfully incorporated into a porous 3D scaffold to enhance the tissue regeneration capacity. In conclusion, nano-structured biomateials are a very exciting and rapidly expanding research area, and are providing new enabling technologies for regenerative medicine. PMID:19946357

  17. Synthesis of porphyrin nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou; Bai, Feng

    2014-10-28

    The present disclosure generally relates to self-assembly methods for generating porphyrin nanostructures. For example, in one embodiment a method is provided that includes preparing a porphyrin solution and a surfactant solution. The porphyrin solution is then mixed with the surfactant solution at a concentration sufficient for confinement of the porphyrin molecules by the surfactant molecules. In some embodiments, the concentration of the surfactant is at or above its critical micelle concentration (CMC), which allows the surfactant to template the growth of the nanostructure over time. The size and morphology of the nanostructures may be affected by the type of porphyrin molecules used, the type of surfactant used, the concentration of the porphyrin and surfactant the pH of the mixture of the solutions, and the order of adding the reagents to the mixture, to name a few variables.

  18. Chiral Inorganic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; de Moura, André F; Wu, Xiaoling; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2017-06-28

    The field of chiral inorganic nanostructures is rapidly expanding. It started from the observation of strong circular dichroism during the synthesis of individual nanoparticles (NPs) and their assemblies and expanded to sophisticated synthetic protocols involving nanostructures from metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and nanocarbons. Besides the well-established chirality transfer from bioorganic molecules, other methods to impart handedness to nanoscale matter specific to inorganic materials were discovered, including three-dimentional lithography, multiphoton chirality transfer, polarization effects in nanoscale assemblies, and others. Multiple chiral geometries were observed with characteristic scales from ångströms to microns. Uniquely high values of chiral anisotropy factors that spurred the development of the field and differentiate it from chiral structures studied before, are now well understood; they originate from strong resonances of incident electromagnetic waves with plasmonic and excitonic states typical for metals and semiconductors. At the same time, distinct similarities with chiral supramolecular and biological systems also emerged. They can be seen in the synthesis and separation methods, chemical properties of individual NPs, geometries of the nanoparticle assemblies, and interactions with biological membranes. Their analysis can help us understand in greater depth the role of chiral asymmetry in nature inclusive of both earth and space. Consideration of both differences and similarities between chiral inorganic, organic, and biological nanostructures will also accelerate the development of technologies based on chiroplasmonic and chiroexcitonic effects. This review will cover both experiment and theory of chiral nanostructures starting with the origin and multiple components of mirror asymmetry of individual NPs and their assemblies. We shall consider four different types of chirality in nanostructures and related physical, chemical, and

  19. Nanostructured Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue “Nanostructured Solar Cells”, published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  20. Plasmonics in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Zhu, Xing

    2013-07-26

    Plasmonics has developed into one of the rapidly growing research topics for nanophotonics. With advanced nanofabrication techniques, a broad variety of nanostructures can be designed and fabricated for plasmonic devices at nanoscale. Fundamental properties for both surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and localized surface plasmons (LSP) arise a new insight and understanding for the electro-optical device investigations, such as plasmonic nanofocusing, low-loss plasmon waveguide and active plasmonic detectors for energy harvesting. Here, we review some typical functional plasmonic nanostructures and nanosmart devices emerging from our individual and collaborative research works. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Nanostructured Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-08-09

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue "Nanostructured Solar Cells", published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  2. Simulation of Semiconductor Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, A J; Grossman, J C; Puzder, A; Benedict, L X; Galli, G

    2001-07-19

    The field of research into the optical properties of silicon nanostructures has seen enormous growth over the last decade. The discovery that silicon nanoparticles exhibit visible photoluminescence (PL) has led to new insights into the mechanisms responsible for such phenomena. The importance of understanding and controlling the PL properties of any silicon based material is of paramount interest to the optoelectronics industry where silicon nanoclusters could be embedded into existing silicon based circuitry. In this talk, we present a combination of quantum Monte Carlo and density functional approaches to the calculation of the electronic, structural, and optical properties of silicon nanostructures.

  3. Nanostructured luminescently labeled nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kricka, Larry J; Fortina, Paolo; Park, Jason Y

    2017-03-01

    Important and emerging trends at the interface of luminescence, nucleic acids and nanotechnology are: (i) the conventional luminescence labeling of nucleic acid nanostructures (e.g. DNA tetrahedron); (ii) the labeling of bulk nucleic acids (e.g. single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA) with nanostructured luminescent labels (e.g. copper nanoclusters); and (iii) the labeling of nucleic acid nanostructures (e.g. origami DNA) with nanostructured luminescent labels (e.g. silver nanoclusters). This review surveys recent advances in these three different approaches to the generation of nanostructured luminescently labeled nucleic acids, and includes both direct and indirect labeling methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. On Structure and Properties of Amorphous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Stachurski, Zbigniew H.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical, optical, magnetic and electronic properties of amorphous materials hold great promise towards current and emergent technologies. We distinguish at least four categories of amorphous (glassy) materials: (i) metallic; (ii) thin films; (iii) organic and inorganic thermoplastics; and (iv) amorphous permanent networks. Some fundamental questions about the atomic arrangements remain unresolved. This paper focuses on the models of atomic arrangements in amorphous materials. The earliest ideas of Bernal on the structure of liquids were followed by experiments and computer models for the packing of spheres. Modern approach is to carry out computer simulations with prediction that can be tested by experiments. A geometrical concept of an ideal amorphous solid is presented as a novel contribution to the understanding of atomic arrangements in amorphous solids. PMID:28824158

  5. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  6. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  7. Increased photon emission from the head while imagining light in the dark is correlated with changes in electroencephalographic power: support for Bókkon's biophoton hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Dotta, B T; Saroka, K S; Persinger, M A

    2012-04-04

    Bókkon's hypothesis that photons released from chemical processes within the brain produce biophysical pictures during visual imagery has been supported experimentally. In the present study measurements by a photomultiplier tube also demonstrated significant increases in ultraweak photon emissions (UPEs) or biophotons equivalent to about 5×10(-11)W/m(2) from the right sides of volunteer's heads when they imagined light in a very dark environment compared to when they did not. Simultaneous variations in regional quantitative electroencephalographic spectral power (μV(2)/Hz) and total energy in the range of ∼10(-12)J from concurrent biophoton emissions were strongly correlated (r=0.95). The calculated energy was equivalent to that associated with action potentials from about 10(7) cerebral cortical neurons. We suggest these results support Bókkon's hypothesis that specific visual imagery is strongly correlated with ultraweak photon emission coupled to brain activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Water Dispersible and Biocompatible Porphyrin-Based Nanospheres for Biophotonics Applications: A Novel Surfactant and Polyelectrolyte-Based Fabrication Strategy for Modifying Hydrophobic Porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ning; Zong, Shenfei; Cao, Wei; Jiang, Jianzhuang; Wang, Zhuyuan; Cui, Yiping

    2015-09-09

    The hydrophobility of most porphyrin and porphyrin derivatives has limited their applications in medicine and biology. Herein, we developed a novel and general strategy for the design of porphyrin nanospheres with good biocompatibility and water dispersibility for biological applications using hydrophobic porphyrins. In order to display the generality of the method, we used two hydrophobic porphyrin isomers as starting material which have different structures confirmed by an X-ray technique. The porphyrin nanospheres were fabricated through two main steps. First, the uniform porphyrin nanospheres stabilized by surfactant were prepared by an interfacially driven microemulsion method, and then the layer-by-layer method was used for the synthesis of polyelectrolyte-coated porphyrin nanospheres to reduce the toxicity of the surfactant as well as improve the biocompatibility of the nanospheres. The newly fabricated porphyrin nanospheres were characterized by TEM techniques, the electronic absorption spectra, photoluminescence emission spectra, dynamic light scattering, and cytotoxicity examination. The resulting nanospheres demonstrated good biocompatibility, excellent water dispersibility and low toxicity. In order to show their application in biophotonics, these porphyrin nanospheres were successfully applied in targeted living cancer cell imaging. The results showed an effective method had been explored to prepare water dispersible and highly stable porphyrin nanomaterial for biophotonics applications using hydrophobic porphyrin. The approach we reported shows obvious flexibility because the surfactants and polyelectrolytes can be optionally selected in accordance with the characteristics of the hydrophobic material. This strategy will expand the applications of hydrophobic porphyrins owning excellent properties in medicine and biology.

  9. Amorphous-Amorphous Phase Separation in API/Polymer Formulations.

    PubMed

    Luebbert, Christian; Huxoll, Fabian; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2017-02-15

    The long-term stability of pharmaceutical formulations of poorly-soluble drugs in polymers determines their bioavailability and therapeutic applicability. However, these formulations do not only often tend to crystallize during storage, but also tend to undergo unwanted amorphous-amorphous phase separations (APS). Whereas the crystallization behavior of APIs in polymers has been measured and modeled during the last years, the APS phenomenon is still poorly understood. In this study, the crystallization behavior, APS, and glass-transition temperatures formulations of ibuprofen and felodipine in polymeric PLGA excipients exhibiting different ratios of lactic acid and glycolic acid monomers in the PLGA chain were investigated by means of hot-stage microscopy and DSC. APS and recrystallization was observed in ibuprofen/PLGA formulations, while only recrystallization occurred in felodipine/PLGA formulations. Based on a successful modeling of the crystallization behavior using the Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT), the occurrence of APS was predicted in agreement with experimental findings.

  10. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  11. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  12. Building Nanostructures with Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wang; Cheetham, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of nanoscience and drug delivery has prompted the formation of the field of nanomedicine, one that exploits the novel physicochemical and biological properties of nanostructures for improved medical treatments and reduced side effects. Until recently, this nanostructure-mediated strategy considered the drug to be solely a biologically active compound to be delivered, and its potential as a molecular building unit remained largely unexplored. A growing trend within nanomedicine has been the use of drug molecules to build well-defined nanostructures of various sizes and shapes. This strategy allows for the creation of self-delivering supramolecular nanomedicines containing a high and fixed drug content. Through rational design of the number and type of the drug incorporated, the resulting nanostructures can be tailored to assume various morphologies (e.g. nanospheres, rods, nanofibers, or nanotubes) for a particular mode of administration such as systemic, topical, and local delivery. This review covers the recent advances in this rapidly developing field, with the aim of providing an in-depth evaluation of the exciting opportunities that this new field could create to improve the current clinical practice of nanomedicine. PMID:27066106

  13. Emerging double helical nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Wei, Fei

    2014-07-01

    As one of the most important and land-mark structures found in nature, a double helix consists of two congruent single helices with the same axis or a translation along the axis. This double helical structure renders the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) the crucial biomolecule in evolution and metabolism. DNA-like double helical nanostructures are probably the most fantastic yet ubiquitous geometry at the nanoscale level, which are expected to exhibit exceptional and even rather different properties due to the unique organization of the two single helices and their synergistic effect. The organization of nanomaterials into double helical structures is an emerging hot topic for nanomaterials science due to their promising exceptional unique properties and applications. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art research progress for the fabrication of double-helical nanostructures based on `bottom-up' and `top-down' strategies. The relevant nanoscale, mesoscale, and macroscopic scale fabrication methods, as well as the properties of the double helical nanostructures are included. Critical perspectives are devoted to the synthesis principles and potential applications in this emerging research area. A multidisciplinary approach from the scope of nanoscience, physics, chemistry, materials, engineering, and other application areas is still required to the well-controlled and large-scale synthesis, mechanism, property, and application exploration of double helical nanostructures.

  14. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  15. Emerging double helical nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Wei, Fei

    2014-08-21

    As one of the most important and land-mark structures found in nature, a double helix consists of two congruent single helices with the same axis or a translation along the axis. This double helical structure renders the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) the crucial biomolecule in evolution and metabolism. DNA-like double helical nanostructures are probably the most fantastic yet ubiquitous geometry at the nanoscale level, which are expected to exhibit exceptional and even rather different properties due to the unique organization of the two single helices and their synergistic effect. The organization of nanomaterials into double helical structures is an emerging hot topic for nanomaterials science due to their promising exceptional unique properties and applications. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art research progress for the fabrication of double-helical nanostructures based on 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' strategies. The relevant nanoscale, mesoscale, and macroscopic scale fabrication methods, as well as the properties of the double helical nanostructures are included. Critical perspectives are devoted to the synthesis principles and potential applications in this emerging research area. A multidisciplinary approach from the scope of nanoscience, physics, chemistry, materials, engineering, and other application areas is still required to the well-controlled and large-scale synthesis, mechanism, property, and application exploration of double helical nanostructures.

  16. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Josh B.; Dick, Don D.; McDonnell, Stephen J.; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H. G.; Owen, William R.; Alexander, Justin D.; Jaeger, David L.; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J.; Wallace, Robert M.; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M.; Randall, John N.; Von Ehr, James

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure. PMID:26274555

  17. Complex WS 2 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, R. L. D.; Hsu, W. K.; Lee, T. H.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    2002-06-01

    A range of elegant tubular and conical nanostructures has been created by template growth of (WS 2) n layers on the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. The structures exhibit remarkably perfect straight segments together with interesting complexities at the intersections, which are discussed here in detail in order to enhance understanding of the structural features governing tube growth.

  18. The physics and applications of amorphous semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Madan, A.; Shaw, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    This is a treatise on the physics and applications of the new emerging technology of amorphous semiconductors. The authors focus upon research problems such as the optimization of device performance while also presenting the general physics of amorphous semiconductors. The first part of the book covers hydrogenated amorphous silicon type alloys, whose applications include inexpensive solar cells, thin film transistors, image scanners, electrophotography, optical recording, and gas sensors. The second part of the book discusses amorphous chalcogenides, whose applications include electrophotography, switching, and memory elements.

  19. Light-emitting diode therapy in exercise-trained mice increases muscle performance, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP and cell proliferation [J. Biophotonics 8, No. 9, 740-754 (2015)].

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Pires de Sousa, Marcelo Victor; Kaippert, Beatriz; Huang, Ying-Ying; Koiso, Tomoharu; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    In the article by C. Ferraresi et al. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbio.201400087), published in J. Biophotonics 8, 740-754 (2015), a statement regarding the approval of some data the authors used is incorrect. This erratum is published to rectify this. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Amorphous silicon based radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Qureshi, S.; Wildermuth, D. ); Fujieda, I.; Street, R.A. )

    1991-07-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin(1 {mu}m) and thick (>30{mu}m) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and {gamma} rays. For x-ray, {gamma} ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  2. Structural study of amorphous polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laridjani, M.; Pouget, J. P.; MacDiarmid, A. G.; Epstein, A. J.

    1992-06-01

    Many materials, especially polymers, have a substantial volume fraction with no long range crystalline order. Through these regions are often termed amorphous, they frequently have a specific local order. We describe and use here a method, base on a non-energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique, to obtain good quality interference functions and, by Fourier transform, radial distribution functions of the amorphous structure of polymers. We apply this approach to members of a family of electronic polymers of current interest : polyaniline emeraldine bases. We show that the local order exhibits significant differences in type I and type II materials, precipitated as salt and base respectively. These studies demonstrate the importance of sample preparation in evaluating the physical properties of polyaniline, and provide a structural origin for memory effects observed in the doping-dedoping processes. Beaucoup de matériaux, spécialement les polymères, ont une importante fraction de leur volume sans ordre cristallin à longue portée. Bien que ces régions soient souvent appelées amorphes, elles présentent fréquemment un ordre local caractéristique. Nous décrivons et utilisons dans ce papier une méthode, basée sur une technique de diffraction de rayons X non dispersive en énergie, pour obtenir des fonctions d'interférence de bonne qualité et, par transformée de Fourier, la fonction de distribution radiale des polymères amorphes. Nous appliquons cette technique à plusieurs éléments d'une même famille de polymères électroniques d'intérêt actuel : les polyanilines éméraldine bases. Nous montrons que l'ordre local présente d'appréciables différences dans les matériaux de type I et II, préparés respectivement sous forme de sel et de base. Cette étude démontre l'importance des conditions de préparation sur les propriétés physiques du polyaniline et donne une base structurale aux effets observés dans les processus de dopage-dédopage de

  3. Crystalline-Amorphous Silicon Nanocomposites with Reduced Thermal Conductivity for Bulk Thermoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Asuka; Zhou, Shu; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-06-24

    Responding to the need for thermoelectric materials with high efficiency in both conversion and cost, we developed a nanostructured bulk silicon thermoelectric materials by sintering silicon crystal quantum dots of several nanometers in diameters synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The material consists of hybrid structures of nanograins of crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon oxide. The percolated nanocrystalline region gives rise to high power factor with the high doping concentration realized by PECVD, and the binding amorphous region reduces thermal conductivity. Consequently, the nondimensional figure of merit reaches 0.39 at 600 °C, equivalent to the best reported value for silicon thermoelectrics. The thermal conductivity of the densely packed material is as low as 5 W m(-1) K(-1) in a wide temperature range from room temperature to 1000 °C, which is beneficial not only for the conversion efficiency but also for material cost by requiring less material to establish certain temperature gradient.

