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Sample records for amorphous metallic coatings

  1. Amorphous metal formulations and structured coatings for corrosion and wear resistance

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA

    2011-12-13

    A system for coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements and applying the amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements to the surface by a spray. Also a coating comprising a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements. An apparatus for producing a corrosion-resistant amorphous-metal coating on a structure comprises a deposition chamber, a deposition source in the deposition chamber that produces a deposition spray, the deposition source containing a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements, and a system that directs the deposition spray onto the structure.

  2. Amorphous metal formulations and structured coatings for corrosion and wear resistance

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements and applying the amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements to the surface by a spray. Also a coating comprising a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements. An apparatus for producing a corrosion-resistant amorphous-metal coating on a structure comprises a deposition chamber, a deposition source in the deposition chamber that produces a deposition spray, the deposition source containing a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements, and a system that directs the deposition spray onto the structure.

  3. Bacterial adhesion on amorphous and crystalline metal oxide coatings.

    PubMed

    Almaguer-Flores, Argelia; Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra; Galicia, Rey; Rodil, Sandra E

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the influence of surface properties (surface energy, composition and topography) of biocompatible materials on the adhesion of cells/bacteria on solid substrates; however, few have provided information about the effect of the atomic arrangement or crystallinity. Using magnetron sputtering deposition, we produced amorphous and crystalline TiO2 and ZrO2 coatings with controlled micro and nanoscale morphology. The effect of the structure on the physical-chemical surface properties was carefully analyzed. Then, we studied how these parameters affect the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Our findings demonstrated that the nano-topography and the surface energy were significantly influenced by the coating structure. Bacterial adhesion at micro-rough (2.6 μm) surfaces was independent of the surface composition and structure, contrary to the observation in sub-micron (0.5 μm) rough surfaces, where the crystalline oxides (TiO2>ZrO2) surfaces exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria. Particularly, crystalline TiO2, which presented a predominant acidic nature, was more attractive for the adhesion of the negatively charged bacteria. The information provided by this study, where surface modifications are introduced by means of the deposition of amorphous or crystalline oxide coatings, offers a route for the rational design of implant surfaces to control or inhibit bacterial adhesion.

  4. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Blink, J; Choi, J; Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed that can be used to enhance the corrosion resistance of containers for the transportation, aging and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Iron-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials, and their stability at high neutron doses, enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for container applications, though the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas atomized powders and applied as near full density, non-porous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This paper summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers, and as neutron absorbers. Relevant corrosion models are also discussed, as well as a cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials.

  5. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Corrosion-Resistant Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J

    2007-07-18

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed that can be used to enhance the corrosion resistance of containers for the transportation, aging and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Fe-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials, and their stability at high neutron doses, enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for container applications, though the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas atomized powders and applied as near full density, non-porous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This paper summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers, and as neutron absorbers. Relevant corrosion models are also discussed, as well as a cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials.

  6. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D; Blue, Craig A; Rivard, John D.K.; Aprigliano, Louis F; Kohler, Leslie K; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J

    2013-09-03

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  7. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D.; Blue, Craig A.; Rivard, John D. K.; Aprigliano, Louis F.; Kohler, Leslie K.; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J.; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2013-07-09

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  8. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  9. Corrosion Characterization of Iron-Based High-Performance Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D; Branagan, D J; Blue, C A; Rivard, J K; Aprigliano, L F; Yang, N; Perepezko, J H; Beardsley, M B

    2005-03-21

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. One of these compositions, SAM1651, is discussed in detail to illustrate the promise of this general class of materials.

  10. Amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1984-01-01

    An improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  11. Metallic amorphous electrodeposited molybdenum coating from aqueous electrolyte: Structural, electrical and morphological properties under current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemla, Fatima; Cherrad, Djellal

    2016-07-01

    Molybdenum coatings are extensively utilized as back contact for CIGS-based solar cells. However, their electrodeposition from aqueous electrolyte still sophisticates, since long time, owing to the high reactivity with oxygen. In this study, we present a successful 30 min electrodeposition experiment of somewhat thick (∼0.98-2.9 μm) and of moderate surface roughness RMS (∼47-58 nm), metallic bright Mo coating from aqueous electrolyte containing molybdate ions. XRD analysis and Hall Effect measurements have been used to confirm the presence of Mo. The crystal structure of deposits was slightly amorphous in nature to body centred cubic structure (bcc) Mo (110), (211) and (220) face. Lattice parameters exhibit some weak fluctuated tensile stress when compared to the reference lattice parameter. Additionally, our calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with some previous works from literature. Discussions on the grain growth prove that they are constrained by grain boundary energy not the thickness effect. Further discussions were made on the electrical resistivity and surface morphology. Resonance scattering of Fermi electrons are expected to contribute towards the variation in the film resistivity through the carrier mobility limitation. However, studied samples might be qualified as candidates for solar cell application.

  12. Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic coatings: Engineering development: Progress report, October 1, 1985-October 1, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, D.J.; DiStefano, S.; Rameshan, R.

    1986-12-01

    Objective is to use sputter-deposited amorphous metallic coatings on alloys in heat recovery systems in power plants. It was found that chromium could be used as a substitute for ruthenium in MoRuB. The new alloy, MoCrB, has corrosion current two orders of magnitude lower than MoRuB. The effort to develop the parameters for depositing FeCrPC on steel was frustrated by a persistent pinhole problem. Two titanium-based alloys were developed which are equal to or better than the optimized FeCrPC alloy in terms of corrosion resistance. The potentiodynamic polarization characteristics of MoCrB and TiCrBC were measured over a range in temperature from 25 to 100/sup 0/C. The corrosion current increased with temperature as predicted by theory. The corrosion characteristics of MoCrB and TiCrPC were also tested in 1.0N HC1. Cost analysis of the magnetron sputtering coating process indicates that the process cost is in the range of $2.50 to $3.00 per square foot steel.

  13. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  14. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  15. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2009-11-17

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  16. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  17. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J

    2007-01-12

    This report describes the analysis and modeling approaches used in the evaluation for criticality-control applications of the neutron-absorbing structural-amorphous metal (SAM) coatings. The applications of boron-containing high-performance corrosion-resistant material (HPCRM)--amorphous metal as the neutron-absorbing coatings to the metallic support structure can enhance criticality safety controls for spent nuclear fuel in baskets inside storage containers, transportation casks, and disposal containers. The use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials to prevent nuclear criticality in transportation, aging, and disposal containers would be extremely beneficial to the nuclear waste management programs.

  18. Li metal coated with amorphous Li3PO4 via magnetron sputtering for stable and long-cycle life lithium metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liping; Wang, Qingji; Jia, Weishang; Chen, Shulin; Gao, Peng; Li, Jingze

    2017-02-01

    Lithium metal with high theoretical capacity (3860 mAh/g) and low operational voltage (-3.04 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode) reflects to be one of the most high energy density anodes for energy storage devices. While, its high chemical activity to continuously react with electrolytes causing low coulombic efficiency and formation of lithium dendrites leading safety concern limits practical applications. To conquer these challenges, amorphous Li3PO4 thin films with thickness of 0-200 nm are directly coated on the surface of Li metal foil via magnetron sputtering. The as-prepared Li3PO4 has almost insulated property with electronic conductivity of 1.4 × 10-10 S/cm and ionic conductivity of 2.8 × 10-8 S/cm. The conformal coating layer Li3PO4 can successfully suppress the lithium dendrites growth and improve its life span. The remarkable improvements of the Li3PO4-coated Li electrodes are mainly attributed to high chemical stability as well as amorphous nature of Li3PO4, which leads layer-by-layer growth Li film rather than islands form dendrites.

  19. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-20

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  20. Amorphous metallic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan; Veazey, Chris; Johnson, William L.

    2003-01-01

    The bulk glass forming alloy Pd43Ni10Cu27P20 is processed into a low-density amorphous metallic foam. Pd43Ni10Cu27P20 is mixed with hydrated B2O3, which releases gas at elevated temperature and/or low pressure. Very homogeneous foams are achieved due to the high viscosity of the alloy even at its liquidus temperature. By processing at the liquidus temperature and decreasing the pressure to 10-2 mbar, well-distributed bubbles expand to foam the material. Foam densities as low as 1.4×103 kg/m3 were obtained, corresponding to a bubble volume fraction of 84%. The bubble diameter ranges between 2×10-4 and 1×10-3 m. Thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry confirms the amorphous nature of the foam. Furthermore, it reveals that the foam's thermal stability is comparable to the bulk material.

  1. In vitro metal ion release and biocompatibility of amorphous Mg67Zn28Ca5 alloy with/without gelatin coating.

    PubMed

    Chan, W Y; Chian, K S; Tan, M J

    2013-12-01

    Amorphous zinc-rich Mg-Zn-Ca alloys have exhibited good tissue compatibility and low hydrogen evolution in vivo. However, suboptimal cell-surface interaction on magnesium alloy surface observed in vitro could lead to reduced integration with host tissue for regenerative purpose. This study aims to improve cell-surface interaction of amorphous Mg67Zn28Ca5 alloy by coating a gelatin layer by electrospinning. Coated/uncoated alloys were immersed and extracted for 3 days under different CO2. The immersion results showed that pH and metal ion release in the alloy extracts were affected by gelatin coating and CO2, suggesting their roles in alloy biocorrosion and a mechanism has been proposed for the alloy-CO2 system with/without coating. Cytotoxicity results are evident that gelatin-coated alloy with 2-day crosslinking not only exhibited no indirect cytotoxicity, but also supported attachment of L929 and MG63 cell lines around/on the alloy with high viability. Therefore, amorphous Mg67Zn28Ca5 alloy coated with gelatin by electrospinning technique provides a useful method to improve alloy biocompatibility.

  2. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Auda K.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  3. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, A.K.

    1979-07-18

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  4. HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C

    2007-12-04

    The infrastructure for transportation in the United States allows for a high level of mobility and freight activity for the current population of 300 million residents, and several million business establishments. According to a Department of Transportation study, more than 230 million motor vehicles, ships, airplanes, and railroads cars were used on 6.4 million kilometers (4 million miles) of highways, railroads, airports, and waterways in 1998. Pipelines and storage tanks were considered to be part of this deteriorating infrastructure. The annual direct cost of corrosion in the infrastructure category was estimated to be approximately $22.6 billion in 1998. There were 583,000 bridges in the United States in 1998. Of this total, 200,000 bridges were steel, 235,000 were conventional reinforced concrete, 108,000 bridges were constructed using pre-stressed concrete, and the balance was made using other materials of construction. Approximately 15 percent of the bridges accounted for at this point in time were structurally deficient, primarily due to corrosion of steel and steel reinforcement. Iron-based amorphous metals, including SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been developed, and have very good corrosion resistance. These materials have been prepared as a melt-spun ribbons, as well as gas atomized powders and thermal-spray coatings. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stabilities of these materials were found to be comparable to that of more expensive high-performance alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. These materials also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation

  5. Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.

    1984-11-29

    A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

  6. Defects in Amorphous Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    this map with a similar plot of the experimental data. An experimental deformation data map for Pd-based amorphous al- loys is shown in fig. 10. In the...Masumoto. I Mat. Sci. 12 (1977) 1927, [IgI T M Ha.es. J. W Allen. J. Tauc . B. C. Giessen and J. J. Hauser. Phys. Re. Lett. 41 i197s) 1282 [191 J

  7. Ultrathin amorphous coatings on lunar dust grains.

    PubMed

    Bibring, J P; Duraud, J P; Durrieu, L; Jouret, C; Maurette, M; Meunier, R

    1972-02-18

    UItrathin amorphous coatings have been observed by high-voltage electron microscopy on micrometer-sized dust grains from the Apollo 11, Apollo 12, Apollo 14, and Luna 16 missions. Calibration experiments show that these coatings result from an "ancient" implantation of solar wind ions in the grains. This phenomenon has interdisciplinary applications concerning the past activity of the sun, the lunar albedo, the ancient lunar atmosphere and magnetic field, the carbon content of lunar soils, and lunar dynamic processes.

  8. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-06-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  9. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  10. CORROSION STUDY OF AMORPHOUS METAL RIBBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, T; Day, S D; Farmer, J C

    2006-07-31

    Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The potential advantages of amorphous metals have been recognized for some time [Latanison 1985]. Iron-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove important for maritime applications [Farmer et al. 2005]. Such materials could also be used to coat the entire outer surface of containers for the transportation and long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel, or to protect welds and heat affected zones, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking [Farmer et al. 1991, 2000a, 2000b]. In the future, it may be possible to substitute such high-performance iron-based materials for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling cost savings in a wide variety of industrial applications. It should be noted that thermal-spray ceramic coatings have also been investigated for such applications [Haslam et al. 2005]. This report focuses on the corrosion resistance of iron-based melt-spun amorphous metal ribbons. Melt-Spun ribbon is made by rapid solidification--a stream of molten metal is dropped onto a spinning copper wheel, a process that enables the manufacture of amorphous metals which are unable to be manufactured by conventional cold or hot rolling techniques. The study of melt-spun ribbon allows quick evaluation of amorphous metals corrosion resistance. The melt-spun ribbons included in this study are DAR40, SAM7, and SAM8, SAM1X series, and SAM2X series. The SAM1X series ribbons have

  11. Flexible amorphous metal films with high stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Cao, C. R.; Lu, Y. M.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-01-01

    We report the formation of amorphous Cu50Zr50 films with a large-area of more than 100 cm2. The films were fabricated by ion beam assisted deposition with a slow deposition rate at moderate temperature. The amorphous films have markedly enhanced thermal stability, excellent flexibility, and high reflectivity with atomic level smoothness. The multifunctional properties of the amorphous films are favorites in the promising applications of smart skin or wearable devices. The method of preparing highly stable amorphous metal films by tuning the deposition rate instead of deposition temperature could pave a way for exploring amorphous metal films with unique properties.

  12. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J; Lee, C; Day, D; Wall, M; Saw, C; MoberlyChan, W; Farmer, J; Boussoufl, M; Liu, B; Egbert, H; Branagan, D; D'Amato, A

    2006-11-13

    Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, etc.). Neutron multiplication and the potential for criticality are enhanced by the presence of a moderator during cask loading in water, water incursion in accidents conditions during spent fuel storage or transport. To prevent nuclear criticality in spent fuel storage, transportation, and during disposal, neutron-absorbing materials (or neutron poisons, such as borated stainless steel, Boral{trademark}, Metamic{trademark}, Ni-Gd, and others) would have to be applied. The success in demonstrating that the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant material (HPCRM) can be thermally applied as coating onto base metal to provide for corrosion resistance for many naval applications raises the interest in applying the HPCRM to USDOE/OCRWM spent fuel management program. The fact that the HPCRM relies on the high content of boron to make the material amorphous--an essential property for corrosion resistance--and that the boron has to be homogeneously distributed in the HPCRM qualify the material to be a neutron poison.

  13. Preparation of the cast glass-coated amorphous magnetic microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, S. A.; Yaltychenko, O. V.; Kanarovskii, E. Yu.; Codescu, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, the cast glass-coated amorphous microwires manufactured by the Ulitovsky-Taylor method are studied. Interest in the cast glass-coated amorphous microwires has greatly increased in the last few years mainly due to their technological applications, in particular, as the sensor elements in the various devices. Technological aspects of the Ulitovsky-Taylor method for the preparation of the glass-coated microwires with the different radius are analyzed. It is essential that the microwires are manufactured using a rapid solidification technique. The geometrical characteristics of a microwire depend on the physical properties of a metal and of glass, the diameter of the initial glass tube, and the parameters of the heating inductor. The given method provides the microwire geometric parameters of within the wide ranges. Respectively, a metallic core diameter in these microwires can range from 0.5 to 70 μm, and their glass-coating thickness can be varied from 1 to 50 μm. Moreover, the length of the derivable samples can reach up to 104 m. The obtained microwires exhibit the magnetic properties, which are high dependent on the metallic core composition, and similarly as it was done here for the residual stresses, they can be expressed through the microwire geometric parameters.

  14. Method of making amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1982-01-01

    The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a low molecular weight (e.g., 1000-5000) thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  15. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing

  16. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  17. LEVELING METAL COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Gage, H.A.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for applying metallic coatings to a cylinder of uranium. An aluminum-silicon coat is applied by a process consisting of first cleaning the article by immersion for 5 minutes in 50% nitric acid at 65 C. The article then is dipped through a flux, prepared by adding 10% sodium fluoride to 90% of a flux comprising 53% potassium chloride, 42% lithium chloride, and 5% sodium chloride at 560 for 2 minutes and then directly into a molten metal bath comprising 99% aluminun and 12% silicon at 620 C for 3 minutes. While the coating is yet molten the article is transferred to a pair of steel rollers and rolled until the coating solidifies. By varying the composition of the flux other metals such as zinc, lead or the like may be coated on uranium in a similar manner.

  18. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, R.C.

    1985-02-11

    Disclosed are: amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M/sub 1/)/sub a/(M/sub 2/)/sub b/ wherein M/sub 1/ is at least one transition metal, M/sub 2/ is at least one main group metal and the integers ''a'' and ''b'' provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  19. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  20. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  1. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-09-19

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

  2. Atomic Bond Deficiency Defects in Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Aiwu; Shiflet, Gary J.; Poon, S. Joseph

    2012-10-01

    Atomic bond deficiency (BD) is considered to be characteristic structural defects in amorphous metals. They are the necessary feature of local atomic configurations that facilitate various atomic transports under different driving forces. Compared with vacancies in crystalline solids, they are "small" in terms of their formation energies, volume costs, and elementary steps involved in atomic transport. This article reviews the authors' recent efforts made to analyze how various local configurations containing BD are related to amorphous metal's unique characteristics, such as glass transition, diffusion, shear flow, and structural relaxation.

  3. Relationship between amorphous silica and precious metal in quartz veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrichhausen, N.; Rowe, C. D.; Board, W. S.; Greig, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Super-saturation of silica is common in fault fluids, due to pressure changes associated with fracture, fault slip, or temperature gradients in hydrothermal systems. These mechanisms lead to precipitation of amorphous silica, which will recrystallize to quartz under typical geologic conditions. These conditions may also promote the saturation of precious metals, such as gold, and the precipitation of nanoparticles. Previous experiments show that charged nanoparticles of gold can attach to the surface of amorphous silica nanoparticles. Thus, gold and silica may be transported as a colloid influencing mineralization textures during amorphous silica recrystallization to quartz. This may enrich quartz vein hosted gold deposits, but the instability of hydrous silica during subsequent deformation means that the microstructural record of precipitation of gold is lost. We investigate a recent, shallow auriferous hydrothermal system at Dixie Valley, Nevada to reveal the nano- to micro-scale relationships between gold and silica in fresh veins. Fault slip surfaces at Dixie Valley exhibit layers of amorphous silica with partial recrystallization to quartz. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) show amorphous silica can contain a few wt. % gold while areas recrystallized to quartz are barren. At the Jurassic Brucejack deposit in British Columbia, Canada we observe the cryptocrystalline quartz textures that may indicate recrystallization from amorphous silica within quartz-carbonate veins containing high grade gold. Comb quartz within syntaxial veins, vugs, and coating breccia clasts indicate structural dilation. Vein geometry is investigated to determine relative importance of fault slip in creating dilational sites. By comparing quartz-carbonate veins from the Dixie Valley to Brucejack, we can determine whether amorphous silica formed in different environments show similar potential to affect precious metal mineralization.

  4. Laser Processing of Fe-Based Bulk Amorphous Alloy Coatings on Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu; Dittrick, Stanley A.; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2013-11-01

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™), a solid freeform fabrication technique, was employed for the processing of Fe-based bulk amorphous alloy (Fe BAA) powder on titanium. One and two layers of the Fe BAA were deposited with the same processing parameters. SEM and XRD analyses of the Fe BAA coatings revealed the retention of the feedstock powder's amorphous nature. The mixing of the feedstock powder in the titanium substrate was very small. A crystalline-amorphous composite microstructure evolved from the laser processing in all types of coatings. The coatings were further laser remelted. The amorphous character was found to increase and the crystallites were found to grow during remelting. The Fe BAA coatings showed higher hardness and smaller wear volume compared to the Ti substrate. A further increase in these properties was observed after laser remelting treatment. During the wear testing in NaCl solution, Ti substrate showed intergranular corrosion, whereas the Fe BAA coatings showed signs of low and localized fretting corrosion in a saline environment. Our results demonstrate that using LENS™, amorphous coatings can be deposited on metallic substrates.

  5. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  6. METAL COATING BATHS

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

  7. Excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon on metallic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delachat, F.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Cayron, C.; Ducros, C.; Lerat, J.-F.; Emeraud, T.; Negru, R.; Huet, K.; Reydet, P.-L.

    2013-06-01

    An attempt has been made to achieve the crystallization of silicon thin film on metallic foils by long pulse duration excimer laser processing. Amorphous silicon thin films (100 nm) were deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on a commercial metallic alloy (N42-FeNi made of 41 % of Ni) coated by a tantalum nitride (TaN) layer. The TaN coating acts as a barrier layer, preventing the diffusion of metallic impurities in the silicon thin film during the laser annealing. An energy density threshold of 0.3 J cm-2, necessary for surface melting and crystallization of the amorphous silicon, was predicted by a numerical simulation of laser-induced phase transitions and witnessed by Raman analysis. Beyond this fluence, the melt depth increases with the intensification of energy density. A complete crystallization of the layer is achieved for an energy density of 0.9 J cm-2. Scanning electron microscopy unveils the nanostructuring of the silicon after laser irradiation, while cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals the crystallites' columnar growth.

  8. Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Riley, Robert E.; Newkirk, Lawrence R.; Valencia, Flavio A.

    1981-09-01

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000.degree. C. with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

  9. Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Riley, R.E.; Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

    1979-12-05

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000/sup 0/C with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

  10. Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic films of Mo49Cr33B18 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, R.; Distefano, S.; Fitzgerald, D.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic alloy films of Mo49Cr33B18 with a crystallization temperature of 590 C were deposited onto glass and quartz substrates by magnetron sputter-quench technique. The amorphous nature of the films was confirmed by their diffuse X-ray diffraction patterns. The deposited films are densely packed (zone T) and exhibit low stress and good adhesion to the substrate. Corrosion current of as-deposited coating of MoCrB amorphous metallic alloy is approximately three orders of magnitude less than the corrosion current of 304 stainless steel in 1N H2SO4 solution.

  11. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Reistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report # Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D

    2007-09-19

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  12. Castable Amorphous Metal Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Davis, Gregory L.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Shapiro, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    A revolutionary way to produce a mirror and mirror assembly is to cast the entire part at once from a metal alloy that combines all of the desired features into the final part: optical smoothness, curvature, flexures, tabs, isogrids, low CTE, and toughness. In this work, it has been demonstrated that castable mirrors are possible using bulk metallic glasses (BMGs, also called amorphous metals) and BMG matrix composites (BMGMCs). These novel alloys have all of the desired mechanical and thermal properties to fabricate an entire mirror assembly without machining, bonding, brazing, welding, or epoxy. BMGs are multi-component metal alloys that have been cooled in such a manner as to avoid crystallization leading to an amorphous (non-crystalline) microstructure. This lack of crystal structure and the fact that these alloys are glasses, leads to a wide assortment of mechanical and thermal properties that are unlike those observed in crystalline metals. Among these are high yield strength, carbide-like hardness, low melting temperatures (making them castable like aluminum), a thermoplastic processing region (for improving smoothness), low stiffness, high strength-to-weight ratios, relatively low CTE, density similar to titanium alloys, high elasticity and ultra-smooth cast parts (as low as 0.2-nm surface roughness has been demonstrated in cast BMGs). BMGMCs are composite alloys that consist of a BMG matrix with crystalline dendrites embedded throughout. BMGMCs are used to overcome the typically brittle failure observed in monolithic BMGs by adding a soft phase that arrests the formation of cracks in the BMG matrix. In some cases, BMGMCs offer superior castability, toughness, and fatigue resistance, if not as good a surface finish as BMGs. This work has demonstrated that BMGs and BMGMCs can be cast into prototype mirrors and mirror assemblies without difficulty.

  13. Metallic coatings on silicon substrates, and methods of forming metallic coatings on silicon substrates

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Hyde, Timothy A.; Fincke, James R.

    2008-03-11

    The invention includes methods of forming a metallic coating on a substrate which contains silicon. A metallic glass layer is formed over a silicon surface of the substrate. The invention includes methods of protecting a silicon substrate. The substrate is provided within a deposition chamber along with a deposition target. Material from the deposition target is deposited over at least a portion of the silicon substrate to form a protective layer or structure which contains metallic glass. The metallic glass comprises iron and one or more of B, Si, P and C. The invention includes structures which have a substrate containing silicon and a metallic layer over the substrate. The metallic layer contains less than or equal to about 2 weight % carbon and has a hardness of at least 9.2 GPa. The metallic layer can have an amorphous microstructure or can be devitrified to have a nanocrystalline microstructure.

  14. Internal stresses in wear and corrosion resistant amorphous metallic coatings of (W/0.6/Re/0.4/)76B24 and (Mo/0.6/Ru/0.4/)82B18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Lamb, J. L.; Williams, R. M.; Khanna, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Hard protective coatings in the W-Re-B and Mo-Ru-B alloy systems have been deposited by magnetron sputtering onto soda-lime glass and heat-treated AISI 52100 steel substrates. X-ray diffraction has confirmed the amorphous nature of the as-deposited coatings, and their crystallization temperatures were determined by differential thermal analysis to be 1000 and 790 C for W-Re-B and Mo-Ru-B coatings, respectively. Both coatings exhibit high microhardness; Mo-Ru-B, in addition, has excellent corrosion resistance by comparison with pure Mo at high anodic potentials. Attention is given to the influence of internal stresses on the protective properties of the coatings deposited under different conditions.

  15. Microstructure and tribological behavior of amorphous and crystalline composite coatings using laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peilei; Yan, Hua; Xu, Peiquan; Yu, Zhishui; Li, Chonggui

    2012-07-01

    Four composite coatings were fabricated by laser melting. Amorphous phase appeared in the Fe43.2Ni28.8B19.2Si4.8Nb4 and Fe43.2Co14.4Ni14.4B19.2Si4.8Nb4 coatings but not in the Fe30Co30Ni15B17Si8 and Fe39Ni36Mo2B18Si5 coatings. The growth of crystalline grain in the coatings was suppressed greatly due to the large cooling rates caused by fast laser scanning. But the crystallization in the coatings cannot be avoided completely and an amorphous and crystalline composite coating was formed in melted zone. Amorphous phase can increase the hardness of coatings greatly and the highest hardness is related to the amount of amorphous phase in the coatings. The amorphous and crystalline composite coatings exhibit excellent performance of abrasion.

  16. The corrosion resistance and neutron-absorbing properties of coatings based on amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevryukov, O. N.; Polyansky, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    The object of the present study was the corrosion-resistant amorphizing alloys with an increased content of boron for cladding the surface of metals, rapidly quenched alloys without boron for protective coatings on a high-boron cladding layer, as well as steel samples with a protective coating with a high content of boron and without boron. The aim of the work is to investigate the corrosion resistance of a coating in water at the temperature of 40 °C in conditions of an open access of oxygen for 1000 h, as well as the features of the microstructure of clad samples before and after the corrosion tests. New data on the corrosion resistance of Cr18Ni10Ti steel samples with a protective layer from a rapidly quenched alloy Ni-19Cr-10Si (in wt.%) on a high-boron coating have been obtained.

  17. Pulsed electrodeposition of Co-W amorphous and crystalline coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulukutla, Mrinalini; Kommineni, Vamsi Karthik; Harimkar, Sandip P.

    2012-01-01

    Replacement of hard chromium plating has been of particular interest to many industrial applications, including automotive, aircraft, and machinery parts that require high hardness and wear/corrosion resistance. Co-W alloy coatings, owing to their eco-friendly processing and high hardness/wear resistance, are promising for electrolytic chromium replacement. In the present study, pulsed electrodeposition of amorphous and crystalline Co-W coating is reported. Systematic investigations on the effect of pulse duty cycle and pulse frequency on development of surface microstructure, phases, composition, surface roughness, and micro-hardness are presented. Furthermore, detailed analysis of micro-/nano-mechanical (using ball-on-disc wear tester and nanoindentor) and corrosion (using potentiodynamic polarization method) behavior of optimized Co-W coatings is presented.

  18. Amorphous Ternary Diffusion Barriers for Silicon Metallizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Jason Sven

    1995-01-01

    Reactively sputtered from transition-metal silicide or boride targets in Ar/N_2 discharges, thin amorphous films of TM-Si-N (TM = Mo, Ta, Ti, or W) and W-B-N are investigated. Resistivity, density, stress, and structure are given as functions of composition, and in some cases, temperature. Transmission electron microscopy shows that most of the films are marginally amorphous with the scale of local order ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 nm. Small -angle scattering measurements reveal chemically dissimilary regions in the films. When fully nitrided, Si appears to be preferentially bonded to nitrogen in the form of Si_3N_4 in the TM-Si-N films, according to extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) measurements. By tests on shallow-junction diodes, 100-nm thick TM-Si-N barriers are able to prevent aluminum overlayers from spiking the Si substrate at temperatures above aluminum's melting point, 660^circC. The exceptional stability is partly attributable to a 3 nm, self-sealing AlN layer which grows at the TM-Si-N/Al interface. The performance of the TM-Si-N and W-B-N barriers with copper overlayers is equally impressive. At the proper compositions, 100-nm barriers prevent copper from diffusing into the junction at 800^circC or higher for a 30-min vacuum annealing. Diode failure typically corresponds to the crystallization temperature of the barrier, which can be reduced by the presence of copper. Preliminary diffusion measurements of Cu in Ta _{36}Si_ {14}N_{50} films by SIMS yield an approximate diffusivity constant of D_{CU} = (0.014 cm ^2/s) times exp(-2.7 eV/kT). A 10-nm-thick TM-Si-N barrier with a Cu overlayer on MOS capacitors reveals no penetration of Cu into SiO_2 during an 80 h bias-thermal-stress at 300^circ C and 1 MV/cm applied field. Through a microscopic four-point probe lithographically defined on a Cu/barrier/Cu trilayer stack, the specific contact resistances of barrier/Cu interfaces are determined for TM-Si-N, TiN, and W barriers. In all instances, the

  19. Amorphous Metals and Composites as Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Agnes, Gregory S. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A mirror or mirror assembly fabricated by molding, pressing, assembling, or depositing one or more bulk metal glass (BMG), bulk metal glass composite (BMGMC), or amorphous metal (AM) parts and where the optical surface and backing of the mirror can be fabricated without machining or polishing by utilizing the unique molding capabilities of this class of materials.

  20. An amorphous fluoropolymer: Next generation optical coating candidate

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Loomis, G.E.; Spragge, M.K.; Lindsey, E.L.; Rainer, F.; Ward, R.L.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1994-05-01

    Anti-reflective (AR) and high reflector (HR) optical coatings were made by physical vapor deposition (PVD) of Teflon AF2400, a perfluorinated amorphous polymer. The AR had the highest laser damage thresholds recorded for PVD coatings at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory damage facility. The HR was a multilayer of ZnS and AF2400. The bandwidth was 550 mn, centered at 1064 mn. Single layers of Teflon AF2400 deposited by PVD were characterized optically. The refractive index could be intentionally reduced below the bulk value by varying either deposition rate or substrate temperature. Scanning electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance observations indicated that morphological changes caused the variations in the refractive index rather than compositional changes.

  1. Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M B

    2008-03-26

    The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

  2. Origin of Magnetic Properties in Amorphous Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Magnetic Properties of Fe-Ni-B Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky, J. L. Walter, and H. H. Liebermann , IEEE Trans. on Magnetics MAG-15, 909 (1979). Also GE...Report 78CRD132. 2. "Formation and Magnetic Properties of Fe-B-Si Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky, J. J. Becker, J. L. Walter, and H. H. Liebermann ...Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky and H. H. Liebermann , J. Appl. Phys., to appear. Also GE Report 79CRD177. 4. "The Effect of Temperature on Magnetic

  3. Synthesis and Thermal Stability of Amorphous Be-B-X Alloy Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Wall, M A; Nieh, T G

    2004-10-14

    Amorphous Be-B-X alloys are vapor deposited as coatings. The microstructure and hardness of the Be-B-X coatings are examined using transmission electron microscopy and nanoindentation, respectively. Whereas a Be-B-2.5 at.% Cu amorphous coating is found to crystallize to a cubic Be-33 at.% B phase at 673 K, a coating of Be-B-1.8 at.% Fe-0.4 at.% Cr-0.3 at.% Co does not crystallize until at a higher temperature of 748 K. The hardness of the amorphous Be-B-X coating increases with B content but is less than its crystalline counterparts.

  4. Investigation of Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Iron-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Königstein, T.

    2017-02-01

    Because of their favorable thermophysical properties, good machinability and low material costs, iron-based coatings which exhibit a highly amorphous/nanocrystalline microstructure are currently in the focus of research. Considering the crystallization temperature of the material, iron-based coatings might be the next generation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for low-temperature systems, reducing thermal losses. The objective of this research project is the development of highly amorphous, iron-based coatings. For this purpose, amorphous feedstock materials with different chromium contents have been developed and characterized regarding their microstructures, phase compositions, crystallization temperatures and amorphous content. The results show that the amorphous content is reduced with increasing particle size and chromium content. The coatings were deposited by air plasma spraying (APS) and high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF). It is shown that all coatings exhibit amorphous structures. HVOF coatings show a smaller amount of amorphous content compared to the feedstock materials, indicating crystallization occurring in not fully melted particles or insufficient rapid cooling. The APS process can increase the amount of amorphous content compared to the feedstock material, as shown for x Cr = 15%. All coatings proof good thermal shock behavior. Lowest thermal diffusivity values were determined for APS coatings, which confirms the potential of iron-based TBCs.

  5. Mechanical properties and microstructure of TiC/amorphous hydrocarbon nanocomposite coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, W. J.; Tittsworth, R. C.; Rehn, L. E.; Materials Science Division; Louisana State Univ.

    2000-12-01

    Using the techniques of reactive magnetron sputter deposition and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) assisted hybrid physical vapor deposition (PVD)/chemical vapor deposition (CVD), we have synthesized a wide variety of metal-free amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H) and Ti-containing hydrocarbon (Ti-C:H) coatings. Coating elastic modulus and hardness have been measured by the technique of instrumented nanoindentation and related to Ti and hydrogen compositions. We show that both metal and hydrogen compositions significantly influence the mechanical properties of Ti-C:H coatings. The microstructure of Ti-C:H coatings is further characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. XANES spectroscopy and high-resolution TEM examination of Ti-C:H specimens shows that the dissolution limit of Ti atoms in an a-C:H matrix is between 0.9 and 2.5 at.%. Beyond the Ti dissolution limit, precipitation of nanocrystalline B1-TiC cluster occurs and Ti-C:H coatings are in fact TiC/a-C:H thin film nanocomposites. Measurements of the average Ti bonding environment in TiC/a-C:H nanocomposites by EXAFS spectroscopy are consistent with a microstructure in which bulk-like B1-TiC clusters are embedded in an a-C:H matrix.

  6. Bulk metallic glass coating of polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soinila, Erno; Sharma, Parmanand; Heino, Markku; Pischow, Kaj; Inoue, Akihisa; Hänninen, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) alloy with the composition of Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 was deposited by sputtering as thin films on several different engineering polymers and polymer composites. Polycarbonate, polymethyl methacrylate, polyamide 12, polyarylamide (50GF=50 % glass fibers), polyphenylene sulfide (30GF) and polybutylene terephthalate (30GF) were used as substrates. The microstructure of the deposited BMG coatings was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of XRD and SEM studies were consistent with amorphous microstructure. Elemental compositions of the coatings were verified by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Mechanical properties of the coatings were compared to copper mould cast BMG using nano- indentation tests with similar results. According to the cross-cut tape tests good adhesion was achieved between the studied BMG alloy and all other polymer substrates except polycarbonate. Nano-indentation results showed similar mechanical properties for coating and cast BMG. The results of this study look promising as they open new opportunities for BMG- polymer composite applications.

  7. Characterization of amorphous Co-P alloy coatings electrodeposited with pulse current using gluconate bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Parthasarathi; Seenivasan, H.; Rajam, K. S.; William Grips, V. K.

    2012-10-01

    Co-P alloy coatings were electrodeposited with pulse current using gluconate bath and characterized by XRD, FESEM, AFM, DSC and XPS. Co-P alloy coatings are amorphous in nature as demonstrated by XRD. FESEM exhibits the “cauliflower type” morphology that is distinctive of nanocrystalline metals and alloys. Co-P alloys are found to follow instantaneous growth mechanism as revealed by AFM studies. Two exothermic peaks at 320 and 340 °C in DSC profiles of Co-P deposit correspond to the crystallization of the deposit. Detailed XPS studies of these alloy coatings have shown that as-deposited coatings consist of Co metal as well as oxidized Co species. P has mostly been present as bulk alloy on the surface as Pδ- form. Increase in the amounts of Co metal and Pδ- are observed upon intermittent sputtering. No appreciable increase in microhardness is observed with increase in the phosphorous content, but it increases with heat treatment significantly.

  8. Amorphous metallizations for high-temperature semiconductor device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, J. D.; Perepezko, J. H.; Nordman, J. E.; Kang-Jin, G.

    1981-01-01

    The initial results of work on a class of semiconductor metallizations which appear to hold promise as primary metallizations and diffusion barriers for high temperature device applications are presented. These metallizations consist of sputter-deposited films of high T sub g amorphous-metal alloys which (primarily because of the absence of grain boundaries) exhibit exceptionally good corrosion-resistance and low diffusion coefficients. Amorphous films of the alloys Ni-Nb, Ni-Mo, W-Si, and Mo-Si were deposited on Si, GaAs, GaP, and various insulating substrates. The films adhere extremely well to the substrates and remain amorphous during thermal cycling to at least 500 C. Rutherford backscattering and Auger electron spectroscopy measurements indicate atomic diffussivities in the 10 to the -19th power sq cm/S range at 450 C.

  9. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  10. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, J.R.

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  11. Amorphous metal distribution transformers: The energy-efficient alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Garrity, T.F.

    1994-12-31

    Amorphous metal distribution transformers have been commercially available for the past 13 years. During that time, they have realized the promise of exceptionally high core efficiency as compared to silicon steel transformer cores. Utility planners today must consider all options available to meet the requirements of load growth. While additional generation capacity will be added, many demand-side initiatives are being undertaken as complementary programs to generation expansion. The efficiency improvement provided by amorphous metal distribution transformers deserves to be among the demand-side options. The key to understanding the positive impact of amorphous metal transformer efficiency is to consider the aggregate contribution those transformers can make towards demand reduction. It is estimated that distribution transformer core losses comprise at least 1% of the utility`s peak demand. Because core losses are continuous, any significant reduction in their magnitude is of great significance to the planner. This paper describes the system-wide economic contributions amorphous metal distribution transformers can make to a utility and suggests evaluation techniques that can be used. As a conservation tool, the amorphous metal transformer contributes to reduced power plant emissions. Calibration of those emissions reductions is also discussed in the paper.

  12. Anti-biofouling function of amorphous nano-Ta2O5 coating for VO2-based intelligent windows.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Guo, Geyong; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhou, Huaijuan; Shen, Hao; Yeung, Kelvin W K

    2017-04-28

    From environmental and health perspectives, the acquisition of a surface anti-biofouling property holds important significance for the usability of VO2 intelligent windows. Herein, we firstly deposited amorphous Ta2O5 nanoparticles on VO2 film by the magnetron sputtering method. It was found that the amorphous nano-Ta2O5 coating possessed a favorable anti-biofouling capability against Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an environmental microorganism model, behind which lay the mechanism that the amorphous nano-Ta2O5 could interrupt the microbial membrane electron transport chain and significantly elevate the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. A plausible relationship was established between the anti-biofouling activity and physicochemical nature of amorphous Ta2O5 nanoparticles from the perspective of defect chemistry. ROS-induced oxidative damage gave rise to microbial viability loss. In addition, the amorphous nano-Ta2O5 coating can endow VO2 with favorable cytocompatibility with human skin fibroblasts. This study may provide new insights into understanding the anti-biofouling and antimicrobial actions of amorphous transition metal oxide nanoparticles, which is conducive to expanding their potential applications in environmental fields.

  13. Abatement of Marine Coatings Containing Heavy Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-01

    in the abatement of heavy metal containing marine coatings. Funding for this...shipyards to be proactive in the area of heavy metal coating systems abatement as current regulations were not "user friendly" in shipboard applications.

  14. STRIPPING METAL COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Siefen, H.T.; Campbell, J.M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for removing aluminumuranium-silicon alloy bonded to metallic U comprising subjecting the Al-U -Si alloy to treatment with hot concentrated HNO/sun 3/ to partially dissolve and embrittle the alloy and shot- blasting the embrittled alloy to loosen it from the U.

  15. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

  16. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

  17. Structure and properties of an amorphous metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas D; Goodwin, Andrew L; Dove, Martin T; Keen, David A; Tucker, Matthew G; Barney, Emma R; Soper, Alan K; Bithell, Erica G; Tan, Jin-Chong; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2010-03-19

    ZIF-4, a metal-organic framework (MOF) with a zeolitic structure, undergoes a crystal-amorphous transition on heating to 300 degrees C. The amorphous form, which we term a-ZIF, is recoverable to ambient conditions or may be converted to a dense crystalline phase of the same composition by heating to 400 degrees C. Neutron and x-ray total scattering data collected during the amorphization process are used as a basis for reverse Monte Carlo refinement of an atomistic model of the structure of a-ZIF. The structure is best understood in terms of a continuous random network analogous to that of a-SiO2. Optical microscopy, electron diffraction and nanoindentation measurements reveal a-ZIF to be an isotropic glasslike phase capable of plastic flow on its formation. Our results suggest an avenue for designing broad new families of amorphous and glasslike materials that exploit the chemical and structural diversity of MOFs.

  18. Structure and Properties of an Amorphous Metal-Organic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Thomas D.; Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Keen, David A.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Barney, Emma R.; Soper, Alan K.; Bithell, Erica G.; Tan, Jin-Chong; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2010-03-01

    ZIF-4, a metal-organic framework (MOF) with a zeolitic structure, undergoes a crystal-amorphous transition on heating to 300°C. The amorphous form, which we term a-ZIF, is recoverable to ambient conditions or may be converted to a dense crystalline phase of the same composition by heating to 400°C. Neutron and x-ray total scattering data collected during the amorphization process are used as a basis for reverse Monte Carlo refinement of an atomistic model of the structure of a-ZIF. The structure is best understood in terms of a continuous random network analogous to that of a-SiO2. Optical microscopy, electron diffraction and nanoindentation measurements reveal a-ZIF to be an isotropic glasslike phase capable of plastic flow on its formation. Our results suggest an avenue for designing broad new families of amorphous and glasslike materials that exploit the chemical and structural diversity of MOFs.

  19. Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making

    DOEpatents

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  20. Coated metal articles and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  1. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Objects Including Amorphous Metal Using Techniques Akin to Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention fabricate objects including amorphous metals using techniques akin to additive manufacturing. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes an amorphous metal includes: applying a first layer of molten metallic alloy to a surface; cooling the first layer of molten metallic alloy such that it solidifies and thereby forms a first layer including amorphous metal; subsequently applying at least one layer of molten metallic alloy onto a layer including amorphous metal; cooling each subsequently applied layer of molten metallic alloy such that it solidifies and thereby forms a layer including amorphous metal prior to the application of any adjacent layer of molten metallic alloy; where the aggregate of the solidified layers including amorphous metal forms a desired shape in the object to be fabricated; and removing at least the first layer including amorphous metal from the surface.

  2. Manufacture of iron-based, amorphous coatings with high fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Königstein, T.

    2017-03-01

    Amorphous iron-based material have excellent corrosion behaviour, show good tribological performances and exhibit interesting thermophysical properties. The deposition as a coating system by thermal spraying technology is an innovative approach to manufacture these materials. In this study, the mechanical properties of three iron-based amorphous coatings with different chromium content xCr = 0, 5 and 15 at.% are presented deposited by means of High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Spraying. For the determination of the amorphous content the linear relationship between crystallization energy and amount of amorphous structures is used. Comparing the crystallization energies of amorphous ribbons manufactured by melt spinning to those of feedstock materials and free standing coatings, assumptions regarding the amorphous contents are drawn. The results show that the amorphous content in the feedstock material is influenced by the amount of chromium content. Furthermore, the amorphous content of all coatings do not exceed those of the feedstock materials. Powder xCr = 15 at.% and the corresponding coating exhibit smallest amount of amorphous structure, presumably due to a not fully melted state of the impacting particles. The values of fracture toughness of the coatings are determined by means of indentation and subsequent measurement of the crack lengths. Furthermore, values of indentation modulus and hardness are measured and compared to each other. While length of indentation cracks decreases with increasing chromium content, an increase in indention modulus and hardness is observed. In comparison to ceramic reference YSZ and the steel reference 1.4404, all amorphous coatings show promising properties such as low indentation crack lengths and high hardness.

  3. Quantification of corrosion resistance of a new-class of criticality control materials: thermal-spray coatings of high-boron iron-based amorphous metals - Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Shaw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-03-28

    An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was produced as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. Earlier studies have shown that ingots and melt-spun ribbons of these materials have good passive film stability in these environments. Thermal spray coatings of these materials have now been produced, and have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both atmospheric and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here.

  4. Caltech Center for Structural and Amorphous Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-10

    fracture resistance and subcritical-crack growth behavior in BMG’s and their composites. We have shown that hydrogen significantly increases the glass...Science des Materiaux , 2713], 2002 L. Shadowspeaker, M. B. Shah and R. Busch, "On the crystalline equilibrium phases of the Zr5 7 Nb 5 Cu 15 .4Ni12.6 A lI0...Lowhaphandu, L.A. Ludrosky, and J.J. Lewandowski "Fracture Resistance of Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be Bulk Amorphous Alloy",, TMS-AIME Fall Meeting, Cincinnati, OH

  5. Mechanics of Metals with Grain Sizes Approaching the Amorphous Limit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-31

    the structural and mechanical similarities and differences between amorphous and nanocrystalline metals. Both have exceptionally high strength , but...structure and mechanics of these materials, with the ultimate aim of consciously designing the next generation of high-performance structural metals... multiaxial loading conditions. We showed that neither of these materials obey the classical von Mises criterion, but must use a different criterion that is

  6. Unveiling the complex electronic structure of amorphous metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Århammar, C.; Pietzsch, Annette; Bock, Nicolas; Holmström, Erik; Araujo, C. Moyses; Gråsjö, Johan; Zhao, Shuxi; Green, Sara; Peery, T.; Hennies, Franz; Amerioun, Shahrad; Föhlisch, Alexander; Schlappa, Justine; Schmitt, Thorsten; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Wallace, Duane C.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Johansson, Börje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous materials represent a large and important emerging area of material’s science. Amorphous oxides are key technological oxides in applications such as a gate dielectric in Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor devices and in Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon and TANOS (TaN-Al2O3-Si3N4-SiO2-Silicon) flash memories. These technologies are required for the high packing density of today’s integrated circuits. Therefore the investigation of defect states in these structures is crucial. In this work we present X-ray synchrotron measurements, with an energy resolution which is about 5–10 times higher than is attainable with standard spectrometers, of amorphous alumina. We demonstrate that our experimental results are in agreement with calculated spectra of amorphous alumina which we have generated by stochastic quenching. This first principles method, which we have recently developed, is found to be superior to molecular dynamics in simulating the rapid gas to solid transition that takes place as this material is deposited for thin film applications. We detect and analyze in detail states in the band gap that originate from oxygen pairs. Similar states were previously found in amorphous alumina by other spectroscopic methods and were assigned to oxygen vacancies claimed to act mutually as electron and hole traps. The oxygen pairs which we probe in this work act as hole traps only and will influence the information retention in electronic devices. In amorphous silica oxygen pairs have already been found, thus they may be a feature which is characteristic also of other amorphous metal oxides.

  7. Magnetic anisotropy in rapidly quenched amorphous glass-coated nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Óvári, T.-A.; Rotărescu, C.; Atițoaie, A.; Corodeanu, S.; Lupu, N.; Chiriac, H.

    2016-07-01

    Results on the roles played by the magnetoelastic and magnetostatic anisotropy terms in the magnetic behavior of glass-coated magnetostrictive amorphous nanowires prepared by means of rapid solidification are reported. Their contributions have been analyzed both experimentally, through hysteresis loop measurements, and theoretically, using micromagnetic simulations. All the investigated samples exhibit a magnetically bistable behavior, characterized by a single-step magnetization reversal when the applied field reaches a critical threshold value, called switching field. The combined interpretation of the experimental and theoretical data allows one to understand the effect of the magnetoelastic term on the value of the switching field, on one hand, and the effect of the magnetostatic term on the nucleation mechanism on the other, both with an essential impact on the characteristics of the nanowires' magnetic bistability. The results are crucial for understanding the basic magnetic properties of these novel rapidly solidified ultrathin magnetic wires, as well as for tailoring their properties according to the specific requirements of various sensing applications.

  8. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  9. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  10. Interference Function of Crystalline Embryo Model of Amorphous Metals. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Tadashi; Fujita, Francisco Eiichi

    1982-07-01

    A simple and possible structural model of amorphous metals based on the concept of crystalline embryos is proposed. The quasi-crystalline clusters are supposed to exist in the liquid state, be enhanced during supercooling, and be frozen as the crystalline embryos in the amorphous state by rapid quenching. A model assembly of atoms containing the crystalline embryos and the boundary regions is constructed, and the pair correlation function and the interference function are calculated. The interference function of the b.c.c. embryo model is in good agreement with experimental ones. It is concluded that the structure of the boundary connecting the embryos plays an essential role as well as the ordered part in the embryos in the diffraction phenomena of the amorphous structures. The importance of chemical clusters and metalloid atoms is also suggested and discussed.

  11. A safer disposal of hazardous phosphate coating sludge by formation of an amorphous calcium phosphate matrix.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Blasco, I; Duran, A; Pérez-Nicolás, M; Fernández, J M; Sirera, R; Alvarez, J I

    2015-08-15

    Phosphate coating hazardous wastes originated from the automotive industry were efficiently encapsulated by an acid-base reaction between phosphates present in the sludge and calcium aluminate cement, yielding very inert and stable monolithic blocks of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). Two different compositions of industrial sludge were characterized and loaded in ratios ranging from 10 to 50 wt.%. Setting times and compressive strengths were recorded to establish the feasibility of this method to achieve a good handling and a safe landfilling of these samples. Short solidification periods were found and leaching tests showed an excellent retention for toxic metals (Zn, Ni, Cu, Cr and Mn) and for organic matter. Retentions over 99.9% for Zn and Mn were observed even for loadings as high as 50 wt.% of the wastes. The formation of ACP phase of low porosity and high stability accounted for the effective immobilization of the hazardous components of the wastes.

  12. Corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility of biodegradable surgical magnesium alloy coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yunchang; Jiang, Jiang; Huo, Kaifu; Tang, Guoyi; Tian, Xiubo; Chu, Paul K

    2009-06-01

    The fast degradation rates in the physiological environment constitute the main limitation for the applications of surgical magnesium alloys as biodegradable hard-tissue implants. In this work, a stable and dense hydrogenated amorphous silicon coating (a-Si:H) with desirable bioactivity is deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy using magnetron sputtering deposition. Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveal that the coating is mainly composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The hardness of the coated alloy is enhanced significantly and the coating is quite hydrophilic as well. Potentiodynamic polarization results show that the corrosion resistance of the coated alloy is enhanced dramatically. In addition, the deterioration process of the coating in simulated body fluids is systematically investigated by open circuit potential evolution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The cytocompatibility of the coated Mg is evaluated for the first time using hFOB1.19 cells and favorable biocompatibility is observed.

  13. Diamond Composite Films for Protective Coatings on Metals and Method of Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Composite films consisting of diamond crystallites and hard amorphous films such as diamond-like carbon, titanium nitride, and titanium oxide are provided as protective coatings for metal substrates against extremely harsh environments. A composite layer having diamond crystallites and a hard amorphous film is affixed to a metal substrate via an interlayer including a bottom metal silicide film and a top silicon carbide film. The interlayer is formed either by depositing metal silicide and silicon carbide directly onto the metal substrate, or by first depositing an amorphous silicon film, then allowing top and bottom portions of the amorphous silicon to react during deposition of the diamond crystallites, to yield the desired interlayer structure.

  14. Coating to enhance metal-polymer adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathi, A.; Mahulikar, D.

    1996-12-31

    An ultra-thin electroplated coating has been developed to enhance adhesion of metals to polymers. The coating was developed for microelectronic packaging applications where it greatly improves adhesion of metal leadframes to plastic molding compounds. Recent tests show that the coating enhances adhesion of different metals to other types of adhesives as well and may thus have wider applicability. Results of adhesion tests with this coating, as well as its other characteristics such as corrosion resistance, are discussed. The coating is a very thin transparent electroplated coating containing zinc and chromium. It has been found to be effective on a variety of metal surfaces including copper alloys, Fe-Ni alloys, Al alloys, stainless steel, silver, nickel, Pd/Ni and Ni-Sn. Contact resistance measurements show that the coating has little or no effect on electrical resistivity.

  15. Apparatus for production of ultrapure amorphous metals utilizing acoustic cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metals are produced by forming a molten unit of metal and deploying the unit into a bidirectional acoustical levitating field or by dropping the unit through a spheroidizing zone, a slow quenching zone, and a fast quenching zone in which the sphere is rapidly cooled by a bidirectional jet stream created in the standing acoustic wave field produced between a half cylindrical acoustic driver and a focal reflector or a curved driver and a reflector. The cooling rate can be further augmented first by a cryogenic liquid collar and secondly by a cryogenic liquid jacket surrounding a drop tower. The molten unit is quenched to an amorphous solid which can survive impact in a unit collector or is retrieved by a vacuum chuck.

  16. Controlled rejuvenation of amorphous metals with thermal processing.

    PubMed

    Wakeda, Masato; Saida, Junji; Li, Ju; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2015-05-26

    Rejuvenation is the configurational excitation of amorphous materials and is one of the more promising approaches for improving the deformability of amorphous metals that usually exhibit macroscopic brittle fracture modes. Here, we propose a method to control the level of rejuvenation through systematic thermal processing and clarify the crucial feasibility conditions by means of molecular dynamics simulations of annealing and quenching. We also experimentally demonstrate rejuvenation level control in Zr(55)Al(10)Ni(5)Cu(30) bulk metallic glass. Our local heat-treatment recipe (rising temperature above 1.1T(g), followed by a temperature quench rate exceeding the previous) opens avenue to modifying the glass properties after it has been cast and processed into near component shape, where a higher local cooling rate may be afforded by for example transient laser heating, adding spatial control and great flexibility to the processing.

  17. Overlay metallic-cermet alloy coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Levine, S. R.; Glasgow, T. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A substrate, such as a turbine blade, vane, or the like, which is subjected to high temperature use is coated with a base coating of an oxide dispersed, metallic alloy (cermet). A top coating of an oxidation, hot corrosion, erosion resistant alloy of nickel, cobalt, or iron is then deposited on the base coating. A heat treatment is used to improve the bonding. The base coating serves as an inhibitor to interdiffusion between the protective top coating and the substrate. Otherwise, the protective top coating would rapidly interact detrimentally with the substrate and degrade by spalling of the protective oxides formed on the outer surface at elevated temperatures.

  18. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, Arthur W.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

  19. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, A.W.

    1988-03-18

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides,e.g., transition metal carbonyl, such as nickel carbonyl and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit. 1 fig.

  20. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2008-01-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  1. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  2. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Joseph; Choi, Jor-Shan; Saw, Cheng; Haslam, Jeffrey; Day, Dan; Hailey, Phillip; Lian, Tiangan; Rebak, Raul; Perepezko, John; Payer, Joe; Branagan, Daniel; Beardsley, Brad; D'Amato, Andy; Aprigliano, Lou

    2009-06-01

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition, materials synthesis, thermal stability, corrosion resistance, environmental cracking, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, radiation effects, and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) and SAM1651 (Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6) have been produced as meltspun ribbons (MSRs), dropcast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of MSRs and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently, thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests; good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while the open-circuit corrosion potentials (OCPs) were simultaneously monitored; reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber and suitable for criticality-control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and Ni-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear

  3. Influence of Metal Properties on the Formation and Evolution of Metal Coatings During Mechanical Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Lu, Yun; Sato, Hiromasa; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Guo, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Powders of Cu, Ti, Ni, Fe, and Zn metals were used to prepare coatings on the surfaces of Al2O3 balls by the mechanical coating technique. The coated Al2O3 balls were characterized with XRD and SEM. The results showed that all the metal powders except Ni formed continuous metal coatings. The evolution of metal coatings during mechanical coating was also investigated. The analysis indicates that as long as continuous metal coatings can be formed, the evolution can fall into the following stages: nucleation, formation and coalescence of discrete islands, formation and thickening of continuous coatings, and exfoliation of continuous coatings. Electronegativity of the metal was shown to have a major effect on the adhesion of the tiny metal particles on the surfaces of the Al2O3 balls during the initial stage of mechanical coating. The lower the electronegativity of the metal, the greater the coverage of the metal on the Al2O3 ball and the easier the adhesion of the tiny metal particles. Further, the better the plastic deformability of metal, the easier the cold welding among metal powder particles and the greater the thickness of the continuous metal coatings.

  4. Ni-WC composite coatings by carburizing electrodeposited amorphous and nanocrystalline Ni-W alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, Saadia; Mehmood, Mazhar; Ahmad, Jamil; Aslam, Muhammad; Ahmed, Maqsood; Zhang, Zhi-dong

    2010-03-01

    In situ formation of tungsten carbide in the matrix of FCC nickel has been achieved by carburizing of the electrodeposited Ni-W alloy coatings. The size of the carbide particles ranges between 100 and 500 nm. The carbide phase is also present in the form of very small precipitates inside the nickel grains. The size of such precipitates is between 10 and 40 nm. The carburizing environment was created by introducing a flowing mixture of vaporized 95.5% alcohol (0.25 ml/min, liquid) and argon (0.5 L/min, gas) into the carburizing furnace. Supersaturated nature of electrodeposited amorphous and nanocrystalline alloys, in addition to high diffusivity, have been attributed for the formation of carbide phase in the deposits at a temperature range of 700-850 °C. The carbide-metal interface is clean and the composite coatings are compact. Hardness values up to about 1100 KHN are achieved. Hardness increases with tungsten content and carburizing temperature.

  5. Preparation and properties of amorphous titania-coated zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Min-Hung; Hsu, Chih-Hsiung; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2006-07-01

    Amorphous TiO 2-coated ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by the solvothermal synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles in ethanol and the followed by sol-gel coating of TiO 2 nanolayer. The analyses of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the resultant ZnO nanoparticles were hexagonal with a wurtzite structure and a mean diameter of about 60 nm. Also, after TiO 2 coating, the TEM images clearly indicated the darker ZnO nanoparticles being surrounded by the lighter amorphous TiO 2 layers. The zeta potential analysis revealed the pH dependence of zeta potentials for ZnO nanoparticles shifted completely to that for TiO 2 nanoparticles after TiO 2 coating, confirming the formation of core-shell structure and suggesting the coating of TiO 2 was achieved via the adhesion of the hydrolyzed species Ti-O - to the positively charged surface of ZnO nanoparticles. Furthermore, the analyses of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectra were also conducted to confirm that amorphous TiO 2 were indeed coated on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. In addition, the analyses of ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra revealed that the absorbance of amorphous TiO 2-coated ZnO nanoparticles at 375 nm gradually decreased with an increase in the Ti/Zn molar ratio and the time for TiO 2 coating, and the emission intensity of ZnO cores could be significantly enhanced by the amorphous TiO 2 shell.

  6. Amorphous structure evolution of high power diode laser cladded Fe-Co-B-Si-Nb coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanyan; Li, Zhuguo; Huang, Jian; Li, Min; Li, Ruifeng; Wu, Yixiong

    2012-11-01

    Fe-Co-B-Si-Nb coatings were fabricated on the surface of low carbon steel using high power diode laser cladding of [(Fe0.5Co0.5)0.75B0.2Si0.05]95.7Nb4.3 amorphous powders at three different scanning speeds of 6, 17 and 50 m/s. At each scanning speed, laser power was optimized to obtain low dilution ratio. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer and electron probe micro analysis were carried out to characterize the microstructure and chemical composition of the cladded coatings. Differential scanning calorimetry was also carried out to investigate the fraction of the amorphous phase. The results showed that dilution ratio and scanning speed were the two main factors for fabricating Fe-Co-B-Si-Nb amorphous coating by high power diode laser cladding. Low dilution ratio was crucial for the formation of amorphous phase. When the dilution ratio was low, the fraction of amorphous phase in the cladded coatings increased upon increasing the scanning speed.

  7. Bulk amorphous metallic alloys: Synthesis by fluxing techniques and properties

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi; Shen, Tongde; Schwarz, R.B.

    1997-05-01

    Bulk amorphous alloys having dimensions of at least 1 cm diameter have been prepared in the Pd-Ni-P, Pd-Cu-P, Pd-Cu-Ni-P, and Pd-Ni-Fe-P systems using a fluxing and water quenching technique. The compositions for bulk glass formation have been determined in these systems. For these bulk metallic glasses, the difference between the crystallization temperature T{sub x}, and the glass transition temperature T{sub g}, {Delta}T = T{sub x} - T{sub g}, ranges from 60 to 1 10 K. These large values of {Delta}T open the possibility for the fabrication of amorphous near net-shape components using techniques such as injection molding. The thermal, elastic, and magnetic properties of these alloys have been studied, and we have found that bulk amorphous Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 17.5}P{sub 20} has spin glass behavior for temperatures below 30 K. 65 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Plasma-Spray Metal Coating On Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molds, forms, and other substrates made of foams coated with metals by plasma spraying. Foam might be ceramic, carbon, metallic, organic, or inorganic. After coat applied by plasma spraying, foam left intact or removed by acid leaching, conventional machining, water-jet cutting, or another suitable technique. Cores or vessels made of various foam materials plasma-coated with metals according to method useful as thermally insulating containers for foods, liquids, or gases, or as mandrels for making composite-material (matrix/fiber) parts, or making thermally insulating firewalls in automobiles.

  9. Coating of calcia-doped ceria with amorphous silica shell by seeded polymerization technique

    SciTech Connect

    El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed . E-mail: el-toni@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Yin, Shu; Yabe, Shinryo; Sato, Tsugio

    2005-07-12

    Calcia-doped ceria is of potential interest as an ultraviolet (UV) radiation blocking material in personal care products. However, its high catalytic ability for oxidation of organic materials makes it difficult to use as a sunscreen material. Therefore, calcia-doped ceria was coated with amorphous silica by means of seeded polymerization technique in order to depress its oxidation catalytic ability. The catalytic ability as well as UV-shielding ability was investigated for coated particles.

  10. Cluster model of amorphized particles formation by plasma spraying of metallic powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakhtin, Boris K.; Nesterova, E. V.

    1999-05-01

    Multifunctional coatings from materials with amorphized microcrystalline or nano-phase structure cause a considerable scientific and practical interest. With their help it is to manufacture heat resistant neutralizers of harmful ejections, to produce ecologically clean sources of electric current, to design electromagnetic protective shields and to fabricate a lot of other technical products. The variety of application and a unique complex of operating characteristics (ductility, strength, magnetic and chemical properties) are governed by the basic peculiarity of material in amorphized state - its thermodynamic instability. In comparison with traditional thermodynamically equilibrium metallic alloys, the kinetics of structure changes in amorphous materials is quite different. Thus, it is suggested, that they have peculiar defects (phasonics) which are not typical of materials in crystalline state, they have no translational symmetry and elementary cells. In the process of coatings forming with non-equilibrium structure states can be realized in them, which are characterized by a fluctuation type of origin, entropy export, appearance of space or temporary symmetry uncertainty of the transition direction 'order $ARLR disorder' in bifurcation points. The aforesaid explains a great scientific (not only practical) interest in the structure study of disordered medium. Functional coatings with amorphized, nano- and microcrystalline structure components formed on copper substrate by plasma spraying of dispersed (to 50 mcm) Ni-Al powder. According to the constitutional diagram it was expected to obtain a mixture from equilibrium intermetallide phases NiAl3 + Ni2Al3. The experimental results and investigations performed by X-ray structure, X-ray spectrum and electron microscopy techniques have shown it is possible to obtain phases of variable composition (Ni)m(Al)n with Ni content from 25 to 75 vol.%, including NiAl. It turned out that in the process of spraying the

  11. Application of amorphous carbon based materials as antireflective coatings on crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, D. S.; Côrtes, A. D. S.; Oliveira, M. H.; Motta, E. F.; Viana, G. A.; Mei, P. R.; Marques, F. C.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the investigation of the potential application of different forms of amorphous carbon (a-C and a-C:H) as an antireflective coating for crystalline silicon solar cells. Polymeric-like carbon (PLC) and hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) was deposited by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique. Those three different amorphous carbon structures were individually applied as single antireflective coatings on conventional (polished and texturized) p-n junction crystalline silicon solar cells. Due to their optical properties, good results were also obtained for double-layer antireflective coatings based on PLC or ta-C films combined with different materials. The results are compared with a conventional tin dioxide (SnO2) single-layer antireflective coating and zinc sulfide/magnesium fluoride (ZnS/MgF2) double-layer antireflective coatings. An increase of 23.7% in the short-circuit current density, Jsc, was obtained using PLC as an antireflective coating and 31.7% was achieved using a double-layer of PLC with a layer of magnesium fluoride (MgF2). An additional increase of 10.8% was obtained in texturized silicon, representing a total increase (texturization + double-layer) of about 40% in the short-circuit current density. The potential use of these materials are critically addressed considering their refractive index, optical bandgap, absorption coefficient, hardness, chemical inertness, and mechanical stability.

  12. Platinum Group Coatings for Refractory Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    Currently the only effective materials available for oxidation protective coatings are silicide -based, These materials are not without their...the silicide and the base metal, repeated temperature cycling results in craching of the coating which allows oxygen to diffuse into the cracks and...ultimately destroy the base material. The upper limit for silicide coatings is approximately 1400 0 C but at these temperatures evaporation of the

  13. Amorphous Ti-Zr; Base Metglas brazing filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinkin, A.; Liebermann, H.; Pounds, S.; Taylor, T. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is the first report on processing, properties and potential application of amorphous titanium/zirconium-base alloys produced in the form of a good quality continuous and ductile ribbon having up to 12.5 mm width. To date, the majority of titanium brazing is accomplished using cooper and aluminum-base brazing filler metals. The brazements produced with these filler metals have rather low ({approximately}300{degrees} C) service temperature, thus impeding progress in aircraft and other technologies and industries. The attempt to develop a generation of high temperature brazing filler metals was made in the late sixties-early seventies studies in detail were a large number of Ti-, Zr-Ti-Zr, Ti-V and Zr-V-Ti based alloys. The majority of these alloys has copper and nickel as melting temperature depressants. The presence of nickel and copper converts them into eutectic alloys having (Ti(Zr)) (Cu(Ni)), intermetallic phases as major structural constituents. This, in turn, results in high alloy brittleness and poor, if any, processability by means of conventional, i.e. melting-ingot casting-deformation technology. In spite of good wettability and high joint strength achieved in dozens of promising alloys, only Ti-15Cu-15Ni is now widely used as a brazing filler metal for high service temperature. Up until now this material could not be produced as a homogeneous foil and is instead applied as a clad strip consisting of three separate metallic layers.

  14. Post-treatment of Plasma-Sprayed Amorphous Ceramic Coatings by Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chraska, T.; Pala, Z.; Mušálek, R.; Medřický, J.; Vilémová, M.

    2015-04-01

    Alumina-zirconia ceramic material has been plasma sprayed using a water-stabilized plasma torch to produce free standing coatings. The as-sprayed coatings have very low porosity and are mostly amorphous. The amorphous material crystallizes at temperatures above 900 °C. A spark plasma sintering apparatus has been used to heat the as-sprayed samples to temperatures above 900 °C to induce crystallization, while at the same time, a uniaxial pressure of 80 MPa has been applied to their surface. After such post-treatment, the ceramic samples are crystalline and have very low open porosity. The post-treated material exhibits high hardness and significantly increased flexural strength. The post-treated samples have a microstructure that is best described as nanocomposite with the very small crystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix.

  15. Barrier coated drug layered particles for enhanced performance of amorphous solid dispersion dosage form.

    PubMed

    Puri, Vibha; Dantuluri, Ajay K; Bansal, Arvind K

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) may entail tailor-made dosage form design to exploit their solubility advantage. Surface phenomena dominated the performance of amorphous celecoxib solid dispersion (ACSD) comprising of amorphous celecoxib (A-CLB), polyvinylpyrrolidone, and meglumine (7:2:1, w/w). ACSD cohesive interfacial interactions hindered its capsule dosage form dissolution (Puri V, Dhantuluri AK, Bansal AK 2011. J Pharm Sci 100:2460-2468). Furthermore, ACSD underwent significant devitrification under environmental stress. In the present study, enthalpy relaxation studies revealed its free surface to contribute to molecular mobility. Based on all these observations, barrier coated amorphous CLB solid dispersion layered particles (ADLP) were developed by Wurster process, using microcrystalline cellulose as substrate and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), inulin, and polyvinyl acetate phthalate (PVAP) as coating excipients. Capsule formulations of barrier coated-ADLP could achieve rapid dispersibility and high drug release. Evaluation under varying temperature and RH conditions suggested the crystallization inhibitory efficiency in order of inulin < PVA ≈ PVAP; however, under only temperature treatment, crystallization inhibition increased with increase in T(g) of the coating material. Simulated studies using DSC evidenced drug-polymer mixing at the interface as a potential mechanism for surface stabilization. In conclusion, surface modification yielded a fast dispersing robust high drug load ASD based dosage form.

  16. Environmental Integrity of Coating/Metal Interface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    carbon steel 19 ABSTRACT Cont,nue on reverse f necessary and ’dentify block numbeI Corrosion of polymer coated steel in neutral media entails the...34,50 Mm blisters. Concentration of NaOH in the microblister weakens the polymer metal interface while the osmotic pressure in the microblisters...this program is to develop new concepts for promoting the stability of polymer coat- ing/metal systems based on observed fundamental molecular and

  17. Metallized coatings for pressure vessel corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Hankirk, M. ); Hansen, D.S. )

    1994-09-01

    Metallized coatings have been successful for many years in providing sacrificial protection to pressure vessels in high-temperature applications in which they are susceptible to localized corrosion, hydrogen blistering, erosion, and pitting. In addition, when corrosion allowances have decreased or have been eliminated after many years of service, metallized coatings can be used to restore the allowances and extend the life of the equipment.

  18. Microstructure and property of Fe-Co-B-Si-C-Nb amorphous composite coating fabricated by laser cladding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. Y.; Li, Z. G.; Li, R. F.; Li, M.; Daze, X. L.; Feng, K.; Wu, Y. X.

    2013-09-01

    Laser cladding of Fe34Co34B20Si5C3Nb4 on a low carbon steel substrate was conducted using coaxial powder feeding method. Microstructure, phase and microhardness were investigated by scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe micro-analysis and microhardness tester. Amorphous coating with NbC particles embedded in the matrix was formed. Differential scanning calorimetry curve showed that the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the onset crystallization temperature (Tx) were 799 K and 850 K, respectively. The supercooled liquid region (ΔTx = Tx - Tg) was as large as 51 K, which implied the high thermal stability of the supercooled liquid against crystallization. Due to the NbC particles embedded in the amorphous matrix, the mean value of the microhardness of the coating prepared by laser cladding was higher than that of the bulk metallic glass formed by the copper mold casting method. The contribution of NbC particles to the total microhardness was theoretically estimated. The estimated hardness of the composite coating agreed well with the tested value.

  19. Eddy Current Assessment of Duplex Metallic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzywosz, K. J.

    2004-02-01

    EPRI is involved in a multi-year program with the Department of Energy to test, evaluate, and develop a field-deployable eddy current NDE system for life assessment of blade coatings for advanced gas turbines. The coatings evaluated from these advanced GE engines include CoCrAlY (GT 29) and NiCoCrAlY (GT 33) bond coats followed by top aluminide overlay coatings. These duplex metallic coatings commonly referred to as GT 29+ and GT 33+ coatings, respectively. In general, during cycling and continuous operation at higher operating temperature, coatings fail due to spallation of protective oxide layers, leading to consumption of protective coating by oxidation and to eventual failure of blades. To extend service life of these critical rotating components, an inspection-based condition assessment program has been initiated to help establish more optimum inspection intervals that are not dependent on time-in-service maintenance approach. This paper summarizes the latest results obtained to date using the state-of-the-art frequency-scanning eddy current tester with a built-in three-layer inversion analysis algorithm. Significant progress has been made in assessing and discriminating the duplex metallic coatings as normal, degraded, and/or cracked. In addition, quantitative assessment was conducted by estimating various coating and substrate conductivity values.

  20. Improvements in Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Fe-Based Amorphous Coating by Laser-Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chaoping; Chen, Hong; Wang, Gui; Chen, Yongnan; Xing, Yazhe; Zhang, Chunhua; Dargusch, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    Amorphous coating technology is an attractive way of taking advantage of the superior properties of amorphous alloys for structural applications. However, the limited bonds between splats within the plasma-sprayed coatings result in a typically lamellar and porous coating structure. To overcome these limitations, the as-sprayed coating was treated by a laser-remelting process. The microstructure and phase composition of two coatings were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The wear resistance of the plasma-sprayed coating and laser-remelted coating was studied comparatively using a pin-on-disc wear test under dry friction conditions. It was revealed that the laser-remelted coating exhibited better wear resistance because of its defect-free and amorphous-nanocrystalline composited structure.

  1. Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, S.; Koenig, D. E.; Dardi, L. E.

    1981-10-01

    Recognizing the fundamental cost advantage, technical capabilities, and compositional flexibility of reduced pressure (vacuum) plasma spraying compared to other overlay coating methods, an advanced, second generation, closed chamber deposition process called VPX (a Howmet trademark) was developed. An automated experimental facility for coating gas turbine engine components was also constructed. This paper describes several important features of the process and equipment. It shows that the use of optimized spray parameters combined with an appropriate schedule of relative orientations between the gun and work-piece can be used to produce dense and highly reproducible coatings of either uniform or controlled thickness distributions. The chemical composition, microstructure, and interfacial characteristics of typical MCrAlY coatings are reported. Some effects of operating procedures and MCrAlY chemical composition on coating density are noted. The results of mechanical property and burner rig tests of coated material are also described.

  2. Molecular Level Coating for Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); Saint Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar aprotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper, making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  3. Molecular Level Coating of Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar osmotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing, synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper. making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  4. Remarkably stable amorphous metal oxide grown on Zr-Cu-Be metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ka Ram; Kim, Chang Eun; Yun, Young Su; Kim, Won Tae; Soon, Aloysius; Kim, Do Hyang

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of an aliovalent dopant upon stabilizing the amorphous oxide film. We added beryllium into the Zr50Cu50 metallic glass system, and found that the amorphous oxide layer of Be-rich phase can be stabilized even at elevated temperature above Tg of the glass matrix. The thermal stability of the amorphous oxide layer is substantially enhanced due to Be addition. As confirmed by high-temperature cross-section HR-TEM, fully disordered Be-added amorphous layer is observed, while the rapid crystallization is observed without Be. To understand the role of Be, we employed ab-initio molecular dynamics to compare the mobility of ions with/without Be dopant, and propose a disordered model where Be dopant occupies Zr vacancy and induces structural disorder to the amorphous phase. We find that the oxygen mobility is slightly suppressed due to Be dopant, and Be mobility is unexpectedly lower than that of oxygen, which we attribute to the aliovalent nature of Be dopant whose diffusion always accompany multiple counter-diffusion of other ions. Here, we explain the origin of superior thermal stability of amorphous oxide film in terms of enhanced structural disorder and suppressed ionic mobility due to the aliovalent dopant. PMID:26658671

  5. Characterization of microstructure and mechanical behavior of sputter deposited Ti-containing amorphous carbon coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, B.; Cao, D. M.; Meng, W. J.; Xu, J.; Tittsworth, R. C.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Doll, G. L.; Materials Science Division; Louisiana State Univ.; The Timken Company

    2001-12-03

    We report on the characterization of microstructure and mechanical properties of sputter deposited Ti-containing amorphous carbon (Ti-aC) coatings as a function of Ti composition. Ti-aC coatings have been deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition, in an industrial-scale four-target coating deposition system. The composition and microstructure of the Ti-aC coatings have been characterized in detail by combining the techniques of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and hydrogen elastic recoil detection (ERD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. At Ti compositions <4at.%, Ti atoms dissolve in an amorphous carbon (a-C) matrix. The dissolution limit of Ti atoms in an a-C matrix is determined to be between 4 and 8 at.%. At Ti compositions >8 at.%, XANES and EXAFS data indicate that the average Ti atomic bonding environment in Ti-aC coatings resembles that in cubic B1-TiC, consistent with TEM observation of precipitation of TiC nanocrystallites in the a-C matrix. Beyond the Ti dissolution limit, the Ti-aC coatings are nanocomposites with nanocrystalline TiC clusters embedded in an a-C matrix. A large scale, quasi one-dimensional composition modulation in the Ti-aC coatings was observed due to the particular coating deposition geometry. Elastic stiffness and hardness of the Ti-aC coatings were measured by instrumented nanoindentation and found to vary systematically as a function of Ti composition. Unlubricated friction coefficient of Ti-aC coatings against WC-Co balls was found to increase as the Ti composition increases. As Ti composition increases, the overall mechanical behavior of the Ti-aC coatings becomes more TiC-like.

  6. Refractive-index change caused by electrons in amorphous AsS and AsSe thin films doped with different metals by photodiffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nordman, Olli; Nordman, Nina; Pashkevich, Valfrid

    2001-08-01

    The refractive-index change caused by electrons was measured in amorphous AsS and AsSe thin films. Films were coated with different metals. Diffraction gratings were written by electron-beam lithography. The interactions of electrons in films with and without the photodiffusion of overcoated metal were compared. Incoming electrons caused metal atom and ion diffusion in both investigated cases. The metal diffusion was dependent on the metal and it was found to influence the refractive index. In some cases lateral diffusion of the metal was noticed. The conditions for applications were verified. {copyright} 2001 Optical Society of America

  7. METHOD FOR COATING GRAPHITE WITH METALLIC CARBIDES

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.A.

    1960-03-22

    A method for producing refractory coatings of metallic carbides on graphite was developed. In particular, the graphite piece to be coated is immersed in a molten solution of 4 to 5% by weight of zirconium, titanium, or niobium dissolved in tin. The solution is heated in an argon atmosphere to above 1400 deg C, whereby the refractory metal reacts with the surface of the graphite to form a layer of metalic carbide. The molten solution is cooled to 300 to 400 deg C, and the graphite piece is removed. Excess tin is wiped from the graphite, which is then heated in vacuum to above 2300 deg C. The tin vaporizes from the graphite surface, leaving the surface coated with a tenacious layer of refractory metallic carbide.

  8. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar; Subbiah, Ramesh; Thangavel, Elangovan; Arumugam, Madhankumar; Park, Kwideok; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp2 bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  9. Mesoporous titanium dioxide coating for metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Grandfield, Kathryn; Hoess, Andreas; Ballo, Ahmed; Cai, Yanling; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    A bioactive mesoporous titanium dioxide (MT) coating for surface drug delivery has been investigated to develop a multifunctional implant coating, offering quick bone bonding and biological stability. An evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) method was used to prepare a mesoporous titanium dioxide coating of the anatase phase with BET surface area of 172 m(2)/g and average pore diameter of 4.3 nm. Adhesion tests using the scratch method and an in situ screw-in/screw-out technique confirm that the MT coating bonds tightly with the metallic substrate, even after removal from bone. Because of its high surface area, the bioactivity of the MT coating is much better than that of a dense TiO(2) coating of the same composition. Quick formation of hydroxyapatite (HA) in vitro can be related to enhance bonding with bone. The uptake of antibiotics by the MT coating reached 13.4 mg/cm(3) within a 24 h loading process. A sustained release behavior has been obtained with a weak initial burst. By using Cephalothin as a model drug, drug loaded MT coating exhibits a sufficient antibacterial effect on the material surface, and within millimeters from material surface, against E.coli. Additionally, the coated and drug loaded surfaces showed no cytotoxic effect on cell cultures of the osteoblastic cell line MG-63. In conclusion, this study describes a novel, biocompatiblemesoporous implant coating, which has the ability to induce HA formation and could be used as a surface drug-delivery system.

  10. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

  11. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Liquid and Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popel, Pjotr; Gelchinskii, Boris; Sidorov, Valeriy; Son, Leonid; Sabirzjanov, Alexandre

    2007-06-01

    The state of the art in the field of liquid and amorphous metals and alloys is regularly updated through two series of complementary international conferences, the LAM (Liquid and Amorphous Metals) and the RQ (Rapidly Quenched Materials). The first series of the conferences started as LM-1 in 1966 at Brookhaven for the basic understanding of liquid metals. The subsequent LM conferences were held in Tokyo (1972) and Bristol (1976). The conference was renewed in Grenoble (1980) as a LAM conference including amorphous metals and continued in Los Angeles (1983), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (1986), Kyoto (1989), Vienna (1992), Chicago (1995), Dortmund (1998), Yokohama (2001) and Metz (2004). The conferences are mainly devoted to liquid and amorphous metals and alloys. However, communications on some non-metallic systems such as semi conductors, quasicrystals etc, were accepted as well. The conference tradition strongly encourages the participation of junior researchers and graduate students. The 13th conference of the LAM series was organized in Ekaterinburg, Russia, by the Institute of Metallurgy of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IMet UB RAS) and Ural State Pedagogical University (USPU) and held on 8-13 July 2007 under the chairmanship of Professors Pjotr Popel (USPU) and Boris Gelchinskii (IMet UB RAS). There were 242 active and about 60 guest participants from 20 countries who attended the conference. There were no parallel sessions and all oral reports were separated into three groups: invited talks (40 min), full-scale (25 min) and brief (15 min) oral reports. The program included 10 sessions, ranging from purely theoretical subjects to technological application of molten and amorphous alloys. The following sessions took place: A) Electronic structure and transport, magnetic properties; B) Phase transitions; C) Structure; D) Atomic dynamics and transport; E) Thermodynamics; F) Modelling, simulation; G) Surface and interface; H) Mechanical properties

  12. Lasing in metallic-coated nanocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Martin T.; Oei, Yok-Siang; Smalbrugge, Barry; Zhu, Youcai; de Vries, Tjibbe; van Veldhoven, Peter J.; van Otten, Frank W. M.; Eijkemans, Tom J.; Turkiewicz, Jarosław P.; de Waardt, Huug; Geluk, Erik Jan; Kwon, Soon-Hong; Lee, Yong-Hee; Nötzel, Richard; Smit, Meint K.

    2007-10-01

    Metallic cavities can confine light to volumes with dimensions considerably smaller than the wavelength of light. It is commonly believed, however, that the high losses in metals are prohibitive for laser operation in small metallic cavities. Here we report for the first time laser operation in an electrically pumped metallic-coated nanocavity formed by a semiconductor heterostructure encapsulated in a thin gold film. The demonstrated lasers show a low threshold current and their dimensions are smaller than the smallest electrically pumped lasers reported so far. With dimensions comparable to state-of-the-art electronic transistors and operating at low power and high speed, they are a strong contender as basic elements in digital photonic very large-scale integration. Furthermore we demonstrate that metallic-coated nanocavities with modal volumes smaller than dielectric cavities can have moderate quality factors.

  13. Metal alloy coatings and methods for applying

    DOEpatents

    Merz, Martin D.; Knoll, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate comprises plasma spraying a prealloyed feed powder onto a substrate, where the prealloyed feed powder comprises a significant amount of an alloy of stainless steel and at least one refractory element selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The plasma spraying of such a feed powder is conducted in an oxygen containing atmosphere and forms an adherent, corrosion resistant, and substantially homogenous metallic refractory alloy coating on the substrate.

  14. High temperature barrier coatings for refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Walech, T.

    1995-01-01

    Improvements in high temperature oxidation resistant metal coating technology will allow NASA and commercial entities to develop competitive civil space transport and communication systems. The success of investigations completed in this program will have a positive impact on broadening the technology base for high temperature materials. The work reported herein describes processes and procedures for successfully depositing coherent oxidation barrier coatings on refractory metals to prevent degradation under very severe operating environments. Application of the new technology developed is now being utilized in numerous Phase 3 applications through several prominent aerospace firms. Major achievements have included: (1) development of means to deposit thick platinum and rhodium coatings with lower stress and fewer microcracks than could be previously achieved; (2) development of processes to deposit thick adherent coatings of platinum group metals on refractory substrates that remain bonded through high temperature excursions and without need for intermediate coatings (bonding processes unique to specific refractory metals and alloys have been defined; (3) demonstration that useful alloys of refractory and platinum coatings can be made through thermal diffusion means; (4) demonstration that selected barrier coatings on refractory substrates can withstand severe oxidizing environments in the range of 1260 deg and 1760 deg C for long time periods essential to the life requirements of the hardware; and (5) successful application of the processes and procedures to prototype hardware. The results of these studies have been instrumental in improved thermal oxidation barrier coatings for the NASP propulsion system. Other Phase 3 applications currently being exploited include small uncooled thrusters for spacecraft and microsatellite maneuvering systems.

  15. Photochemical route for accessing amorphous metal oxide materials for water oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rodney D L; Prévot, Mathieu S; Fagan, Randal D; Zhang, Zhipan; Sedach, Pavel A; Siu, Man Kit Jack; Trudel, Simon; Berlinguette, Curtis P

    2013-04-05

    Large-scale electrolysis of water for hydrogen generation requires better catalysts to lower the kinetic barriers associated with the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Although most OER catalysts are based on crystalline mixed-metal oxides, high activities can also be achieved with amorphous phases. Methods for producing amorphous materials, however, are not typically amenable to mixed-metal compositions. We demonstrate that a low-temperature process, photochemical metal-organic deposition, can produce amorphous (mixed) metal oxide films for OER catalysis. The films contain a homogeneous distribution of metals with compositions that can be accurately controlled. The catalytic properties of amorphous iron oxide prepared with this technique are superior to those of hematite, whereas the catalytic properties of a-Fe(100-y-z)Co(y)Ni(z)O(x) are comparable to those of noble metal oxide catalysts currently used in commercial electrolyzers.

  16. Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic films of Mo/sub 49/Cr/sub 33/B/sub 18/ alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesham, R.; DiStefano, S.; Fitzgerald, D.; Thakoor, A.P.; Khanna, S.K.

    1987-09-01

    Amorphous metallic films of Mo/sub 49/Cr/sub 33/B/sub 18/ have been deposited onto glass and quartz substrates by the magnetron sputter quenching technique. The amorphous nature of the as-deposited films was confirmed by their diffuse x-ray diffraction patterns. The crystallization temperature of the as-deposited films was 590/sup 0/C, according to the differential scanning calorimetry studies. Surface texture and cross-sectional features of the coatings were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Electron microprobe analysis was used to determine the chemical composition of the films. Chemical compositional uniformity of the as-deposited amorphous metallic films was verified by secondary ion mass spectrometry. As-deposited films exhibited microhardness of the order of 600-850 HV. Kinetics of corrosion of the alloy films in H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (1N) solution has been studied by potentiodynamic and galvanostatic techniques. As-deposited amorphous films exhibited corrosion current density three orders of magnitude less than the corrosion current density of 304 stainless steel in H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (1N) solution. A reaction mechanism at the corrosion potential is proposed.

  17. METAL COATED ARTICLES AND METHOD OF MAKING

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-26

    A method for manufacturing a solid metallic uranium body having an integral multiple layer protective coating, comprising an inner uranium-aluminum alloy firmly bonded to the metallic uranium is presented. A third layer of silver-zinc alloy is bonded to the zinc-aluiminum layer and finally a fourth layer of lead-silver alloy is firmly bonded to the silver-zinc layer.

  18. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings on implants drastically reduce biofilm formation and water permeation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernsmann, Falk; Laube, Norbert; Baldsiefen, Gerhard; Castellucci, Mattia

    2014-11-01

    Inflammations and crystalline bacterial biofilms (encrustations) remain a major complication in long-term artificial urinary tract drainage. To solve this problem we present urological implants with coatings made of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) that show excellent protection from encrustation in-vitro as well as in-vivo. Part of the success of a-C:H coatings is attributed to their ability to act as a diffusion barrier between an implant and the body, which prevents leaching of solvents from polymeric implants. To further enhance their barrier properties a-C:H coatings are combined with parylene coatings to develop diffusion-barrier multilayer coatings with a total thickness between 0.2 μm and 0.8 μm. The combination of the two types of coatings leads to a reduction of water diffusion by a factor of up to ten with respect to uncoated 25 μm thick polyimide sub-strates. The diffusion of water vapour from a controlled atmospheric pressure chamber through coated foils to a vacuum chamber is measured in a custom-built device.

  19. Tailoring the optical and hydrophobic property of zinc oxide nanorod by coating with amorphous graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahari, D.; Das, N. S.; Das, B.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized at room temperature on potassium permanganate activated silicon and glass substrate by simple chemical method using zinc acetate as precursor. To modify the surface energy of the as prepared ZnO thin films the samples were coated with amorphous graphene (a-G) synthesized by un-zipping of chemically synthesized amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). All the pure and coated samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The roughness analysis of the as prepared samples was done by atomic force microscopic analysis. The detail optical properties of all the samples were studied with the help of a UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The surface energy of the as prepared pure and coated samples was calculated by measuring the contact angle of two different liquids. It is seen that the water repellence of ZnO nanorods got increased after they are being coated with a-Gs. Also even after UV irradiation the contact angle remain same unlike the case for the uncoated sample where the contact angle gets decreased significantly after UV irradiation. Existing Cassie-Wenzel model has been employed along with the Owen's approach to determine the different components of surface energy.

  20. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2009-03-16

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  1. Biomolecule-coated metal nanoparticles on titanium.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Stephen L; Chatt, Amares; Zhang, Peng

    2012-02-07

    Immobilizations of nanoparticles and biomolecules on biocompatible substrates such as titanium are two promising approaches to bringing new functionalities to Ti-based biomaterials. Herein, we used a variety of X-ray spectroscopic techniques to study and better understand metal-thiolate interactions in biofunctionalized metal nanoparticle systems supported on Ti substrates. Using a facile one-step procedure, a series of Au nanoparticle samples with varied biomolecule coatings ((2-mercatopropionyl)glycine (MPG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) and biomolecule concentrations are prepared. Ag and Pd systems are also studied to observe change with varying metal composition. The structure and properties of these biomolecule-coated nanoparticles are investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and element-specific X-ray techniques, including extended X-ray absorption fine structure (Au L(3)-edge), X-ray absorption near-edge structure (Au L(3), Ag L(3), Pd L(3), and S K-edge), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (Au 4f, Ag 3d, Pd 3d, and S 2p core level). It was found that, by comparison of SEM and X-ray spectroscopy results, the coating of metal nanoparticles with varying model biomolecule systems can have a significant effect on both surface coverage and organization. This work offers a facile chemical method for bio- and nanofunctionalization of Ti substrates as well as provides a physical picture of the structure and bonding of biocoated metal nanoparticles, which may lead to useful applications in orthopedics and biomedicine.

  2. STEM-EELS analysis reveals stable high-density He in nanopores of amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Schierholz, Roland; Lacroix, Bertrand; Godinho, Vanda; Caballero-Hernández, Jaime; Duchamp, Martial; Fernández, Asunción

    2015-02-20

    A broad interest has been showed recently on the study of nanostructuring of thin films and surfaces obtained by low-energy He plasma treatments and He incorporation via magnetron sputtering. In this paper spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope is used to locate and characterize the He state in nanoporous amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering. A dedicated MATLAB program was developed to quantify the helium density inside individual pores based on the energy position shift or peak intensity of the He K-edge. A good agreement was observed between the high density (∼35-60 at nm(-3)) and pressure (0.3-1.0 GPa) values obtained in nanoscale analysis and the values derived from macroscopic measurements (the composition obtained by proton backscattering spectroscopy coupled to the macroscopic porosity estimated from ellipsometry). This work provides new insights into these novel porous coatings, providing evidence of high-density He located inside the pores and validating the methodology applied here to characterize the formation of pores filled with the helium process gas during deposition. A similar stabilization of condensed He bubbles has been previously demonstrated by high-energy He ion implantation in metals and is newly demonstrated here using a widely employed methodology, magnetron sputtering, for achieving coatings with a high density of homogeneously distributed pores and He storage capacities as high as 21 at%.

  3. Bioactivity and hemocompatibility study of amorphous hydrogenated carbon coatings produced by pulsed magnetron discharge.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Santos, C; Colaux, J L; Laloy, J; Fransolet, M; Mullier, F; Michiels, C; Dogné, J-M; Lucas, S

    2013-06-01

    Literature contains very few data about the potential biomedical application of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) thin films deposited by reactive pulsed magnetron discharge even so it is one of the most scalable plasma deposition technique. In this article, we show that such a C2H2 pulsed magnetron plasma produces high quality coating with good hemocompatibility and bioactive response: no effect on hemolysis and hemostasis were observed, and proliferation of various cell types such as endothelial, fibroblast, and osteoblast-like cells was not affected when the deposition conditions were varied. Cell growth on a-C:H coatings is proposed to take place by a two-step process: the initial cell contact is affected by the smooth topography of the a-C:H coatings, whereas the polymeric-like structure, together with a moderate hydrophilicity and a high hydrogen content, directs the posterior cell spreading while preserving the hemocompatible behavior.

  4. Industrial Environmental Testing of Coupons and Prototype Cylinders Coated With Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Aprigliano, L F; Day, S D; Lian, T; Farmer, J C

    2007-03-06

    Iron-based amorphous alloys are desirable for many industrial applications due to their dual capacity to resist corrosion and wear. These alloys may also contain a significant amount of boron which makes them candidates for criticality control, for example, in high-level nuclear waste disposition applications. The Fe-based amorphous alloys can be produced in powder form and then deposited using a HVOF thermal spray process on any surface that needs to be protected. For the current testing coupons of 316L stainless steels were coated with the amorphous alloy SAM2X5 and then tested for corrosion resistance in the salt-fog chamber and in other industrial environments. Prototype cylinders were also prepared and environmentally tested. One cylinder was 30-inch diameter, 88-inch long, and 3/8-inch thick. The coating thickness was 0.015 to 0.019-inch thick. The cylinder was in good condition after the test. Along the body of the cylinder only two pinpoint spot sized signs of rust were seen. Test results will be compared with the behavior of witness materials under the same tested conditions.

  5. Protective metal matrix coating with nanocomponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Galevsky, S. G.; Efimova, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    Experience of nanocrystalline chromium, titanium, silicon carbides and borides components application as nickel, zinc, chromium based electrodeposited composite coating is generalized. Electrodepositing conditions are determined. Structure and physicochemical properties of coatings, namely micro-hardness, adhesion to steel base, inherent stresses, heat resistance, corrosion currents, en-during quality, and their change during isothermal annealing are studied. As is shown, nanocomponents act as metal matrix modifier. Technological and economic feasibility study to evaluate expediency of replacing high priced nano-diamonds with nanocrystalline borides and carbides is undertaken.

  6. Raman Spectroscopy Characterization of amorphous carbon coatings for computer hard disks

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, Joel W.