  4. Direct tunneling through high-κ amorphous HfO{sub 2}: Effects of chemical modification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yin Yu, Zhizhou; Zahid, Ferdows; Wang, Jian; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Yu; Guo, Hong

    2014-07-14

    We report first principles modeling of quantum tunneling through amorphous HfO{sub 2} dielectric layer of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) nanostructures in the form of n-Si/HfO{sub 2}/Al. In particular, we predict that chemically modifying the amorphous HfO{sub 2} barrier by doping N and Al atoms in the middle region—far from the two interfaces of the MOS structure—can reduce the gate-to-channel tunnel leakage by more than one order of magnitude. Several other types of modification are found to enhance tunneling or induce substantial band bending in the Si, both are not desired from leakage point of view. By analyzing transmission coefficients and projected density of states, the microscopic physics of electron traversing the tunnel barrier with or without impurity atoms in the high-κ dielectric is revealed.

  5. Core-shell amorphous silicon-carbon nanoparticles for high performance anodes in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourice, Julien; Bordes, Arnaud; Boulineau, Adrien; Alper, John P.; Franger, Sylvain; Quinsac, Axelle; Habert, Aurélie; Leconte, Yann; De Vito, Eric; Porcher, Willy; Reynaud, Cécile; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Haon, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    Core-shell silicon-carbon nanoparticles are attractive candidates as active material to increase the capacity of Li-ion batteries while mitigating the detrimental effects of volume expansion upon lithiation. However crystalline silicon suffers from amorphization upon the first charge/discharge cycle and improved stability is expected in starting with amorphous silicon. Here we report the synthesis, in a single-step process, of amorphous silicon nanoparticles coated with a carbon shell (a-Si@C), via a two-stage laser pyrolysis where decomposition of silane and ethylene are conducted in two successive reaction zones. Control of experimental conditions mitigates silicon core crystallization as well as formation of silicon carbide. Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy show a carbon shell about 1 nm in thickness, which prevents detrimental oxidation of the a-Si cores. Cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that the core-shell composite reaches its maximal lithiation during the first sweep, thanks to its amorphous core. After 500 charge/discharge cycles, it retains a capacity of 1250 mAh.g-1 at a C/5 rate and 800 mAh.g-1 at 2C, with an outstanding coulombic efficiency of 99.95%. Moreover, post-mortem observations show an electrode volume expansion of less than 20% and preservation of the nanostructuration.

  6. Amorphization of nanocrystalline monoclinic ZrO2 by swift heavy ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fengyuan; Wang, Jianwei; Lang, Maik; Toulemonde, Marcel; Namavar, Fereydoon; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Jiaming; Ewing, Rodney C; Lian, Jie

    2012-09-21

    Bulk ZrO(2) polymorphs generally have an extremely high amorphization tolerance upon low energy ion and swift heavy ion irradiation in which ballistic interaction and ionization radiation dominate the ion-solid interaction, respectively. However, under very high-energy irradiation by 1.33 GeV U-238, nanocrystalline (40-50 nm) monoclinic ZrO(2) can be amorphized. A computational simulation based on a thermal spike model reveals that the strong ionizing radiation from swift heavy ions with a very high electronic energy loss of 52.2 keV nm(-1) can induce transient zones with temperatures well above the ZrO(2) melting point. The extreme electronic energy loss, coupled with the high energy state of the nanostructured materials and a high thermal confinement due to the less effective heat transport within the transient hot zone, may eventually be responsible for the ionizing radiation-induced amorphization without transforming to the tetragonal polymorph. The amorphization of nanocrystalline zirconia was also confirmed by 1.69 GeV Au ion irradiation with the electronic energy loss of 40 keV nm(-1). These results suggest that highly radiation tolerant materials in bulk forms, such as ZrO(2), may be radiation sensitive with the reduced length scale down to the nano-metered regime upon irradiation above a threshold value of electronic energy loss.

  7. Separating weak-localization and electron-electron-interaction contributions to the conductivity of carbon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachev, E. N. Romanenko, A. I.; Anikeeva, O. B.; Buryakov, T. I.; Fedorov, V. E.; Nazarov, A. S.; Makotchenko, V. G.; Kuznetsov, V. L.; Usol'tseva, A. N.

    2007-07-15

    The effect of the modification of curvilinear carbon nanostructures (nanotubes) on their electrical properties has been studied. The samples were prepared using a special method of synthesis, which excluded the formation of amorphous carbon particles in multiwalled carbon nanotubes and in expanded graphite. Such materials exhibit a quadratic growth in the positive magnetoconductivity in the fields of up to B {approx} 1 T, which is not observed in the samples synthesized by usual methods.

  8. Effect of medium range order on pulsed laser crystallization of amorphous germanium thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Li, T. T.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Heo, T. W.; ...

    2016-06-03

    Sputter deposited amorphous Ge thin films had their nanostructure altered by irradiation with high-energy Ar+ ions. The change in the structure resulted in a reduction in medium range order (MRO) characterized using fluctuation electron microscopy. The pulsed laser crystallization kinetics of the as-deposited versus irradiated materials were investigated using the dynamic transmission electron microscope operated in the multi-frame movie mode. In conclusion, the propagation rate of the crystallization front for the irradiated material was lower; the changes were correlated to the MRO difference and formation of a thin liquid layer during crystallization.

  9. High pressure polymorphs and amorphization of upconversion host material NaY(WO4)2

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, Fang; Yue, Binbin; Cheng, Zhenxiang; ...

    2016-07-29

    The pressure effect on the structural change of upconversion host material NaY(WO4)2 was studied in this paper by using in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A transition from the initial scheelite phase to the M-fergusonite phase occurs near 10 GPa, and another phase transition is found near 27.5 GPa, which could be an isostructural transition without symmetry change. The sample becomes amorphous when the pressure is fully released from high pressure. Finally, this work demonstrates the possibility of synthesizing various polymorph structures for non-linear optical applications with a high pressure, chemical doping, or strained thin-film nanostructure process.

  10. Effect of medium range order on pulsed laser crystallization of amorphous germanium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. T.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Heo, T. W.; Santala, M. K.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Campbell, G. H.

    2016-06-03

    Sputter deposited amorphous Ge thin films had their nanostructure altered by irradiation with high-energy Ar+ ions. The change in the structure resulted in a reduction in medium range order (MRO) characterized using fluctuation electron microscopy. The pulsed laser crystallization kinetics of the as-deposited versus irradiated materials were investigated using the dynamic transmission electron microscope operated in the multi-frame movie mode. In conclusion, the propagation rate of the crystallization front for the irradiated material was lower; the changes were correlated to the MRO difference and formation of a thin liquid layer during crystallization.

  11. Effect of medium range order on pulsed laser crystallization of amorphous germanium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. T. Bayu Aji, L. B.; Heo, T. W.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Campbell, G. H.; Santala, M. K.

    2016-05-30

    Sputter deposited amorphous Ge thin films had their nanostructure altered by irradiation with high-energy Ar{sup +} ions. The change in the structure resulted in a reduction in medium range order (MRO) characterized using fluctuation electron microscopy. The pulsed laser crystallization kinetics of the as-deposited versus irradiated materials were investigated using the dynamic transmission electron microscope operated in the multi-frame movie mode. The propagation rate of the crystallization front for the irradiated material was lower; the changes were correlated to the MRO difference and formation of a thin liquid layer during crystallization.

  12. Effect of medium range order on pulsed laser crystallization of amorphous germanium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. T.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Heo, T. W.; Santala, M. K.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Campbell, G. H.

    2016-06-03

    Sputter deposited amorphous Ge thin films had their nanostructure altered by irradiation with high-energy Ar+ ions. The change in the structure resulted in a reduction in medium range order (MRO) characterized using fluctuation electron microscopy. The pulsed laser crystallization kinetics of the as-deposited versus irradiated materials were investigated using the dynamic transmission electron microscope operated in the multi-frame movie mode. In conclusion, the propagation rate of the crystallization front for the irradiated material was lower; the changes were correlated to the MRO difference and formation of a thin liquid layer during crystallization.

  13. Transformations induced in bulk amorphous silica by ultrafast laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vitor; Sharma, Sahendra P; Herrero, Pilar; Vilar, Rui

    2013-12-01

    A transmission electron microscopy study of nanogratings formed in bulk amorphous silica by direct writing with an ultrafast pulsed laser with a radiation wavelength of 1030 nm and pulse duration of 560 fs is presented. The results achieved show that the nanogratings are composed of planar nanostructures with an average periodicity of 250 nm and typical thickness of about 30 nm, consisting of alternating layers of heavily damaged material and layers of material where a dense precipitation of nanocrystals occurred. The crystallization of silica to form these nanocrystals can be explained by the large pressures and temperatures reached in these regions as a result of nanoplasma formation and recombination.

  14. Amorphous boron nanorod as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changjian; Lau, Miu Lun; Barkholtz, Heather M; Xu, Haiping; Parrish, Riley; Xu, Meiyue Olivia; Xu, Tao; Liu, Yuzi; Wang, Hao; Connell, Justin G; Smith, Kassiopeia A; Xiong, Hui

    2017-08-03

    We report an amorphous boron nanorod anode material for lithium-ion batteries prepared through smelting non-toxic boron oxide in liquid lithium. Boron in theory can provide capacity as high as 3099 mA h g(-1) by alloying with Li to form B4Li5. However, experimental studies of the boron anode have been rarely reported for room temperature lithium-ion batteries. Among the reported studies the electrochemical activity and cycling performance of the bulk crystalline boron anode material are poor at room temperature. In this work, we utilized an amorphous nanostructured one-dimensional (1D) boron material aiming at improving the electrochemical reactivity between boron and lithium ions at room temperature. The amorphous boron nanorod anode exhibited, at room temperature, a reversible capacity of 170 mA h g(-1) at a current rate of 10 mA g(-1) between 0.01 and 2 V. The anode also demonstrated good rate capability and cycling stability. The lithium storage mechanism was investigated by both sweep voltammetry measurements and galvanostatic intermittent titration techniques (GITTs). The sweep voltammetric analysis suggested that the contributions from lithium ion diffusion into boron and the capacitive process to the overall lithium charge storage are 57% and 43%, respectively. The results from GITT indicated that the discharge capacity at higher potentials (>∼0.2 V vs. Li/Li(+)) could be ascribed to a capacitive process and at lower potentials (<∼0.2 V vs. Li/Li(+)) to diffusion-controlled alloying reactions. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement further confirmed that the capacity is from electrochemical reactions between lithium ions and the amorphous boron nanorod. This work provides new insights into designing nanostructured boron materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  15. Is Mg-stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate a homogeneous mixture of amorphous magnesium carbonate and amorphous calcium carbonate?

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Yu; Chang, Hsun-Hui; Lin, Cang-Jie; Huang, Shing-Jong; Chan, Jerry C C

    2016-10-04

    We find two types of carbonate ions in Mg stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate (Mg-ACC), whose short-range orders are identical to those of ACC and amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC). Mg-ACC comprises a homogeneous mixture of the nano-clusters of ACC and AMC. Their relative amount varies systematically at different pH.

  16. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing

  17. Hepatic excretory function in sepsis: implications from biophotonic analysis of transcellular xenobiotic transport in a rodent model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hepatobiliary elimination of endo- and xenobiotics is affected by different variables including hepatic perfusion, hepatocellular energy state and functional integrity of transporter proteins, all of which are altered during sepsis. A particular impairment of hepatocellular transport at the canalicular pole resulting in an accumulation of potentially hepatotoxic compounds would have major implications for critical care pharmacology and diagnostics. Methods Hepatic transcellular transport, that is, uptake and hepatobiliary excretion, was studied in a rodent model of severe polymicrobial sepsis by two different biophotonic techniques to obtain insights into the handling of potentially toxic endo- and xenobiotics in sepsis. Direct and indirect in vivo imaging of the liver was performed by intravital multifluorescence microscopy and non-invasive whole-body near-infrared (NIRF) imaging after administration of two different, primarily hepatobiliary excreted xenobiotics, the organic anionic dyes indocyanine green (ICG) and DY635. Subsequent quantitative data analysis enabled assessment of hepatic uptake and fate of these model substrates under conditions of sepsis. Results Fifteen hours after sepsis induction, animals displayed clinical and laboratory signs of multiple organ dysfunction, including moderate liver injury, cholestasis and an impairment of sinusoidal perfusion. With respect to hepatocellular transport of both dyes, excretion into bile was significantly delayed for both dyes and resulted in net accumulation of potentially cytotoxic xenobiotics in the liver parenchyma (for example, specific dye fluorescence in liver at 30 minutes in sham versus sepsis: ICG: 75% versus 89%; DY635 20% versus 40% of maximum fluorescence; P < 0.05). Transcutaneous assessment of ICG fluorescence by whole body NIRF imaging revealed a significant increase of ICG fluorescence from the 30th minute on in the bowel region of the abdomen in sham but not in septic animals

  18. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It

  19. Manganese Nanostructures and Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simov, Kirie Rangelov

    The primary goal of this study is to incorporate adatoms with large magnetic moment, such as Mn, into two technologically significant group IV semiconductor (SC) matrices, e.g. Si and Ge. For the first time in the world, we experimentally demonstrate Mn doping by embedding nanostructured thin layers, i.e. delta-doping. The growth is observed by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), which combines topographic and electronic information in a single image. We investigate the initial stages of Mn monolayer growth on a Si(100)(2x1) surface reconstruction, develop methods for classification of nanostructure types for a range of surface defect concentrations (1.0 to 18.2%), and subsequently encapsulate the thin Mn layer in a SC matrix. These experiments are instrumental in generating a surface processing diagram for self-assembly of monoatomic Mn-wires. The role of surface vacancies has also been studied by kinetic Monte Carlo modeling and the experimental observations are compared with the simulation results, leading to the conclusion that Si(100)(2x1) vacancies serve as nucleation centers in the Mn-Si system. Oxide formation, which happens readily in air, is detrimental to ferromagnetism and lessens the magnetic properties of the nanostructures. Therefore, the protective SC cap, composed of either Si or Ge, serves a dual purpose: it is both the embedding matrix for the Mn nanostructured thin film and a protective agent for oxidation. STM observations of partially deposited caps ensure that the nanostructures remain intact during growth. Lastly, the relationship between magnetism and nanostructure types is established by an in-depth study using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). This sensitive method detects signals even at coverages less than one atomic layer of Mn. XMCD is capable of discerning which chemical compounds contribute to the magnetic moment of the system, and provides a ratio between the orbital and spin contributions. Depending on the amount

  20. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  1. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  2. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; ...

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  3. Amorphization of solids irradiated by fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, V.; Dubinin, S.; Teploukhov, S.; Goshchitskii, B.