    1998-05-07

    Amorphous carbon films are used as protective coatings on magnetic media to protect the magnetic layer from wear and abrasion caused by the read/write head during hard disk drive start-up and operation. A key requirement in increasing the storage capacity and reliability of hard-disk drives is improving the performance of these coatings. This cooperative agreement used optical characterization techniques developed at LBNL to study thin-film hard disk media produced by Seagate Technology, major US hard drive manufacturer. The chief scientific goal was relating quantitatively the results of the optical characterization to the underlying chemical structure of the overcoat. In a collaboration with Seagate, LBNL, and Cambridge University, optical and electron-based characterization were used to evaluate the chemical structure of overcoats. The sp3 fraction of the sputtered amorphous carbon films was measured quantitatively for the first time and related to the optical spectroscopy results. This work and other selected aspects of the research performed under the agreement were presented at technical meetings and published in the open literature. The chief technical goal was designing manufacturing processes for the protective carbon overcoat for use in new generations of Seagate disk drives. To this end, joint research carried out under this agreement enabled Seagate to speed development of new coatings which are currently being used in the production of disk media in Seagate's disk-media manufacturing plants in Fremont, CA.

  7. Dextran-coated superparamagnetic amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy for magnetic resonance imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    An, Lu; Yu, Yanrong; Li, Xuejian; Liu, Wei; Yang, Hong; Wu, Dongmei; Yang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A dextran-coated Fe–Co nanoalloy was developed serving as a sensitive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging applications. - Highlights: • Amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy was prepared via wet chemical reduction approach. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy is water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy is superparamagnetic. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy exhibits T{sub 2}-weighted MR enhancement both in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: For magnetic resonance imaging applications, a facile approach for water-soluble dextran coated amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy was developed. The as-synthesized nanoalloy had a diameter of 9 nm with a narrow size distribution and showed superparamagnetic property with a saturated magnetization (Ms) of 25 emu/g. In vitro cytotoxicity test revealed that it was biocompatible at a concentration below 120 μg/mL. It can be uptaken by HeLa cells effectively and resulted in the obvious T{sub 2} effect after internalization. Biodistribution studies in conjunction with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) confirmed that Fe–Co nanoalloy was preferentially accumulated in lung and spleen after intravenous injection for 4 h. In vivo MRI, dextran-coated Fe–Co nanoalloy can serve as a sensitive contrast agent for MR imaging, especially in the spleen, so we believe that it maybe hold great promise for diagnosis of splenic disease by appropriately functionalizing their surface.

  8. Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Wronski, Christopher R.

    1979-01-01

    A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

  9. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  10. Metal-coated Bragg grating reflecting fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorovskiy, Yu. K.; Butov, O. V.; Kolosovskiy, A. O.; Popov, S. M.; Voloshin, V. V.; Vorob'ev, I. L.; Vyatkin, M. Yu.

    2017-03-01

    High-temperature optical fibres (OF) with fibre Bragg gratings (FBG) arrays written over a long length and in-line metal coating have been made for the first time. The optical parameters of the FBG arrays were tested by the optical frequency domain reflectometer (OFDR) method in a wide temperature range, demonstrating no degradation in reflection at heating up to 600 °C for a fibre with Al coating. The mechanical strength of the developed fibre was practically the same as "ordinary" OF with similar coating, showing the absence of the influence of FBG writing process on fibre strength. Further experiments are necessary to evaluate the possibility of further increases in the operational temperature range.

  11. Self-diffusion and macroscopic diffusion of hydrogen in amorphous metals from first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shiqiang; Sholl, David S

    2009-06-28

    Diffusion of interstitial hydrogen plays a key role in potential uses for amorphous metals as membranes for hydrogen purification. We show how first principles-based methods can be used to characterize diffusion of interstitial H in amorphous metals using amorphous Fe(3)B as an example. Net transport of interstitial H is governed by the transport diffusion coefficient that appears in Fick's law. This diffusion coefficient is strongly dependent on the interstitial concentration, and is not equal to the self-diffusion coefficient except at dilute interstitial concentrations. Under conditions of practical interest, the concentrations of interstitial H in amorphous metals are nondilute so methods to determine the transport diffusion coefficient must be used if net mass transport is to be described. We show how kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of interstitial H diffusion that use rates derived from first-principles calculations can be used to assess both self- and transport diffusion coefficients of H in amorphous metals. These methods will be helpful in efforts to screen amorphous metal alloys as potential membranes for hydrogen purification.

  12. Method of coating graphite tubes with refractory metal carbides

    DOEpatents

    Wohlberg, C.

    1973-12-11

    A method of coating graphite tubes with a refractory metal carbide is described. An alkali halide is reacted with a metallic oxide, the metallic portion being selected from the IVth or Vth group of the Periodic Table, the resulting salt reacting in turn with the carbon to give the desired refractory metal carbide coating. (Official Gazette)

  13. Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating

    DOEpatents

    Byrnes, Larry Edward; Kramer, Martin Stephen; Neiser, Richard A.

    2003-08-26

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

  14. Wear and Corrosion Behaviors of FeCrBSiNbW Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Coating Prepared by Arc Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. B.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, B. S.

    2012-09-01

    FeCrBSiNbW coatings were synthesized using robotically manipulating twin wires arc spraying system. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the coating were characterized. The coating has a laminated structure, and its porosity is 2.8%. The microstructure of the coating consists of amorphous and α-(Fe,Cr) nanocrystalline. The nanocrystalline grains with a scale of 20-75 nm are homogenously dispersed in amorphous matrix. The results show that FeCrBSiNbW coating has excellent wear and corrosion resistance. The wear resistance of the coating is about 4.6 times higher than that of 3Cr13 coating under the same testing condition. In 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution, the amorphous/nanocrystalline coating presents lower I corr values in polarization curves and higher fitted R t values in EIS plots than that of the 0Cr18Ni9 coating (chemical composition by EDAX analysis: C1.07-O12.38-Si0.49-Cr15.18-Mn0.89-Ni7.09-Fe62.24 at.%).

  15. Instrumental color control for metallic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Han, Bing; Cui, Guihua; Rigg, Bryan; Luo, Ming R.

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes work investigating a suitable color quality control method for metallic coatings. A set of psychological experiments was carried out based upon 50 pairs of samples. The results were used to test the performance of various color difference formulae. Different techniques were developed by optimising the weights and/or the lightness parametric factors of colour differences calculated from the four measuring angles. The results show that the new techniques give a significant improvement compared to conventional techniques.

  16. Omni-directional selective shielding material based on amorphous glass coated microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababei, G.; Chiriac, H.; David, V.; Dafinescu, V.; Nica, I.

    2012-01-01

    The shielding effectiveness of the omni-directional selective shielding material based on CoFe-glass coated amorphous wires in 0.8 GHz-3 GHz microwave frequency range is investigated. The measurements were done in a controlled medium using a TEM cell and in the free space using horn antennas, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the composite shielding material can be developed with desired shielding effectiveness and selective absorption of the microwave frequency range by controlling the number of the layers and the length of microwires.

  17. Dynamic response of laser ablative shock waves from coated and uncoated amorphous boron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelikani, Leela; Pinnoju, Venkateshwarlu; Verma, Pankaj; Singh, Raja V.; Kiran, P. Prem

    2017-01-01

    Laser ablative shock waves from compacted nano-sized powders was studied using time resolved shadowgraphy technique. Shock wave properties such as propagation of shock front, contact front, velocity and pressure behind the shock front were studied from nano-sized powders of Amorphous Boron (B) and Lithium Fluoride coated Boron (LiF-B) with the material density of 2.34 g/cc. The experiments were performed to understand the challenging aspects of laser-powder interactions to explore their application potential for laser ablation Propulsion (LAP).

  18. Method of forming metallic coatings on polymeric substrates

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, Raimond

    1984-01-01

    Very smooth polymeric coatings or films graded in atomic number and density an readily be formed by first preparing the coating or film from the desired monomeric material and then contacting it with a fluid containing a metal or a mixture of metals for a time sufficient for such metal or metals to sorb and diffuse into the coating or film. Metal resinate solutions are particularly advantageous for this purpose. A metallic coating can in turn be produced on the metal-loaded film or coating by exposing it to a low pressure plasma of air, oxygen, or nitrous oxide. The process permits a metallic coating to be formed on a heat sensitive substrate without the use of elevated temperatures.

  19. Liquid Galvanic Coatings for Protection of Imbedded Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor); Curran, Joseph J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Coating compositions and methods of their use are described herein for the reduction of corrosion in imbedded metal structures. The coatings are applied as liquids to an external surface of a substrate in which the metal structures are imbedded. The coatings are subsequently allowed to dry. The liquid applied coatings provide galvanic protection to the imbedded metal structures. Continued protection can be maintained with periodic reapplication of the coating compositions, as necessary, to maintain electrical continuity. Because the coatings may be applied using methods similar to standard paints, and because the coatings are applied to external surfaces of the substrates in which the metal structures are imbedded, the corresponding corrosion protection may be easily maintained. The coating compositions are particularly useful in the protection of metal-reinforced concrete.

  20. Long-Term Corrosion Testing of Thermal Spray Coatings of Amorphous Metals: Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 and Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Day, D; Lian, T; Saw, C; Hailey, P; Payer, J; Aprigliano, L; Beardsley, B; Branagan, D

    2007-07-09

    Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of SAM2X5 also made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications.

  1. A Study of Deposition Coatings Formed by Electroformed Metallic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Kojiro; Tobayama, Go; Togashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Major joining methods of dental casting metal include brazing and laser welding. However, brazing cannot be applied for electroformed metals since heat treatment could affect the fit, and, therefore, laser welding is used for such metals. New methods of joining metals that do not impair the characteristics of electroformed metals should be developed. When new coating is performed on the surface of the base metal, surface treatment is usually performed before re-coating. The effect of surface treatment is clinically evaluated by peeling and flex tests. However, these testing methods are not ideal for deposition coating strength measurement of electroformed metals. There have been no studies on the deposition coating strength and methods to test electroformed metals. We developed a new deposition coating strength test for electroformed metals. The influence of the negative electrolytic method, which is one of the electrochemical surface treatments, on the strength of the deposition coating of electroformed metals was investigated, and the following conclusions were drawn: 1. This process makes it possible to remove residual deposits on the electrodeposited metal surface layer. 2. Cathode electrolysis is a simple and safe method that is capable of improving the surface treatment by adjustments to the current supply method and current intensity. 3. Electrochemical treatment can improve the deposition coating strength compared to the physical or chemical treatment methods. 4. Electro-deposition coating is an innovative technique for the deposition coating of electroformed metal. PMID:27326757

  2. Amorphous semiconducting and conducting transparent metal oxide thin films and production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, John; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Ginley, David; Taylor, Matthew; Neuman, George A.; Luten, Henry A.; Forgette, Jeffrey A.; Anderson, John S.

    2010-07-13

    Metal oxide thin films and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a metal oxide thin film may comprise introducing at least two metallic elements and oxygen into a process chamber to form a metal oxide. The method may also comprise depositing the metal oxide on a substrate in the process chamber. The method may also comprise simultaneously controlling a ratio of the at least two metallic elements and a stoichiometry of the oxygen during deposition. Exemplary amorphous metal oxide thin films produced according to the methods herein may exhibit highly transparent properties, highly conductive properties, and/or other opto-electronic properties.

  3. Metal/Ceramic Bond Coatings For High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Leissler, George W.

    1988-01-01

    Reduced-thermal-expansion bond coatings developed for use at high temperatures in thermal-barrier-coating systems. Bond coatings composed of low-pressure-plasma-sprayed metallic matrices dispersed with low-thermal-expansion high-bulk-modulus ceramic particles. New coatings and application lower thermal-expansion-mismatch strain while maintaining integrity at high temperatures.

  4. Study of electrochemical performance of amorphous carbon-coated graphite for Li-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohman, Fadli; Azizah, Umi; Prihandoko, Bambang

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemical performance of graphite coated by amorphous carbon as anode material in the Li-ion battery has been studied with citric acid (labelled CA) as a carbon source with different composition. Citric acid as the amorphous carbon source was mixed with graphite in the ethanol solvent at 80°C using magnetic stirrer with the compositions CA: graphite 2:1, 1:1 and 1:3, respectively. The mixture of graphite and CA were dried at 350°C for 5 hours under Ar atmosphere to evaporate the solvent. This dried mixture was then sintered at 600°C under Ar atmosphere to form amorphous carbon layer on the surface of graphite. The crystal structure and morphology of the particles were characterized using XRD, SEM and TEM, respectively. Electrochemical properties of the samples have been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge test using WBCS 3000. Cyclic voltammogram showed the working potential and redox reaction peak of the sample. Charge-discharge data was obtained to determine the specific capacity of the sample at 0.1C - 2C.

  5. Coating thickness control in continuously fabricating metallic glass-coated composite wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bao-yu; Chen, Xiao-hua; Lu, Zhao-ping; Hui, Xi-dong

    2013-05-01

    A continuous production process was developed for coating bulk metallic glasses on the metallic wire surface. The effects of processing parameters, including the drawing velocity and coating temperature, on the coating thickness were investigated. It is found that the coating thickness increases with the increase in drawing velocity but decreases with the increase in coating temperature. A fluid mechanical model was developed to quantify the coating thickness under various processing conditions. By using this theoretical model, the coating thickness was calculated, and the calculated values are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Amorphous layer coating induced brittle to ductile transition in single crystalline SiC nanowires: an atomistic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Li, Zhijie; Gao, Fei

    2008-08-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations with Tersoff potentials were used to study the response of SiC nanowires with and without amorphous coating to a tensile strain along the axial direction. The uncoated nanowires show brittle properties and fail through bond breaking. Although the amorphous coating leads to the decrease of Young’s modulus of nanowires, yet it also leads the appearance of plastic deformation under axial strain. These results provide an effective way to modify the brittle properties of some other semiconductor nanowires.

  7. Linear topology in amorphous metal oxide electrochromic networks obtained via low-temperature solution processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llordés, Anna; Wang, Yang; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Xiao, Penghao; Lee, Tom; Poulain, Agnieszka; Zandi, Omid; Saez Cabezas, Camila A.; Henkelman, Graeme; Milliron, Delia J.

    2016-12-01

    Amorphous transition metal oxides are recognized as leading candidates for electrochromic window coatings that can dynamically modulate solar irradiation and improve building energy efficiency. However, their thin films are normally prepared by energy-intensive sputtering techniques or high-temperature solution methods, which increase manufacturing cost and complexity. Here, we report on a room-temperature solution process to fabricate electrochromic films of niobium oxide glass (NbOx) and `nanocrystal-in-glass’ composites (that is, tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanocrystals embedded in NbOx glass) via acid-catalysed condensation of polyniobate clusters. A combination of X-ray scattering and spectroscopic characterization with complementary simulations reveals that this strategy leads to a unique one-dimensional chain-like NbOx structure, which significantly enhances the electrochromic performance, compared to a typical three-dimensional NbOx network obtained from conventional high-temperature thermal processing. In addition, we show how self-assembled ITO-in-NbOx composite films can be successfully integrated into high-performance flexible electrochromic devices.

  8. Linear topology in amorphous metal oxide electrochromic networks obtained via low-temperature solution processing.

    PubMed

    Llordés, Anna; Wang, Yang; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Xiao, Penghao; Lee, Tom; Poulain, Agnieszka; Zandi, Omid; Saez Cabezas, Camila A; Henkelman, Graeme; Milliron, Delia J

    2016-12-01

    Amorphous transition metal oxides are recognized as leading candidates for electrochromic window coatings that can dynamically modulate solar irradiation and improve building energy efficiency. However, their thin films are normally prepared by energy-intensive sputtering techniques or high-temperature solution methods, which increase manufacturing cost and complexity. Here, we report on a room-temperature solution process to fabricate electrochromic films of niobium oxide glass (NbOx) and 'nanocrystal-in-glass' composites (that is, tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanocrystals embedded in NbOx glass) via acid-catalysed condensation of polyniobate clusters. A combination of X-ray scattering and spectroscopic characterization with complementary simulations reveals that this strategy leads to a unique one-dimensional chain-like NbOx structure, which significantly enhances the electrochromic performance, compared to a typical three-dimensional NbOx network obtained from conventional high-temperature thermal processing. In addition, we show how self-assembled ITO-in-NbOx composite films can be successfully integrated into high-performance flexible electrochromic devices.

  9. Ultrathin phase-change coatings on metals for electrothermally tunable colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Gokhan; Ayas, Sencer; Saidzoda, Tohir; Celebi, Kemal; Dana, Aykutlu

    2016-08-01

    Metal surfaces coated with ultrathin lossy dielectrics enable color generation through strong interferences in the visible spectrum. Using a phase-change thin film as the coating layer offers tuning the generated color by crystallization or re-amorphization. Here, we study the optical response of surfaces consisting of thin (5-40 nm) phase-changing Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) films on metal, primarily Al, layers. A color scale ranging from yellow to red to blue that is obtained using different thicknesses of as-deposited amorphous GST layers turns dim gray upon annealing-induced crystallization of the GST. Moreover, when a relatively thick (>100 nm) and lossless dielectric film is introduced between the GST and Al layers, optical cavity modes are observed, offering a rich color gamut at the expense of the angle independent optical response. Finally, a color pixel structure is proposed for ultrahigh resolution (pixel size: 5 × 5 μm2), non-volatile displays, where the metal layer acting like a mirror is used as a heater element. The electrothermal simulations of such a pixel structure suggest that crystallization and re-amorphization of the GST layer using electrical pulses are possible for electrothermal color tuning.

  10. Electron Cloud in Steel Beam Pipe vs Titanium Nitride Coated and Amorphous Carbon Coated Beam Pipes in Fermilab's Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Backfish, Michael

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents the use of four retarding field analyzers (RFAs) to measure electron cloud signals created in Fermilab’s Main Injector during 120 GeV operations. The first data set was taken from September 11, 2009 to July 4, 2010. This data set is used to compare two different types of beam pipe that were installed in the accelerator. Two RFAs were installed in a normal steel beam pipe like the rest of the Main Injector while another two were installed in a one meter section of beam pipe that was coated on the inside with titanium nitride (TiN). A second data run started on August 23, 2010 and ended on January 10, 2011 when Main Injector beam intensities were reduced thus eliminating the electron cloud. This second run uses the same RFA setup but the TiN coated beam pipe was replaced by a one meter section coated with amorphous carbon (aC). This section of beam pipe was provided by CERN in an effort to better understand how an aC coating will perform over time in an accelerator. The research consists of three basic parts: (a) continuously monitoring the conditioning of the three different types of beam pipe over both time and absorbed electrons (b) measurement of the characteristics of the surrounding magnetic fields in the Main Injector in order to better relate actual data observed in the Main Injector with that of simulations (c) measurement of the energy spectrum of the electron cloud signals using retarding field analyzers in all three types of beam pipe.

  11. Characterization of interfaces of metal/amorphized (by implantation) Si/c-Si structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golan, A.; Fastow, R.; Eizenberg, M.

    1990-02-01

    The electrical properties of metal/implanted (amorphous) Si contacts were studied, emphasizing the effects of the doping level, of the metal type, and of the heat treatments applied prior to the metal deposition. The implantation was carried out using 60-keV Ar+ ions at a dose of 1016 cm-2, and resulted in the formation of a thin (1000-Å-thick) amorphous layer on top of the crystalline substrate. The doping level of the implanted Si affected the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the contacts mainly in the reverse bias (low doping-low currents), while the forward bias characteristics were quite independent of this parameter. The device characteristics were very sensitive to the metal type, Al, Ti-W, or Pt. Thermal treatments applied prior to the metal deposition affected the characteristics by lowering the device resistance in correspondence with the thinning of the amorphous layer as a result of epitaxial regrowth. The I-V characteristics, as well as their dependence on the different process parameters, are explained using a model of charge injection into a thin layer of trap rich amorphous Si bounded by a metal/a-Si interface on one side and by an a-Si/c-Si heterojunction on the other side.

  12. In Situ Synthesis and Characterization of Fe-Based Metallic Glass Coatings by Electrospark Deposition Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, Alexander A.; Pyachin, S. A.; Ermakov, M. A.; Syuy, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Crystalline FeWMoCrBC electrode materials were prepared by conventional powder metallurgy. Metallic glass (MG) coatings were produced by electrospark deposition onto AISI 1035 steel in argon atmosphere. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy verified the amorphous structure of the as-deposited coatings. The coatings have a thickness of about 40 microns and a uniform structure. The results of dry sliding wear tests against high-speed steel demonstrated that Fe-based MG coatings had a lower friction coefficient and more than twice the wear resistance for 20 km sliding distance with respect to AISI 1035 steel. High-temperature oxidation treatment of the metal glass coatings at 1073 K in air for 12 h revealed that the oxidation resistance of the best coating was 36 times higher than that for bare AISI 1035 steel. These findings are expected to broaden the applications of electrospark Fe-based MG as highly protective and anticorrosive coatings for mild steel.

  13. In Situ Synthesis and Characterization of Fe-Based Metallic Glass Coatings by Electrospark Deposition Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, Alexander A.; Pyachin, S. A.; Ermakov, M. A.; Syuy, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    Crystalline FeWMoCrBC electrode materials were prepared by conventional powder metallurgy. Metallic glass (MG) coatings were produced by electrospark deposition onto AISI 1035 steel in argon atmosphere. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy verified the amorphous structure of the as-deposited coatings. The coatings have a thickness of about 40 microns and a uniform structure. The results of dry sliding wear tests against high-speed steel demonstrated that Fe-based MG coatings had a lower friction coefficient and more than twice the wear resistance for 20 km sliding distance with respect to AISI 1035 steel. High-temperature oxidation treatment of the metal glass coatings at 1073 K in air for 12 h revealed that the oxidation resistance of the best coating was 36 times higher than that for bare AISI 1035 steel. These findings are expected to broaden the applications of electrospark Fe-based MG as highly protective and anticorrosive coatings for mild steel.

  14. Atomic mobility and strain localization in amorphous metals.

    PubMed

    Delogu, Francesco

    2008-02-22

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the atomic mobility in Ni(50)Zr(50) amorphous alloys under both static conditions and shearing. Diffusion occurs under static conditions via cooperative stringlike motion involving atoms with large volumes. Atomic mobility is instead governed by rearrangements localized in shear transformation zones (STZs) under shearing. Local atomic volume plays in both cases a key role, the atomic ensembles involved in diffusion and STZ activity being strongly correlated.

  15. Replication of surface features from a master model to an amorphous metallic article

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L.; Bakke, Eric; Peker, Atakan

    1999-01-01

    The surface features of an article are replicated by preparing a master model having a preselected surface feature thereon which is to be replicated, and replicating the preselected surface feature of the master model. The replication is accomplished by providing a piece of a bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy, contacting the piece of the bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy to the surface of the master model at an elevated replication temperature to transfer a negative copy of the preselected surface feature of the master model to the piece, and separating the piece having the negative copy of the preselected surface feature from the master model.

  16. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeongwoon; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Kim, Seungchul

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV). As the incident energy decreases, the ratio of sp2 carbons increases, that of sp3 decreases, and the carbon films become more porous. The films prepared with very low incident energy contain lithium-ion conducting channels. Also, those films are electrically conductive to supplement the poor conductivity of silicon and can restore their structure after large deformation to accommodate the volume change during the operations. As a result of this study, we suggest that graphite-like porous carbon coating on silicon will extend the lifetime of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries.

  17. Sandwich-lithiation and longitudinal crack in amorphous silicon coated on carbon nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang Wei; Liu, Xiao Hua; Zhao, Kejie; Palmer, Andrew; Patten, Erin; Burton, David; Mao, Scott X; Suo, Zhigang; Huang, Jian Yu

    2012-10-23

    Silicon-carbon nanofibers coaxial sponge, with strong mechanical integrity and improved electronic conductivity, is a promising anode structure to apply into commercial high-capacity lithium ion batteries. We characterized the electrochemical and mechanical behaviors of amorphous silicon-coated carbon nanofibers (a-Si/CNFs) with in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that lithiation of the a-Si coating layer occurred from the surface and the a-Si/CNF interface concurrently, and propagated toward the center of the a-Si layer. Such a process leads to a sandwiched Li(x)Si/Si/Li(x)Si structure, indicating fast Li transport through the a-Si/CNF interface. Nanocracks and sponge-like structures developed in the a-Si layer during the lithiation-delithiation cycles. Lithiation of the a-Si layer sealed in the hollow CNF was also observed, but at a much lower speed than the counterpart of the a-Si layer coated on the CNF surface. An analytical solution of the stress field was formulated based on the continuum theory of finite deformation, explaining the experimental observation of longitudinal crack formation and general mechanical degradation mechanism in a-Si/CNF electrode.

  18. Amorphous mixed-metal hydroxide nanostructures for advanced water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y. Q.; Liu, X. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2016-02-01

    The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec-1, while no deactivation is detected in the CV testing even up to 30 000 cycles, which suggests the promising application of these amorphous nanomaterials in electrochemical oxidation. Meanwhile, the distinct catalytic activities among these amorphous Ni-Fe hydroxide nanostructures prompts us to take notice of the composition of the alloy hydroxides/oxides when studying their catalytic properties, which opens an avenue for the rational design and controllable preparation of such amorphous nanomaterials as advanced OER electrocatalysts.The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec-1, while no deactivation is detected in the CV

  19. Timescales and mechanisms of formation of amorphous silica coatings on fresh basalts at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, Steven M.; Rossman, George R.

    2014-10-01

    Young basalts from Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, frequently feature opaque surface coatings, 1-80 μm thick, composed of amorphous silica and Fe-Ti oxides. These coatings are the product of interaction of the basaltic surface with volcanically-derived acidic fluids. Previous workers have identified these coatings in a variety of contexts on Hawai'i, but the timescales of coating development, coating growth rates, and factors controlling lateral coating heterogeneity were largely unconstrained. We sampled and analyzed young lava flows (of varying ages, from hours to ~ 40 years) along Kīlauea's southwest and east rift zones to characterize variation in silica coating properties across the landscape. Coating thickness varies as a function of flow age, flow surface type, and proximity to acid sources like local fissure vents and regional plumes emitted from Kīlauea Caldera and Pu'u Ō'ō. Silica coatings that form in immediate proximity to acid sources are more chemically pure than those forming in higher pH environments, which contain significant Al and Fe. Incipient siliceous alteration was observed on basalt surfaces as young as 8 days old, but periods of a year or more are required to develop contiguous coatings with obvious opaque coloration. Inferred coating growth rates vary with environmental conditions but were typically 1-5 μm/year. Coatings form preferentially on flow surfaces with glassy outer layers, such as spatter ramparts, volcanic bombs, and dense pahoehoe breakouts, due to glass strain weakening during cooling. Microtextural evidence suggests that the silica coatings form both by in situ dissolution-reprecipitation and by deposition of silica mobilized in solution. Thin films of water, acidified by contact with volcanic vapors, dissolved near-surface basalt, then precipitated amorphous silica in place, mobilizing more soluble cations. Additional silica was transported to and deposited on the surface by silica-bearing altering fluids derived from the

  20. Differences between vacuum-deposited and spin-coated amorphous films of OLED materials (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Daisuke; Shibata, Maki

    2014-10-01

    To realize low-cost fabrication processes for high-performance OLED displays and lighting panels, the understanding of solution-processed films and devices is becoming more important nowadays. However, differences between vacuum- and solution-processed films have not been sufficiently discussed, and they are sometimes regarded as identical. In this presentation, we show and discuss the important differences between physical properties of vacuum-deposited and spin-coated films of small-molecule OLED materials, especially focusing on the differences in film densities and molecular orientation. Since they are fundamental factors affecting both electrical and optical properties of amorphous films used in OLEDs, we should consider their differences carefully when discussing device performances in detail.

  1. Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

  2. Near-infrared–driven decomposition of metal precursors yields amorphous electrocatalytic films

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Danielle A.; Dettelbach, Kevan E.; Hudkins, Jesse R.; Berlinguette, Curtis P.

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous metal-based films lacking long-range atomic order have found utility in applications ranging from electronics applications to heterogeneous catalysis. Notwithstanding, there is a limited set of fabrication methods available for making amorphous films, particularly in the absence of a conducting substrate. We introduce herein a scalable preparative method for accessing oxidized and reduced phases of amorphous films that involves the efficient decomposition of molecular precursors, including simple metal salts, by exposure to near-infrared (NIR) radiation. The NIR-driven decomposition process provides sufficient localized heating to trigger the liberation of the ligand from solution-deposited precursors on substrates, but insufficient thermal energy to form crystalline phases. This method provides access to state-of-the-art electrocatalyst films, as demonstrated herein for the electrolysis of water, and extends the scope of usable substrates to include nonconducting and temperature-sensitive platforms. PMID:26601148

  3. Near-infrared-driven decomposition of metal precursors yields amorphous electrocatalytic films.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Danielle A; Dettelbach, Kevan E; Hudkins, Jesse R; Berlinguette, Curtis P

    2015-03-01

    Amorphous metal-based films lacking long-range atomic order have found utility in applications ranging from electronics applications to heterogeneous catalysis. Notwithstanding, there is a limited set of fabrication methods available for making amorphous films, particularly in the absence of a conducting substrate. We introduce herein a scalable preparative method for accessing oxidized and reduced phases of amorphous films that involves the efficient decomposition of molecular precursors, including simple metal salts, by exposure to near-infrared (NIR) radiation. The NIR-driven decomposition process provides sufficient localized heating to trigger the liberation of the ligand from solution-deposited precursors on substrates, but insufficient thermal energy to form crystalline phases. This method provides access to state-of-the-art electrocatalyst films, as demonstrated herein for the electrolysis of water, and extends the scope of usable substrates to include nonconducting and temperature-sensitive platforms.

  4. Durability of Metallic Interconnects and Protective Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2009-12-15

    To build up a useful voltage, a number of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrically connected into series in a stack via interconnects, which are placed between adjacent cells. In addition to functioning as a bi-polar electrical connector, the interconnect also acts as a separator plate that separates the fuel at the anode side of one cell from the air at the cathode side on an adjacent cell. During SOFC operation at the high temperatures, the interconnects are thus simultaneously exposed to the oxidizing air at one side and a reducing fuel that can be either hydrogen or hydrocarbon at the other. Besides, they are in contact with adjacent components, such as electrodes or electrical contacts, seals, etc. With steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures into the low or intermediate range 600-850oC, oxidation resistant alloys are often used to construct interconnects. However, the metallic interconnects may degrade via interactions at their interfaces with surrounding environments or adjacent components, potentially affecting the stability and performance of interconnects and the SOFC stacks. Thus protection layers are applied to metallic interconnects that also intend to mitigate or prevent chromium migration into cells and the cell poisoning. This chapter provides a comprehensive review of materials for metallic interconnects, their degradation and coating protection.

  5. Bulk formation of metallic glasses and amorphous silicon from the melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures and compositions for producing metallic glasses in bulk at slow cooling rates were investigated. An attempt was made to form the amorphous phase of the tetrahedrally coordinated elements (Si or Ge) by undercooling the melt. The crystal nucleation behavior of pure liquids and glass formers were examined.

  6. Amorphous mixed-metal hydroxide nanostructures for advanced water oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y Q; Liu, X Y; Yang, G W

    2016-03-07

    The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec(-1), while no deactivation is detected in the CV testing even up to 30 000 cycles, which suggests the promising application of these amorphous nanomaterials in electrochemical oxidation. Meanwhile, the distinct catalytic activities among these amorphous Ni-Fe hydroxide nanostructures prompts us to take notice of the composition of the alloy hydroxides/oxides when studying their catalytic properties, which opens an avenue for the rational design and controllable preparation of such amorphous nanomaterials as advanced OER electrocatalysts.

  7. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

    1988-06-29

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

  8. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Donald J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Wright, Steven A.

    1991-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

  9. Electron beam-induced nanopatterning of multilayer graphene and amorphous carbon films with metal layers

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Banhart, Florian

    2011-05-02

    Thin Co and Ni lamellae grow under electron irradiation of metal crystals supported on multilayer graphene or amorphous carbon films. The lateral growth of a lamella from a source crystal is achieved by directing an electron beam to the periphery of the metal crystal and moving the beam over the surrounding carbon. Patterns of linear, branched, or ringlike metal lamellae can be created. The patterning is carried out in situ in a transmission electron microscope, allowing simultaneous structuring and imaging. The process is driven by the metal-carbon interaction at a beam-activated carbon surface.

  10. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, Kendall J; Pena, Maria I

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  11. Long-term research in Japan: amorphous metals, metal oxide varistors, high-power semiconductors and superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.J.; Yorozu, M.; Sogabe, T.; Suzuki, S.

    1985-04-01

    The review revealed that significant activity is under way in the research of amorphous metals, but that little fundamental work is being pursued on metal oxide varistors and high-power semiconductors. Also, the investigation of long-term research program plans for superconducting generators reveals that activity is at a low level, pending the recommendations of a study currently being conducted through Japan's Central Electric Power Council.

  12. Nanometer-thick amorphous-SnO2 layer as an oxygen barrier coated on a transparent AZO electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee Sang; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2016-07-01

    It is necessary for transparent conducting electrodes used in dye-sensitized or perovskite solar cells to have high thermal stability which is required when TiO2 is coated on the electrode. AZO films with their low-cost and good TCO properties are unfortunately unstable above 300 °C in air because of adsorbed oxygen. In this paper, the thermal stability of AZO films is enhanced by depositing an oxygen barrier on AZO films to block the oxygen. As the barrier material, SnO2 is used due to its high heat stability, electrical conductivity, and transmittance. Moreover, when the SnO2 is grown as amorphous phase, the protective effect become greater than the crystalline phase. The thermal stability of the amorphous-SnO2/AZO films varies depending on the thickness of the amorphous SnO2 layer. Because of the outstanding oxygen blocking properties of amorphous SnO2, its optimal thickness is very thin and it results in only a slight decrease in transmittance. The sheet resistance of the amorphous-SnO2/AZO film is 5.4 Ω sq-1 after heat treatment at 500 °C for 30 min in air and the average transmittance in the visible region is 83.4%. The results show that the amorphous-SnO2/AZO films have thermal stability with excellent electrical and optical properties. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Tribocorrosion Behavior of Fe-Based Amorphous Composite Coating Reinforced by Al2O3 in 3.5% NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasir, Muhammad; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Lin

    2016-12-01

    Although corrosion and friction/wear behavior of Fe-based amorphous coatings and their composites has been extensively studied during the past decade, there is very limited work related to tribocorrosion behavior. In this paper, the tribocorrosion behavior of a Fe-based amorphous composite coating reinforced with 20 wt.% Al2O3 particles was investigated in a 3.5% NaCl solution on a ball-on-disk tester and was compared to the monolithic amorphous coating and 316L stainless steel (SS). The results showed that the amorphous composite coating exhibited the highest tribocorrosion resistance among the three materials tested, as evidenced by the lowest coefficient of friction ( 0.3) and tribocorrosion wear rate ( 1.2 × 10-5 mm3/N·m). In addition, potentiodynamic polarization measurements before and during tribocorrosion testing demonstrated that corrosion resistance of the amorphous composite coating was not influenced so much by mechanical loading compared to the amorphous coating and the 316L SS. Observations on the worn surface revealed a corrosion-wear- and oxidational-wear-dominated tribocorrosion mechanism for the composite coatings. The excellent tribocorrosion resistance of the composite coating results from the effect of chemically stable Al2O3 phase which resists oxidation and delamination during sliding, along with poor wettability with corrosive NaCl droplets.

  14. Formulating Precursors for Coating Metals and Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Gatica, Jorge E.; Reye, John T.

    2005-01-01

    A protocol has been devised for formulating low-vapor-pressure precursors for protective and conversion coatings on metallic and ceramic substrates. The ingredients of a precursor to which the protocol applies include additives with phosphate esters, or aryl phosphate esters in solution. Additives can include iron, chromium, and/or other transition metals. Alternative or additional additives can include magnesium compounds to facilitate growth of films on substrates that do not contain magnesium. Formulation of a precursor begins with mixing of the ingredients into a high-vapor-pressure solvent to form a homogeneous solution. Then the solvent is extracted from the solution by evaporation - aided, if necessary, by vacuum and/or slight heating. The solvent is deemed to be completely extracted when the viscosity of the remaining solution closely resembles the viscosity of the phosphate ester or aryl phosphate ester. In addition, satisfactory removal of the solvent can be verified by means of a differential scanning calorimetry essay: the absence of endothermic processes for temperatures below 150 C would indicate that the residual solvent has been eliminated from the solution beyond a detectable dilution level.

  15. Superior Tensile Ductility in Bulk Metallic Glass with Gradient Amorphous Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Liu, C. T.; Ruan, H. H.; Lu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Over centuries, structural glasses have been deemed as a strong yet inherently ‘brittle’ material due to their lack of tensile ductility. However, here we report bulk metallic glasses exhibiting both a high strength of ~2 GPa and an unprecedented tensile elongation of 2–4% at room temperature. Our experiments have demonstrated that intense structural evolution can be triggered in theses glasses by the carefully controlled surface mechanical attrition treatment, leading to the formation of gradient amorphous microstructures across the sample thickness. As a result, the engineered amorphous microstructures effectively promote multiple shear banding while delay cavitation in the bulk metallic glass, thus resulting in superior tensile ductility. The outcome of our research uncovers an unusual work-hardening mechanism in monolithic bulk metallic glasses and demonstrates a promising yet low-cost strategy suitable for producing large-sized, ultra-strong and stretchable structural glasses. PMID:24755683

  16. Superior Tensile Ductility in Bulk Metallic Glass with Gradient Amorphous Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Liu, C. T.; Ruan, H. H.; Lu, J.

    2014-04-01

    Over centuries, structural glasses have been deemed as a strong yet inherently `brittle' material due to their lack of tensile ductility. However, here we report bulk metallic glasses exhibiting both a high strength of ~2 GPa and an unprecedented tensile elongation of 2-4% at room temperature. Our experiments have demonstrated that intense structural evolution can be triggered in theses glasses by the carefully controlled surface mechanical attrition treatment, leading to the formation of gradient amorphous microstructures across the sample thickness. As a result, the engineered amorphous microstructures effectively promote multiple shear banding while delay cavitation in the bulk metallic glass, thus resulting in superior tensile ductility. The outcome of our research uncovers an unusual work-hardening mechanism in monolithic bulk metallic glasses and demonstrates a promising yet low-cost strategy suitable for producing large-sized, ultra-strong and stretchable structural glasses.

  17. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, ShuJun; Song, MingHui; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell-core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell-core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost.

  18. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent.

    PubMed

    Ye, ShuJun; Song, MingHui; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-30

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell-core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell-core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost.

  19. Predicting catalyst-support interactions between metal nanoparticles and amorphous silica supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Christopher S.; Veser, Götz; McCarthy, Joseph J.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Johnson, J. Karl

    2016-10-01

    Metal-support interactions significantly affect the stability and activity of supported catalytic nanoparticles (NPs), yet there is no simple and reliable method for estimating NP-support interactions, especially for amorphous supports. We present an approach for rapid prediction of catalyst-support interactions between Pt NPs and amorphous silica supports for NPs of various sizes and shapes. We use density functional theory calculations of 13 atom Pt clusters on model amorphous silica supports to determine linear correlations relating catalyst properties to NP-support interactions. We show that these correlations can be combined with fast discrete element method simulations to predict adhesion energy and NP net charge for NPs of larger sizes and different shapes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach can be successfully transferred to Pd, Au, Ni, and Fe NPs. This approach can be used to quickly screen stability and net charge transfer and leads to a better fundamental understanding of catalyst-support interactions.

  20. The Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Based Amorphous Metals: Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 and Other Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Lian, T; Saw, C; Hailey, P; Choi, J; Rebak, R; Payer, J; Blue, C; Peters, W; Branagan, D

    2007-07-09

    Several Fe-based amorphous metals were developed with good corrosion resistance. These materials have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, ingots, and thermal-spray coatings. Cyclic polarization has been conducted in several aggressive environments, at ambient temperature, as well as temperatures approaching the boiling points of the test solutions. The hypothesis that the corrosion resistance of iron-based amorphous metals can be enhanced through application of heuristic principles related to the additions of chromium, molybdenum, tungsten has been tested and found to have merit. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature.

  1. Micromechanics of Amorphous Metal/Polymer Hybrid Structures with 3D Cellular Architectures: Size Effects, Buckling Behavior, and Energy Absorption Capability.

    PubMed

    Mieszala, Maxime; Hasegawa, Madoka; Guillonneau, Gaylord; Bauer, Jens; Raghavan, Rejin; Frantz, Cédric; Kraft, Oliver; Mischler, Stefano; Michler, Johann; Philippe, Laetitia

    2017-02-01

    By designing advantageous cellular geometries and combining the material size effects at the nanometer scale, lightweight hybrid microarchitectured materials with tailored structural properties are achieved. Prior studies reported the mechanical properties of high strength cellular ceramic composites, obtained by atomic layer deposition. However, few studies have examined the properties of similar structures with metal coatings. To determine the mechanical performance of polymer cellular structures reinforced with a metal coating, 3D laser lithography and electroless deposition of an amorphous layer of nickel-boron (NiB) is used for the first time to produce metal/polymer hybrid structures. In this work, the mechanical response of microarchitectured structures is investigated with an emphasis on the effects of the architecture and the amorphous NiB thickness on their deformation mechanisms and energy absorption capability. Microcompression experiments show an enhancement of the mechanical properties with the NiB thickness, suggesting that the deformation mechanism and the buckling behavior are controlled by the brittle-to-ductile transition in the NiB layer. In addition, the energy absorption properties demonstrate the possibility of tuning the energy absorption efficiency with adequate designs. These findings suggest that microarchitectured metal/polymer hybrid structures are effective in producing materials with unique property combinations.

  2. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M.; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15 mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1 day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5 mg/kg) treatment at 28 days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3 days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis. PMID:26210349

  3. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5mg/kg) treatment at 28days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis.

  4. High temperature glass coatings for superalloys and refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. W.; Grekila, R. B.; Hirayama, C.; Mattox, D. M.

    1970-01-01

    New glasses are used as protective coatings on metals and alloys susceptible to oxidation at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres. Glasses are stable and solid at temperatures up to 1000 deg C, adhere well to metal surfaces, and are usable for metals with broad range of expansion coefficients.

  5. Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Robert; Loomis, Gary E.; Thomas, Ian M.

    1999-01-01

    Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (.about.1.10-1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm.

  6. Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer

    DOEpatents

    Chow, R.; Loomis, G.E.; Thomas, I.M.

    1999-03-16

    Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (ca. 1.10--1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm. 2 figs.

  7. Low Friction Property of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating Films and Oxygen Transmission Ratio of Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Advanced Coating Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Kano, Makoto; Yoshida, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    The topics of the applied technology of amorphous carbon film to reduce friction using diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated by the vacuum arc ion plating process and to improve the gas barrier property using the amorphous carbon film by the atmospheric pressure plasma process are introduced with the basic experimental results. For reducing friction, the super low friction coefficient below 0.01 has been found when the tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating deposited by T-shape filtered arc deposition method [ta-C(T)] was evaluated the friction property under oleic acid lubrication at pure sliding condition. It was thought that the low share strength tribofilm composed of water and oleic acid mono-layer seemed to be formed on the sliding interface. For gas barrier performance, the amorphous carbon film deposited by the atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate was improved the oxygen transmission ratio (OTR) around 30% compared with that of uncoated PET substrate. These advanced performance obtained by the optimum material combination of DLC with lubricant and the original atmospheric pressure plasma CVD technique are expected to be applied on the actual application for the different types of the industrial fields in near future.

  8. Anomalous small angle x-ray scattering studies of amorphous metal-germanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, M.

    1993-12-01

    This dissertation addresses the issue of composition modulation in sputtered amorphous metal-germanium thin films with the aim of understanding the intermediate range structure of these films as a function of composition. The investigative tool used in this work is anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS). The primary focus of this investigation is the amorphous iron-germanium (a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) system with particular emphasis on the semiconductor-rich regime. Brief excursions are made into the amorphous tungsten-germanium (a-W{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) and the amorphous molybdenum-germanium (a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) systems. All three systems exhibit an amorphous structure over a broad composition range extending from pure amorphous germanium to approximately 70 atomic percent metal when prepared as sputtered films. Across this composition range the structures change from the open, covalently bonded, tetrahedral network of pure a-Ge to densely packed metals. The structural changes are accompanied by a semiconductor-metal transition in all three systems as well as a ferromagnetic transition in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} system and a superconducting transition in the a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} system. A long standing question, particularly in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} and the a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} systems, has been whether the structural changes (and therefore the accompanying electrical and magnetic transitions) are accomplished by homogeneous alloy formation or phase separation. The application of ASAXS to this problem proves unambiguously that fine scale composition modulations, as distinct from the simple density fluctuations that arise from cracks and voids, are present in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}, a-W{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}, and a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} systems in the semiconductor-metal transition region. Furthermore, ASAXS shows that germanium is distributed uniformly throughout each sample in the x<25 regime of all three systems.

  9. Amorphous calcium phosphate nanospheres/polylactide composite coated tantalum scaffold: facile preparation, fast biomineralization and subchondral bone defect repair application.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rong; Xu, Wei; Chen, Feng; Qi, Chao; Lu, Bing-Qiang; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Jin; Qian, Qi-Rong; Zhu, Ying-Jie

    2014-11-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) materials are widely used in various biomedical areas such as drug/gene delivery and bone repair/tissue engineering. In this study, amorphous CaP nanospheres synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method are used to prepare the CaP-polylactide (CaP-PLA) composite. Then, the as-prepared CaP-PLA composite is used to coat tantalum (Ta) plates and porous scaffolds. Compared with bare Ta plate, CaP-PLA coated Ta plates show a high performance of surface biomineralization in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, the hydrophilicity of the CaP-PLA coated Ta plates is significantly improved. CaP-PLA coated Ta plates with bovine serum albumin (BSA) are prepared and used for the investigation of BSA release in vitro. The experimental results indicate a sustained BSA release property and simultaneous biomineralization of the as-prepared BSA-containing CaP-PLA coated Ta plates. Furthermore, CaP-PLA coated Ta scaffolds are favorable for the human osteoblast-like MG63 cells adhesion and spreading. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-containing CaP-PLA coated porous Ta scaffolds are used for the study of rabbit subchondral bone defect repair, covering with autogeneic periosteums. The as-prepared CaP-PLA composite coated Ta scaffolds are useful to guide the bone regeneration in vivo.

  10. Plasmonic effects in amorphous silicon thin film solar cells with metal back contacts.

    PubMed

    Palanchoke, Ujwol; Jovanov, Vladislav; Kurz, Henning; Obermeyer, Philipp; Stiebig, Helmut; Knipp, Dietmar

    2012-03-12

    Plasmonic effects in amorphous silicon thin film solar cells with randomly textured metal back contact were investigated experimentally and numerically. The influence of different metal back contacts with and without ZnO interlayer was studied and losses in the individual layers of the solar cell were quantified. The amorphous silicon thin film solar cells were prepared on randomly textured substrates using large area production equipment and exhibit conversion efficiencies approaching 10%. The optical wave propagation within the solar cells was studied by Finite Difference Time Domain simulations. The quantum efficiency of solar cells with and without ZnO interlayer was simulated and the interplay between the reflection, quantum efficiency and absorption in the back contact will be discussed.

  11. Preparation of metal surfaces for application of functional coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabdrakhmanov, Az T.; Israphilov, I. H.; Galiakbarov, A. T.; Gabdrakhmanov, Al T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an efficient method of plasma purification of metal surfaces before applying coatings or the product finishing treatment. The plasma purification is performed in a steam-gas discharge with an aluminum anode and a liquid cathode.

  12. Anti-diffusion metal coated O-rings

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Boyce, James Reid

    2016-03-22

    A method for inhibiting diffusion of gases and/or transmission of photons through elastomeric seals and a diffusion inhibiting elastomeric seal wherein at least a portion of the surface of a diffusion inhibiting elastomeric seal is coated with a compatibly-deformable, malleable metal coating.

  13. Precious-Metal Salt Coatings for Detecting Hydrazines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, Louis A.; Greene, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    Substrates coated with a precious-metal salt KAuCl4 have been found to be useful for detecting hydrazine vapors in air at and above a concentration of the order of 0.01 parts per million (ppm). Upon exposure to air containing a sufficient amount of hydrazine for a sufficient time, the coating material undergoes a visible change in color.

  14. Nanotribological investigations of NCD coatings covering metal slitting saws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabczak, A.; Niedzielski, Piotr; Mitura, Stanislaw; Zak, J.