    2000-03-01

    The diffraction patterns of amorphous solids produced by both a conventional technique and fast neutron irradiation were systematized. It is shown for the first time that neutron radiation-modified solids belong to the group of amorphous substances of a distortion type.

  4. Evolution of the structure of amorphous ice: from low-density amorphous through high-density amorphous to very high-density amorphous ice.

    PubMed

    Martonák, R; Donadio, D; Parrinello, M

    2005-04-01

    We report results of molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous ice for pressures up to 22.5 kbar. The high-density amorphous ice (HDA) as prepared by pressure-induced amorphization of I(h) ice at T=80 K is annealed to T=170 K at various pressures to allow for relaxation. Upon increase of pressure, relaxed amorphous ice undergoes a pronounced change of structure, ranging from the low-density amorphous ice at p=0, through a continuum of HDA states to the limiting very high-density amorphous ice (VHDA) regime above 10 kbar. The main part of the overall structural change takes place within the HDA megabasin, which includes a variety of structures with quite different local and medium-range order as well as network topology and spans a broad range of densities. The VHDA represents the limit to densification by adapting the hydrogen-bonded network topology, without creating interpenetrating networks. The connection between structure and metastability of various forms upon decompression and heating is studied and discussed. We also discuss the analogy with amorphous and crystalline silica. Finally, some conclusions concerning the relation between amorphous ice and supercooled water are drawn.

  5. Electron beam recrystallization of amorphous semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of crystalline films of silicon, germanium, and cadmium sulfide on substrates of plastic and glass were investigated. Amorphous films of germanium, silicon, and cadmium sulfide on amorphous substrates of glass and plastic were converted to the crystalline condition by electron bombardment.

  6. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  7. Method of making amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1982-01-01

    The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a low molecular weight (e.g., 1000-5000) thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  8. Co amorphous systems: A product development perspective.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Rahul B; Thipparaboina, Rajesh; Kumar, Dinesh; Shastri, Nalini R

    2016-12-30

    Solubility is one of the major problems associated with most of the new chemical entities that can be reasonably addressed by drug amorphization. However, being a high-energy form, it usually tends to re-crystallize, necessitating new formulation strategies to stabilize amorphous drugs. Polymeric amorphous solid dispersion (PASD) is one of the widely investigated strategies to stabilize amorphous drug, with major limitations like limited polymer solubility and hygroscopicity. Co amorphous system (CAM), a new entrant in amorphous arena is a promising alternative to PASD. CAMs are multi component single phase amorphous solid systems made up of two or more small molecules that may be a combination of drugs or drug and excipients. Excipients explored for CAM preparation include amino acids, carboxylic acids, nicotinamide and saccharine. Advantages offered by CAM include improved aqueous solubility and physical stability of amorphous drug, with a potential to improve therapeutic efficacy. This review attempts to address different aspects in the development of CAM as drug products. Criterion for co-former selection, various methods involved in CAM preparation, characterization tools, stability, scale up and regulatory requirements for the CAM product development are discussed.

  9. Nanostructure and composition of bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Soldati, A. L.; Wirth, R.; Huth, J.; Wehrmeister, U.; Hofmeister, W.

    2009-04-01

    Shells and pearls of unionid mussels (Hyriopsis cumingii, Margaritifera margaritifera, Diplodon chilensis patagonicus) were studied by high resolution microbeam methods and -computer tomography to gather insight into the nanostructure and chemical composition of nacre and prism layers. Natural and cultured pearls are formed by many mollusc species and their generation is very similar to that of shells resulting in identical prismatic and nacreous structures of shells and pearls. Basic difference is, however that pearl culturing methods induce biomineralisation of CaCO3 around a crystalline bead which results in a reverse structural organisation compared to bivalve shells. Bivalve shell growth starts from a thick organic matrix (the periostracum; Eyster and Morse, 1984) which is followed towards the inside by two variously thick layers consisting of prismatic CaCO3 aggregations and layers of CaCO3 platelets, respectively. Platelets and prisms are individually covered by a chitinous organic matrix which lends structural support and is thought to exert control over the mineralization process. The minerals within the organic sheaths are highly-aligned poly-twinned crystals with a slightly distorted lattice due to inclusions of organic molecules (Pokroy et al., 2006). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Raman Microscopy analyses of the shells and pearls show that both structures, prisms and platelets, consist of nanometre-sized organic membrane-coated granules of CaCO3 (Jacob et al., 2008). In the vicinity of the periostracum, the granules consist of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), but the crystallinity increases with increasing distance from the periostracum. The transition from disordered (amorphous) to crystalline CaCO3 is gradual within a few micrometers and coincides with a decrease in porosity. Concentrations of sulphur and phosphorus are higher in ACC than in aragonite indicating a

  10. Nanostructured Protective Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    first phase of what was designed as a multiphase program focused on the two component system of nanocrystalline titanium nitride (nc-TiN) and...designed as a multiphase program focused on the two component system of nanocrystalline titanium nitride (nc-TiN) and amorphous silicon nitride (a...Constant monitoring and logging of deposition rates, gas flows , pressures, and ion beam parameters were also done to provide input into the

  11. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  12. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-28

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO{sub 2}. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  13. Amorphization of sugar hydrates upon milling.

    PubMed

    Willart, J F; Dujardin, N; Dudognon, E; Danède, F; Descamps, M

    2010-07-19

    The possibility to amorphize anhydrous crystalline sugars, like lactose, trehalose and glucose, by mechanical milling was previously reported. We test here the possibility to amorphize the corresponding crystalline hydrates: lactose monohydrate, trehalose dihydrate and glucose monohydrate using fully identical milling procedures. The results show that only the first hydrate amorphizes while the other two remain structurally invariant. These different behaviours are attributed to the plasticizing effect of the structural water molecules which can decrease the glass transition temperature below the milling temperature. The results reveal clearly the fundamental role of the glass transition in the solid-state amorphization process induced by milling, and they also explain why crystalline hydrates are systematically more difficult to amorphize by milling than their anhydrous counterpart. The investigations have been performed by differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction.

  14. Compensated amorphous-silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, G.

    1982-06-21

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the elecrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF/sub 3/ doped intrinsic layer.

  15. Role of diffusion in amorphous-phase formation and crystallization of amorphous Ni--Zr

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, J.C.; de Reus, R.; Denier van der Gon, A.W.; Saris, F.W.

    1987-03-01

    The Ni--Zr system is examined as a representative system for the formation of an amorphous phase by diffusion and for the crystallization of an amorphous phase by diffusion. High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) is used to show that the amorphous phase grows by bulk diffusion through the amorphous material rather than by short-circuit diffusion. Also, the HREM shows that the amorphous phase formed by diffusion appears to be the same as the vapor-deposited amorphous phase. A correlation between crystallization temperatures (T/sub x/) and the enthalpy of large-atom hole formation is given. This correlation predicts values of T/sub x/ that are lower than those predicted from the small-atom hole-formation model. The difference in hole-formation enthalpies for the large and small atoms is given as a criterion for amorphous-phase formation via diffusion.

  16. Nanostructured Porous Silicon: The Winding Road from Photonics to Cell Scaffolds – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Montelongo, Jacobo; Muñoz-Noval, Alvaro; García-Ruíz, Josefa Predestinación; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Martín-Palma, Raul J.; Manso-Silván, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    For over 20 years, nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) has found a vast number of applications in the broad fields of photonics and optoelectronics, triggered by the discovery of its photoluminescent behavior in 1990. Besides, its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and bioresorbability make porous silicon (PSi) an appealing biomaterial. These properties are largely a consequence of its particular susceptibility to oxidation, leading to the formation of silicon oxide, which is readily dissolved by body fluids. This paper reviews the evolution of the applications of PSi and nanoPS from photonics through biophotonics, to their use as cell scaffolds, whether as an implantable substitute biomaterial, mainly for bony and ophthalmological tissues, or as an in vitro cell conditioning support, especially for pluripotent cells. For any of these applications, PSi/nanoPS can be used directly after synthesis from Si wafers, upon appropriate surface modification processes, or as a composite biomaterial. Unedited studies of fluorescently active PSi structures for cell culture are brought to evidence the margin for new developments. PMID:26029688

  17. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures and its photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Yu, Shanwen; Fang, Xiaoxin; Huang, Honghong; Li, Lun; Wang, Xiuyuan; Wang, Huihu

    2016-12-01

    An ultrathin layer of amorphous carbon coated C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal carbonization process using glucose as precursor in this work. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy (DRS) were used for the characterization of as-prepared samples. Photoluminescence (PL) properties of C@ZnO samples were investigated using PL spectroscopy. The microstructure analysis results show that the glucose content has a great influence on the size, morphology, crystallinity and surface chemical states of C@ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, the as-prepared C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures exhibit the enhanced photocatalytic activity and good photostability for methyl orange dye degradation due to its high adsorption ability and its improved optical characteristics.

  18. Surface properties and biocompatibility of nanostructured TiO2 film deposited by RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Asif; He, Jie; Jiao, Lingrui; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Sheng, Zhengming

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 films are deposited on a silicon substrate using 150-W power from the RF magnetron sputtering at working pressures of 3 to 5 Pa, with no substrate bias, and at 3 Pa with a substrate bias of -50 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that TiO2 films deposited on unbiased as well as biased substrates are all amorphous. Surface properties such as surface roughness and wettability of TiO2 films, grown in a plasma environment, under biased and unbiased substrate conditions are reported according to the said parameters of RF power and the working pressures. Primary rat osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) cells have been cultured on nanostructured TiO2 films fabricated at different conditions of substrate bias and working pressures. The effects of roughness and hydrophilicity of nanostructured TiO2 films on cell density and cell spreading have been discussed.

  19. Surface properties and biocompatibility of nanostructured TiO2 film deposited by RF magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Asif; He, Jie; Jiao, Lingrui; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Sheng, Zhengming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 films are deposited on a silicon substrate using 150-W power from the RF magnetron sputtering at working pressures of 3 to 5 Pa, with no substrate bias, and at 3 Pa with a substrate bias of -50 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that TiO2 films deposited on unbiased as well as biased substrates are all amorphous. Surface properties such as surface roughness and wettability of TiO2 films, grown in a plasma environment, under biased and unbiased substrate conditions are reported according to the said parameters of RF power and the working pressures. Primary rat osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) cells have been cultured on nanostructured TiO2 films fabricated at different conditions of substrate bias and working pressures. The effects of roughness and hydrophilicity of nanostructured TiO2 films on cell density and cell spreading have been discussed.

  20. Planar plasmonic chiral nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Shuai; Bao, Yanjun; Fang, Zheyu

    2016-02-01

    A strong chiral optical response induced at a plasmonic Fano resonance in a planar Au heptamer nanostructure was experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. The scattering spectra show the characteristic narrow-band feature of Fano resonances for both left and right circular polarized lights, with a chiral response reaching 30% at the Fano resonance. Specifically, we systematically investigate the chiral response of planar heptamers with gradually changing the inter-particle rotation angles and separation distance. The chiral spectral characteristics clearly depend on the strength of Fano resonances and the associated near-field optical distributions. Finite element method simulations together with a multipole expansion method demonstrate that the enhanced chirality is caused by the excitation of magnetic quadrupolar and electric toroidal dipolar modes. Our work provides an effective method for the design of 2D nanostructures with a strong chiral response.A strong chiral optical response induced at a plasmonic Fano resonance in a planar Au heptamer nanostructure was experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. The scattering spectra show the characteristic narrow-band feature of Fano resonances for both left and right circular polarized lights, with a chiral response reaching 30% at the Fano resonance. Specifically, we systematically investigate the chiral response of planar heptamers with gradually changing the inter-particle rotation angles and separation distance. The chiral spectral characteristics clearly depend on the strength of Fano resonances and the associated near-field optical distributions. Finite element method simulations together with a multipole expansion method demonstrate that the enhanced chirality is caused by the excitation of magnetic quadrupolar and electric toroidal dipolar modes. Our work provides an effective method for the design of 2D nanostructures with a strong chiral response. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  1. Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that deals with the nanostructured superhydrophobic (SH) powders developed at ORNL. This project seeks to (1) improve powder quality; (2) identify binders for plastics, fiberglass, metal (steel being the first priority), wood, and other products such as rubber and shingles; (3) test the coated product for coating quality and durability under operating conditions; and (4) application testing and production of powders in quantity.

  2. Macromolecular Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueyama, Norikazu; Harada, Akira

    This book presents a detailed account of the synthesis, characterization and application of organic and inorganic macromolecular nanostructured materials. These materials consist of simple organic compounds, inorganic complexes and polymers, and display unique properties such as electrical conductivity ranging from semiconducting to superconducting. Also described in the book are the roles of these materials in electrodeposition and gas deposition, as photosensitizers, magnets, macromolecular metal catalysts, sol-gel hybrids, and in biomineralization.

  3. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  4. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  5. Biologically formed amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Steve; Levi-Kalisman, Yael; Raz, Sefi; Addadi, Lia

    2003-01-01

    Many organisms from a wide variety of taxa produce amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), despite the fact that it is inherently unstable and relatively soluble in its pure state. These properties also make it difficult to detect and characterize ACC. Raman spectroscopy is a particularly useful method for investigating ACC because the sample can be examined wet, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis can provide detailed information on the short-range order. Other methods for characterizing ACC include infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis (TGA and DTA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron and X-ray diffraction. Because of the difficulties involved, we suspect that ACC is far more widely distributed than is presently known, and a comparison of EXAFS spectra shows that different biogenic ACC phases have different short-range order structures. We also suspect that ACC fulfils many different functions, including as a transient precursor phase during the formation of crystalline calcium carbonate.

  6. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Ali E; Mayo, Nathanael K; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Robles, Raquel O; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Yongsheng; Lee, Jae Ah; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-05-26

    Thermophones are highly promising for applications such as high-power SONAR arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding carbon nanotube aerogel sheets provide the most attractive performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large-size freestanding carbon nanotube aerogel sheets and other even more exotic materials recently investigated hampers the field. We describe alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high-energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanostructured materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. We demonstrate that the heat capacity of aerogel-like nanostructures can be extracted by a thorough analysis of the sound pressure spectra. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high-power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  7. Sonoelectrochemical Approach Towards Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burda, Clemens; Qiu, Xiaofeng

    2006-03-01

    We will report on the sonoelectrochemical synthesis of nanostructured semiconductor materials. The talk will focus on the control of the nanostructure size, shape, and composition using sonolectrochemistry as a versatile synthesis tool. The synthesis of targeted nanostructures requires thorough control of the redox chemistry during the growth process. The composition of the product can be controlled by changing the initial metal-ligand concentration. Futhermore, the properties of the novel materials will be discussed. Powder X-ray diffraction of the products confirmed the compositional change in the nanomaterials. Control of the involved sonoelectrochemistry also allows for the formation of highly monodispersed 1-D Nanorods. Qiu, Xiaofeng; Lou, Yongbing; Samia, Anna C. S.; Devadoss, Anando; Burgess, James D.; Dayal, Smita; Burda, Clemens. PbTe nanorods by sonoelectrochemistry. Angewandte Chemie, International Edition (2005), 44(36), 5855-5857. Qiu, Xiaofeng; Burda, Clemens; Fu, Ruiling; Pu, Lin; Chen, Hongyuan; Zhu, Junjie. Heterostructured Bi2Se3 Nanowires with Periodic Phase Boundaries. Journal of the American Chemical Society (2004), 126(50), 16276-16277.