    1997-06-01

    In the paper an assessment of the usefulness of a method for the formation of a hard carbon coating on the working surface of metal slitting saws has been presented. Metal slitting saws were used to cut off the tips of non-ferrous metals in printed-circuit boards. The results o the authors' own investigations concerning the assessment of life of metal slitting saws with modified geometry of the cutting edge and a hard carbon coating have been presented. Conclusions on the practicability of the RF PCVD method used have been formulated.

  15. Amorphous formation on metal surfaces by an intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yatsuzuka, M.; Yamasaki, T.; Uchida, H.; Hashimoto, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, intense pulsed ion beams (PIBs) have been interested as a tool for surface modification of metals, because irradiation of PIBs to metals leads to rapid heating of the near surface which is immediately followed by rapid cooling and resolidification. In this paper formation of an amorphous layer on a Ni{sub 65}Cr{sub 15}P{sub 16}B{sub 4} alloy by a PIB irradiation is successfully demonstrated. A shot of the mixed carbon and fluorine PIB was irradiated on a Ni{sub 65}Cr{sub 15}P{sub 16}B{sub 4} alloy to make amorphous structure. The amorphous nature of the PIB-processed surface was examined by the X-ray diffractometry. The diffraction pattern of the non-processed substrate reveals the crystalline phase which is characterized by the narrow spectrum. On the other hand, the PIB-processed Ni{sub 65}Cr{sub 15}P{sub 16}B{sub 4} alloy surface exhibit the typical diffraction pattern of the amorphous structure, when the maximum X-ray diffraction depth is within 0.66 {micro}m. Assuming that a single species of carbon of fluorine ions is injected into the nickel target, ion range, heating temperature and cooling rate for a nickel substrate are estimated to be 0.23 {micro}m, 3,150 K and 3.8 {times} 10{sup 5}K/sec, respectively. The cooling rate estimated above is enough for producing amorphous structure of nickel alloys.

  16. Ultra-Flexible, Invisible Thin-Film Transistors Enabled by Amorphous Metal Oxide/Polymer Channel Layer Blends

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-25

    Transistors Enabled by Amorphous Metal Oxide/Polymer Channel Layer Blends Xinge Yu , Li Zeng , Nanjia Zhou , Peijun Guo , Fengyuan Shi , Donald B...chemical vapor deposition processes. Thus, a key issue for inexpensive large-scale roll-to-roll production is to enable MO TFT manu- facturing with...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ultra-Flexible, ’Invisible’ Thin-Film Transistors Enabled by Amorphous Metal Oxide/Polymer Channel Layer Blends 5a. CONTRACT

  17. Optical properties of surface layers of Co-based amorphous metallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poperenko, L. V.; Kravets, V. G.; Lysenko, S. I.; Vinnichenko, K. L.

    2005-04-01

    The modification of roughness and structure of the surface layers of a cobalt-based amorphous metal alloy after thermal treatment at elevated and cryogenic temperatures and under the influence of an external magnetic field is studied by light scattering and atomic force microscopy. The parameters of the surface roughness were calculated from the measured indicatrices of light scattering. It is shown that heating of the metal ribbons to T=350-475 °C partially relieves stresses arising in the course of the ribbon preparation and increases the surface roughness compared to freshly prepared samples.

  18. Capillary flow of amorphous metal for high performance electrode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Yun; Kim, Suk Jun; Jee, Sang Soo; Park, Jin Man; Park, Keum Hwan; Park, Sung Chan; Cho, Eun Ae; Lee, Jun Ho; Song, In Yong; Lee, Sang Mock; Han, In Taek; Lim, Ka Ram; Kim, Won Tae; Park, Ju Cheol; Eckert, Jürgen; Kim, Do Hyang; Lee, Eun-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Metallic glass (MG) assists electrical contact of screen-printed silver electrodes and leads to comparable electrode performance to that of electroplated electrodes. For high electrode performance, MG needs to be infiltrated into nanometer-scale cavities between Ag particles and reacts with them. Here, we show that the MG in the supercooled state can fill the gap between Ag particles within a remarkably short time due to capillary effect. The flow behavior of the MG is revealed by computational fluid dynamics and density funtional theory simulation. Also, we suggest the formation mechanism of the Ag electrodes, and demonstrate the criteria of MG for higher electrode performance. Consequently, when Al85Ni5Y8Co2 MG is added in the Ag electrodes, cell efficiency is enhanced up to 20.30% which is the highest efficiency reported so far for screen-printed interdigitated back contact solar cells. These results show the possibility for the replacement of electroplating process to screen-printing process.

  19. Capillary flow of amorphous metal for high performance electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Yun; Kim, Suk Jun; Jee, Sang Soo; Park, Jin Man; Park, Keum Hwan; Park, Sung Chan; Cho, Eun Ae; Lee, Jun Ho; Song, In Yong; Lee, Sang Mock; Han, In Taek; Lim, Ka Ram; Kim, Won Tae; Park, Ju Cheol; Eckert, Jürgen; Kim, Do Hyang; Lee, Eun-Sung

    2013-07-01

    Metallic glass (MG) assists electrical contact of screen-printed silver electrodes and leads to comparable electrode performance to that of electroplated electrodes. For high electrode performance, MG needs to be infiltrated into nanometer-scale cavities between Ag particles and reacts with them. Here, we show that the MG in the supercooled state can fill the gap between Ag particles within a remarkably short time due to capillary effect. The flow behavior of the MG is revealed by computational fluid dynamics and density funtional theory simulation. Also, we suggest the formation mechanism of the Ag electrodes, and demonstrate the criteria of MG for higher electrode performance. Consequently, when Al85Ni5Y8Co2 MG is added in the Ag electrodes, cell efficiency is enhanced up to 20.30% which is the highest efficiency reported so far for screen-printed interdigitated back contact solar cells. These results show the possibility for the replacement of electroplating process to screen-printing process.

  20. Method for improving the oxidation-resistance of metal substrates coated with thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Anthony Mark; Gray, Dennis Michael; Jackson, Melvin Robert

    2002-01-01

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

  1. Interfacial bond strength of electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings on metals.

    PubMed

    Wei, M; Ruys, A J; Swain, M V; Kim, S H; Milthorpe, B K; Sorrell, C C

    1999-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were deposited onto substrates of metal biomaterials (Ti, Ti6Al4V, and 316L stainless steel) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Only ultra-high surface area HAp powder, prepared by the metathesis method 10Ca(NO3)2 + 6(NH4)2HPO4 + 8NH4OH), could produce dense coatings when sintered at 875-1000degreesC. Single EPD coatings cracked during sintering owing to the 15-18% sintering shrinkage, but the HAp did not decompose. The use of dual coatings (coat, sinter, coat, sinter) resolved the cracking problem. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) inspection revealed that the second coating filled in the "valleys" in the cracks of the first coating. The interfacial shear strength of the dual coatings was found, by ASTM F1044-87, to be approximately 12 MPa on a titanium substrate and approximately 22 MPa on 316L stainless steel, comparing quite favorably with the 34 MPa benchmark (the shear strength of bovine cortical bone was found to be 34 MPa). Stainless steel gave the better result since -316L (20.5 microm mK(-1)) > alpha-HAp (approximately 14 microm mK(-1)), resulting in residual compressive stresses in the coating, whereas alpha-titanium (approximately 10.3 microm mK(-1)) < alpha-HAp, resulting in residual tensile stresses in the coating.

  2. Coatings Preserve Metal, Stone, Tile, and Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    John B. Schutt, a chemist at Goddard Space Flight Center, created a coating for spacecraft that could resist corrosion and withstand high heat. After retiring from NASA, Schutt used his expertise to create new formulations for Daytona Beach, Florida-based Adsil Corporation, which now manufactures a family of coatings to preserve various surfaces. Adsil has created 150 jobs due to the products.

  3. Improved metallic and thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1981-01-01

    Low thermal conductivity two layer ceramic coatings are efficient thermal barriers between cooled matallic components and high temperature combustion gases. Potential components are combustors, blades, and vanes in aircraft engines of power-generating turbines. Presence of two layer coatings greatly reduces temperature and coolant requirements.

  4. Formation of selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide-sulfide films on metal or metal coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Eser, Erten; Fields, Shannon

    2012-05-01

    A process and composition for preventing cracking in composite structures comprising a metal coated substrate and a selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide sulfide film. Specifically, cracking is prevented in the coating of molybdenum coated substrates upon which a copper, indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) film is deposited. Cracking is inhibited by adding a Se passivating amount of oxygen to the Mo and limiting the amount of Se deposited on the Mo coating.

  5. Model for determination of mid-gap states in amorphous metal oxides from thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubel, S.; Chabinyc, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    The electronic density of states in metal oxide semiconductors like amorphous zinc oxide (a-ZnO) and its ternary and quaternary oxide alloys with indium, gallium, tin, or aluminum are different from amorphous silicon, or disordered materials such as pentacene, or P3HT. Many ZnO based semiconductors exhibit a steep decaying density of acceptor tail states (trap DOS) and a Fermi level (EF) close to the conduction band energy (EC). Considering thin film transistor (TFT) operation in accumulation mode, the quasi Fermi level for electrons (Eq) moves even closer to EC. Classic analytic TFT simulations use the simplification EC-EF> `several'kT and cannot reproduce exponential tail states with a characteristic energy smaller than 1/2 kT. We demonstrate an analytic model for tail and deep acceptor states, valid for all amorphous metal oxides and include the effect of trap assisted hopping instead of simpler percolation or mobility edge models, to account for the observed field dependent mobility.

  6. Deformation analysis of amorphous metals based on atomic elastic stiffness coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, K.; Nishimura, M.; Tomita, Y.

    2006-06-01

    The elastic limit of a crystal can be evaluated by the positiveness of elastic stiffness coefficients, Bijkl. We had demonstrated that the nucleation of lattice defects such as dislocation and cleavage cracking can be predicted by the atomic Bijkl at each atom point. Amorphous metals and bulk metallic glasses draw intense interest whether the criteria are applicable or not since they are regarded as the ultimate of lattice defects. In the present study, an amorphous Ni-Al binary alloy is made by a usual melt-quench simulation and subjected to tension by means of molecular dynamics simulation. During simulations, the positiveness of atomic Bijkl is discussed for all atoms. Contrary to an Ni-Al crystal, many atoms show negative value even in the initial equilibrium of the amorphous before loading. These unstable atoms turn out to be the non-clustered atom or the outer-shell of the local cluster such as 12(0, 0, 12, 0) icosahedron. On the other hand, the centre atoms of the local clusters show high stability resulting in the positive Bijkl of the whole system. It is also demonstrated that the change in the atomic Bijkl can reveal the collapse and re-configuration of local clusters during the deformation.

  7. 21 CFR 888.3358 - Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3358 Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3358 - Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3358 Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3358 - Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3358 Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3358 - Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3358 Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3358 - Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3358 Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  12. Preparation and characterization of amorphous SiO2 coatings deposited by mirco-arc oxidation on sintered NdFeB permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. L.; Xiao, Q. F.; Mei, D. D.; Zhong, Z. C.; Tong, Y. X.; Zheng, Y. F.; Li, L.

    2017-03-01

    Amorphous SiO2 coatings were prepared on sintered NdFeB magnets by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in silicate solution. The surface and cross-sectional morphologies, element and phase composition, corrosion resistance and magnetic properties of the coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), potentiodynamic polarization test and physical properties measurements system (PPMS). The results showed that the surface morphologies of the coatings exhibited the "coral reef" like structure, different from the typical MAO porous structure. With increasing the voltages, the thickness of the coatings increased from 12.72 to 19.90 μm, the content of Si element increased, while the contents of Fe, Nd and P elements decreased. The coatings were mainly composed of amorphous SiO2 and a few amorphous Fe2O3 and Nd2O3. The amorphous SiO2 coatings presented excellent thermal shock resistance, while the thermal shock resistance decreased with increasing the voltages. The corrosion resistance of the coatings increased with increasing the voltages, and it could be enhanced by one order of magnitude compared to the uncoated NdFeB magnets. The MAO coatings slightly decreased the magnetic properties of the NdFeB samples in different degrees.

  13. Magnetic sensors using amorphous metal materials: detection of premature ventricular magnetic waves

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    The detection of magnetic activity enables noncontact and noninvasive evaluation of electrical activity in humans. We review the detection of biomagnetic fields using amorphous metal wire-based magnetic sensors with the sensitivity of a pico-Tesla (pT) level. We measured magnetic fields close to the thoracic wall in a healthy subject sitting on a chair. The magnetic sensor head was mounted perpendicularly against the thoracic wall. Simultaneous measurements with ECG showed that changes in the magnetic field were synchronized with the cardiac electric activity, and that the magnetic wave pattern changed reflecting electrical activity of the atrium and ventricle, despite a large variation. Furthermore, magnetic waves reflecting ventricular arrhythmia were recorded in the same healthy subject. These results suggest that this magnetic sensor technology is applicable to human physiology and pathophysiology research. We also discuss future applications of amorphous wire-based magnetic sensors as well as possible improvements. PMID:24303116

  14. Magnetic sensors using amorphous metal materials: detection of premature ventricular magnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Shinsuke

    2013-07-01

    The detection of magnetic activity enables noncontact and noninvasive evaluation of electrical activity in humans. We review the detection of biomagnetic fields using amorphous metal wire-based magnetic sensors with the sensitivity of a pico-Tesla (pT) level. We measured magnetic fields close to the thoracic wall in a healthy subject sitting on a chair. The magnetic sensor head was mounted perpendicularly against the thoracic wall. Simultaneous measurements with ECG showed that changes in the magnetic field were synchronized with the cardiac electric activity, and that the magnetic wave pattern changed reflecting electrical activity of the atrium and ventricle, despite a large variation. Furthermore, magnetic waves reflecting ventricular arrhythmia were recorded in the same healthy subject. These results suggest that this magnetic sensor technology is applicable to human physiology and pathophysiology research. We also discuss future applications of amorphous wire-based magnetic sensors as well as possible improvements.

  15. Oxidation induced amorphous stabilization of the subsurface region in Zr-Cu metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, K. R.; Park, J. M.; Park, S. H.; Na, M. Y.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, W. T.

    2014-01-20

    In the present study, we demonstrate that selective surface oxidation of Zr{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} metallic glass can stabilize the amorphous structure in the subsurface region of the matrix. The oxidation proceeds by selective oxidation of Zr, forming monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} layer on the surface, and the subsurface layer becomes Cu-enriched due to back diffusion of Cu atoms from the oxide layer. Interestingly, in this system, the composition change in the subsurface region leads to enhancement of glass stability, forming of a double layered surface structure consisted of inner amorphous layer and outer monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} layer even when the remaining matrix is completely crystallized.

  16. Selective heavy metals removal from waters by amorphous zirconium phosphate: behavior and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Qingrui; Du, Wei; Zhang, Weiming; Pan, Bingjun; Zhang, Qingjian; Xu, Zhengwen; Zhang, Quanxing

    2007-07-01

    Selective removal of heavy metals from water has been of considerable concern for several decades. In the present study, the amorphous zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was synthesized and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrography (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) as well as pH-titration experiments. Uptake of heavy metals including lead, cadmium, and zinc onto ZrP was studied by using a polystyrene sulfonic-acid exchanger D-001 as a reference sorbent and Ca(2+) as a competing cation due to its ubiquity in natural or industrial waters. The results indicated that the uptake of heavy metals onto ZrP is essentially an ion-exchange process and dependent upon solution pH. In comparison with D-001, ZrP exhibited more favorable sorption of heavy metals particularly in terms of high selectivity, as indicated by the distribution coefficients of ZrP even several orders higher than D-001 towards heavy metals when calcium ion coexisted at a high level in solution. The Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic investigation indicated that the uptake of calcium, cadmium, and zinc ions onto ZrP is only driven by the electrostatic interaction, while that of lead ion is possibly dependent upon the inner-sphere complex formation with ZrP. XPS results further elucidated that ZrP displays different sorption affinity towards heavy metals in the same order as selectivity sequence of Pb(2+)>Zn(2+) approximately Cd(2+)>Ca(2+), which can be explained by hard and soft acids and bases (HASB) theory. Moreover, uptake of heavy metals onto ZrP approached to equilibrium quickly and the used ZrP could be readily regenerated for reuse by the dilute HCl solution. Thus, all the results suggest that amorphous ZrP has excellent potential as a sorption material for water treatment.

  17. Metal-Coated Optical Fibers for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeakes, Jason; Murphy, Kent; Claus, Richard; Greene, Jonathan; Tran, Tuan

    1996-01-01

    This poster will highlight on-going research at the Virginia Tech Fiber & Electro-Optics Research Center (FEORC) in the area of thin films on optical fibers. Topics will include the sputter deposition of metals and metal; alloys onto optical fiber and fiber optic sensors for innovative applications. Specific information will be available on thin film fiber optic hydrogen sensors, corrosion sensors, and metal-coated optical fiber for high temperature aerospace applications.

  18. Biocompatibility evaluation of sputtered zirconium-based thin film metallic glass-coated steels

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Balasubramanian; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Rajan, Senthilperumal Thanka

    2015-01-01

    Thin film metallic glasses comprised of Zr48Cu36Al8Ag8 (at.%) of approximately 1.5 μm and 3 μm in thickness were prepared using magnetron sputtering onto medical grade 316L stainless steel. Their structural and mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion, and antimicrobial activity were analyzed. The amorphous thin film metallic glasses consisted of a single glassy phase, with an absence of any detectable peaks corresponding to crystalline phases. Elemental composition close to the target alloy was noted from EDAX analysis of the thin film. The surface morphology of the film showed a smooth surface on scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In vitro electrochemical corrosion studies indicated that the zirconium-based metallic glass could withstand body fluid, showing superior resistance to corrosion and electrochemical stability. Interactions between the coated surface and bacteria were investigated by agar diffusion, solution suspension, and wet interfacial contact methods. The results indicated a clear zone of inhibition against the growth of microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, confirming the antimicrobial activity of the thin film metallic glasses. Cytotoxicity studies using L929 fibroblast cells showed these coatings to be noncytotoxic in nature. PMID:26491304

  19. Biocompatibility evaluation of sputtered zirconium-based thin film metallic glass-coated steels.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Balasubramanian; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Rajan, Senthilperumal Thanka

    2015-01-01

    Thin film metallic glasses comprised of Zr48Cu36Al8Ag8 (at.%) of approximately 1.5 μm and 3 μm in thickness were prepared using magnetron sputtering onto medical grade 316L stainless steel. Their structural and mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion, and antimicrobial activity were analyzed. The amorphous thin film metallic glasses consisted of a single glassy phase, with an absence of any detectable peaks corresponding to crystalline phases. Elemental composition close to the target alloy was noted from EDAX analysis of the thin film. The surface morphology of the film showed a smooth surface on scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In vitro electrochemical corrosion studies indicated that the zirconium-based metallic glass could withstand body fluid, showing superior resistance to corrosion and electrochemical stability. Interactions between the coated surface and bacteria were investigated by agar diffusion, solution suspension, and wet interfacial contact methods. The results indicated a clear zone of inhibition against the growth of microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, confirming the antimicrobial activity of the thin film metallic glasses. Cytotoxicity studies using L929 fibroblast cells showed these coatings to be noncytotoxic in nature.

  20. Hydrous silica coatings: occurrence, speciation of metals, and environmental significance.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Michael; Durocher, Jennifer L; Abdu, Yassir; Hawthorne, Frank C

    2009-12-01

    Si-enriched coatings form on the surface of silicate minerals under acidic conditions. Although they are often only a few nanometers thick, their large specific surface area may control the interaction between silicate minerals in acidic soils, aquifers, and mine tailings. Micrometer thick, hydrous-silica coatings occur on the surface of a granite outcrop in contact with acidic pond water at the Coppercliff mine-tailings area in the Greater City of Sudbury, Ontario, and are ideal to study the concentration and speciation of metals and metalloids inside Si-enriched coatings. These coatings have higher average concentrations of Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb than coatings composed of schwertmannite, Fe(8)O(8)(OH)(4.4)(SO(4))(1.8) (H(2)O)(8.4). Microscopic and spectroscopic examination of the hydrous-silica coating indicates the occurrence of Fe- and Cu-Zn-oxy-hydroxide particles, tetrahedrally coordinated Fe(3+) and a high proportion of M-O-Si bonds (M = metal). These observations suggest that metals occur either finely distributed in the hydrous-silica matrix or in oxy-hydroxide particles. The latter particles are products of the diffusion of metals into the hydrous silica and the subsequent nucleation of oxy-hydroxide phases.

  1. On the Prospects of Using Nanoindentation and Wear Test to Study the Mechanical Behavior of Fe-Based Metallic Glass Coating Reinforced by B4C Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedi, Behrooz

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Fe-based metallic glass was served as the matrix in which various ratios of hard B4C nanoparticles as reinforcing agents were prepared using a high-energy mechanical milling. The feedstock nanocomposite powders were transferred to the coatings using a high-velocity oxygen fuel process. The results showed that the microstructure of the nanocomposite coating was divided into two regions, namely a full amorphous phase region and homogeneous dispersion of B4C nanoparticles with a scale of 10 to 50 nm in a residual amorphous matrix. As the B4C content is increased, the hardness of the composite coatings is increased too, but the fracture toughness begins to be decreased at the B4C content higher than 20 vol pct. The optimal mechanical properties are obtained with 15 vol pct B4C due to the suitable content and uniform distribution of nanoparticles. The addition of 15 vol pct B4C to the Fe-based metallic glass matrix reduced the friction coefficient from 0.49 to 0.28. The average specific wear rate of the nanocomposite coating (0.48 × 10-5 mm3 Nm-1) was much less than that for the single-phase amorphous coating (1.23 × 10-5 mm3Nm-1). Consequently, the changes in wear resistance between both coatings were attributed to the changes in the brittle to ductile transition by adding B4C reinforcing nanoparticles.

  2. On the Prospects of Using Nanoindentation and Wear Test to Study the Mechanical Behavior of Fe-Based Metallic Glass Coating Reinforced by B4C Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedi, Behrooz

    2017-03-01

    In this study, Fe-based metallic glass was served as the matrix in which various ratios of hard B4C nanoparticles as reinforcing agents were prepared using a high-energy mechanical milling. The feedstock nanocomposite powders were transferred to the coatings using a high-velocity oxygen fuel process. The results showed that the microstructure of the nanocomposite coating was divided into two regions, namely a full amorphous phase region and homogeneous dispersion of B4C nanoparticles with a scale of 10 to 50 nm in a residual amorphous matrix. As the B4C content is increased, the hardness of the composite coatings is increased too, but the fracture toughness begins to be decreased at the B4C content higher than 20 vol pct. The optimal mechanical properties are obtained with 15 vol pct B4C due to the suitable content and uniform distribution of nanoparticles. The addition of 15 vol pct B4C to the Fe-based metallic glass matrix reduced the friction coefficient from 0.49 to 0.28. The average specific wear rate of the nanocomposite coating (0.48 × 10-5 mm3 Nm-1) was much less than that for the single-phase amorphous coating (1.23 × 10-5 mm3Nm-1). Consequently, the changes in wear resistance between both coatings were attributed to the changes in the brittle to ductile transition by adding B4C reinforcing nanoparticles.

  3. Osteoconductive Properties Of Metal/Metal Alloy Coated Silicon Dioxide Nanosprings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hass, Jamie L.

    This dissertation focuses on the potential of silicon dioxide nanosprings as an osteoconductive nanobiomaterial. The use of nanomaterials as substrates for tissue engineering has recently been considered and the remarkable similarity of the nanosprings and the amorphic mat to collagen fiber type 1 and woven bone, respectively, makes this nanobiomaterial a promising substrate for bone growth. The nanosprings are easily grown on many materials such as glass and orthopedic metals. In addition, there is a unique ability to coat the nanospring surface with both osteogenic metal/metal alloys and proteins. In-vitro bone tissue culture studies, surface science evaluation of osteoblast and protein attachment, and nanomechanical characterization are protocols to determine if nanosprings exhibits promise as an osteoconductive nanomaterial. Firstly, osteoblast cell behaviors on nanosprings are assessed, which were found to display a greater magnitude of proliferation, differentiation, and calcium deposition as a function of the metal/metal alloy when compared to the controls. All the nanospring substrates proved to be biocompatible and durable in the tissue culture environment for an entire 36-day incubation. Secondly, a protocol was developed to evaluate different wettable surface characteristics of the nanospring substrates and relate these to osteoblast attachment, as well as the adsorption of the serum proteins albumin and fibronectin. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) elucidated the surface stoichiometry of the nanospring substrates and after attachment of the proteins. The surface examination exposed preference for albumin to hydrophobic nanospring substrate and fibronectin to dynamically hydrophilic nanospring substrate. Lastly, nanoindentation testing of nanospring substrates before and after bone growth was performed. The hardness, stiffness and reduced elastic moduli values of the nanospring-bone matrix that

  4. Application of amorphous filler metals in production of fusion reactor high heat flux components

    SciTech Connect

    Kalin, B.A.; Fedotov, V.T.; Grigoriev, A.E.

    1994-12-31

    The technology of Al-Si, Zr-Ti-Be and Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni amorphous filler metals for Be and graphite brazing with Cu, Mo and V was developed. The fusion reactor high heat flux components from Cu-Be, Cu-graphite, Mo-Be, Mo-graphite, V-Re and V-graphite materials were produced by brazing. Every component represents metallic base, to which Be or graphite plates are brazed. The distance between plates was equal 0.2 times the plate height. These components were irradiated by hydrogen plasma with 5 x 10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} power. The microstructure and the element distribution in the brazed zone were investigated before and after heat plasma irradiation. Topography graphite plate surfaces and topography of metal surfaces between plates were also investigated after heat plasma irradiation. The results of microstructure investigation and material erosion are discussed.

  5. Hidden amorphous phase and reentrant supercooled liquid in Pd-Ni-P metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, S.; Ren, Y.; Wei, X. Y.; Wang, B.; Gilbert, E. P.; Shibayama, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ohnuma, M.; Wang, X.-L.

    2017-03-01

    An anomaly in differential scanning calorimetry has been reported in a number of metallic glass materials in which a broad exothermal peak was observed between the glass and crystallization temperatures. The mystery surrounding this calorimetric anomaly is epitomized by four decades long studies of Pd-Ni-P metallic glasses, arguably the best glass-forming alloys. Here we show, using a suite of in situ experimental techniques, that Pd-Ni-P alloys have a hidden amorphous phase in the supercooled liquid region. The anomalous exothermal peak is the consequence of a polyamorphous phase transition between two supercooled liquids, involving a change in the packing of atomic clusters over medium-range length scales as large as 18 Å. With further temperature increase, the alloy reenters the supercooled liquid phase, which forms the room-temperature glass phase on quenching. The outcome of this study raises a possibility to manipulate the structure and hence the stability of metallic glasses through heat treatment.

  6. Stoichiometry determined exchange interactions in amorphous ternary transition metal oxides: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shu-jun; Yan, Shi-shen Zhang, Yun-peng; Zhao, Ming-wen; Kang, Shi-shou; Mei, Liang-mo

    2014-07-28

    Amorphous transition metal oxides exhibit exotic transport and magnetic properties, while the absence of periodic structure has long been a major obstacle for the understanding of their electronic structure and exchange interaction. In this paper, we have formulated a theoretical approach, which combines the melt-quench approach and the spin dynamic Monte-Carlo simulations, and based on it, we explored amorphous Co{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}O{sub 1−y} ternary transition metal oxides. Our theoretical results reveal that the microstructure, the magnetic properties, and the exchange interactions of Co{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}O{sub 1−y} are strongly determined by the oxygen stoichiometry. In the oxygen-deficient sample (y > 0), we have observed the long-range ferromagnetic spin ordering which is associated with the non-stoichiometric cobalt-rich region rather than metallic clusters. On the other hand, the microstructure of stoichiometric sample takes the form of continuous random networks, and no long-range ferromagnetism has been observed in it. Magnetization characterization of experimental synthesized Co{sub 0.61}Zn{sub 0.39}O{sub 1−y} films verifies the relation between the spin ordering and the oxygen stoichiometry. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of electrical transport shows a typical feature of semiconductors, in agreement with our theoretical results.

  7. Surface coating for prevention of metallic seed migration in tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunseok; Park, Jong In; Lee, Won Seok; Park, Min; Son, Kwang-Jae; Bang, Young-bong; Choy, Young Bin E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr; Ye, Sung-Joon E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, metallic implants often detach from their deposited sites and migrate to other locations. This undesirable migration could cause inadequate dose coverage for permanent brachytherapy and difficulties in image-guided radiation delivery for patients. To prevent migration of implanted seeds, the authors propose a potential strategy to use a biocompatible and tissue-adhesive material called polydopamine. Methods: In this study, nonradioactive dummy seeds that have the same geometry and composition as commercial I-125 seeds were coated in polydopamine. Using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the surface of the polydopamine-coated and noncoated seeds was characterized. The detachment stress between the two types of seeds and the tissue was measured. The efficacy of polydopamine-coated seed was investigated through in vitro migration tests by tracing the seed location after tissue implantation and shaking for given times. The cytotoxicity of the polydopamine coating was also evaluated. Results: The results of the coating characterization have shown that polydopamine was successfully coated on the surface of the seeds. In the adhesion test, the polydopamine-coated seeds had 2.1-fold greater detachment stress than noncoated seeds. From the in vitro test, it was determined that the polydopamine-coated seed migrated shorter distances than the noncoated seed. This difference was increased with a greater length of time after implantation. Conclusions: The authors suggest that polydopamine coating is an effective technique to prevent migration of implanted seeds, especially for permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  8. Magnetic metal nanoparticles coated polyacrylonitrile textiles as microwave absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akman, O.; Kavas, H.; Baykal, A.; Toprak, M. S.; Çoruh, Ali; Aktaş, B.

    2013-02-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) textiles with 2 mm thickness are coated with magnetic nanoparticles in coating baths with Ni, Co and their alloys via an electroless metal deposition method. The crystal structure, morphology and magnetic nature of composites are investigated by X-ray Powder diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and dc magnetization measurement techniques. The frequency dependent microwave absorption measurements have been carried out in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (X and P bands). Diamagnetic and ferromagnetic properties are also investigated. Finally, the microwave absorption of composites is found strongly dependent on the coating time. One absorption peak is observed between 14.3 and 15.8 GHz with an efficient absorption bandwidth of 3.3-4.1 GHz (under -20 dB reflection loss limit). The Reflection loss (RL) can be achieved between -30 and -50 dB. It was found that the RL is decreasing and absorption bandwidth is decreasing with increasing coating time. While absorption peak moves to lower frequencies in Ni coated PAN textile, it goes higher frequencies in Co coated ones. The Ni-Co alloy coated composites have fluctuating curve of absorption frequency with respect to coating time. These results encourage further development of magnetic nanoparticle coated textile absorbers for broadband applications.

  9. Ohmic contact formation of metal/amorphous-Ge/n-Ge junctions with an anomalous modulation of Schottky barrier height

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hanhui; Wang, Peng; Qi, Dongfeng; Li, Xin; Han, Xiang; Wang, Chen; Chen, Songyan Li, Cheng; Huang, Wei

    2014-11-10

    The modulation of Schottky barrier height of metal/Ge inserting an amorphous Ge layer has been demonstrated. It is interested that the Schottky barrier height of Al/amorphous-Ge/n-Ge junctions is oscillated with increase of the a-Ge thickness from 0 to 10 nm, and when the thickness reaches above 10 nm, the Al/amorphous-Ge/n-Ge shows ohmic characteristics. Electron hopping through localized states of a-Ge layer, the alleviation of metal induced gap states, as well as the termination of dangling bonds at the amorphous-Ge/n-Ge interface are proposed to explain the anomalous modulation of Schottky barrier height.

  10. Metallic and nonmetallic coatings for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.; Crane, J.K.; Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.

    1981-04-17

    Some fusion targets designed to be driven by 0.35 to 1 ..mu..m laser light are glass spheres coated with layers of various materials such as hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, beryllium, copper, gold, platinum, etc. The glass shell, which is filled with gas, liquid or solid deuterium-tritium fuel, must have remarkably good surface and wall thickness uniformity. Methods for depositing the various materials will be discussed. They include plasma polymerization, electro-deposition, sputtering and evaporation. Many of the difficulties encountered in the coating processes are the result of coating on free spheres with very small radii - 35 to 500 micrometers. Several means of overcoming the problems will be described and experimental results presented.

  11. Protective coatings for metal alloys and methods incorporating the same

    DOEpatents

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Ibanez, Sergio; Swartz, Scott L.

    2015-06-09

    An electrochemical device having one or more solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), each of the SOFCs including a cathode, an anode, and an electrolyte layer positioned between the cathode and anode; and at least one additional component comprising a metallic substrate having an electronically conductive, chromium-free perovskite coating deposited directly thereon. The perovskite coating has the formula ABO.sub.3, wherein A is a lanthanide element or Y, and B is a mixture of two or more transition elements, with the A site undoped by any alkaline earth element, and the perovskite coating exhibits limited or no ionic transport of oxygen.

  12. Graded coatings for metallic implant alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Fujino, Shigeru; Gomez-Vega, Jose M.

    2002-08-01

    Graded glass and glass-hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been prepared using a simple enameling technique. The composition of the glasses has been tailored to match the thermal expansion of the alloys. By controlling the firing time, and temperature, it has been possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25 to 150 mu m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate, resistant to corrosion and able to precipitate hydroxyapatite during in vitro tests in simulated body fluid.

  13. Preparing oxidizer coated metal fuel particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. I.; Simmons, G. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A solid propellant composition of improved efficiency is described which includes an oxidizer containing ammonium perchlorate, and a powered metal fuel, preferably aluminum or beryllium, in the form of a composite. The metal fuel is contained in the crystalline lattice framework of the oxidizer, as well as within the oxidizer particles, and is disposed in the interstices between the oxidizer particles of the composition. The propellant composition is produced by a process comprising the crystallization of ammonium perchlorate in water, in the presence of finely divided aluminum or beryllium. A suitable binder is incorporated in the propellant composition to bind the individual particles of metal with the particles of oxidizer containing occluded metal.

  14. Synchrotron radiation photoemission study of metal overlayers on hydrogenated amorphous silicon at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, J.

    1990-09-21

    In this dissertation, metals deposited on a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film at room temperature are studied. The purpose of this work is mainly understanding the electronic properties of the interface, using high-resolution synchrotron radiation photoemission techniques as a probe. Atomic hydrogen plays an important role in passivating dangling bonds of a-Si:H films, thus reducing the gap-state distribution. In addition, singly bonded hydrogen also reduces states at the top of the valence band which are now replaced by deeper Si-H bonding states. The interface is formed by evaporating metal on an a-Si:H film in successive accumulations at room temperature. Au, Ag, and Cr were chosen as the deposited metals. Undoped films were used as substrates. Since some unique features can be found in a-Si:H, such as surface enrichment of hydrogen diffused from the bulk and instability of the free surface, we do not expect the metals/a-Si:H interface to behave exactly as its crystalline counterpart. Metal deposits, at low coverages, are found to gather preferentially around regions deficient in hydrogen. As the thickness is increased, some Si atoms in those regions are likely to leave their sites to intermix with metal overlayers like Au and Cr. 129 refs., 30 figs.

  15. Application of metal nanowire networks on hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shouyi; Hou, Guofu; Chen, Peizhuan; Jia, Baohua; Gu, Min

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate the application of metal nanowire (NW) networks as a transparent electrode on hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) solar cells. We first systematically investigate the optical performances of the metal NW networks on a-Si:H solar cells in different electrode configurations through numerical simulations to fully understand the mechanisms to guide the experiments. The theoretically optimized configuration is discovered to be metal NWs sandwiched between a 40 nm indium tin oxide (ITO) layer and a 20 nm ITO layer. The overall performances of the solar cells integrated with the metal NW networks are experimentally studied. It has been found the experimentally best performing NW integrated solar cell deviates from the theoretically predicated design due to the performance degradation induced by the fabrication complicity. A 6.7% efficiency enhancement was achieved for the solar cell with metal NW network integrated on top of a 60 nm thick ITO layer compared to the cell with only the ITO layer due to enhanced electrical conductivity by the metal NW network.

  16. Application of metal nanowire networks on hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shouyi; Hou, Guofu; Chen, Peizhuan; Jia, Baohua; Gu, Min

    2017-02-24

    We demonstrate the application of metal nanowire (NW) networks as a transparent electrode on hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) solar cells. We first systematically investigate the optical performances of the metal NW networks on a-Si:H solar cells in different electrode configurations through numerical simulations to fully understand the mechanisms to guide the experiments. The theoretically optimized configuration is discovered to be metal NWs sandwiched between a 40 nm indium tin oxide (ITO) layer and a 20 nm ITO layer. The overall performances of the solar cells integrated with the metal NW networks are experimentally studied. It has been found the experimentally best performing NW integrated solar cell deviates from the theoretically predicated design due to the performance degradation induced by the fabrication complicity. A 6.7% efficiency enhancement was achieved for the solar cell with metal NW network integrated on top of a 60 nm thick ITO layer compared to the cell with only the ITO layer due to enhanced electrical conductivity by the metal NW network.

  17. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  18. Abrasion Resistance of Al-Ni-Mm-Fe Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Composite Coating on the Surface of AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. B.; Liang, X. B.; Chen, Y. X.; Xu, B. S.

    An Al-Ni-Mm-Fe amorphous and nanocrystalline composite coating was prepared onto the surface of AZ91 magnesium alloy by high velocity arc spraying process. And the microstructure of the coating was analyzed by scanning electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The analysis results indicated that the coating consists of amorphous, nanocrystalline and crystalline phases. It has a dense structure with a low porosity of about 2.0%. Its average micro Vickers hardness value is about 330 HV0.1, which is five times than that of AZ91 magnesium alloy (62 HV0.1) and four times than that of pure Al coating (71 HV0.1). The abrasion tests showed that the Al-Ni-Mm-Fe coating exhibits a good abrasion resistance.

  19. Atomistic simulation of Voronoi-based coated nanoporous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onur Yildiz, Yunus; Kirca, Mesut

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a new method developed for the generation of periodic atomistic models of coated and uncoated nanoporous metals (NPMs) is presented by examining the thermodynamic stability of coated nanoporous structures. The proposed method is mainly based on the Voronoi tessellation technique, which provides the ability to control cross-sectional dimension and slenderness of ligaments as well as the thickness of coating. By the utilization of the method, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of randomly structured NPMs with coating can be performed efficiently in order to investigate their physical characteristics. In this context, for the purpose of demonstrating the functionality of the method, sample atomistic models of Au/Pt NPMs are generated and the effects of coating and porosity on the thermodynamic stability are investigated by using MD simulations. In addition to that, uniaxial tensile loading simulations are performed via MD technique to validate the nanoporous models by comparing the effective Young’s modulus values with the results from literature. Based on the results, while it is demonstrated that coating the nanoporous structures slightly decreases the structural stability causing atomistic configurational changes, it is also shown that the stability of the atomistic models is higher at lower porosities. Furthermore, adaptive common neighbour analysis is also performed to identify the stabilized atomistic structure after the coating process, which provides direct foresights for the mechanical behaviour of coated nanoporous structures.

  20. Investigating the structure and biocompatibility of niobium and titanium oxides as coatings for orthopedic metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, D; Wren, A W; Misture, S T; Mellott, N P

    2016-01-01

    Applying sol gel based coatings to orthopedic metallic implant materials can significantly improve their properties and lifespan in vivo. For this work, niobium (Nb2O5) and titanium (TiO2) oxides were prepared via solution processing in order to determine the effect of atomic arrangement (amorphous/crystalline) on bioactivity. Thermal evaluation on the synthesized materials identified an endotherm for Nb2O5 at 75 °C with 40% weight loss below 400 °C, and minimal weight loss between 400 and 850 °C. Regarding TiO2 an endotherm was present at 92 °C with 25% weight loss below 400 °C, and 4% between 400 and 850 °C. Phase evolution was determined using High Temperature X-ray Diffraction (HT-XRD) where amorphous-Nb2O5 (450 °C), hexagonal-Nb2O5 (525 °C), orthorhombic-Nb2O5 (650 °C), amorphous-TiO2 (275 °C) and tetragonal TiO2 (500 °C) structures were produced. Simulated body fluid (SBF) testing was conducted over 1, 7 and 30 days and resulted in positive chemical and morphological changes for crystalline Nb2O5 (525 °C) and TiO2 (500 °C) after 30 days of incubation. Rod-like CaP deposits were observed on the surfaces using Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Grazing Incidence-X-ray Diffraction (GI-XRD) shows that the deposits were X-ray amorphous. Cell viability was higher with the TiO2 (122%) samples when compared to the growing cell population while Nb2O5 samples exhibited a range of viability (64-105%), partially dependent on materials atomic structure.

  1. Bulk Formation of Metallic Glasses and Amorphous Silicon from the Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1985-01-01

    By using metallic glass compositions with a high relative glass transition temperature, such as Pd40Ni40P20, homogeneous nucleation also becomes negligible. Large (5g) masses of this alloys were obtained using a molten B2O3 flux. Presently, bulk glass formation in iron based glasses is being investigated. It is expected that if an undercooling of about 250K can be achieved in a Ge or Si melt, formation of the amorphous semiconductor phase (rather than the crystal) may be kinetically favored. The volumetric behavior of undercooled liquid Ga droplet dispersion is investigated by dilatometry. A theoretical model (both analytical and numerical) was developed for transient nucleation in glass forming melts. The model, originally designed for isothermal conditions, was extended to continuous quenching. It is being applied to glass formation in various metallic and oxide systems. A further refinement will be the inclusion of diffusion controlled interfacial rearrangements governing the growth of the crystal embryos.

  2. Direct observation of small cluster mobility and ripening. [during annealing of metal films on amorphous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1975-01-01

    Direct evidence is reported for the simultaneous occurrence of Ostwald ripening and short-distance cluster mobility during annealing of discontinuous metal films on clean amorphous substrates. The annealing characteristics of very thin particulate deposits of silver on amorphized clean surfaces of single crystalline thin graphite substrates were studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under controlled environmental conditions (residual gas pressure of 10 to the minus 9th power torr) in the temperature range from 25 to 450 C. Sputter cleaning of the substrate surface, metal deposition, and annealing were monitored by TEM observation. Pseudostereographic presentation of micrographs in different annealing stages, the observation of the annealing behavior at cast shadow edges, and measurements with an electronic image analyzing system were employed to aid the visual perception and the analysis of changes in deposit structure recorded during annealing. Slow Ostwald ripening was found to occur in the entire temperature range, but the overriding surface transport mechanism was short-distance cluster mobility.

  3. Ionic Liquid Activation of Amorphous Metal-Oxide Semiconductors for Flexible Transparent Electronic Devices

    DOE PAGES

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony T.; ...

    2016-02-09

    To begin this abstract, amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors offer the high carrier mobilities and excellent large-area uniformity required for high performance, transparent, flexible electronic devices; however, a critical bottleneck to their widespread implementation is the need to activate these materials at high temperatures which are not compatible with flexible polymer substrates. The highly controllable activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels using ionic liquid gating at room temperature is reported. Activation is controlled by electric field-induced oxygen migration across the ionic liquid-semiconductor interface. In addition to activation of unannealed devices, it is shown that threshold voltages of a transistormore » can be linearly tuned between the enhancement and depletion modes. Finally, the first ever example of transparent flexible thin film metal oxide transistor on a polyamide substrate created using this simple technique is demonstrated. Finally, this study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as a promising alternative to traditional postdeposition thermal annealing which opens the door to wide scale implementation into flexible electronic applications.« less

  4. Ionic Liquid Activation of Amorphous Metal-Oxide Semiconductors for Flexible Transparent Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony T.; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Haglund, Amanda V.; Dai, Sheng; Ward, Thomas Zac; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-02-09

    To begin this abstract, amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors offer the high carrier mobilities and excellent large-area uniformity required for high performance, transparent, flexible electronic devices; however, a critical bottleneck to their widespread implementation is the need to activate these materials at high temperatures which are not compatible with flexible polymer substrates. The highly controllable activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels using ionic liquid gating at room temperature is reported. Activation is controlled by electric field-induced oxygen migration across the ionic liquid-semiconductor interface. In addition to activation of unannealed devices, it is shown that threshold voltages of a transistor can be linearly tuned between the enhancement and depletion modes. Finally, the first ever example of transparent flexible thin film metal oxide transistor on a polyamide substrate created using this simple technique is demonstrated. Finally, this study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as a promising alternative to traditional postdeposition thermal annealing which opens the door to wide scale implementation into flexible electronic applications.

  5. Microstructure and tribological properties of Zr-based amorphous-nanocrystalline coatings deposited on the surface of titanium alloys by Electrospark Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiang; Tan, Yefa; Zhou, Chunhua; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Zhongwei

    2015-11-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of titanium alloys, the Zr-based amorphous-nanocrystalline coatings were prepared by Electrospark Deposition (ESD) on the surface of TC11. The microstructure of the coatings was analyzed and the tribological behavior and mechanism of the coatings were investigated. The results show that the coating is mainly composed of amorphous phase Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 and distributed a large number of nano particles with the diameter between 2 nm and 4 nm such as CuZr3, Ni2Zr3, NiZr2, etc. The new alloy system made up of molten electrode material of Zr-based alloy and TC11 substrate has a large glass forming ability, which transforms to amorphous phase in the rapid heating and cooling ESD process. The long-range diffusions of atoms such as Zr and Cu in amorphous microstructure play an important role in nano nucleation growth. The coating is dense, uniform, bonding with TC11 substrate metallurgically. The thickness of the coating is from 55 μm to 60 μm and the average microhardness is 801.3 HV0.025. The coating has good friction-reducing and anti-wear properties. The friction coefficient of the coating changes between 0.13 and 0.21 with small fluctuation, decreasing about 60% compared to that of TC11 substrate. And the wear resistance of the coating is increased by 57% than that of TC11 substrate. The main wear mechanism of the coating is micro-cutting wear accompanied with oxidation wear.

  6. FUSED SALT METHOD FOR COATING URANIUM WITH A METAL

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for coating uranium with a less active metal such as Cr, Ni, or Cu comprising immersing the U in a substantially anhydrous molten solution of a halide of these less active metals in a ternary chloride composition which consists of selected percentages of KCl, NaCl and another chloride such as LiCl or CaCl/sub 2/.

  7. Method for Making Metal Coated Powders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-19

    of cobalt, copper , nickel, lead and silver using the polyol method . These particles consisted of single elements. Depending upon the... Copper -coated alumina powders formed by this method . Two grams of alpha-form alumina, -325 mesh, as added to a stirred solution of ethylene glycol...can be controlled by the selection of the proper synthesis conditions to favor either nucleation or growth, respectively. Figure 1 is a LaMer

  8. Coated metal sintering carriers for fuel cell electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Donelson, Richard; Bryson, E. S.

    1998-01-01

    A carrier for conveying components of a fuel cell to be sintered through a sintering furnace. The carrier comprises a metal sheet coated with a water-based carbon paint, the water-based carbon paint comprising water, powdered graphite, an organic binder, a wetting agent, a dispersing agent and a defoaming agent.

  9. Coated metal sintering carriers for fuel cell electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Donelson, R.; Bryson, E.S.

    1998-11-10

    A carrier is described for conveying components of a fuel cell to be sintered through a sintering furnace. The carrier comprises a metal sheet coated with a water-based carbon paint, the water-based carbon paint comprising water, powdered graphite, an organic binder, a wetting agent, a dispersing agent and a defoaming agent.

  10. Theoretical adhesion strength of diamond coating with metallic interlayers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haibo; Qi, Yue; Li, Xiaodong

    2009-03-01

    Metallic interlayers are often needed to enhance the adhesion of diamond coatings to substrates and to promote diamond nucleation and growth. The interfaces between diamond coatings and metallic interlayer materials with different carbide formation enthalpies, Cu, Al, and Ti, are studied using density functional theory. The ideal interface strength or the work of separation is found to decrease with the carbide formation enthalpy. Analysis to the electronic structure shows that covalent metal-carbon bonds form at the interface, and the perturbation from the interface weakens nearby metal phase. Comparing the work of separation at the interface with the fracture energy of the metal, a fracture is likely to initiate in the metal phase near the interface, therefore a tough metal with a large surface energy is needed to achieve a higher overall toughness. In addition, when the surface energy is larger than the interface energy, a wetted diamond/metal interface is formed during diamond nucleation, which also contributes to good adhesion. The interface energy, which is an energy barrier to diamond nucleation, is found to decrease with the carbide formation enthalpy. These results indicate strong carbide formability and a large surface energy of the interlayer enhance the adhesion and the fracture resistance of the interface, and also conduce to the diamond nucleation on the interlayer.

  11. Metallic biomaterials TiN-coated: corrosion analysis and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, André Luís; Vanâncio, Everaldo Carlos; Canale, Lauralice de Campos Franceschini; da Silva, Orivaldo Lopes; Huerta-Vilca, Domingos; Motheo, Artur de Jesus

    2003-05-01

    Corrosion processes due to contact with the physiological environment should be avoided or minimized in orthopedic implants. Four metallic substrates frequently used as biomaterials: pure Ti, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, ASTM F138 stainless steel, and Co-Cr-Mo alloy, were coated with TiN using the physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. These coatings have been screened by polarization curves in physiological solutions. TiN prepared by PVD is efficient as coating for stainless steel. On titanium and alloy there are no benefits concerning the corrosion resistance compared to the bare Ti-materials. TiN coatings have been screened according to ISO 10993 standard tests for biocompatibility and exhibited no cytotoxicity, dermal irritation, or acute systemic toxicity response.

  12. Transient liquid-phase bonding using coated metal powders

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, W.D.; Eagar, T.W.

    1997-04-01

    Powder particles coated with a small amount of melting point depressant (MPD) reveal different sintering behavior in comparison to an uncoated powder mixture of the same composition. Interlayers consisting of the coated powder particles were used in the transient liquid-phase (TLP) bonding process. The coating material and the thickness of the deposit are important parameters that influence shrinkage. The amount of MPD was controlled such that the volume fraction of the liquid was very small but existed at all contacts, thus improving densification of the interlayer. Ni-20Cr and 304L stainless steel powders coated with Ni-10P were applied to join 304 stainless steels. Fully dense joints with mechanical properties comparable to those of the base metals were obtained with Ni-20Cr powder interlayers, whereas joints with 304L stainless steel powder interlayers showed inferior mechanical properties due to residual porosity in the joints.

  13. Helium-3 in nickel-base amorphous metals: Surface features, subsurface microstructure, migration, and release upon annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Uenleu, K.

    1989-01-01

    The amorphous alloys Ni{sub 75.1}Cr{sub 14}P{sub 10.1}C{sub 0.08}, Ni{sub 63.5}Zr{sub 36.5}, and Ni{sub 87.7}P{sub 12.3} have been implanted with 150 keV helium-3 ions with doses 1 {times} 10{sup 16} He{sup 3}/cm{sup 2} and 5 {times} 10{sup 16} He{sup 3}/cm{sup 2}. The samples were isochronally annealed at several consecutive stages up t their crystallization temperatures. The surface features were examined by scanning electron microscope, subsurface microstructural changes were investigated by electron diffraction using a scanning transmission electron microscope, and helium-3 depth profiles were measured by a thermal neutron induced nuclear reaction technique called neutron depth profiling (NDP). It was confirmed that for amorphous metals: (a) the helium-3 release is concentration dependent; (b) the migration and the release of helium-3 is controlled by detrapping mechanism; and (c) the crystallization temperatures obtained in this study are in agreement with the reported values. The penetration depth or the projected depth of helium-3 ions with an initial energy of 150 keV is measured here for the first time after obtaining the depth profiles by using the NDP technique. The most probable range values are: 320 nm for Ni{sub 75.1}Cr{sub 14}P{sub 10.1}C{sub 0.08}, 378 nm for Ni{sub 63.5}Zr{sub 36.5} and 375 nm for Ni{sub 87.7}P{sub 12.3}. No blisters, bubbles or pitting were observed on the samples when they were annealed up to their crystallization temperature. Some of the helium-3 trapped in amorphous metals seems not to be as strongly bound as in single crystal nickel. More helium-3 release was observed for the metal-metal amorphous metal samples than the metal-metalloid amorphous metal. For metal-metal amorphous alloy the helium-3 release behavior can be correlated with the partial or full crystallization. For metal-metalloid amorphous alloys this correlation may depend on the chemical composition.

  14. Self-dissolution assisted coating on magnesium metal for biodegradable bone fixation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakbaz, Hadis; Walter, Rhys; Gordon, Timothy; Bobby Kannan, M.

    2014-12-01

    An attempt was made to develop a self-dissolution assisted coating on a pure magnesium metal for potential bone fixation implants. Magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) was coated successfully on the magnesium metal in ammonium dihydrogen phosphate solution. The in vitro degradation behaviour of the MPC coated metal was evaluated using electrochemical techniques. The MPC coating increased the polarisation resistance (RP) of the metal by ˜150% after 2 h immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and reduced the corrosion current density (icorr) by ˜80%. The RP of the MPC coated metal remained relatively high even after 8 h immersion period. However, post-degradation analysis of the MPC coated metal revealed localized attack. Hence, the study suggests that MPC coating alone may not be beneficial, but this novel coating could provide additional protection if used as a precursor for other potential coatings such as biodegradable polymers or calcium phosphates.

  15. Electronic structure and conductivity of nanocomposite metal (Au,Ag,Cu,Mo)-containing amorphous carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Endrino, Jose L.; Horwat, David; Gago, Raul; Andersson, Joakim; Liu, Y.S.; Guo, Jinghua; Anders, Andre

    2008-05-14

    In this work, we study the influence of the incorporation of different metals (Me = Au, Ag, Cu, Mo) on the electronic structure of amorphous carbon (a-C:Me) films. The films were produced at room temperature using a novel pulsed dual-cathode arc deposition technique. Compositional analysis was performed with secondary neutral mass spectroscopy whereas X-ray diffraction was used to identify the formation of metal nanoclusters in the carbon matrix. The metal content incorporated in the nanocomposite films induces a drastic increase in the conductivity, in parallel with a decrease in the band gap corrected from Urbach energy. The electronic structure as a function of the Me content has been monitored by x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the C K-edge. XANES showed that the C host matrix has a dominant graphitic character and that it is not affected significantly by the incorporation of metal impurities, except for the case of Mo, where the modifications in the lineshape spectra indicated the formation of a carbide phase. Subtle modifications of the spectral lineshape are discussed in terms of nanocomposite formation.

  16. Coating of metal implant materials with strontium.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias J; Walter, Martin S; Tiainen, Hanna; Rubert, Marina; Monjo, Marta; Lyngstadaas, S Petter; Haugen, Håvard J

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to show that cathodic polarization can be used for coating commercial implant surfaces with an immobilized but functional and bioavailable surface layer of strontium (Sr). Moreover, this study assessed the effect of fluorine on Sr-attachment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that addition of fluorine (F) to the buffer during coating increased surface Sr-amounts but also changed the chemical surface composition by adding SrF2 alongside of SrO whereas pre-treatment of the surface by pickling in hydrofluoric acid appeared to hinder Sr-attachment. Assessment of the bio-availability hinted at a positive effect of Sr on cell differentiation given that the surface reactivity of the original surface remained unchanged. Additional SrF2 on the surface appeared to reduce undesired surface contamination while maintaining the surface micro-topography and micro-morphology. Anyhow, this surface modification revealed to create nano-nodules on the surface.

  17. Method For Improving The Oxidation Resistance Of Metal Substrates Coated With Thermal Barrier Coatings

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Anthony Mark; Gray, Dennis Michael; Jackson, Melvin Robert

    2003-05-13

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described. A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

  18. Cr-Free Metallic-Ceramic Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    PT6-, etc. Nov. 2014 ASM/TSS Aerospace Ctgs. Conf. & Expo. 4 • Al-Chromate/Phosphate Slurries Contain Hexavalent Chromium PEL = 5...Aluminum Metallic-Ceramics Al-Cr2O7/PO4 • Zero VOC’s. • 13.0 wt. % inorganic phosphates • 3.3 wt. % Cr+6 (hexavalent chromium ) before curing

  19. SILANE-BASED CONVERSION COATING FOR METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the past three years, a project to develop new pretreatment rinses for metals was carried out by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the University of Cincinnati. The project involved optimization of laboratory rinses with dilute aqueous solutions organofunctional s...

  20. The Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Coated Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, David C.; Pederson, Mark R.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    1998-03-01

    Clusters composed of fullerene molecules with an outer shell of transition metal atoms in the composition C_60M_62 (M being a transition metal) have been produced with laser vaporisation techniques(F. Tast, N. Malinowski, S. Frank, M. Heinebrodt, I.M.L. Billas, and T. P. Martin, Z. Phys D 40), 351 (1997).. We have studied several of these very large systems with a parallel version of the all-electron NRLMOL cluster code. Optimized geometries of the metal encased fullerenes C_60Ti_62 and C_60V_62 are presented along with their HOMO-LUMO gaps, electron affinities, ionization energies, and cohesive energies. We compare the stability of these clusters to relaxed met-car structures (e.g. Ti_8C_12) and to relaxed rocksalt metal-carbide fragments (TiC)n with n=8 and 32. In addition to metal-coated fullerenes we consider the possibility of a trilayered structure consisting of a small shell of metal atoms enclosed by a metal coated fullerene. The nature of bonding in these systems is analyzed by studying the electronic charge distributions.

  1. Probing Stochastic Nano-Scale Inelastic Events in Stressed Amorphous Metal

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Fu, X. L.; Wang, S.; Liu, Z. Y.; Ye, Y. F.; Sun, B. A.; Liu, C. T.

    2014-01-01

    One fundamental yet longstanding issue in materials science is how local inelasticity arises within an amorphous structure before yielding occurs. Although many possible scenarios were postulated or predicted by theories and simulations,however, direct experimental evidence has been lacking today due to the lack of a sensitive way to detect nano-scale inelasticity. Through the carefully designed microcompression method as coupled with the state-of-art nano-scale electric resistance measurement, we here unfold a stochastic inelastic deformation process in a Zr-based metallic glass, which takes place via the recurrence of two types of short-lived inelastic events causing structural damage and recovery, respectively, prior to yielding. Our current findings reveal that these stochastic events not only self-organize into sub-critical events due to elastic coupling, but also compete with each other in a way that enables the whole amorphous structure to self-heal as well as to sustain local damage. PMID:25331932

  2. Visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based TFTs for transparent electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Tae-Jun

    2014-10-15

    We investigate the origin of visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin film transistors (oxide-TFTs) for transparent electronics by exploring the shift in threshold voltage (V{sub th}). A large hysteresis window in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) TFTs possessing large optical band-gap (≈3 eV) was observed in a visible-light illuminated condition whereas no hysteresis window was shown in a dark measuring condition. We also report the instability caused by photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress in oxide-TFTs. Larger V{sub th} shift was observed after photo-induced stress combined with a negative gate bias than the sum of that after only illumination stress and only negative gate bias stress. Such results can be explained by trapped charges at the interface of semiconductor/dielectric and/or in the gate dielectric which play a role in a screen effect on the electric field applied by gate voltage, for which we propose that the localized-states-assisted transitions by visible-light absorption can be responsible.

  3. Real-time Measurement of Biomagnetic Vector Fields in Functional Syncytium Using Amorphous Metal

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Uchiyama, Tusyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic field detection of biological electric activities would provide a non-invasive and aseptic estimate of the functional state of cellular organization, namely a syncytium constructed with cell-to-cell electric coupling. In this study, we investigated the properties of biomagnetic waves which occur spontaneously in gut musculature as a typical functional syncytium, by applying an amorphous metal-based gradio-magneto sensor operated at ambient temperature without a magnetic shield. The performance of differentiation was improved by using a single amorphous wire with a pair of transducer coils. Biomagnetic waves of up to several nT were recorded ~1 mm below the sample in a real-time manner. Tetraethyl ammonium (TEA) facilitated magnetic waves reflected electric activity in smooth muscle. The direction of magnetic waves altered depending on the relative angle of the muscle layer and magneto sensor, indicating the existence of propagating intercellular currents. The magnitude of magnetic waves rapidly decreased to ~30% by the initial and subsequent 1 mm separations between sample and sensor. The large distance effect was attributed to the feature of bioelectric circuits constructed by two reverse currents separated by a small distance. This study provides a method for detecting characteristic features of biomagnetic fields arising from a syncytial current. PMID:25744476

  4. The peculiar behavior of the glass transition temperature of amorphous drug-polymer films coated on inert sugar spheres.

    PubMed

    Dereymaker, Aswin; Van Den Mooter, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Fluid bed coating has been proposed in the past as an alternative technology for manufacturing of drug-polymer amorphous solid dispersions, or so-called glass solutions. It has the advantage of being a one-step process, and thus omitting separate drying steps, addition of excipients, or manipulation of the dosage form. In search of an adequate sample preparation method for modulated differential scanning calorimetry analysis of beads coated with glass solutions, glass transition broadening and decrease of the glass transition temperature (Tg ) were observed with increasing particle size of crushed coated beads and crushed isolated films of indomethacin (INDO) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Substituting INDO with naproxen gave comparable results. When ketoconazole was probed or the solvent in INDO-PVP films was switched to dichloromethane (DCM) or a methanol-DCM mixture, two distinct Tg regions were observed. Small particle sizes had a glass transition in the high Tg region, and large particle sizes had a glass transition in the low Tg region. This particle size-dependent glass transition was ascribed to different residual solvent amounts in the bulk and at the surface of the particles. A correlation was observed between the deviation of the Tg from that calculated from the Gordon-Taylor equation and the amount of residual solvent at the Tg of particles with different sizes.

  5. Effect of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating on the resistivity and wear of single-walled carbon nanotube network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Ajai; Kaskela, Antti; Novikov, Serguei; Etula, Jarkko; Liu, Xuwen; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Koskinen, Jari

    2016-05-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube networks (SWCNTNs) were coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) to improve the mechanical wear properties of the composite film. The ta-C deposition was performed by using pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method resulting in the generation of C+ ions in the energy range of 40-60 eV which coalesce to form a ta-C film. The primary disadvantage of this process is a significant increase in the electrical resistance of the SWCNTN post coating. The increase in the SWCNTN resistance is attributed primarily to the intrinsic stress of the ta-C coating which affects the inter-bundle junction resistance between the SWCNTN bundles. E-beam evaporated carbon was deposited on the SWCNTNs prior to the ta-C deposition in order to protect the SWCNTN from the intrinsic stress of the ta-C film. The causes of changes in electrical resistance and the effect of evaporated carbon thickness on the changes in electrical resistance and mechanical wear properties have been studied.

  6. Dilution effect on the formation of amorphous phase in the laser cladded Ni-Fe-B-Si-Nb coatings after laser remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruifeng; Li, Zhuguo; Huang, Jian; Zhu, Yanyan

    2012-08-01

    Ni-Fe-B-Si-Nb coatings have been deposited on mild steel substrates using high power diode laser cladding. Scanning laser beam at high speeds was followed to remelt the surface of the coatings. Different laser cladding powers in the range of 700-1000 W were used to obtain various dilution ratios in the coating. The dilution effect on the chemical characterization, phase composition and microstructure is analyzed by energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning-electron microscopy. The microhardness distribution of the coatings after laser processing is also measured. The results reveal that Ni-based amorphous composite coatings have successfully been fabricated on mild steel substrate at low dilution ratio when the cladding power was 700 W, 800 W and 900 W. While at high laser power of 1000 W, no amorphous phase was found. The coatings with low dilution ratio exhibit the highest microhardness of 1200 HV0.5 due to their largest volume fraction of amorphous phase.

  7. Digital image processing of nanometer-size metal particles on amorphous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soria, F.; Artal, P.; Bescos, J.; Heinemann, K.

    1989-01-01

    The task of differentiating very small metal aggregates supported on amorphous films from the phase contrast image features inherently stemming from the support is extremely difficult in the nanometer particle size range. Digital image processing was employed to overcome some of the ambiguities in evaluating such micrographs. It was demonstrated that such processing allowed positive particle detection and a limited degree of statistical size analysis even for micrographs where by bare eye examination the distribution between particles and erroneous substrate features would seem highly ambiguous. The smallest size class detected for Pd/C samples peaks at 0.8 nm. This size class was found in various samples prepared under different evaporation conditions and it is concluded that these particles consist of 'a magic number' of 13 atoms and have cubooctahedral or icosahedral crystal structure.

  8. Pressure-induced Transformations of Dense Carbonyl Sulfide to Singly Bonded Amorphous Metallic Solid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minseob; Dias, Ranga; Ohishi, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Takehiro; Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-01-01

    The application of pressure, internal or external, transforms molecular solids into non-molecular extended network solids with diverse crystal structures and electronic properties. These transformations can be understood in terms of pressure-induced electron delocalization; however, the governing mechanisms are complex because of strong lattice strains, phase metastability and path dependent phase behaviors. Here, we present the pressure-induced transformations of linear OCS (R3m, Phase I) to bent OCS (Cm, Phase II) at 9 GPa; an amorphous, one-dimensional (1D) polymer at 20 GPa (Phase III); and an extended 3D network above ~35 GPa (Phase IV) that metallizes at ~105 GPa. These results underscore the significance of long-range dipole interactions in dense OCS, leading to an extended molecular alloy that can be considered a chemical intermediate of its two end members, CO2 and CS2. PMID:27527241

  9. What Can Plasticity of Amorphous Silicon Tell Us about Plasticity of Metallic Glasses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argon, A. S.; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2008-08-01

    In a recent set of computer simulations, we have analyzed the atomic-level kinematics and kinetics of the plastic relaxations that constitute shear transformations (STs) responsible for plasticity in amorphous silicon (a-Si). Here, we summarize the rich mechanistic details of the triggering of these transformations from “fertile” sites having a slight excess of liquidlike atomic environments and develop analytical models for the evolution of liquidlike material with plastic strain, leading to a unique flow state. Furthermore, a kinetic model of flow is developed, which accounts for the stress-strain curves with broad yield phenomena as well as for the temperature dependence of the plastic resistance found in the simulations. While the details of these findings apply specifically to network glasses of a-Si, we find far-reaching parallels to the flow mechanisms in metallic and polymeric glasses.

  10. Coercivity of domain wall motion in thin films of amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansuripur, M.; Giles, R. C.; Patterson, G.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of a two dimensional lattice of magnetic dipoles are performed on the Connection Machine. The lattice is a discrete model for thin films of amorphous rare-earth transition metal alloys, which have application as the storage media in erasable optical data storage systems. In these simulations, the dipoles follow the dynamic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation under the influence of an effective field arising from local anisotropy, near-neighbor exchange, classical dipole-dipole interactions, and an externally applied field. Various sources of coercivity, such as defects and/or inhomogeneities in the lattice, are introduced and the subsequent motion of domain walls in response to external fields is investigated.

  11. Pressure-induced Transformations of Dense Carbonyl Sulfide to Singly Bonded Amorphous Metallic Solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minseob; Dias, Ranga; Ohishi, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Takehiro; Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-08-01

    The application of pressure, internal or external, transforms molecular solids into non-molecular extended network solids with diverse crystal structures and electronic properties. These transformations can be understood in terms of pressure-induced electron delocalization; however, the governing mechanisms are complex because of strong lattice strains, phase metastability and path dependent phase behaviors. Here, we present the pressure-induced transformations of linear OCS (R3m, Phase I) to bent OCS (Cm, Phase II) at 9 GPa an amorphous, one-dimensional (1D) polymer at 20 GPa (Phase III); and an extended 3D network above ~35 GPa (Phase IV) that metallizes at ~105 GPa. These results underscore the significance of long-range dipole interactions in dense OCS, leading to an extended molecular alloy that can be considered a chemical intermediate of its two end members, CO2 and CS2.

  12. Paint coating characterization for thermoelastic stress analysis of metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. F.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Quinn, S.; Burguete, R. L.

    2010-08-01

    In thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) it is normal practice to coat metallic specimens with black paint to enhance and standardize the surface emissivity. It is assumed that the paint coating has no effect on the thermal emission from the specimen, but it is well known that the response is sensitive to paint coating thickness, particularly at higher frequencies. In this paper the effects of loading frequency and paint coating thickness on the thermoelastic response are investigated. The thermoelastic response is compared to theory, and optimum test conditions and coating characteristics are suggested. The motivation for the work is to develop a TSA-based means of residual stress assessment, where the measurement of much smaller temperature changes than those that are resolved in standard TSA is required; therefore the analysis is much more sensitive to the effects of the paint coating. However, the work presented in this paper is relevant to a wide range of TSA investigations and presents data that will be of interest to all practitioners of TSA.

  13. Smart Metal-Organic Framework Coatings: Triggered Antibiofilm Compound Release.

    PubMed

    Claes, Birgit; Boudewijns, Tom; Muchez, Laurens; Hooyberghs, Geert; Van der Eycken, Erik V; Vanderleyden, Jozef; Steenackers, Hans P; De Vos, Dirk E

    2017-02-08

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a large potential for delivery of active molecules. Here, a MOF coating is investigated as a smart host matrix for triggered release of antibiofilm compounds. In addition to a coating consisting of the regular Fe-terephthalate MIL-88B(Fe), a new hydrophobic MIL-88B(Fe) coating is synthesized in hydrothermal conditions using palmitic acid as a lattice terminating group. These porous materials are used as a host matrix for the antibiofilm compound 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-(2-isobutyl)-2-aminoimidazole, which has a specific biofilm-inhibiting effect at concentrations at which no activity against planktonic cells is detected. The stability of MIL-88B(Fe) in distilled water and tryptic soy broth medium is investigated, together with the ability of iron(III) chelators to serve as a trigger for controlled decomposition of MIL-88B(Fe) by metal complexation. Organic iron chelators are used to mimic the iron chelating function of siderophores, which are specific molecules excreted by biofilm-forming bacteria. Trisodium citrate is able to chelate metal ions from the junctions of the framework. By sequestration of these metal ions, the host matrix is partially degraded, resulting in an antibiofilm compound release. Finally, the antibiofilm properties against Salmonella Typhimurium are validated by monitoring biofilm growth on MOF layers either loaded or not with aminoimidazole. A strong proof-of-concept is shown for efficient inhibition of biofilm growth through triggered antibiofilm compound release.

  14. Hidden amorphous phase and reentrant supercooled liquid in Pd-Ni-P metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Lan, S; Ren, Y; Wei, X Y; Wang, B; Gilbert, E P; Shibayama, T; Watanabe, S; Ohnuma, M; Wang, X-L

    2017-03-17

    An anomaly in differential scanning calorimetry has been reported in a number of metallic glass materials in which a broad exothermal peak was observed between the glass and crystallization temperatures. The mystery surrounding this calorimetric anomaly is epitomized by four decades long studies of Pd-Ni-P metallic glasses, arguably the best glass-forming alloys. Here we show, using a suite of in situ experimental techniques, that Pd-Ni-P alloys have a hidden amorphous phase in the supercooled liquid region. The anomalous exothermal peak is the consequence of a polyamorphous phase transition between two supercooled liquids, involving a change in the packing of atomic clusters over medium-range length scales as large as 18 Å. With further temperature increase, the alloy reenters the supercooled liquid phase, which forms the room-temperature glass phase on quenching. The outcome of this study raises a possibility to manipulate the structure and hence the stability of metallic glasses through heat treatment.

  15. Room temperature phosphorescence of metal-free organic materials in amorphous polymer matrices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongwook; Bolton, Onas; Kim, Byoung Choul; Youk, Ji Ho; Takayama, Shuichi; Kim, Jinsang

    2013-04-24

    Developing metal-free organic phosphorescent materials is promising but challenging because achieving emissive triplet relaxation that outcompetes the vibrational loss of triplets, a key process to achieving phosphorescence, is difficult without heavy metal atoms. While recent studies reveal that bright room temperature phosphorescence can be realized in purely organic crystalline materials through directed halogen bonding, these organic phosphors still have limitations to practical applications due to the stringent requirement of high quality crystal formation. Here we report bright room temperature phosphorescence by embedding a purely organic phosphor into an amorphous glassy polymer matrix. Our study implies that the reduced beta (β)-relaxation of isotactic PMMA most efficiently suppresses vibrational triplet decay and allows the embedded organic phosphors to achieve a bright 7.5% phosphorescence quantum yield. We also demonstrate a microfluidic device integrated with a novel temperature sensor based on the metal-free purely organic phosphors in the temperature-sensitive polymer matrix. This unique system has many advantages: (i) simple device structures without feeding additional temperature sensing agents, (ii) bright phosphorescence emission, (iii) a reversible thermal response, and (iv) tunable temperature sensing ranges by using different polymers.

  16. Hidden amorphous phase and reentrant supercooled liquid in Pd-Ni-P metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Lan, S.; Ren, Y.; Wei, X. Y.; Wang, B.; Gilbert, E. P.; Shibayama, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ohnuma, M.; Wang, X. -L.

    2017-01-01

    An anomaly in differential scanning calorimetry has been reported in a number of metallic glass materials in which a broad exothermal peak was observed between the glass and crystallization temperatures. The mystery surrounding this calorimetric anomaly is epitomized by four decades long studies of Pd-Ni-P metallic glasses, arguably the best glass-forming alloys. Here we show, using a suite of in situ experimental techniques, that Pd-Ni-P alloys have a hidden amorphous phase in the supercooled liquid region. The anomalous exothermal peak is the consequence of a polyamorphous phase transition between two supercooled liquids, involving a change in the packing of atomic clusters over medium-range length scales as large as 18 Å. With further temperature increase, the alloy reenters the supercooled liquid phase, which forms the room-temperature glass phase on quenching. The outcome of this study raises a possibility to manipulate the structure and hence the stability of metallic glasses through heat treatment. PMID:28303882

  17. Effect of chromium and phosphorus on the physical properties of iron and titanium-based amorphous metallic alloy films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Distefano, S.; Rameshan, R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous iron and titanium-based alloys containing various amounts of chromium, phosphorus, and boron exhibit high corrosion resistance. Some physical properties of Fe and Ti-based metallic alloy films deposited on a glass substrate by a dc-magnetron sputtering technique are reported. The films were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, stress analysis, SEM, XRD, SIMS, electron microprobe, and potentiodynamic polarization techniques.

  18. Amorphous carbon enriched with pyridinic nitrogen as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingyan; Wang, Xin; Cui, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Guangmin; Zheng, Weitao

    2014-01-18

    An amorphous metal-free N-doped carbon film prepared by sputtering and annealing exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity and superior stability and methanol tolerance to the commercial Pt/C catalyst via a four-electron pathway for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Pyridinic nitrogen in films plays a key role in electrocatalytic activity for ORR.

  19. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, Jr., Joseph K.; Gensse, Chantal

    1993-01-01

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials.

  20. Corrosion resistant coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Thakoor, A. P.; Williams, R. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate with an amorphous metal is described. A solid piece of the metal is bombarded with ions of an inert gas in the presence of a magnetic field to provide a vapor of the metal which is deposited on the substrate at a sufficiently low gas pressure so that there is formed on the substrate a thin, uniformly thick, essentially pinhole-free film of the metal.

  1. The corrosion behavior and microstructure of high-velocity oxy-fuel sprayed nickel-base amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, A. H.; Horlock, A. J.; McCartney, D. G.; Harris, S. J.

    1999-09-01

    The corrosion characteristics of two Ni-Cr-Mo-B alloy powders sprayed by the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process have been studied using potentiodynamic and potentiostatic corrosion analysis in 0.5 M H2SO4. The deposits were also microstructurally characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) (utilizing both secondary electron and backscattered electron modes), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results from the microstructural examination of the two alloys have revealed a predominantly amorphous/nanocrystalline face centered cubic (fcc) matrix containing submicron boride precipitates as well as regions of martensitically transformed laths. Apparent recrystallization of the amorphous matrix has also been observed in the form of cellular crystals with a fcc structure. The oxide stringers observed at splat boundaries were found to be columnar grained α-Cr2O3, though regions of the spinel oxide NiCr2O4 with a globular morphology were also observed. The coatings of the two alloys exhibited comparable resistance to corrosion in 0.5 M H2SO4, as revealed by potentiodynamic tests. They both had rest potentials approximately equal to -300 mV saturated calomel electrode (SCE) and passive region current densities of ˜1 mA/cm2. Microstructural examination of samples tested potentiostatically revealed the prevalence of degradation at splat boundaries, especially those where significant oxidation of the deposit occurred.

  2. A possible method for the characterization of amorphous slags: Recovery of refractory metal oxides from tin slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballah, I.; Allain, E.; Meyer-Joly, M.-Ch.; Malau, K.

    1992-06-01

    As X-ray, neutron scattering, and vibrational spectroscopy are not useful for amorphous solids characterization, microprobe analysis is used in determining the composition of these materials. The correlation coefficient matrix between the slag’s elements is obtained by a simple computer program which is commercially available. This matrix is employed for the constitution of the neighborhood of an element, which may be called the “pseudo-structure” (PS). The proposed method is a statistical view of the probable associations between the elements. It gives an insight into the amorphous solids' structure. The lixiviation of tin slags in order to recover the refractory metals they contain is used to illustrate the importance of the PS. A multistage acid-basic (AB) leaching leads to the dissolution of the matrix composed of Ca, Al, Fe, Mn, Si, ... oxides and the concentration of refractory metal oxides in the residues. The optimum tantalum and niobium recovery rates are 93 and 78 pct, respectively. The results of this research indicate that the leaching of the amorphous tin slag is a structure-sensitive operation. However, one may emphasize that the PS of amorphous solids is a simplification of the real neighborhood of ele-ments. It may be considered as a complement to other methods of investigation of the amorphous solids and may facilitate the hydrometallurgical process planning.

  3. Electron Irradiation Induced Phase Transition of an Amorphous Phase and Face-Centered Cubic Solid Solutions in Zr66.7Pd33.3 Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Takeshi; Hosokawa, Takashi; Umakoshi, Yukichi

    2007-02-01

    Both amorphization and crystallization were observed in Zr66.7Pd33.3 metallic glass under electron irradiation. The melt-spun amorphous phase was not stable under 2.0 MV electron irradiation and two kinds of fcc-solid solution were precipitated through electron irradiation induced crystallization at 103 and 298 K. The fcc-solid solution obtained by electron irradiation induced crystallization at 298 K transformed to an amorphous phase during irradiation at 103 K. Electron irradiation induced phase transformation behavior in Zr66.7Pd33.3 metallic glass can be explained by phase stability of an amorphous phase and crystalline phases against electron irradiation.

  4. Repairing Chipped Silicide Coatings on Refractory Metal Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter s reaction control system (RCS) is a series of small thrusters that use hypergolic fuels to orient the orbiter in space. The RCS thrusters are constructed from a special niobium-based alloy -- the C-103. This alloy retains excellent mechanical properties from cryogenic temperature all the way up to 2,500 F (1,370 C). C-103 is susceptible to rapid oxidation at elevated temperatures. The authors have developed two methods to repair damaged R512a coatings on C-103. For the first repair technique, metal foundries, semiconductor manufacturers, and many other industries have developed and routinely use coatings that can easily be painted on metal to protect it from corrosion, including oxidation, to temperatures in excess of 2,500 F (1,370 C). This first repair technique is considered somewhat temporary. The second repair technique is based on using the native coating material of the RCS nozzles. the chipped area is ground out and a "green" R512a coating is applied to the repair area. Both repair techniques can be applied for moderate protection until the permanent laser-repair technique is available to the repair area.

  5. Extraordinary optical transmission through metal-coated colloidal monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landström, L.; Brodoceanu, D.; Piglmayer, K.; Bäuerle, D.

    2006-09-01

    Extraordinary optical transmission through metal-coated close-packed monolayers has been observed. The monolayers consist of silica (a-SiO2) or polystyrene microspheres that form two-dimensional close-packed lattices by self-assembly. Metal layers of Ag, Au and Ni with different thicknesses (larger than the skin depth) were evaporated onto such lattices by means of standard techniques. The optical transmission spectra investigated between 300 and 2500 nm show pronounced peaks that scale with the diameter and the optical properties of the composite slabs. The enhanced transmission observed is most likely mediated via plasmons.

  6. Quantitative analysis of electroplated nickel coating on hard metal.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Hassan A; Noordin, M Y; Izman, S; Kurniawan, Denni

    2013-01-01

    Electroplated nickel coating on cemented carbide is a potential pretreatment technique for providing an interlayer prior to diamond deposition on the hard metal substrate. The electroplated nickel coating is expected to be of high quality, for example, indicated by having adequate thickness and uniformity. Electroplating parameters should be set accordingly for this purpose. In this study, the gap distances between the electrodes and duration of electroplating process are the investigated variables. Their effect on the coating thickness and uniformity was analyzed and quantified using design of experiment. The nickel deposition was carried out by electroplating in a standard Watt's solution keeping other plating parameters (current: 0.1 Amp, electric potential: 1.0 V, and pH: 3.5) constant. The gap distance between anode and cathode varied at 5, 10, and 15 mm, while the plating time was 10, 20, and 30 minutes. Coating thickness was found to be proportional to the plating time and inversely proportional to the electrode gap distance, while the uniformity tends to improve at a large electrode gap. Empirical models of both coating thickness and uniformity were developed within the ranges of the gap distance and plating time settings, and an optimized solution was determined using these models.

  7. Mechanical Behavior of Spray-Coated Metallic Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackel, Andrew; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-06-01

    Thermal spray (TS) coatings have been extensively utilized for various surface modifications such as enhancing wear/erosion resistance and thermal protection. In the present study, a new function of TS material is explored by studying its load-carrying capability. Due to the inherent microstructures containing voids and interfaces, it has been presumed TS materials were not suitable to bear loads. However, the recent advances in TS technology to manufacture near fully dense TS coatings have expanded their potential applications. In the current experiments, TS nickel coatings are deposited onto metallic substrates, and their mechanical behaviors are closely examined. Based on the measured data, the estimated elastic modulus of TS Ni is about 130 GPa (35% less than bulk value), and the maximum tensile strength is about 500 MPa (comparable to bulk value). It was found that such a high value is attainable because the coating is deposited onto a substrate, enabling a load-transfer mechanism and preventing coating failure at a much lower stress level. Three distinct deformation stages are identified to describe this behavior. Such a clarification is critical for enabling TS process to restore structural parts as well as to additively manufacture load-bearing components.

  8. Metallic coatings for enhancement of thermal contact conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, M. A.; Fletcher, L. S.

    1994-04-01

    The reliability of standard electronic modules may be improved by decreasing overall module temperature. This may be accomplished by enhancing the thermal contact conductance at the interface between the module frame guide rib and the card rail to which the module is clamped. Some metallic coatings, when applied to the card rail, would deform under load, increasing the contact area and associated conductance. This investigation evaluates the enhancements in thermal conductance afforded by vapor deposited silver and gold coatings. Experimental thermal conductance measurements were made for anodized aluminum 6101-T6 and electroless nickel-plated copper C11000-H03 card materials to the aluminum A356-T61 rail material. Conductance values for the electroless nickel-plated copper junction ranged from 600 to 2800 W/m(exp 2)K and those for the anodized aluminum junction ranged from 25 to 91 W/m(exp 2)K for contact pressures of 0.172-0.862 MPa and mean junction temperatures of 20-100 C. Experimental thermal conductance values of vapor deposited silver- and gold-coated aluminum A356-T61 rail surfaces indicate thermal enhancements of 1.25-2.19 for the electroless nickel-plated copper junctions and 1.79-3.41 for the anodized aluminum junctions. The silver and gold coatings provide significant thermal enhancement; however, these coating-substrate combinations are susceptible to galvanic corrosion under some conditions.

  9. Metallic coatings for enhancement of thermal contact conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.A.; Fletcher, L.S. )

    1994-04-01

    The reliability of standard electronic modules may be improved by decreasing overall module temperature. This may be accomplished by enhancing the thermal contact conductance at the interface between the module frame guide rib and the card rail to which the module is clamped. Some metallic coatings, when applied to the card rail, would deform under load, increasing the contact area and associated conductance. This investigation evaluates the enhancements in thermal conductance afforded by vapor deposited silver and gold coatings. Experimental thermal conductance measurements were made for anodized aluminum 6101-T6 and electroless nickel-plated copper C11000-H03 card materials to the aluminum A356-T61 rail material. Conductance values for the electroless nickel-plated copper junction ranged from 600 to 2800 W/m(exp 2)K and those for the anodized aluminum junction ranged from 25 to 91 W/m(exp 2)K for contact pressures of 0.172-0.862 MPa and mean junction temperatures of 20-100 C. Experimental thermal conductance values of vapor deposited silver- and gold-coated aluminum A356-T61 rail surfaces indicate thermal enhancements of 1.25-2.19 for the electroless nickel-plated copper junctions and 1.79-3.41 for the anodized aluminum junctions. The silver and gold coatings provide significant thermal enhancement; however, these coating-substrate combinations are susceptible to galvanic corrosion under some conditions. 25 refs.

  10. Reduction experiment of FeO-bearing amorphous silicate: application to origin of metallic iron in GEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Junya; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Miyake, Akira; Noguchi, Ryo; Ichikawa, Satoshi

    2014-09-10

    Glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS) are amorphous silicates included in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and can provide information about material evolution in our early solar system. Several formation processes for GEMS have been proposed so far, but these theories are still being debated. To investigate a possible GEMS origin by reduction of interstellar silicates, we synthesized amorphous silicates with a mean GEMS composition and performed heating experiments in a reducing atmosphere. FeO-bearing amorphous silicates were heated at 923 K and 973 K for 3 hr, and at 1023 K for 1-48 hr at ambient pressure in a reducing atmosphere. Fe grains formed at the interface between the silicate and the reducing gas through a reduction. In contrast, TEM observations of natural GEMS show that metallic grains are uniformly embedded in amorphous silicates. Therefore, the present study suggests that metallic inclusions in GEMS could not form as reduction products and that other formation process such as condensation or irradiation are more likely.

  11. Magnesium-Aluminum-Zirconium Oxide Amorphous Ternary Composite: A Dense and Stable Optical Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahoo, N. K.; Shapiro, A. P.

    1998-01-01

    In the present work, the process parameter dependent optical and structural properties of MgO-Al(2)O(3)-ZrO(2) ternary mixed-composite material have been investigated. Optical properties were derived from spectrophotometric measurements. The surface morphology, grain size distributions, crystallographic phases and process dependent material composition of films have been investigated through the use of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction analysis and Energy Dispersive X- ray (EDX) analysis. EDX analysis made evident the correlation between the optical constants and the process dependent compositions in the films. It is possible to achieve environmentally stable amorphous films with high packing density under certain optimized process conditions.

  12. Effect of pretreatment process parameters on diamond nucleation on unscratched silicon substrates coated with amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z.; Komvopoulos, K.; Bogy, D. B.; Ager, J. W., III; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Wang, Z.; Brown, I. G.

    1996-01-01

    Diamond nucleation on unscratched silicon substrates was investigated using a conventional microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. Silicon substrates were coated with thin films of amorphous carbon using a vacuum arc technique. The carbon-coated silicon substrates were pretreated with a methane-rich plasma at relatively low temperatures and were subsequently exposed to the diamond nucleation conditions. The significance of the pretreatment on the diamond nucleation density was examined by varying the methane concentration, chamber pressure, and exposure time. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that densely packed spherical nanoparticles on the pretreated surfaces played the role of diamond nucleation seeds. Raman spectroscopy analysis showed that the nucleation seeds consisted of nonhydrogenated carbon and that their structure was influenced by the pretreatment conditions. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the nucleation seeds comprised disordered graphitic carbon and ultrafine diamond crystallites. Submicrometer films of good quality diamond possessing significantly higher nucleation densities (˜5×1010 cm-2) were grown from nanoparticles produced under optimum pretreatment conditions. The enhancement of the diamond nucleation density is mainly attributed to the formation of a large number of nanoparticles, which provided sufficient high-surface free-energy sites for diamond nucleation, in conjunction with their high etching resistance to atomic hydrogen stemming from the significant percentage of sp3 atomic carbon configurations, as evidenced by the presence of nanocrystalline diamond in the nanoparticle structure.

  13. Lateral amorphous selenium metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal photodetectors using ultrathin dielectric blocking layers for dark current suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Pan, Fu-Ming; Lin, Jian-Siang; Yu, Tung-Yuan; Li, Yi-Ming; Chen, Chieh-Yang

    2016-12-01

    We fabricated amorphous selenium (a-Se) photodetectors with a lateral metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal (MISIM) device structure. Thermal aluminum oxide, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride, and thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide (ALD-HfO2) were used as the electron and hole blocking layers of the MISIM photodetectors for dark current suppression. A reduction in the dark current by three orders of magnitude can be achieved at electric fields between 10 and 30 V/μm. The effective dark current suppression is primarily ascribed to electric field lowering in the dielectric layers as a result of charge trapping in deep levels. Photogenerated carriers in the a-Se layer can be transported across the blocking layers to the Al electrodes via Fowler-Nordheim tunneling because a high electric field develops in the ultrathin dielectric layers under illumination. Since the a-Se MISIM photodetectors have a very low dark current without significant degradation in the photoresponse, the signal contrast is greatly improved. The MISIM photodetector with the ALD-HfO2 blocking layer has an optimal signal contrast more than 500 times the contrast of the photodetector without a blocking layer at 15 V/μm.

  14. Effect of antireflection coating on the crystallization of amorphous silicon films by flash lamp annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, Yuki; Ohdaira, Keisuke

    2017-04-01

    We succeed in decreasing the fluence of a flash-lamp pulse required for the crystallization of electron-beam (EB)-evaporated amorphous silicon (a-Si) films using silicon nitride (SiN x ) antireflection films. The antireflection effect of SiN x is confirmed not only when SiN x is placed on the surface of a-Si or flash lamp annealing (FLA) is performed from the film side, but also when SiN x is inserted between glass and a-Si and a flash pulse is supplied from the glass side. We also quantitatively confirm, by calculating flash-lamp pulse energies actually reaching a-Si films using reflectance spectra, that the reduction in the fluence of a flash-lamp pulse for the crystallization of a-Si films is due to the antireflection effect of SiN x .

  15. Dynamics of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates under fast thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher; Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2007-11-01

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the growth/decay rate of surface perturbations of an ultrathin metal film on an amorphous substrate (SiO2). The formulation combines the approach of Mullins [W. W. Mullins, J. Appl. Phys. 30, 77 (1959)] for bulk surfaces, in which curvature-driven mass transport and surface deformation can occur by surface/volume diffusion and evaporation-condensation processes, with that of Spencer etal . [B. J. Spencer, P. W. Voorhees, and S. H. Davis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 26 (1991)] to describe solid-state transport in thin films under epitaxial strain. Modifications of the Mullins model to account for thin-film boundary conditions result in qualitatively different dispersion relationships especially in the limit as kho≪1, where k is the wavenumber of the perturbation and ho is the unperturbed film height. The model is applied to study the relative rate of solid-state mass transport as compared to that of liquid phase dewetting in a thin film subjected to a fast thermal pulse. Specifically, we have recently shown that multiple cycles of nanosecond (ns) pulsed laser melting and resolidification of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates can lead to the formation of various types of spatially ordered nanostructures [J. Trice, D. Thomas, C. Favazza, R. Sureshkumar, and R. Kalyanaraman, Phys. Rev. B 75, 235439 (2007)]. The pattern formation has been attributed to the dewetting of the thin film by a hydrodynamic instability. In such experiments the film is in the solid state during a substantial fraction of each thermal cycle. However, results of a linear stability analysis based on the aforementioned model suggest that solid-state mass transport has a negligible effect on morphological changes of the surface. Further, a qualitative analysis of the effect of thermoelastic stress, induced by the rapid temperature changes in the film-substrate bilayer, suggests that stress relaxation does not appreciably contribute to surface

  16. Monolayer and/or few-layer graphene on metal or metal-coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sutter, Peter Werner; Sutter, Eli Anguelova

    2015-04-14

    Disclosed is monolayer and/or few-layer graphene on metal or metal-coated substrates. Embodiments include graphene mirrors. In an example, a mirror includes a substrate that has a surface exhibiting a curvature operable to focus an incident beam onto a focal plane. A graphene layer conformally adheres to the substrate, and is operable to protect the substrate surface from degradation due to the incident beam and an ambient environment.

  17. Spinodal decomposition in amorphous metal-silicate thin films: Phase diagram analysis and interface effects on kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; McIntyre, P. C.

    2002-11-01

    Among several metal silicate candidates for high permittivity gate dielectric applications, the mixing thermodynamics of the ZrO2-SiO2 system were analyzed, based on previously published experimental phase diagrams. The driving force for spinodal decomposition was investigated in an amorphous silicate that was treated as a supercooled liquid solution. A subregular model was used for the excess free energy of mixing of the liquid, and measured invariant points were adopted for the calculations. The resulting simulated ZrO2-SiO2 phase diagram matched the experimental results reasonably well and indicated that a driving force exists for amorphous Zr-silicate compositions between approx40 mol % and approx90 mol % SiO2 to decompose into a ZrO2-rich phase (approx20 mol % SiO2) and SiO2-rich phase (>98 mol % SiO2) through diffusional phase separation at a temperature of 900 degC. These predictions are consistent with recent experimental reports of phase separation in amorphous Zr-silicate thin films. Other metal-silicate systems were also investigated and composition ranges for phase separation in amorphous Hf, La, and Y silicates were identified from the published bulk phase diagrams. The kinetics of one-dimensional spinodal decomposition normal to the plane of the film were simulated for an initially homogeneous Zr-silicate dielectric layer. We examined the effects that local stresses and the capillary driving force for component segregation to the interface have on the rate of spinodal decomposition in amorphous metal-silicate thin films.

  18. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    PubMed Central

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  19. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating.

    PubMed

    Sun, B A; Chen, S H; Lu, Y M; Zhu, Z G; Zhao, Y L; Yang, Y; Chan, K C; Liu, C T

    2016-06-08

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability.

  20. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability.

  1. Corrosion processes of physical vapor deposition-coated metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes

    2009-01-01

    Protecting metallic implants from the harsh environment of physiological fluids is essential to guaranteeing successful long-term use in a patient's body. Chemical degradation may lead to the failure of an implant device in two different ways. First, metal ions may cause inflammatory reactions in the tissues surrounding the implant and, in extreme cases, these reactions may inflict acute pain on the patient and lead to loosening of the device. Therefore, increasing wear strength is beneficial to the performance of the metallic implant. Second, localized corrosion processes contribute to the nucleation of fatigue cracks, and corrosion fatigue is the main reason for the mechanical failure of metallic implants. Common biomedical alloys such as stainless steel, cobalt-chrome alloys, and titanium alloys are prone to at least one of these problems. Vapor-deposited hard coatings act directly to improve corrosion, wear, and fatigue resistances of metallic materials. The effectiveness of the corrosion protection is strongly related to the structure of the physical vapor deposition layer. The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the correlation between the structure of physical vapor deposition layers and the corrosion properties of metallic implants.

  2. Plasma-sprayed metal-glass fluoride coatings for lubrication to 1170 K (1650 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma spray of Nichrome matrix composite contains dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication. Coatings can be applied to bearing journals and bearing bores. Coating was easily machinable and had excellent bond strength on substrate metal.

  3. Optical properties of uniform, porous, amorphous Ta2O5 coatings on silica: temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghinolfi, L.; Prato, M.; Chtanov, A.; Gross, M.; Chincarini, A.; Neri, M.; Gemme, G.; Canepa, M.