  8. Plasmonic Nanostructured Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhazraji, Emad; Ghalib, A.; Manzoor, K.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the scattering plasmonic resonance characteristics of silver nanospheres with a geometrical distribution that is modelled by Cellular Automata using time-domain numerical analysis. Cellular Automata are discrete mathematical structures that model different natural phenomena. Two binary one-dimensional Cellular Automata rules are considered to model the nanostructure, namely rule 30 and rule 33. The analysis produces three-dimensional scattering profiles of the entire plasmonic nanostructure. For the Cellular Automaton rule 33, the introduction of more Cellular Automata generations resulted only in slight red and blue shifts in the plasmonic modes with respect to the first generation. On the other hand, while rule 30 introduced significant red shifts in the resonance peaks at early generations, at later generations however, a peculiar effect is witnessed in the scattering profile as new peaks emerge as a feature of the overall Cellular Automata structure rather than the sum of the smaller parts that compose it. We strongly believe that these features that emerge as a result adopting the different 256 Cellular Automata rules as configuration models of nanostructures in different applications and systems might possess a great potential in enhancing their capability, sensitivity, efficiency, and power utilization.

  9. Strength, Deformation and Fracture in Metallic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xun Wendy

    An understanding of the mechanics of nanoscale metals and semiconductors is necessary for the safe and prolonged operation of nanostructured devices from transistors to nanowire- based solar cells to miniaturized electrodes. This is a fascinating but challenging pursuit because mechanical properties that are size-invariant in conventional materials, such as strength, ductility and fracture behavior, can depend critically on sample size when materials are reduced to sub-micron dimensions. In this thesis, the effect of nanoscale sample size, microstructure and structural geometry on mechanical strength, deformation and fracture are explored for several classes of solid materials. Nanocrystalline platinum nano-cylinders with diameters of 60 nm to 1 μm and 12 nm sized grains are fabricated and tested in compression. We find that nano-sized metals containing few grains weaken as sample diameter is reduced relative to grain size due to a change from deformation governed by internal grains to surface grain governed deformation. Fracture at the nanoscale is explored by performing in-situ SEM tension tests on nanocrystalline platinum and amorphous, metallic glass nano-cylinders containing purposely introduced structural flaws. It is found that failure location, mechanism and strength are determined by the stress concentration with the highest local stress whether this is at the structural flaw or a microstructural feature. Principles of nano-mechanics are used to design and test mechanically robust hierarchical nanostructures with structural and electrochemical applications. 2-photon lithography and electroplating are used to fabricate 3D solid Cu octet meso-lattices with micron-scale features that exhibit strength higher than that of bulk Cu. An in-situ SEM lithiation stage is developed and used to simultaneously examine morphological and electrochemical changes in Si-coated Cu meso-lattices that are of interest as high energy capacity electrodes for Li-ion batteries.

  10. Nanostructured diamond-TiC composites with high fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haikuo; He, Duanwei; Xu, Chao; Tang, Mingjun; Li, Yu; Dong, Haini; Meng, Chuanmin; Wang, Zhigang; Zhu, Wenjun

    2013-01-01

    We report the preparation of nanostructured diamond-TiC composites with high fracture toughness and high hardness starting from a ball-milled mixture of nano-sized Ti3SiC2 and submicron-sized diamond by simultaneously tuning the pressure-temperature conditions. The phase segregation of Ti3SiC2 at pressure of 5.5 GPa were investigated by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that the Ti3SiC2 could decompose into nanosized TiC and amorphous Ti-Si at 600-700 °C. The subsequent reaction between diamond and Ti-Si led to an amorphous Ti-Si-C matrix in which diamond and TiC crystals are embedded. With a loading force of 98 N, the measured fracture toughness KIC and Vicker's hardness HV of the synthesized composites reach up to 14 MPa m1/2 and 45.5 GPa, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the nanocrystalline/amorphous bonding matrix could largely enhance the toughness of the brittle composites.

  11. Nanostructured FeZrCuB alloys prepared by mechanosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, R. D.; Passamani, E. C.; Larica, C.; Freitas, J. C. C.; Takeuchi, A. Y.

    2007-08-01

    Nanostructured Fe{sub 84}Zr{sub 9}B{sub 6}Cu{sub 1} alloys were prepared by the mechanosynthesis method, following two alternative routes. In the first procedure, the alloy was directly obtained from the milling of the powder mixture of all elemental components. The resulting alloy was partially nanocrystalline, with dispersion of nanograins in an amorphous matrix. In the second route, Cu and B elemental powders were progressively added to a previously milled Fe{sub 90}Zr{sub 10} alloy. A nearly single amorphous phase was consequently obtained. The dispersion of nanograins was easily recovered in this case, after annealing the milled alloy. The hyperfine magnetic properties of the amorphous phase prepared by milling were comparable to those found in similar melt-spun alloys. The crystallization temperatures and activation energies, associated with the first and second crystallization stages, were found to be lower for the milled alloy when compared with the corresponding melt-spun alloy, an effect associated with the larger number of defects induced by the mechanosynthesis process.

  12. Microstructural Evolution and Optical Properties of (InGa)(AsN) Nanostructures Synthesized by Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, X.; Clarke, S.; Kumar, S.; Goldman, R. S.; Rotberg, V. H.; Krishna, S.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Holt, J.; Sipowska, J.; Francis, A.; Daniel, A.; Clarke, R.

    2001-03-01

    Mixed anion nitride-arsenide compound semiconductor heterostructures are promising for light-emitting devices operating throughout the near infrared range. However, due to the large N-As size difference, a limited miscibility of (InGa)(AsN) on the anion sublattice is predicted. Furthermore, alloy phase separation resulting in the formation of quantum dot-like nanostructures has been reported in GaAsN/GaAs [1] and InGaAsN/GaAs [2] superlattices. We have investigated the evolution of the microstructure and optical properties of (InGa)(AsN) quantum dot-like nanostructures synthesized by N ion implantation into GaAs and InAs, using a variety of implantation and rapid thermal annealing conditions. For 50keV N ion implanted GaAs and InAs substrates, high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals ~5 nm diameter amorphous nanostructures surrounded by crystalline matrices. For 100keV N ion implanted GaAs epilayers, ~10 nm diameter crystalline nanostructures surrounded by amorphous matrices are apparent. Electron diffraction indicates that these crystallites are mostly randomly-oriented cubic phases, with lattice parameters close to that of pure GaN. Furthermore, the crystalline nanostructures exhibit significant photoluminescence in the near-infrared range. The apparent lowering of the fundamental band gap is consistent with strain-induced band gap narrowing of a GaN-rich spherical cluster [1]. We will discuss the mechanisms of formation and coarsening of these nanostructures, as well as correlations between their optical and structural properties. [1] R. S. Goldman, R. M. Feenstra, B. G. Briner, M. L. O'Steen, and R. J. Hauenstein, Appl. Phys. Lett. 69, 3698 (1996), J. Electr. Mater. 26, 1342 (1997). [2] H. P. Xin, K. L. Kavanagh, Z. Q. Zhu, and C. W. Tu, Appl. Phys. Lett. 74, 2337 (1999).

  13. Low Temperature Growth of Nanostructured Diamond Films on Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul A.; Catledge, Shane A.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2001-01-01

    The field of nanocrystalline diamond and tetrahedral amorphous carbon films has been the focus of intense experimental activity in the last few years for applications in field emission display devices, optical windows, and tribological coatings, The choice of substrate used in most studies has typically been silicon. For metals, however, the thermal expansion mismatch between the diamond film and substrate gives rise to thermal stress that often results in delamination of the film. To avoid this problem in conventional CVD deposition low substrate temperatures (less than 700 C) have been used, often with the incorporation of oxygen or carbon monoxide to the feedgas mixture. Conventionally grown CVD diamond films are also rough and would require post-deposition polishing for most applications. Therefore, there is an obvious need to develop techniques for deposition of well-adhered, smooth nano-structured diamond films on metals for various tribological applications. In our work, nanostructured diamond films are grown on a titanium alloy substrate using a two-step deposition process. The first step is performed at elevated temperature (820 C) for 30 minutes using a H2/CH4/N2 gas mixture in order to grow a thin (approx. 600 nm) nanostructured diamond layer and improve film adhesion. The remainder of the deposition involves growth at low temperature (less than 600 C) in a H2/CH4/O2 gas mixture. Laser reflectance Interferometry (LRI) pattern during growth of a nanostructured diamond film on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The first 30 minutes are at a high temperature of 820 C and the rest of the film is grown at a low temperature of 580 T. The fringe pattern is observed till the very end due to extremely low surface roughness of 40 nm. The continuation of the smooth nanostructured diamond film growth during low temperature deposition is confirmed by in-situ laser reflectance interferometry and by post-deposition micro-Raman spectroscopy and surface profilometry. Similar experiments

  14. Low Temperature Growth of Nanostructured Diamond Films on Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul A.; Catledge, Shane A.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2001-01-01

    The field of nanocrystalline diamond and tetrahedral amorphous carbon films has been the focus of intense experimental activity in the last few years for applications in field emission display devices, optical windows, and tribological coatings, The choice of substrate used in most studies has typically been silicon. For metals, however, the thermal expansion mismatch between the diamond film and substrate gives rise to thermal stress that often results in delamination of the film. To avoid this problem in conventional CVD deposition low substrate temperatures (less than 700 C) have been used, often with the incorporation of oxygen or carbon monoxide to the feedgas mixture. Conventionally grown CVD diamond films are also rough and would require post-deposition polishing for most applications. Therefore, there is an obvious need to develop techniques for deposition of well-adhered, smooth nano-structured diamond films on metals for various tribological applications. In our work, nanostructured diamond films are grown on a titanium alloy substrate using a two-step deposition process. The first step is performed at elevated temperature (820 C) for 30 minutes using a H2/CH4/N2 gas mixture in order to grow a thin (approx. 600 nm) nanostructured diamond layer and improve film adhesion. The remainder of the deposition involves growth at low temperature (less than 600 C) in a H2/CH4/O2 gas mixture. Laser reflectance Interferometry (LRI) pattern during growth of a nanostructured diamond film on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The first 30 minutes are at a high temperature of 820 C and the rest of the film is grown at a low temperature of 580 T. The fringe pattern is observed till the very end due to extremely low surface roughness of 40 nm. The continuation of the smooth nanostructured diamond film growth during low temperature deposition is confirmed by in-situ laser reflectance interferometry and by post-deposition micro-Raman spectroscopy and surface profilometry. Similar experiments

  15. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects.

  16. Engineering hybrid nanostructures of active materials: Applications as electrode materials in lithium ion rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan

    stability by hindering the tin from aggregation, and also to reduce their capacity loss by the enhancement of electronic contact. The Sn2P2O7/C nanocomposite shows much improved stability with Q50/Q2 = 71%, compared to 27% for bulk amorphous Sn2P2O7. Furthermore, this nanostructured composite leads to much better rate capability. As the rate increases by 20 fold (from C/10 to 2C), close to 90% of the total capacity is still accessible. Similar improvement of the stability is also observed for some SnO-B 2O3-P2O5/C nanocomposites.

  17. Controllable Si (100) micro/nanostructures by chemical-etching-assisted femtosecond laser single-pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Xie, Qian; Jiang, Lan; Han, Weina; Wang, Qingsong; Wang, Andong; Hu, Jie; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-05-01

    In this study, silicon micro/nanostructures of controlled size and shape are fabricated by chemical-etching-assisted femtosecond laser single-pulse irradiation, which is a flexible, high-throughput method. The pulse fluence is altered to create various laser printing patterns for the etching mask, resulting in the sequential evolution of three distinct surface micro/nanostructures, namely, ring-like microstructures, flat-top pillar microstructures, and spike nanostructures. The characterized diameter of micro/nanostructures reveals that they can be flexibly tuned from the micrometer (˜2 μm) to nanometer (˜313 nm) scales by varying the laser pulse fluence in a wide range. Micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are utilized to demonstrate that the phase state changes from single-crystalline silicon (c-Si) to amorphous silicon (a-Si) after single-pulse femtosecond laser irradiation. This amorphous layer with a lower etching rate then acts as a mask in the wet etching process. Meanwhile, the on-the-fly punching technique enables the efficient fabrication of large-area patterned surfaces on the centimeter scale. This study presents a highly efficient method of controllably manufacturing silicon micro/nanostructures with different single-pulse patterns, which has promising applications in the photonic, solar cell, and sensors fields.

  18. Origin of Magnetic Properties in Amorphous Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Magnetic Properties of Fe-Ni-B Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky, J. L. Walter, and H. H. Liebermann , IEEE Trans. on Magnetics MAG-15, 909 (1979). Also GE...Report 78CRD132. 2. "Formation and Magnetic Properties of Fe-B-Si Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky, J. J. Becker, J. L. Walter, and H. H. Liebermann ...Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky and H. H. Liebermann , J. Appl. Phys., to appear. Also GE Report 79CRD177. 4. "The Effect of Temperature on Magnetic

  19. Characterization of mechanical heterogeneity in amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. L.; Li, M. Z.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, W. H.

    2012-07-01

    The structural geometry and size distribution of the local atomic rearrangements induced by external stress in amorphous solids are investigated by molecular dynamics studies. We find that the size distribution exhibits a generic power-law behavior and their structural geometry shows fractal feature. This indicates that the local atomic rearrangements in amorphous solids are self-organized during deformation. A simple theoretical model based on the interaction of the heterogeneous elastic field sources is proposed which predicts the power-law scaling and characterizes the properties of the local atomic rearrangements in amorphous solids.

  20. Laser irradiation to produce amorphous pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Titapiwatanakun, Varin; Tankul, Junlathip; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2016-11-30

    Using a high-power CO2 laser to irradiate powder beds, it was possible to induce phase transformation to the amorphous state. Irradiation of a model drug, indometacin, resulted in formation of a glass. Varying the settings of the laser (power and raster speed) was shown to change the physicochemical properties of the glasses produced and all irradiated glasses were found to be more stable than a reference glass produced by melt-quenching. Irradiation of a powder blend of paracetamol and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 was found to produce a solid amorphous dispersion. The results suggest that laser-irradiation might be a useful method for making amorphous pharmaceuticals.

  1. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states.

  2. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. PMID:27877676

  3. Synthesis of amorphous platinum nanofibers directly on an ITO substrate and its heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation characterization.

    PubMed

    Balouch, Aamna; Ali Umar, Akrajas; Mawarnis, Elvy Rahmi; Md Saad, Siti Khatijah; Mat Salleh, Muhamad; Abd Rahman, Mohd Yusri; Kityk, I V; Oyama, Munetaka

    2015-04-15

    This paper reports a facile, solution-phase approach to synthesizing a one-dimensional amorphous face-centered-cubic (fcc) platinum (a-Pt) nanostructure (nanofibers) directly on an indium-tin oxide (ITO) substrate. The electron microscopy analysis result shows that the a-Pt nanofiber has a diameter and length of approximately 50 nm and 1 μm, respectively, and is grown in high density on the entire surface of the ITO substrate. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis result further reveals that the a-Pt nanofibers feature metallic properties with highly reactive surface chemistry, promising novel performance in electrochemistry, catalysis, and sensors. A synergetic interplay between the formic acid reducing agent and the hexamethylenetetramine surfactant in the reduction of Pt ions is assumed as the driving force for the formation of the amorphous phase in the Pt nanostructure. The catalytic properties of a-Pt were examined in the acetone hydrogenation reaction under microwave irradiation. a-Pt shows excellent heterogeneous catalytic properties for converting acetone to isopropyl alcohol with turnover number and frequency as high as 400 and 140 min(-1), respectively. The preparation and formation mechanism of the a-Pt nanofibers will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  4. Non-crosslinked, amorphous, block copolymer electrolyte for batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mayes, Anne M.; Ceder, Gerbrand; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Sadoway, Donald R.; Aydinol, Mehmet K.; Soo, Philip P.; Jang, Young-Il; Huang, Biying

    2006-04-11

    Solid battery components are provided. A block copolymeric electrolyte is non-crosslinked and non-glassy through the entire range of typical battery service temperatures, that is, through the entire range of at least from about 0.degree. C. to about 70.degree. C. The chains of which the copolymer is made each include at least one ionically-conductive block and at least one second block immiscible with the ionically-conductive block. The chains form an amorphous association and are arranged in an ordered nanostructure including a continuous matrix of amorphous ionically-conductive domains and amorphous second domains that are immiscible with the ionically-conductive domains. A compound is provided that has a formula of Li.sub.xM.sub.yN.sub.zO.sub.2. M and N are each metal atoms or a main group elements, and x, y and z are each numbers from about 0 to about 1. y and z are chosen such that a formal charge on the M.sub.yN.sub.z portion of the compound is (4-x). In certain embodiments, these compounds are used in the cathodes of rechargeable batteries. The present invention also includes methods of predicting the potential utility of metal dichalgogenide compounds for use in lithium intercalation compounds. It also provides methods for processing lithium intercalation oxides with the structure and compositional homogeneity necessary to realize the increased formation energies of said compounds. An article is made of a dimensionally-stable, interpenetrating microstructure of a first phase including a first component and a second phase, immiscible with the first phase, including a second component. The first and second phases define interphase boundaries between them, and at least one particle is positioned between a first phase and a second phase at an interphase boundary. When the first and second phases are electronically-conductive and ionically-conductive polymers, respectively, and the particles are ion host particles, the arrangement is an electrode of a battery.

  5. Amorphous to Amorphous Form Transitions of Water Ice and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Blake, David F.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have combined Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) and cryogenic techniques in an instrumental configuration that allows observing the structure of vapor deposited ice as it evolves during warmup. The ice is deposited in-situ inside an Hitachi H-500 H transmission electron microscope at a base pressure of 1-5 x 10(exp -7) torr on a thin amorphous carbon substrate at 15K or 86K and warmed up at a rate of 1-2 K/min. We find a progression of amorphous forms and well defined amorphous to amorphous transitions. Apart from the well known low-density form of ice, we confirm the presence of a high-density form and find a third amorphous form that coexists with cubic ice. We will report too on the amorphous to crystalline transition and the implications of these results for radical diffusion and gas retention observed in laboratory analog studies of interstellar and cometary ices.

  6. Formation of quasi-single crystalline porous ZnO nanostructures with a single large cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seungho; Kim, Semi; Jung, Dae-Won; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2011-09-01

    We report a method for synthesizing quasi-single crystalline porous ZnO nanostructures containing a single large cavity. The microwave-assisted route consists of a short (about 2 min) temperature ramping stage (from room temperature to 120 °C) and a stage in which the temperature is maintained at 120 °C for 2 h. The structures produced by this route were 200-480 nm in diameter. The morphological yields of this method were very high. The temperature- and time-dependent evolution of the synthesized powders and the effects of an additive, vitamin C, were studied. Spherical amorphous/polycrystalline structures (70-170 nm in diameter), which appeared transitorily, may play a key role in the formation of the single crystalline porous hollow ZnO nanostructures. Studies and characterization of the nanostructures suggested a possible mechanism for formation of the quasi-single crystalline porous ZnO nanostructures with an interior space.We report a method for synthesizing quasi-single crystalline porous ZnO nanostructures containing a single large cavity. The microwave-assisted route consists of a short (about 2 min) temperature ramping stage (from room temperature to 120 °C) and a stage in which the temperature is maintained at 120 °C for 2 h. The structures produced by this route were 200-480 nm in diameter. The morphological yields of this method were very high. The temperature- and time-dependent evolution of the synthesized powders and the effects of an additive, vitamin C, were studied. Spherical amorphous/polycrystalline structures (70-170 nm in diameter), which appeared transitorily, may play a key role in the formation of the single crystalline porous hollow ZnO nanostructures. Studies and characterization of the nanostructures suggested a possible mechanism for formation of the quasi-single crystalline porous ZnO nanostructures with an interior space. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images and the corresponding SAED image of a Zn

  7. Resolving the nanostructure of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited nanocrystalline SiO{sub x} layers for application in solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klingsporn, M.; Costina, I.; Kirner, S.; Stannowski, B.; Villringer, C.; Abou-Ras, D.; Lehmann, M.

    2016-06-14

    Nanocrystalline silicon suboxides (nc-SiO{sub x}) have attracted attention during the past years for the use in thin-film silicon solar cells. We investigated the relationships between the nanostructure as well as the chemical, electrical, and optical properties of phosphorous, doped, nc-SiO{sub 0.8}:H fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure was varied through the sample series by changing the deposition pressure from 533 to 1067 Pa. The samples were then characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and a specialized plasmon imaging method. We found that the material changed with increasing pressure from predominantly amorphous silicon monoxide to silicon dioxide containing nanocrystalline silicon. The nanostructure changed from amorphous silicon filaments to nanocrystalline silicon filaments, which were found to cause anisotropic electron transport.

  8. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2009-11-17

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  9. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  10. Nanostructures for peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  11. Nanoindentation of Carbon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Karamjit; Verma, Veena; Bhatti, H S

    2016-06-01

    In the present research paper carbon nanostructures viz. single walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, single walled carbon nanohorns and graphene nanoplatelets have been synthesized by CVD technique, hydrothermal method, DC arc discharge method in liquid nitrogen and microwave technique respectively. After synthesis 5 mm thick pallets of given nanomaterial are prepared by making a paste in isopropyl alcohol and using polyvinylidene difluoride as a binder and then these pallets were used for nanoindentation measurements. Hardness, reduced modulus, stiffness, contact height and contact area have been measured using nanoindenter.

  12. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more-serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss [Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap, http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_u/bcpr/index.cfm]. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It shows that an extrapolation of the microgravity induced bone loss rates to longer time scales, such as a 2.5 year round-trip to Mars (6 months out at 0 g, 1.5 year stay on Mars at 0.38 g, 6 months back at 0 g), could severely compromise the skeletal system of such a person.

  13. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It is well known that bone remodeling responds to mechanical forces. We are developing two-photon microscopy techniques to study bone tissue and bone cell cultures to better understand the fundamental response mechanism in bone remodeling. Osteoblast and osteoclast cell cultures are being studied, and the goal is to use molecular biology techniques in conjunction with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to study the physiology of in-vitro cell cultures in response to various stimuli, such as fluid flow induced shear stress and mechanical stress. We have constructed a two-photon fluorescence microscope for these studies, and are currently incorporating FLIM detection. Current progress will be reviewed. This work is supported by the NASA John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium.

  14. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  15. Analysing and Manipulating the Nanostructure of Geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, J. L.; Hajimohammadi, A.; Rees, C. A.; van Deventer, J. S. J.

    Geopolymer concretes are currently being commercialised in Australia and elsewhere around the world, with a view towards enhancing the sustainability of the world’s construction industry. The fundamental geopolymer binder is an aluminosilicate gel which displays key structural features on every length scale from Ångstroms up to centimetres, meaning that multiscale analysis is key to the development of a detailed understanding of geopolymer formation and performance. Here, we present results from investigations of geopolymer nanostructure, focusing on the use of infrared spectroscopy as an analytical tool. The effects of different combinations of precursors in geopolymer formation provides critical information, in particular with regard to the rate of reaction and its impact on the final distribution of elements and structures within the geopolymer binder. Formulations are designed so that the same composition is obtained by the use of precursors which release their constituent elements at very different rates under alkaline attack during geopolymerisation, and this provides essential information regarding the role of different elements in forming strong and durable geopolymer structures. Seeding the geopolymer mixture with very low doses of oxide nanoparticles presents several unexpected effects, both in terms of reaction kinetics and also in altering the nature of the zeolitic crystallites formed within the predominantly X-ray amorphous geopolymer binder.

  16. Amorphous Phases on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ruff, S. W.; Horgan, B.; Dehouck, E.; Achilles, C. N.; Ming, D. W.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Both primary (volcanic/impact glasses) and secondary (opal/silica, allophane, hisingerite, npOx, S-bearing) amorphous phases appear to be major components of martian surface materials based on orbital and in-situ measurements. A key observation is that whereas regional/global scale amorphous components include altered glass and npOx, local scale amorphous phases include hydrated silica/opal. This suggests widespread alteration at low water-to-rock ratios, perhaps due to snow/ice melt with variable pH, and localized alteration at high water-to-rock ratios. Orbital and in-situ measurements of the regional/global amorphous component on Mars suggests that it is made up of at least three phases: npOx, amorphous silicate (likely altered glass), and an amorphous S-bearing phase. Fundamental questions regarding the composition and the formation of the regional/global amorphous component(s) still remain: Do the phases form locally or have they been homogenized through aeolian activity and derived from the global dust? Is the parent glass volcanic, impact, or both? Are the phases separate or intimately mixed (e.g., as in palagonite)? When did the amorphous phases form? To address the question of source (local and/or global), we need to look for variations in the different phases within the amorphous component through continued modeling of the chemical composition of the amorphous phases in samples from Gale using CheMin and APXS data. If we find variations (e.g., a lack of or enrichment in amorphous silicate in some samples), this may imply a local source for some phases. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the weathering products may give insight into the formation mechanisms of the parent glass (e.g., impact glasses contain higher Al and lower Si [30], so we might expect allophane as a weathering product of impact glass). To address the question of whether these phases are separate or intimately mixed, we need to do laboratory studies of naturally altered samples made

  17. Ion-beam amorphization of semiconductors: A physical model based on the amorphous pocket population

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, K.R.C.; Jaraiz, M.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Rubio, J.E.; Castrillo, P.; Pinacho, R.; Barbolla, J.; Srinivasan, M.P.

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a model for damage accumulation up to amorphization, based on the ion-implant damage structures commonly known as amorphous pockets. The model is able to reproduce the silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature for C, Si, and Ge ion implants. Its use as an analysis tool reveals an unexpected bimodal distribution of the defect population around a characteristic size, which is larger for heavier ions. The defect population is split in both size and composition, with small, pure interstitial and vacancy clusters below the characteristic size, and amorphous pockets with a balanced mixture of interstitials and vacancies beyond that size.

  18. Amorphization strategy affects the stability and supersaturation profile of amorphous drug nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Wean Sin; Kiew, Tie Yi; Yang, Yue; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2014-05-05

    Amorphous drug nanoparticles have recently emerged as a promising bioavailability enhancement strategy of poorly soluble drugs attributed to the high supersaturation solubility generated by the amorphous state and fast dissolution afforded by the nanoparticles. Herein we examine the effects of two amorphization strategies in the nanoscale, i.e., (1) molecular mobility restrictions and (2) high energy surface occupation, both by polymer excipient stabilizers, on the (i) morphology, (ii) colloidal stability, (iii) drug loading, (iv) amorphous state stability after three-month storage, and (v) in vitro supersaturation profiles, using itraconazole (ITZ) as the model drug. Drug-polyelectrolyte complexation is employed in the first strategy to prepare amorphous ITZ nanoparticles using dextran sulfate as the polyelectrolyte (ITZ nanoplex), while the second strategy employs pH-shift precipitation using hydroxypropylmethylcellulose as the surface stabilizer (nano-ITZ), with both strategies resulting in >90% ITZ utilization. Both amorphous ITZ nanoparticles share similar morphology (∼300 nm spheres) with the ITZ nanoplex exhibiting better colloidal stability, albeit at lower ITZ loading (65% versus 94%), due to the larger stabilizer amount used. The ITZ nanoplex also exhibits superior amorphous state stability, attributed to the ITZ molecular mobility restriction by electrostatic complexation with dextran sulfate. The higher stability, however, is obtained at the expense of slower supersaturation generation, which is maintained over a prolonged period, compared to the nano-ITZ. The present results signify the importance of selecting the optimal amorphization strategy, in addition to formulating the excipient stabilizers, to produce amorphous drug nanoparticles having the desired characteristics.

  19. Using containerless methods to develop amorphous pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Weber, J K R; Benmore, C J; Suthar, K J; Tamalonis, A J; Alderman, O L G; Sendelbach, S; Kondev, V; Yarger, J; Rey, C A; Byrn, S R

    2017-01-01

    Many pipeline drugs have low solubility in their crystalline state and require compounding in special dosage forms to increase bioavailability for oral administration. The use of amorphous formulations increases solubility and uptake of active pharmaceutical ingredients. These forms are rapidly gaining commercial importance for both pre-clinical and clinical use. Synthesis of amorphous drugs was performed using an acoustic levitation containerless processing method and spray drying. The structure of the products was investigated using in-situ high energy X-ray diffraction. Selected solvents for processing drugs were investigated using acoustic levitation. The stability of amorphous samples was measured using X-ray diffraction. Samples processed using both spray drying and containerless synthesis were compared. We review methods for making amorphous pharmaceuticals and present data on materials made by containerless processing and spray drying. It was shown that containerless processing using acoustic levitation can be used to make phase-pure forms of drugs that are known to be difficult to amorphize. The stability and structure of the materials was investigated in the context of developing and making clinically useful formulations. Amorphous compounds are emerging as an important component of drug development and for the oral delivery of drugs with low solubility. Containerless techniques can be used to efficiently synthesize small quantities of pure amorphous forms that are potentially useful in pre-clinical trials and for use in the optimization of clinical products. Developing new pharmaceutical products is an essential enterprise to improve patient outcomes. The development and application of amorphous pharmaceuticals to increase absorption is rapidly gaining importance and it provides opportunities for breakthrough research on new drugs. There is an urgent need to solve problems associated with making formulations that are both stable and that provide high

  20. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongfeng; Shiwa, Mitsuharu

    2014-01-01

    Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/√Hz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor. PMID:24940865

  1. Picosecond Electronic Relaxations In Amorphous Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauc, Jan

    1983-11-01

    Using the pump and probe technique the relaxation processes of photogenerated carriers in amorphous tetrahedral semiconductors and chalcogenide glasses in the time domain from 0.5 Ps to 1.4 ns have been studied. The results obtained on the following phenomena are reviewed: hot carrier thermalization in amorphous silicon; trapping of carriers in undoped a-Si:H; trapping of carriers in deep traps produced by doping; geminate recombination in As2S3-xSex glasses.

  2. Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Progress in identification of strengths and weaknesses of amorphous-silicon technology detailed. Report describes achievements in testing reliability of solar-power modules made of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic cells. Based on investigation of modules made by U.S. manufacturers. Modules subjected to field tests, to accelerated-aging tests in laboratory, and to standard sequence of qualification tests developed for modules of crystalline-silicon cells.

  3. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  4. Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Hydrogenated Irradiated and Amorphous Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerasinghe, Asanka; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    Defect engineering and chemical functionalization of graphene are promising routes for fabrication of carbon nanostructures and 2D metamaterials with unique properties and function. Here, we use hydrogenation of irradiated, including irradiation-induced amorphous, graphene as a means of studying chemical functionalization effects on its electronic structure and mechanical response. We use molecular-dynamics simulations based on a reliable bond-order potential to prepare the hydrogenated configurations and carry out dynamic deformation tests at constant strain rate and temperature. Our mechanical tests show that hydrogenation does not affect the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the irradiated graphene sheet if the hydrogenated C atoms remain sp2-hybridized; however, upon inducing sp3 hybridization of these C atoms, UTS decreases by about 10 GPa. Furthermore, the fracture strain of the irradiated structure decreases by up to 30% upon hydrogenation independent of the hybridization type. We also report results for the electronic structure of hydrogenated configurations based on a density-functional tight-binding approach and assess the potential for tuning the electronic properties of these defective, functionalized graphenes.