    2013-11-01

    We present spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) results, in the 0.75-5 eV spectral range, obtained on highly uniform Ta2O5 coatings deposited on high-quality silica substrates by ion sputtering. The study was motivated mainly by issues related to the exploitation of Ta2O5-SiO2 λ/4 multilayers in detectors of gravitational waves. Two sets of samples with nominal thicknesses of 40 and 500 nm were considered. A sub-set of samples was treated with post-growth annealing in air for several hours at temperatures Tann up to 600 °C. The SE data were complemented with photothermal common-path interferometry measurements at 1064 nm providing data about absorption losses in the 1-4 ppm range. SE data, taken at room temperature, were analysed by exploiting three different three-phase (substrate/film/surface) models (Cody-Lorentz, Tauc-Lorentz and Herzinger-Johs) of the fundamental absorption edge. Following the literature (Stenzel 2009 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42 055312) the simulations exploited a graded nano-porosity inside the coating, testing both the shape and composition of the pores. The best simulation of data was obtained using the Cody-Lorentz approach and a quasi-uniform density (6-7.5%) of empty spherical pores, slowly degrading from the substrate/film interface towards the film/ambient interface. A comparison with the literature indicated a high stoichiometric quality of the coatings. The analysis of samples annealed to increasingly higher Tann showed (i) a slight blue-shift of the energy gap (ii) an increase in the pore volume fraction, (iii) an increase (1-2%) in the coating thickness, (iv) a small (less than 1%) reduction in the index of refraction in the transparency region and (v) a limited increase in absorption losses. These findings were interpreted in terms of a release of the compressive strain inherent to the deposition process.

  4. 21 CFR 888.3565 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer... Devices § 888.3565 Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3565 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer... Devices § 888.3565 Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3565 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer... Devices § 888.3565 Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3565 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer... Devices § 888.3565 Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3565 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer... Devices § 888.3565 Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  9. Method of applying a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating on a metal substrate, and related articles

    DOEpatents

    Hasz, Wayne Charles; Borom, Marcus Preston

    2002-01-01

    A method for applying at least one bond coating on a surface of a metal-based substrate is described. A foil of the bond coating material is first attached to the substrate surface and then fused thereto, e.g., by brazing. The foil is often initially prepared by thermally spraying the bond coating material onto a removable support sheet, and then detaching the support sheet. Optionally, the foil may also include a thermal barrier coating applied over the bond coating. The substrate can be a turbine engine component.

  10. Effect of patch borders on coercivity in amorphous rare earth-transition metal thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, G.; Fu, H.; Giles, R. C.; Mansuripur, M.

    1991-01-01

    The coercivity at the micron scale is a very important property of magneto-optical media. It is a key factor that determines the magnetic domain wall movement and domain reversal. How the coercivity is influenced by a special type of patch borders is discussed. Patch formation is a general phenomenon in growth processes of amorphous rare earth transition metal thin films. Different patches may stem from different seeds and the patch borders are formed when they merge. Though little is known about the exact properties of the borders, we may expect that the exchange interaction at the patch border is weaker than that within a patch, since there is usually a spatial gap between two patches. Computer simulations were performed on a 2-D hexagonal lattice consisting of 37 complete patches with random shape and size. From the series of simulations we may conclude that the domain in the patch with borders of 30 percent exchange strength can expand most easily to the whole lattice, because the exchange strength can expand most easily to the whole lattice, because the exchange strength of the border is not too high to prevent the domain from growing within the patch and it is not too low to prevent the domain from expanding beyond the patch.

  11. Hydrogen evolution from a copper(I) oxide photocathode coated with an amorphous molybdenum sulphide catalyst.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Tilley, S David; Vrubel, Heron; Grätzel, Michael; Hu, Xile

    2014-01-01

    Concerns over climate change resulting from accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the uncertainty in the amount of recoverable fossil fuel reserves are driving forces for the development of renewable, carbon-neutral energy technologies. A promising clean solution is photoelectrochemical water splitting to produce hydrogen using abundant solar energy. Here we present a simple and scalable technique for the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulphide films as hydrogen evolution catalyst onto protected copper(I) oxide films. The efficient extraction of excited electrons by the conformal catalyst film leads to photocurrents of up to -5.7 mA cm(-2) at 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (pH 1.0) under simulated AM 1.5 solar illumination. Furthermore, the photocathode exhibits enhanced stability under acidic environments, whereas photocathodes with platinum nanoparticles as catalyst deactivate more rapidly under identical conditions. The work demonstrates the potential of earth-abundant light-harvesting material and catalysts for solar hydrogen production.

  12. Hydrogen evolution from a copper(I) oxide photocathode coated with an amorphous molybdenum sulphide catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G.; Tilley, S. David; Vrubel, Heron; Grätzel, Michael; Hu, Xile

    2014-01-01

    Concerns over climate change resulting from accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the uncertainty in the amount of recoverable fossil fuel reserves are driving forces for the development of renewable, carbon-neutral energy technologies. A promising clean solution is photoelectrochemical water splitting to produce hydrogen using abundant solar energy. Here we present a simple and scalable technique for the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulphide films as hydrogen evolution catalyst onto protected copper(I) oxide films. The efficient extraction of excited electrons by the conformal catalyst film leads to photocurrents of up to -5.7mAcm-2 at 0V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (pH 1.0) under simulated AM 1.5 solar illumination. Furthermore, the photocathode exhibits enhanced stability under acidic environments, whereas photocathodes with platinum nanoparticles as catalyst deactivate more rapidly under identical conditions. The work demonstrates the potential of earth-abundant light-harvesting material and catalysts for solar hydrogen production.

  13. Rotary feeding system for metallic coating installation by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stănescu, A.; Alecusan, A. M.; Dimitescu, A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper aims to present an alternative feeding system for metallic coatings lines by electrodeposition which lends itself to the circular arrangement of the cuvettes used in such plants. The novelty lies both, in the arrangement of the electrodeposition installation components and mechanical feeding and transport system for parts to be electrodeposited. The control and actuation system of this type of installation simplifies. Nevertheless, all these increase the system reliability and run lower maintenance costs, without adversely affecting the quality of the end product. The paper presents the justification for reducing the total energy consumption in the electrodeposition process, too.

  14. Protective coatings of metal surfaces by cold plasma treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manory, R.; Grill, A.

    1985-01-01

    The cold plasma techniques for deposition of various types of protective coatings are reviewed. The main advantage of these techniques for deposition of ceramic films is the lower process temperature, which enables heat treating of the metal prior to deposition. In the field of surface hardening of steel, significant reduction of treatment time and energy consumption were obtained. A simple model for the plasma - surface reactions in a cold plasma system is presented, and the plasma deposition techniques are discussed in view of this model.

  15. 21 CFR 888.3670 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained or semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained... ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3670 Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained or semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3670 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained or semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained... ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3670 Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained or semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3670 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained or semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained... ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3670 Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained or semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3670 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained or semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained... ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3670 Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained or semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3670 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained or semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained... ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3670 Shoulder joint metal/polymer/metal nonconstrained or semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint...

  20. Development of coatings for ultrasonic additive manufacturing sonotrode using laser direct metal deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Niyanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Jordan, Brian H.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-10-01

    ORNL partnered with Fabrisonic, LLC to develop galling resistant hard facing coatings on sonotrodes used to fabricate 3D printed materials using ultrasonic additive manufacturing. The development and deployment of a coated sonotrode is expected to push the existing state of the art to facilitate the solidstate additive manufacturing of hard steels and titanium alloys. To this effect a structurally amorphous stainless steel material and cobalt chrome material were deposited on the sonotrode material. Both the deposits showed good adhesion to the substrate. The coatings made using the structurally amorphous steel materials showed cracking during the initial trials and cracking was eliminated by deposition on a preheated substrate. Both the coatings show hardness in excess of 600 HVN. Thus the phase 1 of this project has been used to identify suitable materials to use to coat the sonotrode. Despite the fact that successful deposits were obtained, the coatings need to be evaluated by performing detailed galling tests at various temperatures. In addition field tests are also necessary to test the stability of these coatings in a high cycle ultrasonic vibration mode. If awarded, phase 2 of the project would be used to optimize the composition of the deposit material to maximize galling resistance. The industrial partner would then use the coated sonotrode to fabricate builds made of austenitic stainless steel to test the viability of using a coated sonotrode.

  1. Electrochemical performance of natural graphite coated by amorphous carbon using two step synthesis processes at various temperatures for anode material in Li-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohman, F.; Nikmah, S. M.; Triwibowo, J.

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemical performance of natural graphite as anode material in the Li-ion battery has been modified by coating this particle with amorphous carbon through two step synthesis process. Citric acid as the amorphous carbon source was mixed with natural graphite (NG) in the ethanol solvent at 80 °C using magnetic stirrer. In the first step, the mixture of NG and CA were dried at 350 °C for 5 hours under argon atmosphere to evaporate the solvent. This dried mixture was then sintered at different temperature i.e. 500 °C (labeled CNG500), 600 °C (CNG600) and 700 °C (CNG700) under argon atmosphere to form amorphous carbon layer on the surface of NG. The crystal structure and morphology of the particles were characterized by using XRD, SEM and TEM. Electrochemical performance and charge-discharge of amorphous carbon-coated graphite has been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and WBCS 3000, respectively. Cyclic voltammogram showed the working potential and redox reaction peak of the sample. Charge-discharge data was obtained to determine the specific capacity of the sample at 0.1C.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of the tribological behaviour of a water-lubricated amorphous carbon-fluorine PECVD coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rullich, Markus; Weiss, Volker C.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Hybrid bearings comprising ceramic balls and steel rings exhibit increased wear-resistance and a reduced coefficient of friction (COF) compared with standard steel bearings. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) coatings to modify the surface properties, the performance of these bearings can be further improved. Fluorine-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C : F : H) films are well suited to this purpose. To study the influence of such coatings on the friction characteristics of key parts of hybrid bearings, a model of an a-C : F : H film was constructed and employed in molecular dynamics simulations of two slabs sliding past each other, lubricated by water. With one slab being pulled by a virtual spring, the perpendicular force (load) was kept constant using a barostat. For comparison, a system of two silicon dioxide (cristobalite) slabs and a mixed system consisting of a cristobalite slab and an a-C : F : H slab were investigated. Our results indicate a linear dependence of the friction force on the perpendicular force. With an increasing amount of water between the slabs, the COFs decrease. A decrease in temperature leads to an increased COF, while a decrease in the relative velocity of the slabs does not influence the COF between two a-C : F : H slabs, but reduces the COF for the other two systems. Our results for the COF and its dependence on temperature and relative sliding velocity generally agree well both with experiments and with simulations for similar systems reported in the literature.

  3. Optical and surface characterization of amorphous boron nitride thin films for use as blood compatible coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousinian, S.; Kalfagiannis, N.; Logothetidis, S.

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this work is the investigation of the haemocompatibility properties of homogeneous and amorphous boron nitride (a-BN) thin films, through the adsorption of two basic blood plasma proteins, human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen (Fib). The a-BN thin films were grown onto c-Si(100) substrates under different values of substrate bias voltage, employing the radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique. For the consideration of the optical, compositional and structural properties of the films, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) in the Vis-UV spectral region was used, while for the study of surface topography and surface charge distribution as well as of the wetting properties of the a-BN thin films, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Electric Force Microscopy (EFM) and Contact Angle measurements were additionally employed. The properties of the thin films were correlated with their haemocompatibility, through the estimation of the ratio of HSA/Fib surface concentration. The sp 3 content of the samples does not seem to correlate with the haemocompatibility of the a-BN thin films. However, the surface properties determine the thrombogenicity potential of the studied samples. More precisely, the a-BN films with a less negatively charged surface exhibit the smallest possibility of clot formation, possibly due to the interactions between the charged chains of the Fib molecules and the a-BN surface, while slight changes in the surface roughness do not affect their haemocompatibility properties. The wetting properties determine the thickness of the adsorbed Fib as well as the ratio of HSA/Fib surface concentration.

  4. Molecular-scale tribology of amorphous carbon coatings: effects of film thickness, adhesion, and long-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Gao, G T; Mikulski, Paul T; Harrison, Judith A

    2002-06-19

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted to investigate the atomic-scale friction and wear when hydrogen-terminated diamond (111) counterfaces are in sliding contact with diamond (111) surfaces coated with amorphous, hydrogen-free carbon films. Two films, with approximately the same ratio of sp(3)-to-sp(2) carbon, but different thicknesses, have been examined. Both systems give a similar average friction in the load range examined. Above a critical load, a series of tribochemical reactions occur resulting in a significant restructuring of the film. This restructuring is analogous to the "run-in" observed in macroscopic friction experiments and reduces the friction. The contribution of adhesion between the probe (counterface) and the sample to friction was examined by varying the saturation of the counterface. Decreasing the degree of counterface saturation, by reducing the hydrogen termination, increases the friction. Finally, the contribution of long-range interactions to friction was examined by using two potential energy functions that differ only in their long-range forces to examine friction in the same system.

  5. Characterization and simulation on antireflective coating of amorphous silicon oxide thin films with gradient refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lu; Jin, Qi; Qu, Xingling; Jin, Jing; Jiang, Chaochao; Yang, Weiguang; Wang, Linjun; Shi, Weimin

    2016-08-01

    The optical reflective properties of silicon oxide (SixOy) thin films with gradient refractive index are studied both theoretically and experimentally. The thin films are widely used in photovoltaic as antireflective coatings (ARCs). An effective finite difference time domain (FDTD) model is built to find the optimized reflection spectra corresponding to structure of SixOy ARCs with gradient refractive index. Based on the simulation analysis, it shows the variation of reflection spectra with gradient refractive index distribution. The gradient refractive index of SixOy ARCs can be obtained in adjustment of SiH4 to N2O ratio by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The optimized reflection spectra measured by UV-visible spectroscopy confirms to agree well with that simulated by FDTD method.

  6. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek metal coating removal system consists of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER(R), and VAC-PAC(R). The system is designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M ROTO-PEEN tungsten carbide cutters, while the CORNER-CUTTER(R) uses solid needles for descaling activities. These are used with the VAC-PAC(R) vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure was minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended, since the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place may skew the results. It is feasible that dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  7. Multifunctional methacrylate-based coatings for glass and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospiech, Doris; Jehnichen, Dieter; Starke, Sandra; Müller, Felix; Bünker, Tobias; Wollenberg, Anne; Häußler, Liane; Simon, Frank; Grundke, Karina; Oertel, Ulrich; Opitz, Michael; Kruspe, Rainer

    2017-03-01

    In order to prevent freshwater biofouling glass and metal surfaces were coated with novel transparent methacrylate-based copolymers. The multifunctionality of the copolymers, such as adhesion to the substrate, surface polarity, mechanical long-term stability in water, and ability to form metal complexes was inserted by the choice of suitable comonomers. The monomer 2-acetoacetoxy ethyl methacrylate (AAMA) was used as complexing unit to produce copper(II) complexes in the coating's upper surface layer. The semifluorinated monomer 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl methacrylate was employed to adjust the surface polarity and wettability. Comprehensive surface characterization techniques, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements showed that surface compositions and properties can be easily adjusted by varying the concentrations of the comonomers. The formation of copper(II) complexes along the copolymer chains and their stability against washing out with plenty of water was proven by XPS. Copolymers containing semifluorinated comonomers significantly inhibited the growth of Achnanthidium species. Copolymers with copper-loaded AAMA-sequences were able to reduce both the growth of Achnanthidium spec. and Staphylococcus aureus.

  8. Strong Light Confinement in Metal-Coated Si Nanopillars: Interplay of Plasmonic Effects and Geometric Resonance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sujung; Kim, Eunah; Lee, Yeon Ui; Ko, Eunkyo; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Wu, Jeong Weon; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the influence of metal coating on the optical characteristics of Si nanopillar (NP) arrays with and without thin metal layers coated on the sample surface. The reflection dips of the metal-coated arrays were much broader and more pronounced than those of the bare arrays. The coated metal layers consisted of two parts-the metal disks on the Si NP top and the holey metal backreflectors on the Si substrate. The Mie-like geometrical resonance in the NPs, the localized surface plasmons in the metal disks, and the propagation of surface plasmon polariton along the backreflector/substrate interface could contribute to the reflection spectra. Finite-difference time-domain simulation results showed that the interplay of the plasmonic effects and the geometric resonance gave rise to significantly enhanced light confinement and consequent local absorption in the metal-Si hybrid nanostructures.

  9. Strong Light Confinement in Metal-Coated Si Nanopillars: Interplay of Plasmonic Effects and Geometric Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sujung; Kim, Eunah; Lee, Yeon Ui; Ko, Eunkyo; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Wu, Jeong Weon; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the influence of metal coating on the optical characteristics of Si nanopillar (NP) arrays with and without thin metal layers coated on the sample surface. The reflection dips of the metal-coated arrays were much broader and more pronounced than those of the bare arrays. The coated metal layers consisted of two parts—the metal disks on the Si NP top and the holey metal backreflectors on the Si substrate. The Mie-like geometrical resonance in the NPs, the localized surface plasmons in the metal disks, and the propagation of surface plasmon polariton along the backreflector/substrate interface could contribute to the reflection spectra. Finite-difference time-domain simulation results showed that the interplay of the plasmonic effects and the geometric resonance gave rise to significantly enhanced light confinement and consequent local absorption in the metal-Si hybrid nanostructures.

  10. Platinum-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell electrocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2015-04-14

    Core-shell particles encapsulated by a thin film of a catalytically active metal are described. The particles are preferably nanoparticles comprising a non-noble core with a noble metal shell which preferably do not include Pt. The non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles are encapsulated by a catalytically active metal which is preferably Pt. The core-shell nanoparticles are preferably formed by prolonged elevated-temperature annealing of nanoparticle alloys in an inert environment. This causes the noble metal component to surface segregate and form an atomically thin shell. The Pt overlayer is formed by a process involving the underpotential deposition of a monolayer of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a Pt salt. A thin Pt layer forms via the galvanic displacement of non-noble surface atoms by more noble Pt atoms in the salt. The overall process is a robust and cost-efficient method for forming Pt-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles.

  11. Amorphization and Directional Crystallization of Metals Confined in Carbon Nanotubes Investigated by in Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Ren, Cui-Lan; Lv, Ruitao; Yu, Wan-Jing; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Wei, Xianlong; Xu, Zhi; Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Bando, Yoshio; Mitome, Masanori; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-08-12

    The hollow core of a carbon nanotube (CNT) provides a unique opportunity to explore the physics, chemistry, biology, and metallurgy of different materials confined in such nanospace. Here, we investigate the nonequilibrium metallurgical processes taking place inside CNTs by in situ transmission electron microscopy using CNTs as nanoscale resistively heated crucibles having encapsulated metal nanowires/crystals in their channels. Because of nanometer size of the system and intimate contact between the CNTs and confined metals, an efficient heat transfer and high cooling rates (∼10(13) K/s) were achieved as a result of a flash bias pulse followed by system natural quenching, leading to the formation of disordered amorphous-like structures in iron, cobalt, and gold. An intermediate state between crystalline and amorphous phases was discovered, revealing a memory effect of local short-to-medium range order during these phase transitions. Furthermore, subsequent directional crystallization of an amorphous iron nanowire formed by this method was realized under controlled Joule heating. High-density crystalline defects were generated during crystallization due to a confinement effect from the CNT and severe plastic deformation involved.

  12. Anisotropic phase separation through the metal-insulator transition in amorphous Mo-Ge and Fe-Ge alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, Michael J.

    1993-12-01

    Since an amorphous solid is often defined as that which lacks long-range order, the atomic structure is typically characterized in terms of the high-degree of short-range order. Most descriptions of vapor-deposited amorphous alloys focus on characterizing this order, while assuming that the material is chemically homogeneous beyond a few near neighbors. By coupling traditional small-angle x-ray scattering which probes spatial variations of the electron density with anomalous dispersion which creates a species-specific contrast, one can discern cracks and voids from chemical inhomogeneity. In particular, one finds that the chemical inhomogeneities which have been previously reported in amorphous FexGe1-x and MoxGe1-x are quite anisotropic, depending significantly on the direction of film growth. With the addition of small amounts of metal atoms (x<0.2), no films appear isotropic nor homogeneous through the metal/insulator transition. The results indicate that fluctuations in the growth direction play a pivotal role in preventing simple growth models of a columnar structure or one that evolves systematically as it grows. The anomalous scattering measurements identify the metal atoms (Fe or Mo) as the source of the anisotropy, with the Ge atoms distributed homogeneously. The author has developed a method for using these measurements to determine the compositions of the phase-separating species. The results indicate phase separation into an amorphous Ge and an intermetallic phase of stoichiometry close to FeGe2or MoGe3. Finally, by manipulating the deposited power flux and rates of growth, FexGe1-x films which have the same Fe composition x can be grown to different states of phase separation. These results may help explain the difficulty workers have had in isolating the metal/insulator transition for these and other vapor-deposited amorphous alloys.

  13. Microtribological Performance of Metal-doped Molybdenum Disulfide Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Pantcho

    2011-07-01

    The mechanical and tribological properties of pure MoS2, pure Au, Au-MoS2 and Ti-MoS2 coatings were evaluated and examined at a microscopic scale. The metal doped MoS2 coatings had varying metal content, 5-10at% for Ti and 10-90% for Au. Reciprocating sliding wear tests were performed with a range of initial Hertzian contact pressures from 0.41 to 3.5 GPa and in air at two humidity levels (i.e. "low" being 3-5%RH and "high" being 30-40%RH). Titanium and gold were chosen for this study as metal additives due to their positive influence on the mechanical properties of the coating. The friction and wear behavior at the micro-scale were directly compared to tribological properties at the macro-scale, which were performed using an in situ tribometer. Reciprocating micro- and macro- wear tests were performed with spherical diamond tip (with 10 and 50 mum radii) and a sapphire tip (with a radius of 3.175 mm), respectively. The range of initial Hertzian contact pressures for macro-scale (i.e. between 0.41GPa and 1.2GPa) overlapped with that for micro-scale. However, the initial Hertzian contact diameters (2*a) were very different (i.e. 0.8-2.3 mum for micro-scale and 60-180 mum for macro-scale). It was observed that the small addition of Ti or Au to MoS2 improved the microtribological properties (i.e. lower friction and less wear) compared to pure MoS2 coatings. The improved microtribological properties with metal additions were attributed to an increase in the mechanical properties, decrease in adhesion, and a decrease in the interfacial shear strength. In terms of the different length scales, lower steady state friction was observed for macrotribology compared to microtribology. The higher friction at the micro- scale was explained by the greater adhesion effects and additional velocity accommodation modes (e.g. microplowing or plowing). The microplowing or plowing at the microscopic scale was attributed to the tip roughness and the inability to sustain a stable

  14. Mixed polyvalent-monovalent metal coating for carbon-graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper-Tervet, J.; Tervet, F. W.; Humphrey, M. F. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved coating of gasification catalyst for carbon-graphite fibers is provided comprising a mixture of a polyvalent metal such as calcium and a monovalent metal such as lithium. The addition of lithium provides a lighter coating and a more flexible coating when applied to a coating of a carboxyl containing resin such as polyacrylic acid since it reduces the crosslink density. Furthermore, the presence of lithium provides a glass-like substance during combustion which holds the fiber together resulting in slow, even combustion with much reduced evolution of conductive fragments. The coated fibers are utilized as fiber reinforcement for composites.

  15. Hypervelocity impact on silicon wafers with metallic and polymeric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, E. A.; Scott, H. J.; Abraham, M.; Kearsley, A. T.

    2001-10-01

    Current and near future developments in microsystem technologies (MST, also known as MEMS) are defining a new trend towards lower mass, smaller volume spacecraft, without loss of functionality. The MST spacecraft components are etched onto silicon wafers coated with different metallic or polymeric material layers (typically 1-2 microns in thickness). These silicon wafers are then integrated to provide the spacecraft structure subsystem. For the majority of spacecraft, small debris and meteoroid impacts are not often able to cause large satellite platform failures, due to the shielding provided by existing structural and thermal materials and the high percentage of 'empty volume' contained within a typical spacecraft structure. Smaller satellites incorporating MST and based on silicon wafers, whilst presenting a smaller surface area, are expected to be vulnerable to impacts as the lower subsystem mass defines a less substantial structure, providing significantly less protection against impact. This paper presents results of a BNSC-funded study aimed at identifying the vulnerability of MST technologies based on silicon wafers to space debris and meteoroid impact. Hypervelocity impact tests were carried out on silicon wafers coated with five different types of deposited material. Multiple glass spheres were fired simultaneously at velocities in the range of 6 km/s. The impact results identify the hypervelocity impact response of the silicon wafers. The impacted targets showed a brittle material damage morphology (defined by fracture) and linked to the crystalline structure of the silicon wafer. As predicted from the mechanical properties, it was found that the silicon tended to fracture along the 111 planes. Cross-sectioned craters also showed the crystalline structure of the silicon, with the onset of fracture-driven spall on the rear surface. The metal and polymeric coatings produced diverse damage morphologies, with delamination zones being up to twice the diameter

  16. Raising the shields: PCR in the presence of metallic surfaces protected by tailor-made coatings.

    PubMed

    Scherag, Frank D; Brandstetter, Thomas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    The implementation of PCR reactions in the presence of metallic surfaces is interesting for the generation of novel bioanalytical devices, because metals exhibit high mechanical stability, good thermal conductivity, and flexibility during deformation. However, metallic substrates are usually non-compatible with enzymatic reactions such as PCR due to poisoning of the active center of the enzyme or nonspecific adsorption of the enzymeto the metal surface, which could result in protein denaturation. We present a method for the generation of polymer coatings on metallic surfaces which are designed to minimize protein adsorption and also prevent the release of metal ions. These coatings consist of three layers covalently linked to each other; a self-assembled monolayer to promote adhesion, a photochemically generated barrier layer and a photochemically generated hydrogel. The coatings can be deposited onto aluminum, stainless steel, gold and copper surfaces. We compare PCR efficiencies in the presence of bare metallic surfaces with those of surfaces treated with the novel coating system.

  17. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  18. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, J.K. Jr.; Gensse, C.

    1993-09-14

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials. 8 figures.

  19. Structural characterization of ion-vapor deposited hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings by solid state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jiao; Kato, Takahisa; Watanabe, Sadayuki; Hayashi, Hideo; Kawaguchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-07

    In the present study, unique structural heterogeneity was observed in ion-vapor deposited a-C:H coatings by performing {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CPMAS experiments on solid state nuclear magnetic resonance devices. Two distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters were discovered: one of them denoted as sp{sup 2} C′ in content of 3–12 at. % was non-protonated specifically localized in hydrogen-absent regions, while the other dominant one denoted as sp{sup 2} C″ was hydrogenated or at least proximate to proton spins. On basis of the notably analogous variation of sp{sup 2} C′ content and Raman parameters as function of substrate bias voltage in the whole range of 0.5 kV–3.5 kV, a model of nano-clustering configuration was proposed that the sp{sup 2} C′ clusters were embedded between sp{sup 2} C″ clusters and amorphous sp{sup 3} C matrix as trapped interfaces or boundaries where the sp{sup 2} carbon bonds were highly distorted. Continuous increase of bias voltage would promote the nano-clustering and re-ordering of dominant sp{sup 2} C″ clusters, thus results in a marked decrease of interspace and a change of the content of sp{sup 2} C′ clusters. Further investigation on the {sup 13}C magnetization recovery showed typical stretched-exponential approximation due to the prominent presence of paramagnetic centers, and the stretched power α varied within 0.6–0.9 from distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters. Differently, the magnetization recovery of {sup 1}H showed better bi-exponential approximation with long and short T{sub 1}(H) fluctuated within 40–60 ms and 0.1–0.3 ms approximately in content of 80% ± 5% and 20% ± 5%, respectively, varying with various bias voltages. Meanwhile, the interrupted {sup 13}C saturation recovery with an interval of short T{sub 1}(H) showed that most of quick-relaxing protons were localized in sp{sup 2} C″ clusters. Such a short T{sub 1}(H) was only possibly resulted from a relaxation mechanism

  20. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser

    2003-10-01

    In the 11th quarter, further testing was performed on thermal spray coatings. A component coated and fused in the 9th quarter underwent high-stress abrasive wear testing. The test successfully showed this coating could survive in a high stress, sliding wear environment as the base layer in an FGM design coating. Work on the ferrous metal-matrix composites was completed in previous quarter and therefore no update is provided.

  1. Effective mineral coatings for hardening the surface of metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislov, S. V.; Kislov, V. G.; Skazochkin, A. V.; Bondarenko, G. G.; Tikhonov, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    The structural changes that occur in the surface and surface layers of steel 20Kh13 and titanium alloy PT-3V (Russian designation) samples after each stage of hardening due to a formed mineral surface layer are studied by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Electric spark alloying, pressing, and ultrasonic processing are used to reach the effect of volume compression of the base metal and the mineral in the plastic deformation zone. As a result, applied mineral particles concentrate in preliminarily created microvoids in a thin surface layer. The surface layer thus modified acquires a high hardness and wear resistance. Durometry shows that the hardness of the processed sample surfaces increases more than twofold. Therefore, the developed technology of creating a mineral coating can be used to increase the tribological properties of the surfaces of the parts, units, and mechanisms of turbine, pump, and mining equipment, which undergo intense wear during operation.

  2. Combustion zone durability program-B. Task VIII. Sputter deposited ceramic and metallic coatings. Executive summary. [Graded metal; metal/ceramic layered; dense surface ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, J. W.; Moss, R. W.; Hays, D. D.

    1980-11-01

    The graded metal coatings are of the CoCrAlY type modified by including high Cr surface compositions, gradients in Cr and Al composition, underlayers and graded Pt additions, and Hf substitutions for Y. The metal ceramic layered coatings consist of alternate metal (Ni, Ni-Cr, CoCrAlY or Pt) and ceramic (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or ZrO/sub 2/ + Y) layers. Investigations of dense surface ceramic coatings are directed towards methods for obtaining adherent impermeable ceramic protective coatings for gas turbine hot section components. Increased coating adherence is being sought through two coating designs intended to accomodate expansion and modulus mismatches at the coating-substrate interface.

  3. Enhanced fluorescence cell imaging with metal-coated slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moal, Eric; Fort, Emmanuel; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Janin, Anne; Murata, Hideyuki; Cordelières, Fabrice P.

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has witnessed momentous advances in fluorescence microscopy. The introduction of novel fluorescent markers, together with the development of original microscopy techniques, made it possible to study biomolecular interactions in living cells and to examine the structure and function of living tissues. The emergence of these innovative techniques had a remarkable impact on all the life sciences. However, many biological and medical applications involve the detection of minute quantities of biomolecules, and are limited by the signal weakness in common observation conditions. Here, we show that silver and gold-coated microscope slides can be used as mirror substrates to efficiently improve detection sensitivity when fluorescence microscopy is applied to micrometer-thick biological samples. We report a fourfold enhancement of the fluorescence signal and a noticeable strengthening of the image contrast, when mirror substrates are used with standard air microscope objectives. We demonstrate that metal-coated substrates provide the means to get sensitivity-enhanced fluorescence detection with dry optics, while keeping a wide field observation and a large depth of field. This is a crucial advantage for automated and high-throughput applications to cell and tissue diagnostic analysis.

  4. Young's Moduli of Cold and Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pawlik, R.; Loewenthal, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic metallic copper alloy and NiCrAlY coatings were fabricated by either the cold spray (CS) or the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) deposition processes. Dynamic elastic modulus property measurements were conducted on these monolithic coating specimens between 300 K and 1273 K using the impulse excitation technique. The Young's moduli decreased almost linearly with increasing temperature at all temperatures except in the case of the CS Cu-23%Cr-5%Al and VPS NiCrAlY, where deviations from linearity were observed above a critical temperature. It was observed that the Young's moduli for VPS Cu-8%Cr were larger than literature data compiled for Cu. The addition of 1%Al to Cu- 8%Cr significantly increased its Young's modulus by 12 to 17% presumably due to a solid solution effect. Comparisons of the Young s moduli data between two different measurements on the same CS Cu- 23%Cr-5%Al specimen revealed that the values measured in the first run were about 10% higher than those in the second run. It is suggested that this observation is due to annealing of the initial cold work microstructure resulting form the cold spray deposition process.

  5. Effects of a ceramic coating on metal temperatures of an air-cooled turbine vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, H. J.; Liebert, C. H.

    1980-02-01

    The metal temperatures of air cooled turbine vanes both uncoated and coated with the NASA thermal barrier system were studied experimentally. Current and advanced gas turbine engine conditions were simulated at reduced temperatures and pressures. Airfoil metal temperatures were significantly reduced, both locally and on the average, by use of the the coating. However, at low gas Reynolds number, the ceramic coating tripped a laminar boundary layer on the suction surface, and the resulting higher heat flux increased the metal temperatures. Simulated coating loss was also investigated and shown to increase local metal temperatures. However, the metal temperatures in the leading edge region remained below those of the uncoated vane tested at similar conditions. Metal temperatures in the trailing edge region exceeded those of the uncoated vane.

  6. Effects of a ceramic coating on metal temperatures of an air-cooled turbine vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, H. J.; Liebert, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The metal temperatures of air cooled turbine vanes both uncoated and coated with the NASA thermal barrier system were studied experimentally. Current and advanced gas turbine engine conditions were simulated at reduced temperatures and pressures. Airfoil metal temperatures were significantly reduced, both locally and on the average, by use of the the coating. However, at low gas Reynolds number, the ceramic coating tripped a laminar boundary layer on the suction surface, and the resulting higher heat flux increased the metal temperatures. Simulated coating loss was also investigated and shown to increase local metal temperatures. However, the metal temperatures in the leading edge region remained below those of the uncoated vane tested at similar conditions. Metal temperatures in the trailing edge region exceeded those of the uncoated vane.

  7. THz-Driven Ultrafast Spin-Lattice Scattering in Amorphous Metallic Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, S.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Sher, M.-J.; Chen, Z.; Yang, S.-H.; Samant, M. G.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Dürr, H. A.

    2016-08-01

    We use single-cycle THz fields and the femtosecond magneto-optical Kerr effect to, respectively, excite and probe the magnetization dynamics in two thin-film ferromagnets with different lattice structures: crystalline Fe and amorphous CoFeB. We observe Landau-Lifshitz-torque magnetization dynamics of comparable magnitude in both systems, but only the amorphous sample shows ultrafast demagnetization caused by the spin-lattice depolarization of the THz-induced ultrafast spin current. Quantitative modeling shows that such spin-lattice scattering events occur on similar time scales than the conventional spin conserving electronic scattering (˜30 fs ). This is significantly faster than optical laser-induced demagnetization. THz conductivity measurements point towards the influence of lattice disorder in amorphous CoFeB as the driving force for enhanced spin-lattice scattering.

  8. Sol-gel metal oxide and metal oxide/polymer multilayers applied by meniscus coating

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J.A.; Thomas, I.M.

    1993-10-01

    We are developing a meniscus coating process for manufacturing large-aperture dielectric multilayer high reflectors (HR`s) at ambient conditions from liquid suspensions. Using a lab-scale coater capable of coating 150 mm square substrates, we have produced several HR`s which give 99% + reflection with 24 layers and with edge effects confined to about 10 mm. In calendar 1993 we are taking delivery of an automated meniscus coating machine capable of coating substrates up to 400 mm wide and 600 mm long. The laser-damage threshold and failure stress of sol-gel thin films can be substantially increased through the use of soluble polymers which act as binders for the metal oxide particles comprising the deposited film. Refractive index control of the film is also possible through varying the polymer/oxide ratio. Much of our present effort present is in optimizing oxide particle/binder/solvent formulations for the high-index material. Films from colloidal zirconia strengthened with polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP) have given best results to date. An increase in the laser damage threshold (LDT) for single layers has been shown to significantly increase with increased polymer loading, but as yet the LDT for multilayer stacks remains low.

  9. Developing metal coated mesh filters for mid-infrared astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, Shigeyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Kamizuka, Takafumi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Asano, Kentaro; Uchiyama, Mizuho; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Wada, Takehiko

    2012-09-01

    A metal mesh filter is appropriate to a band-pass filter for astronomy in the long mid-infrared between 25 and 40 μm, where most of optical materials are opaque. The mesh filter does not require transparent dielectric materials unlike interference filters because the transmission characteristics bare determined by surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) resonances excited on a metal surface with a periodic structure. In this study, we have developed the mesh filters optimized to atmospheric windows at 31.8 and 37.5 μm accessible from the Chajnantor site of 5,640 m altitude. First, mesh filters made of a gold film of 2 μm thickness have been fabricated. Four identical film-type filters are stacked incoherently to suppress leakages at stop-bands. The transmissions of the stacked filters have been measured to be 0.8 at the peaks and below 1 x 10-3 at the stop-bands at 4 K. The ground-based mid-infrared camera MAX38 has been equipped with the stacked filters and successfully obtained diffraction-limited stellar images at the Chajnantor site. The film-type mesh filter does not have sufficient mechanical strength for a larger aperture and for use in space. We have developed mesh filters with higher strength by applying the membrane technology for x-ray optics. The membrane-type mesh filter is made of SiC and coated with a thin gold layer. The optical performance of the mesh filter is independent of internal materials in principle because the SPP resonances are excited only on the metal surface. The fabricated membrane-type mesh filter has been confirmed to provide comparable optical performance to the film-type mesh filter.

  10. Modeling emissivity of low-emissivity coating containing horizontally oriented metallic flake particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuai; Yuan, Le; Weng, Xiaolong; Deng, Longjiang

    2014-11-01

    The scattering and absorption cross sections of horizontally oriented metallic flake particles are estimated by extended geometric optics that includes diffraction and edge effects. Emissivity of the coating containing those particles is calculated using Kubelka-Munk theory. The dependence of emissivity of the coating on the radius, thickness, content of metallic flake particles and coating thickness is discussed. Finally, theoretical results are compared with the experimental measurements with Al/acrylic resin coating system and the results show that simulation values are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  11. Surface plasmon response of metal spherical nanoshells coated with dielectric overlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peihong; Bao, Jilong; Wu, Ligang; Li, Xue; Zhao, Hongxia; Zhu, Renxiang; Wang, Jinxia; Li, Dongsheng

    2013-11-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) characteristics of metal spherical nanoshells coated with different dielectric overlayers were investigated in this Letter. Besides band position, it is found that the line width of the symmetric dipole SP resonance is affected by the overlayer coating when the coupling strength of the inner surface cavity mode and outer surface sphere mode is strong. When the surrounding dielectric constant is comparative to that of core silica, narrowest damping width is expected. The computation results also demonstrate that the quality factors and electromagnetic field distribution are dependent on the overlayer coating. Consequently, an appropriate dielectric overlayer coating may be an important way of tuning SP characteristics of metal nanoshells.

  12. Simple model-free estimation of orientation order parameters of vacuum-deposited and spin-coated amorphous films used in organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yoshiya; Shibata, Maki; Yokoyama, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    Molecular orientation in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is now regarded as an important factor that affects device efficiency. However, methods to quantitatively estimate the degree of molecular orientation in OLEDs are currently limited, and they require constructing a model of an optical structure. Here, we propose a simple model-free method to estimate the orientation order parameters (S) of molecules in amorphous OLED films from their absorption spectra using the randomization of molecular orientation induced by heating. This method is used to quantitatively estimate the S values of vacuum-deposited and spin-coated films and clearly demonstrate the random orientation in the latter.

  13. Indium (In)- and tin (Sn)-based metal induced crystallization (MIC) on amorphous germanium (α-Ge)

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Dong-Ho; Park, Jin-Hong

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • In- and Sn-based MIC phenomenon on amorphous (α)-Ge is newly reported. • The In- and Sn-MIC phenomenon respectively started at 250 °C and 400 °C. • The Sn-MIC process presents higher sheet resistance and bigger crystal grains. - Abstract: In this paper, metal-induced crystallization (MIC) phenomenon on α-Ge by indium (In) and tin (Sn) are thoroughly investigated. In- and Sn-MIC process respectively started at 250 °C and 400 °C. Compared to the previously reported MIC samples including In-MIC, Sn-MIC process presented higher sheet resistance (similar to that of SPC) and bigger crystal grains above 50 nm (slightly smaller than that of SPC). According to SIMS analysis, Sn atoms diffused more slowly into Ge than In at 400 °C, providing lower density of heterogeneous nuclei induced by metals and consequently larger crystal grains.

  14. Molten metal containment vessel with rare earth oxysulfide protective coating thereon and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    An improved molten metal containment vessel is disclosed in which wetting of the vessel's inner wall surfaces by molten metal is inhibited by coating at least the inner surfaces of the containment vessel with one or more rare earth oxysulfide or rare earth sulfide compounds to inhibit wetting and or adherence by the molten metal to the surfaces of the containment vessel.

  15. 40 CFR 52.253 - Metal surface coating thinner and reducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal surface coating thinner and... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.253 Metal surface... Counties Air Basin portion). (iii) This section is rescinded for metal parts and products coaters which...

  16. 40 CFR 52.253 - Metal surface coating thinner and reducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metal surface coating thinner and... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.253 Metal surface... Counties Air Basin portion). (iii) This section is rescinded for metal parts and products coaters which...

  17. 40 CFR 52.253 - Metal surface coating thinner and reducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metal surface coating thinner and... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.253 Metal surface... Counties Air Basin portion). (iii) This section is rescinded for metal parts and products coaters which...

  18. 40 CFR 52.253 - Metal surface coating thinner and reducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Metal surface coating thinner and... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.253 Metal surface... Counties Air Basin portion). (iii) This section is rescinded for metal parts and products coaters which...

  19. 40 CFR 52.253 - Metal surface coating thinner and reducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Metal surface coating thinner and... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.253 Metal surface... Counties Air Basin portion). (iii) This section is rescinded for metal parts and products coaters which...

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of ceramic coatings on metals and ceramic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nable, Jun Co

    2005-07-01

    The research presented in this study consists of two major parts. The first part is about the development of ceramic coatings on metals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Ceramics such as Al2O3 and Cr2O3, are used as protective coatings for materials used at elevated temperatures (>700°C). These metal oxides either exhibit oxidation resistance or have been used as environmental bond coats. Conventional methods of coating by chemical vapor deposition requires deposition temperatures of >950°C which could damage the substrate material during the coating process. Lower deposition temperatures (400 to 600°C) by MOCVD of these metal oxides were successful on Ni metal substrates. Surface modification such as pre-oxidation and etching were also investigated. In addition, a novel approach for the CVD of TiN on metals was developed. This new approach utilizes ambient pressure conditions which lead to deposition temperatures of 800°C or lower compared to conventional CVD of TiN at 1000°C. Titanium nitride can be used as an abrasive and wear coating on cutting and grinding tools. This nitride can also serve as a diffusion coating in metals. The second major part of this research involves the synthesis of interfacial coatings on ceramic reinforcing fibers for ceramic matrix composites. Aluminum and chromium oxides were deposited onto SiC, and Al2O3-SiO 2 fibers by MOCVD. The effects of the interface coatings on the tensile strength of ceramic fibers are also discussed. New duplex interface coatings consisting of BN or TiN together with Al2O3 or ZrO 2 were also successfully deposited and evaluated on SiC fibers.

  1. P-type conductive amorphous oxides of transition metals from solution processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinwang; Kaneda, Toshihiko; Tokumitsu, Eisuke; Koyano, Mikio; Mitani, Tadaoki; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2012-07-01

    We report a series of solution-processed p-type conductive amorphous Ln-M-O (a-Ln-M-O, where M = Ru, Ir, and Ln is a lanthanide element except Ce) having low resistivities (10-3 to 10-2 Ω cm). These oxides are thermally stable to a high degree, being amorphous up to 800 °C, and processable below 400 °C. Their film surfaces are smooth on the atomic scale, and the process allows patterning simply by direct imprinting without distortion of the pattern after annealing. These properties have high potential for use in printed electronics. The electron configurations of these oxides are apparently different from existing p-type oxides.

  2. Study the formation of metastable crystalline phases from amorphous metallic systems with an integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhuo; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Yang; Mendelev, Mikhail; Ott, Ryan; Park, Eun-Soo; Besser, Matt; Kramer, Matt; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-03-01

    An efficient genetic algorithm (GA) is integrated with experimental diffraction data to solve a metastable Al20Sm4 phase that evolves during rapid solidification of an amorphous Al-10%Sm alloy produced by magnetron sputtering. The excellent match between calculated and experimental X-ray diffraction patterns confirms that this new phase appeared in the crystallization of the alloy. We discover the strong similarity of the underlying atomic structure between the amorphous alloy and this phase. Both phases share the same Sm-centered motif, providing a low-barrier pathway to form this Al20Sm4phase in the glass matrix at low temperatures. Molecular dynamic simulations of crystal growth from the liquid phase predict the formation of disordered anti-site defects in the devitrified crystal.

  3. Field Performance of Three-Phase Amorphous Metal Core Distribution Transformers at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    37 Waste water management and sanitary engineering Airfields and pavements 38 O1 pollution removal and recovery3 Air polution ADVANCED BASE AND...utility systems at Ford Island, Barbers Point Naval Air Station, the Naval Shipyard, and the Naval Supply Center at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The main...Power Meter connected to a three-phase 4-wire amorphous core transformer under test at Barbers Point Naval Air Station. This testing procedure was

  4. Calcium and Zinc Containing Bactericidal Glass Coatings for Biomedical Metallic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Díaz, Luis A.; Prado, Catuxa; Cabal, Belén; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-01-01

    The present work presents new bactericidal coatings, based on two families of non-toxic, antimicrobial glasses belonging to B2O3–SiO2–Na2O–ZnO and SiO2–Na2O–Al2O3–CaO–B2O3 systems. Free of cracking, single layer direct coatings on different biomedical metallic substrates (titanium alloy, Nb, Ta, and stainless steel) have been developed. Thermal expansion mismatch was adjusted by changing glass composition of the glass type, as well as the firing atmosphere (air or Ar) according to the biomedical metallic substrates. Formation of bubbles in some of the glassy coatings has been rationalized considering the reactions that take place at the different metal/coating interfaces. All the obtained coatings were proven to be strongly antibacterial versus Escherichia coli (>4 log). PMID:25056542

  5. Effect of Zr on microstructure of metallic glass coatings prepared by gas tunnel type plasma spraying.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Kuroda, T; Kimura, H; Inoue, A

    2012-06-01

    Metallic glass is one of the most attractive advanced materials, and many researchers have conducted various developmental research works. Metallic glass is expected to be used as a functional material because of its excellent physical and chemical functions such as high strength and high corrosion resistance. However, the application for small size parts has been carried out only in some industrial fields. In order to widen the industrial application fields, a composite material is preferred for the cost performance. In the coating processes of metallic glass with the conventional deposition techniques, there is a difficulty to form thick coatings due to their low deposition rate. Thermal spraying method is one of the potential candidates to produce metallic glass composites. Metallic glass coatings can be applied to the longer parts and therefore the application field can be widened. The gas tunnel plasma spraying is one of the most important technologies for high quality ceramic coating and synthesizing functional materials. As the gas tunnel type plasma jet is superior to the properties of other conventional type plasma jets, this plasma has great possibilities for various applications in thermal processing. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying was used to form the metallic glass coatings on the stainless-steel substrate. The microstructure and surface morphology of the metallic glass coatings were examined using Fe-based metallic glass powder and Zr-based metallic glass powder as coating material. For the mechanical properties the Vickers hardness was measured on the cross section of both the coatings and the difference between the powders was compared.

  6. Magnetron sputtering of metallic coatings onto elastomeric substrates for a decrease in fuel permeation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myntti, Matthew F.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the application of a metallic coating by magnetron sputtering onto elastomeric substrates, as an inhibiting layer to permeation transport. The metallic coatings which were deposited were aluminum, titanium, and copper. The substrates used were NBR, FVMQ, and FKM elastomers. The permeating fluids were ASTM Fuel C, isooctane, and toluene. The magnetron sputtering properties of these metallic elements were unique to each material, with the titanium sputtering rate being very low. The sputtering rates of these materials correlated well with their sublimation temperature. It was found that some of the metallic particles which were sputtered onto the substrates, implanted into the surface of the elastomeric membranes, with the total amount and distance of implantation being related to the density of the substrate material. The permeation of these solvents through the composite materials was reduced by the presence of these coatings with the reduction in permeation rate ranging from 12 to 25% for Fuel C. The pervaporation properties of these substrates were also evaluated. It was found from this analysis that for the FVMQ and NBR substrates, the permeation rate of the permeating solute molecules was proportional to the size of the permeation molecule. The substrate materials were not significantly stiffened by the addition of the thin metallic coatings. The coated materials were cohesive and well adhered, as determined by stretching of the substrate materials with the metallic layer in place. Upon stretching, there was no evidence of damage to the metallic coating.