  5. External field-assisted solution synthesis and selectively catalytic properties of amorphous iron nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Jianguo; Yan, Gongqin; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun

    2012-03-07

    This work describes an easy and flexible approach for the synthesis of 2D nanostructures by external composite field-induced self-assembly. Amorphous iron nanoplatelets with a large aspect ratio were prepared by reducing a concentrated FeSO4 solution with NaBH4 without any templates or surfactants under a magnetic field and a shear field, and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Based on the morphological dependence of the resultant iron nanostructures on the kinetic parameters such as reactant concentration, reaction temperature, external fields as well as reaction time, etc., a novel conceivable formation mechanism of the iron nanoplatelets was substantiated to be a self-assembly of concentrated iron nuclei induced by the synergistic effect of both a magnetic field and a shear field. Due to the amorphous nature and shape anisotropy, the as-synthesized iron nanoplatelets exhibit quite different magnetic properties with an enhanced coercivity of >220 Oe from isotropic iron nanoparticles. In the oxidation of cyclohexane with hydrogen peroxide as a 'green' oxidant, the as-obtained amorphous iron nanoplatelets show a conversion more than 84% and a complete selectivity for cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone due to the unique structure. Moreover, their catalytic performances are strongly influenced by their morphology, and the iron atoms located on the faces tend to catalyze the formation of cyclohexanol while those on the sides tend to catalyze the formation of cyclohexanone. The external composite field-induced solution synthesis reported here can be readily explored for fabricating other 2D magnetic nanoplatelets, and the resulting iron nanoplatelets are promising for a number of applications such as high efficient selective catalysis, energy, environment fields and so forth.

  6. Amorphous boron nitride at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2016-06-01

    The pressure-induced phase transformation in hexagonal boron nitrite and amorphous boron nitrite is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The hexagonal-to-wurtzite phase transformation is successfully reproduced in the simulation with a transformation mechanism similar to one suggested in experiment. Amorphous boron nitrite, on the other hand, gradually transforms to a high-density amorphous phase with the application of pressure. This phase transformation is irreversible because a densified amorphous state having both sp3 and sp2 bonds is recovered upon pressure release. The high-density amorphous state mainly consists of sp3 bonds and its local structure is quite similar to recently proposed intermediate boron nitrite phases, in particular tetragonal structure (P42/mnm), rather than the known the wurtzite or cubic boron nitrite due to the existence of four membered rings and edge sharing connectivity. On the basis of this finding we propose that amorphous boron nitrite might be best candidate as a starting structure to synthesize the intermediate phase(s) at high pressure and temperature (probably below 800 °C) conditions.

  7. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  8. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, L. L.; Hay, J. C.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides the properties of bulk stoichiometric silicon carbide which has been amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60°C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 × 10 25 n/m 2. Amorphization was seen in both materials as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the amorphized CVD SiC. Using measured thermal conductivity data for the CVD SiC sample, the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than ˜125°C.

  9. Magnetic Properties of Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciraldo, John

    2007-10-01

    The recent development of the superlattice nanowire pattern transfer (SNAP) technique has enabled the fabrication of complex molecular-electronic circuits at unprecedented densities. In this project, we explore the possibility of extending this technique to generate comparably dense arrays of nanoscale giant magnetoresistive (GMR) and tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) devices. My primary contribution to this project has focused on using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), as well as a superconducting interference device (SQUID) magnetometer to monitor the magnetic properties of the devices as they are processed from thin 2D films into nanostructure arrays. This investigation allows us to investigate both fundamental and technological aspects of the nanopatterning process. For example, the effects of changing surface to volume ratios on the ferromagnetic exchange interaction and the role of various patterning techniques in determining surface chemistry and oxidation of the final nanostructures, respectively. Additionally I have worked on simulations of the materials using NIST's OOMF program, allowing me to compare actual results with theoretical expectations. I am also designing a magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) detector, which will allow faster approximations of magnetic behavior.

  10. Comparison of bioavailability of amorphous versus crystalline itraconazole nanoparticles via pulmonary administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Johnston, Keith P; Williams, Robert O

    2010-05-01

    The effect of supersaturation on bioavailability of inhaled nebulized aerosols is compared for amorphous versus crystalline nanoparticulate dispersions. The nanocrystalline formulations of itraconazole (ITZ) were made by wet milling (i.e. Wet-milled ITZ), whereas amorphous nanostructured aggregates (ITZ/mannitol/lecithin=1:0.5:0.2, weight ratio) were made by an ultra-rapid freezing process (i.e. URF-ITZ). Dissolution tests revealed the extent of supersaturation was 4.7-times higher for URF-ITZ versus Wet-milled ITZ, though their dissolution rates were similar. The aerodynamic performances of both aqueous colloidal dispersions were comparable and suitable for deep lung delivery. Single-dose 24-h pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats following inhalation of the nebulized colloidal dispersions (equivalent to 20mgITZ/mL dispersion in 5mL) in a nose-only dosing apparatus. Lung depositions following inhalation were similar for both compositions. In systemic circulation, Wet-milled ITZ and URF-ITZ achieved C(max) of 50 and 180ng/mL at 2.7 and 4.0h, and AUC(0-24) of 662 and 2543ngh/mL, respectively, based on a one-compartmental analysis. Pulmonary delivery of the nanoparticulate amorphous ITZ composition resulted in significantly higher systemic bioavailability than for the nanocrystalline ITZ composition, as a result of the higher supersaturation that increased the permeation.

  11. Hard magnetic phase evolution in nanocrystalline mechanically milled amorphous Pr2Co14B powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nlebedim, Cajetan; Ucar, Huseyin; Paranthaman, Parans; McCallum, R. W.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the evolution of the structural and magnetic properties of Pr2Co14B with mechanical milling and heat-treatment is presented. Understanding the phase evolution of magnetic properties in hard magnetic materials is crucial for developing high performance permanent magnets. Mechanical alloying/milling offers a traditional and easily deployable approach to synthesizing nanostructured materials. Nevertheless, such can result in amorphization due to high defect density leading to disorder in atomic arrangement. The crystalline phase can be thermally recovered but requires the understanding of how the properties evolve with temperature, in order to achieve useful hard magnetic properties desired for developing permanent magnets. This work shows how properties such as energy product, coercivity, remanent magnetization, saturation magnetization and Curie temperature evolve when PrCoB alloy transitions from amorphous to crystalline phase. The presentation will also include how different levels of amorphization affect the magnetic properties. This work was supported by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office.

  12. Erratum: High speed sCMOS-based oblique plane microscopy applied to the study of calcium dynamics in cardiac myocytes: [J. Biophotonics 9, No. 3, 311-323 (2016)].

    PubMed

    Sikkel, Markus B; Kumar, Sunil; Maioli, Vincent; Rowlands, Christina; Gordon, Fabiana; Harding, Sian E; Lyon, Alexander R; MacLeod, Kenneth T; Dunsby, Chris

    2017-05-01

    In the article by M.B. Sikkel et al. (doi: 10.1002/jbio.201500193), published in J. Biophotonics 9, 311-323 (2016), an error occurred in the computer code that was used to generate Figure 3. This erratum is published to correct Figure 3, the calculated value of tgeom and the experimentally determined value of toptics in the text of the article. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. EDITORIAL: Nanostructured solar cells Nanostructured solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenham, Neil C.; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Conversion into electrical power of even a small fraction of the solar radiation incident on the Earth's surface has the potential to satisfy the world's energy demands without generating CO2 emissions. Current photovoltaic technology is not yet fulfilling this promise, largely due to the high cost of the electricity produced. Although the challenges of storage and distribution should not be underestimated, a major bottleneck lies in the photovoltaic devices themselves. Improving efficiency is part of the solution, but diminishing returns in that area mean that reducing the manufacturing cost is absolutely vital, whilst still retaining good efficiencies and device lifetimes. Solution-processible materials, e.g. organic molecules, conjugated polymers and semiconductor nanoparticles, offer new routes to the low-cost production of solar cells. The challenge here is that absorbing light in an organic material produces a coulombically bound exciton that requires dissociation at a donor-acceptor heterojunction. A thickness of at least 100 nm is required to absorb the incident light, but excitons only diffuse a few nanometres before decaying. The problem is therefore intrinsically at the nano-scale: we need composite devices with a large area of internal donor-acceptor interface, but where each carrier has a pathway to the respective electrode. Dye-sensitized and bulk heterojunction cells have nanostructures which approach this challenge in different ways, and leading research in this area is described in many of the articles in this special issue. This issue is not restricted to organic or dye-sensitized photovoltaics, since nanotechnology can also play an important role in devices based on more conventional inorganic materials. In these materials, the electronic properties can be controlled, tuned and in some cases completely changed by nanoscale confinement. Also, the techniques of nanoscience are the natural ones for investigating the localized states, particularly at

  14. Broadband absorption enhancement in amorphous Si solar cells using metal gratings and surface texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdi, Sara; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2017-02-01

    The efficiencies of thin film amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cells are restricted by the small thickness required for efficient carrier collection. This thickness limitations result in poor light absorption. In this work, broadband absorption enhancement is theoretically achieved in a-Si solar cells by using nanostructured back electrode along with surface texturing. The back electrode is formed of Au nanogratings and the surface texturing consists of Si nanocones. The results were then compared to random texturing surfaces. Three dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations are used to design and optimize the structure. The Au nanogratings achieved absorption enhancement in the long wavelengths due to sunlight coupling to surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) modes. High absorption enhancement was achieved at short wavelengths due to the decreased reflection and enhanced scattering inside the a-Si absorbing layer. Optimizations have been performed to obtain the optimal geometrical parameters for both the nanogratings and the periodic texturing. In addition, an enhancement factor (i.e. absorbed power in nanostructured device/absorbed power in reference device) was calculated to evaluate the enhancement obtained due to the incorporation of each nanostructure.

  15. Amorphous calcium (ortho)phosphates.

    PubMed

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2010-12-01

    Amorphous calcium phosphates (ACPs) represent a unique class of biomedically relevant calcium orthophosphate salts, having variable chemical but essentially identical glass-like physical properties, in which there is neither translational nor orientational long-range ordering of the atomic positions. Normally, ACPs are the first solid phases, precipitated after a rapid mixing of aqueous solutions containing ions of Ca(2+) and PO₄³⁻; however, other production techniques are known. Interestingly, ACPs prepared by wet-chemical techniques were found to have a relatively constant chemical composition over a relatively wide range of preparation conditions, which suggests the presence of a well-defined local structural unit, presumably with the structure of Ca₉(PO₄)₆ - so-called Posner cluster. However, the presence of similar clusters in ACPs produced by other techniques remains uncertain. All ACPs are thermodynamically unstable compounds and, unless stored in dry conditions or doped by stabilizers, spontaneously tend to transform to crystalline calcium orthophosphates, mainly to calcium apatites. This solution instability of ACPs and their easy transformation to crystalline phases are of a great biological relevance. Specifically, the initiating role ACPs play in matrix vesicle biomineralization raises the importance of ACPs from a mere laboratory curiosity to that of a key intermediate in skeletal calcification. In addition, due to significant chemical and structural similarities with calcified mammalian tissues, as well as excellent biocompatibility and bioresorbability, all types of ACPs are very promising candidates for the manufacture of artificial bone grafts. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the occurrence, preparation, composition, structure, major properties and biomedical applications of ACPs. To assist readers in looking for the specific details on ACPs, a great number of references have been collected and systematized. Copyright

  16. Periodic nanostructural materials for nanoplasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dukhyun

    2017-02-01

    Nanoscale periodic material design and fabrication are essentially fundamental requirement for basic scientific researches and industrial applications of nanoscience and engineering. Innovative, effective, reproducible, large-area uniform, tunable and robust nanostructure/material syntheses are still challenging. Here, I would like to introduce the novel periodic nanostructural materials particularly with uniformly ordered nanoporous or nanoflower structures, which are fabricated by simple, cost-effective, and high-throughput wet chemical methods. I also report large-area periodic plasmonic nanostructures based on template-based nanolithography. The surface morphology and optical properties are characterized by SEM and UV-vis. spectroscopy. Furthermore, their enhancement factor is evaluated by using SERS signals.

  17. Mechanical design of DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carlos E; Su, Hai-Jun; Marras, Alexander E; Zhou, Lifeng; Johnson, Joshua

    2015-04-14

    Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems.

  18. Electronic Properties of Novel Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmany, Hans; Fink, Jörg; Mehring, Michael; Roth, Siegmar

    The 19th Winterschool focused mainly on new nanostructured materials, with data presented on functionalized fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, filled and double-wall nanotubes, non-carbon nanotubes, such as BN and MoS2 tubes, and other nanostructures. The direction of nanoelectronics research was explored in depth, and advancements in composite technology and novel applications for nanotubes were discussed. Importantly, participants were updated on the theoretical and experimental determinations of structural and electronic properties as well as on characterization methods for molecular nanostructures.

  19. Formation of nanostructured TiO{sub 2} by femtosecond laser irradiation of titanium in O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, Elizabeth C.; Phillips, Katherine C.; Mazur, Eric; Friend, Cynthia M.

    2012-09-15

    We used femtosecond laser irradiation of titanium metal in an oxidizing environment to form a highly stable surface layer of nanostructured amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). We studied the influence of atmospheric composition on these surface structures and found that gas composition and pressure affect the chemical composition of the surface layer but not the surface morphology. Incorporation of nitrogen is only possible when no oxygen is present in the surrounding atmosphere.

  20. Electrons and phonons in amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The coupling between lattice vibrations and electrons is one of the central concepts of condensed matter physics. The subject has been deeply studied for crystalline materials, but far less so for amorphous and glassy materials, which are among the most important for applications. In this paper, we explore the electron-lattice coupling using current tools of a first-principles computer simulation. We choose three materials to illustrate the phenomena: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se) and amorphous gallium nitride (a-GaN). In each case, we show that there is a strong correlation between the localization of electron states and the magnitude of thermally induced fluctuations in energy eigenvalues obtained from the density-functional theory (i.e. Kohn-Sham eigenvalues). We provide a heuristic theory to explain these observations. The case of a-GaN, a topologically disordered partly ionic insulator, is distinctive compared to the covalent amorphous examples. Next, we explore the consequences of changing the charge state of a system as a proxy for tracking photo-induced structural changes in the materials. Where transport is concerned, we lend insight into the Meyer-Neldel compensation rule and discuss a thermally averaged Kubo-Greenwood formula as a means to estimate electrical conductivity and especially its temperature dependence. We close by showing how the optical gap of an amorphous semiconductor can be computationally engineered with the judicious use of Hellmann-Feynman forces (associated with a few defect states) using molecular dynamics simulations. These forces can be used to close or open an optical gap, and identify a structure with a prescribed gap. We use the approach with plane-wave density functional methods to identify a low-energy amorphous phase of silicon including several coordination defects, yet with a gap close to that of good quality a-Si models.

  1. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    DOEpatents

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  2. Bioscaffolds for metal nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radloff, Corey J.; Vaia, Richard A.; Brunton, Jason; Ward, Vernon; Kalmakoff, James; Dokland, Terge

    2004-10-01

    The use of virus nanoparticles, specifically Chilo and Wiseana Iridovirus, as core substrates in the fabrication of metallodielectric, plasmonic nanostructures is discussed. A gold shell is assembled around the viral core by attaching small, 2 - 5 nm, gold nanoparticles to the virus surface by means of inherent chemical functionality found within the protein cage structure of the viral capsid. These gold nanoparticles act as nucleation sites for electroless deposition of gold ions from solution. The density of the gold nucleation sites on the virus was maximized by reducing the repulsive forces between the gold particles, which was accompolished by controlling the ionic strength of the nanoparticle solution. UV/Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to verify creation of the virus-Au particles. The optical extinction spectra of the metallo-viral complex were compared to Mie scattering theory and found to be in quantitative agreement.

  3. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Aliev, Ali; Baughman, Ray

    2015-03-01

    There is a large promise for thermophones in high power sonar arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding aerogel-like carbon nanotube sheets demonstrate the best performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large size freestanding carbon nanotube sheets and other even more exotic materials published recently, hampers the field. We present here new alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly and cost effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanoscale materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  4. Synthesis of graphene and graphene nanostructures by ion implantation and pulsed laser annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaotie; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Appleton, Bill R.; Berke, Kara; Hebard, Arthur F.; Venkatachalam, Dinesh K.; Elliman, Robert G.; Fridmann, Joel; Ren, Fan; Gila, Brent P.

    2016-07-14

    In this paper, we report a systematic study that shows how the numerous processing parameters associated with ion implantation (II) and pulsed laser annealing (PLA) can be manipulated to control the quantity and quality of graphene (G), few-layer graphene (FLG), and other carbon nanostructures selectively synthesized in crystalline SiC (c-SiC). Controlled implantations of Si{sup −} plus C{sup −} and Au{sup +} ions in c-SiC showed that both the thickness of the amorphous layer formed by ion damage and the doping effect of the implanted Au enhance the formation of G and FLG during PLA. The relative contributions of the amorphous and doping effects were studied separately, and thermal simulation calculations were used to estimate surface temperatures and to help understand the phase changes occurring during PLA. In addition to the amorphous layer thickness and catalytic doping effects, other enhancement effects were found to depend on other ion species, the annealing environment, PLA fluence and number of pulses, and even laser frequency. Optimum II and PLA conditions are identified and possible mechanisms for selective synthesis of G, FLG, and carbon nanostructures are discussed.

  5. Synthesis of graphene and graphene nanostructures by ion implantation and pulsed laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaotie; Berke, Kara; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Venkatachalam, Dinesh K.; Elliman, Robert G.; Fridmann, Joel; Hebard, Arthur F.; Ren, Fan; Gila, Brent P.; Appleton, Bill R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report a systematic study that shows how the numerous processing parameters associated with ion implantation (II) and pulsed laser annealing (PLA) can be manipulated to control the quantity and quality of graphene (G), few-layer graphene (FLG), and other carbon nanostructures selectively synthesized in crystalline SiC (c-SiC). Controlled implantations of Si- plus C- and Au+ ions in c-SiC showed that both the thickness of the amorphous layer formed by ion damage and the doping effect of the implanted Au enhance the formation of G and FLG during PLA. The relative contributions of the amorphous and doping effects were studied separately, and thermal simulation calculations were used to estimate surface temperatures and to help understand the phase changes occurring during PLA. In addition to the amorphous layer thickness and catalytic doping effects, other enhancement effects were found to depend on other ion species, the annealing environment, PLA fluence and number of pulses, and even laser frequency. Optimum II and PLA conditions are identified and possible mechanisms for selective synthesis of G, FLG, and carbon nanostructures are discussed.

  6. @AuAg nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rina; Soni, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    Bimetallic and trimetallic nanoparticles have attracted significant attention in recent times due to their enhanced electrochemical and catalytic properties compared to monometallic nanoparticles. The numerical calculations using Mie theory has been carried out for three-layered metal nanoshell dielectric-metal-metal (DMM) system consisting of a particle with a dielectric core (Al@Al2O3), a middle metal Ag (Au) layer and an outer metal Au (Ag) shell. The results have been interpreted using plasmon hybridization theory. We have also prepared Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au and Al@Al2O3@AgAu triple-layered core-shell or alloy nanostructure by two-step laser ablation method and compared with calculated results. The synthesis involves temporal separations of Al, Ag, and Au deposition for step-by-step formation of triple-layered core-shell structure. To form Al@Ag nanoparticles, we ablated silver for 40 min in aluminium nanoparticle colloidal solution. As aluminium oxidizes easily in water to form alumina, the resulting structure is core-shell Al@Al2O3. The Al@Al2O3 particle acts as a seed for the incoming energetic silver particles for multilayered Al@Al2O3@Ag nanoparticles is formed. The silver target was then replaced by gold target and ablation was carried out for different ablation time using different laser energy for generation of Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au core-shell or Al@Al2O3@AgAu alloy. The formation of core-shell and alloy nanostructure was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy. The absorption spectra show shift in plasmon resonance peak of silver to gold in the range 400-520 nm with increasing ablation time suggesting formation of Ag-Au alloy in the presence of alumina particles in the solution.

  7. Repairable, nanostructured biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, M.; Brombosz, S.; Grubjesic, S.

    2013-03-01

    Proteins facilitate many key cellular processes, including signal recognition and energy transduction. The ability to harness this evolutionarily-optimized functionality could lead to the development of protein-based systems useful for advancing alternative energy storage and conversion. The future of protein-based, however, requires the development of materials that will stabilize, order and control the activity of the proteins. Recently we have developed a synthetic approach for the preparation of a durable biomimetic chemical hydrogel that can be reversibly swollen in water. The matrix has proven ideal for the stable encapsulation of both water- and membrane-soluble proteins. The material is composed of an aqueous dispersion of a diacrylate end-derivatized PEO-PPO-PEO macromer, a saturated phospholipid and a zwitterionic co-surfactant that self-assembles into a nanostructured physical gel at room temperature as determined by X-ray scattering. The addition of a water soluble PEGDA co-monomer and photoinitator does not alter the self-assembled structure and UV irradiation serves to crosslink the acrylate end groups on the macromer with the PEGDA forming a network within the aqueous domains as determined by FT-IR. More recently we have begun to incorporate reversible crosslinks employing Diels-Alder chemistry, allowing for the extraction and replacement of inactive proteins. The ability to replenish the materials with active, non-denatured forms of protein is an important step in advancing these materials for use in nanostructured devices This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences, USDoE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  8. Laser processing and in-situ diagnostics for crystallization: from thin films to nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; In, Jung Bin; Zheng, Andy Cheng; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Hwang, David J.; Xiang, Bin; Minor, Andrew M.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2014-10-01

    Recent work on laser-induced crystallization of thin films and nanostructures is presented. Characterization of the morphology of the crystallized area reveals the optimum conditions for sequential lateral growth in a-Si thin films under high-pulsed laser irradiation. Silicon crystal grains of several micrometers in lateral dimensions can be obtained reproducibly. Laser-induced grain morphology change is observed in silicon nanopillars under a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) environment. The TEM is coupled with a near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) pulsed laser processing system. This combination enables immediate scrutiny on the grain morphologies that the pulsed laser irradiation produces. The tip of the amorphous or polycrystalline silicon pillar is transformed into a single crystalline domain via melt-mediated crystallization. The microscopic observation provides a fundamental basis for laser-induced conversion of amorphous nanostructures into coarse-grained crystals. A laser beam shaping strategy is introduced to control the stochastic dewetting of ultrathin silicon film on a foreign substrate under thermal stimulation. Upon a single pulse irradiation of the shaped laser beam, the thermodynamically unstable ultrathin silicon film is dewetted from the glass substrate and transformed to a nanodome. The results suggest that the laser beam shaping strategy for the thermocapillary-induced de-wetting combined with the isotropic etching is a simple alternative for scalable manufacturing of array of nanostructures.

  9. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  10. Peptide nanostructures in biomedical technology.

    PubMed

    Feyzizarnagh, Hamid; Yoon, Do-Young; Goltz, Mark; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2016-09-01

    Nanostructures of peptides have been investigated for biomedical applications due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties in addition to their excellent biocompatibility. Peptides may form fibrils, spheres and tubes in nanoscale depending on the formation conditions. These peptide nanostructures can be used in electrical, medical, dental, and environmental applications. Applications of these nanostructures include, but are not limited to, electronic devices, biosensing, medical imaging and diagnosis, drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. This review offers a discussion of basic synthesis methods, properties and application of these nanomaterials. The review concludes with recommendations and future directions for peptide nanostructures. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:730-743. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1393 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Rashad; Tekinay, Ayse B; Dana, Aykutlu; Guler, Mustafa O

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based nanomaterials have been utilized for various applications from regenerative medicine to electronics since they provide several advantages including easy synthesis methods, numerous routes for functionalization and biomimicry of secondary structures of proteins which leads to design of self-assembling peptide molecules to form nanostructures. Microscopic characterization at nanoscale is critical to understand processes directing peptide molecules to self-assemble and identify structure-function relationship of the nanostructures. Here, fundamental studies in microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures are discussed to provide insights in widely used microscopy tools. In this review, we will encompass characterization studies of peptide nanostructures with modern microscopes, such as TEM, SEM, AFM, and advanced optical microscopy techniques. We will also mention specimen preparation methods and describe interpretation of the images.

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Magnetic surface nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, A.; Skomski, R.; Honolka, J.

    2010-11-01

    Recent trends in the emerging field of surface-supported magnetic nanostructures are reviewed. Current strategies for nanostructure synthesis are summarized, followed by a predominantly theoretical description of magnetic phenomena in surface magnetic structures and a review of experimental research in this field. Emphasis is on Fe- or Co-based nanostructures in various low-dimensional geometries, which are studied as model systems to explore the effects of dimensionality, atomic coordination, chemical bonds, alloying and, most importantly, interactions with the supporting substrate on the magnetism. This review also includes a discussion of closely related systems, such as 3d element impurities integrated into organic networks, surface-supported Fe-based molecular magnets, Kondo systems or 4d element nanostructures that exhibit emergent magnetism, thereby bridging the traditional areas of surface science, molecular physics and nanomagnetism.

  13. Nanostructured Materials for Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose overall objective is to advance the fundamental understanding of novel photoelectronic organic device structures integrated with inorganic nanostructures, while also expanding the general field of nanomaterials for renewable energy devices and systems.

  14. Novel Internal Friction of Amorphous Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao

    1998-03-01

    Owing to the great sensitivity of the double-paddle oscillators, we have recently measured the low-temperature internal friction of amorphous silicon films (X. Liu, B. E. White, Jr., R. O. Pohl, E. Iwanizcko, K. M. Jones, A. H. Mahan, B. N. Nelson, R. S. Crandall, S. Veprek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), 4418 (1997). While e-beam evaporation, sputtering, or Si^+ ion implantation produce a-Si films with similar tunneling states as in all amorphous solids, hydrogenated a-Si films with 1 at.% H prepared by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition show no sign of any significant low energy excitations. This observation offers an exciting opportunity to study the structural origin of the low energy excitations common to amorphous solids. A possible explanation is that in the hydrogenated films the amorphous structure is closer to the fourfold coordinated continuous random network expected in amorphous Si, and thus the lattice is more constrained, resulting in the absence of tunneling states.

  15. SURVIVAL OF AMORPHOUS WATER ICE ON CENTAURS

    SciTech Connect

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie

    2012-10-01

    Centaurs are believed to be Kuiper Belt objects in transition between Jupiter and Neptune before possibly becoming Jupiter family comets. Some indirect observational evidence is consistent with the presence of amorphous water ice in Centaurs. Some of them also display a cometary activity, probably triggered by the crystallization of the amorphous water ice, as suggested by Jewitt and this work. Indeed, we investigate the survival of amorphous water ice against crystallization, using a fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model. Simulations are performed for varying heliocentric distances and obliquities. They suggest that crystallization can be triggered as far as 16 AU, though amorphous ice can survive beyond 10 AU. The phase transition is an efficient source of outgassing up to 10-12 AU, which is broadly consistent with the observations of the active Centaurs. The most extreme case is 167P/CINEOS, which barely crystallizes in our simulations. However, amorphous ice can be preserved inside Centaurs in many heliocentric distance-obliquity combinations, below a {approx}5-10 m crystallized crust. We also find that outgassing due to crystallization cannot be sustained for a time longer than 10{sup 4}-10{sup 4} years, leading to the hypothesis that active Centaurs might have recently suffered from orbital changes. This could be supported by both observations (although limited) and dynamical studies.

  16. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  17. Modeling of amorphous SiCxO6/5 by classical molecular dynamics and first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ningbo; Zhang, Miao; Zhou, Hongming; Xue, Wei

    2017-02-14

    Polymer-derived silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) presents excellent performance for high temperature and lithium-ion battery applications. Current experiments have provided some information on nano-structure of SiCO, while it is very challenging for experiments to take further insight into the molecular structure and its relationship with properties of materials. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) based on empirical potential and first principle calculation were combined to investigate amorphous SiCxO6/5 ceramics. The amorphous structures of SiCO containing silicon-centered mix bond tetrahedrons and free carbon were successfully reproduced. The calculated radial distribution, angular distribution and Young's modulus were validated by current experimental data, and more details on molecular structure were discussed. The change in the slope of Young's modulus is related to the glass transition temperature of the material. The proposed modeling approach can be used to predict the properties of SiCO with different compositions.

  18. Factor analysis of 27Al MAS NMR spectra for identifying nanocrystalline phases in amorphous geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Martina; Kobera, Libor; Brus, Jiri

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructured materials offer enhanced physicochemical properties because of the large interfacial area. Typically, geopolymers with specifically synthesized nanosized zeolites are a promising material for the sorption of pollutants. The structural characterization of these aluminosilicates, however, continues to be a challenge. To circumvent complications resulting from the amorphous character of the aluminosilicate matrix and from the low concentrations of nanosized crystallites, we have proposed a procedure based on factor analysis of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra. The capability of the proposed method was tested on geopolymers that exhibited various tendencies to crystallize (i) completely amorphous systems, (ii) X-ray amorphous systems with nanocrystalline phases, and (iii) highly crystalline systems. Although the recorded (27)Al MAS NMR spectra did not show visible differences between the amorphous systems (i) and the geopolymers with the nanocrystalline phase (ii), the applied factor analysis unambiguously distinguished these materials. The samples were separated into the well-defined clusters, and the systems with the evolving crystalline phase were identified even before any crystalline fraction was detected by X-ray powder diffraction. Reliability of the proposed procedure was verified by comparing it with (29)Si MAS NMR spectra. Factor analysis of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra thus has the ability to reveal spectroscopic features corresponding to the nanocrystalline phases. Because the measurement time of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra is significantly shorter than that of (29)Si MAS NMR data, the proposed procedure is particularly suitable for the analysis of large sets of specifically synthesized geopolymers in which the formation of the limited fractions of nanocrystalline phases is desired.

  19. Amorphous boron nanorod as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Changjian; Lau, Miu Lun; Barkholtz, Heather; ...

    2017-08-14

    We report an amorphous boron nanorod anode material for lithium ion batteries prepared through smelting non-toxic boron oxide in liquid lithium. Boron in theory can provide capacity as high as 3099 mAh g-1 by alloying with Li to form B4Li5. However, experimental studies of boron anode were rarely reported for room temperature lithium-ion batteries. Among the reported studies the electrochemical activity and cycling performance of bulk crystalline boron anode material are poor at room temperature. In this work, we developed amorphous nanostructured one-dimensional (1D) boron material aiming at improving lithium ion diffusion in boron at room temperature. The amorphous boronmore » nanorod anode exhibited, at room temperature, a reversible capacity of 170 mAh g-1 at a current rate of 10 mA g-1 between 0.01 and 2 V. The anode also demonstrated good rate capability and cycling stability. Lithium storage mechanism was investigated by both sweep voltammetry measurements and galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT). The sweep voltammetric analysis suggested that the contributions from lithium ions diffusion into boron as well as the capacitive process are 42.44% and 57.56%, respectively. Results from GITT indicated that the discharge capacity at higher potentials (> ~ 0.2 V vs, Li/Li+) could be ascribed to a capacitive process and at lower potentials (< ~0.2 V vs, Li/Li+) to diffusion control. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement further confirmed that the capacity is from electrochemical reactions between lithium ions and the amorphous boron nanorod.« less

  20. Nanostructure-induced DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ting; Llizo, Axel; Wang, Chen; Xu, Guiying; Yang, Yanlian

    2013-08-01

    The control of the DNA condensation process is essential for compaction of DNA in chromatin, as well as for biological applications such as nonviral gene therapy. This review endeavours to reflect the progress of investigations on DNA condensation effects of nanostructure-based condensing agents (such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, cationic polymer and peptide agents) observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other techniques. The environmental effects on structural characteristics of nanostructure-induced DNA condensates are also discussed.