  7. Efficiently-cooled plasmonic amorphous silicon solar cells integrated with a nano-coated heat-pipe plate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinan; Du, Yanping; Shum, Clifford; Cai, Boyuan; Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Chen, Xi; Duck, Benjamin; Fell, Christopher; Zhu, Yonggang; Gu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) are emerging as a major alternative energy source. The cost of PV electricity depends on the efficiency of conversion of light to electricity. Despite of steady growth in the efficiency for several decades, little has been achieved to reduce the impact of real-world operating temperatures on this efficiency. Here we demonstrate a highly efficient cooling solution to the recently emerging high performance plasmonic solar cell technology by integrating an advanced nano-coated heat-pipe plate. This thermal cooling technology, efficient for both summer and winter time, demonstrates the heat transportation capability up to ten times higher than those of the metal plate and the conventional wickless heat-pipe plates. The reduction in temperature rise of the plasmonic solar cells operating under one sun condition can be as high as 46%, leading to an approximate 56% recovery in efficiency, which dramatically increases the energy yield of the plasmonic solar cells. This newly-developed, thermally-managed plasmonic solar cell device significantly extends the application scope of PV for highly efficient solar energy conversion. PMID:27113558

  8. Efficiently-cooled plasmonic amorphous silicon solar cells integrated with a nano-coated heat-pipe plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinan; Du, Yanping; Shum, Clifford; Cai, Boyuan; Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Chen, Xi; Duck, Benjamin; Fell, Christopher; Zhu, Yonggang; Gu, Min

    2016-04-01

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) are emerging as a major alternative energy source. The cost of PV electricity depends on the efficiency of conversion of light to electricity. Despite of steady growth in the efficiency for several decades, little has been achieved to reduce the impact of real-world operating temperatures on this efficiency. Here we demonstrate a highly efficient cooling solution to the recently emerging high performance plasmonic solar cell technology by integrating an advanced nano-coated heat-pipe plate. This thermal cooling technology, efficient for both summer and winter time, demonstrates the heat transportation capability up to ten times higher than those of the metal plate and the conventional wickless heat-pipe plates. The reduction in temperature rise of the plasmonic solar cells operating under one sun condition can be as high as 46%, leading to an approximate 56% recovery in efficiency, which dramatically increases the energy yield of the plasmonic solar cells. This newly-developed, thermally-managed plasmonic solar cell device significantly extends the application scope of PV for highly efficient solar energy conversion.

  9. Efficiently-cooled plasmonic amorphous silicon solar cells integrated with a nano-coated heat-pipe plate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinan; Du, Yanping; Shum, Clifford; Cai, Boyuan; Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Chen, Xi; Duck, Benjamin; Fell, Christopher; Zhu, Yonggang; Gu, Min

    2016-04-26

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) are emerging as a major alternative energy source. The cost of PV electricity depends on the efficiency of conversion of light to electricity. Despite of steady growth in the efficiency for several decades, little has been achieved to reduce the impact of real-world operating temperatures on this efficiency. Here we demonstrate a highly efficient cooling solution to the recently emerging high performance plasmonic solar cell technology by integrating an advanced nano-coated heat-pipe plate. This thermal cooling technology, efficient for both summer and winter time, demonstrates the heat transportation capability up to ten times higher than those of the metal plate and the conventional wickless heat-pipe plates. The reduction in temperature rise of the plasmonic solar cells operating under one sun condition can be as high as 46%, leading to an approximate 56% recovery in efficiency, which dramatically increases the energy yield of the plasmonic solar cells. This newly-developed, thermally-managed plasmonic solar cell device significantly extends the application scope of PV for highly efficient solar energy conversion.

  10. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  11. Fact Sheets: Final Rules to Reduce Toxic Air Pollutants from Surface Coating of Metal Cans

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the August 2003 final rule fact sheet and the December 2005 final rule fact sheet that contain information on the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Surface Coating of Metal Cans.

  12. Ceramic coating of metal by laser heat treatment at ambient pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picouet, Pierre A.; McStay, Daniel; Hunter, Catherine; Tonge, Kenneth

    2000-02-01

    Initial results for a new laser based procedure to make ceramic coatings on ferrous metals are described. The procedure is performed at ambient temperature and pressure to avoid the use of a vacuum chamber. An Nd:YAG laser beam (1064 nm) coupled to a mechanical scanner is used to produce coating. The coating precursor materials are sprayed onto the metal sample before the laser-generated heat treatment. A jet of argon gas is used to avoid oxidation of the metallic substrate. The principal ingredients of the coating precursor are sodium tetraborate and a natural clay mineral. The product is a glassy ceramic. The product has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and hardness and adhesion tests. The results indicate that the surface material is a micrometric, single layer which adheres to the metal surface.

  13. Analysis of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistor contact metal using Pilling-Bedworth theory and a variable capacitance diode model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Ahmed; Hasko, David G.; Milne, William I.; Flewitt, Andrew J.

    2013-04-01

    It is widely reported that threshold voltage and on-state current of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide bottom-gate thin-film transistors are strongly influenced by the choice of source/drain contact metal. Electrical characterisation of thin-film transistors indicates that the electrical properties depend on the type and thickness of the metal(s) used. Electron transport mechanisms and possibilities for control of the defect state density are discussed. Pilling-Bedworth theory for metal oxidation explains the interaction between contact metal and amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide, which leads to significant trap formation. Charge trapping within these states leads to variable capacitance diode-like behavior and is shown to explain the thin-film transistor operation.

  14. Study of barrier properties and chemical resistance of recycled PET coated with amorphous carbon through a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process.

    PubMed

    Cruz, S A; Zanin, M; Nerin, C; De Moraes, M A B

    2006-01-01

    Many studies have been carried out in order to make bottle-to-bottle recycling feasible. The problem is that residual contaminants in recycled plastic intended for food packaging could be a risk to public health. One option is to use a layer of virgin material, named functional barrier, which prevents the contaminants migration process. This paper shows the feasibility of using polyethylene terephthalate (PET) recycled for food packaging employing a functional barrier made from hydrogen amorphous carbon film deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) process. PET samples were deliberately contaminated with a series of surrogates using a FDA protocol. After that, PET samples were coated with approximately 600 and 1200 Angstrons thickness of amorphous carbon film. Then, the migration tests using as food simulants: water, 10% ethanol, 3% acetic acid, and isooctane were applied to the sample in order to check the chemical resistance of the new coated material. After the tests, the liquid extracts were analysed using a solid-phase microextraction device (SPME) coupled to GC-MS.

  15. Hybrid organic-inorganic network coatings for protecting metal substrates from abrasion and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Jordens, K.; Wilkes, G.

    1996-12-31

    Ceramers or Ormocers are hybrid organic-inorganic materials first created a decade ago, and are the subject of a recent review article. Recent research from the authors laboratory in this area of materials science has focused on synthesizing protective coatings for (soft) polymeric substrates, i.e. polycarbonate. The authors have now extended the application of such coatings to metallic substrates.

  16. Durable hydrophobic coating composition for metallic surfaces and method for the preparation of the composition

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jiong

    2017-02-14

    A durable hydrophobic coating composition containing fluorinated silanes for metallic surfaces, such as stainless steel surfaces. The composition includes at least one fluorine-containing silane compound, at least one phosphorus-containing silane compound, and at least one hydrolysable compound. This coating is suitable for condenser tubes, among other applications, to promote dropwise condensation.

  17. Selective wet etch of a TaN metal gate with an amorphous-silicon hard mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongliang, Li; Qiuxia, Xu

    2010-11-01

    The appropriate wet etch process for the selective removal of TaN on the HfSiON dielectric with an amorphous-silicon (a-Si) hardmask is presented. SC1 (NH4OH: H2O2: H2O), which can achieve reasonable etch rates for metal gates and very high selectivity to high-k dielectrics and hardmask materials, is chosen as the TaN etchant. Compared with the photoresist mask and the tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) hardmask, the a-Si hardmask is a better choice to achieve selective removal of TaN on the HfSiON dielectric because it is impervious to the SC1 etchant and can be readily etched with NH4OH solution without attacking the TaN and the HfSiON film. In addition, the surface of the HfSiON dielectric is smooth after the wet etching of the TaN metal gate and a-Si hardmask removal, which could prevent device performance degradation. Therefore, the wet etching of TaN with the a-Si hardmask can be applied to dual metal gate integration for the selective removal of the first TaN metal gate deposition.

  18. Apparatus for coating a surface with a metal utilizing a plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.; Galvin, James E.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for coating or layering a surface with a metal utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source. The apparatus includes a trigger mechanism for actuating the metal vacuum vapor arc plasma source in a pulsed mode at a predetermined rate. The surface or substrate to be coated or layered is supported in position with the plasma source in a vacuum chamber. The surface is electrically biased for a selected period of time during the pulsed mode of operation of the plasma source. Both the pulsing of the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source and the electrical biasing of the surface are synchronized for selected periods of time.

  19. Bonding bases coated with porous metal powder: a comparison with foil mesh.

    PubMed

    Hanson, G H; Gibbon, W M; Shimizu, H

    1983-01-01

    This study was undertaken to test the theory that a special porous metal powder coating can provide better mechanical keying than mesh by virtue of its greater surface area and intricate microscopic void network. Identical brackets were laser-welded to an equal number of conventional foil-mesh and powder-coated bases of identical shape and peripheral dimensions. The experimental base material was found to provide significantly greater tensile bond strength at the metal/adhesive interface.

  20. Non-stick syringe needles: Beneficial effects of thin film metallic glass coating

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jinn P.; Yu, Chia-Chi; Tanatsugu, Yusuke; Yasuzawa, Mikito; Shen, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of Zr-based (Zr53Cu33Al9Ta5) thin film metallic glass (TFMG) for the coating of syringe needles and compares the results with those obtained using titanium nitride and pure titanium coatings. TFMG coatings were shown to reduce insertion forces by ∼66% and retraction forces by ∼72%, when tested using polyurethane rubber block. The benefits of TFMG-coated needles were also observed when tested using muscle tissue from pigs. In nano-scratch tests, the TFMG coatings achieved a coefficient of friction (COF) of just ∼0.05, which is about one order of magnitude lower than those of other coatings. Finite-element modeling also indicates a significant reduction in injection and retraction forces. The COF can be attributed to the absence of grain boundaries in the TFMG coating as well as a smooth surface morphology and low surface free energy. PMID:27573062

  1. Thermoelastic Stability Analysis of Solidification of Pure Metals on a Coated Planar Mold of Finite Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Mehmet Hakan; Yigit, Faruk

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical model for investigating the thermoelastic instability/mechanism during pure metal solidification on a coated mold of finite thickness is developed. This study extends the previous theoretical works on growth instability during solidification process by investigating the effects of an added coating layer. Mold coating is one of the most important factors controlling the heat transfer rate, and hence it has a very important role on the solidification rate and the development of microstructure. In this model, thermal and mechanical problems are coupled through the pressure-dependent contact resistances at mold/coating and coating/shell interfaces. The thermal diffusivities of solidified shell, coating, and mold materials are assumed to be zero. This assumption provides us to solve heat transfer problem analytically. A linear perturbation method is used to simplify complexity of the modeled solidification problem, and governing equations are solved numerically using a variable step variable order predictor-corrector algorithm. The effects of coating layer thickness and coupling rates at shell/coating and coating/mold interfaces are investigated in detail. The results show that coating thickness has destabilizing effect on the growth instability when the coupling rates are small. However, when these coupling rates are increased individually or together, the destabilizing effect of coating thickness turns to be stabilizing. On the other hand, coupling rates have generally destabilizing effects on the process, but an increase in the thickness of coating leads to diminishing coupling rates effect in some cases.

  2. Thermoelastic Stability Analysis of Solidification of Pure Metals on a Coated Planar Mold of Finite Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Mehmet Hakan; Yigit, Faruk

    2017-04-01

    A theoretical model for investigating the thermoelastic instability/mechanism during pure metal solidification on a coated mold of finite thickness is developed. This study extends the previous theoretical works on growth instability during solidification process by investigating the effects of an added coating layer. Mold coating is one of the most important factors controlling the heat transfer rate, and hence it has a very important role on the solidification rate and the development of microstructure. In this model, thermal and mechanical problems are coupled through the pressure-dependent contact resistances at mold/coating and coating/shell interfaces. The thermal diffusivities of solidified shell, coating, and mold materials are assumed to be zero. This assumption provides us to solve heat transfer problem analytically. A linear perturbation method is used to simplify complexity of the modeled solidification problem, and governing equations are solved numerically using a variable step variable order predictor-corrector algorithm. The effects of coating layer thickness and coupling rates at shell/coating and coating/mold interfaces are investigated in detail. The results show that coating thickness has destabilizing effect on the growth instability when the coupling rates are small. However, when these coupling rates are increased individually or together, the destabilizing effect of coating thickness turns to be stabilizing. On the other hand, coupling rates have generally destabilizing effects on the process, but an increase in the thickness of coating leads to diminishing coupling rates effect in some cases.

  3. Plasma mediated collagen-I-coating of metal implant materials to improve biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Joerg; Koeller, Manfred; Bensch, Sebastian; Halfmann, Helmut; Awakowicz, Peter; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Esenwein, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    This study describes the collagen-I coating of titanium and steel implants via cold low-pressure gas plasma treatment. To analyze the coatings in terms of biocompatibility osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells and human leukocytes were cultivated on the metal surfaces. Two different implant materials were assessed (Ti6Al4V, X2CrNiMo18) and four different surface properties were evaluated: (a) plasma pretreated and collagen-I coated implant materials; (b) collagen-I dip-coated without plasma pretreatment; (c) plasma treated but not collagen-I coated; (d) standard implant materials served as control. The different coating characteristics were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For adhesion and viability tests calcein-AM staining of the cells and Alamar blue assays were performed. The quantitative analysis was conducted by computer assisted microfluorophotography and spectrometer measurements. SEM analysis revealed that stable collagen-I coatings could not be achieved on the dip-coated steel and titanium alloys. Only due to pretreatment with low-pressure gas plasma a robust deposition of collagen I on the surface could be achieved. The cell viability and cell attachment rate on the plasma pretreated, collagen coated surfaces was significantly (p < 0.017) increased compared to the non coated surfaces. Gas plasma treatment is a feasible method for the deposition of proteins on metal implant materials resulting in an improved biocompatibility in vitro. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2010.

  4. Thin metal layer as transparent electrode in n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theuring, Martin; Geissendörfer, Stefan; Vehse, Martin; von Maydell, Karsten; Agert, Carsten

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, transparent electrodes, based on a thin silver film and a capping layer, are investigated. Low deposition temperature, flexibility and low material costs are the advantages of this type of electrode. Their applicability in structured n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells is demonstrated in simulation and experiment. The influence of the individual layer thicknesses on the solar cell performance is discussed and approaches for further improvements are given. For the silver film/capping layer electrode, a higher solar cell efficiency could be achieved compared to a reference ZnO:Al front contact.

  5. Connecting defects and amorphization in UiO-66 and MIL-140 metal-organic frameworks: a combined experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Thomas D.; Todorova, Tanya K.; Baxter, Emma F.; Reid, David G.; Gervais, Christel; Bueken, Bart; Van de Voorde, B.; De Vos, Dirk; Keen, David A.; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline

    The mechanism and products of the structural collapse of the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) UiO-66, MIL-140B and MIL-140C upon ball-milling are investigated through solid state 13C NMR and pair distribution function (PDF) studies, finding amorphization to proceed by the breaking of a fraction of metal-ligand bonding in each case. The amorphous products contain inorganic-organic bonding motifs reminiscent of the crystalline phases. Whilst the inorganic Zr6O4(OH)4 clusters of UiO-66 remain intact upon structural collapse, the ZrO backbone of the MIL-140 frameworks undergoes substantial distortion. Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate defective models of MIL-140B and show, through comparison of calculated and experimental 13C NMR spectra, that amorphization and defects in the materials are linked.

  6. A Comparative Study of Natural Fiber and Glass Fiber Fabrics Properties with Metal or Oxide Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusis, Andrej; Pentjuss, Evalds; Bajars, Gunars; Sidorovicha, Uljana; Strazds, Guntis

    2015-03-01

    Rapidly growing global demand for technical textiles industries is stimulated to develop new materials based on hybrid materials (yarns, fabrics) made from natural and glass fibres. The influence of moisture on the electrical properties of metal and metal oxide coated bast (flax, hemp) fibre and glass fibre fabrics are studied by electrical impedance spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. The bast fibre and glass fiber fabrics are characterized with electrical sheet resistance. The method for description of electrical sheet resistance of the metal and metal oxide coated technical textile is discussed. The method can be used by designers to estimate the influence of moisture on technical data of new metal coated hybrid technical textile materials and products.

  7. Electrically Conductive, Corrosion-Resistant Coatings Through Defect Chemistry for Metallic Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Anil V. Virkar

    2006-12-31

    The principal objective of this work was to develop oxidation protective coatings for metallic interconnect based on a defect chemistry approach. It was reasoned that the effectiveness of a coating is dictated by oxygen permeation kinetics; the slower the permeation kinetics, the better the protection. All protective coating materials investigated to date are either perovskites or spinels containing metals exhibiting multiple valence states (Co, Fe, Mn, Cr, etc.). As a result, all of these oxides exhibit a reasonable level of electronic conductivity; typically at least about {approx}0.05 S/cm at 800 C. For a 5 micron coating, this equates to a maximum {approx}0.025 {Omega}cm{sup 2} area specific resistance due to the coating. This suggests that the coating should be based on oxygen ion conductivity (the lower the better) and not on electronic conductivity. Measurements of ionic conductivity of prospective coating materials were conducted using Hebb-Wagner method. It was demonstrated that special precautions need to be taken to measure oxygen ion conductivity in these materials with very low oxygen vacancy concentration. A model for oxidation under a protective coating is presented. Defect chemistry based approach was developed such that by suitably doping, oxygen vacancy concentration was suppressed, thus suppressing oxygen ion transport and increasing effectiveness of the coating. For the cathode side, the best coating material identified was LaMnO{sub 3} with Ti dopant on the Mn site (LTM). It was observed that LTM is more than 20 times as effective as Mn-containing spinels. On the anode side, LaCrO3 doped with Nb on the Cr site (LNC) was the material identified. Extensive oxidation kinetics studies were conducted on metallic alloy foils with coating {approx}1 micron in thickness. From these studies, it was projected that a 5 micron coating would be sufficient to ensure 40,000 h life.

  8. Application of hybrid organic/inorganic polymers as coatings on metallic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustinho, T. R.; Motz, G.; Ihlow, S.; Machado, R. A. F.

    2016-09-01

    Acrylic polymers, particularly poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), have certain specific properties, such as good film formation, transparency, and good mechanical properties, which have been widely used in paints, coatings and adhesives. However, the limited chemical and physical stability of these pure polymers limits their applications when exposed to hostile conditions, as in ship hulls, for example. A suitable way to enhance PMMA properties is the addition of silicon polymers with very good protective characteristics. In this study, a PMMA and HTT 1800 (commercial silazane) copolymer were applied on metallic substrate and compared to pure PMMA and HTT 1800. All the materials were applied as coatings. They were applied on stainless steel via dip-coating to investigate the coating properties. Thermal cycling was employed to analyze coating durability at high temperatures (50 °C to 600 °C). Optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the coated surfaces, and the adhesion of pure PMMA, pure HTT 1800 and PMMA/HTT 1800 coatings on metallic substrate was investigated by Cross-Cut-Test (ASTM D 3359). The sessile drop method was used to determine the contact angle. PMMA coatings presented complete degradation from 250 °C, while hybrid coatings of PMMA and HTT 1800 have good protection until 400 °C. The adherence of the coating on metallic substrate showed improvement in all synthesized materials when compared to pure PMMA, obtaining the best adherence possible. The contact angle test showed that the hydrophobicity of the hybrid coatings is higher than that of the pure coatings.

  9. Ceramic coating effect on liner metal temperatures of film-cooled annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.; Wear, J. D.; Liebert, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the effect of a ceramic coating on the average metal temperatures of full annular, film cooled combustion chamber liner. The investigation was conducted at pressures from 0.50 to 0.062. At all test conditions, experimental results indicate that application of a ceramic coating will result in significantly lower wall temperatures. In a simplified heat transfer analysis, agreement between experimental and calculated liner temperatures was achieved. Simulated spalling of a small portion of the ceramic coating resulted in only small increases in liner temperature because of the thermal conduction of heat from the hotter, uncoated liner metal.

  10. PROCESS OF COATING METALS WITH BISMUTH OR BISMUTH-BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Beach, J.G.

    1958-01-28

    A method is described for producing coatings of bismuth or bismuth alloys on a metal base. This is accomplished by electrodepositing the bismuth from an aqueous solution of BiCl/sub 3/, and by making the metal base alternately the cathode and the anode, the cathode periods being twice as long as the anode periods. In one embodiment a nickel coating is first electrodeposited in a known way, and this nickel plated piece is tae base upon which tae bismuth is deposited by the process of this patent. The coated piece is then heat treated to produce a homogeneous Ni--Bi alloy by diffusion.

  11. Modification of semiconductor or metal nanoparticle lattices in amorphous alumina by MeV heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanović Radović, I.; Buljan, M.; Karlušić, M.; Jerčinović, M.; Dražič, G.; Bernstorff, S.; Boettger, R.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work we investigate effects of MeV heavy ions (from 0.4 MeV Xe to 15 MeV Si) on regularly ordered nanoparticle (NP) lattices embedded in amorphous alumina matrix. These nanostructures were produced by self-assembling growth using magnetron-sputtering deposition. From grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering measurements we have found that the used MeV heavy ions do not change the NP sizes, shapes or distances among them. However, ions cause a tilt of the entire NP lattice in the direction parallel to the surface. The tilt angle depends on the incident ion energy, type and the applied fluence and a nearly linear increase of the tilt angle with the ion fluence and irradiation angle was found. This way, MeV heavy ion irradiation can be used to design custom-made NP lattices. In addition, grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering can be effectively used as a method for the determination of material redistribution/shift caused by the ion hammering effect. For the first time, the deformation yield in amorphous alumina was determined for irradiation performed at the room temperature.

  12. Method and Apparatus for Thermal Spraying of Metal Coatings Using Pulsejet Resonant Pulsed Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thermal spraying a metal coating on a substrate is accomplished with a modified pulsejet and optionally an ejector to assist in preventing oxidation. Metal such as Aluminum or Magnesium may be used. A pulsejet is first initiated by applying fuel, air, and a spark. Metal is inserted continuously in a high volume of metal into a combustion chamber of the pulsejet. The combustion is thereafter controlled resonantly at high frequency and the metal is heated to a molten state. The metal is then transported from the combustion chamber into a tailpipe of said pulsejet and is expelled therefrom at high velocity and deposited on a target substrate.

  13. Adherent diamond like carbon coatings on metals via plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.P.

    1996-12-01

    Various techniques are currently used to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on various materials. Many of these techniques use metallic interlayers, such as Ti or Si, to improve the adhesion of a DLC coating to a ferrous substrate. An alternative processing route would be to use plasma source ion implantation (PSII) to create a carbon composition gradient in the surface of the ferrous material to serve as the interface for a DLC coating. The need for interlayer deposition is eliminated by using a such a graded interfaces PSII approach has been used to form adherent DLC coatings on magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, chromium, brass, nickel, and tungsten. A PSII process tailored to create a graded interface allows deposition of adherent DLC coatings even on metals that exhibit a positive heat of formation with carbon, such as magnesium, iron, brass and nickel.

  14. Preface: Proceedings of the 13th Conference on Liquid and Amorphous Metals (LAM13) (Ekaterinburg, Russia, 8 14 July 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popel, Pjotr; Gelchinskii, Boris; Sidorov, Valeriy

    2008-03-01

    The most recent developments in the field of liquid and amorphous metals and alloys are regularly updated through two complementary international conferences: the liquid and amorphous metals conference (LAM) and the rapidly quenched materials (RQ) conference. The first series of conferences started as LM1 in 1966 at Brookhaven for the basic understanding of liquid metals. The subsequent LM conferences were held in Tokyo (1972) and Bristol (1976). The conference was renewed in Grenoble (1980) as a LAM conference including amorphous metals and continued in Los Angeles (1983), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (1986), Kyoto (1989), Vienna (1992), Chicago (1995), Dortmund (1998), Yokohama (2001) and Metz (2004). The conferences are mainly devoted to liquid and amorphous metals and alloys. However, communications on some non-metallic systems such as semiconductors, quasicrystals etc, are also accepted. The conference tradition strongly encourages participation from junior researchers and graduate students. The 13th conference of the LAM series was organized in Ekaterinburg, Russia, by the Institute of Metallurgy of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IMet UB RAS) and the Ural State Pedagogical University (USPU), and held from 8-14 July 2007 under the chairmanship of Professors Pjotr Popel (USPU) and Boris Gelchinskii (IMet UB RAS). Two hundred and forty two active participants and about 60 guest participants from 20 countries attended the conference. There were no parallel sessions and all oral reports were separated into three groups: invited talks (40 min), full-scale oral reports (25 min), and brief oral reports (15 min). The program included ten sessions, ranging from purely theoretical subjects to the technological application of molten and amorphous alloys. The following sessions took place: A: Electronic structure and transport, magnetic properties; B: Phase transitions; C: Structure; D: Atomic dynamics and transport; E: Thermodynamics; F: Modelling

  15. Lifetime Prediction of Organic Coating/Metal System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    210 5. Phosphate Conversion Coatings ....... . ..... .. .. . .... .......... 26 a. Deposition Kinetics...samples ............. 25 13 Potential-time curves for steel of four different surface pretreatments immersed in phosphating solution...28 14 Surface morphology of zinc phosphate conversion coating on steel for five different pretreatment procedures ............... 30 15 Typical

  16. Corrosion Resistance of Amorphous Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 coating - a new criticality-controlled material

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-03-28

    An iron-based amorphous metal with good corrosion resistance and a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons has been developed and is reported here. This amorphous alloy has the approximate formula Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} and is known as SAM2X5. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) were added to provide corrosion resistance, while boron (B) was added to promote glass formation and the absorption of thermal neutrons. Since this amorphous metal has a higher boron content than conventional borated stainless steels, it provides the nuclear engineer with design advantages for criticality control structures with enhanced safety. While melt-spun ribbons with limited practical applications were initially produced, large quantities (several tons) of gas atomized powder have now been produced on an industrial scale, and applied as thermal-spray coatings on prototypical half-scale spent nuclear fuel containers and neutron-absorbing baskets. These prototypes and other SAM2X5 samples have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both salt-fog and long-term immersion testing. Modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in various relevant environments, and are reported here. While these coatings have less corrosion resistance than melt-spun ribbons and optimized coatings produced in the laboratory, substantial corrosion resistance has been achieved.

  17. Metallic and Nonmetallic Inorganic Coatings. General Requirements for the Selection of Coatings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-02

    Oxide with paint-and-varnish coating. (32) Not aluminum. (33) Condensed aluminum. (34) letallated aluminum. (35) Condensed titanium . (36) Cast iron. (37...19) Silver-antimony alloy coating. (20) Ilectrodeposited gold. (21) Gold-copper alloy coating. (22) Palladium on nickel or silver sublaer. (23...14 9. in technically substantiated cases, if the mnifestation of isolated foci of corrosion during operation does not disturb the working capacity or

  18. Permanent optical doping of amorphous metal oxide semiconductors by deep ultraviolet irradiation at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Hyungtak; Cho, Young-Je; Bobade, Santosh M.; Park, Kyoung-Youn; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Lee, Jaegab

    2010-05-31

    We report an investigation of two photon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced permanent n-type doping of amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) at room temperature. The photoinduced excess electrons were donated to change the Fermi-level to a conduction band edge under the UV irradiation, owing to the hole scavenging process at the oxide interface. The use of optically n-doped a-IGZO channel increased the carrier density to approx10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} from the background level of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, as well as the comprehensive enhancement upon UV irradiation of a-IGZO thin film transistor parameters, such as an on-off current ratio at approx10{sup 8} and field-effect mobility at 22.7 cm{sup 2}/V s.

  19. Novel Nanocrystalline Intermetallic Coatings for Metal Alloys in Coal-fired Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Zak Fang; H. Y. Sohn

    2009-08-31

    Intermetallic coatings (iron aluminide and nickel aluminide) were prepared by a novel reaction process. In the process, the aluminide coating is formed by an in-situ reaction between the aluminum powder fed through a plasma transferred arc (PTA) torch and the metal substrate (steel or Ni-base alloy). Subjected to the high temperature within an argon plasma zone, aluminum powder and the surface of the substrate melt and react to form the aluminide coatings. The prepared coatings were found to be aluminide phases that are porosity-free and metallurgically bonded to the substrate. The coatings also exhibit excellent high-temperature corrosion resistance under the conditions which simulate the steam-side and fire-side environments in coal-fired boilers. It is expected that the principle demonstrated in this process can be applied to the preparation of other intermetallic and alloy coatings.

  20. Surface topographical effects on the structural growth of thick sputtered metal and alloy coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Brainard, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    Thick sputtered S-Monel, silver, and 304 stainless steel coatings were deposited on mica and metal substrates with various surface finishes to investigate the structural growth of the coating by scanning electron microscopy. The geometry and the surface structure of the nodules are characterized. Compositional changes within the coating were analyzed by X-ray dispersion microscopy. Defects in the surface finish (i.e., scratches, inclusions, etc.) act as preferential nucleation sites and form isolated and complex nodules and various surface overgrowths in the coating. The nodule boundaries are very vulnerable to chemical etching and these nodules do not disappear after full annealing. Further, they have undesirable effects on mechanical properties; cracks are initiated at the nodules when the coating is stressed by mechanical forces. These effects are illustrated by micrographs. Nodular growth within a coating can be minimized or eliminated by reducing the surface roughness.

  1. Metallized coatings for corrosion control of Naval ship structures and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    In attempting to improve corrosion control, the U.S. Navy has undertaken a program of coating corrosion-susceptible shipboard components with thermally sprayed aluminum. In this report the program is reviewed in depth, including examination of processes, process controls, the nature and properties of the coatings, nondestructive examination, and possible hazards to personnel. The performance of alternative metallic coating materials is also discussed. It is concluded that thermally sprayed aluminum can provide effective long-term protection against corrosion, thereby obviating the need for chipping of rust and repainting by ship personnel. Such coatings are providing excellent protection to below-deck components such as steam valves, but improvements are needed to realize the full potential of coatings for above-deck service. Several recommendations are made regarding processes, materials, and research and development aimed at upgrading further the performance of these coatings.

  2. Effect of an amorphous titania nanotubes coating on the fatigue and corrosion behaviors of the biomedical Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Leonardo Contri; Bortolan, Carolina Catanio; da Silva, Paulo Sergio Carvalho Pereira; Bolfarini, Claudemiro; Oliveira, Nilson Tadeu Camarinho

    2017-01-01

    An array of self-organized TiO2 nanotubes with an amorphous structure was produced on the biomedical Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys, and the resulting fatigue and corrosion behaviors were studied. The electrochemical response of the nanotubular oxide surfaces was investigated in Ringer physiological solution through potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The absence of transpassivation in the chloride-containing solution, in addition to the micron-scale values of the passivation current density, indicated the excellent corrosion behavior of the coating and the satisfactory protection against the creation of potential stress concentrators in the surface. Axial fatigue tests were performed in physiological solution on polished and coated conditions, with characterization of the treated surfaces by scanning electron microscopy before and after the tests. The surface modification was not deleterious to the fatigue response of both alloys mainly due to the nano-scale dimension of the nanotubes layer. An estimation based on fracture mechanics revealed that a circumferential crack in the range of 5μm depth would be necessary to affect the fatigue performance, which is far from the thickness of the studied coating, although no cracks were actually observed in the oxide surfaces after the tests.

  3. Tribological coatings for liquid metal and irradiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.N.

    1986-06-01

    Several metallurgical coatings have been developed that provide good tribological performances in high-temperature liquid sodium and that are relatively unaffected by neutron fluences to 6 X 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV). The coatings that have consistently provided the best tribological performance have been the nickel aluminide diffusion coatings created by the pack cementation process, chromium carbide or Tribaloy 700 trade mark (a nickel-base hardfacing alloy) applied by the detonation-gun process, and chromium carbide and other hardfacing alloy) applied by the detonation-gun process, and chromium carbide and other hardfacing materials applied by the electro-spark deposition process. The latter process is a relatively recent development for nuclear applications and is expected to find wide usage. Other coating processes, such as plasma-spray coating, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition, were candidates for use on various components, but the coatings did not pass the required qualification tests or were not economically competitive. The advantages and limitations of the three selected processes are discussed, the tribological performance of the coatings is reviewed, and representative applications and their performance requirements are described.

  4. Influence of laser irradiation on change properties of bulk amorphous Zr-Pd metallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V. A.; Yakovlev, A. V.; Pluzhnikova, T. N.; Shlikova, A. A.; Berezner, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    We study the morphological features of laser irradiation zones formed on the surface of the bulk metallic glasses. We use the nanoindentation method for estimation alloys properties caused by impulse heating during irradiation.

  5. The Effect of Oxygen Contamination on the Amorphous Structure of Thermally Sprayed Coatings of Cu47Ti33Zr11Ni8Si1

    SciTech Connect

    Besser, Matthew Frank

    2002-01-01

    this research has shown that it is possible to deposit coatings of gas atomized Cu47Ti33Zr11Ni8Si1 powders containing various levels of oxygen contamination using plasma arc spray methods. The structure of the coating was found to depend primarily on the spray environment, with an argon atmosphere producing the most amorphous samples for a given starting powder. The oxygen content of the coatings reflected the relative levels of the oxygen contamination in the starting powders. The analysis of the starting powders displayed oxygen contents ranging from 0.125-0.79 wt.%. It was shown that higher oxygen levels lead to more crystalline structure in the starting powders as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). This trend was found to be true for both the starting powders and for the plasma sprayed coatings. Chemical composition for all starting powders was very close to the nominal alloy composition. Chemical changes in the coatings involved the loss of Cu in coatings where high levels of oxidation were found. Cavitation erosion testing of selected coatings showed a weak trend that coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spray (VPS) had lower damage rates, but there was no clear data to indicate which coating parameters were superior. The range of data produced from testing duplicate coating was too wide to provide a good statistical measure of cavitation erosion resistance. of interest was the fact that when coatings began to show damage from cracking, all samples of a group showed similar damage and usually the damage pattern was somewhat unique to that group of samples. Failure of the coatings was due to features inherent to plasma arc spray (PAS) coating (i.e., pores, splat boundaries, oxide inclusions) rather than the mechanical characteristics of the amorphous alloy.

  6. Water-Based Assembly of Polymer-Metal Organic Framework (MOF) Functional Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    De, Souvik; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, Benard Peter; Nune, Satish K.; Lutkenhaus, Jodie L.

    2016-12-27

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have gained tremendous attention for their porosity, size selectivity, and structural diversity. There is a need for MOF-based coatings, particularly in applications such as separations, electronics and energy; yet forming thin, functional, conformal coatings is prohibitive because MOFs exist as a powder. Layer-by- layer assembly, a versatile thin film coating approach, offers a unique solution to this problem, but this approach requires MOFs that are water-dispersible and bear a surface charge. Here, we address these issues by examining water-based dispersions of MIL-101(Cr) that facilitate the formation of robust polymer-MOF hybrid coatings. Specifically, the substrate to be coated is alternately exposed to an aqueous solution of poly(styrene sulfonate) and dispersion MIL-101(Cr), yielding linear film growth and coatings with a MOF content as high as 77 wt%.This approach is surface-agnostic, in which the coating is successfully applied to silicon, glass, flexible plastic, and even cotton fabric, conformally coating individual fibers. In contrast, prior attempts at forming MOF-coatings were severely limited to a handful of surfaces, required harsh chemical treatment, and were not conformal. The approach presented here unambiguously confirms that MOFs can be conformally coated onto complex and unusual surfaces, opening the door for a wide variety of applications.

  7. Mesoporous SnO2-coated metal nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Na; Polavarapu, Lakshminarayana; Wang, Qing; Xu, Qing-Hua

    2015-03-04

    Aggregation of plasmonic nanoparticles under harsh conditions has been one of the major obstacles to their potential applications. Here we present the preparation of uniform mesoporous SnO2 shell coated Au nanospheres, Au nanorods and Au/Ag core-shell nanorods and their applications in molecular sensing and catalysis. In these nanostructures, the mesoporous SnO2 shell stabilizes the metal nanoparticle and allows the metal core to be exposed to the surrounding environment for various applications at the same time. These nanostructures display high refractive index sensitivity, which makes them promising materials for LSPR based molecular sensing. Applications of these materials as catalysts for reduction of 4-nitrophenol by NaBH4 have also been demonstrated. Both uncoated and SnO2-coated anisotropic Au and Au/Ag nanorods were found to display significantly better catalytic efficiency compared to the corresponding spherical Au nanoparticles. Catalytic activities of different metal nanoparticles were significantly enhanced by 4-6 times upon coating with the mesoporous SnO2 shell. The enhanced catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles upon SnO2 coating was attributed to charge-redistribution between noble metal and SnO2 that disperses the electrons to a large area and prolonged electron lifetime in SnO2-coated metal nanoparticles. The charge transfer mechanism of enhanced catalytic efficiency for SnO2-coated metal nanoparticles has been further demonstrated by photochemical reduction of silver ions on the outer surface of these NPs. These metal/semiconductor core-shell nanomaterials are potentially useful for various applications such as molecular sensing and catalysis.

  8. METHOD OF FORMING A PROTECTIVE COATING ON FERROUS METAL SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Weeks, J.R.; Kammerer, O.F.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1960-02-23

    A method is described of protecting ferrous metal surfaces from corrosive attack by liquid metals, such as liquid bismuth or lead-bismuth alloys. The nitrogen content of the ferrous metal surface is first reduced by reacting the metal surface with a metal which forms a stable nitride. Thereafter, the surface is contacted with liquid metal containing at least 2 ppm zirconium at a temperature in the range of 550 to 1100 deg C to form an adherent zirconium carbide layer on the ferrous surface.

  9. Water treatment residual (WTR)-coated wood mulch for alleviation of toxic metals and phosphorus from polluted urban stormwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Soleimanifar, Hanieh; Deng, Yang; Wu, Laying; Sarkar, Dibyendu

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum-based water treatment residual (WTR)-coated wood mulches were synthesized and tested for removal of heavy metals and phosphorus (P) in synthetic urban stormwater. WTRs are an industrial waste produced from coagulation in water treatment facilities, primarily composed of amorphous aluminum or iron hydroxides. Batch tests showed that the composite filter media could effectively adsorb 97% lead (Pb), 76% zinc (Zn), 81% copper (Cu) and 97% P from the synthetic stormwater (Pb = 100 μg/L, Zn = 800 μg/L, Cu = 100 μg/L, P = 2.30 mg/L, and pH = 7.0) within 120 min, due to the presence of aluminum hydroxides as an active adsorbent. The adsorption was a 2(nd)-order reaction with respect toward each pollutant. Column tests demonstrated that the WTR-coated mulches considerably alleviated the select pollutants under a continuous-flow condition over the entire filtration period. The effluent Pb, Zn, Cu, and P varied at 0.5-8.9%, 33.4-46.7%, 45.8-55.8%, and 6.4-51.9% of their respective initial concentrations with the increasing bed volume from 0 to 50. Synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests indicated that leached contaminants were all below the U.S. criteria, suggesting that the release of undesired chemicals under rainfall or landfilling conditions is not a concern during application. This study demonstrates that the WTR-coated mulches are a new, low-cost, and effective filter media for urban stormwater treatment. Equally important, this study provides a sustainable approach to beneficially reuse an industrial waste for environmental pollution control.

  10. Influence of the Substrate on the Formation of Metallic Glass Coatings by Cold Gas Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henao, John; Concustell, Amadeu; Dosta, Sergi; Cinca, Núria; Cano, Irene G.; Guilemany, Josep M.

    2016-06-01

    Cold gas spray technology has been used to build up coatings of Fe-base metallic glass onto different metallic substrates. In this work, the effect of the substrate properties on the viscoplastic response of metallic glass particles during their impact has been studied. Thick coatings with high deposition efficiencies have been built-up in conditions of homogeneous flow on substrates such as Mild Steel AISI 1040, Stainless Steel 316L, Inconel 625, Aluminum 7075-T6, and Copper (99.9%). Properties of the substrate have been identified to play an important role in the viscoplastic response of the metallic glass particles at impact. Depending on the process gas conditions, the impact morphologies show not only inhomogeneous deformation but also homogeneous plastic flow despite the high strain rates, 108 to 109 s-1, involved in the technique. Interestingly, homogenous deformation of metallic glass particles is promoted depending on the hardness and the thermal diffusivity of the substrate and it is not exclusively a function of the kinetic energy and the temperature of the particle at impact. Coating formation is discussed in terms of fundamentals of dynamics of undercooled liquids, viscoplastic flow mechanisms of metallic glasses, and substrate properties. The findings presented in this work have been used to build up a detailed scheme of the deposition mechanism of metallic glass coatings by the cold gas spraying technology.

  11. Thin Film Metal Coated Fiber Optic Hydrophone Probe

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, R.; Arora, P.; Gandhi, G.; Daryoush, A.S.; El-Sherif, M.; Lewin, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve on sensitivity performance of fiber sensor employed as Fiber Optic Hydrophone Probe (FOHP) by nano-scale thin film gold coating. The fiber is designed to provide a uniform and spatial averaging free response up to 100 MHz by etching down to an active diameter of about 9 μm. The sensitivity performance of straight cleaved (i.e. full size core and cladding) uncoated, tapered uncoated and tapered thin film gold coated fiber sensors were compared in the frequency range of 1.5 MHz to 20 MHz in the presence of acoustic pressure amplitude levels of up to 6 MPa. An unprecedented voltage sensitivity of −245 dB re 1V/uPa (560 mV/ MPa) was measured for thin film gold coated FOHP by optimizing the gold coating thickness. PMID:19881652

  12. Effect of metallic-coating properties on the tribology of coated and oil-lubricated ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.; Erck, R.A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-09-01

    Friction and wear behavior was determined for zirconia ceramics lubricated with solid coatings (Ag, Au, and Nb) deposited by ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD) techniques, and a polyol-ester-based synthetic oil. Although the use of soft Ag and Au coatings as solid lubricants in conjunction with the synthetic oil significantly reduced the friction and wear under boundary lubrication at temperatures up to 250[degrees]C, these films had poor durability. In contrast, the Nb coating was more durable (in terms of chemical reactivity and adhesion during the tribo-tests) than were the Ag or Au films. However, the friction and wear behavior of the Nb-coated zirconia was poorer than that of the ceramics coated with Ag or Au.

  13. Biocompatibility of core@shell particles: cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human osteosarcoma cells of colloidal silica spheres coated with crystalline or amorphous zirconia.

    PubMed

    Di Virgilio, A L; Arnal, P M; Maisuls, I

    2014-08-01

    The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of novel colloidal silica spheres coated with crystalline or amorphous zirconia (SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) or SiO2@ZrO2(am)) have been studied in a human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63), after 24 h exposure. SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) and SiO2@ZrO2(am) had mean diameters of 782±19 and 891±34 nm, respectively. SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) exposure reduced cell viability, with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a decrease of the GSH/GSSG ratio. The comet and micronucleus (MN) assays detected DNA damage at 5 and 25 μg/mL, respectively. SiO2@ZrO2(am) induced genotoxic action only at 10 and 50 μg/mL (comet and MN assays), along with a decrease of the GSH/GSSG ratio at 50 μg/mL. Both particles were found inside the cells, forming vesicles; however, none of them entered the nucleus. Our findings show that crystallization of the shell of the amorphous ZrO2 increases both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  14. Semiconductor to metallic transition in bulk accumulated amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide dual gate thin-film transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Minkyu; Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Jang, Jin

    2015-05-15

    We investigated the effects of top gate voltage (V{sub TG}) and temperature (in the range of 25 to 70 {sup o}C) on dual-gate (DG) back-channel-etched (BCE) amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) characteristics. The increment of V{sub TG} from -20V to +20V, decreases the threshold voltage (V{sub TH}) from 19.6V to 3.8V and increases the electron density to 8.8 x 10{sup 18}cm{sup −3}. Temperature dependent field-effect mobility in saturation regime, extracted from bottom gate sweep, show a critical dependency on V{sub TG}. At V{sub TG} of 20V, the mobility decreases from 19.1 to 15.4 cm{sup 2}/V ⋅ s with increasing temperature, showing a metallic conduction. On the other hand, at V{sub TG} of - 20V, the mobility increases from 6.4 to 7.5cm{sup 2}/V ⋅ s with increasing temperature. Since the top gate bias controls the position of Fermi level, the temperature dependent mobility shows metallic conduction when the Fermi level is above the conduction band edge, by applying high positive bias to the top gate.

  15. High-throughput exploration of thermoelectric and mechanical properties of amorphous NbO2 with transition metal additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Denis; Geyer, Richard W.; Hans, Marcus

    2016-07-01

    To increase the thermoelectric efficiency and reduce the thermal fatigue upon cyclic heat loading, alloying of amorphous NbO2 with all 3d and 5d transition metals has systematically been investigated using density functional theory. It was found that Ta fulfills the key design criteria, namely, enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient and positive Cauchy pressure (ductility gauge). These quantum mechanical predictions were validated by assessing the thermoelectric and elastic properties on combinatorial thin films, which is a high-throughput approach. The maximum power factor is 2813 μW m-1 K-2 for the Ta/Nb ratio of 0.25, which is a hundredfold increment compared to pure NbO2 and exceeds many oxide thermoelectrics. Based on the elasticity measurements, the consistency between theory and experiment for the Cauchy pressure was attained within 2%. On the basis of the electronic structure analysis, these configurations can be perceived as metallic, which is consistent with low electrical resistivity and ductile behavior. Furthermore, a pronounced quantum confinement effect occurs, which is identified as the physical origin for the Seebeck coefficient enhancement.

  16. Comparison of Crevice Corrosion of Fe-Based Amorphous Metal and Crystalline Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, X; Ha, H; Payer, J H

    2008-07-24

    The crevice corrosion behaviors of an Fe-based bulk metallic glass alloy (SAM1651) and a Ni-Cr-Mo crystalline alloy (C-22) were studied in 4M NaCl at 100 C with cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and constant potential tests. The corrosion damage morphologies, corrosion products and the compositions of corroded surfaces of these two alloys were studied with optical 3D reconstruction, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). It was found that the Fe-based bulk metallic glass (amorphous alloy) SAM1651 had a more positive breakdown potential and repassivation potential than crystalline alloy C-22 in cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests and required a more positive oxidizing potential to initiate crevice corrosion in constant potential test. Once crevice corrosion initiated, the corrosion propagation of C-22 was more localized near the crevice border compared to SAM1651, and SAM1651 repassivated more readily than C-22. The EDS results indicated that the corrosion products of both alloys contained high amount of O and were enriched in Mo and Cr. The AES results indicated that a Cr-rich oxide passive film was formed on the surfaces of both alloys, and both alloys were corroded congruently.

  17. High-strength and high-ductility nanostructured and amorphous metallic materials.

    PubMed

    Kou, Hongning; Lu, Jian; Li, Ying

    2014-08-20

    The development of materials with dual properties of high strength and high ductility has been a constant challenge since the foundation of the materials science discipline. The rapid progress of nanotechnology in recent decades has further brought this challenge to a new era. This Research News highlights a few newly developed strategies to optimize advanced nanomaterials and metallic glasses with exceptional dual mechanical properties of high strength and high ductility. A general concept of strain non-localization is presented to describe the role of multiscale (i.e., macroscale, microscale, nanoscale, and atomic scale) heterogeneities in the ductility enhancement of materials reputed to be intrinsically brittle, such as nanostructured metallic materials and bulk metallic glasses. These nanomaterials clearly form a new group of materials that display an extraordinary relationship between yield strength and the uniform elongation with the same chemical composition. Several other examples of nanomaterials such as those reinforced by nanoprecipitates will also be described.

  18. Hyperfine frequency shift and Zeeman relaxation in alkali-metal-vapor cells with antirelaxation alkene coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Eric P.; Karaulanov, Todor; Balabas, Mikhail; Budker, Dmitry

    2013-02-01

    An alkene-based antirelaxation coating for alkali-metal vapor cells exhibiting Zeeman relaxation times up to 77 s was recently identified by Balabas The long relaxation times, two orders of magnitude longer than in paraffin- (alkane-) coated cells, motivate revisiting the question of what the mechanism is underlying wall-collision-induced relaxation and renew interest in applications of alkali-metal vapor cells to secondary frequency standards. We measure the width and frequency shift of the ground-state hyperfine mF=0→mF'=0 transition (clock resonance) in vapor cells with 85Rb and 87Rb atoms, with an alkene antirelaxation coating. We find that the frequency shift is slightly larger than for paraffin-coated cells and that the Zeeman linewidth scales linearly with the hyperfine frequency shift.

  19. Potential applications of cold sprayed Cu50Ti20Ni30 metallic glassy alloy powders for antibacterial protective coating in medical and food sectors.

    PubMed

    El-Eskandrany, M Sherif; Al-Azmi, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical alloying was utilized for synthesizing of metallic glassy Cu50Ti20Ni30 alloy powders, using a low energy ball milling technique. The metallic glassy powders obtained after 100 h of ball milling had an average particle size of 1.7 mm in diameter and possessed excellent thermal stability, indexed by a relatively high glass transition temperature (358.3 °C) with a wide supercooled liquid region (61 °C). This amorphous phase crystallized into Ti2Cu and CuTiNi2 ordered phases through two overlapped crystallization temperatures at 419.3 °C and 447.5 °C, respectively. The total enthalpy change of crystallization was -4.8 kJ/mol. The glassy powders were employed as feedstock materials to double-face coating the surface of SUS 304 substrate, using cold spraying process under helium gas pressure at 400 °C. This coating material had an extraordinary high nanohardness value of 3.1 GPa. Moreover, it showed a high resistance to wear with a low value of the coefficient of friction ranging from 0.45 to 0.45. Biofilms were grown on 20-mm(2) SUS304 sheets coated coupons inoculated with 1.5 × 10(8) CFU ml(-1)E. coli. Significant biofilm inhibition (p The inhibition of biofilm formation by nanocrystalline powders of Cu-based provides a practical approach to achieve the inhibition of biofilms formation.

  20. Electrodes synthesized from carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal metal adlayer

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2014-04-15

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by a surface preparation process involving immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing a suitable quantity of non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means. The nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. The process can be controlled and repeated to obtain a desired film coverage. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  1. Insulin-coated gold nanoparticles: a plasmonic device for studying metal-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Chanana, Munish; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2011-09-19

    Insulin-capped gold nanoparticles (Au@insulin NPs) are highly sensitive towards pH and heavy metals, due to the protein coating. Au@insulin NPs aggregate and disaggregate reversibly with pH and in the presence of various heavy metal ions, which can be monitored through reversible changes in their optical properties. The sensitivity of the NPs towards different metal ions is dissimilar and depends on the coordinative properties of each specific metal ion, its valence number, concentration, and reaction time (kinetics), representing a simple tool for studying fundamental metal-protein interactions. Moreover, Au@insulin NPs are biocompatible and highly stable at high ionic strengths, due to their robust protein coating.

  2. Metal coated functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes for composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qiang

    This study is considered as a method for producing multifunctional composite materials by using metals coated Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this research, various metals (Ni, Cu, Ag) were successfully deposited onto the surface of SWCNTs. It has been found that homogenous dispersion and dense nucleation sites are the necessary conditions to form uniform coatings on SWCNTs. Functionalization has been applied to achieve considerable improvement in the dispersion of purified SWCNTs and creates more nucleation sites for subsequent metal deposition. A three-step electroless plating approach was used and the coating mechanism is described in the paper. The samples were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Bulk copper/aluminum-SWNT composites were processed by powder metallurgy with wet mixing techniques. Coated SWCNTs were well dispersed in the metal matrix. Cold pressing followed by sintering was applied to control porosity. The relationships between hardness and SWCNTs addition were discussed. Ni-SWCNTs composite coatings were prepared by electro-composite deposition. SWCNTs were suspended in a Ni deposition electrolyte and deposited together with nickel during electrodeposition. SWCNTs concentrations in the coatings were found to be related to the SWCNTs concentration in the solution, current density and agitation rate. The microstructure of the coatings has been examined by electron microscopy. Ni coated SWCNTs were also incorporated into the high temperature Bismaleimide (BMI)/graphite composite to improve Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding and surface conductivity. The vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) was used to process these composites. Surface and volume resistivity and EMI shielding effectiveness of the composites

  3. Hybrid nanostructured coatings for corrosion protection of base metals: a sustainability perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Robert V.; Patil, Vikas; Andrews, Justin L.; Aldinger, Jeffrey P.; Yadav, Ganapati D.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-03-01

    In this topical review article, we attempt to capture recent advances in the development of sustainable hybrid nanocomposite coatings for the corrosion inhibition of structural metals. Spurred primarily by the urgent imperative of replacing hexavalent chromium but also driven by concerns regarding the environmental impact of organic solvents, materials criticality considerations, the need to maintain structural integrity and function under extreme environments, and a renewed impetus towards lightweighting, the design of new coating concepts has seen an explosion of activity. We discuss varying modes of corrosion inhibition and the drive towards multicomponent nanostructured coatings that synergistically unite multiple modes of corrosion inhibition within a single coating system. Nanocomposite coatings in which nanoparticles of one phase are dispersed within a continuous phase, usually a polymeric matrix, provide a modular design approach to multifunctional coatings provided fundamental challenges such as dispersion and compatibility can be resolved. By dint of their high surface-to-volume ratios, the incorporation of nanoparticles profoundly modifies the adjacent polymeric matrix, giving rise to an ‘interphase’ region with modified properties, at relatively low filler loadings. The implications of incorporating metallic, porous metal oxide, and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotubes) within polymeric matrices are explored with an emphasis on active corrosion inhibition. The availability of high-quality nanoparticles that are either electroactive (e.g., metals, graphene, carbon nanotubes, etc.) or are capable of serving as reservoirs for active corrosion inhibitors (e.g., porous silicon oxide, layered double hydroxides, halloysite) provides unprecedented functionality and opportunities for multifunctional coatings. The review emphasizes mechanistic considerations where these have been elucidated with a view towards developing systematic design

  4. Effect of metallic coating properties on the tribology of oil- lubricated coated-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Fenske, G.R.; Erdemir, A.; Erck, R.A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-04-01

    The friction and wear behavior of zirconia ceramics lubricated with solid coatings (AG, Au, and Nb), deposited by ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD) techniques, and a polyol-ester-based synthetic oil are presented. These results demonstrate that, although the simultaneous use of soft (e.g. Ag and Au) solid lubricants in conjunction with the synthetic lubricant significantly reduces the friction and wear under boundary lubrication at temperatures up to 250{degree}C, the durability of the soft films was poor. In contrast, durability of Nb coating (in terms of chemical reactivity and adhesion during the tribo-tests) was better than that of the Ag or Au films. However, the friction and wear behavior of the Nb-coated films was poorer than that of the ceramics coated with Ag or Au.

  5. Effect of metallic coating properties on the tribology of oil- lubricated coated-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Fenske, G.R.; Erdemir, A.; Erck, R.A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    The friction and wear behavior of zirconia ceramics lubricated with solid coatings (AG, Au, and Nb), deposited by ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD) techniques, and a polyol-ester-based synthetic oil are presented. These results demonstrate that, although the simultaneous use of soft (e.g. Ag and Au) solid lubricants in conjunction with the synthetic lubricant significantly reduces the friction and wear under boundary lubrication at temperatures up to 250{degree}C, the durability of the soft films was poor. In contrast, durability of Nb coating (in terms of chemical reactivity and adhesion during the tribo-tests) was better than that of the Ag or Au films. However, the friction and wear behavior of the Nb-coated films was poorer than that of the ceramics coated with Ag or Au.

  6. Friction modifier using adherent metallic multilayered or mixed element layer conversion coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Frank G. (Inventor); Starks, Sr., Lloyd L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process for creating conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes for surfaces, wherein the conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes contain potassium, phosphorus, nitrogen, silicon, and one or more non-alkaline metals. The process comprises forming a first aqueous solution of silicate, potassium hydroxide, and ammonium hydroxide; forming a second aqueous solution of water, phosphoric acid, ammonium hydroxide, an alkali metal hydroxide, and one or more non-alkaline metals, and then combining the first solution with the second solution to form a final solution. This final solution forms an anti-friction multi-layer conversion coating or a spin, drawing, and extrusion finish on a surface when applied to the surface, either directly or as an additive in lubricating fluids.

  7. Friction Modifier Using Adherent Metallic Multilayered or Mixed Element Layer Conversion Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Starks, Lloyd L., Sr. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A process for creating conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes for surfaces, wherein the conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes contain potassium, phosphorus, nitrogen, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The process comprises forming an aqueous solution of water, phosphoric acid or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide, an alkali metal hydroxide, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The aqueous solution forms an anti-friction multilayer conversion and/or mixed element coating or a spin, drawing, and extrusion finish on a surface when applied to the surface, either directly without the use of applied external electromotive force, or as an additive in lubricating fluids.

  8. Al-Si-Mn Alloy Coating on Aluminum Substrate Using Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) Welding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, G. P.; Kamaraj, M.; Bakshi, S. R.

    2014-06-01

    The cold metal transfer (CMT) process was explored as a weld overlay technique for synthesizing Al-Si-Mn alloy coating on a commercially pure Al plate. The effect of welding speed on the bead geometry, deposition rate, and the dilution were studied and the best parameter was used to synthesize the coatings. The CMT process can be used to produce thick coatings (>2.5 mm) without porosity and with low dilution levels. The Vickers hardness number of the Al substrate increased from 28 in the bulk to 57 in the coating. It is suggested that the CMT process can be an effective and energy-efficient technique for depositing thick coatings and is useful in weld repair of aluminum alloy components.

  9. A shape-recovery polymer coating for the corrosion protection of metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Alexander; van den Berg, Otto; Van Damme, Jonas; Verheyen, Karen; Bauters, Erwin; De Graeve, Iris; Du Prez, Filip E; Terryn, Herman

    2015-01-14

    Self-healing polymer coatings are a type of smart material aimed for advanced corrosion protection of metals. This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of two new UV-cure self-healing coatings based on acrylated polycaprolactone polyurethanes. On a macroscopic scale, the cured films all show outstanding mechanical properties, combining relatively high Young's modulus of up to 270 MPa with a strain at break above 350%. After thermal activation the strained films recover up to 97% of their original length. Optical and electron microscopy reveals the self-healing properties of these coatings on hot dip galvanized steel with scratches and microindentations. The temperature-induced closing of such defects restores the corrosion protection and barrier properties of the coating as shown by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning vibrating electrode technique. Therefore, such coatings are a complementary option for encapsulation-based autonomous corrosion protection systems.

  10. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  11. Coating compositions and method for the treatment of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Das, N.; Stastny, P.M.

    1984-09-11

    An aqeuous acidic composition provides improved coating for aluminum. The composition comprises from about 10 to about 150 ppm zirconium, from about 20 to about 250 ppm fluoride, from 30 to about 125 ppm tannin, from about about 15 to about 100 ppm phosphate and from about 5 to about 50 ppm zinc, said coating solution having a tannin to phosphate ratio in the range of at least about 1:1 to about 2:1 and a pH in the range of about 2.3 to about 2.95.

  12. Phosphate chemical conversion coatings on metallic substrates for biomedical application: a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Xian; Xiao, Gui-yong; Lu, Yu-peng

    2015-02-01

    Phosphate chemical conversion (PCC) technology has been investigated for improving the surface performance of metallic implants in the biomedical field over the last decade. The metallic materials, such as magnesium and its alloys, titanium, pure iron and stainless steel are widely used as orthopedic devices for immobilization of bone fractures in clinic. They were previously studied as metal substrates for PCC coating aiming to modify their biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Zinc, calcium and zinc-calcium PCC coatings are frequently utilized considering their nature and the end-use. Although PCC coating has been confirmed to potentially improve the bio-performance of metallic implants in vitro and in vivo by many researchers, there are no unified standards or regulations to give quantitative appraisal of its quality and property. As such, an overview of several main phosphate phases together with their properties and behaviors in vitro and in vivo was conducted. The mechanism of phosphating was also briefly discussed. Critical qualities of PCC coating used for biomedical application including corrosion resistance, wettability and bonding strength were analyzed separately. Biological response including in vitro cell investigations and in vivo tissue response were discussed in terms of the cytocompatibility and bioactivity of PCC coating. Further investigations are proposed to develop appropriate performance evaluation measurements by combining conventional technologies and biomedical procedures.

  13. Adhesion of metals to spin-coated fluorocarbon polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Kil; Chang, Chin-An; Schrott, A. G.

    1990-01-01

    Adhesion between metals and fluorocarbon polymer films has been studied for Cu, Cr, Ti, Al, and Au on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and tetrafluoroethylene-hexafluoropropylene copolymer (FEP) films. Polymer films were applied on the Cr/SiO2 /Si substrate by spinning the aqueous dispersions of the polymer resin particles, followed by thermal curing. Strips of different metals were deposited on the polymers, and adhesion was measured at 90° peel test. The peel strengths were invariably higher for the metals on FEP than those of the corresponding metals on PTFE. Among the metals, Ti showed the highest peel strength for both polymers, followed by Cr and Al, with Cu and Au being the lowest. The peel strengths of Ti, Cr, and Cu on FEP are 85, 45, and 12 g/mm, respectively, and the corresponding ones on PTFE are 23, 5, and 2 g/mm, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis shows that the metal-polymer bonding involves the metal-carbon interactions. The strongest interaction is observed for Ti with the polymers, forming Ti carbidelike bonds. Cr also shows strong interaction with the two polymers, but to a lesser degree compared with Ti. Only a weak bonding is shown for Cu. The difference in peel strengths among the metals shows a correlation with the difference in electronegativities between the metals and carbon. Little contribution to the observed peel strengths is seen from the surface morphological analysis of the untreated polymers.

  14. PLURAL METALLIC COATINGS ON URANIUM AND METHOD OF APPLYING SAME

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-09-16

    A method is described of applying protective coatings to uranlum articles. It consists in applying chromium plating to such uranium articles by electrolysis in a chromic acid bath and subsequently applying, to this minum containing alloy. This aluminum contalning alloy (for example one of aluminum and silicon) may then be used as a bonding alloy between the chromized surface and an aluminum can.

  15. Electrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 90oCElectrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 9

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J; Day, S D; Lian, T; Saw, C K; Hailey, P D; Choi, J S; Rebak, R B; Yang, N; Payer, J H; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Branagan, D J; Buffa, E J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-04-25

    An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was prepared as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stability was found to be comparable to that of high-performance nickel-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. This material also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. This material and its parent alloy maintained corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature, and remained in the amorphous state during exposure to relatively high neutron doses.

  16. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian H.; Kurtiz,Tanya

    1999-06-01

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: (1) decreased exposure hazards for workers; (2) decreased secondary waste generation; (3) increased efficiency of decontamination; (4) positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and (5) lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  17. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian H.; Kuritz, Tanya

    2000-06-01

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: (1) decreased exposure hazards for workers; (2) decreased secondary waste generation; (3) increased efficiency of decontamination; (4) positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and (5) lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  18. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian H.

    2002-04-30

    The proposed research aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies include the following: decreased exposure hazards for workers; decreased secondary waste generation; increased efficiency of decontamination; positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and lower cost of cleanup to the government. We proposed to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) was to be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  19. METHOD OF COATING GRAPHITE WITH STABLE METAL CARBIDES AND NITRIDES

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1959-10-27

    A method is presented for forming protective stable nitride and carbide compounds on the surface of graphite. This is accomplished by contacting the graphite surface with a fused heavy liquid metal such as bismuth or leadbismuth containing zirconium, titanium, and hafnium dissolved or finely dispersed therein to form a carbide and nitride of at least one of the dissolved metals on the graphite surface.

  20. Amorphous silicon enhanced metal-insulator-semiconductor contacts for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, J. Cuevas, A.; Yan, D.; Demaurex, B.; Hessler-Wyser, A.; De Wolf, S.

    2014-10-28

    Carrier recombination at the metal-semiconductor contacts has become a significant obstacle to the further advancement of high-efficiency diffused-junction silicon solar cells. This paper provides the proof-of-concept of a procedure to reduce contact recombination by means of enhanced metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures. Lightly diffused n{sup +} and p{sup +} surfaces are passivated with SiO{sub 2}/a-Si:H and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-Si:H stacks, respectively, before the MIS contacts are formed by a thermally activated alloying process between the a-Si:H layer and an overlying aluminum film. Transmission/scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are used to ascertain the nature of the alloy. Idealized solar cell simulations reveal that MIS(n{sup +}) contacts, with SiO{sub 2} thicknesses of ∼1.55 nm, achieve the best carrier-selectivity producing a contact resistivity ρ{sub c} of ∼3 mΩ cm{sup 2} and a recombination current density J{sub 0c} of ∼40 fA/cm{sup 2}. These characteristics are shown to be stable at temperatures up to 350 °C. The MIS(p{sup +}) contacts fail to achieve equivalent results both in terms of thermal stability and contact characteristics but may still offer advantages over directly metallized contacts in terms of manufacturing simplicity.

  1. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode

    PubMed Central

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-01-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes. PMID:27001370

  2. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-03-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3•0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes.

  3. The Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed WC: Metal Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Liam P.; Pilkington, Antony

    2014-09-01

    WC-based cermet coatings containing various metallic binders such as Ni, Co, and Cr are known for their superior tribological properties, particularly abrasion resistance and enhanced surface hardness. Consequently, these systems are considered as replacements for traditional hard chrome coatings in critical aircraft components such as landing gear. The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a comparative study on the dry sliding wear behavior of three WC-based cermet coatings (WC-12Ni, WC-20Cr2C3-7Ni, and WC-10Co-4Cr), when deposited on carbon steel substrates. Ball on disk wear tests were performed on the coatings using a CSEM Tribometer (pin-on-disk) with a 6-mm ruby ball at 20 N applied load, 0.2 m/s sliding velocity, and sliding distances up to 2000 m. Analysis of both the coating wear track and worn ruby ball was performed using optical microscopy and an Alphastep-250 profilometer. The results of the study revealed both wear of the ruby ball and coated disks allowed for a comparison of both the ball wear and coating wear for the systems considered. Generally, the use of Co and Cr as a binder significantly improved the sliding wear resistance of the coating compared to Ni and/or Cr2C3.

  4. Microstructural disintegration in dense hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite-coated metal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Dong Seok; Lee, Jong Kook

    2007-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been widely used as a coating for orthopedic metal implants. An important concern regarding HA coating is its degradation of the biological milieu. In this study, the microstructure of a retrieved HA-coated acetabular cup implanted for four years after total hip arthroplasty (THA) was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. In order to understand the underlying mechanism, of degradation and exfoliation of the HA coating, degradation of phase-pure and dense HA ceramics was also observed by in vitro and in vivo testing. The surface morphology and fracture surfaces of HA ceramics revealed that the dissolution starting at the surface extended inwards resulting in particle loosening and microstructural-level degradation. The dissolution features of HA ceramics were similar to the case of HA coating. It was found that extensive dissolution of the coating occurred and most of the coating disappeared. The majority of the remaining graints were fractured by the intergranular mode, suggesting that grain boundaries should be predominantly dissolved. These observations may explain the mechanism through which the biological stability of the HA coated layer becomes unexpectedly poor.

  5. Effects of metal coating on the fiber Bragg grating temperature sensing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Changjin; Li, Yulong

    2016-04-01

    Effects of the metal coatings on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensing characteristics were simulated and experimentally investigated. Temperature sensitivity of the coated FBG as a function of the coating material properties was simulated using MATLAB software based on the temperature sensing model. The simulation results show that the elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, thermal expansion coefficient and coating thickness of the coatings have noticeable impacts on the sensing characteristics of the coated FBG. It is noted that (i) there is an extreme value for the influence of the elastic modulus on temperature sensitivity; (ii) temperature sensitivity increases with the increase of Poisson's ratio and thermal expansion coefficient; (iii) with the increase of the coating thickness, the temperature sensitivity increases first then reaches a plateau asymptotically. To validate the simulation results, several FBGs were coated with copper, nickel, cobalt, copper-zinc, and Ni-ZrO2, and subsequently the associated temperature sensitivities were measured using a network analyzer as well as a water bath. The results show that the simulation results agree well with that of the experiments, with the errors up to 5.49%.

  6. Comparison of different hard, metal-like coatings sprayed by plasma and detonation gun processes

    SciTech Connect

    Vuoristo, P.; Niemi, K.; Maentylae, T.; Berger, L.M.; Nebelung, M.

    1995-12-31

    Structure and wear properties of atmospheric plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed coatings prepared from an experimental (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo powder were compared to coatings sprayed from commercially available WC-12%Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25%NiCr powders. All powders had an agglomerated (spray dried) and sintered structure and nearly the same content of the metallic binder of approximately 20 vol.-%. The powders were characterized by SEM (morphology and cross-sections) and X-ray diffraction (phase composition). The coatings were studied by optical microscope, microhardness measurements, X-ray diffraction analysis and by abrasion and erosion wear tests. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the coatings show that the (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo powder is characterized by high phase stability in both spray processes, whereas the WC-12%Co powder is prone to significant phase transformations during spraying. The results clearly show the high potential of the experimental (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo coatings in substituting the conventional systems in wear applications. For instance, it was found that plasma spraying of the (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo powder with an Ar-H{sub 2} plasma gas resulted in coatings with wear resistance comparable to WC-12%Co coatings. However, detonation gun sprayed WC-12%Co coatings showed somewhat better abrasion wear resistance.

  7. Thermal Shock Resistance of Stabilized Zirconia/Metal Coat on Polymer Matrix Composites by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; Huang, Wenzhi; Cheng, Haifeng; Cao, Xueqiang

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized zirconia/metal coating systems were deposited on the polymer matrix composites by a combined thermal spray process. Effects of the thicknesses of metal layers and ceramic layer on thermal shock resistance of the coating systems were investigated. According to the results of thermal shock lifetime, the coating system consisting of 20 μm Zn and 125 μm 8YSZ exhibited the best thermal shock resistance. Based on microstructure evolution, failure modes and failure mechanism of the coating systems were proposed. The main failure modes were the formation of vertical cracks and delamination in the outlayer of substrate, and the appearance of coating spallation. The residual stress, thermal stress and oxidation of substrate near the substrate/metal layer interface were responsible for coating failure, while the oxidation of substrate near the substrate/coating interface was the dominant one.

  8. Localized surface plasmon-enhanced photoluminescence of amorphous silicon quantum dots through plasmonic subwavelength crossed metallic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Lin, Ming-Yi; Hsiao, Li-Jen; Choi, Wing-Kit; Lin, Hoang Yan

    2016-04-01

    We investigate experimentally the enhancing effect of plasmonic subwavelength crossed Ag gratings on photoluminescence (PL) from the amorphous silicon quantum dots (a-Si QDs) embedded in a central silicon-rich SiO x film of the Ag/SiO x :a-Si QDs/Ag sandwich nanostructures. The use of the crossed Ag grating structure as the top layer in the sandwich nanostructures results in a 2-fold increase in the PL peak intensity and a 1.34-fold increase in the integrated emission intensity compared with the use of a one-dimensional (1D) Ag grating top layer, and a 1.53-fold peak intensity increase compared with that of a SiO x :a-Si QDs/Ag structure without a Ag top layer. These significant PL enhancements can be attributed to the high light-extraction efficiency of the polarization-independent crossed metallic grating structure, the strong out-coupling of localized surface plasmons (LSPs), and the strong a-Si QD-LSP coupling.

  9. Variable-range hopping conduction and metal-insulator transition in amorphous RexSi1-x thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisunov, K. G.; Vinzelberg, H.; Arushanov, E.; Schumann, J.

    2011-09-01

    Resistivity, ρ(T), of the amorphous RexSi1-x thin films with x = 0.285-0.351 is investigated in the interval of T ~ 300-0.03 K. At x = 0.285-0.324 the activated behavior of ρ(T) is governed by the Mott and the Shklovskii-Efros variable-range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanisms in different temperature intervals and the three-dimensional regime of the hopping. Between x = 0.328 and 0.351 the activationless dependence of ρ(T) takes place. The critical behavior of the characteristic VRH temperatures and of the Coulomb gap, Δ, pertinent to proximity to the metal-insulator transition at the critical value of xc ≈ 0.327, is observed. The analysis of the critical behavior of Δ yields directly the critical exponent of the dielectric permittivity, η = 2.1 ± 0.2, in agreement with the theoretical prediction, η = 2. On the other hand, the values of the critical exponent of the correlation length ν ~ 0.8-1.1 close to the expected value of unity can be obtained from the analysis of the critical behavior of the VRH characteristic temperatures under an additional assumption of a strong underbarrier scattering of hopping charge carriers in conditions, when the concentration of scattering centers considerably exceeds the concentration of sites involved in the hopping.

  10. The influence of Sc addition on the welding microstructure of Zr-based bulk metallic glass: The stability of the amorphous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shing Hoa; Kuo, Pei Hung; Tsang, Hsiao Tsung; Jeng, Rong Ruey; Lin, Yu Lon

    2007-10-01

    Pulsed direct current autogeneous tungsten inert gas arc welding was conducted on rods of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 and (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10)99.98Sc0.02 under two different cooling conditions. The crystalline precipitates in the fusion zone of BMG Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 were confirmed by microfocused x-ray diffraction pattern analysis as Zr2Ni and Zr2(Cu,Al) intermetallic compounds. In contrast, BMG with Sc addition (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10)99.98Sc0.02 shows an excellent stable glass forming ability. The fusion zone of BMG (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10)99.98Sc0.02 remains in the same amorphous state as that of the amorphous base metal when the weld is cooled with accelerated cooling.

  11. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer...

  13. Apparatus for coating a surface with a metal utilizing a plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, I.G.; MacGill, R.A.; Galvin, J.E.

    1991-05-07

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for coating or layering a surface with a metal utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source. The apparatus includes a trigger mechanism for actuating the metal vacuum vapor arc plasma source in a pulsed mode at a predetermined rate. The surface or substrate to be coated or layered is supported in position with the plasma source in a vacuum chamber. The surface is electrically biased for a selected period of time during the pulsed mode of operation of the plasma source. Both the pulsing of the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source and the electrical biasing of the surface are synchronized for selected periods of time. 10 figures.

  14. Itinerant magnetic properties of amorphous metallic systems II: Magnetic moment distribution in the Fe-B alloys and the magnetism of amorphous Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krompiewski, S.; Krey, U.; Krauss, U.; Ostermeier, H.

    1988-05-01

    For realistic structural models of amorphous Fe 1- xB x with 0.2⩽x⩽0.6 and for the fictitious case of x = 0 (amorphous iron, a-Fe), we calculate the distribution function p( ml) of the local magnetic moments ml by means of a self-consistent itinerant electron approach. Generally, p( ml) is rather broad and agrees with experimental hyperfine field distributions. For x→0 and x > 0.5, even negative moments appear, although overlinem remains positive. Additionally we find that for a-Fe a rather drastic transition from paramagnetic behaviour at densities ρ<ρ c(≈8.3 g/cm 3) to ferromagnetism at ρ > ρ c would happen, if the magnetization could be forced to remain homogeneous. However, if the ml are allowed to relax to their local values, no such transition happens. Finally, we study the question whether the spread of the local moments is important for the density of states and find that this is the case except for 0.2⩽x⩽0.35.

  15. Development of a low loss magnetic composite utilizing amorphous metal flake. Third semi-annual progress report, 19 September 1979-18 March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.

    1980-04-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of casting amorphous metal ribbon in the shape of a helix with properties suitable for motor applications. The tasks include (1) determination of the casting parameters required to produce a helical ribbon, (2) evaluation of magnetic properties and methods for bonding, and (3) developing methods for patterning a wheel for producing motor slots in as-cast ribbon.

  16. Effect of chromium and phosphorus on the physical properties of iron and titanium-based amorphous metallic alloy films. [FEPC; TIPC; TIBC; CR

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, S.; Ramesham, R.; Fitzgerald, D.J. )

    1991-07-01

    Amorphous iron and titanium-based alloys containing various amounts of chromium, phosphorus, and boron exhibit high corrosion resistance. We report some physical properties of Fe and Ti-based metallic alloy films deposited on a glass substrate by a dc-magnetron sputtering technique. The films were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), stress analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), electron microprobe, and potentiodynamic polarization technique.

  17. MgO-Al2O3-ZrO2 Amorphous Ternary Composite: A Dense and Stable Optical Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaoo, Naba K.; Shapiro, Alan P.

    1998-01-01

    The process-parameter-dependent optical and structural properties of MgO-Al2O3-ZrO2 ternary mixed-composite material were investigated. Optical properties were derived from spectrophotometric measurements. The surface morphology, grain size distributions, crystallographic phases, and process- dependent material composition of films were investigated through the use of atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis made evident the correlation between the optical constants and the process-dependent compositions in the films. It is possible to achieve environmentally stable amorphous films with high packing density under certain optimized process conditions.

  18. Metal coated glasses by sputtering and their microfouling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kougo, T.; Kanematsu, H.; Wada, N.; Hihara, T.; Minekawa, M.; Fujita, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Some elements as contaminant tend to be concentrated in biofilm. In order to prevent the fogging of glass, it is very important to control biofilm formation by metal dissolution. In this study, Metals were deposited on glass substrate by Helicon-wave-excited-plasma sputtering process. Sample was very thin metals layer like as half mirror, it could transmit light. The results of biofilm formation test, biofilm formation were inhibited on Cu, Sn and Cr, and light transmission of these samples was not degradation. It could be said that inhibition of biofilm formation was effective to suppressing cloudiness.

  19. Influence of the Conditions of Electrode Position and Heat Treatment on the Structure and Properties of Metallic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovenskiy, I. M.; Kulemina, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Influence of electrodeposition conditions and heat treatment on the structure and properties of metallic coatings has been considered. It has been that at different values of overvoltage, metals crystallize with a cellular, subgrain or monoblock structure. The final formation of the structure occurs during annealing, in the process of which either polygonization or recrystallization develops in the coatings. Varying the conditions of electrodeposition and heat treatment allows obtaining coatings with functional characteristics for specific operating conditions.

  20. Advanced Coatings from Natural-Based Polymers for Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    polysaccharide biopolymers originating from pectin, starch , and chitosan as renewable agricultural and marine resources, and on assessing their potential as the...excellent salt-spray resistance. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER IF PAGES Coating, Corrosion, Aluminum, Biopolymer, Starch , Chitosan 7 16. PRICE CODE 17...The natural polymers used in this program were the corn-or potato- starch and crab or shrimp shells-chitosan obtained from renewable agricultural and

  1. Oxidation Resistant, Cr Retaining, Electrically Conductive Coatings on Metallic Alloys for SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Gorokhovsky

    2008-03-31

    This report describes significant results from an on-going, collaborative effort to enable the use of inexpensive metallic alloys as interconnects in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through the use of advanced coating technologies. Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC, under the leadership of Dr. Vladimir Gorokhovsky, is investigating filtered-arc and filtered-arc plasma-assisted hybrid coating deposition technologies to promote oxidation resistance, eliminate Cr volatility, and stabilize the electrical conductivity of both standard and specialty steel alloys of interest for SOFC metallic interconnect (IC) applications. Arcomac has successfully developed technologies and processes to deposit coatings with excellent adhesion, which have demonstrated a substantial increase in high temperature oxidation resistance, stabilization of low Area Specific Resistance values and significantly decrease Cr volatility. An extensive matrix of deposition processes, coating compositions and architectures was evaluated. Technical performance of coated and uncoated sample coupons during exposures to SOFC interconnect-relevant conditions is discussed, and promising future directions are considered. Cost analyses have been prepared based on assessment of plasma processing parameters, which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed surface engineering process for SOFC metallic IC applications.

  2. Composite materials obtained by the ion-plasma sputtering of metal compound coatings on polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikov, Nikolai; Polyakov, Evgenii; Borisov, Sergei; Barashev, Nikolai; Biramov, Emir; Maltceva, Anastasia; Vereshchagin, Artem; Khartov, Stas; Voronin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the principle and examples composite materials obtained by deposition of metal compound coatings on polymer film substrates by the ion-plasma sputtering method are presented. A synergistic effect is to obtain the materials with structural properties of the polymer substrate and the surface properties of the metal deposited coatings. The technology of sputtering of TiN coatings of various thicknesses on polyethylene terephthalate films is discussed. The obtained composites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is shown. The examples of application of this method, such as receiving nanocomposite track membranes and flexible transparent electrodes, are considered.

  3. FINISHING FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS WITH POWDER COATING. Project Summary (EPA/600/SR-96/152)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides a technical and economic evaluation of a polyester powder coating system applied to the exterior and interior surfaces of metal boxes fabricated for the telephone and cable industries. This evaluation summarized many of the requirements and benefits of a clea...

  4. Process for ultra smooth diamond coating on metals and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); Catledge, Shane A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a new process to deposit well adhered ultra smooth diamond films on metals by adding nitrogen gas to the methane/hydrogen plasma created by a microwave discharge. Such diamond coating process is useful in tribological/wear resistant applications in bio-implants, machine tools, and magnetic recording industry.

  5. Plasma electrolytic oxide coatings on valve metals and their activity in CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukiyanchuk, I. V.; Rudnev, V. S.; Tyrina, L. M.; Chernykh, I. V.

    2014-10-01

    Two approaches have been examined for obtaining titanium- or aluminum-supported catalysts with transition and noble metals using the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique. Elemental compositions, distribution of active elements and catalytic activity in CO oxidation have been compared for composites formed by one-stage PEO technique and those obtained as a result of modification of PEO coatings by impregnation.

  6. Nanosecond multi-pulse laser milling for certain area removal of metal coating on plastics surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Jia, Zhenyuan; Ma, Jianwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Metal coating with functional pattern on engineering plastics surface plays an important role in industry applications; it can be obtained by adding or removing certain area of metal coating on engineering plastics surface. However, the manufacturing requirements are improved continuously and the plastic substrate presents three-dimensional (3D) structure-many of these parts cannot be fabricated by conventional processing methods, and a new manufacturing method is urgently needed. As the laser-processing technology has many advantages like high machining accuracy and constraints free substrate structure, the machining of the parts is studied through removing certain area of metal coating based on the nanosecond multi-pulse laser milling. To improve the edge quality of the functional pattern, generation mechanism and corresponding avoidance strategy of the processing defects are studied. Additionally, a prediction model for the laser ablation depth is proposed, which can effectively avoid the existence of residual metal coating and reduces the damage of substrate. With the optimal machining parameters, an equiangular spiral pattern on copper-clad polyimide (CCPI) is machined based on the laser milling at last. The experimental results indicate that the edge of the pattern is smooth and consistent, the substrate is flat and without damage. The achievements in this study could be applied in industrial production.

  7. PIXE characterization of tissues surrounding metallic prostheses coated with biological glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbotteau, Y.; Irigaray, J. L.; Moretto, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    Biological glasses can be used as coatings for metallic prostheses in order to prevent corrosion. According to their composition, these glasses have different properties. We studied, in vivo, two glasses referred to as BVA and BVH. They are used as coatings of Ti6Al4V metallic implant. BVA glass disappears after 3 months of implantation and is replaced by bone. Prostheses initially coated by this glass have a larger osseous contact perimeter compared to the uncoated prostheses. This ensures a better anchoring of the implant and limits the micro-motions which cause wear debris. BVH glass keeps a constant composition during implantation and it is used like a layer which isolates metal implant from biological environment. In order to characterize the bony environment surrounding implants, we have used PIXE and RBS methods. This paper shows results of the behavior of bony tissue under micro-beam, the quality tests of new bone which replaces the BVA glass coating and the evaluation of corrosion effects. Titanium release in bony tissues begins when the metal surface of the prosthesis is exposed to biological fluids. After a few months of implantation, the titanium contamination is stabilized and remains localized within the first tens of micrometers of surrounding bone.

  8. Comparison of the corrosion behavior of a bulk amorphous metal, Zr{sub 41.2}Ti{sub 13.8}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5}, with its crystallized form

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, V.; Gilbert, C.J.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1998-04-14

    Amorphous metals have generated much interest, both in basic research and for structural applications, because of their near-theoretical strength to stiffness ratio and extremely low damping characteristics. In addition, a number of amorphous metals exhibit excellent corrosion resistance, which has been explained in terms of their structural homogeneity. Since amorphous metals are in principle structurally and chemically homogeneous and thus lack any microstructure, such as grain boundaries, which could act as local electrochemically-active sites, many researchers attribute good corrosion resistance to the entire class of amorphous metals. It is this point, whether the amorphous condition itself confers improved corrosion resistance, that the authors examine in the present note.

  9. Formation, Removal, and Reformation of Surface Coatings on Various Metal Oxide Surfaces Inspired by Mussel Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taegon; Oh, Dongyeop X; Heo, Jinhwa; Lee, Han-Koo; Choy, Seunghwan; Hawker, Craig J; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-11-11

    Mussels survive by strongly attaching to a variety of different surfaces, primarily subsurface rocks composed of metal oxides, through the formation of coordinative interactions driven by protein-based catechol repeating units contained within their adhesive secretions. From a chemistry perspective, catechols are known to form strong and reversible complexes with metal ions or metal oxides, with the binding affinity being dependent on the nature of the metal ion. As a result, catechol binding with metal oxides is reversible and can be broken in the presence of a free metal ion with a higher stability constant. It is proposed to exploit this competitive exchange in the design of a new strategy for the formation, removal, and reformation of surface coatings and self-assembled monolayers (SAM) based on catechols as the adhesive unit. In this study, catechol-functionalized tri(ethylene oxide) (TEO) was synthesized as a removable and recoverable self-assembled monolayer (SAM) for use on oxides surfaces. Attachment and detachment of these catechol derivatives on a variety of surfaces was shown to be reversible and controllable by exploiting the high stability constant of catechol to soluble metal ions, such as Fe(III). This tunable assembly based on catechol binding to metal oxides represents a new concept for reformable coatings with applications in fields ranging from friction/wettability control to biomolecular sensing and antifouling.

  10. Protective lithium ion conducting ceramic coating for lithium metal anodes and associate method

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A battery structure including a cathode, a lithium metal anode and an electrolyte disposed between the lithium anode and the cathode utilizes a thin-film layer of lithium phosphorus oxynitride overlying so as to coat the lithium anode and thereby separate the lithium anode from the electrolyte. If desired, a preliminary layer of lithium nitride may be coated upon the lithium anode before the lithium phosphorous oxynitride is, in turn, coated upon the lithium anode so that the separation of the anode and the electrolyte is further enhanced. By coating the lithium anode with this material lay-up, the life of the battery is lengthened and the performance of the battery is enhanced.

  11. Plasma sprayed coatings for containment of Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material

    DOE PAGES

    Withey, Elizabeth Ann; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Andraka, Charles E.; ...

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performance of Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ), Y2O3, and Al2O3 plasma sprayed coatings are investigated for their ability to prevent attack of Haynes 230 by a near-eutectic Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material (PCM) in a closed environment at 820 °C. Areas where coatings failed were identified with optical and scanning electron microscopy, while chemical interactions were clarified through elemental mapping using electron microprobe analysis. Despite its susceptibility to reduction by Mg, the Al2O3 coating performed well while the YSZ and Y2O3 coating showed clear areas of attack. These results are attributed to the evolution of gaseous Mg atmore » 820 °C leading to the formation of MgO and MgAl2O4.« less

  12. Fly ash based geopolymer thin coatings on metal substrates and its thermal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Temuujin, Jadambaa; Minjigmaa, Amgalan; Rickard, William; Lee, Melissa; Williams, Iestyn; van Riessen, Arie

    2010-08-15

    Class F fly ash based Na-geopolymer formulations have been applied as fire resistant coatings on steel. The main variables for the coating formulations were Si: Al molar and water: cement weight ratios. We have determined that the adhesive strength of the coatings strongly depend on geopolymer composition. The ease with which geopolymer can be applied onto metal surfaces and the resultant thickness depend on the water content of the formulation. Adhesive strengths of greater than 3.5 MPa have been achieved on mild steel surfaces for compositions with Si:Al of 3.5. Microstructure evolution and thermal properties of the optimised coating formulations show that they have very promising fire resistant characteristics.

  13. JOINING OF MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE TO STAINLESS STEEL USING AMORPHOUS METAL BRAZES-RESIDUAL STRESS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    VAIDYA, RAJENDRA U; KAUTZ, DOUGLAS D.; GALLEGOS, DAVID E.

    2007-01-30

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2})/stainless steel 316 L jOints were produced by high temperature brazing using a cobalt-based metallic-glass (METGLAS{trademark} 2714A). Successful joining was completed in two different ways; either by feeding excess braze into the braze gap upon heating or by constraining the MoSi{sub 2}/stainiess steel assembly with an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) fixture during the heating cycle. These steps were necessary to ensure the production of a high quality void free joint. Residual stress measurements were completed on these joints. Indentation results show higher tensile residual stresses in the stainless steel for the joint with the external constraint, in comparison to the unconstrained state. In contrast, the compressive residual stresses In the MoSi{sub 2} (as measured by X-ray diffraction) were lower in the constrained state relative to the unconstrained state. These results and a lack of residual stress balance indicate that the stress state in the braze is significantly different under the two joining conditions and the volume of the braze plays an important role in the development of the residual stresses. Push-out tests carried out on these joints gave higher joint strengths in the unconstrained as compared to the constrained condition. The results of this study have important implications on the selection of the appropriate joining process (use of constraint versus extra braze).

  14. Bump Bonding Using Metal-Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, James L.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Liao, Anna; Bronikowski, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Bump bonding hybridization techniques use arrays of indium bumps to electrically and mechanically join two chips together. Surface-tension issues limit bump sizes to roughly as wide as they are high. Pitches are limited to 50 microns with bumps only 8-14 microns high on each wafer. A new process uses oriented carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a metal (indium) in a wicking process using capillary actions to increase the aspect ratio and pitch density of the connections for bump bonding hybridizations. It merges the properties of the CNTs and the metal bumps, providing enhanced material performance parameters. By merging the bumps with narrow and long CNTs oriented in the vertical direction, higher aspect ratios can be obtained if the metal can be made to wick. Possible aspect ratios increase from 1:1 to 20:1 for most applications, and to 100:1 for some applications. Possible pitch density increases of a factor of 10 are possible. Standard capillary theory would not normally allow indium or most other metals to be drawn into the oriented CNTs, because they are non-wetting. However, capillary action can be induced through the ability to fabricate oriented CNT bundles to desired spacings, and the use of deposition techniques and temperature to control the size and mobility of the liquid metal streams and associated reservoirs. This hybridization of two technologies (indium bumps and CNTs) may also provide for some additional benefits such as improved thermal management and possible current density increases.

  15. Blood compatibility of titanium-based coatings prepared by metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, I.; Maitz, M. F.; Wieser, E.

    2004-07-01

    Titanium with its natural oxide is known to be generally good biocompatible; and therefore, the suitability of some Ti-based coatings as coating for blood-contacting implants is analyzed. Layers of pure Ti, Ti oxynitrides (TiN 1- xO x with x=0.25, 0.50, and 0.75), and Ti oxides were deposited on oxidized Si from a plasma produced by cathodic arc evaporation under addition of N 2 and/or O 2 to the ambient near the substrate. The oxynitrides are crystalline with the fcc structure of TiN up to x=0.25. For x=0.5, a two-phase system of fcc TiN and fcc TiO has been found. In dependence on the deposition parameters, amorphous and crystalline layers (anatase + brookite or rutile) of TiO 2 have been obtained. The rutile layers were doped by implantation of P. The amorphous TiO 2 layers were implanted with Cr. To study the correlation between structure of the coating and blood compatibility, the clotting time of blood plasma as well as the adhesion and activation of blood platelets on the surface was investigated. TiN and oxynitrides showed the longest clotting time compared to rutile. Minimum platelet adhesion has been observed for pure TiO 2. Contrasting tendencies in the dependence of clotting time and platelet adhesion on the microstructure have been stated. However, for P +-doped rutile, both enhanced clotting time and improved platelet adhesion were observed. Platelet adherence and activation always showed similar trends.

  16. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  17. Hybrid WGM-SPP modes in metal-coated microcylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yadong; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Mi; Xiang, Yu; Peng, Yunchong; Chen, Qiang; Song, Yuejiang

    2016-11-01

    Based on electromagnetic eigenequation in silver-coated microcylinder, we study its mode characteristics and sensing characteristics, including dispersion relation, quality factor (Q factor), sensitivity (S) and detection limit (DL). We find hybrid WGM-SPPs modes in energy distribution and mode coupling phenomenon in dispersion curve. In the vicinity of mode coupling point, hybrid TM-SPPs modes (or supermodes) have both high Q factor and high surface enhancement factor. Meanwhile the hybrid modes have high refractive sensitivity and figure of merit (FoM), which enables potential applications in chemical and biological sensing.

  18. Metal-enhanced fluorescence: effect of surface coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lismont, M.; François, A.; Dreesen, L.; Monro, T. M.

    2014-03-01

    Metal Enhanced Fluorescence (MEF), a phenomenon arising when a fluorophore is in closed proximity to a metallic structure such as metallic films or nanostructures, is seen as a way to increase the amount of reactive oxygen species produced by the irradiation of the protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a photosensitizer commonly used in photodynamic therapy. Here, we show a study of the distance-dependent of MEF by applying multiple layers of polyelectrolyte (PE) on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to progressively increase the distance between AgNPs and PpIX, covalently bond to the last polyelectrolyte layer as well as exploring the use of AgNPs of different sizes ranging from 40 to 100 nm. Up to four fold increase of PpIX fluorescence was observed when this photosensitizing agent is bounded onto 100 nm sized Ag NPs. The effective corresponding distance between AgNPs and PpIX is three layers of PE.

  19. Protective conversion coating on mixed-metal substrates and methods thereof

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Matthew J.; Maddela, Surender

    2016-09-06

    Mixed-metal automotive vehicle bodies-in-white comprising ferrous metal surfaces, zinc surfaces, aluminum alloy surfaces, and magnesium alloy surfaces are cleaned and immersed in an aqueous bath comprising an adhesion promoter and an aqueous electrocoat bath (the adhesion promoter may be in the electrocoat bath. The adhesion promoter, which may be a cerium salt, is selected to react with each metal in the body surfaces to form an oxide layer that provides corrosion resistance for the surface and adherence for the deposited polymeric paint coating. The body is cathodic in the electrocoat deposition.

  20. Hard coating of ultrananocrystalline diamond/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films on cemented tungsten carbide by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naragino, Hiroshi; Egiza, Mohamed; Tominaga, Aki; Murasawa, Koki; Gonda, Hidenobu; Sakurai, Masatoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite (UNCD/a-C) films were deposited on cemented carbide containing Co by coaxial arc plasma deposition. With decreasing substrate temperature, the hardness was enhanced accompanied by an enhancement in the sp3/(sp2 + sp3). Energy-dispersive X-ray and secondary ion mass spectrometry spectroscopic measurements exhibited that the diffusion of Co atoms from the substrates into the films hardly occurs. The film deposited at room temperature exhibited the maximum hardness of 51.3 GPa and Young's modulus of 520.2 GPa, which evidently indicates that graphitization induced by Co in the WC substrates, and thermal deformation from sp3 to sp2 bonding are suppressed. The hard UNCD/a-C films can be deposited at a thickness of approximately 3 μm, which is an order larger than that of comparably hard a-C films. The internal compressive stress of the 51.3-GPa film is 4.5 GPa, which is evidently smaller than that of comparably hard a-C films. This is a reason for the thick deposition. The presence of a large number of grain boundaries in the film, which is a structural specific to UNCD/a-C films, might play a role in releasing the internal stress of the films.