  1. Surface plasmon effects in the absorption enhancements of amorphous silicon solar cells with periodical metal nanowall and nanopillar structures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yu; Kuo, Yang; Liao, Cheng-Yuan; Yang, C C; Kiang, Yean-Woei

    2012-01-02

    The authors numerically investigate the absorption enhancement of an amorphous Si solar cell, in which a periodical one-dimensional nanowall or two-dimensional nanopillar structure of the Ag back-reflector is fabricated such that a dome-shaped grating geometry is formed after Si deposition and indium-tin-oxide coating. In this investigation, the effects of surface plasmon (SP) interaction in such a metal nanostructure are of major concern. Absorption enhancement in most of the solar spectral range of significant amorphous Si absorption (320-800 nm) is observed in a grating solar cell. In the short-wavelength range of high amorphous Si absorption, the weakly wavelength-dependent absorption enhancement is mainly caused by the broadband anti-reflection effect, which is produced through the surface nano-grating structures. In the long-wavelength range of diminishing amorphous Si absorption, the highly wavelength-sensitive absorption enhancement is mainly caused by Fabry-Perot resonance and SP interaction. The SP interaction includes the contributions of surface plasmon polariton and localized surface plasmon.

  2. Moisture-induced surface crystallization of spray-dried amorphous lactose particles studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahlin, Denny; Berggren, Jonas; Alderborn, Göran; Engström, Sven

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to obtain mechanistic and kinetic information about the process of moisture-induced surface crystallization of single particles of amorphous lactose. Completely amorphous lactose particles were prepared by spray-drying a solution of alpha-lactose monohydrate, and moisture-induced crystallization was monitored for a bed of particles by microcalorimetry and for single particles by AFM. From the AFM images it was found that crystallization of the surface of single particles can be described in terms of a sequence of three events: an initial smoothening of the surface, formation of crystalline nanostructures dispersed in amorphous material, and growth of these structures to a complete crystalline surface. The surface roughness parameter rugosity was used to estimate the fraction crystalline surface, and the growth kinetics were found to obey the JMAK equation. The fraction crystalline surface at different times could also be estimated by determining the growth rate of individual crystals. It was concluded that AFM offers a unique means of visualizing the process of moisture-induced surface crystallization of amorphous particles and enables mechanistic and kinetic information about the process to be extracted. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yutao U. T.; Killian, Christopher E.; Olson, Ian C.; Appathurai, Narayana P.; Amasino, Audra L.; Martin, Michael C.; Holt, Liam J.; Wilt, Fred H.; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Crystalline biominerals do not resemble faceted crystals. Current explanations for this property involve formation via amorphous phases. Using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), here we examine forming spicules in embryos of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchins, and observe a sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC·H2O) → dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) → calcite. Unexpectedly, we find ACC·H2O-rich nanoparticles that persist after the surrounding mineral has dehydrated and crystallized. Protein matrix components occluded within the mineral must inhibit ACC·H2O dehydration. We devised an in vitro, also using XANES-PEEM, assay to identify spicule proteins that may play a role in stabilizing various mineral phases, and found that the most abundant occluded matrix protein in the sea urchin spicules, SM50, stabilizes ACC·H2O in vitro. PMID:22492931

  4. IUE observations of amorphous hot galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. A.; Hjellming, M. S.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Hunter, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Blue amorphous galaxies are star-forming, irregularlike systems which lack the spatially distinct OB stellar groups that are characteristic of most late-type galaxies. In order to better understand the nature of star-formation processes in these unusual galaxies, short-wavelength IUE spectra of the amorphous galaxies NGC 1705 and NGC 1800 have been obtained. It is found that NGC 1705 contains a normal mix of OB stars, which is consistent with the nearly constant recent star-formation rate inferred from new optical data. NGC 1800 is likely to have similar properties, and blue galaxies with amorphous structures thus do not show evidence for anomalies in stellar populations. The UV spectra of these galaxies and a variety of other hot extragalactic stellar systems in fact have similar characteristics, which suggests OB stellar populations are often homogeneous in their properties.

  5. Investigation of superconducting interactions and amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janocko, M. A.; Jones, C. K.; Gavaler, J. R.; Deis, D. W.; Ashkin, M.; Mathur, M. P.; Bauerle, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Research papers on superconducting interactions and properties and on amorphous materials are presented. The search for new superconductors with improved properties was largely concentrated on the study of properties of thin films. An experimental investigation of interaction mechanisms revealed no new superconductivity mechanism. The properties of high transition temperature, type 2 materials prepared in thin film form were studied. A pulsed field solenoid capable of providing fields in excess of 300 k0e was developed. Preliminary X-ray measurements were made of V3Si to determine the behavior of cell constant deformation versus pressure up to 98 kilobars. The electrical properties of amorphous semiconducting materials and bulk and thin film devices, and of amorphous magnetic materials were investigated for developing radiation hard, inexpensive switches and memory elements.

  6. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-06-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  7. Nanocrystalline silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Fauchet, P.M.; Tsybeskov, L.; Zacharias, M. |; Hirschman, K. |

    1998-12-31

    Thin layers made of densely packed silicon nanocrystals sandwiched between amorphous silicon dioxide layers have been manufactured and characterized. An amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattice is first grown by CVD or RF sputtering. The a-Si layers are recrystallized in a two-step procedure (nucleation + growth) for form layers of nearly identical nanocrystals whose diameter is given by the initial a-Si layer thickness. The recrystallization is monitored using a variety of techniques, including TEM, X-Ray, Raman, and luminescence spectroscopies. When the a-Si layer thickness decreases (from 25 nm to 2.5 nm) or the a-SiO{sub 2} layer thickness increases (from 1.5 nm to 6 nm), the recrystallization temperature increases dramatically compared to that of a single a-Si film. The removal of the a-Si tissue present between the nanocrystals, the passivation of the nanocrystals, and their doping are discussed.

  8. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  9. Amorphous/epitaxial superlattice for thermoelectric application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Akihiro; Thao, Hoang Thi Xuan; Shibata, Mamoru; Nakashima, Seisuke; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Hidenari; Kinoshita, Yohei; Ishikiriyama, Mamoru; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    An amorphous/epitaxial superlattice system is proposed for application to thermoelectric devices, and the superlattice based on a PbGeTeS system was prepared by the alternate deposition of PbS and GeTe using a hot wall epitaxy technique. The structure was analyzed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray analysis, and it was found that the superlattice consists of an epitaxial PbTe-based layer and a GeS-based amorphous layer by the reconstruction of the constituents. A reduction in thermal conductivity due to the amorphous/epitaxial system was confirmed by a 2ω method. Electrical and thermoelectric properties were measured for the samples.

  10. The Phagocytosis and Toxicity of Amorphous Silica

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Knecht, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Inhalation of crystalline silica is known to cause an inflammatory reaction and chronic exposure leads to lung fibrosis and can progress into the disease, silicosis. Cultured macrophages bind crystalline silica particles, phagocytose them, and rapidly undergo apoptotic and necrotic death. The mechanism by which particles are bound and internalized and the reason particles are toxic is unclear. Amorphous silica has been considered to be a less toxic form, but this view is controversial. We compared the uptake and toxicity of amorphous silica to crystalline silica. Methodology/Principal Findings Amorphous silica particles are phagocytosed by macrophage cells and a single internalized particle is capable of killing a cell. Fluorescent dextran is released from endo-lysosomes within two hours after silica treatment and Caspase-3 activation occurs within 4 hours. Interestingly, toxicity is specific to macrophage cell lines. Other cell types are resistant to silica particle toxicity even though they internalize the particles. The large and uniform size of the spherical, amorphous silica particles allowed us to monitor them during the uptake process. In mCherry-actin transfected macrophages, actin rings began to form 1-3 minutes after silica binding and the actin coat disassembled rapidly following particle internalization. Pre-loading cells with fluorescent dextran allowed us to visualize the fusion of phagosomes with endosomes during internalization. These markers provided two new ways to visualize and quantify particle internalization. At 37°C the rate of amorphous silica internalization was very rapid regardless of particle coating. However, at room temperature, opsonized silica is internalized much faster than non-opsonized silica. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that amorphous and crystalline silica are both phagocytosed and both toxic to mouse alveolar macrophage (MH-S) cells. The pathway leading to apoptosis appears to be similar in both

  11. Self-assembled nanostructured cellulose prepared by a dissolution and regeneration process using phosphoric acid as a solvent.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaoxia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Zhigang; Zhu, Jiaming; Feng, Li; Wu, Zongwei; Wang, Peng; Zeng, Xiaoxiong; Wu, Tao

    2015-06-05

    This report describes a "green" method for preparing self-assembled nanostructured cellulose through a dissolution and regeneration process. Cold phosphoric acid is used to dissolve cellulose in order to convert crystalline cellulose into its molecular form. Self-assembly of cellulose molecules into nanostructured cellulose is achieved by using water to regenerate cellulose. By controlling the temperature and time of the phosphoric acid treatment between dissolution and regeneration, the degree of polymerization and the degree of substitution of phosphorous for the regenerated celluloses can be tuned. As a result, cellulose nanofibers or nanospheres can be obtained when the treatment temperature is set to 5 or 50°C, respectively. X-ray analysis shows that the cellulose nanofibers are amorphous and that the cellulose nanospheres are structured similarly to cellulose II with crystallinity indexes between 56 and 73%. Our method offers a "green" process for preparing nanostructured celluloses in high yields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Atomic Bond Deficiency Defects in Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Aiwu; Shiflet, Gary J.; Poon, S. Joseph

    2012-10-01

    Atomic bond deficiency (BD) is considered to be characteristic structural defects in amorphous metals. They are the necessary feature of local atomic configurations that facilitate various atomic transports under different driving forces. Compared with vacancies in crystalline solids, they are "small" in terms of their formation energies, volume costs, and elementary steps involved in atomic transport. This article reviews the authors' recent efforts made to analyze how various local configurations containing BD are related to amorphous metal's unique characteristics, such as glass transition, diffusion, shear flow, and structural relaxation.

  13. Neutron scattering studies of amorphous Invar alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Baca, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews recent inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed to study the spin dynamics of two amorphous Invar systems: Fe/sub 100-x/B/sub x/ and Fe/sub 90-x/Ni/sub x/Zr/sub 10/. As in crystalline Invar Fe/sub 65/Ni/sub 35/ and Fe/sub 3/Pt, the excitation of conventional long-wavelength spin waves in these amorphous systems cannot account for the relatively rapid change of their magnetization with temperature. These results are discussed in terms of additional low-lying excitations which apparently have a density of states similar to the spin waves.

  14. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-02-15

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  15. Amorphous graphene: a realization of Zachariasen's glass.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Avishek; Wilson, Mark; Thorpe, M F

    2012-12-05

    Amorphous graphene is a realization of a two-dimensional Zachariasen glass as first proposed 80 years ago. Planar continuous random networks of this archetypal two-dimensional network are generated by two complementary simulation methods. In the first, a Monte Carlo bond switching algorithm is employed to systematically amorphize a crystalline graphene sheet. In the second, molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to quench from the high temperature liquid state. The two approaches lead to similar results as detailed here, through the pair distribution function and the associated diffraction pattern. Details of the structure, including ring statistics and angular distortions, are shown to be sensitive to preparation conditions, and await experimental confirmation.

  16. Radiation-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N. Q.; Sabochick, M. J.; Okamoto, P. R.

    1994-06-01

    In the present paper, important results of our recent computer simulation of radiation-induced amorphization in the ordered compounds CuTi and Cu4Ti3 are summarized. The energetic, structural, thermodynamic and mechanical responses of these intermetallics during chemical disordering, point-defect production and heating were simulated, using molecular dynamics and embedded-atom potentials. From the atomistic details obtained, the critical role of radiation-induced structural disorder in driving the crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformation is discussed.

  17. Amorphous Insulator Films With Controllable Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Warner, Joseph D.; Liu, David C.; Pouch, John J.

    1987-01-01

    In experiments described in report, amorphous hydrogenated carbon films grown at room temperature by low-frequency plasma deposition, using methane or butane gas. Films have unique array of useful properties; (a) adhere to wide variety of materials; (b) contain only carbon and hydrogen; (c) smooth and free of pinholes; (d) resistant to attack by moisture and chemicals; and (e) have high electric-breakdown strength and electrical resistivity. Two of optical properties and hardness of this film controlled by deposition conditions. Amorphous a-C:H and BN films used for hermetic sealing and protection of optical, electronic, magnetic, or delicate mechanical systems, and for semiconductor field dielectrics.

  18. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects.

  19. Magnetic Phases in Amorphous Alloys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Prosenjit

    In magnetic amorphous alloy with competiting exchange interactions, there exists a multicritical point (MCP) in the temperature (T) vs. concentration (x) phase diagram (x(,c), (theta)(,c)). In the present work, the static (equilibrium) magnetic response near the MCP is thoroughly investigated using low, d.c. fields (B(,a) < 10 Oe) in two systems of alloys: (I) Fe(,x)Ni(,75-x)P(,16)B(,6)Al(,3) and (II) Fe(,x)Ni(,80-x)P(,14)B(,6). From the measurements of the reversible magnetization M(x, T, B(,a)), the following notable results are found: (1) The phase diagram exhibits a non-montonic FM-SG transition line (i.e. T(,f)'s) in both the systems. (2) There is a dramatic change in the magnetic response as x goes across x(,c). (3) The magnetization collapses as M(,P) (TURN) (x - x(,c))('0.3(+OR-)0.1) when x (--->) x(,c)('+). (4) The peak susceptibility diverges as (chi)(,P) (TURN) (x(,c) - x)('-1.5(+OR-)0.2) when x (--->) x(,c)('-). (5) The results (2), (3), and (4) are highly suggestive of a percolation transition in the magnetic network at the critical concentration for ferromagnetism (i.e. x(,c)). (6) Dramatic changes in the transition temperatures and a perceptible shift in x(,c) are observed when normal boron is replaced by enriched boron ((TURN)100% B('11)) in the series (I) samples. (7) The non-linear susceptibility ((chi)(,H)) exhibits the expected divergence at T(,g) with 'universal' exponents in concentrated spin glasses. (8) In the latter, a divergence in the linear susceptibility ((chi)(,o)) is observed for the first time. This is attributed to the close proximity of the ferromagnetic phase at x(,c). The study of the irreversible moment M(,i) (x, T, B(,a)) reveals the following: (9) Depending on the various methods of preparation, it is possible to generate states with different values of M(,i) at low T, all of which are stable (metastable) in time. This implies non -ergodic behavior. (10) For re-entrants (x > x(,c)), the amount of freezing achieved viz. M

  20. Nanostructured photovoltaic materials using block polymer assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastroianni, Sarah Elizabeth

    Despite its potential as an abundant, sustainable alternative to non-renewable energy sources, solar energy currently is underutilized. Photovoltaics, which convert energy from sunlight into electricity, commonly are made from inorganic semiconductor materials that require expensive manufacturing and processing techniques. Alternatively, organic materials can be used to produce flexible and lightweight organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can be prepared using solution-based processing techniques. However, OPV devices are limited by low efficiencies and short lifetimes compared to their inorganic counterparts. In OPV systems, charge carriers are generated in the active layer via the separation of excitons (electron-hole pairs) at interfaces between donor and acceptor materials. Because excitons have a limited diffusion length (˜10 nm), they may recombine before reaching a donor-acceptor interface if domain sizes are large. This exciton recombination can limit device efficiency; thus, the design parameters for improved active layer morphologies include large interfacial areas, small size scales, and continuous conducting pathways. Currently, most OPV devices are prepared by blending donor and acceptor materials in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices, often resulting in non-ideal, process-dependent morphologies. Alternatively, the self-assembly of block polymers (BP)s offers a reproducible means to generate nanostructured active layers. The work presented in this dissertation examines the synthetic approaches to preparing BPs containing different electroactive materials: non-conjugated, amorphous poly(vinyl-m-triphenylamine) [PVmTPA] and conjugated poly(3-alkythiophene) [P3AT] p-type materials as well as fullerene-based n-type materials. The synthesis and self-assembly of a model poly(methyl methacrylate)- b-PVmTPA system is presented. This work was extended to synthesize PVmTPA BPs with complementary poly(methyl methacrylate- co-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [P