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Sample records for amorphous silicon detector

  1. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  2. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  3. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  4. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  5. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  6. Amorphous silicon based radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Qureshi, S.; Wildermuth, D. ); Fujieda, I.; Street, R.A. )

    1991-07-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin(1 {mu}m) and thick (>30{mu}m) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and {gamma} rays. For x-ray, {gamma} ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  8. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  9. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  10. Spectrometric characterization of amorphous silicon PIN detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, A.; Ramírez, F. J.; Ortega, Y.; Estrada, M.; Cabal, A.; Cerdeira, A.; Díaz, A.

    2000-10-01

    During the last years, much interest has been dedicated to the use of amorphous silicon PIN diodes as particle and radiation detectors for medical applications. This work presents the spectrometric characterization of PECVD high deposition rate diodes fabricated at our laboratory, with thickness up to 17.5 μm. Results show that the studied devices detect the Am241 alpha particles and the medical X-rays generated by a mammograph model Senographe 700T from General Electric Possible reasons of the observed energy losses are discussed in the text. Using the SRIM2000 program, the transit of 5.5 MeV alpha particles through a diode was simulated, determining the optimum thickness for these particles to deposit their energy in the intrinsic layer of the diode.

  11. Flexible amorphous silicon PIN diode x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, Michael; Bawolek, Edward; Smith, Joseph T.; Raupp, Gregory B.; Morton, David

    2013-05-01

    A low temperature amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film transistor (TFT) and amorphous silicon PIN photodiode technology for flexible passive pixel detector arrays has been developed using active matrix display technology. The flexible detector arrays can be conformed to non-planar surfaces with the potential to detect x-rays or other radiation with an appropriate conversion layer. The thin, lightweight, and robust backplanes may enable the use of highly portable x-ray detectors for use in the battlefield or in remote locations. We have fabricated detector arrays up to 200 millimeters along the diagonal on a Gen II (370 mm x 470 mm rectangular substrate) using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) a-Si as the active layer and PECVD silicon nitride (SiN) as the gate dielectric and passivation. The a-Si based TFTs exhibited an effective saturation mobility of 0.7 cm2/V-s, which is adequate for most sensing applications. The PIN diode material was fabricated using a low stress amorphous silicon (a-Si) PECVD process. The PIN diode dark current was 1.7 pA/mm2, the diode ideality factor was 1.36, and the diode fill factor was 0.73. We report on the critical steps in the evolution of the backplane process from qualification of the low temperature (180°C) TFT and PIN diode process on the 150 mm pilot line, the transfer of the process to flexible plastic substrates, and finally a discussion and demonstration of the scale-up to the Gen II (370 x 470 mm) panel scale pilot line.

  12. Laminated Amorphous Silicon Neutron Detector (pre-print)

    SciTech Connect

    Harry McHugh, Howard Branz, Paul Stradins, and Yueqin Xu

    2009-01-29

    An internal R&D project was conducted at the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) of National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), to determine the feasibility of developing a multi-layer boron-10 based thermal neutron detector using the amorphous silicon (AS) technology currently employed in the manufacture of liquid crystal displays. The boron-10 neutron reaction produces an alpha that can be readily detected. A single layer detector, limited to an approximately 2-micron-thick layer of boron, has a theoretical sensitivity of about 3%; hence a thin multi-layer device with high sensitivity can theoretically be manufactured from single layer detectors. Working with National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), an AS PiN diode alpha detector was developed and tested. The PiN diode was deposited on a boron-10 coated substrate. Testing confirmed that the neutron sensitivity was nearly equal to the theoretical value of 3%. However, adhesion problems with the boron-10 coating prevented successful development of a prototype detector. Future efforts will include boron deposition work and development of integrated AS signal processing circuitry.

  13. Synchrotron applications of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Lee, John H; Aydiner, C Can; Almer, Jonathan; Bernier, Joel; Chapman, Karena W; Chupas, Peter J; Haeffner, Dean; Kump, Ken; Lee, Peter L; Lienert, Ulrich; Miceli, Antonino; Vera, German

    2008-09-01

    A GE Revolution 41RT flat-panel detector (GE 41RT) from GE Healthcare (GE) has been in operation at the Advanced Photon Source for over two years. The detector has an active area of 41 cm x 41 cm with 200 microm x 200 microm pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. The physical set-up and utility software of the detector system are discussed in this article. The linearity of the detector response was measured at 80.7 keV. The memory effect of the detector element, called lag, was also measured at different exposure times and gain settings. The modulation transfer function was measured in terms of the line-spread function using a 25 microm x 1 cm tungsten slit. The background (dark) signal, the signal that the detector will carry without exposure to X-rays, was measured at three different gain settings and with exposure times of 1 ms to 15 s. The radial geometric flatness of the sensor panel was measured using the diffraction pattern from a CeO(2) powder standard. The large active area and fast data-capturing rate, i.e. 8 frames s(-1) in radiography mode, 30 frames s(-1) in fluoroscopy mode, make the GE 41RT one of a kind and very versatile in synchrotron diffraction. The loading behavior of a Cu/Nb multilayer material is used to demonstrate the use of the detector in a strain-stress experiment. Data from the measurement of various samples, amorphous SiO(2) in particular, are presented to show the detector effectiveness in pair distribution function measurements.

  14. Converting films for X-ray detectors, applied to amorphous silicon arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, S.; Zentai, G.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents results from the on-going efforts to characterize semiconductor thin films for direct X-ray conversion. The authors deposit these thin films onto an amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) readout array with the overall goal of developing a large area X-ray detector for protein crystallography, and for other X-ray imaging fields.

  15. Converting films for x-ray detectors, applied to amorphous silicon arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, S.; Zentai, G.

    1997-12-05

    This paper presents results from our on-going efforts to characterize semiconductor thin films for direct x-ray conversion. We deposit these thin films onto an amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) readout array with the overall goal of developing a large area x-ray detector for protein crystallography, and for other x-ray imaging fields.

  16. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, Michael A.; Raupp, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm2 and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate. PMID:27472329

  17. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors.

    PubMed

    Marrs, Michael A; Raupp, Gregory B

    2016-07-26

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm² and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate.

  18. Test of an amorphous silicon detector in medical proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martišíková, M.; Hesse, B. M.; Nairz, O.; Jäkel, O.

    2011-05-01

    Ion beam radiation therapy for cancer treatment allows for improved dose confinement to the target in comparison with the standard radiation therapy using high energy photons. Dose delivery to the patient using focused ion beam scanning over the target volume is going to be increasingly used in the upcoming years. The high precision of the dose delivery achieved in this way has to be met by practical methods for beam monitoring with sufficient spatial resolution in two dimensions. Flat panel detectors, used for photon portal imaging at the newest medical linear accelerators, are an interesting candidate for this purpose. Initial detector tests presented here were performed using proton beams with the highest available energy. The investigations include measurements of beam profiles at different beam intensities and for different beam width, as well as the signal linearity. Radiation damage was also investigated. The obtained results show that the detector is a promising candidate to be used in the therapeutic proton beams.

  19. Wavelength prediction of laser incident on amorphous silicon detector by neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili Sani, V.; Moussavi-Zarandi, A.; Kafaee, M.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we present a method based on artificial neural networks (ANN) and the use of only one amorphous semiconductor detector to predict the wavelength of incident laser. Amorphous semiconductors and especially amorphous hydrogenated silicon, a-Si:H, are now widely used in many electronic devices, such as solar cells, many types of position sensitive detectors and X-ray imagers for medical applications. In order to study the electrical properties and detection characteristics of thin films of a-Si:H, n-i-p structures have been simulated by SILVACO software. The basic electronic properties of most of the materials used are known, but device modeling depends on a large number of parameters that are not all well known. In addition, the relationship between the shape of the induced anode current and the wavelength of the incident laser leads to complicated calculations. Soft data-based computational methods can model multidimensional non-linear processes and represent the complex input-output relation between the form of the output signal and the wavelength of incident laser.

  20. 3D scanning characteristics of an amorphous silicon position sensitive detector array system.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Javier; Gomes, Luis; Filonovich, Sergej; Correia, Nuno; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Isabel

    2012-02-13

    The 3D scanning electro-optical characteristics of a data acquisition prototype system integrating a 32 linear array of 1D amorphous silicon position sensitive detectors (PSD) were analyzed. The system was mounted on a platform for imaging 3D objects using the triangulation principle with a sheet-of-light laser. New obtained results reveal a minimum possible gap or simulated defect detection of approximately 350 μm. Furthermore, a first study of the angle for 3D scanning was also performed, allowing for a broad range of angles to be used in the process. The relationship between the scanning angle of the incident light onto the object and the image displacement distance on the sensor was determined for the first time in this system setup. Rendering of 3D object profiles was performed at a significantly higher number of frames than in the past and was possible for an incident light angle range of 15 ° to 85 °.

  1. Thermal and Cold Neutron Computed Tomography at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center Using an Amorphous Silicon Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Schwab, M.J.; Farnum, E.H.; McDonald, T.E.; Summa, D.A.; Sheats, M.J.; Stupin, D.M.; Sievers, W.L.

    1998-07-19

    The use of the EG and G-Heimann RTM 128 or dpiX FS20 amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector array for thermal neutron radiography/computed tomography has proven to be a quick and efficient means of producing high quality digital radiographic images. The resolution, although not as good as film, is about 750 pm with the RTM and 127 pm with the dpiX array with a dynamic range in excess of 2,800. In many respects using an amorphous silicon detector is an improvement over other techniques such as imaging with a CCD camera, using a storage phosphor plate or film radiography. Unlike a CCD camera, which is highly susceptible to radiation damage, a-Si detectors can be placed in the beam directly behind the object under examination and do not require any special optics or turning mirrors. The amorphous silicon detector also allows enough data to be acquired to construct a digital image in just a few seconds (minimum gate time 40 ms) whereas film or storage plate exposures can take many minutes and then need to be digitized with a scanner. The flat panel can therefore acquire a complete 3D computed tomography data set in just a few tens of minutes. While a-Si detectors have been proposed for use in imaging neutron beams, this is the first reported implementation of such a detector for neutron imaging.

  2. Tritium in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Kosteski, T.; O`Leary, S.K.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.; Kherani, N.P.; Shmadya, W.

    1996-12-31

    Preliminary results on infrared and luminescence measurements of tritium incorporated amorphous silicon are reported. Tritium is an unstable isotope that readily substitutes hydrogen in the amorphous silicon network. Due to its greater mass, bonded tritium is found to introduce new stretching modes in the infrared spectrum. Inelastic collisions between the beta particles, produced as a result of tritium decay, and the amorphous silicon network, results in the generation of excess electron-hole pairs. Radiative recombination of these carriers is observed.

  3. High spatial resolution radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Tao

    1995-05-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) as a large-area thin film semiconductor with ease of doping and low-cost fabrication capability has given a new impetus to the field of imaging sensors; its high radiation resistance also makes it a good material for radiation detectors. In addition, large-area microelectronics based on a-Si:H or polysilicon can be made with full integration of peripheral circuits, including readout switches and shift registers on the same substrate. Thin a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes coupled to suitable scintillators are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. The response speed of CsI/a-Si:H diode combinations to individual particulate radiation is limited by the scintillation light decay since the charge collection time of the diode is very short (< 10ns). The reverse current of the detector is analyzed in term of contact injection, thermal generation, field enhanced emission (Poole-Frenkel effect), and edge leakage. A good collection efficiency for a diode is obtained by optimizing the p layer of the diode thickness and composition. The CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to an a-Si:H photodiode detector shows a capability for detecting minimum ionizing particles with S/N ~20. In such an arrangement a p-i-n diode is operated in a photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). In addition, a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3--8 for shaping times of 1 {micro}s. The mechanism of the formation of structured CsI scintillator layers is analyzed. Initial nucleation in the deposited layer is sensitive to the type of substrate medium, with imperfections generally catalyzing nucleation. Therefore, the microgeometry of a patterned substrate has a significant effect on the structure of the CsI growth.

  4. Development of radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wan-Shick

    1995-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon and related materials have been applied to radiation detectors, utilizing their good radiation resistance and the feasibility of making deposits over a large area at low cost. Effects of deposition parameters on various material properties of a-Si:H have been studied to produce a material satisfying the requirements for specific detection application. Thick(-~50 μm), device quality a-Si:H p-i-n diodes for direct detection of minimum ionizing particles have been prepared with low internal stress by a combination of low temperature growth, He-dilution of silane, and post annealing. The structure of the new film contained voids and tiny crystalline inclusions and was different from the one observed in conventional a-Si:H. Deposition on patterned substrates was attempted as an alternative to controlling deposition parameters to minimize substrate bending and delamination of thick a-Si:H films. Growth on an inversed-pyramid pattern reduced the substrate bending by a factor of 3 ≈ 4 for the same thickness film. Thin (0.1 ≈ 0.2 μm) films of a-Si:H and a-SiC:H have been applied to microstrip gas chambers to control gain instabilities due to charges on the substrate. Light sensitivity of the a-Si:H sheet resistance was minimized and the surface resistivity was successfully` controlled in the range of 1012 ≈ 1017 Ω/(four gradient) by carbon alloying and boron doping. Performance of the detectors with boron-doped a-Si:C:H layers was comparable to that of electronic-conducting glass. Hydrogen dilution of silane has been explored to improve electrical transport properties of a-Si:H material for high speed photo-detectors and TFT applications.

  5. Multidetector-row CT with a 64-row amorphous silicon flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Edward G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Daley, Earl T.; Job, Isaias D.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Mollov, Todor I.; Pavkovich, John M.; Roos, Pieter G.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Tognina, Carlo A.

    2007-03-01

    A unique 64-row flat panel (FP) detector has been developed for sub-second multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The intent was to explore the image quality achievable with relatively inexpensive amorphous silicon (a-Si) compared to existing diagnostic scanners with discrete crystalline diode detectors. The FP MDCT system is a bench-top design that consists of three FP modules. Each module uses a 30 cm x 3.3 cm a-Si array with 576 x 64 photodiodes. The photodiodes are 0.52 mm x 0.52 mm, which allows for about twice the spatial resolution of most commercial MDCT scanners. The modules are arranged in an overlapping geometry, which is sufficient to provide a full-fan 48 cm diameter scan. Scans were obtained with various detachable scintillators, e.g. ceramic Gd IIO IIS, particle-in-binder Gd IIO IIS:Tb and columnar CsI:Tl. Scan quality was evaluated with a Catphan-500 performance phantom and anthropomorphic phantoms. The FP MDCT scans demonstrate nearly equivalent performance scans to a commercial 16-slice MDCT scanner at comparable 10 - 20 mGy/100mAs doses. Thus far, a high contrast resolution of 15 lp/cm and a low contrast resolution of 5 mm @ 0.3 % have been achieved on 1 second scans. Sub-second scans have been achieved with partial rotations. Since the future direction of MDCT appears to be in acquiring single organ coverage per scan, future efforts are planned for increasing the number of detector rows beyond the current 64- rows.

  6. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  7. Amorphous silicon pixel radiation detectors and associated thin film transistor electronics readout

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Mireshghi, A.; Wildermuth, D. ); Goodman, C. ); Fujieda, I. )

    1992-07-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin (1 {mu}m) and thick (> 30 {mu}m) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-ray, {gamma} rays and thermal neutrons. For x-ray, {gamma} ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For thermal neutron detection we use thin (2{approximately}5 {mu}m) gadolinium converters on 30 {mu}m thick a-Si:H diodes. For direct detection of minimum ionizing particles and others with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. Diode and amorphous silicon readouts as well as polysilicon pixel amplifiers are described.

  8. Full breast digital mammography with an amorphous silicon-based flat panel detector: physical characteristics of a clinical prototype.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, S; Karellas, A; Suryanarayanan, S; Albagli, D; Han, S; Tkaczyk, E J; Landberg, C E; Opsahl-Ong, B; Granfors, P R; Levis, I; D'Orsi, C J; Hendrick, R E

    2000-03-01

    The physical characteristics of a clinical prototype amorphous silicon-based flat panel imager for full-breast digital mammography have been investigated. The imager employs a thin thallium doped CsI scintillator on an amorphous silicon matrix of detector elements with a pixel pitch of 100 microm. Objective criteria such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and noise equivalent quanta were employed for this evaluation. The presampling MTF was found to be 0.73, 0.42, and 0.28 at 2, 4, and 5 cycles/mm, respectively. The measured DQE of the current prototype utilizing a 28 kVp, Mo-Mo spectrum beam hardened with 4.5 cm Lucite is approximately 55% at close to zero spatial frequency at an exposure of 32.8 mR, and decreases to approximately 40% at a low exposure of 1.3 mR. Detector element nonuniformity and electronic gain variations were not significant after appropriate calibration and software corrections. The response of the imager was linear and did not exhibit signal saturation under tested exposure conditions.

  9. Amorphous silicon pixel radiation detectors and associated thin film transistor electronics readout

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Drewery, J.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Lee, H.; Mireshghi, A.

    1994-10-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin (1 {mu}m) and thick (>30 {mu}m) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and {gamma} rays. For x-ray, {gamma} ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. Deposition techniques using helium dilution, which produce samples with low stress are described. Pixel arrays for flux exposures can be readout by transistor, single diode or two diode switches. Polysilicon charge sensitive pixel amplifiers for single event detection are described. Various applications in nuclear, particle physics, x-ray medical imaging, neutron crystallography, and radionuclide chromatography are discussed.

  10. Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    The use of silicon detectors has experienced an exponential growth in accelerator and space based experiments, similar to trends in the semiconductor industry as a whole, usually paraphrased as ``Moore's Law.'' Some of the essentials for this phenomenon will be presented, together with examples of the exciting science results which it enabled. With the establishment of a ``semiconductor culture'' in universities and laboratories around the world, an increased understanding of the sensors results in thinner, faster, more radiation-resistant detectors, spawning an amazing wealth of new technologies and applications, which will be the main subject of the presentation.

  11. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  12. DQE(f) of an amorphous-silicon flat-panel x-ray detector: detector parameter influences and measurement methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granfors, Paul R.; Aufrichtig, Richard

    2000-04-01

    We discuss how the frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency [DQE(f)] in a well-designed amorphous silicon flat panel detector is affected by several phenomena that reduce the DQE in other types of medical imaging detectors. The detector examined employs a CsI(Tl) scintillator and is designed for general diagnostic x-ray imaging applications. We consider DQE degradation due to incomplete x-ray absorption, secondary quantum noise, Swank factor, Lubberts effect, spatial variation in gain, noise aliasing, and additive system noise. The influences of detector design parameters on the frequency- and exposure-dependent DQE are also examined. We find that the DQE does not depend directly on MTF and that DQE is independent of exposure within the detector's operating range, except at the lowest exposures. Likewise the signal per absorbed x-ray, which contains the fill factor as one of several multiplicative components, does not affect DQE except at the lowest exposures. A methodology for determining DQE(f) from measurements of MTF(f), noise power spectrum (NPS), average signal, and x-ray exposure is presented. We find that it is important to incorporate several corrections in the NPS measurement procedure in order to obtain accurate results. These include corrections for lag, non-linearity, response variation from pixel to pixel, and use of a finite number of flat-field images. MTF, NPS, and DQE results are presented for a 41 X 41-cm2 flat panel detector designed for radiographic applications.

  13. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Karthik

    2011-12-01

    Silicon Photonics is quickly proving to be a suitable interconnect technology for meeting the future goals of on-chip bandwidth and low power requirements. However, it is not clear how silicon photonics will be integrated into CMOS chips, particularly microprocessors. The issue of integrating photonic circuits into electronic IC fabrication processes to achieve maximum flexibility and minimum complexity and cost is an important one. In order to minimize usage of chip real estate, it will be advantageous to integrate in three-dimensions. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is emerging as a promising material for the 3-D integration of silicon photonics for on-chip optical interconnects. In addition, a-Si:H film can be deposited using CMOS compatible low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at any point in the fabrication process allowing maximum flexibility and minimal complexity. In this thesis, we demonstrate a-Si:H as a high performance alternate platform to crystalline silicon, enabling backend integration of optical interconnects in a hybrid photonic-electronic network-on-chip architecture. High quality passive devices are fabricated on a low-loss a-Si:H platform enabling wavelength division multiplexing schemes. We demonstrate a broadband all-optical modulation scheme based on free-carrier absorption effect, which can enable compact electro-optic modulators in a-Si:H. Furthermore, we comprehensively characterize the optical nonlinearities in a-Si:H and observe that a-Si:H exhibits enhanced nonlinearities as compared to crystalline silicon. Based on the enhanced nonlinearities, we demonstrate low-power four-wave mixing in a-Si:H waveguides enabling high speed all-optical devices in an a-Si:H platform. Finally, we demonstrate a novel data encoding scheme using thermal and all-optical tuning of silicon waveguides, increasing the spectral efficiency in an interconnect link.

  14. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, R. A.

    1991-08-01

    Divided roughly into two parts, the book describes the physical properties and device applications of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The first section is concerned with the atomic and electronic structure, and covers growth defects and doping and defect reactions. The emphasis is on the optical and electronic properties that result from the disordered structure. The second part of the book describes electronic conduction, recombination, interfaces, and multilayers. The special attribute of a-Si:H which makes it useful is the ability to deposit the material inexpensively over large areas, while retaining good semiconducting properties, and the final chapter discusses various applications and devices.

  15. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

  16. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  17. Utilization of amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si:C:H) as a resistive layer in gas microstrip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, W.S.; Cho, H.S.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Gong, W.G.

    1995-04-01

    Thin semiconducting films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its carbon alloy (a-Si:C:H) were applied to gas microstrip detectors in order to control gain instabilities due to charges on the substrate. Thin ({approximately}100nm) layers of a-Si:H or p-doped a-Si:C:H were placed either over or under the electrodes using the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique to provide the substrate with a suitable surface conductivity. By changing the carbon content and boron doping density, the sheet resistance of the a-Si:C:H coating could be successfully controlled in the range of 10{sup 12} {approximately} 10{sup 17} {Omega}/{four_gradient}, and the light sensitivity, which causes the resistivity to vary with ambient light conditions, was minimized. An avalanche gain of 5000 and energy resolution of 20% FWHM were achieved and the gain remained constant over a week of operation. A-Si:C:H film is an attractive alternative to ion-implanted or semiconducting glass due to the wide range of resistivities possible and the feasibility of making deposits over a large area at low cost.

  18. Characterization of an Indirect-Detection Amorphous Silicon Detector for Dosimetric Measurement of Intensity Modulated Photon Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Daniel Wayne

    Indirect-detection amorphous silicon electronic imagers show much promise for measurement of radiation dose, particularly for pre-treatment verification of patient-specific intensity modulated radiotherapy plans. These instruments, commonly known as Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs), have high data density, large detecting area, convenient electronic read-out, excellent positional reproducibility, and are quickly becoming standard equipment on today's medical megavoltage linear accelerators. However, because these devices were originally intended to be digital radiograph imagers and not dosimeters, the modeling, calibration, and prediction of their response to dose carries a number of challenges. For instance, EPID dose images exhibit off-axis dose errors of up to 18% with increasing distance from the central axis of the imager (as compared to dose predictions calculated by a commercially available treatment planning system). Furthermore, these off-axis errors are asymmetric, with higher errors in the in-plane direction than in the cross-plane direction. In this work, methods are proposed to account for EPID off-axis effects by precisely calculating off-axis output factors from experimental measurements to increase the accuracy of EPID absolute dose measurement. Using these methods, dose readings acquired over the entire surface of the detector agree to within 2% accuracy as compared to respective EPID dose predictions. Similarly, the percentage of measured dose points that agree with respective calculated dose points (using 3%, 3 mm criteria) improves by as much as 60% for off-axis intensity modulated photon fields. Furthermore, a number of clinical applications of EPID dosimetry are investigated, including pixel response constancy, the effect of data density on a common metric for quantitatively comparing measured vs. calculated dose, and the implementation of an electronic portal dosimetry program for radiotherapy quality assurance.

  19. Thick amorphous silicon layers suitable for the realization of radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wan-Shick; Drewery, J.S.; Jing, Tao; Lee, Hyong-Koo; Perez-Mendez, V.; Petrova-Koch, V.

    1995-04-01

    Thick silicon films with good electronic quality have been prepared by glow discharge of He-diluted SiH{sub 4} at a substrate temperature {approximately} 150{degree}C and subsequent annealing at 160{degree}C for about 100 hours. The stress in the films obtained this way decreased to {approximately} 100 MPa compared to the 350 MPa in conventional a-Si:H. The post-annealing helped to reduce the ionized dangling bond density from 2.5 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} to 7 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} without changing the internal stress. IR spectroscopy and hydrogen effusion measurements implied the existence of microvoids and tiny crystallites in the material showing satisfactory electronic properties. P-I-N diodes for radiation detection applications have been realized out of the new material.

  20. Nanocrystalline silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Fauchet, P.M.; Tsybeskov, L.; Zacharias, M. |; Hirschman, K. |

    1998-12-31

    Thin layers made of densely packed silicon nanocrystals sandwiched between amorphous silicon dioxide layers have been manufactured and characterized. An amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattice is first grown by CVD or RF sputtering. The a-Si layers are recrystallized in a two-step procedure (nucleation + growth) for form layers of nearly identical nanocrystals whose diameter is given by the initial a-Si layer thickness. The recrystallization is monitored using a variety of techniques, including TEM, X-Ray, Raman, and luminescence spectroscopies. When the a-Si layer thickness decreases (from 25 nm to 2.5 nm) or the a-SiO{sub 2} layer thickness increases (from 1.5 nm to 6 nm), the recrystallization temperature increases dramatically compared to that of a single a-Si film. The removal of the a-Si tissue present between the nanocrystals, the passivation of the nanocrystals, and their doping are discussed.

  1. Applications of an amorphous silicon-based area detector for high resolution, high sensitivity and fast time-resolved pair distribution function measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Chupas, P. J.; Chapman, K. W.; Lee, P. L.; X-Ray Science Division

    2007-01-01

    The application of a large-area (41 x 41 cm, 2048 x 2048 or 1024 x 1024 pixel) high-sensitivity (detective quantum efficiency > 65%) fast-readout (up to 7.5 or 30 Hz) flat-panel detector based on an amorphous silicon array system to the collection of high-energy X-ray scattering data for quantitative pair distribution function (PDF) analysis is evaluated and discussed. Data were collected over a range of exposure times (0.13 s-7 min) for benchmark PDF samples: crystalline nickel metal and amorphous silica (SiO2). The high real-space resolution of the resultant PDFs (with Q{sub max} up to {approx} 40 Angstroms{sup -1})and the high quality of fits to data [RNi(0.13s) = 10.5%, RNi(1.3s) = 6.3%] obtained in short measurement times indicate that this detector is well suited to studies of materials disorder. Further applications of the detector to locate weakly scattering H2 molecules within the porous Prussian blue system, Mn{sup II}{sub 3}[CoIII(CN)6]2 x xH2, and to follow the in situ reduction of PtIVO2 to Pt0 at 30 Hz, confirm the high sensitivity of the detector and demonstrate a new potential for fast time-resolved studies.

  2. Construction and characterization of amorphous-silicon test structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, L.N.; Milgram, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    The central goal of the project was to qualify amorphous silicon, a newly developed semiconductor material, as the basis for economical large-area photoconductive detectors of penetrating radiation. The thrust of the project was to establish the feasibility of constructing photoconductive amorphous-silicon devices whose electronic properties supported the radiation detection application. This issue of feasibility was successfully resolved by construction and experimental characterization of amorphous-silicon test pieces representative of the existing state-of-the-art. The focus of this work was the measurement of material electronic properties known to affect the performance of solid-state radiation detectors, and the investigation of candidate junction-device architectures. The construction and experimental evaluation of prototype radiation detectors based on amorphous silicon was beyond the scope of the current effort, and will form the core of work to be accomplished within a Phase II continuation of the project.

  3. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Performance of a 41 x 41 cm2 amorphous silicon flat panel x-ray detector designed for angiographic and R&F imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Granfors, Paul R; Aufrichtig, Richard; Possin, George E; Giambattista, Brian W; Huang, Zhong S; Liu, Jianqiang; Ma, Bing

    2003-10-01

    We measured the physical imaging performance of a 41 x 41 cm2 amorphous silicon flat panel detector designed for angiographic and R&F imaging applications using methods from the emerging IEC standard for the measurement of detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in digital radiographic detectors. Measurements on 12 production detectors demonstrate consistent performance. The mean DQE at the detector center is about 0.77 at zero frequency and 0.27 at the Nyquist frequency (2.5 cycles/mm) when measured with a 7 mm of Al HVL spectrum at about 3.6 microGy. The mean MTF at the center of the detector for this spectrum is 0.24 at the Nyquist frequency. For radiographic operation all 2048 x 2048 detector elements are read out individually. For fluoroscopy, the detector operates in two 30 frame per second modes: either the center 1024 x 1024 detector elements are read out or the entire detector is read out with 2 x 2 pixel binning. A model was developed to predict differences in performance between the modes, and measurements demonstrate agreement with the model. Lag was measured using a quasi-equilibrium exposure method and was found to be 0.044 in the first frame and less than 0.007 after 1 s. We demonstrated that it is possible to use the lag data to correct for temporal correlation in images when measuring DQE with a fluoroscopic imaging technique. Measurements as a function of position on the detector demonstrate a high degree of uniformity. We also characterized dependences on spectrum, exposure level, and direction. Finally, we measured the DQE of a current state of the art image intensifier/CCD system using the same method as for the flat panel. We found the image intensifier system to have lower DQE than the flat panel at high exposure levels and approximately equivalent DQE at fluoroscopic levels.

  5. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  6. Optical absorption in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, S.K.; Zukotynski, S.; Perz, J.M.; Sidhu, L.S.

    1996-12-31

    The role that disorder plays in shaping the form of the optical absorption spectrum of hydrogenated amorphous silicon is investigated. Disorder leads to a redistribution of states, which both reduces the Tauc gap and broadens the absorption tail. The observed relationship between the Tauc gap and the breadth of the absorption tail is thus explained.

  7. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  8. [Full-field digital mammography with amorphous silicon-based flat- panel detector: physical imaging characteristics and signal detection].

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Tadamitsu; Higashida, Yoshiharu; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Ohki, Masafumi; Nakamura, Satoru; Yoshida, Akira; Takagi, Rie; Hatano, Hirohide; Kuwahara, Rie; Toyonaga, Makiko; Tanaka, Isamu; Toyofuku, Fukai

    2004-03-01

    The physical characteristics of a clinical amorphous silicon-based flat-panel imager for full-field digital mammography were investigated. Pre-sampled modulation transfer functions (MTF) were measured by using a slit method. Noise power spectra were determined for different input exposures by fast Fourier transform. The MTFs of full-field digital mammography systems showed significantly higher values than those of the computed radiography (CR) system. The full-field digital mammography system showed a lower noise level than that of the CR system under the same exposure conditions. Contrast detail analysis has been performed to compare the detectability of the full-field digital mammography system with that of the screen-film (Min-R 2000/Min-R 2000) system. The average contrast-detail curves of digital and film images were obtained from the results of observation. Image quality figures (IQF) were also calculated from the individual observer performance tests. The results indicated that the digital contrast-detail curves and IQF, on average, are superior to those of the screen-film system.

  9. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  10. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bosworth, D. Sahonta, S.-L.; Barber, Z. H.; Hadfield, R. H.

    2015-08-15

    Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using W{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (Mo{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}) offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo{sub 83}Si{sub 17}. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz), there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  11. The Silicon Cube detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matea, I.; Adimi, N.; Blank, B.; Canchel, G.; Giovinazzo, J.; Borge, M. J. G.; Domínguez-Reyes, R.; Tengblad, O.; Thomas, J.-C.

    2009-08-01

    A new experimental device, the Silicon Cube detector, consisting of six double-sided silicon strip detectors placed in a compact geometry was developed at CENBG. Having a very good angular coverage and high granularity, it allows simultaneous measurements of energy and angular distributions of charged particles emitted from unbound nuclear states. In addition, large-volume Germanium detectors can be placed close to the collection point of the radioactive species to be studied. The setup is ideally suited for isotope separation on-line (ISOL)-type experiments to study multi-particle emitters and was tested during an experiment at the low-energy beam line of SPIRAL at GANIL.

  12. Detection of charged particles in amorphous silicon layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, S.N.; Morel, J.R.; Mulera, T.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Schnurmacher, G.; Street, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    The successful development of radiation detectors made from amorphous silicon could offer the possibility for relatively easy construction of large area position-sensitive detectors. We have conducted a series of measurements with prototype detectors, on signals derived from alpha particles. The measurement results are compared with simple model calculations, and projections are made of potential applications in high-energy and nuclear physics. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Clinical comparative study with a large-area amorphous silicon flat-panel detector: image quality and visibility of anatomic structures on chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Hallscheidt, Peter J; Noeldge, Gerd; Kampschulte, Annette; Radeleff, Boris; Hosch, Waldemar P; Kauffmann, Günter W; Hansmann, Jochen

    2002-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare clinical chest radiographs of a large-area, flat-panel digital radiography system and a conventional film-screen radiography system. The comparison was based on an observer preference study of image quality and visibility of anatomic structures. Routine follow-up chest radiographs were obtained from 100 consecutive oncology patients using a large-area, amorphous silicon flat-panel detector digital radiography system (dose equivalent to a 400-speed film system). Hard-copy images were compared with previous examinations of the same individuals taken on a conventional film-screen system (200-speed). Patients were excluded if changes in the chest anatomy were detected or if the time interval between the examinations exceeded 1 year. Observer preference was evaluated for the image quality and the visibility of 15 anatomic structures using a five-point scale. Dose measurements with a chest phantom showed a dose reduction of approximately 50% with the digital radiography system compared with the film-screen radiography system. The image quality and the visibility of all but one anatomic structure of the images obtained with the digital flat-panel detector system were rated significantly superior (p < or = 0.0003) to those obtained with the conventional film-screen radiography system. The image quality and visibility of anatomic structures on the images obtained by the flat-panel detector system were perceived as equal or superior to the images from conventional film-screen chest radiography. This was true even though the radiation dose was reduced approximately 50% with the digital flat-panel detector system.

  14. Compensated amorphous-silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, G.

    1982-06-21

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the elecrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF/sub 3/ doped intrinsic layer.

  15. Microstructured silicon radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Derzon, Mark S.; Draper, Bruce L.

    2017-03-14

    A radiation detector comprises a silicon body in which are defined vertical pores filled with a converter material and situated within silicon depletion regions. One or more charge-collection electrodes are arranged to collect current generated when secondary particles enter the silicon body through walls of the pores. The pores are disposed in low-density clusters, have a majority pore thickness of 5 .mu.m or less, and have a majority aspect ratio, defined as the ratio of pore depth to pore thickness, of at least 10.

  16. Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Progress in identification of strengths and weaknesses of amorphous-silicon technology detailed. Report describes achievements in testing reliability of solar-power modules made of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic cells. Based on investigation of modules made by U.S. manufacturers. Modules subjected to field tests, to accelerated-aging tests in laboratory, and to standard sequence of qualification tests developed for modules of crystalline-silicon cells.

  17. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  18. Performance of optimized amorphous silicon, cesium-iodide based large field-of-view detector for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albagli, D.; Han, Sung; Couture, Aaron; Hudspeth, H.; Collazo, Chris; Granfors, P.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a performance characterization of a new large field-of-view (LFOV) flat panel detector with a novel pixel design that has been optimized for both screening mammography and low dose advanced applications such as tomosynthesis. The measurements reported here were performed on prototype x-ray imagers for GE's upcoming LFOV mammography system. In addition to a light sensitive photodiode and a field effect transistor (FET), a storage capacitor has been added to each pixel in order to increase the dynamic range. In order to characterize the performance of the detector, measurements of the MTF, noise power spectrum, DQE, electronic noise, conversion factor, and lag were made. The results show that the new detector can deliver a DQE at 0 and 5 lp/mm of 72% and 28% while maintaining an MTF at 5 lp/mm of 30%. The addition of a storage capacitor at each pixel allows the conversion factor to be increased to reduce the noise floor - leading to a 400% extension of the dynamic range. Finally, a re-design of the FET and photodiode to reduce the time constants allows a 10X reduction in the lag that enables up to 4 frame per second imaging with less than 1% lag. This work represents the first results from a next generation large field of view a Si/CsI based x-ray imager for mammography and shows that a single detector can achieve high performance standards for both high dose screening and low dose, fast acquisition tomosynthesis simultaneously.

  19. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  20. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-05-13

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material.

  1. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski <111> silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  2. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  3. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  4. Silicon-Gas Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Korotkova, N.; Romaniouk, A.; Sinev, N.; Tikhomirov, V.

    2017-01-01

    The proposed Silicon-Gas Pixel Detector (SGPD) combines the advantages of Silicon and Gas-pixel detectors (GPD). 7 micron space resolution and down to 0.2 degree both angles measurements are inside 10 mm thick and very low material detector. Silicon pixels implemented directly into electronic chip structure allow to know exact time when particle crossed the detector and to use SGPD as a completely self-triggered device. Binary readout, advanced data collection and analysis on hardware level allow to obtain all the information in less than 1 microsecond and to use SGPD for the fast trigger generation.

  5. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  6. Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

  7. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  8. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects.

  9. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects.

  10. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, L. L.; Hay, J. C.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides the properties of bulk stoichiometric silicon carbide which has been amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60°C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 × 10 25 n/m 2. Amorphization was seen in both materials as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the amorphized CVD SiC. Using measured thermal conductivity data for the CVD SiC sample, the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than ˜125°C.

  11. Structural characterization of stable amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shibin; Kong, Guanglin; Wang, Yongqian; Sheng, Shuran; Liao, Xianbo

    2002-05-01

    A kind of hydrogenated diphasic silicon films has been prepared by a new regime of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in the region adjacent to the phase transition from amorphous to crystalline state. The photoelectronic and microstructural properties of the films have been investigated by the constant photocurrent method (CPM), Raman scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Our experimental results and corresponding analyses showed that the diphasic films, incorporated with a subtle boron compensation, could gain both the fine photosensitivity and high stability, provided the crystalline fraction ( f) was controlled in the range of 0< f<0.3. When compared with the conventional hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), the diphasic films are more ordered and robust in the microstructure, and have a less clustered phase in the Si-H bond configurations.

  12. Ultra-fast silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Petersen, B.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Marchetto, F.; Bruzzi, M.; Mori, R.; Scaringella, M.; Vinattieri, A.

    2013-12-01

    We propose to develop a fast, thin silicon sensor with gain capable to concurrently measure with high precision the space (∼10 μm) and time (∼10 ps) coordinates of a particle. This will open up new application of silicon detector systems in many fields. Our analysis of detector properties indicates that it is possible to improve the timing characteristics of silicon-based tracking sensors, which already have sufficient position resolution, to achieve four-dimensional high-precision measurements. The basic sensor characteristics and the expected performance are listed, the wide field of applications are mentioned and the required R&D topics are discussed.

  13. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-06-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  14. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  15. Rad-Hard Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, Marco

    2005-06-01

    For the next generation of High Energy Physics (HEP) Experiments silicon microstrip detectors working in harsh radiation environments with excellent performances are necessary. The irradiation causes bulk and surface damages that modify the electrical properties of the detector. Solutions like AC coupled strips, overhanging metal contact, <100> crystal lattice orientation, low resistivity n-bulk and Oxygenated substrate are studied for rad-hard detectors. The paper presents an outlook of these technologies.

  16. Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, D.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Bulla, L.; Caria, G.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; De Pietro, G.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C.; Kandra, J.; Kambara, N.; Kang, K. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kumar, R.; Kun, W.; Kvasnička, P.; La Licata, C.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Libby, J.; Lueck, T.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Resmi, P. K.; Rozanska, M.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Watanuki, S.; Watanabe, M.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.; Zani, L.

    2017-02-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB asymmetric energy e+e‑ collider in KEK, Japan will operate at an instantaneous luminosity 40 times larger than that of its predecessor, Belle. It is built with an aim of collecting a huge amount of data (50 ab‑1 by 2025) for precise CP violation measurements and new physics search. Thus, we need an accurate vertex determination and reconstruction of low momentum tracks which will be achieved with the help of vertex detector (VXD). The Belle II VXD consists of two layers of DEPFET pixels (`Pixel Detector') and four layers of double-sided silicon microstrip sensors (`Silicon Vertex Detector'), assembled over carbon fibre ribs. In this paper, we discuss about the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector, especially its design and key features; we also present its module (`ladder') assembly and testing procedures.

  17. Dose reduction in skeletal and chest radiography using a large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide: technical background, basic image quality parameters, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Völk, Markus; Hamer, Okka W; Feuerbach, Stefan; Strotzer, Michael

    2004-05-01

    The two most frequently performed diagnostic X-ray examinations are those of the extremities and of the chest. Thus, dose reduction in the field of conventional skeletal and chest radiography is an important issue and there is a need to reduce man-made ionizing radiation. The large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide provides a significant reduction of radiation dose in skeletal and chest radiography compared with traditional imaging systems. This article describes the technical background and basic image quality parameters of this 43 x 43-cm digital system, and summarizes the available literature (years 2000-2003) concerning dose reduction in experimental and clinical studies. Due to its high detective quantum efficiency and dynamic range compared with traditional screen-film systems, a dose reduction of up to 50% is possible without loss of image quality.

  18. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Enami, K.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-09-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  19. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/.mu.c-Si) solar cells which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell.

  20. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-07-23

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/{micro}c-Si) solar cells are disclosed which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell. 4 figs.

  1. Low temperature internal friction of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Metcalf, Thomas; Jernigan, Glenn; Jugdersuren, Battogtokh; Kearney, Brian; Culberston, James

    The ubiquitous low-energy excitations, known as two-level tunnelling systems (TLS), are one of the universal phenomena of amorphous solids. These excitations dominate the acoustic, dielectric, and thermal properties of structurally disordered solids. Using the double-paddle oscillator internal friction measurement technique, we have shown that TLS can be made to almost completely disappear in e-beam deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si) as the growth temperature increased to 400°C. However, there is a mysterious broad maximum in internal friction at 2-3K, which we suspect to come from metallic contamination of our oscillators and is not related to a-Si. Our new result of a-Si, deposited in a different UHV system and on oscillators with a different type of metallic electrodes, confirms our suspicion. This lowers the upper bound of possible TLS content in a-Si, in terms of tunnelling strength, to below 10-6. Our results offer an encouraging opportunity to use growth temperature to improve the structure order of amorphous thin films and to develop high quality amorphous dielectrics for applications, such as in modern quantum devices. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  2. Germanium detector passivated with hydrogenated amorphous germanium

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, William L.; Haller, Eugene E.

    1986-01-01

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices (12) is provided for by a surface coating (21) of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating (21) of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface (11) in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices (12), which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating (21) compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device (12) against future impregnation with impurities.

  3. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Payson, J. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films were irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15 cm(-2). The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy and photoconductivity measurements. The investigations show that the radiation introduces sub-band-gap states 1.35 eV below the conduction band and the states increase supralinearly with fluence. Photoconductivity measurements suggest the density of states above the Fermi energy is not changing drastically with fluence.

  4. Structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Lee, Y.H.; Chen, C.; Pang, T.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon (a-Si) using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method. The most significant difference between vacancies in a-Si and those in crystalline silicon (c-Si) is that the deep gap states do not show up in a-Si. This difference is explained through the unusual behavior of the structural relaxation near the vacancies in a-Si, which enhances the sp{sup 2} + p bonding near the band edges. They have also observed that the vacancies do not migrate below 450 K although some of them can still be annihilated, particularly at high defect density due to large structural relaxation.

  5. Amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Andrea; Riesen, Yannick; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Dunand, Sylvain; Powolny, François; Jarron, Pierre; Ballif, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) were recently introduced to overcome some of the limitations of crystalline silicon and glass MCP. The typical thickness of a-Si:H based MCPs (AMCP) ranges between 80 and 100 μm and the micromachining of the channels is realized by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). Advantages and issues regarding the fabrication process are presented and discussed. Electron amplification is demonstrated and analyzed using Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) technique. The gain increases as a function of the bias voltage, limited to -340 V on account of high leakage currents across the structure. EBIC maps on 10° tilted samples confirm that the device active area extend to the entire channel opening. AMCP characterization with the electron beam shows gain saturation and signal quenching which depends on the effectiveness of the charge replenishment in the channel walls.

  6. The CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tkaczyk, S.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.

    1993-09-01

    A silicon strip vertex detector was designed, constructed and commissioned at the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. The mechanical design of the detector, its cooling and monitoring are presented. The front end electronics employing a custom VLSI chip, the readout electronics and various components of the SVX system are described. The system performance and the experience with the operation of the detector in the radiation environment are discussed. The device has been taking colliding beams data since May of 1992, performing at its best design specifications and enhancing the physics program of CDF.

  7. Endurance Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.; Sugimura, Russell S.

    1989-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in high-power service studied. Report discusses factors affecting endurance of amorphous-silicon solar cells. Based on field tests and accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules. Concludes that aggressive research needed if amorphous-silicon modules to attain 10-year life - value U.S. Department of Energy established as goal for photovoltaic modules in commercial energy-generating plants.

  8. Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rajeewa R.

    1988-01-12

    Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

  9. Method for improving the stability of amorphous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard M.

    2004-03-30

    A method of producing a metastable degradation resistant amorphous hydrogenated silicon film is provided, which comprises the steps of growing a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, the film having an exposed surface, illuminating the surface using an essentially blue or ultraviolet light to form high densities of a light induced defect near the surface, and etching the surface to remove the defect.

  10. Endurance Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.; Sugimura, Russell S.

    1989-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in high-power service studied. Report discusses factors affecting endurance of amorphous-silicon solar cells. Based on field tests and accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules. Concludes that aggressive research needed if amorphous-silicon modules to attain 10-year life - value U.S. Department of Energy established as goal for photovoltaic modules in commercial energy-generating plants.

  11. Switching in coplanar amorphous hydrogenated silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, A.; Asomoza, R.

    2000-01-01

    Switching has been observed in a wide variety of materials and devices. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon has become one of the most important cases because of interest in neural network applications. Although there are many reports regarding this phenomenon, not all of the physical processes involved are still determined precisely. Therefore, some more experimental information is needed in order to achieve this task. Much of the behavior of the devices has been ascribed to the existence of a filamentary region which is produced after the first switching process, called forming. We observed this filamentary region in its full extension by producing forming in amorphous silicon devices with coplanar metallic contacts placed near each other (˜5 μm). The I-V characteristics, filament optical and atomic force microscopy images and chemical etching led us to correlate changes in resistance to metal inclusion into the amorphous film. There are two stages: the first is related to contact stabilization, the second to metal transport into the film bulk. Optical images show a permanent filamentary region after forming. AFM images of these filaments showed that they are formed essentially by material accumulation between the contacts. This material tends to get some atomic arrangement, becoming a polycrystalline solid. If the device was led to breakdown, such accumulation becomes either a hillock or a thin conducting channel connecting both contacts. In the case of a switching filament, the accumulation tends to be a chain of smaller hillocks along the conduction path. Metal from the contacts remains in the conduction path after forming and chemical etching indicated that it is placed near the path core. Before forming, a tunneling transport process can be ascribed to the non-ohmic behavior of the samples during the first stage of metallic inclusion.

  12. Tritiated amorphous silicon films and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosteski, Tome

    The do saddle-field glow discharge deposition technique has been used to bond tritium within an amorphous silicon thin film network using silane and elemental tritium in the glow discharge. The concentration of tritium is approximately 7 at. %. Minimal outgassing of tritium from tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) at room temperature suggests that tritium is bonded stably. Tritium effusion only occurred at temperatures above the film's growth temperature. The radioactive decay of tritium results in the production of high-energy beta particles. Each beta particle can generate on average approximately 1300 electron-hole pairs in a-Si:H:T. Electrical conductivity of a-Si:H:T is shown to be due to a thermally activated process and due to the generation of excess carriers by the beta particles. p-i-n betavoltaic devices have been made with a-Si:H:T in the intrinsic (i-) region. The i-region consisted of either a-Si:H:T, or a thin section of a-Si:H:T (a Delta layer) sandwiched between undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The excess carriers generated in the i-region are separated by the device's built-in electric field. Short-circuit currents (Isc ), open-circuit voltages (Voc), and power have been measured and correlated to the generation of excess carriers in the i-region. Good devices were made at a substrate temperature of 250°C and relatively large flow rates of silane and tritium; this ensures that there are more monohydride bonds than dihydride bonds. Under dark conditions, Isc, and Voc have been found to decrease rapidly. This is consistent with the production of silicon neutral dangling bonds (5 x 1017cm-3 per day) from the loss of tritium due to its transmutation into helium. Dangling bonds reduce carrier lifetime and weaken the electric field in the i-region. The short-circuit current from Delta layer devices decreased more slowly and settled to higher values for narrower Delta layers. This is because the dangling bonds are

  13. Performance of ultra-fast silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartiglia, N.; Baselga, M.; Dellacasa, G.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Garbolino, S.; Marchetto, F.; Martoiu, S.; Mazza, G.; Ngo, J.; Obertino, M.; Parker, C.; Rivetti, A.; Shumacher, D.; F-W Sadrozinski, H.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-02-01

    The development of Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors has opened up the possibility of manufacturing silicon detectors with signal larger than that of traditional sensors. In this paper we explore the timing performance of Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors, and in particular we demonstrate the possibility of obtaining ultra-fast silicon detector with time resolution of less than 20 picosecond.

  14. Chest radiography with a large-area detector based on cesium-iodide/amorphous-silicon technology: image quality and dose requirement in comparison with an asymmetric screen-film system.

    PubMed

    Strotzer, M; Völk, M; Reiser, M; Lenhart, M; Manke, C; Gmeinwieser, J; Holzknecht, N; Link, J; Feuerbach, S

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a large-area, flat-panel X-ray detector, which uses cesium-iodide (CsI) and amorphous silicon (a-Si). Conventional images were compared with digital images acquired with equal dose (2.5 microGy) and with 50% dose reduction. Fifteen consecutive patients were studied prospectively using an asymmetric screen-film system (detector dose, 2.5 microGy). Digital images were taken from the same patients in a posteroanterior view with detector doses of 2.5 and 1.25 microGy, respectively. The CsI/a-Si active-matrix imager had a panel-size of 43 x 43 cm, a matrix of 3 x 3k, and a pixel-pitch of 143 microm. Hard copies were presented in a random order to eight independent observers, who rated image quality according to six subjective quality criteria. Statistical significance of differences was evaluated with Student's t test for paired samples (confidence level, 95%). Digital radiographs with 2.5 and 1.25 microGy were superior to conventional images regarding all quality criteria. Statistically significant differences were observed for five of six criteria at a detector dose of 2.5 microGy and for only one quality feature at 1.25 microGy. Flat-panel digital imagers based on CsI/a-Si technique have the potential to replace conventional systems and might allow a reduction of radiation dose by 50% without loss of image quality.

  15. Deuterium magnetic resonance studies in amorphous and crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzi, Raffaella

    Hydrogenation is essential for useful amorphous silicon films and devices. We used deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) to investigate the hydrogen microstructure in amorphous and crystalline silicon. DMR line shapes analyses and longitudinal relaxation time studies can distinguish silicon-bonded deuterons from molecular deuterons. Our comparisons between crystalline and amorphous silicon have yielded new perspectives on the characterization of molecular hydrogen sites including interstitial tetragonal T-sites, and microvoids. Quantitative analyses of DMR line shapes and spin populations show that the fraction of interstitially trapped molecular hydrogen increases with increasing photovoltaic quality of the films.

  16. Theoretical studies of amorphous silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon with molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, I.

    1991-12-20

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. The structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of these materials have been studied with computer-generated structural models and compare well with experimental observations. The stability of a-si and a-Si:H have been studied with the aim of understanding microscopic mechanisms underlying light-induced degradation in a-Si:H (the Staebler-Wronski effect). With a view to understanding thin film growth processes, a-Si films have been generated with molecular dynamics simulations by simulating the deposition of Si-clusters on a Si(111) substrate. A new two- and three-body interatomic potential for Si-H interactions has been developed. The structural properties of a-Si:H networks are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The presence of H atoms reduces strain and disorder relative to networks without H.

  17. Theoretical studies of amorphous silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon with molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, I.

    1991-12-20

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. The structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of these materials have been studied with computer-generated structural models and compare well with experimental observations. The stability of a-si and a-Si:H have been studied with the aim of understanding microscopic mechanisms underlying light-induced degradation in a-Si:H (the Staebler-Wronski effect). With a view to understanding thin film growth processes, a-Si films have been generated with molecular dynamics simulations by simulating the deposition of Si-clusters on a Si(111) substrate. A new two- and three-body interatomic potential for Si-H interactions has been developed. The structural properties of a-Si:H networks are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The presence of H atoms reduces strain and disorder relative to networks without H.

  18. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  19. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  20. Energy landscape of relaxed amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiquette, Francis; Mousseau, Normand

    2003-09-01

    We analyze the structure of the energy landscape of a well-relaxed 1000-atom model of amorphous silicon using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). Generating more than 40 000 events starting from a single minimum, we find that activated mechanisms are local in nature, that they are distributed uniformly throughout the model, and that the activation energy is limited by the cost of breaking one bond, independently of the complexity of the mechanism. The overall shape of the activation-energy-barrier distribution is also insensitive to the exact details of the configuration, indicating that well-relaxed configurations see essentially the same environment. These results underscore the localized nature of relaxation in this material.

  1. Short range atomic migration in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Strauß, F. Jerliu, B.; Geue, T.; Stahn, J.; Schmidt, H.

    2016-05-07

    Experiments on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon between 400 and 500 °C are presented, which were carried out by neutron reflectometry in combination with {sup 29}Si/{sup nat}Si isotope multilayers. Short range diffusion is detected on a length scale of about 2 nm, while long range diffusion is absent. Diffusivities are in the order of 10{sup −19}–10{sup −20} m{sup 2}/s and decrease with increasing annealing time, reaching an undetectable low value for long annealing times. This behavior is strongly correlated to structural relaxation and can be explained as a result of point defect annihilation. Diffusivities for short annealing times of 60 s follow the Arrhenius law with an activation enthalpy of (0.74 ± 0.21) eV, which is interpreted as the activation enthalpy of Si migration.

  2. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payson, J. Scott; Woodyard, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15/sq cm is presented. The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy, transmission and reflection spectroscopy, and photoconductivity and annealing measurements. Large changes were observed in the subband-gap optical absorption for energies between 0.9 and 1.7 eV. The steady-state photoconductivity showed decreases of almost five orders of magnitude for a fluence of 1E15/sq cm, but the slope of the intensity dependence of the photoconductivity remained almost constant for all fluences. Substantial annealing occurs even at room temperature, and for temperatures greater than 448 K the damage is completely annealed. The data are analyzed to describe the defects and the density of states function.

  3. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold.

  4. Comparative study of silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Allier, C.P.; Valk, H.; Huizenga, J.; Bom, V.R.; Hollander, R.W.; Eijk, C.W.E. van

    1998-06-01

    The authors studied three different types of silicon sensors: PIN diodes, circular drift detectors, both made at the Delft University of Technology (DUT), and Hamamatsu S5345 avalanche photodiodes. Measurements have been carried out in the same optimized experimental setup, both at room temperature and at low temperatures. Comparison is made for direct X-ray detection and CsI(Tl) scintillation light readout.

  5. Direct-patterned optical waveguides on amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Steve; Bond, Tiziana C.; Bond, Steven W.; Pocha, Michael D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2005-08-02

    An optical waveguide structure is formed by embedding a core material within a medium of lower refractive index, i.e. the cladding. The optical index of refraction of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polycrystalline silicon (p-Si), in the wavelength range between about 1.2 and about 1.6 micrometers, differ by up to about 20%, with the amorphous phase having the larger index. Spatially selective laser crystallization of amorphous silicon provides a mechanism for controlling the spatial variation of the refractive index and for surrounding the amorphous regions with crystalline material. In cases where an amorphous silicon film is interposed between layers of low refractive index, for example, a structure comprised of a SiO.sub.2 substrate, a Si film and an SiO.sub.2 film, the formation of guided wave structures is particularly simple.

  6. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  7. Computer-assisted infrared spectra interpretation for amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavak, Hamide; Esen, Ramazan

    2005-12-01

    A computer program for the structural interpretation of the infrared (IR) spectra is developed and tested. The interpretation of the IR spectra is made by using an hybrid system which includes library search and rule-based interpretation methods together. The computer programs were written in Pascal Codes. The prototype IR library of silicon alloys includes amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiOx), amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4) and amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) references. The known spectra of these compounds were fed into the system as an unknown samples. The performance of the developed program was evaluated on a test set of 157 spectra and the percentages of successful identification ranged between 78% and 99% for different alloys.

  8. Microcavity effects in the photoluminescence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpenguzel, Ali; Aydinli, Atilla; Bek, Alpan

    1998-07-01

    Fabry-Perot microcavities are used for the alteration of photoluminescence in hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride grown with and without ammonia. The photoluminescence is red-near-infrared for the samples grown without ammonia, and blue-green for the samples grown with ammonia. In the Fabry- Perot microcavities, the amplitude of the photoluminescence is enhanced, while its linewidth is reduced with respect to the bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride. The microcavity was realized by a metallic back mirror and a hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride--air or a metallic front mirror. The transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance spectra were also measured and calculated. The calculated spectra agree well with the experimental spectra. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride microcavity has potential for becoming a versatile silicon based optoelectronic device such as a color flat panel display, a resonant cavity enhanced light emitting diode, or a laser.

  9. Excimer laser crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Yongbing; Xu Zhongyang; Wang Changan; Zhang Shaoqiang; An Chengwu; Li Xingjiao; Wan Xinheng; Ding Hui

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films have been crystallized by the irradiations of XeCl excimer laser. The crystallized films have been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and conductivity measurements to clarify their morphologies, structure and electrical properties. The results show that a high conductive super thin layer is formed by a single pulse laser irradiation with the energy density of 75mJ/cm{sup 2}. The conductivity increases quickly at laser energy density threshold which decreases when the hydrogen in a-Si:H films is removed by pre-annealing. During crystallization process, oxygen atoms from the air ambient have been introduced into the films and such an introducing process is hindered by the hydrogen eruption. When the oxygen content is high enough, the carrier-transport mechanism includes thermionic emission (TE) and thermionic field emission (TFE) in the vicinity of room temperature, which is similar to semi-insulating polycrystalline silicon (SIPOS).

  10. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphousmore » silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.« less

  11. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Peter E. D.; Pugar, Eloise A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of "whiskers" or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900.degree. C.

  12. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, P.E.D.; Pugar, E.A.

    1985-11-12

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of whiskers'' or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900 C to about 1,200 C to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900 C. 6 figs.

  13. Method of inducing differential etch rates in glow discharge produced amorphous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Staebler, David L.; Zanzucchi, Peter J.

    1980-01-01

    A method of inducing differential etch rates in glow discharge produced amorphous silicon by heating a portion of the glow discharge produced amorphous silicon to a temperature of about 365.degree. C. higher than the deposition temperature prior to etching. The etch rate of the exposed amorphous silicon is less than the unheated amorphous silicon.

  14. Proton NMR studies of PECVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and HWCVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberg, Julie Lynn

    This dissertation discusses a new understanding of the internal structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Recent research in our group has included nuclear spin echo double resonance (SEDOR) measurements on device quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaic films. Using the SEDOR pulse sequence with and without the perturbing 29Si pulse, we obtain Fourier transform spectra for film at 80K that allows us to distinguish between molecular hydrogen and hydrogen bonded to silicon. Using such an approach, we have demonstrated that high quality a-Si:H films produced by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) from SiH 4 contains about ten atomic percent hydrogen, nearly 40% of which is molecular hydrogen, individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of tetragonal sites (T-sites). The main objective of this dissertation is to examine the difference between a-Si:H made by PECVD techniques and a-Si:H made by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) techniques. Proton NMR and 1H- 29Si SEDOR NMR are used to examine the hydrogen structure of HWCVD a-Si:H films prepared at the University of Utrecht and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Past NMR studies have shown that high quality PECVD a-Si:H films have geometries in which 40% of the contained hydrogen is present as H2 molecules individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of T-sites. A much smaller H2 fraction sometimes is physisorbed on internal surfaces. In this dissertation, similar NMR methods are used to perform structural studies of the two HWCVD aSi:H samples. The 3kHz resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole-burn behavior similar to that found for PECVD a-Si:H films as does the 24kHz FWHM line from clustered hydrogen bonded to silicon. Radio frequency hole-burning is a tool to distinguish between inhomogenous and homogeneous broadening. In the hole-burn experiments, the 3kHz FWHM resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole

  15. Radiation experience with the CDF silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Husemann, Ulrich; /Rochester U.

    2005-11-01

    The silicon detectors of the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider are operated in a harsh radiation environment. The lifetime of the silicon detectors is limited by radiation damage, and beam-related incidents are an additional risk. This article describes the impact of beam-related incidents on detector operation and the effects of radiation damage on electronics noise and the silicon sensors. From measurements of the depletion voltage as a function of the integrated luminosity, estimates of the silicon detector lifetime are derived.

  16. Defects in Amorphous Silicon: Dynamics and Role on Crystallization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jung Hoon

    Defects play a crucial role in determining the properties of many materials of scientific and technological interest. With ion irradiation, it is possible to controllably inject defects, and thus carefully study the dynamics of defect creation and annihilation, as well as the effects such defect injection has on materials properties and phase transformations. Amorphous silicon is a model system for the study of amorphous solids characterized as continuous random networks. In hydrogenated form, it is an important material for semiconductor devices such as solar cells and thin film transistors. It is the aim of this thesis to elucidate the dynamics of defects in an amorphous silicon matrix, and the role such defects can play on crystallization of amorphous silicon. In the first chapter, the concept of a continuous random network that characterizes amorphous silicon is presented as an introduction to amorphous silicon. Structural relaxation, or annihilation of non-equilibrium defects in an amorphous matrix, is introduced. Also developed are the concept of the activation energy spectrum theory for structural relaxation of amorphous solids and the density of relaxation states. In the second chapter, the density of relaxation states for the structural relaxation of amorphous silicon is measured by measuring changes in electrical conductivity, using ion irradiation and thermal anneal to create and annihilate defects, respectively. A new quantitative model for defect creation and annihilation, termed the generalized activation energy spectrum theory, is developed in Chapter 3, and is found to be superior to previous models in describing defect dynamics in amorphous silicon. In Chapter 4, the effect of irradiation on the crystallization of amorphous silicon is investigated. It is found that irradiation affects crystallization even when the growth kinetics of crystal grains is unaffected, and that defects injected into amorphous matrix by irradiation probably play a role in

  17. Polarization effects in femtosecond laser induced amorphization of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Feng; Li, Hong-Jin; Huang, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Wen-Zhong; Pan, Huai-Hai; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Jing; Li, Yang-Bo; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate monocrystalline silicon wafer. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of ablation surface indicates horizontally polarized laser beam shows an enhancement in amorphization efficiency by a factor of 1.6-1.7 over the circularly polarized laser ablation. This demonstrates that one can tune the amorphization efficiency through the polarization of irradiation laser.

  18. Hydrogen effusion from tritiated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kherani, N. P.; Liu, B.; Virk, K.; Kosteski, T.; Gaspari, F.; Shmayda, W. T.; Zukotynski, S.; Chen, K. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the effusion and outgassing of tritium from tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) films are presented. The samples were grown by dc-saddle field glow discharge at various substrate temperatures between 150 and 300°C. The tracer property of radioactive tritium is used to detect tritium release. Tritium effusion measurements are performed in a nonvacuum ion chamber and are found to yield similar results as reported for standard high vacuum technique. The results suggest for decreasing substrate temperature the growth of material with an increasing concentration of voids. These data are corroborated by analysis of infrared absorption data in terms of microstructure parameters. For material of low substrate temperature (and high void concentration) tritium outgassing in air at room temperature was studied, and it was found that after 600h about 0.2% of the total hydrogen (hydrogen+tritium) content is released. Two rate limiting processes are identified. The first process, fast tritium outgassing with a time constant of 15h, seems to be related to surface desorption of tritiated water (HTO) with a free energy of desorption of 1.04eV. The second process, slow tritium outgassing with a time constant of 200-300h, appears to be limited by oxygen diffusivity in a growing oxide layer. This material of lowest H stability would lose half of the hydrogen after 60years.

  19. Amorphous Silicon: Flexible Backplane and Display Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri R.

    Advances in the science and technology of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H, also referred to as a-Si) and the associated devices including thin-film transistors (TFT) during the past three decades have had a profound impact on the development and commercialization of major applications such as thin-film solar cells, digital image scanners and X-ray imagers and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Particularly, during approximately the past 15 years, a-Si TFT-based flat panel AMLCDs have been a huge commercial success. a-Si TFT-LCD has enabled the note book PCs, and is now rapidly replacing the venerable CRT in the desktop monitor and home TV applications. a-Si TFT-LCD is now the dominant technology in use for applications ranging from small displays such as in mobile phones to large displays such as in home TV, as well-specialized applications such as industrial and avionics displays.

  20. Amorphous Silicon Nanowires Grown on Silicon Oxide Film by Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhishan; Wang, Chengyong; Chen, Ke; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, amorphous silicon nanowires (α-SiNWs) were synthesized on (100) Si substrate with silicon oxide film by Cu catalyst-driven solid-liquid-solid mechanism (SLS) during annealing process (1080 °C for 30 min under Ar/H2 atmosphere). Micro size Cu pattern fabrication decided whether α-SiNWs can grow or not. Meanwhile, those micro size Cu patterns also controlled the position and density of wires. During the annealing process, Cu pattern reacted with SiO2 to form Cu silicide. More important, a diffusion channel was opened for Si atoms to synthesis α-SiNWs. What is more, the size of α-SiNWs was simply controlled by the annealing time. The length of wire was increased with annealing time. However, the diameter showed the opposite tendency. The room temperature resistivity of the nanowire was about 2.1 × 103 Ω·cm (84 nm diameter and 21 μm length). This simple fabrication method makes application of α-SiNWs become possible.

  1. Amorphous Silicon Nanowires Grown on Silicon Oxide Film by Annealing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhishan; Wang, Chengyong; Chen, Ke; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2017-08-10

    In this paper, amorphous silicon nanowires (α-SiNWs) were synthesized on (100) Si substrate with silicon oxide film by Cu catalyst-driven solid-liquid-solid mechanism (SLS) during annealing process (1080 °C for 30 min under Ar/H2 atmosphere). Micro size Cu pattern fabrication decided whether α-SiNWs can grow or not. Meanwhile, those micro size Cu patterns also controlled the position and density of wires. During the annealing process, Cu pattern reacted with SiO2 to form Cu silicide. More important, a diffusion channel was opened for Si atoms to synthesis α-SiNWs. What is more, the size of α-SiNWs was simply controlled by the annealing time. The length of wire was increased with annealing time. However, the diameter showed the opposite tendency. The room temperature resistivity of the nanowire was about 2.1 × 10(3) Ω·cm (84 nm diameter and 21 μm length). This simple fabrication method makes application of α-SiNWs become possible.

  2. Silicon heterojunction solar cell and crystallization of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meijun

    The rapid growth of photovoltaics in the past decade brings on the soaring price and demand for crystalline silicon. Hence it becomes necessary and also profitable to develop solar cells with over 20% efficiency, using thin (˜100mum) silicon wafers. In this respect, diffused junction cells are not the best choice, since the inescapable heating in the diffusion process not only makes it hard to handle thin wafers, but also reduces carriers' bulk lifetime and impairs the crystal quality of the substrate, which could lower cell efficiency. An alternative is the heterojunction cells, such as amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cell, where the emitter layer can be grown at low temperature (<200°C). In first part of this dissertation, I will introduce our work on front-junction SHJ solar cell, including the importance of intrinsic buffer layer; the discussion on the often observed anomalous "S"-shaped J-V curve (low fill factor) by using band diagram analysis; the surface passivation quality of intrinsic buffer and its relationship to the performance of front-junction SHJ cells. Although the a-Si:H is found to help to achieve high efficiency in c-Si heterojuntion solar cells, it also absorbs short wavelength (<600 nm) light, leading to non-ideal blue response and lower short circuit currents (JSC) in the front-junction SHJ cells. Considering this, heterojunction with both a-Si:H emitter and base contact on the back side in an interdigitated pattern, i.e. interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell, is developed. This dissertation will show our progress in developing IBC-SHJ solar cells, including the structure design; device fabrication and characterization; two dimensional simulation by using simulator Sentaurus Device; some special features of IBC-SHJ solar cells; and performance of IBC-SHJ cells without and with back surface buffer layers. Another trend for solar cell industry is thin film solar cells, since

  3. Construction of the CDF silicon vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Snider, F.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S. ); Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Gonzales, B.; Hrycyk, M.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T. ); Carithers, W.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester

    1992-04-01

    Technical details and methods used in constructing the CDF silicon vertex detector are presented. This description includes a discussion of the foam-carbon fiber composite structure used to silicon microstrip detectors and the procedure for achievement of 5 {mu}m detector alignment. The construction of the beryllium barrel structure, which houses the detector assemblies, is also described. In addition, the 10 {mu}m placement accuracy of the detectors in the barrel structure is discussed and the detector cooling and mounting systems are described. 12 refs.

  4. Fluorine-enhanced boron diffusion in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, J. M.; Robertson, L. S.; Jones, K. S.; Law, M. E.; Rendon, Mike; Bennett, Joe

    2003-05-01

    Silicon wafers were preamorphized with 70 keV Si+ at a dose of 1×1015atoms/cm2, generating a deep amorphous layer of 1800 Å. Implants of 500 eV 11B+, with and without 6 keV F+, followed at doses of 1×1015 atoms/cm2 and 2×1015 atoms/cm2, respectively. After annealing at 550 °C, secondary ion mass spectroscopy determined that the diffusivity of boron in amorphous silicon is significantly enhanced in the presence of fluorine. Ellipsometry and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicate the enhanced diffusion only occurs in the amorphous layer. Fluorine increases the boron diffusivity by approximately five orders of magnitude at 550 °C. It is proposed that the ability of fluorine to reduce the dangling bond concentration in amorphous silicon may reduce the formation energy for mobile boron, enhancing its diffusivity.

  5. Electrical characteristics of amorphous iron-tungsten contacts on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finetti, M.; Pan, E. T.-S.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Suni, I.

    1983-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of amorphous Fe-W contacts have been determined on both p-type and n-type silicon. The amorphous films were obtained by cosputtering from a composite target. Contact resistivities of 1 x 10 to the -7th and 2.8 x 10 to the -6th were measured on n(+) and p(+) silicon, respectively. These values remain constant after thermal treatment up to at least 500 C. A barrier height of 0.61 V was measured on n-type silicon.

  6. Fabrication process development for high-purity germanium radiation detectors with amorphous semiconductor contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looker, Quinn

    minimizing charge injection leakage current, increasing the long-term stability of the contacts, and achieving good charge collection properties in segmented detectors. A systematic study of contact characteristics is presented where amorphous germanium (a-Ge) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) contacts are sputtered with varying sputter gas hydrogen content, sputter gas pressure, and amorphous film thickness. A set of about 45 detectors fabricated from 11 different crystal samples were analyzed for electron barrier height and effective Richardson constant. Most of these detectors were subjected to as many as 10 temperature cycles over a period of up to several months in order to assess their long-term stability. Additionally, 6 double-sided strip detectors were fabricated with a-Ge and a-Si contacts in order to study their inter-electrode charge collection properties. An attempt is made to relate fabrication process parameters such as hydrogen content, sputter pressure, and film thickness to changes observed in detector performance and assess the level of reproducibility using the current methods. Several important results and conclusions were found that enable more reliable and highly performing detectors with amorphous semiconductor contacts. Utilizing the new information should enable consistent production of finely segmented detectors with excellent energy resolution that can be operated reliably for a long period of time. The passivation process could impact planar detectors as well as other designs, such as the p-type point contact detector. It is demonstrated that the long-term stability of amorphous semiconductor contacts is primarily dependent on the time the detector is at room temperature rather than the number of temperature cycles. For a-Ge contacts, higher sputter pressure yields a more stable process that changes little with time, giving a reliable hole-blocking contact. The a-Si contacts form a good electron-blocking contact with decreasing leakage current over

  7. Theoretical studies of amorphous and paracrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhmanson, Serge M.

    Until recently, structural models used to represent amorphous silicon (a-Si) in computer simulations were either perfectly fourfold connected random networks or random networks containing only miscoordinated atoms. These models are an approximation to the structure of the real material and do not uniformly comply with all the experimental data for a-Si. In this dissertation we make an attempt to go beyond this approximation and construct and examine models that have two major types of defects, encountered in real material, in their structure---nanovoids and crystalline grains. For our study of voids in a-Si we have calculated vibrational properties of structural models of a-Si with and without voids using ab initio and empirical molecular dynamics techniques. A small 216 atom and a large 4096 atom continuous random network (CRN) models for a-Si have been employed as starting points for our a-Si models with voids. Our calculations show that the presence of voids leads to an emergence of localized low-energy states in the vibrational spectrum of the model system. Moreover, it appears that these states are responsible for the anomalous behavior of system's specific heat at very low temperatures. To our knowledge these are the first numerical simulations that provide adequate agreement with experiment for the very low-temperature properties of specific heat in disordered materials within the limits of harmonic approximation. For our study of crystalline grains in a-Si we have developed a new procedure for the preparation of physically realistic models of paracrystalline silicon based on a modification of the bond-switching method of Wooten, Winer, and Weaire. Our models contain randomly oriented c-Si grains embedded in a disordered matrix. Our technique creates interfaces between the crystalline and disordered phases of Si with an extremely low concentration of coordination defects. The resulting models possess structural and vibrational properties comparable with

  8. Should 3K zoom function be used for detection of pneumothorax in cesium iodide/amorphous silicon flat-panel detector radiographs presented on 1K-matrix soft copies?

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Karin A; Bonél, H M; Stäbler, A; Voelk, M; Strotzer, M; Zech, C J; Reiser, M F

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate observer performance in the detection of pneumothorax with cesium iodide and amorphous silicon flat-panel detector radiography (CsI/a-Si FDR) presented as 1K and 3K soft-copy images. Forty patients with and 40 patients without pneumothorax diagnosed on previous and subsequent digital storage phosphor radiography (SPR, gold standard) had follow-up chest radiographs with CsI/a-Si FDR. Four observers confirmed or excluded the diagnosis of pneumothorax according to a five-point scale first on the 1K soft-copy image and then with help of 3K zoom function (1K monitor). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed for each modality (1K and 3K). The area under the curve (AUC) values for each observer were 0.7815, 0.7779, 0.7946 and 0.7066 with 1K-matrix soft copies and 0.8123, 0.7997, 0.8078 and 0.7522 with 3K zoom. Overall detection of pneumothorax was better with 3K zoom. Differences between the two display methods were not statistically significant in 3 of 4 observers (p-values between 0.13 and 0.44; observer 4: p = 0.02). The detection of pneumothorax with 3K zoom is better than with 1K soft copy but not at a statistically significant level. Differences between both display methods may be subtle. Still, our results indicate that 3K zoom should be employed in clinical practice.

  9. Construction and characterization of amorphous-silicon test structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, L.N.; Milgram, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    Semiconductor device fabrication and characterization work indicates that construction of amorphous-Si photoconductive radiation detectors is feasible. Amorphous Si films are mechanically stable and adhere well to candidate electrode materials; form Schottky-type rectifying junctions with several electrode metals. Materials exist for forming ohmic contacts on amorphous-Si films. Fabrication facilities accessible to ARACOR produce material of nominal band-gap energy, dangling bond density, and dielectric constant. Modification of amorphous-Si conductivity is feasible and supports the construction of PIN devices. Significant photoconductive response is observed for both Schottky-type and PIN devices, with the latter providing superior performance. It is recommended that construction and experimental evaluation of prototype amorphous-Si radiation detectors be persued in Phase II.

  10. Vacuum UV performance of silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhaber, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The sensitivity, time-varying response, and spatial sensitivity of four silicon detectors of vacuum UV were measured by passing a typical flux of 3 x 10 photons/s at the Lyman alpha line of 1215.7 A through an exit aperture of 0.55 mm x 0.8 mm. The detectors tested were: (1) a Fairchild FPM 200 silicon planar passivated photodiode with the window removed so that radiation could directly impinge on the center of the 1.0 mm square silicon chip, (2) a Fairchild FPM 100 silicon NPN planar passivated phototransistor, (3) the Hewlett-Packard 5082-4204 silicon planar PIN photodiode, and (4) the United Detector Technology PIN Spot/2 special sensitive silicon Schottky surface photodiode with the window removed.

  11. Vacuum UV performance of silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhaber, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The sensitivity, time-varying response, and spatial sensitivity of four silicon detectors of vacuum UV were measured by passing a typical flux of 3 x 10 photons/s at the Lyman alpha line of 1215.7 A through an exit aperture of 0.55 mm x 0.8 mm. The detectors tested were: (1) a Fairchild FPM 200 silicon planar passivated photodiode with the window removed so that radiation could directly impinge on the center of the 1.0 mm square silicon chip, (2) a Fairchild FPM 100 silicon NPN planar passivated phototransistor, (3) the Hewlett-Packard 5082-4204 silicon planar PIN photodiode, and (4) the United Detector Technology PIN Spot/2 special sensitive silicon Schottky surface photodiode with the window removed.

  12. Niobium nitride-niobium Josephson tunnel junctions with sputtered amorphous silicon barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Jillie, D.W.; Kroger, H.; Smith, L.N.; Cukauskas, E.J.; Nisenoff, M.

    1982-04-15

    Niobium nitride-niobium Josephson tunnel junctions with sputtered amorphous silicon barriers (NbN-..cap alpha..Si-Nb) have been prepared using processing that is fully compatible with integrated circuit fabrication. These junctions are of suitable quality and uniformity for digital circuit and S-I-S detector applications. The junction quality depends critically upon the properties of the NbN surface, and seems to correlate well with the UV/visible reflectivity of this surface.

  13. Design and feasibility of active matrix flat panel detector using avalanche amorphous selenium for protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Afrin; Reznik, Alla; Karim, Karim S; Rowlands, J A

    2008-10-01

    Protein crystallography is the most important technique for resolving the three-dimensional atomic structure of protein by measuring the intensity of its x-ray diffraction pattern. This work proposes a large area flat panel detector for protein crystallography based on direct conversion x-ray detection technique using avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) as the high gain photoconductor, and active matrix readout using amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistors. The detector employs avalanche multiplication phenomenon of a-Se to make the detector sensitive to each incident x ray. The advantages of the proposed detector over the existing imaging plate and charge coupled device detectors are large area, high dynamic range coupled to single x-ray detection capability, fast readout, high spatial resolution, and inexpensive manufacturing process. The optimal detector design parameters (such as detector size, pixel size, and thickness of a-Se layer), and operating parameters (such as electric field across the a-Se layer) are determined based on the requirements for protein crystallography application. The performance of the detector is evaluated in terms of readout time (<1 s), dynamic range (approximately 10(5)), and sensitivity (approximately 1 x-ray photon), thus validating the detector's efficacy for protein crystallography.

  14. Electronic structure and localized states in a model amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, G.; Delerue, C.; Lannoo, M.

    1998-03-01

    The electronic structure of a model amorphous silicon (a-Si) represented by a supercell of 4096 silicon atoms [B.R. Djordjevic, M.F. Thorpe, and F. Wooten, Phys. Rev. B 52, 5685 (1995)] and of a model hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) that we have built from the a-Si model are calculated in the tight-binding approximation. The band edges near the gap are characterized by exponential tails of localized states induced mainly by the variations in bond angles. The spatial localization of the states is compared between a-Si and a-Si:H. Comparison with experiments suggests that the structural models give good descriptions of the amorphous materials.

  15. Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.

    1984-11-29

    A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

  16. Amorphous silicon oxide window layers for high-efficiency silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter Seif, Johannes; Descoeudres, Antoine; Filipič, Miha; Smole, Franc; Topič, Marko; Charles Holman, Zachary; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells, optical losses can be mitigated by replacing the amorphous silicon films by wider bandgap amorphous silicon oxide layers. In this article, we use stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon oxide as front intrinsic buffer layers and show that this increases the short-circuit current density by up to 0.43 mA/cm2 due to less reflection and a higher transparency at short wavelengths. Additionally, high open-circuit voltages can be maintained, thanks to good interface passivation. However, we find that the gain in current is more than offset by losses in fill factor. Aided by device simulations, we link these losses to impeded carrier collection fundamentally caused by the increased valence band offset at the amorphous/crystalline interface. Despite this, carrier extraction can be improved by raising the temperature; we find that cells with amorphous silicon oxide window layers show an even lower temperature coefficient than reference heterojunction solar cells (-0.1%/°C relative drop in efficiency, compared to -0.3%/°C). Hence, even though cells with oxide layers do not outperform cells with the standard design at room temperature, at higher temperatures—which are closer to the real working conditions encountered in the field—they show superior performance in both experiment and simulation.

  17. P-type silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Krieger, B.; Krofcheck, D.; O`Donnell, R.; Odyniec, G.; Partlan, M.D.; Wang, N.W.

    1995-06-01

    Preliminary results on 16 CM{sup 2}, position-sensitive silicon drift detectors, fabricated for the first time on p-type silicon substrates, are presented. The detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested recently at LBL and show interesting properties which make them attractive for use in future physics experiments. A pulse count rate of approximately 8 {times} l0{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1} is demonstrated by the p-type silicon drift detectors. This count rate estimate is derived by measuring simultaneous tracks produced by a laser and photolithographic mask collimator that generates double tracks separated by 50 {mu}m to 1200 {mu}m. A new method of using ion-implanted polysilicon to produce precise valued bias resistors on the silicon drift detectors is also discussed.

  18. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mews, Mathias Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120 meV and 200 meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724 mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  19. Theoretical estimation of static charge fluctuation in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugler, Sándor; Surján, Péter R.; Náray-Szabó, Gábor

    1988-05-01

    A quantum-chemical method has been developed to determine charge fluctuations in finite aperiodic clusters of amorphous silicon. Calculated atomic net charges are in a close linear relationship to bond-angle distortions involving first and second neighbors. Applying this relationship to a continuous-random-network model of 216 silicon atoms proposed by Wooten et al., we obtained 0.021 electron units for the rms deviation from charge neutrality.

  20. Recombination mechanisms in amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, N.; Rau, U.; Hausner, R. M.; Uppal, S.; Oberbeck, L.; Bergmann, R. B.; Werner, J. H.

    2000-03-01

    This article investigates limitations to the open circuit voltage of n-type amorphous silicon/p-type crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. The analysis of quantum efficiency and temperature dependent current/voltage characteristics identifies the dominant recombination mechanism. Depending on the electronic quality of the crystalline silicon absorber, either recombination in the neutral bulk or recombination in the space charge region prevails; recombination at the heterointerface is not relevant. Although interface recombination does not limit the open circuit voltage, recombination of photogenerated charge carriers at the heterointerface or in the amorphous silicon emitter diminishes the short circuit current of the solar cells.

  1. Gamma radiation effects in amorphous silicon and silicon nitride photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Du, Qingyang; Huang, Yizhong; Ogbuu, Okechukwu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Junying; Singh, Vivek; Agarwal, Anuradha M; Hu, Juejun

    2017-02-01

    Understanding radiation damage is of significant importance for devices operating in radiation-harsh environments. In this Letter, we present a systematic study on gamma radiation effects in amorphous silicon and silicon nitride guided wave devices. It is found that gamma radiation increases the waveguide modal effective indices by as much as 4×10-3 in amorphous silicon and 5×10-4 in silicon nitride at 10 Mrad dose. This Letter further reveals that surface oxidation and radiation-induced densification account for the observed index change.

  2. Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenon ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface of strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56 eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature-dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV silicon ions at 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340 {+-} 10K.

  3. Laterally inherently thin amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R. Kherani, Nazir P.

    2014-12-29

    This article reports on an amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell concept wherein the heterojunction regions are laterally narrow and distributed amidst a backdrop of well-passivated crystalline silicon surface. The localized amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunctions consisting of the laterally thin emitter and back-surface field regions are precisely aligned under the metal grid-lines and bus-bars while the remaining crystalline silicon surface is passivated using the recently proposed facile grown native oxide–plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride passivation scheme. The proposed cell concept mitigates parasitic optical absorption losses by relegating amorphous silicon to beneath the shadowed metallized regions and by using optically transparent passivation layer. A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.6% is obtained for an untextured proof-of-concept cell illuminated under AM 1.5 global spectrum; the specific cell performance parameters are V{sub OC} of 666 mV, J{sub SC} of 29.5 mA-cm{sup −2}, and fill-factor of 69.3%. Reduced parasitic absorption, predominantly in the shorter wavelength range, is confirmed with external quantum efficiency measurement.

  4. Laterally inherently thin amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R.; Kherani, Nazir P.

    2014-12-01

    This article reports on an amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell concept wherein the heterojunction regions are laterally narrow and distributed amidst a backdrop of well-passivated crystalline silicon surface. The localized amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunctions consisting of the laterally thin emitter and back-surface field regions are precisely aligned under the metal grid-lines and bus-bars while the remaining crystalline silicon surface is passivated using the recently proposed facile grown native oxide-plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride passivation scheme. The proposed cell concept mitigates parasitic optical absorption losses by relegating amorphous silicon to beneath the shadowed metallized regions and by using optically transparent passivation layer. A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.6% is obtained for an untextured proof-of-concept cell illuminated under AM 1.5 global spectrum; the specific cell performance parameters are VOC of 666 mV, JSC of 29.5 mA-cm-2, and fill-factor of 69.3%. Reduced parasitic absorption, predominantly in the shorter wavelength range, is confirmed with external quantum efficiency measurement.

  5. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  6. Integral bypass diodes in an amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Flaisher, H.

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film, tandem-junction, amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules were constructed in which a part of the a-Si alloy cell material is used to form bypass protection diodes. This integral design circumvents the need for incorporating external, conventional diodes, thus simplifying the manufacturing process and reducing module weight.

  7. Performance of amorphous silicon photovoltaic systems, 1985--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses the performance of commercial amorphous silicon modules used in photovoltaic power systems from 1985 through 1989. Topics discussed include initial degradation, reliability, durability, and effects of temperature and solar irradiance on peak power and energy production. 6 refs., 18 figs.

  8. Photo-induced defects and photoconductivity in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, H.; Kida, H.; Hamakawa, Y.

    1984-02-01

    An essential connection between photo-induced defects and photoconductivity in amorphous silicon is discussed within the framework of Street's defect creation model. The excitation intensity dependence and doping level dependence of the photo-induced defect density and photoconductivity are derived on the basis of simple rate equation analysis, and compared with experimental data.

  9. Ultrasonic attenuation in amorphous silicon at 50 and 100 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondongwa, D. B.; Daly, B. C.; Norris, T. B.; Yan, B.; Yang, J.; Guha, S.

    2011-03-01

    We have measured the attenuation of longitudinal acoustic waves in a series of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon films using picosecond ultrasonics. The films were grown using a modified very high frequency glow discharge method on steel substrates. The deposition conditions were similar to that used in the fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells. The film thicknesses were varied so we could distinguish between interface losses and intrinsic losses within the silicon films. We determine the attenuation of amorphous Si to be 780 ± 160 cm-1 at 100 GHz and 340 ± 120 cm-1 at 50 GHz, values that are lower than those predicted by theories based on anharmonic interactions of the sound wave with localized phonons or extended resonant modes. We determine the attenuation of nanocrystalline Si at 50 GHz to be nearly an order of magnitude higher than amorphous Si (2600 ± 660 cm-1) and compare that value to a simple Rayleigh scattering prediction.

  10. Tight binding simulation of the thermodynamic behavior of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, V.; Celino, M.

    1999-12-01

    Structures of amorphous silicon have been generated by using a suitable implementation of the reverse Monte Carlo technique, based on the reproduction of different experimental data. The structures have been subsequently relaxed at fixed temperature and pressure via tight binding molecular dynamics. The amorphous structures have been further characterized by evaluating structural, dynamic and electronic structure properties, as a function of temperature, up to and above the melting point. The model of amorphous silicon undergoes a melting transition at Tal≃0.55Tm (where Tm is the homogeneous melting temperature of the bulk crystal). In the temperature range between Tal and Tm, the system exhibits thermodynamic and structural properties typical of an undercooled liquid.

  11. Silicon nanoparticle optimization and integration into amorphous silicon via PECVD for use in photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klafehn, Grant W.

    An alternative approach to traditional growth methods of nanocrystalline material is co-deposition by injection of separately synthesized silicon nanoparticles into amorphous silicon. Current methods of co-deposition of silicon nanoparticles and amorphous silicon via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition allow the two reactors' pressures to affect each other, leading to either poor amorphous silicon quality or uncontrollable nanoparticle size and deposition rate. In this thesis, a technique for greater control of stand-alone silicon nanoparticle size and quality grown was achieved by using a slit nozzle. The nozzle was used to separate the nanoparticle and amorphous reactors, allowing for the ability to control nanoparticle size, crystallinity, and deposition rate during co-deposition, while still allowing for high quality amorphous silicon growth. Changing the width of the nozzle allowed for control of the size of the nanoparticles from 10 to 4.5 nm in diameter, and allowed for the precursor gas flow rate, and thus deposition rate, to be changed with only a 6 % change in size estimated from luminescence emission wavelength. Co-deposited samples were grown within a broad range of flow rates for the silicon nanoparticle precursor gas, resulting in each sample having a different crystal fraction. FTIR, PL, Raman, and XRD were used to analyze their composition. The silicon nanoparticle synthesis was separately optimized to control size and crystallinity, and the influence of the nanoparticle process gases on amorphous silicon growth was also explored. Finally, COMSOL simulations were performed to support and possibly predict Si-NP growth variables that pertain to Si-NP size.

  12. The Silicon Pixel Detector for ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, D.; Bombonati, C.; Dima, R.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pepato, A.; Bohus, L. Sajo; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.; Shen, D.; Turrisi, R.; Viesti, G.; Anelli, G.; Boccardi, A.; Burns, M.; Campbell, M.; Ceresa, S.; Conrad, J.; Kluge, A.; Kral, M.

    2007-10-26

    The Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment is made of position sensitive detectors which have to operate in a region where the track density may be as high as 50 tracks/cm{sup 2}. To handle such densities detectors with high precision and granularity are mandatory. The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD), the innermost part of the ITS, has been designed to provide tracking information close to primary interaction point. The assembly of the entire SPD has been completed.

  13. Silicon mirror suspensions for gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, A. V.; Cunningham, L.; Hammond, G. D.; Haughian, K.; Hough, J.; Kroker, S.; Martin, I. W.; Nawrodt, R.; Rowan, S.; Schwarz, C.; van Veggel, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant limits to the sensitivity of current, and future, long-baseline interferometric gravitational wave detectors is thermal displacement noise of the test masses and their suspensions. This paper reports results of analytical and experimental studies of the limits to thermal noise performance of cryogenic silicon test mass suspensions set by two constraints on suspension fibre dimensions: the minimum dimensions required to allow conductive cooling for extracting incident laser beam heat deposited in the mirrors; and the minimum dimensions of fibres (set by their tensile strength) which can support test masses of the size envisaged for use in future detectors. We report experimental studies of breaking strength of silicon ribbons, and resulting design implications for the feasibility of suspension designs for future gravitational wave detectors using silicon suspension fibres. We analyse the implication of this study for thermal noise performance of cryogenically cooled silicon suspensions.

  14. Silicon radiation detectors: materials and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Haller, E.E.

    1982-10-01

    Silicon nuclear radiation detectors are available today in a large variety of sizes and types. This profusion has been made possible by the ever increasing quality and diameter silicon single crystals, new processing technologies and techniques, and innovative detector design. The salient characteristics of the four basic detector groups, diffused junction, ion implanted, surface barrier, and lithium drift are reviewed along with the silicon crystal requirements. Results of crystal imperfections detected by lithium ion compensation are presented. Processing technologies and techniques are described. Two recent novel position-sensitive detector designs are discussed - one in high-energy particle track reconstruction and the other in x-ray angiography. The unique experimental results obtained with these devices are presented.

  15. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Mahan, Archie H.; Carapella, Jeffrey C.; Gallagher, Alan C.

    1995-01-01

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH.sub.4) over a high temperature, 2000.degree. C., tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400.degree. C., substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20-30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content.

  16. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

    1995-03-14

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

  17. An alternative system for mycotoxin detection based on amorphous silicon sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, D.; de Cesare, G.; De Rossi, P.; Fanelli, C.; Nascetti, A.; Ricelli, A.; Scipinotti, R.

    2007-05-01

    In this work we investigate, for the first time, the performances of a system based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon photosensors for the detection of Ochratoxin A. The sensor is a n-type/intrinsic/p-type amorphous silicon stacked structure deposited on a glass substrate. The mycotoxin is deposited on a thin layer chromatographic plate and aligned with the sensor. An ultraviolet radiation excites the ochratoxin A, whose fluorescence produces a photocurrent in the sensor. The photocurrent value is proportional to the deposited mycotoxin quantity. An excellent linearity of the detector response over more than two orders of magnitude of ochratoxin A amount is observed. The minimum detected mycotoxin quantity is equal to 0.1ng, suggesting that the presented detection system could be a good candidate to perform rapid and analytical ochratoxin A analysis in different kind of samples.

  18. Computer models for amorphous silicon hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    1990-02-01

    A procedure for generating fully coordinated model structures appropriate to hydrogenated amorphous semiconductors is described. The hydrogen is incorporated into an amorphous matrix using a bond-switching process similar to that proposed by Wooten, Winer, and Weaire, which ensures that fourfold coordination is preserved. After each inclusion of hydrogen, the structure is relaxed using a finite-temperature Monte Carlo algorithm. The method is applied to a-Si:H at various hydrogen concentrations. The resulting model structures are found to be in excellent agreement with recent neutron-scattering measurements on a sample with 12 at. % H. Our prescription, which is essentially nonlocal, allows great flexibility and can easily be extended to related systems.

  19. Heat-Induced Agglomeration of Amorphous Silicon Nanoparticles Toward the Formation of Silicon Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bo Yun; Kim, Ja Young; Seo, Gyeongju; Shin, Chae-Ho; Ko, Chang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The thermal behavior of silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs) was investigated for the preparation of silicon thin film using a solution process. TEM analysis of Si NPs, synthesized by inductively coupled plasma, revealed that the micro-structure of the Si NPs was amorphous and that the Si NPs had melted and merged at a comparatively low temperature (~750 °C) considering bulk melting temperature of silicon (1414 °C). A silicon ink solution was prepared by dispersing amorphous Si NPs in propylene glycol (PG). It was then coated onto a silicon wafer and a quartz plate to form a thin film. These films were annealed in a vacuum or in an N₂ environment to increase their film density. N2 annealing at 800 °C and 1000 °C induced the crystallization of the amorphous thin film. An elemental analysis by the SIMS depth profile showed that N₂annealing at 1000 °C for 180 min drastically reduced the concentrations of carbon and oxygen inside the silicon thin film. These results indicate that silicon ink prepared using amorphous Si NPs in PG can serve as a proper means of preparing silicon thin film via solution process.

  20. Photoluminescence Study of Metastable Degradation of Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlin, Jeremy; Inglefield, Colin; Plachy, Robin; Su, Tining; Taylor, P. Craig; Ganguly, Gautam; Carlson, Dave

    2001-11-01

    It is well known that the luminescent intensity of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and the efficiency of a-Si:H solar cells degrade after long exposure to light (known as the Staebler-Wronski effect). It is also known that annealing light-soaked amorphous silicon can restore the luminescence intensity to a level similar to that before light soaking. In our study, state-of-the-art device-quality a-Si:H was used to determine, quantitatively, the luminescence intensity before and after light soaking and after subsequent annealing. We found that the luminescence decreases by a roughly factor of ten over the entire measurable spectrum after exposure to a 1-Sun lamp for 600 hours. We also studied silicon that had been light-soaked and annealed (170 degrees Celsius for 4 hours in a nitrogen environment) and found the luminescence returned to its original level. We are also correlating our results with Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements to determine the effects of light-induced degradation on number of defects and the hydrogen local environment, respectively. By combining these three results, we hope to further define the effect of light soaking on the microstructure of amorphous silicon.

  1. Preparation and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, T. M.

    1980-12-01

    Direct current magnetron sputtering was evaluated as a viable approach to producing amorphous SiH thin films for solar photovoltaic applications. It is shown that the optical and transport properties of these films are similar to those of rf diode sputtered material, but the photoresponse and, more importantly, Schottky diode performance are inferior to that already obtained by rd diode sputtering. In order to improve film morphology, ion bombardment was added to the deposition process. Transmission electron microscopy and SIMS measurements are discussed. Optical properties, transport, and photoconductivity of oxygen doped rf diode films are discussed.

  2. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  3. An intercomparison of 11 amorphous silicon EPIDs of the same type: implications for portal dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Peter; Georg, Dietmar

    2006-09-01

    The use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for portal dosimetry requires knowledge of their dosimetric properties. The pixel value response of amorphous silicon EPIDs of type Elekta iViewGT™ is known to be nonlinear with dose. However, it is not clear whether these nonlinearities vary with time and from one detector to another, respectively. In the present study, the dose-response characteristics of 11 iViewGT EPIDs were investigated with respect to dose rate, total dose and field size. It was found that each detector needs to be individually calibrated, not only in terms of absolute sensitivity but also with respect to its relative response variations with exposure parameters. Doubling the dose rate typically increased the EPID signal between 1.4% and 2.8%. Changing the number of monitor units from 30 to 500 was accompanied by an increase in detector sensitivity between 1.7% and 2.8%. The EPID scatter factors were always within ±1%. It was observed that the dose-response behaviour was not stable with respect to time. Particularly within the first weeks of operation, detector ageing caused variations in both absolute sensitivity and relative response curves. It is recommended to establish a quality assurance programme if the amorphous silicon EPIDs are intended to be used for clinical portal dosimetry.

  4. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  5. Proton Straggling in Thick Silicon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Straggling functions for protons in thick silicon radiation detectors are computed by Monte Carlo simulation. Mean energy loss is constrained by the silicon stopping power, providing higher straggling at low energy and probabilities for stopping within the detector volume. By matching the first four moments of simulated energy-loss distributions, straggling functions are approximated by a log-normal distribution that is accurate for Vavilov k is greater than or equal to 0:3. They are verified by comparison to experimental proton data from a charged particle telescope.

  6. Proton straggling in thick silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.

    2017-03-01

    Straggling functions for protons in thick silicon radiation detectors are computed by Monte Carlo simulation. Mean energy loss is constrained by the silicon stopping power, providing higher straggling at low energy and probabilities for stopping within the detector volume. By matching the first four moments of simulated energy-loss distributions, straggling functions are approximated by a log-normal distribution that is accurate for Vavilov κ ≳ 0.3 . They are verified by comparison to experimental proton data from a charged particle telescope.

  7. Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P.K.; Brown, S.; Hollingsworth, R.; Shen, D.S.; del Cueto, J.; Iwanicko, E.; Marshall, C.; DeHart, C.; Mentor, D.; Benson, A.; Matovich, C.; Sandwisch, J. )

    1991-04-01

    This report describes a contract to produce multijunction modules based entirely on amorphous silicon alloys, the modules having an aperture area of at least 900 cm{sup 2} and a stable, reproducible conversion efficiency of at least 6.5% after 600 hours of light exposure (air mass 1.5) at 50{degrees} C. The work focussed on (1) producing opto-electronic-grade amorphous silicon material for band gaps of about 1.7 and 1.9 eV by changing the hydrogen content in the film bonded to the silicon, (2) studying and obtaining data on the light stability of single-junction p-i-n solar cells with gaps of about 1.7 and 1.9 eV, and (3) analyzing losses in a silicon/silicon multijunction cell. We report new results on an indium tin oxide (ITO)/silver back contact and the deposition of granular tin oxide by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition. Progress toward module fabrication at the end of six months has been good, with the demonstration of 5.4% initial efficiency in a silicon/silicon multijunction submodule with an aperture area of 4620 cm{sup 2} and incorporating devices with 2nd-junction i-layer thicknesses of about 3500 {angstrom}. We also demonstrated a single-junction silicon submodule with an aperture area of 4620 cm{sup 2}, a thickness of about 3500 {angstrom}, and an initial efficiency of 6.5%. 4 refs., 39 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Mechanism of boron diffusion in amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, Salvatore; De Salvador, Davide; Bruno, Elena; Napolitani, Enrico; Pecora, Emanuele F; Boninelli, Simona; Priolo, Francesco

    2008-04-18

    We have elucidated the mechanism for B migration in the amorphous (a-) Si network. B diffusivity in a-Si is much higher than in crystalline Si; it is transient and increases with B concentration up to 2 x 10(20) B/cm(3). At higher density, B atoms in a-Si quickly precipitate. B diffusion is indirect, mediated by dangling bonds (DB) present in a-Si. The density of DB is enhanced by B accommodation in the a-Si network and decreases because of a-Si relaxation. Accurate data simulations allow one to extract the DB diffusivity, whose activation energy is 2.6 eV. Implications of these results are discussed.

  9. Excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon on metallic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delachat, F.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Cayron, C.; Ducros, C.; Lerat, J.-F.; Emeraud, T.; Negru, R.; Huet, K.; Reydet, P.-L.

    2013-06-01

    An attempt has been made to achieve the crystallization of silicon thin film on metallic foils by long pulse duration excimer laser processing. Amorphous silicon thin films (100 nm) were deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on a commercial metallic alloy (N42-FeNi made of 41 % of Ni) coated by a tantalum nitride (TaN) layer. The TaN coating acts as a barrier layer, preventing the diffusion of metallic impurities in the silicon thin film during the laser annealing. An energy density threshold of 0.3 J cm-2, necessary for surface melting and crystallization of the amorphous silicon, was predicted by a numerical simulation of laser-induced phase transitions and witnessed by Raman analysis. Beyond this fluence, the melt depth increases with the intensification of energy density. A complete crystallization of the layer is achieved for an energy density of 0.9 J cm-2. Scanning electron microscopy unveils the nanostructuring of the silicon after laser irradiation, while cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals the crystallites' columnar growth.

  10. Use of Tritium in the Study of defects in Amorphous Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Costea, S.; Pisana, S.; Kherani, N.P.; Gaspari, F.; Kosteski, T.; Shmayda, W.T.; Zukotynski, S.

    2005-11-28

    Hydrogen is known to strongly affect the physical properties of amorphous semiconductors. Indeed hydrogen is introduced during the growth of amorphous silicon films, used in active matrix displays and solar cells, to passivate silicon dangling bonds and to relax the lattice thereby reducing the density of states in the energy gap by several orders of magnitude and giving rise to device grade material. Ideally, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a continuous covalently bonded random network of silicon-silicon and silicon-hydrogen atoms, with the predominant nearest neighbour environment similar to that of crystalline silicon.

  11. Quantum efficiencies exceeding unity in amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vanmaekelbergh, D.; Lagemaat, J. van de; Schropp, R.E.I.

    1994-12-31

    The experimental observation of internal quantum efficiencies above unity in crystalline silicon solar cells has brought up the question whether the generation of multiple electron/hole pairs has to be taken into consideration also in solar cells based on direct gap amorphous semiconductors. To study photogenerated carrier dynamics, the authors have applied Intensity Modulated Photocurrent Spectroscopy (IMPS) to hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells. In the reverse voltage bias region at low illumination intensities it has been observed that the low frequency limit of the AC quantum yield Y increases significantly above unit with decreasing light intensity, indicating that more than one electron per photon is detected in the external circuit. This phenomenon can be explained by considering trapping and thermal emission of photogenerated carriers at intragap atmospheric dangling bond defect centers.

  12. Spherical silicon photonic microcavities: From amorphous to polycrystalline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenollosa, R.; Garín, M.; Meseguer, F.

    2016-06-01

    Shaping silicon as a spherical object is not an obvious task, especially when the object size is in the micrometer range. This has the important consequence of transforming bare silicon material in a microcavity, so it is able to confine light efficiently. Here, we have explored the inside volume of such microcavities, both in their amorphous and in their polycrystalline versions. The synthesis method, which is based on chemical vapor deposition, causes amorphous microspheres to have a high content of hydrogen that produces an onionlike distributed porous core when the microspheres are crystallized by a fast annealing regime. This substantially influences the resonant modes. However, a slow crystallization regime does not yield pores, and produces higher-quality-factor resonances that could be fitted to the Mie theory. This allows the establishment of a procedure for obtaining size calibration standards with relative errors of the order of 0.1%.

  13. Electrochemical degradation of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques of module electrochemical corrosion research, developed during reliability studies of crystalline-silicon modules (C-Si), have been applied to this new investigation into amorphous-silicon (a-Si) module reliability. Amorphous-Si cells, encapsulated in the polymers polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), were exposed for more than 1200 hours in a controlled 85 C/85 percent RH environment, with a constant 500 volts applied between the cells and an aluminum frame. Plotting power output reduction versus charge transferred reveals that about 50 percent a-Si cell failures can be expected with the passage of 0.1 to 1.0 Coulomb/cm of cell-frame edge length; this threshold is somewhat less than that determined for C-Si modules.

  14. The reliability and stability of multijunction amorphous silicon PV modules

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.E.

    1995-11-01

    Solarex is developing a manufacturing process for the commercial production of 8 ft{sup 2} multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV modules starting in 1996. The device structure used in these multijunction modules is: glass/textured tin oxide/p-i-n/p-i-n/ZnO/Al/EVA/Tedlar where the back junction of the tandem structure contains an amorphous silicon germanium alloy. As an interim step, 4 ft{sup 2} multijunction modules have been fabricated in a pilot production mode over the last several months. The distribution of initial conversion efficiencies for an engineering run of 67 modules (4 ft{sup 2}) is shown. Measurements recently performed at NREL indicate that the actual efficiencies are about 5% higher than those shown, and thus exhibit an average initial conversion efficiency of about 9.5%. The data indicates that the process is relatively robust since there were no modules with initial efficiencies less than 7.5%.

  15. Amorphous-silicon thin-film heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cretella, M. C.; Gregory, J. A.; Sandstrom, D. B.; Paul, W.

    1981-01-01

    The investigation of amorphous silicon materials at MTSEC has had two major thrusts: (1) to improve the amorphous material, i.e., obtain a low state density in the gap, improve the carrier collection depth and diminish non-radiative recombinations; and (2) to attempt to understand and improve on the limitations of the junction devices while evaluating the amorphous silicon materials. In the first of these efforts, the investigation has continued to examine the modifications to the a-Si(H) network by alloying silicon with other group IVA elements, either in binary or ternary compositions, and/or by replacing the hydrogenation for defect compensation with a combination of hydrogenation and alkylation or hydrogenation and halogenation. The doped junction layers are being examined in an attempt to determine the limiting characteristics of the junctions in solar cell devices of these amorphous materials. Amorphous alloys of Si-Ge, Si-C, Si-Sn were prepared as well as ternary compositions of Si-Ge-C and Si-Sn-C. In addition, Na vapor was added to the gas feed to deposit a-Si(Na, H) films, and to prepare Si-Sn, fluoride was added along with the tin by vapor additions of SnF/sub 4/ to the gas feed. The optical properties of these materials were measured, and structural and compositional information was obtained from the IR vibrational spectra using the scanning electron microscope and from analyses using scanning Auger microscopy. Electrical measurements have included the dark conductivity and the photo conductivity under room fluorescent light and at AM1 conditions. With alloys that displayed promising photoconductive properties n-i-p devices were prepared to assess the solar cell properties. Details are presented. (WHK)

  16. Status of the CDF silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstein, Sebastian; /Harvard U.

    2006-05-01

    The CDF Run II silicon micro-strip detector is an essential part of the heavy flavor tagging and forward tracking capabilities of the experiment. Since the commissioning period ended in 2002, about 85% of the 730 k readout channels have been consistently provided good data. A summary of the recent improvements in the DAQ system as well as experience of maintaining and operating such a large, complex detector are presented.

  17. Advantages of gated silicon single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legré, Matthieu; Lunghi, Tommaso; Stucki, Damien; Zbinden, Hugo

    2013-05-01

    We present gated silicon single photon detectors based on two commercially available avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and one customised APD from ID Quantique SA. This customised APD is used in a commercially available device called id110. A brief comparison of the two commercial APDs is presented. Then, the charge persistence effect of all of those detectors that occurs just after a strong illumination is shown and discussed.

  18. PHENIX Silicon Stripixel Detector at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneja, Swadhin

    2010-11-01

    A novel design for a silicon sensor consisting of ``spirals'' of silicon strip-pixel was developed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This strip-pixel silicon sensor is a single-sided, DC-coupled, two-dimensional detector. A silicon vertex tracker (VTX) is now under construction and will be installed at PHENIX in fall 2010. The strip-pixel ladders will form the two outer barrels of the VTX. The VTX will substantially enhance the physics capabilities of the PHENIX central arm spectrometer and will enable precision measurements of heavy-quark production (charm and beauty) in A + A, p(d) + A, and polarized p + p collisions. In this talk I will focus on the silicon modules and the ladder assembly. I will show the performance results of the ladders.

  19. Detector materials: germanium and silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1981-11-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1981 Nuclear Science Symposium. The basic physical properties of elemental semiconductors are reviewed. The interaction of energetic radiation with matter is discussed in order to develop a feeling for the appropriate semiconductor detector dimensions. The extremely low net dopant concentrations which are required are derived directly from the detector dimensions. A survey of the more recent techniques which have been developed for the analysis of detector grade semiconductor single crystals is presented.

  20. Hybrid photovoltaics based on semiconductor nanocrystals and amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baoquan; Findikoglu, Alp T; Sykora, Milan; Werder, Donald J; Klimov, Victor I

    2009-03-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are promising materials for applications in photovoltaic (PV) structures that could benefit from size-controlled tunability of absorption spectra, the ease of realization of various tandem architectures, and, perhaps, increased conversion efficiency in the ultraviolet region through carrier multiplication. The first practical step toward utilization of the unique properties of NCs in PV technologies could be through their integration into traditional silicon-based solar cells. Here, we demonstrate an example of such hybrid PV structures that combine colloidal NCs with amorphous silicon. In these structures, NCs and silicon are electronically coupled, and the regime of this coupling can be tuned by altering the alignment of NC energy states with regard to silicon band edges. For example, using wide-gap CdSe NCs we demonstrate a photoresponse which is exclusively due to the NCs. On the other hand, in devices comprising narrow-gap PbS NCs, both the NCs and silicon contribute to photocurrent, which results in PV response extending from the visible to the near-infrared region. The hybrid silicon/PbS NC solar cells show external quantum efficiencies of approximately 7% at infrared energies and 50% in the visible and a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.9%. This work demonstrates the feasibility of hybrid PV devices that combine advantages of mature silicon fabrication technologies with the unique electronic properties of semiconductor NCs.

  1. Amorphous Ternary Diffusion Barriers for Silicon Metallizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Jason Sven

    1995-01-01

    Reactively sputtered from transition-metal silicide or boride targets in Ar/N_2 discharges, thin amorphous films of TM-Si-N (TM = Mo, Ta, Ti, or W) and W-B-N are investigated. Resistivity, density, stress, and structure are given as functions of composition, and in some cases, temperature. Transmission electron microscopy shows that most of the films are marginally amorphous with the scale of local order ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 nm. Small -angle scattering measurements reveal chemically dissimilary regions in the films. When fully nitrided, Si appears to be preferentially bonded to nitrogen in the form of Si_3N_4 in the TM-Si-N films, according to extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) measurements. By tests on shallow-junction diodes, 100-nm thick TM-Si-N barriers are able to prevent aluminum overlayers from spiking the Si substrate at temperatures above aluminum's melting point, 660^circC. The exceptional stability is partly attributable to a 3 nm, self-sealing AlN layer which grows at the TM-Si-N/Al interface. The performance of the TM-Si-N and W-B-N barriers with copper overlayers is equally impressive. At the proper compositions, 100-nm barriers prevent copper from diffusing into the junction at 800^circC or higher for a 30-min vacuum annealing. Diode failure typically corresponds to the crystallization temperature of the barrier, which can be reduced by the presence of copper. Preliminary diffusion measurements of Cu in Ta _{36}Si_ {14}N_{50} films by SIMS yield an approximate diffusivity constant of D_{CU} = (0.014 cm ^2/s) times exp(-2.7 eV/kT). A 10-nm-thick TM-Si-N barrier with a Cu overlayer on MOS capacitors reveals no penetration of Cu into SiO_2 during an 80 h bias-thermal-stress at 300^circ C and 1 MV/cm applied field. Through a microscopic four-point probe lithographically defined on a Cu/barrier/Cu trilayer stack, the specific contact resistances of barrier/Cu interfaces are determined for TM-Si-N, TiN, and W barriers. In all instances, the

  2. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  3. Two-phase electrochemical lithiation in amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang Wei; He, Yu; Fan, Feifei; Liu, Xiao Hua; Xia, Shuman; Liu, Yang; Harris, C Thomas; Li, Hong; Huang, Jian Yu; Mao, Scott X; Zhu, Ting

    2013-02-13

    Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized portable electronics and will be a key to electrifying transport vehicles and delivering renewable electricity. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is being intensively studied as a high-capacity anode material for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. Its lithiation has been widely thought to occur through a single-phase mechanism with gentle Li profiles, thus offering a significant potential for mitigating pulverization and capacity fade. Here, we discover a surprising two-phase process of electrochemical lithiation in a-Si by using in situ transmission electron microscopy. The lithiation occurs by the movement of a sharp phase boundary between the a-Si reactant and an amorphous Li(x)Si (a-Li(x)Si, x ~ 2.5) product. Such a striking amorphous-amorphous interface exists until the remaining a-Si is consumed. Then a second step of lithiation sets in without a visible interface, resulting in the final product of a-Li(x)Si (x ~ 3.75). We show that the two-phase lithiation can be the fundamental mechanism underpinning the anomalous morphological change of microfabricated a-Si electrodes, i.e., from a disk shape to a dome shape. Our results represent a significant step toward the understanding of the electrochemically driven reaction and degradation in amorphous materials, which is critical to the development of microstructurally stable electrodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

  4. Fluoroscopic x-ray imaging with amorphous silicon thin-film arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Ulrich W.; Conrads, Norbert; Jung, Norbert; Weibrecht, Martin; Wieczorek, Herfried K.; Zaengel, Thomas T.; Powell, M. J.; French, I. D.; Glasse, C.

    1994-05-01

    The dream of an all-solid state large area x-ray image sensor with digital readout and full dynamic performance will most probably find a first realization in 2D thin-film amorphous silicon arrays. In this paper we address in particular the evaluation of the limits of the signal/noise ratio in this concept. Using small prototype detectors measurements of MTF and noise power spectra have been made as a function of x-ray dose. The results are given in terms of the detective quantum efficiency as a function of dose and spatial frequency. We further present an analysis of the different noise sources and their dependence on the detector parameters, and we provide estimates on the maximum signals that may be achieved per unit dose. The intrinsic lag of the amorphous silicon photodiodes causes a second problem area with this type of x-ray detectors. Especially in radiography/fluoroscopy mixed applications, memory effects may not be negligible.

  5. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  6. Silicon Detector Letter of Intent

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Burrows, P.; Oreglia, M.

    2010-05-26

    This document presents the current status of SiD's effort to develop an optimized design for an experiment at the International Linear Collider. It presents detailed discussions of each of SiD's various subsystems, an overview of the full GEANT4 description of SiD, the status of newly developed tracking and calorimeter reconstruction algorithms, studies of subsystem performance based on these tools, results of physics benchmarking analyses, an estimate of the cost of the detector, and an assessment of the detector R&D needed to provide the technical basis for an optimised SiD.

  7. Silicon Detectors for PET and SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Eric R.

    Silicon detectors use state-of-the-art electronics to take advantage of the semiconductor properties of silicon to produce very high resolution radiation detectors. These detectors have been a fundamental part of high energy, nuclear, and astroparticle physics experiments for decades, and they hold great potential for significant gains in both PET and SPECT applications. Two separate prototype nuclear medicine imaging systems have been developed to explore this potential. Both devices take advantage of the unique properties of high resolution pixelated silicon detectors, designed and developed as part of the CIMA collaboration and built at The Ohio State University. The first prototype is a Compton SPECT imaging system. Compton SPECT, also referred to as electronic collimation, is a fundamentally different approach to single photon imaging from standard gamma cameras. It removes the inherent coupling of spatial resolution and sensitivity in mechanically collimated systems and provides improved performance at higher energies. As a result, Compton SPECT creates opportunities for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals based on higher energy isotopes as well as opportunities to expand the use of current isotopes such as 131I due to the increased resolution and sensitivity. The Compton SPECT prototype consists of a single high resolution silicon detector, configured in a 2D geometry, in coincidence with a standard NaI scintillator detector. Images of point sources have been taken for 99mTc (140 keV), 131I (364keV), and 22Na (511 keV), demonstrating the performance of high resolution silicon detectors in a Compton SPECT system. Filtered back projection image resolutions of 10 mm, 7.5 mm, and 6.7 mm were achieved for the three different sources respectively. The results compare well with typical SPECT resolutions of 5-15 mm and validate the claims of improved performance in Compton SPECT imaging devices at higher source energies. They also support the potential of

  8. Silicon buried channels for pixel detector cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscardin, M.; Conci, P.; Crivellari, M.; Ronchin, S.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.

    2013-08-01

    The support and cooling structures add important contributions to the thickness, in radiation length, of vertex detectors. In order to minimize the material budget of pixel sensors, we developed a new approach to integrate the cooling into the silicon devices. The microchannels are formed in silicon using isotropic SF6 plasma etching in a DRIE (deep reactive ion etcher) equipment. Due to their peculiar profiles, the channels can be sealed by a layer of a PECVD silicon oxide. We have realized on a silicon wafer microchannels with different geometries and hydraulic diameters. We describe the main fabrication steps of microchannels with focus on the channel definition. The experimental results are reported on the thermal characterization of several prototypes, using a mixture of glycol and water as a liquid coolant. The prototypes have shown high cooling efficiency and high-pressure breaking strength.

  9. Enhanced crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films using embedded silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Curtis Michael

    This thesis is concerned with the production of silicon thin films for photovoltaic applications. Much research has been carried out to find a stable, more efficient alternative to amorphous silicon, resulting in a number of various amorphous/crystalline mixed-phase film structures with properties superior to amorphous silicon. This thesis work details a completely new approach to mixed-phase film deposition, focusing on the fast crystallization of these films. The deposition of amorphous silicon films with embedded nanocrystals was carried out via a dual-plasma system. It is known that plasma conditions to produce high quality films are much different from those to produce particles. Hence the experimental system used here involved two separate plasmas to allow the optimum production of the crystalline nanoparticles and the amorphous film. Both plasmas use 13.56 MHz excitation voltage with diluted silane as the silicon precursor. The nanoparticle production reactor is a flow-through device that can be altered to control the size of the particles from around 5--30 nm average diameter. The film production reactor is a parallel-plate capacitively-coupled plasma system, into which the aerosol-suspended nanoparticles were injected. The nanocrystals could either be "co-deposited" simultaneously with the amorphous film, or be deposited separately in a layer-by-layer technique; both approaches are discussed in detail. Measurements of the film conductivity provide for the first time unambiguous evidence that the presence of nanocrystallites above 5 nm in the amorphous film have a direct impact on the electronic properties of co-deposited films. Further measurements of the film structure by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate clearly the effect of embedded nanocrystals on the annealed crystallization process; the immediate growth of the crystal seeds has been observed. Additionally, a newly discovered mechanism of film crystallization

  10. The U.S. and Japanese amorphous silicon technology programs A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Amorphous Silicon (a-Si) Solar Cell Program performs R&D on thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon for eventual development of stable amorphous silicon cells with 12 percent efficiency by 1988. The Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Program in Japan is sponsored by the Sunshine Project to develop an alternate energy technology. While the objectives of both programs are to eventually develop a-Si photovoltaic modules and arrays that would produce electricity to compete with utility electricity cost, the U.S. program approach is research oriented and the Japanese is development oriented.

  11. Electron-beam-induced information storage in hydrogenated amorphous silicon devices

    DOEpatents

    Yacobi, B.G.

    1985-03-18

    A method for recording and storing information in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, comprising: depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate to form a charge collection device; and generating defects in the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, wherein the defects act as recombination centers that reduce the lifetime of carriers, thereby reducing charge collection efficiency and thus in the charge collection mode of scanning probe instruments, regions of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device that contain the defects appear darker in comparison to regions of the device that do not contain the defects, leading to a contrast formation for pattern recognition and information storage.

  12. The U.S. and Japanese amorphous silicon technology programs A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Amorphous Silicon (a-Si) Solar Cell Program performs R&D on thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon for eventual development of stable amorphous silicon cells with 12 percent efficiency by 1988. The Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Program in Japan is sponsored by the Sunshine Project to develop an alternate energy technology. While the objectives of both programs are to eventually develop a-Si photovoltaic modules and arrays that would produce electricity to compete with utility electricity cost, the U.S. program approach is research oriented and the Japanese is development oriented.

  13. Improved method of preparing p-i-n junctions in amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.

    1984-12-10

    A method of preparing p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junctions for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes depositing amorphous silicon on a thin layer of trivalent material, such as aluminum, indium, or gallium at a temperature in the range of 200/sup 0/C to 250/sup 0/C. At this temperature, the layer of trivalent material diffuses into the amorphous silicon to form a graded p/sup +/-i junction. A layer of n-type doped material is then deposited onto the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer in a conventional manner to finish forming the p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junction.

  14. Flowing damage in ion-implanted amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Pothier, Jean-Christophe; Schiettekatte, Francois; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2011-06-15

    Using molecular-dynamics simulations, we have studied the creation and evolution of damage in crystalline and amorphous silicon following the implantation of energetic keV ions. A method is proposed to identify anomalous atoms based on a weighted combination of local, atomic-scale properties, which applies to both Si phases. For crystalline Si, the passage of the ions causes compact amorphous regions to form, while no evidence for melting is observed. The relaxation of the amorphouslike regions proceeds initially by the rapid recrystallization of smaller clusters and isolated atoms, followed by a long period of steplike changes in the number of defects due to spontaneous annealing of damage pockets at the crystalline-amorphous interface. In amorphous Si, the initial stage of damage annealing (which lasts a few picoseconds) resembles closely that observed in crystalline Si; on larger time scales, however, the damage is found to ''percolate,'' or flow, through the system, inducing damage away from the collision cascade, thus causing an overall ''derelaxation'' of the material.

  15. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-11-12

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized.

  16. Studies on Amorphizing Silicon Using Silicon Ion Implantation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    130-200 keV ions with doses of 5 x 1014 to 2 x 1015 2 15 2ions/cm and for 0.5 micron films, 260-300 keV ions at 1-2 x 10 ions/cm . Svensson et al...Vol. 42, pp. 707-709, 1983. 17. B. Svensson , J. Linnros & G. Holmen, "Ion Beam Induced Annealing of Radiation Damage in Silicon on Sapphire," Nucl...Mayer, Lennart Eriksson & John A. Davies, Ion Implantation in Semiconductors, Academic Press, NY, 1970. 21. L. T. Chadderton & F. H. Eisen, editors. Ion

  17. Impurity-defect complexes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.H. ); Fong, C.Y. . Dept. of Physics); Nichols, C.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-11-01

    The two most outstanding features observed for dopants in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) -- a shift in the Fermi level accompanied by an increase in the defect density and an absence of degenerate doping -- have previously been postulated to stem from the formation of substitutional dopant-dangling bond complexes. Using first-principles self-consistent pseudopotential calculation in conjunction with a supercell model for the amorphous network and the ability of network relaxation from the first-principles results, we have studied the electronic and structural properties of substitutional fourfold-coordinated phosphorus and boron at the second neighbor position to a dangling bond defect. We demonstrate that such impurity-defect complexes can account for the general features observed experimentally in doped a-Si:H. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Amorphous silicon research project government/industry program

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.

    1990-09-01

    This summary report covers that the second DOE/SERI three-year amorphous silicon initiative (1987--1989). Increased performance of amorphous silicon cells has resulted as a result of progress in the areas of light (photon) management and device structure. An improved utilization of the solar spectrum has resulted from developing textured transparent conducting oxide contacts and multilayer back reflectors, which have enhanced the light trapping in cells. For example, researchers developed a high-conductivity, textured SnO{sub 2}:F front contact deposited by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition on glass; the sheet resistance is low (8--10 {Omega}/square) and the optical transmittance is high (over 80% over the wavelength range 450--700 nm). Subsequently, researchers developed a textured ZnO front contact with an optical transmittance over a wider range than that of SnO{sub 2}:F. Reactors also developed highly reflective indium tin oxide (ITO)/aluminum and ZnO/Al or ZnO/Ag multilayer back reflectors that result in enhanced quantum efficiencies for a-SiGe:H(F) of up to 67% at 700 nm. Notable efficiencies were achieved for all-amorphous-silicon alloy, two-terminal, different-band-gap multijunction devices. Efficiencies for two-terminal, same-band-gap, multijunction 0.25-cm{sup 2} cells and 900-cm{sup 2} submodules were also improved, as were the efficiencies for four-terminal, 4-cm{sup 2} cells and 900-cm{sup 2} submodules.

  19. FTIR study of silicon carbide amorphization by heavy ion irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Miro, Sandrine; Pluchery, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    We have measured at room temperature (RT) the Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) absorption spectra of ion-irradiated thin epitaxial films of cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) with 1.1 µm thickness on a 500 µm thick (1 0 0) silicon wafer substrate. Irradiations were carried out at RT with 2.3 MeV 28Si+ ions and 3.0 MeV 84Kr+ ions for various fluences in order to induce amorphization of the SiC film. Ion projected ranges were adjusted to be slightly larger than the film thickness so that the whole SiC layers were homogeneously damaged. FTIR spectra of virgin and irradiated samples were recorded for various incidence angles from normal incidence to Brewster’s angle. We show that the amorphization process in ion-irradiated 3C-SiC films can be monitored non-destructively by FTIR absorption spectroscopy without any major interference of the substrate. The compared evolutions of TO and LO peaks upon ion irradiation yield valuable information on the damage process. Complementary test experiments were also performed on virgin silicon nitride (Si3N4) self-standing films for similar conditions. Asymmetrical shapes were found for TO peaks of SiC, whereas Gaussian profiles are found for LO peaks. Skewed Gaussian profiles, with a standard deviation depending on wave number, were used to fit asymmetrical peaks for both materials. A new methodology for following the amorphization process is proposed on the basis of the evolution of fitted IR absorption peak parameters with ion fluence. Results are discussed with respect to Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling and Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  20. Ion-beam sputtered amorphous silicon films for cryogenic precision measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Peter G.; Martin, Iain W.; Craig, Kieran; Hough, James; Robie, Raymond; Rowan, Sheila; Abernathy, Matt R.; Pershing, Teal; Penn, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Thermal noise resulting from the mechanical loss of multilayer dielectric coatings is expected to impose a limit to the sensitivities of precision measurement systems used in fundamental and applied science. In the case of gravitational wave astronomy, future interferometric gravitational wave detectors are likely to operate at cryogenic temperatures to reduce such thermal noise and ameliorate thermal loading effects, with the desirable thermomechanical properties of silicon making it an attractive mirror substrate choice for this purpose. For use in such a precision instrument, appropriate coatings of low thermal noise are essential. Amorphous silicon (a -Si ) deposited by e-beam and other techniques has been shown to have low mechanical loss. However, to date, the levels of mechanical and optical loss for a -Si when deposited by ion-beam sputtering (the technique required to produce amorphous mirrors of the specification for gravitational wave detector mirrors) are unknown. In this paper results from measurements of the mechanical loss of a series of IBS a -Si films are presented which show that reductions are possible in coating thermal noise of a factor of 1.5 at 120 K and 2.1 at 20 K over the current best IBS coatings (alternating stacks of silica and titania-doped tantala), with further reductions feasible under appropriate heat treatments.

  1. High performance uncooled amorphous silicon VGA IRFPA with 17-µm pixel-pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.; Durand, A.; Garret, Th.; Minassian, C.; Robert, P.; Tinnes, S.; Vilain, M.

    2010-04-01

    The high level of accumulated expertise by ULIS and CEA/LETI on uncooled microbolometers made from amorphous silicon enables ULIS to develop VGA IRFPA formats with 17μm pixel-pitch to build up the currently available product catalog. This detector keeps all the innovations developed on the 25 μm pixel-pitch ROIC (detector configuration by serial link, low power consumption and wide electrical dynamic range). The specific appeal of this unit lies in the high spatial resolution it provides. The reduction of the pixel-pitch turns this TEC-less VGA array into a product well adapted for high resolution and compact systems. In the last part of the paper, we will look more closely at the high electro-optical performances of this IRFPA and the rapid performance enhancement. We will insist on NETD trade-off with wide thermal dynamic range, as well as the high characteristics uniformity, achieved thanks to the mastering of the amorphous silicon technology coupled with the ROIC design. This technology node paves the way to high end products as well as low end compact smaller formats like 160 x 120 or smaller.

  2. Structural properties of amorphous silicon produced by electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, J.; Takeda, S.

    1999-07-01

    The structural properties of the amorphous Si (a-Si), which was created from crystalline silicon by 2 MeV electron irradiation at low temperatures about 25 K, are examined in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The peak positions in the radial distribution function (RDF) of the a-Si correspond well to those of a-Si fabricated by other techniques. The electron-irradiation-induced a-Si returns to crystalline Si after annealing at 550 C.

  3. Enhanced electrochemical etching of ion irradiated silicon by localized amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Z. Y.; Breese, M. B. H.; Lin, Y.; Tok, E. S.; Vittone, E.

    2014-05-12

    A tailored distribution of ion induced defects in p-type silicon allows subsequent electrochemical anodization to be modified in various ways. Here we describe how a low level of lattice amorphization induced by ion irradiation influences anodization. First, it superposes a chemical etching effect, which is observable at high fluences as a reduced height of a micromachined component. Second, at lower fluences, it greatly enhances electrochemical anodization by allowing a hole diffusion current to flow to the exposed surface. We present an anodization model, which explains all observed effects produced by light ions such as helium and heavy ions such as cesium over a wide range of fluences and irradiation geometries.

  4. Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator Using Amorphous Silicon Photoconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Peng; Qihong, Wu; Jinfa, Tang

    1990-02-01

    The development of a reflection mode nematic field effect a ¬â€? Si:H LCLV is described. The amor-phous silicon photoconductor layer is deposited by glow discharge without doping. The configuration al-so consists of dielectric mirror as CdS LCLVs do. The bias frequency is in the range of 500Hz to 10KHz. MTF, sensitivity and time response of the device are measured. High resolution of > 501p/mm and switching time less than 25ms are achieved. Also reported is an equivalent circuit mode which has been compared with experimental results.

  5. Thermopower and conductivity activation energies in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Dyalsingh, H.M.; Kakalios, J.

    1996-12-31

    The long range fluctuation model has been widely used to account for the difference in activation energies seen experimentally in dark conductivity and thermopower measurements in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The authors report on a test of this model using measurements of the conductivity and thermoelectric effects carried out in both open and short circuit configurations. While the thermopower activation energy is less than that of the dark conductivity, the short circuit Seebeck conductivity is found to be nearly identical to the dark conductivity in both activation energy and magnitude, consistent with the long range fluctuation model.

  6. Comment on ``Electron drift mobility in doped amorphous silicon''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overhof, H.; Silver, M.

    1989-05-01

    Experimental drift-mobility data obtained by different methods in doped amorphous silicon are compared. It is shown that the presence of a long-range random potential will lead to a modification of the drift mobility in one experiment while the corresponding values in other experiments are virtually unaffected. It is shown that this effect accounts for the apparent discrepancy between the results of these experiments rather than the shift of the mobility edge upon doping which was recently proposed by Street, Kakalios, and Hack [Phys. Rev. B 38, 5603 (1988)] in order to understand their data.

  7. Realistic modeling of the electronic properties of doped amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, M.; Street, R.A.

    1988-09-19

    In this letter we describe a fundamental approach to calculating the electronic properties of doped amorphous silicon which takes into account the thermal history of the material. Above the equilibrium temperature, the material is in a thermodynamically stable state, and this is derived by minimizing the free energy using a simple density of states model. The calculations are based on the defect compensation model of doping, introducing distributions of formation energies for neutral dangling bonds and fourfold dopant atoms while preserving charge neutrality. Our results are in good agreement with experimental data providing a realistic model for use in device simulation programs.

  8. Ultralight amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic modules for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Chen, Englade; Fulton, C.; Myatt, A.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Ultralight and ultrathin, flexible, rollup monolithic PV modules have been developed consisting of multijunction, amorphous silicon alloys for either terrestrial or aerospace applications. The rate of progress in increasing conversion efficiency of stable multijunction and multigap PV cells indicates that arrays of these modules can be available for NASA's high power systems in the 1990's. Because of the extremely light module weight and the highly automated process of manufacture, the monolithic a-Si alloy arrays are expected to be strongly competitive with other systems for use in NASA's space station or in other large aerospace applications.

  9. Determination of electric field profiles in amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konenkamp, R.; Muramatsu, S.; Itoh, H.; Matsubara, S.; Shimada, T.

    1990-07-01

    Time-resolved photoconductivity measurements with subnanosecond time resolution are applied to study the electric field profile in amorphous silicon solar cells in the range from 0.3 V forward to 0.8 V reverse bias. The method is used for a comparison of state-of-the-art devices with different junction design. Optical and electrical contributions to the device performance are discussed and the limitations in improving the performance by use of a-SiC:H window layers are pointed out.

  10. A 4096 atom model of amorphous silicon: Structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Joseph L.; Bickham, Scott R.; Davidson, Brian N.; Wooten, Frederick

    1997-03-01

    We present structural and lattice dynamical information for a 4096 atom model of amorphous silicon. The structural model was obtained, similarly to previously published smaller models, using periodic boundary conditions, the Wooten-Winer-Weaire bond-switching algorithm, and the Broughton-Li relaxation with respect to the Stillinger-Weber potential. The structure is dynamically stable and there is no evidence in the radial distribution function of medium range order. For examining this large model, we use a 1000 processor Connection Machine to compute all the eigenvalues and eigenvectors exactly. The phonon density of states and inverse participation ratio are compared with results for related 216, 432 and 1000-atom models.

  11. Molecular-dynamics simulation of thermal conductivity in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Hee; Biswas, R.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Wang, C. Z.; Chan, C. T.; Ho, K. M.

    1991-03-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivity κ(T) of amorphous silicon has been calculated from equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations using the time correlations of the heat flux operator in which anharmonicity is explicitly incorporated. The Stillinger-Weber two- and three-body Si potential and the Wooten-Weaire-Winer a-Si model were utilized. The calculations correctly predict an increasing thermal conductivity at low temperatures (below 400 K). The κ(T), for T>400 K, is affected by the thermally generated coordination-defect states. Comparisons to both experiment and previous calculations will be described.

  12. Progress in amorphous silicon PV technology: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W; Branz, H M; Dalal, V L; Hegedus, S S; Schiff, E A

    1995-07-01

    To reach the 15% stabilized efficiency goal for amorphous silicon (a-Si) modules by the year 2005, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has established four research teams. The teams -- with members from industry, universities, and NREL -- have been in operation for 2.5 years now. Consensus has been reached that a triple-junction a-Si structure is needed to reach the efficiency goal. Performance parameter goals for the overall structure and the three component cells have been formulated. All four teams have generated their own development plans. Individual team progress relative to the plans is reported.

  13. Cathodic deposition of amorphous alloys of silicon, carbon, and fluorine

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Kroger, F.A.

    1982-05-01

    Amorphous silicon containing fluorine and carbon, pure and doped with boron or phosphorus, was deposited cathodically from solutions of K/sub 2/SiF/sub 6/ in acetone with HF. The conditions for optimum deposition were determined, and the deposits were characterized by electron microprobe x-ray emission, electrical conductivity, and infrared absorption. Doping with phosphorus causes a change from p- to n-type semiconductor behavior, with a maximum of resistivity >10/sup 13/ /OMEGA/ cm at the compensation point. 48 refs.

  14. The performance of an amorphous silicon flat panel for neutron imaging at the PSI NEUTRA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estermann, Mirko; Frei, Gabriel; Lehmann, Eberhard; Vontobel, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Commonly applied imaging methods in neutron radiography use a CCD camera in conjunction with a scintillator or imaging plates. CCDs and imaging plates have desirable properties concerning resolution, linearity, dynamic range and signal-to-noise ratio ( S/ N) but both techniques have the disadvantage of a slow read out and for the CCD camera, an additional disadvantage is the loss of light through the optical system. Amorphous silicon detectors, originally developed for medical and industrial X-ray imaging, generally do not have the above-mentioned disadvantages. These detectors have a much faster readout and, in comparison to the generally used crystalline silicon, can be put directly in the X-ray or neutron beam without being damaged. This type of detector also does not require any optical interface, minimizing possible light loss. The detector is operated at room temperature, which has some influence on the noise. Using the whole dynamic range with a low gain, results in a S/ N of up to 30, for normal applications, however, a S/ N of about 15-20 is typical. The main drawback of this imaging device is the dynamic range of only 12 bits and the relatively complicated operating system in which different operation modes can be chosen. In 2003, successful experiments were performed with this new device, but it is still in its fledgling stages and improvements from the manufacturer as well as the experience from the NEUTRA team will help to advance this technique for neutron imaging in a most efficient way.

  15. Signal formation in irradiated silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassarri, B.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Sadrozinski, H.; Seiden, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we present an initial study on the effects induced by radiation on the signal generated by a minimum ionising particle in silicon detector. The results are obtained by implementing in the simulation programme Weightfield2 (WF2) charge carrier trapping and non linear distribution of the electric field. Results of sample simulations are presented, along with a discussion of the limitations of the current approach and ideas for future improvements.

  16. Lithium concentration dependent structure and mechanics of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sitinamaluwa, H. S.; Wang, M. C.; Will, G.; Senadeera, W.; Yan, C.; Zhang, S.

    2016-06-28

    A better understanding of lithium-silicon alloying mechanisms and associated mechanical behavior is essential for the design of Si-based electrodes for Li-ion batteries. Unfortunately, the relationship between the dynamic mechanical response and microstructure evolution during lithiation and delithiation has not been well understood. We use molecular dynamic simulations to investigate lithiated amorphous silicon with a focus to the evolution of its microstructure, phase composition, and stress generation. The results show that the formation of Li{sub x}Si alloy phase is via different mechanisms, depending on Li concentration. In these alloy phases, the increase in Li concentration results in reduction of modulus of elasticity and fracture strength but increase in ductility in tension. For a Li{sub x}Si system with uniform Li distribution, volume change induced stress is well below the fracture strength in tension.

  17. The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Bergauer, T.; Dolejschi, P.; Frankenberger, A.; Gfall, I.; Irmler, C.; Obermayer, T.; Onuki, Y.; Smiljic, D.; Tsuboyama, T.; Valentan, M.

    The KEKB factory (Tsukuba, Japan) has been shut down in mid-2010 after reaching a total integrated luminosity of 1ab-1. Recently, the work on an upgrade of the collider (SuperKEKB), aiming at an ultimate luminosity of 8×1035 cm-2s-1, has started. This is 40 times the peak value of the previous system and thus also requires a redesign of the Belle detector (leading to Belle II), especially its Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), which surrounds the beam pipe. Similar to its predecessor, the future Belle II SVD will again consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors (DSSD), but at higher radii. Moreover, a double-layer PiXel Detector (PXD) will complement the SVD as the innermost sensing device. All DSSDs will be made from 6" silicon wafers and read out by APV25 chips, which were originally developed for the CMS experiment. That system was proven to meet the requirements for Belle II in matters of occupancy and dead time. Since the KEKB factory operates at relatively low energy, material inside the active volume has to be minimized in order to reduce multiple scattering. This can be achieved by the Origami chip-on-sensor concept, including a very light-weight mechanical support structure made from carbon fiber reinforced Airex foam. Moreover, CO2 cooling for the front-end chips will ensure high efficiency at minimum material budget.

  18. Amorphous silicon-carbon alloys and amorphous carbon from direct methane and ethylene activation by ECR

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, J.P.; Chu, V.; Giorgis, F.; Pirri, C.F.; Arekat, S.

    1997-07-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloys are prepared using electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Hydrogen is introduced into the source resonance cavity as an excitation gas. Silane is introduced in the main chamber in the vicinity of the plasma stream, whereas the carbon source gases, methane or ethylene, are introduced either with the silane or with the hydrogen as excitation gases. The effect of the type of carbon-source gas, excitation gas mixture and silane-to-carbon source gas flow ratio on the deposition rate, bandgap, subgap density of states, spin density and hydrogen evolution are studied.

  19. The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Ackermann, K.; Aihara, H.; Aziz, T.; Bergauer, T.; Bozek, A.; Campbell, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Drasal, Z.; Frankenberger, A.; Gadow, K.; Gfall, I.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Higuchi, T.; Himori, S.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Joo, C.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kodys, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kvasnicka, P.; Marinas, C.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mibe, T.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Negishi, K.; Nakayama, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Niebuhr, C.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Park, H.; Rao, K. K.; Ritter, M.; Rozanska, M.; Saito, T.; Sakai, K.; Sato, N.; Schmid, S.; Schnell, M.; Shimizu, N.; Steininger, H.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G.; Tsuboyama, T.; Ueno, K.; Uozumi, S.; Ushiroda, Y.; Valentan, M.; Yamamoto, H.

    2013-12-01

    The KEKB machine and the Belle experiment in Tsukuba (Japan) are now undergoing an upgrade, leading to an ultimate luminosity of 8×1035 cm-2 s-1 in order to measure rare decays in the B system with high statistics. The previous vertex detector cannot cope with this 40-fold increase of luminosity and thus needs to be replaced. Belle II will be equipped with a two-layer Pixel Detector surrounding the beam pipe, and four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors at higher radii than the old detector. The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) will have a total sensitive area of 1.13 m2 and 223,744 channels-twice as many as its predecessor. All silicon sensors will be made from 150 mm wafers in order to maximize their size and thus to reduce the relative contribution of the support structure. The forward part has slanted sensors of trapezoidal shape to improve the measurement precision and to minimize the amount of material as seen by particles from the vertex. Fast-shaping front-end amplifiers will be used in conjunction with an online hit time reconstruction algorithm in order to reduce the occupancy to the level of a few percent at most. A novel “Origami” chip-on-sensor scheme is used to minimize both the distance between strips and amplifier (thus reducing the electronic noise) as well as the overall material budget. This report gives an overview on the status of the Belle II SVD and its components, including sensors, front-end detector ladders, mechanics, cooling and the readout electronics.

  20. Commissioning and operation of the CDF silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. D'Auria

    2002-01-18

    The CDF-II silicon detector has been partially commissioned and used for taking preliminary physics data. This paper is a report on commissioning and initial operations of the 5.8m{sup 2} silicon detector. This experience can be useful to the large silicon systems that are presently under construction.

  1. Lithium-drifted silicon detector with segmented contacts

    DOEpatents

    Tindall, Craig S.; Luke, Paul N.

    2006-06-13

    A method and apparatus for creating both segmented and unsegmented radiation detectors which can operate at room temperature. The devices include a metal contact layer, and an n-type blocking contact formed from a thin layer of amorphous semiconductor. In one embodiment the material beneath the n-type contact is n-type material, such as lithium compensated silicon that forms the active region of the device. The active layer has been compensated to a degree at which the device may be fully depleted at low bias voltages. A p-type blocking contact layer, or a p-type donor material can be formed beneath a second metal contact layer to complete the device structure. When the contacts to the device are segmented, the device is capable of position sensitive detection and spectroscopy of ionizing radiation, such as photons, electrons, and ions.

  2. Determining the Onset of Amorphization of Crystalline Silicon due to Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, C. Shane; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2009-03-01

    Atomistic simulations were performed to study a hypervelocity impactor striking a silicon/silicon nitride interface with varying silicon substrate thicknesses. Visualization indicates that the crystalline silicon amorphizes upon impact. The objective of the present study is to determine where the boundary between amorphous and crystalline silicon occurrs. In the analysis, the silicon substrate is separated into sixty layers and for each layer the average z displacement is determined. Our results show that the boundary between amorphous and crystalline silicon occurs between layers 20 and 22 for an impactor traveling at 5 km/s. This corresponds to a depth of approximately 32 Angstroms into the silicon. More detailed analyses reveals that the z displacement is noticeably larger for the layers that do not have a silicon atom bonded beneath them compared to the ones that do.

  3. A magnesium/amorphous silicon passivating contact for n-type crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yimao; Samundsett, Chris; Yan, Di; Allen, Thomas; Peng, Jun; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Xinyu; Bullock, James; Cuevas, Andres

    2016-09-01

    Among the metals, magnesium has one of the lowest work functions, with a value of 3.7 eV. This makes it very suitable to form an electron-conductive cathode contact for silicon solar cells. We present here the experimental demonstration of an amorphous silicon/magnesium/aluminium (a-Si:H/Mg/Al) passivating contact for silicon solar cells. The conduction properties of a thermally evaporated Mg/Al contact structure on n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) are investigated, achieving a low resistivity Ohmic contact to moderately doped n-type c-Si (˜5 × 1015 cm-3) of ˜0.31 Ω cm2 and ˜0.22 Ω cm2 for samples with and without an amorphous silicon passivating interlayer, respectively. Application of the passivating cathode to the whole rear surface of n-type front junction c-Si solar cells leads to a power conversion efficiency of 19% in a proof-of-concept device. The low thermal budget of the cathode formation, its dopant-less nature, and the simplicity of the device structure enabled by the Mg/Al contact open up possibilities in designing and fabricating low-cost silicon solar cells.

  4. Microstructured silicon neutron detectors for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, S.; Fleta, C.; Guardiola, C.; Jumilla, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Rodriguez, J.; Lozano, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present the design and performance of a perforated thermal neutron silicon detector with a 6LiF neutron converter. This device was manufactured within the REWARD project workplace whose aim is to develop and enhance technologies for the detection of nuclear and radiological materials. The sensor perforated structure results in a higher efficiency than that obtained with an equivalent planar sensor. The detectors were tested in a thermal neutron beam at the nuclear reactor at the Instituto Superior Técnico in Lisbon and the intrinsic detection efficiency for thermal neutrons and the gamma sensitivity were obtained. The Geant4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the experimental conditions, i.e. thermal neutron beam and the whole detector geometry. An intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency of 8.6%±0.4% with a discrimination setting of 450 keV was measured.

  5. Improving the performance of amorphous silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. E.; Arya, R. R.; Catalano, A.; D'Aiello, R. V.; Dickson, C. R.

    1987-08-01

    High-performance amorphous silicon solar cells require high-quality undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon, a conductive p-layer or n-layer window, an effective light-trapping geometry such as textured tin oxide, a reflective back contact (e.g. silver), and low-contact resistance (less than 0.5 ohm sq cm). Requirements for high module-performance require low interconnect resistance (e.g. less than 0.005 ohm sq cm for the Al-SnO2 contact), large percentage of active area, and good uniformity of material properties over large areas. New developments such as superlattice doped layers and improved tin-oxide texturing have led to efficiencies as high as 10.l9 percent in small cells (1 sq cm). Processing improvements have led to efficiencies of 8.1 percent in small cells (1 sq cm). Processing improvements have led to efficiencies of 8.1 percent in l-sq ft modules patterned entirely by laser scribing.

  6. Electrical characteristics of amorphous molybdenum-nickel contacts to silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kung, K. T.-Y.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Suni, I.

    1984-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of sputtered, amorphous Mo-Ni contacts have been measured on both p- and n-type Si, as functions of composition (30, 54, and 58 at. percent Mo). The contact resistivity on both p(+) and n(+) Si is in the 0.00000 ohm sq cm range. The barrier height for as-deposited samples varies between phi-bp = 0.47-0.42 V on p-type Si and between phi-bn = 0.63-0.68 V on n-type Si, as the composition of the amorphous layer goes from Ni-rich to Mo-rich. The sum phi-bp + phi-bn always equals 1.12 V, within experimental error. After thermal treatment at 500 C for 1/2 h, the contact resistivity changes by a factor of two or less, while the barrier height changes by at most approximately 0.05 V. In light of these results, the amorphous Mo-Ni film makes good ohmic contacts to silicon.

  7. Electrical characteristics of amorphous molybdenum-nickel contacts to silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kung, K. T.-Y.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Suni, I.

    1984-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of sputtered, amorphous Mo-Ni contacts have been measured on both p- and n-type Si, as functions of composition (30, 54, and 58 at. percent Mo). The contact resistivity on both p(+) and n(+) Si is in the 0.00000 ohm sq cm range. The barrier height for as-deposited samples varies between phi-bp = 0.47-0.42 V on p-type Si and between phi-bn = 0.63-0.68 V on n-type Si, as the composition of the amorphous layer goes from Ni-rich to Mo-rich. The sum phi-bp + phi-bn always equals 1.12 V, within experimental error. After thermal treatment at 500 C for 1/2 h, the contact resistivity changes by a factor of two or less, while the barrier height changes by at most approximately 0.05 V. In light of these results, the amorphous Mo-Ni film makes good ohmic contacts to silicon.

  8. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors.

  9. Sputtered pin amorphous silicon semi-conductor device and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Friedman, Robert A.

    1983-11-22

    A high efficiency amorphous silicon PIN semi-conductor device is constructed by the sequential sputtering of N, I and P layers of amorphous silicon and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode. A method of construction produces a PIN device, exhibiting enhanced physical integrity and facilitates ease of construction in a singular vacuum system and vacuum pump down procedure.

  10. Amorphous silicon passivation for 23.3% laser processed back contact solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, Kai; Dahlinger, Morris; Hoffmann, Erik; Zapf-Gottwick, Renate; Werner, Jürgen H.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents amorphous silicon deposited at temperatures below 200 °C, leading to an excellent passivation layer for boron doped emitter and phosphorus doped back surface field areas in interdigitated back contact solar cells. A higher deposition temperature degrades the passivation of the boron emitter by an increased hydrogen effusion due to lower silicon hydrogen bond energy, proved by hydrogen effusion measurements. The high boron surface doping in crystalline silicon causes a band bending in the amorphous silicon. Under these conditions, at the interface, the intentionally undoped amorphous silicon becomes p-type conducting, with the consequence of an increased dangling bond defect density. For bulk amorphous silicon this effect is described by the defect pool model. We demonstrate, that the defect pool model is also applicable to the interface between amorphous and crystalline silicon. Our simulation shows the shift of the Fermi energy towards the valence band edge to be more pronounced for high temperature deposited amorphous silicon having a small bandgap. Application of optimized amorphous silicon as passivation layer for the boron doped emitter and phosphorus doped back surface field on the rear side of laser processed back contact solar cells, fabricated using four laser processing steps, yields an efficiency of 23.3%.

  11. Highly featured amorphous silicon nanorod arrays for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani-Amiri, Samaneh; Safiabadi Tali, Seied Ali; Azimi, Soheil; Sanaee, Zeinab; Mohajerzadeh, Shamsoddin

    2014-11-10

    High aspect-ratio vertical structures of amorphous silicon have been realized using hydrogen-assisted low-density plasma reactive ion etching. Amorphous silicon layers with the thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm were deposited using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Standard photolithography and nanosphere colloidal lithography were employed to realize ultra-small features of the amorphous silicon. The performance of the patterned amorphous silicon structures as a lithium-ion battery electrode was investigated using galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The patterned structures showed a superior Li-ion battery performance compared to planar amorphous silicon. Such structures are suitable for high current Li-ion battery applications such as electric vehicles.

  12. Electron-beam-induced information storage in hydrogenated amorphous silicon device

    DOEpatents

    Yacobi, Ben G.

    1986-01-01

    A method for recording and storing information in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, comprising: depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate to form a charge-collection device; and generating defects in the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, wherein the defects act as recombination centers that reduce the lifetime of carriers, thereby reducing charge-collection efficiency; and thus in the charge-collection mode of scanning probe instruments, regions of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device that contain the defects appear darker in comparison to regions of the device that do not contain the defects, leading to a contrast formation for pattern recognition and information storage, in the device, which darkened areas can be restored to their original charge-collection efficiency by heating the hydrogenated amorphous silicon to a temperature of about 100.degree. C. to 250.degree. C. for a sufficient period of time to provide for such restoration.

  13. NMR structural studies of PECVD amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Thomas Sidley, Jr.

    The properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) amorphous semiconductor films vary depending upon preparation conditions and doping. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films (a-Si:H) have some properties that make these films desirable for use in solar cells and photoreceptor devices. Maximizing electronic and structural properties of such films is key to their success. Nuclear magnetic resonance, and in particular deuterium magnetic resonance (DMR) for a-Si:H,D films, is a useful means to study the morphology of such samples. The location and motions of hydrogen and the chemically equivalent deuterium within an amorphous semiconductor film can be observed with NMR. The information from the NMR studies can be correlated with electronic properties studies to determine whether a given sample would make a successful photovoltaic device. This thesis focuses on three aspects of study: comparison of two samples that differ in the bias applied to the substrate upon which the amorphous films were grown; derivation of relaxation parameters for covalently bonded deuterium; development of a new pulse sequence "incremental spin echo double resonance (SEDOR)" to study the number of unlike spins that contribute to the local field of a given nuclei. Four significant conclusions can be drawn. First, the electronic quality as measured by the photoresponse product etamutau correlates with the broad Gaussian DMR spectral feature which arises from molecular hydrogen in sites that restrict motion. Second, the relaxation of nuclear magnetization under extreme inhomogeneous broadening can be modeled very well as the relaxation without spin diffusion to faster relaxing species within a sample. Third, incremental SEDOR has either a quantum mechanical or classical behavior depending upon the length of the pulse spacing in comparison to the spin-spin relaxation time. Fourth, the local field at the hydrogen of an HD pair within an a-Si:H,D sample is determined on average by

  14. Radiation damage studies for the D0 silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lehner, F.; /Zurich U.

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies performed on spare production silicon detector modules for the current D0 silicon detector. The lifetime expectations due to radiation damage effects of the existing silicon detector are reviewed. A new upgrade project was started with the goal of a complete replacement of the existing silicon detector. In that context, several investigations on the radiation hardness of new prototype silicon microstrip detectors were carried out. The irradiation on different detector types was performed with 10 MeV protons up to fluences of 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2} at the J.R. Mcdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different normalization techniques. As a result, we observe roughly 40-50% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV p exposure than it is expected by the predicted NIEL scaling.

  15. Layered amorphous silicon as negative electrodes in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Leyi; Dvorak, D. J.; Obrovac, M. N.

    2016-11-01

    Chemical delithiation is used to prepare bulk quantities of amorphous silicon powder from lithium-silicon compounds. The amorphous silicon materials formed are air and water stable and are found to have layered structures. When cycled in Li-ion half cells, coatings containing layered amorphous silicon are found to have significantly lower volume expansion during lithiation and improved cycling characteristics compared to that of bulk crystalline Si. We suggest chemical delithiation as a convenient method to synthesize bulk quantities of Si powders containing self-organized void spaces that can accommodate volume expansion during lithiation.

  16. Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors for 4D tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, V.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bellora, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Cirio, R.; Durando, S.; Ferrero, M.; Galloway, Z.; Gruey, B.; Freeman, P.; Mashayekhi, M.; Mandurrino, M.; Monaco, V.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M. M.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, N.; Staiano, A.; Wilder, M.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2017-02-01

    We review the progress toward the development of a novel type of silicon detectors suited for tracking with a picosecond timing resolution, the so called Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors. The goal is to create a new family of particle detectors merging excellent position and timing resolution with GHz counting capabilities, very low material budget, radiation resistance, fine granularity, low power, insensitivity to magnetic field, and affordability. We aim to achieve concurrent precisions of ~ 10 ps and ~ 10 μm with a 50 μm thick sensor. Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors are based on the concept of Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors, which are silicon detectors with an internal multiplication mechanism so that they generate a signal which is factor ~ 10 larger than standard silicon detectors.

  17. Stacked Metal Silicide/Silicon Far-Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    Selective doping of silicon in proposed metal silicide/silicon Schottky-barrier infrared photodetector increases maximum detectable wavelength. Stacking layers to form multiple Schottky barriers increases quantum efficiency of detector. Detectors of new type enhance capabilities of far-infrared imaging arrays. Grows by molecular-beam epitaxy on silicon waferscontaining very-large-scale integrated circuits. Imaging arrays of detectors made in monolithic units with image-preprocessing circuitry.

  18. Mechanism of the growth of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon from silicon tetrafluoride and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Y.; Chen, J.; Campbell, I. H.; Fauchet, P. M.; Wagner, S.

    1990-02-01

    We study the growth of amorphous (a-Si:H,F) and of microcrystalline (μc-Si) silicon over trench patterns in crystalline silicon substrates. We vary the conditions of the SiF4-H2 glow discharge from deposition to etching. All deposited films form lips at the trench mouth and are uniformly thick on the trench walls. Therefore, surface diffusion is not important. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation suggest that film growth is governed by a single growth species with a low (˜0.2) sticking coefficient, in combination with a highly reactive etching species.

  19. The CDF Run IIb Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    M. Aoki; N. Bacchetta; S. Behari et al.

    2004-02-25

    Fermilab plans to deliver 5-15 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity to the CDF and D0 experiments. The current inner silicon detectors at CDF (SVXIIa and L00) will not tolerate the radiation dose associated with high luminosity running and will need to be replaced. A new readout chip (SVX4) has been designed in radiation-hard 0.25 {micro}m CMOS technology. Single sided sensors are arranged in a compact structure, called a stave, with integrated readout and cooling systems. This paper describes the general design of the Run IIb system, testing results of prototype electrical components (staves), and prototype silicon sensor performance before and after irradiation.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Luminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon (ap-Si) Nanoparticles via unconventional Stain Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchalala, M. R.; El-Demellawi, J. K.; Mughal, A. J.; Chaieb, S.

    2016-10-01

    Starting from crystalline silicon we synthesised bright suspensions of amorphous porous silicon nanoparticles through unconventional stain etching. Upon excitation with UV light, this novel nanostructured material gives rise to an intense red photoluminescence (PL) which resembles that of some silicon nanostructures. We studied the properties of the prepared nanoparticles using a number of cutting-edge characterization techniques such as TEM, SEM and EDX. The complete crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition, confirmed by the morphological studies, seems fortuitous.

  1. Status and performance of the CDF Run II silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2006-10-01

    The CDF silicon detector is one of the largest silicon detectors in operation. It has a total of 722,432 electronic channels, and it covers a sensor surface area of 6 m{sup 2}. The detector has been operating reliably for five years, and it has recorded 1.5 fb{sup -1} of data. This article discusses experiences of operating such a large, complex system as well as the longevity of the detector.

  2. Characterization of Silicon Detector Readout Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    2015-07-22

    Configuration and calibration of the front-end electronics typical of many silicon detector configurations were investigated in a lab activity based on a pair of strip sensors interfaced with FSSR2 read-out chips and an FPGA. This simple hardware configuration, originally developed for a telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility, was used to measure thresholds and noise on individual readout channels and to study the influence that different configurations of the front-end electronics had on the observed levels of noise in the system. An understanding of the calibration and operation of this small detector system provided an opportunity to explore the architecture of larger systems such as those currently in use at LHC experiments.

  3. Ultra-fast silicon detectors (UFSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Anker, A.; Chen, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Freeman, P.; Galloway, Z.; Gruey, B.; Grabas, H.; John, C.; Liang, Z.; Losakul, R.; Mak, S. N.; Ng, C. W.; Seiden, A.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Baldassarri, B.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Ferrero, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Hidalgo, S.; Baselga, M.; Carulla, M.; Fernandez-Martinez, P.; Flores, D.; Merlos, A.; Quirion, D.; Mikuž, M.; Kramberger, G.; Cindro, V.; Mandić, I.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2016-09-01

    We report on measurements on Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD) which are based on Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD). They are n-on-p sensors with internal charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction, obtained with a highly doped implant. We have performed several beam tests with LGAD of different gain and report the measured timing resolution, comparing it with laser injection and simulations. For the 300 μm thick LGAD, the timing resolution measured at test beams is 120 ps while it is 57 ps for IR laser, in agreement with simulations using Weightfield2. For the development of thin sensors and their readout electronics, we focused on the understanding of the pulse shapes and point out the pivotal role the sensor capacitance plays.

  4. Fast neutron damage in silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, H.W.; Li, Z.; Poesnecker, K.U.

    1988-08-01

    Radiation effects of fast neutrons have been measured in silicon detectors of varying resistivity irradiated to approx. 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/ over periods of weeks. The principal damage effect is increased leakage current due to generation of carriers from defect levels in the depletion region. Damage and leakage current constants have been established for detector resistivities between 10 and 27,000 ohm-cm and lie in the range of 0.7 /minus/ 2 /times/ 10E7 sec/cm/sup 2/ (K) for PuBe neutrons. A slight increase in K was observed for higher resistivities which translates into somewhat improved radiation hardness. A fit of this data was attempted to a two-level recombination formulation of the damage constant. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of monolithically integrated microchannel plates based on amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Franco, Andrea; Geissbühler, Jonas; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-04-04

    Microchannel plates are vacuum-based electron multipliers for particle--in particular, photon--detection, with applications ranging from image intensifiers to single-photon detectors. Their key strengths are large signal amplification, large active area, micrometric spatial resolution and picosecond temporal resolution. Here, we present the first microchannel plate made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) instead of lead glass. The breakthrough lies in the possibility of realizing amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates (AMCPs) on any kind of substrate. This achievement is based on mastering the deposition of an ultra-thick (80-120 μm) stress-controlled a-Si:H layer from the gas phase at temperatures of about 200 °C and micromachining the channels by dry etching. We fabricated AMCPs that are vertically integrated on metallic anodes of test structures, proving the feasibility of monolithic integration of, for instance, AMCPs on application-specific integrated circuits for signal processing. We show an electron multiplication factor exceeding 30 for an aspect ratio, namely channel length over aperture, of 12.5:1. This result was achieved for input photoelectron currents up to 100 pA, in the continuous illumination regime, which provides a first evidence of the a-Si:H effectiveness in replenishing the electrons dispensed in the multiplication process.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of monolithically integrated microchannel plates based on amorphous silicon

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Andrea; Geissbühler, Jonas; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Microchannel plates are vacuum-based electron multipliers for particle—in particular, photon— detection, with applications ranging from image intensifiers to single-photon detectors. Their key strengths are large signal amplification, large active area, micrometric spatial resolution and picosecond temporal resolution. Here, we present the first microchannel plate made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) instead of lead glass. The breakthrough lies in the possibility of realizing amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates (AMCPs) on any kind of substrate. This achievement is based on mastering the deposition of an ultra-thick (80–120 μm) stress-controlled a-Si:H layer from the gas phase at temperatures of about 200°C and micromachining the channels by dry etching. We fabricated AMCPs that are vertically integrated on metallic anodes of test structures, proving the feasibility of monolithic integration of, for instance, AMCPs on application-specific integrated circuits for signal processing. We show an electron multiplication factor exceeding 30 for an aspect ratio, namely channel length over aperture, of 12.5:1. This result was achieved for input photoelectron currents up to 100 pA, in the continuous illumination regime, which provides a first evidence of the a-Si:H effectiveness in replenishing the electrons dispensed in the multiplication process. PMID:24698955

  7. Photoluminescence in erbium doped amorphous silicon oxycarbide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, Spyros; Huang, Mengbing; Efstathiadis, Harry; Eisenbraun, Eric; Kaloyeros, Alain E.; Nyein, Ei Ei; Hommerich, Uwe

    2005-08-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) in Er-doped amorphous silicon oxycarbide (a-SiCxOy:Er) thin films, synthesized via thermal chemical vapor deposition, was investigated for carbon and oxygen concentrations in the range of 0-1.63. Intense room-temperature PL was observed at 1540 nm, with the PL intensity being dependent on the carbon and oxygen content. The strongest PL intensity was detected for a-SiC0.53O0.99:Er when pumped at 496.5 nm, with ˜20 times intensity enhancement as compared to a-SiO2:Er. Broadband excitation in the visible was observed for a-SiC0.53O0.99:Er. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses suggest that the formation of Si-C-O networks plays an important role in enhancing the Er optical activity in a-SiCxOy:Er films.

  8. Light-induced metastability in pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Queen, D. R.; Liu, X.; Karel, J.; Wang, Q.; Crandall, R. S.; Metcalf, T. H.; Hellman, F.

    2015-10-01

    Light soaking is found to increase the specific heat C and internal friction Q-1 of pure (a-Si) and hydrogenated (a-Si:H) amorphous silicon. At the lowest temperatures, the increases in C and Q-1 are consistent with an increased density of two-level systems (TLS). The light-induced increase in C persists to room temperature. Neither the sound velocity nor shear modulus change with light soaking indicating that the Debye specific heat is unchanged which suggests that light soaking creates localized vibrational modes in addition to TLS. The increase can be reversibly added and removed by light soaking and annealing, respectively, suggesting that it is related to the Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE), even in a-Si without H, and involves a reversible nanoscale structural rearrangement that is facilitated by, but does not require, H to occur.

  9. Mobility-lifetime products in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, R.S. ); Balberg, I. )

    1991-02-04

    The most important parameters characterizing the photoelectronic quality of a semiconductor are its charge-carrier mobility lifetime, {mu}{tau}, products. The two common experimental methods used to determine these parameters in hydrogenated amorphous silicon, {ital a}-Si:H, are the steady-state photoconductivity measurement and the life-of-flight charge-collection measurement. The two methods yield quite different results. We show that the difference can be resolved by an understanding of the physics involved in each of the measurements. We show that the steady-state {mu}{tau} is expected to be up to three orders of magnitude larger than the time-of-flight {mu}{tau} in undoped {ital a}-Si:H. This prediction is in excellent agreement with the corresponding experimental results.

  10. Radiation Resistance Studies of Amorphous Silicon Alloy Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys was investigated. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were insensitive to proton fluences below 1E12 sq cm. The parameters of the irradiated cells were restored with annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters for fluences below lE14 sq cm require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed in dark I-V measurements. The current mechanisms were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  11. Monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmer, D.P. )

    1992-03-01

    This report examines manufacturing monolithic amorphous silicon modules on a continuous polymer substrate. Module production costs can be reduced by increasing module performance, expanding production, and improving and modifying production processes. Material costs can be reduced by developing processes that use a 1-mil polyimide substrate and multilayers of low-cost material for the front encapsulant. Research to speed up a-Si and ZnO deposition rates is needed to improve throughputs. To keep throughput rates compatible with depositions, multibeam fiber optic delivery systems for laser scribing can be used. However, mechanical scribing systems promise even higher throughputs. Tandem cells and production experience can increase device efficiency and stability. Two alternative manufacturing processes are described: (1) wet etching and sheet handling and (2) wet etching and roll-to-roll fabrication.

  12. Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S. )

    1992-09-01

    This report describes research on semiconductor and non-semiconductor materials to enhance the performance of multi-band-gap, multijunction panel with an area greater than 900 cm[sup 2] by 1992. Double-junction and triple-junction cells are mode on a Ag/ZnO back reflector deposited on stainless steel substrates. An a-SiGe alloy is used for the i-layer in the bottom and the middle cells; the top cell uses an amorphous silicon alloy. After the evaporation of an antireflection coating, silver grids and bus bars are put on the top surface and the panel is encapsulated in an ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA)/Tefzel structure to make a 1-ft[sup 2] monolithic module.

  13. High Performance Molybdenum Disulfide Amorphous Silicon Heterojunction Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili-Rad, Mohammad R.; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2013-01-01

    One important use of layered semiconductors such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) could be in making novel heterojunction devices leading to functionalities unachievable using conventional semiconductors. Here we demonstrate a metal-semiconductor-metal heterojunction photodetector, made of MoS2 and amorphous silicon (a-Si), with rise and fall times of about 0.3 ms. The transient response does not show persistent (residual) photoconductivity, unlike conventional a-Si devices where it may last 3–5 ms, thus making this heterojunction roughly 10X faster. A photoresponsivity of 210 mA/W is measured at green light, the wavelength used in commercial imaging systems, which is 2−4X larger than that of a-Si and best reported MoS2 devices. The device could find applications in large area electronics, such as biomedical imaging, where a fast response is critical. PMID:23907598

  14. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic device trimming by UV-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lipka, Timo; Kiepsch, Melanie; Trieu, Hoc Khiem; Müller, Jörg

    2014-05-19

    A method to compensate for fabrication tolerances and to fine-tune individual photonic circuit components is inevitable for wafer-scale photonic systems even with most-advanced CMOS-fabrication tools. We report a cost-effective and highly accurate method for the permanent trimming of hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic devices by UV-irradiation. Microring resonators and Mach-Zehnder-interferometers were utilized as photonic test devices. The MZIs were tuned forth and back over their complete free spectral range of 5.5 nm by locally trimming the two MZI-arms. The trimming range exceeds 8 nm for compact ring resonators with trimming accuracies of 20 pm. Trimming speeds of ≥ 10 GHz/s were achieved. The components did not show any substantial device degradation.

  15. Mobility-Lifetime Product in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könenkamp, Rolf; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Itoh, Haruo; Matsubara, Sunao; Shimada, Toshikazu

    1990-12-01

    We report an analysis of the carrier loss process in time-of-flight experiments on amorphous silicon solar cells. The electron mobility-lifetime (μτ) product is determined by a transitory immobilization of the carriers in deep traps. The carriers can be recovered and collected when the experiment is extended into the ms time range. The collection efficiency is shown to depend on the occupation of gap states. We discuss the discrepancy between μτ values obtained from time-of-flight and photoconductivity measurements and present an analysis which relates the time-of-flight μτ products to the density of shallow and deep states in a-Si:H.

  16. Approximate ab initio calculations of electronic structure of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, M.; Drabold, D. A.; Mousseau, N.

    2000-12-01

    We report on ab initio calculations of electronic states of two large and realistic models of amorphous silicon generated using a modified version of the Wooten-Winer-Weaire algorithm and relaxed, in both cases, with a Keating and a modified Stillinger-Weber potentials. The models have no coordination defects and a very narrow bond-angle distribution. We compute the electronic density-of-states and pay particular attention to the nature of the band-tail states around the electronic gap. All models show a large and perfectly clean optical gap and realistic Urbach tails. Based on these results and the extended quasi-one-dimensional stringlike structures observed for certain eigenvalues in the band tails, we postulate that the generation of model a-Si without localized states might be achievable under certain circumstances.

  17. Model investigation of the Raman spectra of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, M.; Zotov, N.

    1997-02-01

    A model for calculating the first-order Raman spectra of amorphous silicon (a-Si) without adjustable parameters is proposed. Calculations on the original 216-atom model of a-Si, generated by the algorithm of Wooten, Winer, and Weaire (WWW) are in very good agreement with experimental spectra and give further indication that the WWW cluster is a realistic model of moderately disordered a-Si. The TA-TO assignment of the low and high frequency bands is supported by direct numerical calculations of the phase quotient and the stretching character of the vibrational modes. The calculated participation ratios and correlation lengths of the vibrational modes indicate that the high-frequency TO-like modes are strongly localized on defects. The relative intensities of the TA-, LA-, and LO-like bands depend on the intermediate-range order, while that of the TO-like band mainly on the short-range order.

  18. ESR studies on hot-wire amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Unold, T.; Mahan, A.H.

    1997-07-01

    The authors measure a series of hot-wire (HW) amorphous silicon films grown with hydrogen contents C{sub H} varying between 0.5--17 at.%. From constant photocurrent method (CPM) measurements and the steady-state photocarrier grating method (SSPG) they find good agreement with previous measurements on similar hot-wire films. Electron spin resonance measurements on the same samples, however, yield significantly higher spin densities than expected. A thickness series indicates a highly defective layer close to the substrate interface. They propose that this defective layer may be due to excessive out diffusion of hydrogen during growth at high temperatures, as seen by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. ESR measurements on light-degraded samples indicate an improved stability of samples with C{sub H} < 9 at.%.

  19. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon (a-Si:H) Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Justin T.; Hueso, Jose L.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2010-12-14

    Colloidal particles of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) were synthesized by decomposition of trisilane (Si{sub 3}H{sub 8}) in supercritical n-hexane (sc-hexane) at temperatures ranging from 380 to 550 °C. The reaction temperature, pressure and Si{sub 3}H{sub 8} concentration have a significant influence on the average particle size, Si bond order and hydrogen content. The particle diameter could be varied from 170 nm to 1.7 μm, with hydrogen loadings between 10% and 58%. Raman spectroscopy of the particles revealed significant differences in Si bond order that correlated with hydrogen content, with the lowest reaction temperatures yielding particles with the least structural order and most associated hydrogen. Particles synthesized at temperatures higher than 420 °C had sufficient bond order to allow crystallization under the Raman laser probe.

  20. Charge collection in silicon strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, H.W.; Beuttenmuller, R.; Ludlam, T.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Radeka, V.; Heijne, E.H.M.

    1982-11-01

    The use of position sensitive silicon detectors as very high resolution tracking devices in high energy physics experiments has been a subject of intense development over the past few years. Typical applications call for the detection of minimum ionizing particles with position measurement accuracy of 10 ..mu..m in each detector plane. The most straightforward detector geometry is that in which one of the collecting electrodes is subdivided into closely spaced strips, giving a high degree of segmentation in one coordinate. Each strip may be read out as a separate detection element, or, alternatively, resistive and/or capacitive coupling between adjacent strips may be exploited to interpolate the position via charge division measrurements. With readout techniques that couple several strips, the numer of readout channels can, in principle, be reduced by large factors without sacrificing the intrinsic position accuracy. The testing of individual strip properties and charge division between strips has been carried out with minimum ionizing particles or beams for the most part except in one case which used alphs particless scans. This paper describes the use of a highly collimated MeV proton beam for studies of the position sensing properties of representative one dimensional strip detectors.

  1. Correlating the properties of amorphous silicon with its flexibility volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhao; Ding, Jun; Li, Qing-Jie; Ma, Evan

    2017-04-01

    For metallic glasses, "flexibility volume" has recently been introduced as a property-revealing indicator of the structural state the glass is in. This parameter incorporates the atomic volume and the vibrational mean-square displacement, to combine both static structure and dynamics information. Flexibility volume was shown to quantitatively correlate with the properties of metallic glasses [J. Ding et al., Nat. Commun. 7, 13733 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms13733]. However, it remains to be examined if this parameter is useful for other types of glasses with bonding characteristics, atomic packing structures, as well as properties that are distinctly different from metallic glasses. In this paper, we tackle this issue through systematic molecular-dynamics simulations of amorphous silicon (a -Si) models produced with different cooling rates, as a -Si is a prototypical covalently bonded network glass whose structure and properties cannot be characterized using structural parameters such as free volume used for metallic and polymeric glasses. Specifically, we demonstrate a quantitative prediction of the shear modulus of a -Si from the flexibility for atomic motion. This flexibility volume descriptor, when evaluated on the atomic scale, is shown to also correlate well with local packing, as well as with the propensity for thermal relaxations and shear transformations, providing a metric to map out and explain the structural and mechanical heterogeneity in the amorphous material. This case study of a model of covalently bonded network a -Si, together with our earlier demonstration for metallic glasses, points to the universality of flexibility volume as an indicator of the structure state to link with properties, applicable across amorphous materials with different chemical bonding and atomic packing structures.

  2. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulraheem, Yaser; Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef

    2014-05-01

    An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties -including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc) bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause of the observed

  3. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulraheem, Yaser; Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef

    2014-05-15

    An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc) bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause of the observed

  4. Time evolution of charged defect states in tritiated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costea, Stefan; Kherani, Nazir P.; Zukotynski, Stefan

    2007-11-01

    Tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) thin films were deposited on crystalline silicon and high resistivity glass substrates. The time evolution of the density of defect states in these films was studied using the constant photocurrent method (CPM) and isothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (ICTS). The density of defect states was found to change with time and to recover upon thermal annealing. The ICTS results revealed that, following thermal annealing, in a sample with approximately 1at.% tritium, the concentration of positively charged dangling bonds (D+) decreased by more than an order of magnitude over a period of 300h. The CPM results showed that, over the same period of time, the concentration of negatively charged dangling bonds (D-) increased by over two orders of magnitude. The D+ and D- concentrations followed exponential functions of time, but the rate was different than that of tritium decay. At the same time, the Urbach energy was found to decrease with time to about 1/2 of its postanneal value. The change in the D+ and D- concentrations is primarily the result of capture of the beta particle generated electrons in dangling bonds and weak bonds, with steady state achieved through the development of a balance between carrier generation and carrier capture processes. The role of excess carriers was confirmed by CPM experiments under electrical bias.

  5. Laser induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summonte, C.; Rizzoli, R.; Servidori, M.; Milita, S.; Nicoletti, S.; Bianconi, M.; Desalvo, A.; Iencinella, D.

    2004-10-01

    Laser induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy (a-Si1-xCx:H) films has been investigated by means of synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The a-Si1-xCx:H films were deposited on (100) silicon wafers by very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 100MHz in hydrogen diluted silane-methane gas mixtures. The substrate was kept at 250°C or 350°C and the stoichiometry was changed from x =0.20 to 0.63. The structural characterization of the as-grown films has been carried out by Rutherford backscattering (hydrogen concentration) and infrared spectroscopy (film ordering). The films were irradiated by a KrF excimer laser (248nm ) with varying energy density and number of pulses. After irradiation, the formation of SiC crystallites has been revealed by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Besides SiC nanocrystals, the formation of crystalline Si and graphite is observed for under- (x <0.50) and over-stoichiometric (x>0.50) samples, respectively. The essential role played by hydrogen concentration and hydrogen bonding configuration in determining the melting threshold and the consequent SiC grain formation is highlighted.

  6. Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.; Truher, Joel B.; Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900.degree. C.), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180.degree. C. for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180.degree. C.) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide.

  7. Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Truher, J.B.; Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1994-09-13

    A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate is disclosed. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900 C), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180 C for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180 C) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide. 5 figs.

  8. Interplay of amorphous silicon disorder and hydrogen content with interface defects in amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, T. F.; Beushausen, H. N.; Leendertz, C.; Dobrich, A.; Rech, B.; Korte, L.

    2010-06-01

    We analyze the dependence of the interface defect density Dit in amorphous/crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterojunctions on the microscopic properties of ultrathin (10 nm) undoped a-Si:H passivation layers. It is shown that the hydrogen bonding and network disorder, probed by infrared- and photoelectron spectroscopy, govern the initial Dit and its behavior upon a short thermal treatment at 200 °C. While the initial Dit is determined by the local and nonequilibrated interface structure, the annealed Dit is defined by the bulk a-Si:H network strain. Thus it appears that the equilibrated a-Si:H/c-Si interface does not possess unique electronic properties but is governed by the a-Si:H bulk defects.

  9. A simple amorphous-silicon photodetector for two-dimensional position sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Carabe, J.; Gandia, J.J.; Gonzalez, N.; Galiano, E.; Gutierrez, M.T.

    1996-11-01

    A simple two-dimensional position-sensitive detector is proposed and initial tests are reported. The device, aimed to be high-energy-radiation resistant and reliable under magnetic fields, is based on a set of small {ital p}-{ital i}-{ital n} amorphous silicon photodiodes acting as pixels sandwiched between two perpendicular strip electrode structures. No thin-film transistors are used. A simplified prototype has been made and tested. The results show that the position of a laser spot on its surface can be deduced from the signals it generates. Further work proposed, includes tests on possible cross talk and behavior under radiation and magnetic fields, as well as the development of methods for accurate position calculation and for appropriate response calibration. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. High-Sensitivity X-ray Polarimetry with Amorphous Silicon Active-Matrix Pixel Proportional Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jahoda, K.; Ready, S. E.; Street, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Photoelectric X-ray polarimeters based on pixel micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) offer order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity over more traditional techniques based on X-ray scattering. This new technique places some of the most interesting astronomical observations within reach of even a small, dedicated mission. The most sensitive instrument would be a photoelectric polarimeter at the focus of 2 a very large mirror, such as the planned XEUS. Our efforts are focused on a smaller pathfinder mission, which would achieve its greatest sensitivity with large-area, low-background, collimated polarimeters. We have recently demonstrated a MPGD polarimeter using amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) readout suitable for the focal plane of an X-ray telescope. All the technologies used in the demonstration polarimeter are scalable to the areas required for a high-sensitivity collimated polarimeter. Leywords: X-ray polarimetry, particle tracking, proportional counter, GEM, pixel readout

  11. The PHENIX Forward Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidala, C.; Anaya, L.; Anderssen, E.; Bambaugh, A.; Barron, A.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J.; Boose, S.; Brooks, M. L.; Butsyk, S.; Cepeda, M.; Chacon, P.; Chacon, S.; Chavez, L.; Cote, T.; D'Agostino, C.; Datta, A.; DeBlasio, K.; DelMonte, L.; Desmond, E. J.; Durham, J. M.; Fields, D.; Finger, M.; Gingu, C.; Gonzales, B.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hawke, T.; van Hecke, H. W.; Herron, M.; Hoff, J.; Huang, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, T.; Jonas, M.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Key, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurtz, J.; LaBounty, J.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, K. B.; Leitch, M. J.; Lenz, M.; Lenz, W.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Mannel, E.; McGaughey, P. L.; Meles, A.; Meredith, B.; Nguyen, H.; O'Brien, E.; Pak, R.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S.; Pereira, H.; Perera, G. D. N.; Phillips, M.; Pisani, R.; Polizzo, S.; Poncione, R. J.; Popule, J.; Prokop, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Ronzhina, N.; Silva, C. L.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, R.; Sondheim, W. E.; Spendier, K.; Stoffer, M.; Tennant, E.; Thomas, D.; Tomášek, M.; Veicht, A.; Vrba, V.; Wang, X. R.; Wei, F.; Winter, D.; Yarema, R.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Zimmerman, A.; Zimmerman, T.

    2014-08-01

    A new silicon detector has been developed to provide the PHENIX experiment with precise charged particle tracking at forward and backward rapidity. The Forward Silicon Vertex Tracker (FVTX) was installed in PHENIX prior to the 2012 run period of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The FVTX is composed of two annular endcaps, each with four stations of silicon mini-strip sensors, covering a rapidity range of 1.2<|η|<2.2 that closely matches the two existing PHENIX muon arms. Each station consists of 48 individual silicon sensors, each of which contains two columns of mini-strips with 75 μm pitch in the radial direction and lengths in the ϕ direction varying from 3.4 mm at the inner radius to 11.5 mm at the outer radius. The FVTX has approximately 0.54 million strips in each endcap. These are read out with FPHX chips, developed in collaboration with Fermilab, which are wire bonded directly to the mini-strips. The maximum strip occupancy reached in central Au-Au collisions is approximately 2.8%. The precision tracking provided by this device makes the identification of muons from secondary vertices away from the primary event vertex possible. The expected distance of closest approach (DCA) resolution of 200 μm or better for particles with a transverse momentum of 5 GeV/c will allow identification of muons from relatively long-lived particles, such as D and B mesons, through their broader DCA distributions.

  12. Design optimization of ultra-fast silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartiglia, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Baselga, M.; Bellan, R.; Boscardin, M.; Cenna, F.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Fernndez-Martnez, P.; Ferrero, M.; Flores, D.; Galloway, Z.; Greco, V.; Hidalgo, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Obertino, M.; Pancheri, L.; Paternoster, G.; Picerno, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Solano, A.; Spencer, N.

    2015-10-01

    Low-Gain Avalanche Diodes (LGAD) are silicon detectors with output signals that are about a factor of 10 larger than those of traditional sensors. In this paper we analyze how the design of LGAD can be optimized to exploit their increased output signal to reach optimum timing performances. Our simulations show that these sensors, the so-called Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD), will be able to reach a time resolution factor of 10 better than that of traditional silicon sensors.

  13. Specific energy yield comparison between crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon based PV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferenczi, Toby; Stern, Omar; Hartung, Marianne; Mueggenburg, Eike; Lynass, Mark; Bernal, Eva; Mayer, Oliver; Zettl, Marcus

    2009-08-01

    As emerging thin-film PV technologies continue to penetrate the market and the number of utility scale installations substantially increase, detailed understanding of the performance of the various PV technologies becomes more important. An accurate database for each technology is essential for precise project planning, energy yield prediction and project financing. However recent publications showed that it is very difficult to get accurate and reliable performance data of theses technologies. This paper evaluates previously reported claims the amorphous silicon based PV modules have a higher annual energy yield compared to crystalline silicon modules relative to their rated performance. In order to acquire a detailed understanding of this effect, outdoor module tests were performed at GE Global Research Center in Munich. In this study we examine closely two of the five reported factors that contribute to enhanced energy yield of amorphous silicon modules. We find evidence to support each of these factors and evaluate their relative significance. We discuss aspects for improvement in how PV modules are sold and identify areas for further study further study.

  14. Mechanical design of the CDF SVX II silicon vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    A next generation silicon vertex detector is planned at CDF for the 1998 Tevatron collider run with the Main Injector. The SVX II silicon vertex detector will allow high luminosity data-taking, enable online triggering of secondary vertex production, and greatly increase the acceptance for heavy flavor physics at CDF. The design specifications, geometric layout, and early mechanical prototyping work for this detector are discussed.

  15. Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Wronski, Christopher R.

    1979-01-01

    A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

  16. RF sputtering for controlling dihydride and monohydride bond densities in amorphous silicon hydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffery, F.R.; Shanks, H.R.

    1980-08-26

    A process is described for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicone produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous solicone hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  17. Energy level of the nitrogen dangling bond in amorphous silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.L. ); Kanicki, J. ); Robertson, J. ); Lenahan, P.M. )

    1991-09-30

    The composition dependence and room-temperature metastability of the paramagnetic nitrogen dangling-bond center is amorphous silicon nitride suggest that its energy level lies close to the N {ital p}{pi} states, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  18. Optical losses in amorphous silicon solar cells due to back reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Madjdpour, J.; Von Roedern, B.; Chen, W.; Hegedus, S.S.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have used a new numerical model and here present initial results on how texturing and backreflectors affect the maximum achievable short-circuit current densities in amorphous silicon solar cells.

  19. Silicon detector readout system using commercially available items

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1986-05-01

    The basic properties of silicon detectors are briefly noted, including bulk and electrical properties. Thermal and shot noise in front end amplifiers is discussed. The configuration of detectors and preamps is then briefly described. A detector test is described and results are given. (LEW)

  20. SVX{prime}, the new CDF silicon vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cihangir, S.; Gillespie, G.; Gonzalez, H.

    1994-08-26

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) radiation hardened silicon vertex detector (SVX{prime}) is described. The new detector has several improvements over its predecessor such as better signal to noise and higher efficiency. It`s expected to have a radiation tolerance in excess of 1 Mrad. It has been taking data for several months and some preliminary results are shown.

  1. Optimization of large amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations of energetic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samela, Juha; Norris, Scott A.; Nordlund, Kai; Aziz, Michael J.

    2011-07-01

    A practical method to create optimized amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations is developed and tested. The method is based on the Wooten, Winer, and Weaire algorithm and combination of small optimized blocks to larger structures. The method makes possible to perform simulations of either very large cluster hypervelocity impacts on amorphous targets or small displacements induced by low energy ion impacts in silicon.

  2. Laser-induced amorphization of silicon during pulsed-laser irradiation of TiN/Ti/polycrystalline silicon/SiO2/silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. F.; Pey, K. L.; Wee, A. T. S.; Thompson, M. O.; Tung, C. H.; See, A.

    2002-11-01

    In this letter, we report on the complex solidification structures formed during laser irradiation of a titanium nitride/titanium/polycrystalline silicon/silicon dioxide/silicon film stack. Due to enhanced optical coupling, the titanium nitride/titanium capping layer increases the melt depth of polycrystalline silicon by more than a factor of 2. It is found that the titanium atoms diffuse through the entire polycrystalline silicon layer during irradiation. Contrary to the expected polycrystalline silicon growth, distinct regions of polycrystalline and amorphous silicon are formed instead. Possible mechanisms for the formation of these microstructures are proposed.

  3. Laser assisted patterning of hydrogenated amorphous silicon for interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vecchi, S.; Desrues, T.; Souche, F.; Muñoz, D.; Lemiti, M.

    2012-10-01

    This work reports on the elaboration of a new industrial process based on laser selective ablation of dielectric layers for Interdigitated Back Contact Silicon Heterojunction (IBC Si-HJ) solar cells fabrication. Choice of the process is discussed and cells are processed to validate its performance. A pulsed green laser (515nm) with 10-20ns pulse duration is used for hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers patterning steps, whereas metallization is made by screen printed. High Open-Circuit Voltage (Voc=699mV) and Fill Factor (FF=78.5%) values are obtained simultaneously on IBC Si-HJ cells, indicating a high surface passivation level and reduced resistive losses. An efficiency of 19% on non textured 26 cm² solar cells has been reached with this new industrial process.

  4. Status and performance of the CDF Run II silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason; /LBL, Berkeley

    2004-11-01

    In 2001, an upgraded silicon detector system was installed in the CDF II experiment on the Tevatron at Fermilab. The complete system consists of three silicon microstrip detectors: SVX II with five layers for precision tracking, Layer 00 with one beampipe-mounted layer for vertexing, and two Intermediate Silicon Layers located between SVX II and the main CDF II tracking chamber. Currently all detectors in the system are operating at or near design levels. The performance of the combined silicon system is excellent in the context of CDF tracking algorithms, and the first useful physics results from the innermost Layer 00 detector have been recently documented. Operational and monitoring efforts have also been strengthened to maintain silicon efficiency through the end of Run 2 at the Tevatron.

  5. Recrystallization of silicon-on-sapphire structures at various amorphization-ion-beam energies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, P. A. Demakov, K. D.; Shemardov, S. G.; Kuznetsov, Yu. Yu.

    2013-02-15

    Silicon films on sapphire substrates are grown via recrystallization from the silicon-sapphire interface. An amorphous layer is formed using ion implantation with silicon ion energies of 90-150 keV. An X-ray rocking curve is used to estimate the crystalline perfection of the silicon films. After recrystallization, the silicon layer consists of two parts with different crystalline quality. The recrystallized silicon-on-sapphire structures have a highly perfect upper layer (for fabricating microelectronic devices) and a lower layer adjacent to the sapphire substrate containing a large number of defects.

  6. THE 15 LAYER SILICON DRIFT DETECTOR TRACKER IN EXPERIMENT 896.

    SciTech Connect

    PANDY,S.U.

    1998-11-08

    Large linear silicon drift detectors have been developed and are in production for use in several experiments. Recently 15 detectors were used as a tracking device in BNL-AGS heavy ion experiment (E896). The detectors were successfully operated in a 6.2 T magnetic field. The behavior of the detectors, such as drift uniformity, resolution, and charge collection efficiency are presented. The effect of the environment on the detector performance is discussed. Some results from the experimental run are presented. The detectors performed well in an experimental environment. This is the first tracking application of these detectors.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of amorphous selenium imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuan; Badal, Andreu; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2010-04-01

    We present a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method for studying the signal formation process in amorphous Selenium (a-Se) imaging detectors for design validation and optimization of direct imaging systems. The assumptions and limitations of the proposed and previous models are examined. The PENELOPE subroutines for MC simulation of radiation transport are used to model incident x-ray photon and secondary electron interactions in the photoconductor. Our simulation model takes into account applied electric field, atomic properties of the photoconductor material, carrier trapping by impurities, and bimolecular recombination between drifting carriers. The particle interaction cross-sections for photons and electrons are generated for Se over the energy range of medical imaging applications. Since inelastic collisions of secondary electrons lead to the creation of electron-hole pairs in the photoconductor, the electron inelastic collision stopping power is compared for PENELOPE's Generalized Oscillator Strength model with the established EEDL and NIST ESTAR databases. Sample simulated particle tracks for photons and electrons in Se are presented, along with the energy deposition map. The PENEASY general-purpose main program is extended with custom transport subroutines to take into account generation and transport of electron-hole pairs in an electromagnetic field. The charge transport routines consider trapping and recombination, and the energy required to create a detectable electron-hole pair can be estimated from simulations. This modular simulation model is designed to model complete image formation.

  8. Charge injectors of ALICE Silicon Drift Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashevsky, A.; Batigne, G.; Beole, S.; Coli, S.; Crescio, E.; Deremigis, P.; Giraudo, G.; Mazza, G.; Prino, F.; Riccati, L.; Rivetti, A.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Vacchi, A.; Wheadon, R.; Zampa, G.

    2007-03-01

    Large area, 7.25×8.76 cm2, Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) has been developed for the ALICE experiment at CERN [A. Vacchi, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 306 (1991) 187; A. Rashevsky, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 461 (2001) 133-138; A. Rashevsky, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 485 (2002) 54; P. Burger, C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, A. Roncastri, A. Vacchi, INFN/TC-02/07; C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, INFN/TC-02/08; C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, D. Nouais, INFN/TC-00/04. C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, A. Vacchi, ALICE-INT-2002-15, 2002; Inner Tracking System, CERN/LHCC, June 1999]. SDDs form two out of six cylindrical layers of the ALICE inner tracking system. The 260 high-quality SDDs needed to equip these two layers have been selected. One of the detector design elements devoted to allow controlled operating conditions is the on-board arrays of point-like charge injectors [D. Nouais, et al., CERN-ALICE-PUB-99-31; V. Bonvicini, et al., Il Nuovo Cimento 112AN (1-2) (1999) 137-146]. In the case of an SDD they are essential to trace, with the required frequency and precision, the changes in drift velocity induced by temperature variations. In order to ensure operating stability during the 10 years of the ALICE experiment the bias scheme of the charge injectors exploits the electrical properties not only of a detector itself, but also those of the cables mounted onto it, thus constituting a module. Computer simulations of the equivalent circuit revealed a significant improvement of the injection efficiency. Subsequent experimental tests of the first assembled modules confirmed the predicted performances. We report the layout of the charge injectors integrated in the ALICE SDD, as well as test results.

  9. Characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films obtained from rice husk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, K. C.; Mukherjee, D.; Biswas, A. K.; Acharya, H. N.

    1991-08-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon ( a-Si: H) films were prepared by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of silanes generated by the acid hydrolysis of magnesium silicide (Mg 2Si) obtained from rice husk. The films were deposited at various substrate temperatures ( Ts) ranging from 430 to 520°C. The results show that the films have room temperature (294 K) dark conductivity (σ d) of the order of 10 -8 - 10 -10 (ohm-cm) -1 with single activation energy (Δ Ed) and the photoconductivity (σ ph) decreases with increase of Ts. Optical band gap ( Eopt) lies between 1.60-1.73 eV and hydrogen content ( CH) in the films is at best 8.3 at %. Au/ a-Si: H junction shows that it acts as a rectifier contact with Schottky barrier height ( VB) 0.69 eV. The films are contaminated by traces of impurities like Na, K, Al, Cl and O as revealed by secondary ion mass spectrometric (SIMS) analysis.

  10. The influence of pressure on defects in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Jeffrey; Wagner, Lucas

    2009-03-01

    Amorphous silicon(a-Si) thin-film solar cells are promising materials for solar cells, but they suffer from the Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE), in which the efficiency degrades over the course of a few hours of light exposure. While there has been progress in mitigating this effect through sample preparation, there is still no clear microscopic explanation for the degradation. We have used first principles density functional theory and highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations to investigate the effect of pressure on different types of defects present in a-Si. Our calculations show that the effect of pressure on a-Si is strongly dependent on the particular type of defect, and they further may provide new ways to experimentally determine the dominant defect type. We also report on the effect of pressure on the simplest reaction in a-Si: a bond switch between two neighboring Si atoms, which could be an important element in the understanding of the SWE [1]. [1] L.K. Wagner and J.C. Grossman. PRL (in press)

  11. Hot wire deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, A.H.; Iwaniczko, E.; Nelson, B.P.; Reedy, R.C. Jr.; Crandall, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    This paper details the results of a study in which low H content, high deposition rate hot wire (HW) deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has been incorporated into a substrate solar cell. The authors find that the treatment of the top surface of the HW i layer while it is being cooled from its high deposition temperature is crucial to device performance. They present data concerning these surface treatments, and correlate these treatments with Schottky device performance. The authors also present first generation HW n-i-p solar cell efficiency data, where a glow discharge (GD) {mu}c-Si(p) layer was added to complete the partial devices. No light trapping layer was used to increase the device Jsc. Their preliminary investigations have yielded efficiencies of up to 6.8% for a cell with a 4000 {Angstrom} thick HW i-layer, which degrade less than 10% after a 900 hour light soak. The authors suggest avenues for further improvement of their devices.

  12. Nanohole Structuring for Improved Performance of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Johlin, Eric; Al-Obeidi, Ahmed; Nogay, Gizem; Stuckelberger, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-06-22

    While low hole mobilities limit the current collection and efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic devices, attempts to improve mobility of the material directly have stagnated. Herein, we explore a method of utilizing nanostructuring of a-Si:H devices to allow for improved hole collection in thick absorber layers. This is achieved by etching an array of 150 nm diameter holes into intrinsic a-Si:H and then coating the structured material with p-type a-Si:H and a conformal zinc oxide transparent conducting layer. The inclusion of these nanoholes yields relative power conversion efficiency (PCE) increases of ∼45%, from 7.2 to 10.4% PCE for small area devices. Comparisons of optical properties, time-of-flight mobility measurements, and internal quantum efficiency spectra indicate this efficiency is indeed likely occurring from an improved collection pathway provided by the nanostructuring of the devices. Finally, we estimate that through modest optimizations of the design and fabrication, PCEs of beyond 13% should be obtainable for similar devices.

  13. Effects of relaxation on the energy landscape of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallel, Houssem; Mousseau, Normand; Schiettekatte, Francois

    2008-03-01

    Amorphous silicon is used in many devices around us, included as a thin-film transistor in most flat screens, it also serves as the reference for the study of disordered network systems. Recently, differential scanning calorimetry and nanocalorimetry measurements (DSC) ^1 have shown that the heat released as the temperature of the sample is raised following implantation, is temperature independent. To understand this behaviour, we characterize the energy landscape of model a-Si. Using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) with the modified Stillinger-Weber potential, we generate models at four levels of relaxation and identify the relaxation mechanisms by analysing 100 000 events for each model. We find that while the distribution of the activation barriers shifts to higher energy as the system is relaxed, the distribution of the relaxation energies is almost unchanged. The relation between these two phenomena is consistent with the DSC measurements. This work is supported, in part, by NSERC, FQRNT and the CRC Foundation. HK is grateful for a scholarship from the Tunisian Ministry of Higher Education, Scientific Research and Technology. ^1 R. Karmouch et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 075304 (2007)

  14. Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A.; Chen, E.; Clough, R.; Glatfelter, T.; Guha, S.; Hammond, G.; Hopson, M.; Jackett, N.; Lycette, M.; Noch, J.; Palmer, T.; Pawlikiewicz, A.; Rosenstein, I.; Ross, R.; Wolf, D.; Xu, X.; Yang, J.; Younan, K.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the progress made during Phase 1 of research and development program to obtain high-efficiency amorphous silicon alloy multijunction modules. Using a large-area deposition system, double-and triple-junction cells were made on stainless steel substrates of over 1 ft{sup 2} area with Ag and ZnO predeposited back reflector. Modules of over 1 ft{sup 2} were produced with between 9.2% and 9.9 initial aperture-area efficiencies as measured under a USSC Spire solar simulator. Efficiencies as measured under the NREL Spire solar simulator were found to be typically 15% to 18% lower. The causes for this discrepancy are now being investigated. The modules show about 15% degradation after 600 hours of one-sun illumination at 50{degrees}C. To optimize devices for higher stabilized efficiency, a new method was developed by which the performance of single-junction cells after long-term, one-sun exposure at 50{degrees}C can be predicted by exposing cells to short-term intense light at different temperatures. This method is being used to optimize the component cells of the multijunction structure to obtain the highest light-degraded efficiency.

  15. Power change in amorphous silicon technology by low temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Ankit; Rennhofer, Marcus; Dangel, Angelika; Duman, Bogdan; Schlosser, Victor

    2015-07-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is one of the best established thin-film solar-cell technologies. Despite its long history of research, it still has many critical issues because of its defect rich material and its susceptibility to degrade under light also called as Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE). This leads to an increase in the defect density of a-Si, but as a metastable effect it can be completely healed at temperatures above 170 °C. Our study is focused on investigating the behavior of annealing of different a-Si modules under low temperature conditions below 80 °C indicated by successive change of module power. These conditions reflect the environmental temperature impact of the modules in the field, or integrated in buildings as well. The power changes were followed by STC power rating and investigation of module-power evolution under low irradiance conditions at 50 W/m2. Our samples were recovered close to their initial state of power, reaching as high as 99% from its degraded value. This shows the influence of low temperature annealing and light on metastable module behavior in a-Si thin-film modules.

  16. Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S. )

    1991-12-01

    This report describes research to improve the understanding of amorphous silicon alloys and other relevant non-semiconductor materials for use in high-efficiency, large-area multijunction modules. The research produced an average subcell initial efficiency of 8.8% over a 1-ft{sup 2} area using same-band-gap, dual-junction cells deposited over a ZnO/AlSi back reflector. An initial efficiency of 9.6% was achieved using a ZnO/Ag back reflector over smaller substrates. A sputtering machine will be built to deposit a ZnO/Ag back reflector over a 1-ft{sup 2} area so that a higher efficiency can also be obtained on larger substrates. Calculations have been performed to optimize the grid pattern, bus bars, and cell interconnects on modules. With our present state of technology, we expect a difference of about 6% between the aperture-area and active-area efficiencies of modules. Preliminary experiments show a difference of about 8%. We can now predict the performance of single-junction cells after long-term light exposure at 50{degree}C by exposing cells to short-term intense light at different temperatures. We find that single-junction cells deposited on a ZnO/Ag back reflector show the highest stabilized efficiency when the thickness of the intrinsic layers is about 2000 {angstrom}. 8 refs.

  17. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film anode for proton conducting batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Tiejun; Young, Kwo; Beglau, David; Yan, Shuli; Zeng, Peng; Cheng, Mark Ming-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) thin films deposited by chemical vapor deposition were used as anode in a non-conventional nickel metal hydride battery using a proton-conducting ionic liquid based non-aqueous electrolyte instead of alkaline solution for the first time, which showed a high specific discharge capacity of 1418 mAh g-1 for the 38th cycle and retained 707 mAh g-1 after 500 cycles. A maximum discharge capacity of 3635 mAh g-1 was obtained at a lower discharge rate, 510 mA g-1. This electrochemical discharge capacity is equivalent to about 3.8 hydrogen atoms stored in each silicon atom. Cyclic voltammogram showed an improved stability 300 mV below the hydrogen evolution potential. Both Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies showed no difference to the pre-existing covalent Si-H bond after electrochemical cycling and charging, indicating a non-covalent nature of the Si-H bonding contributing to the reversible hydrogen storage of the current material. Another a-Si:H thin film was prepared by an rf-sputtering deposition followed by an ex-situ hydrogenation, which showed a discharge capacity of 2377 mAh g-1.

  18. Effect of argon ion bombardment on amorphous silicon carbonitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batocki, R. G. S.; Mota, R. P.; Honda, R. Y.; Santos, D. C. R.

    2014-04-01

    Amorphous silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) films were synthesized by radiofrequency (RF) Plasma Enhanced Vapor Chemical Deposition (PECVD) using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSN) as precursor compound. Then, the films were post-treated by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) in argon atmosphere from 15 to 60 min. The hardness of the film enhanced after ion implantation, and the sample treated at 45 min process showed hardness greater than sixfold that of the untreated sample. This result is explained by the crosslinking and densification of the structure. Films were exposed to oxygen plasma for determining of the etching rate. It decreased monotonically from 33 Å/min to 19 Å/min for the range of process time, confirming structural alterations. Hydrophobic character of the a-SiCN:H films were modified immediately after ion bombardment, due to incorporation of polar groups. However, the high wettability of the films acquired by the ion implantation was diminished after aging in air. Therefore, argon PIII made a-SiCN:H films mechanically more resistant and altered their hydrophobic character.

  19. Crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition in irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, D.N.; Averback, R.S.; Okamoto, P.R.; Baily, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    The amorphous(a)-to-crystalline (c) phase transition has been studied in electron(e ) and/or ion irradiated silicon (Si). The irradiations were performed in situ in the Argonne High Voltage Microscope-Tandem Facility. The irradiation of Si, at <10K, with 1-MeV e to a fluence of 14 dpa failed to induce the c-to-a transition. Whereas an irradiation, at <10K, with 1.0 or 1.5-MeV Kr+ ions induced the c-to-a transition by a fluence of approx.0.37 dpa. Alternatively a dual irradiation, at 10K, with 1.0-MeV e and 1.0 or 1.5-MeV Kr+ to a Kr+ fluence of 1.5 dpa - where the ratio of the displacement rates for e to ions was approx.0.5 - resulted in the Si specimen retaining a degree of crystallinity. These results are discussed in terms of the degree of dispersion of point defects in the primary state of damage and the mobilities of point defects.

  20. ON-state reliability of amorphous-silicon antifuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, N.; Fair, R. B.; Massoud, H. Z.; Zhao, T.; Look, K.; Karpovich, Y.; Hart, M. J.

    1998-12-01

    The ON state of metal-to-metal amorphous-silicon antifuses suffers from two reliability concerns: switch-off and dc-stress failure. The switch-off current and dc-stress lifetime are strongly dependent on the temperature of the conducting filament and hence, on the programming current and ambient temperature. Numerical simulations of the filament temperature in the ON state were carried out to explain the experimental characteristics obtained in this work such as the dependence of the switch off and dc-stress failures on ambient temperature, stress current, and programming current. The temperature in the conducting filament is found to increase as the square of the stress current. The temperature and power dissipation at switch off are found to be independent of the programming current. The temperature at switch off is determined to be approximately 1500 °C. The ON-state device lifetime decreases exponentially with increasing stress current and ambient temperature. Numerical simulations of the temperature in the ON state successfully explain the experimentally observed increase in switch-off currents with programming current and the exponential decrease in device lifetime with increasing programming currents, stress currents, and ambient temperature.

  1. Deployable aerospace PV array based on amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Walter, Lee; Dobias, David; Flaisher, Harvey

    1989-01-01

    The development of the first commercial, ultralight, flexible, deployable, PV array for aerospace applications is discussed. It is based on thin-film, amorphous silicon alloy, multijunction, solar cells deposited on a thin metal or polymer by a proprietary, roll-to-roll process. The array generates over 200 W at AM0 and is made of 20 giant cells, each 54 cm x 29 cm (1566 sq cm in area). Each cell is protected with bypass diodes. Fully encapsulated array blanket and the deployment mechanism weigh about 800 and 500 g, respectively. These data yield power per area ratio of over 60 W/sq m specific power of over 250 W/kg (4 kg/kW) for the blanket and 154 W/kg (6.5 kg/kW) for the power system. When stowed, the array is rolled up to a diameter of 7 cm and a length of 1.11 m. It is deployed quickly to its full area of 2.92 m x 1.11 m, for instant power. Potential applications include power for lightweight space vehicles, high altitude balloons, remotely piloted and tethered vehicles. These developments signal the dawning of a new age of lightweight, deployable, low-cost space arrays in the range from tens to tens of thousands of watts for near-term applications and the feasibility of multi-100 kW to MW arrays for future needs.

  2. Temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Haberl, B.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.

    2014-03-21

    High temperature nanoindentation has been performed on pure ion-implanted amorphous silicon (unrelaxed a-Si) and structurally relaxed a-Si to investigate the temperature dependence of mechanical deformation, including pressure-induced phase transformations. Along with the indentation load-depth curves, ex situ measurements such as Raman micro-spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the residual indents reveal the mode of deformation under the indenter. While unrelaxed a-Si deforms entirely via plastic flow up to 200 °C, a clear transition in the mode of deformation is observed in relaxed a-Si with increasing temperature. Up to 100 °C, pressure-induced phase transformation and the observation of either crystalline (r8/bc8) end phases or pressure-induced a-Si occurs in relaxed a-Si. However, with further increase of temperature, plastic flow rather than phase transformation is the dominant mode of deformation. It is believed that the elevated temperature and pressure together induce bond softening and “defect” formation in structurally relaxed a-Si, leading to the inhibition of phase transformation due to pressure-releasing plastic flow under the indenter.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of PIN hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keya, Kimitaka; Torigoe, Yoshihiro; Toko, Susumu; Yamashita, Daisuke; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Light-induced degradation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a key issue for enhancing competitiveness in solar cell market. A-Si:H films with a lower density of Si-H2 bonds shows higher stability. Here we identified Si-H2 bonds in PIN a-Si:H solar cells fabricated by plasma CVD using Raman spectroscopy. A-Si:H solar cell has a structure of B-doped μc-SiC:H (12.5 nm)/ non-doped a-Si:H (250nm)/ P-doped μc-Si:H (40 nm) on glass substrates (Asahi-VU). By irradiating HeNe laser light from N-layer, peaks correspond to Si-H2 bonds (2100 cm-1) and Si-H bonds (2000 cm-1) have been identified in Raman scattering spectra. The intensity ratio of Si-H2 and Si-H ISiH2/ISiH is found to correlate well to light induced degradation of the cells Therefore, Raman spectroscopy is a promising method for studying origin of light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells.

  4. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon barriers for niobium-niobium Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, H.; Aucoin, R.; Currier, L.W.; Jillie, D.W.; Potter, C.N.; Shaw, D.W.; Smith, L.N.; Thaxter, J.B.; Willis, P.H.

    1985-03-01

    The authors report on further studies of the effects of hydrogenation of sputtered amorphous silicon barriers upon the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of Nb-Nb Josephson tunnel junctions. For composite trilayer barriers (a-Si/a-Si:H/a-Si) which are deposited using 8 mT of Ar, we find that there is an abrupt improvement in device characteristics when the central hydrogenated layer is deposited using a hydrogen partial pressure which exceeds about 0.5 mT. They attribute this to the reduction in the density of localized states in the a-Si:H layer. We have observed excellent I-V characteristics with trilayer barrier devices whose central hydrogenated layer is only about 1/7 of the thickness of the entire barrier. This observation suggests that localized states near the geometric center of the barrier are the most significant in degrading device characteristics. Annealing experiments and published data on the diffusion of deuterium in a-Si suggest that the composite barriers will be extremely stable during processing and storage. Zero bias anomalies in device I-V characteristics and spin density in the a-Si and a-Si:H layers have been measured.

  5. Deployable aerospace PV array based on amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Walter, Lee; Dobias, David; Flaisher, Harvey

    1989-04-01

    The development of the first commercial, ultralight, flexible, deployable, PV array for aerospace applications is discussed. It is based on thin-film, amorphous silicon alloy, multijunction, solar cells deposited on a thin metal or polymer by a proprietary, roll-to-roll process. The array generates over 200 W at AM0 and is made of 20 giant cells, each 54 cm x 29 cm (1566 sq cm in area). Each cell is protected with bypass diodes. Fully encapsulated array blanket and the deployment mechanism weigh about 800 and 500 g, respectively. These data yield power per area ratio of over 60 W/sq m specific power of over 250 W/kg (4 kg/kW) for the blanket and 154 W/kg (6.5 kg/kW) for the power system. When stowed, the array is rolled up to a diameter of 7 cm and a length of 1.11 m. It is deployed quickly to its full area of 2.92 m x 1.11 m, for instant power. Potential applications include power for lightweight space vehicles, high altitude balloons, remotely piloted and tethered vehicles. These developments signal the dawning of a new age of lightweight, deployable, low-cost space arrays in the range from tens to tens of thousands of watts for near-term applications and the feasibility of multi-100 kW to MW arrays for future needs.

  6. Amorphous silicon cell array powered solar tracking apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    An array of an even number of amorphous silicon solar cells are serially connected between first and second terminals of opposite polarity. The terminals are connected to one input terminal of a DC motor whose other input terminal is connected to the mid-cell of the serial array. Vane elements are adjacent the end cells to selectively shadow one or the other of the end cells when the array is oriented from a desired attitude relative to the sun. The shadowing of one cell of a group of cells on one side of the mid-cell reduces the power of that group substantially so that full power from the group of cells on the other side of the mid-cell drives the motor to reorient the array to the desired attitude. The cell groups each have a full power output at the power rating of the motor. When the array is at the desired attitude the power output of the two groups of cells balances due to their opposite polarity so that the motor remains unpowered.

  7. Wide gap microcrystalline silicon carbide emitter for amorphous silicon oxide passivated heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomaska, Manuel; Richter, Alexei; Lentz, Florian; Niermann, Tore; Finger, Friedhelm; Rau, Uwe; Ding, Kaining

    2017-02-01

    Wide gap n-type microcrystalline silicon carbide [µc-SiC:H(n)] is highly suitable as window layer material for silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells due to its high optical transparency combined with high electrical conductivity. However, the hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of highly crystalline µc-SiC:H(n) requires a high hydrogen radical density in the gas phase that gives rise to strong deterioration of the intrinsic amorphous silicon oxide [a-SiO x :H(i)] surface passivation. Introducing an n-type microcrystalline silicon oxide [µc-SiO x :H(n)] protection layer between the µc-SiC:H(n) and the a-SiO x :H(i) prevents the deterioration of the passivation by providing an etch resistance and by blocking the diffusion of hydrogen radicals. We fabricated solar cells with µc-SiC:H(n)/µc-SiO x :H(n)/a-SiO x :H(i) stack for the front side and varied the µc-SiO x :H(n) material properties by changing the microstructure of the µc-SiO x :H(n) to evaluate the potential of such stack implemented in SHJ solar cells and to identify the limiting parameters of the protection layer in the device. With this approach we achieved a maximum open circuit voltage of 677 mV and a maximum energy conversion efficiency of 18.9% for a planar solar cell.

  8. Amorphization and reduction of thermal conductivity in porous silicon by irradiation with swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Pascal J.; Canut, Bruno; Bluet, Jean-Marie; Lysenko, Vladimir; Gomes, Severine; Isaiev, Mykola; Burbelo, Roman; Chantrenne, Patrice; Frechette, Luc G.

    2013-07-07

    In this article, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of nanostructured porous silicon is reduced by amorphization and also that this amorphous phase in porous silicon can be created by swift (high-energy) heavy ion irradiation. Porous silicon samples with 41%-75% porosity are irradiated with 110 MeV uranium ions at six different fluences. Structural characterisation by micro-Raman spectroscopy and SEM imaging show that swift heavy ion irradiation causes the creation of an amorphous phase in porous Si but without suppressing its porous structure. We demonstrate that the amorphization of porous silicon is caused by electronic-regime interactions, which is the first time such an effect is obtained in crystalline silicon with single-ion species. Furthermore, the impact on the thermal conductivity of porous silicon is studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning thermal microscopy. The creation of an amorphous phase in porous silicon leads to a reduction of its thermal conductivity, up to a factor of 3 compared to the non-irradiated sample. Therefore, this technique could be used to enhance the thermal insulation properties of porous Si. Finally, we show that this treatment can be combined with pre-oxidation at 300 Degree-Sign C, which is known to lower the thermal conductivity of porous Si, in order to obtain an even greater reduction.

  9. Status and performance of the CDF Run II silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Boveia, A.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The CDF Run II silicon detector with its 8 layers of double- and single-sided silicon microstrip sensors and a total 722,432 readout channels is one of the largest silicon detector devices currently in use by a HEP experiment. We report our experience commissioning and operating this complex device during the first 4 years of Run II. As the luminosity delivered by the Tevatron increases, we have observed measurable effects of radiation damage in studies of charge collection and noise versus applied bias voltage at many different integrated luminosities. We discuss these studies and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector.

  10. Small area silicon diffused junction x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Pehl, R.H.; Larsh, A.E.

    1981-10-01

    The low temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy x-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 cm/sup 2/ and a thickness of 100 ..mu..m. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values indicating that the defects introduced by the high temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low energy x-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 to 150/sup 0/K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low energy x-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon diffused junction technology to x-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon x-ray detector designs.

  11. Amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon biosensor for the specific identification of unamplified nucleic acid sequences using gold nanoparticle probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Rodrigo; Baptista, Pedro; Raniero, Leandro; Doria, Gonçalo; Silva, Leonardo; Franco, Ricardo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2007-01-01

    Amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon pi 'ii'n devices fabricated on micromachined glass substrates are integrated with oligonucleotide-derivatized gold nanoparticles for a colorimetric detection method. The method enables the specific detection and quantification of unamplified nucleic acid sequences (DNA and RNA) without the need to functionalize the glass surface, allowing for resolution of single nucleotide differences between DNA and RNA sequences—single nucleotide polymorphism and mutation detection. The detector's substrate is glass and the sample is directly applied on the back side of the biosensor, ensuring a direct optical coupling of the assays with a concomitant maximum photon capture and the possibility to reuse the sensor.

  12. Preparation of fine silicon particles from amorphous silicon monoxide by the disproportionation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamiya, Mikito; Takei, Humihiko; Kikuchi, Masae; Uyeda, Chiaki

    2001-07-01

    Fine Si particles have been prepared by the disproportionation reaction of silicon monoxide (SiO), that is: 2SiO→Si+SiO 2. Amorphous powders of SiO are heated between 900°C and 1400°C in a flow of Ar and the obtained specimens are analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The treatments between 1000°C and 1300°C for more than 0.5 h result in origination of Si particles dispersed in amorphous oxide media. The particle size varies from 1-3 to 20-40 nm, depending on the heating temperature. Kinetic analyses of the reaction reveal that the activation energy is 1.1 eV (82.1 kJ mol -1). The specimens annealed above 1350°C changes into a mixture of Si and cristobalite, suggesting a solid state transformation in the surrounding oxides from the amorphous to crystalline states.

  13. Realistic inversion of diffraction data for an amorphous solid: The case of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anup; Biswas, Parthapratim; Bhattarai, Bishal; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    We apply a method called "force-enhanced atomic refinement" (FEAR) to create a computer model of amorphous silicon (a -Si) based upon the highly precise x-ray diffraction experiments of Laaziri et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3460 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.3460]. The logic underlying our calculation is to estimate the structure of a real sample a -Si using experimental data and chemical information included in a nonbiased way, starting from random coordinates. The model is in close agreement with experiment and also sits at a suitable energy minimum according to density-functional calculations. In agreement with experiments, we find a small concentration of coordination defects that we discuss, including their electronic consequences. The gap states in the FEAR model are delocalized compared to a continuous random network model. The method is more efficient and accurate, in the sense of fitting the diffraction data, than conventional melt-quench methods. We compute the vibrational density of states and the specific heat, and we find that both compare favorably to experiments.

  14. Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells incorporating a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells which incorporate a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer adjacent to the junction forming metal layer exhibit increased open circuit voltages compared to standard rectifying junction metal devices, i.e., Schottky barrier devices, and rectifying junction metal insulating silicon devices, i.e., MIS devices.

  15. Spectral response of multi-element silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Rossington, C.S.; Chapman, K.

    1997-04-01

    Multi-element silicon strip detectors, in conjunction with integrated circuit pulse-processing electronics, offer an attractive alternative to conventional lithium-drifted silicon Si(Li) and high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) for high count rate, low noise synchrotron x-ray fluorescence applications. One of the major differences between the segmented Si detectors and the commercially available single-element Si(Li) or HPGe detectors is that hundreds of elements can be fabricated on a single Si substrate using standard silicon processing technologies. The segmentation of the detector substrate into many small elements results in very low noise performance at or near, room temperature, and the count rate of the detector is increased many-fold due to the multiplication in the total number of detectors. Traditionally, a single channel of detector with electronics can handle {approximately}100 kHz count rates while maintaining good energy resolution; the segmented detectors can operate at greater than MHz count rates merely due to the multiplication in the number of channels. One of the most critical aspects in the development of the segmented detectors is characterizing the charge sharing and charge loss that occur between the individual detector strips, and determining how these affect the spectral response of the detectors.

  16. Technological customization of uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometer for THz real time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocas, S.; Deronzier, E.; Brianceau, P.; Imperinetti, P.; Dumont, G.; Roule, A.; Rabaud, W.; Meilhan, J.; Simoens, F.; Goudon, V.; Vialle, Claire; Arnaud, A.

    2013-03-01

    Terahertz uncooled antenna-coupled microbolometer focal plane arrays are being developed at CEA Leti for real time THz imaging and sensing. This detector relies on LETI amorphous silicon uncooled infrared bolometer technology that has been deeply modified to optimize sensitivity in the THz range. The main technological key lock of the pixel structure is the quarter wavelength cavity that consists in a thick dielectric layer deposited over the metalized CMOS wafer; such cavity improves significantly the optical coupling efficiency. Copper plugs connect the microbolometer level down to the CMOS readout circuit (ROIC) upper metal pads through this thick dielectric cavity. This paper explains how we have improved the copper vias technology and the challenges we have faced to customize the microbolometer while keeping a monolithically above IC technology fully compatible with standard silicon processes. The results show a very good operability and reproducibility of the contact through this thick oxide cavity. Due to these good results, we have been able to characterize a very efficient THz absorption that enables real time imaging with high sensitivity in the 1-3 THz range.

  17. Relaxation and derelaxation of pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon during thermal annealing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kail, F.; Farjas, J.; Roura, P.; Secouard, C.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J.; Alzina, F.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2010-07-01

    The structural relaxation of pure amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) materials, that occurs during thermal annealing experiments, has been analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Unlike a-Si, the heat evolved from a-Si:H cannot be explained by relaxation of the Si-Si network strain but it reveals a derelaxation of the bond angle strain. Since the state of relaxation after annealing is very similar for pure and hydrogenated materials, our results give strong experimental support to the predicted configurational gap between a-Si and crystalline silicon.

  18. Production Of Tandem Amorphous Silicon Alloy Solar Cells In A Continuous Roll-To-Roll Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izu, Masat; Ovshinsky, Stanford R.

    1983-09-01

    A roll-to-roll plasma deposition machine for depositing multi-layered amorphous alloys has been developed. The plasma deposition machine (approximately 35 ft. long) has multiple deposition areas and processes 16-inch wide stainless steel substrate continuously. Amorphous photovoltaic thin films (less than 1pm) having a six layered structure (PINPIN) are deposited on a roll of 16-inch wide 1000 ft. long stainless steel substrate, continu-ously, in a single pass. Mass production of low-cost tandem amorphous solar cells utilizing roll-to-roll processes is now possible. A commercial plant utilizing this plasma deposition machine for manufacturing tandem amorphous silicon alloy solar cells is now in operation. At Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD), one of the major tasks of the photovoltaic group has been the scale-up of the plasma deposition process for the production of amorphous silicon alloy solar cells. Our object has been to develop the most cost effective way of producing amorphous silicon alloy solar cells having the highest efficiency. The amorphous silicon alloy solar cell which we produce has the following layer structure: 1. Thin steel substrate. 2. Multi-layered photovoltaic amorphous silicon alloy layers (approximately 1pm thick; tandem cells have six layers). 3. ITO. 4. Grid pattern. 5. Encapsulant. The deposition of the amorphous layer is technologically the key process. It was clear to us from the beginning of this scale-up program that amorphous silicon alloy solar cells produced in wide width, continuous roll-to-roll production process would be ultimate lowest cost solar cells according to the following reasons. First of all, the material cost of our solar cells is low because: (1) the total thickness of active material is less than 1pm, and the material usage is very small; (2) silicon, fluorine, hydrogen, and other materials used in the device are abundant and low cost; (3) thin, low-cost substrate is used; and (4) product yield is high. In

  19. Amorphous silicon carbide ultramicroelectrode arrays for neural stimulation and recording.

    PubMed

    Deku, Felix; Cohen, Yarden; Joshi-Imre, Alexandra; Kanneganti, Aswini; Gardner, Timothy; Cogan, Stuart

    2017-09-27

    Foreign body response to indwelling cortical microelectrodes limits the reliability of neural stimulation and recording, particularly for extended chronic applications in behaving animals. The extent to which this response compromises the chronic stability of neural devices depends on many factors including the materials used in the electrode construction, the size, and geometry of the indwelling structure. Here, we report on the development of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) based on amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC). This technology utilizes a-SiC for its chronic stability and employs semiconductor manufacturing processes to create MEAs with small shank dimensions. The a-SiC films were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and patterned by thin-film photolithographic techniques. To improve stimulation and recording capabilities with small contact areas, we investigated low impedance coatings on the electrode sites. The assembled devices were characterized in phosphate buffered saline for their electrochemical properties. MEAs utilizing a-SiC as both the primary structural element and encapsulation were fabricated successfully. These a-SiC MEAs had 16 penetrating shanks. Each shank has a cross-sectional area less than 60 µm<sup>2</sup> and electrode sites with a geometric surface area varying from 20-200 μm<sup>2</sup>. Electrode coatings of TiN and SIROF reduced 1 kHz electrode impedance to less than 100 kΩ from ~2.8 MΩ for 100 µm<sup>2</sup> Au electrode sites and increased the charge injection capacities to values greater than 3 mC/cm<sup>2</sup>. Finally, we demonstrated functionality by recording neural activity from basal ganglia nucleus of Zebra Finches and motor cortex of rat. The a-SiC MEAs provide a significant advancement in the development of microelectrodes that over the years has relied on silicon platforms for device manufacture. These flexible a-SiC MEAs have the potential for

  20. Amorphous and crystalline silicon based heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüttauf, J. A.

    2011-10-01

    In this thesis, research on amorphous and crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells is described. Probably the most important feature of SHJ solar cells is a thin intrinsic amorphous silicion (a-Si:H) layer that is deposited before depositing the doped emitter and back surface field. The passivation properties of such intrinsic layers made by three different chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have been investigated. For layers deposited at 130°C, all techniques show a strong reduction in surface recombination velocity (SRV) after annealing. Modelling indicates that dangling bond saturation by atomic hydrogen is the predominant mechanism. We obtain outstanding carrier lifetimes of 10.3 ms, corresponding to SRVs of 0.56 cm/s. For a-Si:H films made at 250°C, an as-deposited minority carrier lifetime of 2.0 ms is observed. In contrast to a-Si:H films fabricated at 130°C, however, no change in passivation quality upon thermal annealing is observed. These films were fabricated for the first time using a continuous in-line HWCVD mode. Wafer cleaning before a-Si:H deposition is a crucial step for c-Si surface passivation. We tested the influence of an atomic hydrogen treatment before a-Si:H deposition on the c-Si surface. The treatments were performed in a new virgin chamber to exclude Si deposition from the chamber walls. Subsequently, we deposited a-Si:H layers onto the c-Si wafers and measured the lifetime for different H treatment times. We found that increasing hydrogen treatment times led to lower effective lifetimes. Modelling of the measured minority carrier lifetime data shows that the decreased passivation quality is caused by an increased defect density at the amorphous-crystalline interface. Furtheremore, the passivation of different a-Si:H containing layers have been tested. For intrinsic films and intrinsic/n-type stacks, an improvement in passivation up to 255°C and 270°C is observed. This improvement is attributed to dangling bond

  1. The SVX II Silicon Vertex Detector at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valls, Juan A.

    1999-08-01

    The Silicon VerteX detector (SVX II) for the CDF experiment at the Tevatron p overlinep collider is a 3-barrel 5-layer device with double-sided, AC-coupled silicon strip detectors. The readout is based on a custom IC, the SVX3 chip, capable of simultaneous acquisition, digitization and readout operation (dead-timeless). In this paper we report on the SVX II design and project status including mechanical design, frontend electronics, and data acquisition.

  2. Dynamics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon flexural resonators for enhanced performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouro, J.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin-film flexural resonators with sub-micron actuation gaps are fabricated by surface micromachining on glass substrates. Experimentally, the resonators are electrostatically actuated and their motion is optically detected. Three different configurations for the electrostatic excitation force are used to study the dynamics of the resonators. In the first case, a dc voltage (Vdc) is added to an ac voltage with variable excitation frequency (Vac(ω)) and harmonic, superharmonic, and subharmonic resonances of different orders are observed. The second case consists on mixing the dc voltage (Vdc) with an ac voltage applied at a fixed frequency of twice the natural frequency of the resonator (V(2ω0)). High-amplitude parametric resonance is excited at the natural frequency of the system, ω0. This configuration allows a separation between the frequencies of the excitation and the mechanical motion. Finally, in the third case, the dc voltage (Vdc) is combined with both ac voltages, Vac(ω) and V(2ω0), and parametric resonance is excited and emerges from the fundamental harmonic resonance peak. The single-degree-of-freedom equation of motion is modeled and discussed for each case. The nonlinearity inherent to the electrostatic force is responsible for modulating the spring constant of the system at different frequencies, giving rise to parametric resonance. These equations of motion are simulated in the time and frequency domains, providing a consistent explanation of the experimentally observed phenomena. A wide variety of possible resonance modes with different characteristics can be used advantageously in MEMS device design.

  3. Stabilization of amorphous structure in silicon thin film by adding germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, Nobuaki; Shigeta, Yukichi

    2015-06-21

    The stabilization of the amorphous structure in amorphous silicon film by adding Ge atoms was studied using Raman spectroscopy. Amorphous Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} (x = 0.0, 0.03, 0.14, and 0.27) films were deposited on glass substrates from electron beam evaporation sources and annealed in N{sub 2} atmosphere. The change in the amorphous states and the phase transition from amorphous to crystalline were characterized using the TO, LO, and LA phonons in the Raman spectra. The temperature of the transition from the amorphous phase to the crystalline phase was higher for the a-Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} (x = 0.03, 0.14) films, and the crystallization was hindered. The reason why the addition of a suitable quantity of Ge atoms into the three-dimensional amorphous silicon network stabilizes its amorphous structure is discussed based on the changes in the Raman signals of the TO, LO, and LA phonons during annealing. The characteristic bond length of the Ge atoms allows them to stabilize the random network of the amorphous Si composed of quasi-tetrahedral Si units, and obstruct its rearrangement.

  4. Silicon Detector System and Noise Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan Ho; Kyung, Richard

    2012-03-01

    We can postulate that dark matter are WIMPS, more specifically, Majorana particles called neutralinos floating through space. Upon neutralino-neutralino annihilation, they create a greater burst of other particles into space: these being all kinds of particles including anti-deuterons which are the indications of the existence of dark matter. For the development of the silicon detector, many factors including noise, shaping times and leakage current are considered. It is also an object of this study to find out factors affected by parallel noise such as leakage current and parallel resistance. High noise is not desirable, so we tried to avoid noise because it blurs the accurate readings that measure the x-ray signatures by adding a passivation material. We searched for the optimal resolution at which the FWHM is at a minimum at a specific shaping time, and for this, we used different shaping times to find the optimal resolution. Results shows where the paint/passivation material affects, and when is the best shaping time for the resolution measurement.

  5. Fiber Optic Excitation of Silicon Microspheres in Amorphous and Crystalline Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Huzeyfe; Yılmaz, Hasan; Sharif Murib, Mohammed; Serpengüzel, Ali

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the optical resonance spectra of free-standing monolithic single crystal silicon microspheres immersed in various amorphous fluids, such as air, water, ethylene glycol, and 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl nematic liquid crystal. For the various amorphous fluids, morphology-dependent resonances with quality factors on the order of 105 are observed at 1428 nm. The mode spacing is always on the order of 0.23 nm. The immersion in various amorphous fluids affects the spectral response of the silicon microsphere and heralds this technique for use in novel optofluidics applications. Even though the nematic liquid crystal is a highly birefringent, scattering, and high-index optical medium, morphology-dependent resonances with quality factors on the order of 105 are observed at 1300 nm in the elastic scattering spectra of the silicon microsphere, realizing a liquid-crystal-on-silicon geometry. The relative refractive index and the size parameter of the silicon microsphere are the parameters that affect the resonance structure. The more 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl interacting with the silicon microsphere, the lower the quality factor of the resonances is. The more 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl is interacting with the silicon microsphere, the lower the mode spacing Δλ of the resonances is. The silicon microspheres wetted with nematic liquid crystal can be used for optically addressed liquid-crystal-on-silicon displays, light valve applications, or reconfigurable optical networks.

  6. Formation of amorphous silicon by light ion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Y.C.

    1985-12-01

    Amorphization by implantation of boron ions (which is the lightest element generally used in I.C. fabrication processes) has been systematically studied for various temperatures, various voltages and various dose rates. Based on theoretical considerations and experimental results, a new amorphization model for light and intermediate mass ion damage is proposed consisting of two stages. The role of interstitial type point defects or clusters in amorphization is emphasized. Due to the higher mobility of interstitials out-diffusion to the surface particularly during amorphization with low energy can be significant. From a review of the idealized amorphous structure, diinterstitial-divacancy pairs are suggested to be the embryos of amorphous zones formed during room temperature implantation. The stacking fault loops found in specimens implanted with boron at room temperature are considered to be the origin of secondary defects formed during annealing.

  7. DEPOSITS ON FLAME IONIZATION DETECTORS WITH SILICONE GUM RUBBER COLUMNS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    During the preparative gas chromatography of some organophosphorus esters using a silicone gum rubber column, a copious white deposit was formed on...detector deposits were mainly silicon phosphate (2SiO2.P2O5), and the injection port samples were alpha cristobalite (SiO2).

  8. a-Si:H TFT-silicon hybrid low-energy x-ray detector

    DOE PAGES

    Shin, Kyung -Wook; Karim, Karim S.

    2017-03-15

    Direct conversion crystalline silicon X-ray imagers are used for low-energy X-ray photon (4-20 keV) detection in scientific research applications such as protein crystallography. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel pixel architecture that integrates a crystalline silicon X-ray detector with a thin-film transistor amorphous silicon pixel readout circuit. We describe a simplified two-mask process to fabricate a complete imaging array and present preliminary results that show the fabricated pixel to be sensitive to 5.89-keV photons from a low activity Fe-55 gamma source. Furthermore, this paper presented can expedite the development of high spatial resolution, low cost, direct conversion imagers formore » X-ray diffraction and crystallography applications.« less

  9. Reaction of amorphous Ni-W and Ni-N-W films with substrate silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, M. F.; Suni, I.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Sands, T.

    1984-01-01

    Wiley et al. (1982) have studied sputtered amorphous films of Nb-Ni, Mo-Ni, Si-W, and Si-Mo. Kung et al. (1984) have found that amorphous Ni-Mo films as diffusion barriers between multilayer metallizations on silicon demonstrate good electrical and thermal stability. In the present investigation, the Ni-W system was selected because it is similar to the Ni-Mo system. However, W has a higher silicide formation temperature than Mo. Attention is given to aspects of sample preparation, sample characterization, the interaction between amorphous Ni-W films and Si, the crystallization of amorphous Ni(36)W(64) films on SiO2, amorphous Ni-N-W films, silicide formation and phase separation, and the crystallization of amorphous Ni(36)W(64) and Ni(30)N(21)W(49) layers.

  10. Development, prototyping and characterization of double sided silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topkar, Anita; Singh, Arvind; Aggarwal, Bharti; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Arvind; Murali Krishna, L. V.; Das, D.

    2016-10-01

    Double sided DC-coupled silicon strip detectors with geometry of 65 mm×65 mm have been developed in India for nuclear physics experiments. The detectors have 64 P+ strips on the front side and 64 N+ strips on the backside with a pitch of 0.9 mm. These detectors were fabricated using a twelve mask layer process involving double sided wafer processing technology. Semiconductor process and device simulations were carried out in order to theoretically estimate the impact of important design and process parameters on the breakdown voltage of detectors. The performance of the first lot of prototype detectors has been studied using static characterization tests and using an alpha source. The characterization results demonstrate that the detectors have low leakage currents and good uniformity over the detector area of about 40 cm2. Overview of the detector design, fabrication process, simulation results and initial characterization results of the detectors are presented in this paper.

  11. Clinical evaluation of digital radiography based on a large-area cesium iodide-amorphous silicon flat-panel detector compared with screen-film radiography for skeletal system and abdomen.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Terue; Tanaka, Saori; Koyama, Koichi; Norihumi, Nishida; Daikokuya, Hideo; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Kishimoto, Kenji; Hatagawa, Masakatsu; Kudoh, Hiroaki; Yamada, Ryusaku

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to compare the image quality of digital radiography using the new digital Bucky system based on a flat-panel detector with that of a conventional screen-film system for the skeletal structure and the abdomen. Fifty patients were examined using digital radiography with a flat-panel detector and screen-film systems, 25 for the skeletal structures and 25 for the abdomen. Six radiologists judged each paired image acquired under the same exposure parameters concerning three observation items for the bone and six items for the abdomen. Digital radiographic images for the bone were evaluated to be similar to screen-film images at the mean of 42.2%, to be superior at 50.2%, and to be inferior at 7.6%. Digital radiographic images for the abdomen were judged to be similar to screen-film images at the mean of 43.4%, superior at 52.4%, and inferior at 4.2%; thus, digital radiographic images were estimated to be either similar as or superior to screen-film images at over 92% for the bone and abdomen. On the statistical analysis, digital radiographic images were also judged to be preferred significantly in the most items for the bone and abdomen. In conclusion, the image quality of digital radiography with a flat-panel detector was superior to that of a screen-film system under the same exposure parameters, suggesting that dose reduction is possible with digital radiography.

  12. Passivation of c-Si surfaces by sub-nm amorphous silicon capped with silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao Yan, Di; Bullock, James; Zhang, Xinyu; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-12-07

    A sub-nm hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film capped with silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) is shown to provide a high level passivation to crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. When passivated by a 0.8 nm a-Si:H/75 nm SiN{sub x} stack, recombination current density J{sub 0} values of 9, 11, 47, and 87 fA/cm{sup 2} are obtained on 10 Ω·cm n-type, 0.8 Ω·cm p-type, 160 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused, and 120 Ω/sq boron-diffused silicon surfaces, respectively. The J{sub 0} on n-type 10 Ω·cm wafers is further reduced to 2.5 ± 0.5 fA/cm{sup 2} when the a-Si:H film thickness exceeds 2.5 nm. The passivation by the sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thermally stable at 400 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 min on all four c-Si surfaces. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a reduction in interface defect density and film charge density with an increase in a-Si:H thickness. The nearly transparent sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thus demonstrated to be a promising surface passivation and antireflection coating suitable for all types of surfaces encountered in high efficiency c-Si solar cells.

  13. Performance improvement in amorphous silicon based uncooled microbolometers through pixel design and materials development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajmera, Sameer; Brady, John; Hanson, Charles; Schimert, Tom; Syllaios, A. J.; Taylor, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometers have been established as a field-worthy technology for a broad range of applications where performance and form factor are paramount, such as soldier-borne systems. Recent developments in both bolometer materials and pixel design at L-3 in the 17μm pixel node have further advanced the state-of-the-art. Increasing the a-Si material temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) has the impact of improving NETD sensitivity without increasing thermal time constant (TTC), leading to an improvement in the NETD×TTC product. By tuning the amorphous silicon thin-film microstructure using hydrogen dilution during deposition, films with high TCR have been developed. The electrical properties of these films have been shown to be stable even after thermal cycling to temperatures greater than 300oC enabling wafer-level vacuum packaging currently performed at L-3 to reduce the size and weight of the vacuum packaged unit. Through appropriate selection of conditions during deposition, amorphous silicon of ~3.4% TCR has been integrated into the L-3 microbolometer manufacturing flow. By combining pixel design enhancements with improvements to amorphous silicon thin-film technology, L-3's amorphous silicon microbolometer technology will continue to provide the performance required to meet the needs to tomorrow's war-fighter.

  14. Proton and deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance studies of amorphous hydrogenated silicon, carbon, and carbon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernan, Mary Jane Wurth

    Despite the profound influence of semiconductors and the changes they have produced, many fundamental questions remain unanswered. We have used proton and deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to explore the role of hydrogens in amorphous silicon and amorphous carbon and carbon alloy films. In the carbon films, dipolar filtering techniques reveal a two-component shifted lineshape in the proton NMR spectra and deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) data demonstrate a feedstock gas dependence in the film deposition process. In these measurements, DMR is used to examine the effect of hydrogen on the photovoltaic properties of amorphous silicon thin films. We have measured the effects of photoillumination on amorphous silicon, particularly with respect to the process of metastable defect formation (the Staebler-Wronski effect). The creation and passivation of dangling silicon bonds is observed and quantified. We report large-scale light-induced atomic rearrangements which produce shifts and broadenings of the DMR lineshapes. The deuterium NMR lineshape component most affected by atomic rearrangements is a broad central feature which is shown to be molecular in origin. This spectral feature includes hydrogens trapped and immobile on surfaces created by strains and dislocations in the material. Narrowing of the lineshape at elevated temperatures indicates motion with a small activation energy. The substantial population represented by this feature is shown to account for at least 15% of the total hydrogens in high-quality amorphous silicon samples.

  15. Status and future of government-supported amorphous silicon research in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W L; Sabisky, E S

    1986-06-01

    The Amorphous Silicon Research Project (ASRP) was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute in 1983 and is responsible for all US Department of Energy government supported research activities in the field of amorphous silicon photovoltaics. The objectives and research directions of the project have been established by a Five-Year Research Plan, which was developed at SERI in cooperation with the Department of Energy in 1984 and is divided into research on single-junction and multi-junction solar cells. DOE/SERI has recently initiated a new three year program to be performed in collaboration with US industry to perform work on high efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells and submodules. The objectives of this initiative are: (i) to achieve 18% efficiencies for small area multi-junction amorphous silicon cells, and (ii) to achieve amorphous silicon submodule efficiencies in the 10 to 13% range for single-junction and multi-junction submodule configurations over areas of at least 1000 cm/sup 2/.

  16. Cosmic ray positron research and silicon track detector development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. Vernon; Wefel, John P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to conduct research on: (1) position sensing detector systems, particularly those based upon silicon detectors, for use in future balloon and satellite experiments; and (2) positrons, electrons, proton, anti-protons, and helium particles as measured by the NASA NMSU Balloon Magnet Facility.

  17. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  18. Status and upgrade plans of the Belle silicon vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, H.; Arakawa, T.; Asano, Y.; Aso, T.; Bakich, A.; Barbero, M.; Browder, T.; Chang, M. C.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chidzik, S.; Chouvikov, A.; Choi, Y. K.; Das, A.; Dalseno, J.; Fratina, S.; Friedl, M.; Fujiyama, Y.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Harrop, B.; Hayashi, K.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Higuchi, T.; Hirakawa, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishino, H.; Joshi, N. K.; Kajiwara, S.; Kakuno, H.; Kameshima, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kibayashi, A.; Kim, Y. J.; Koike, S.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kurashiro, H.; Kusaka, A.; Marlow, D.; Miyake, H.; Moloney, G. R.; Nakahama, Y.; Natkaniec, Z.; Okuno, S.; Ono, S.; Ostrowicz, W.; Ozaki, H.; Peak, L.; Pernicka, M.; Rosen, M.; Rozanska, M.; Sato, N.; Schmid, S.; Schümann, J.; Stanič, S.; Steininger, H.; Sumisawa, K.; Tajima, O.; Takahashi, T.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, M.; Tani, N.; Taylor, G. N.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, K.; Ueno, K.; Ushiroda, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K.; Velikzhanin, Y. S.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, M. Z.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Ziegler, T.

    2007-12-01

    The second generation of Belle Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) has been efficiently operated for more than three years. With increasing beam-induced background, a degradation of the detector performance is expected. To avoid such a difficulty, we are planing a next upgrade, the third generation of the SVD. Currently, its design is almost finalized.

  19. Status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. Nahn

    2003-04-10

    A snapshot of the status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector is presented, with a summary of commissioning issues since the start of Run II, current performance of the detector, and the use of the data in both the trigger and offline reconstruction.

  20. Catalytic phosphorus and boron doping of amorphous silicon films for application to silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohdaira, Keisuke; Seto, Junichi; Matsumura, Hideki

    2017-08-01

    We investigate a novel doping method, catalytic impurity doping (Cat-doping), for application to the fabrication of silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. Thin n- or p-type doped layers can be formed on intrinsic amorphous Si (a-Si) films by exposing P- or B-related radicals generated by the catalytic cracking of phosphine (PH3) or diborane (B2H6) gas molecules. The passivation quality of underlying a-Si films can be maintained both for phosphorus (P) and boron (B) Cat-doping if we carefully choose the appropriate substrate temperature during Cat-doping. We confirm the rectifying and photovoltaic properties of an SHJ solar cell containing a B Cat-doped layer as a p-type a-Si emitter. These findings suggest the applicability of Cat-doping to SHJ solar cells.

  1. Fabrication of detectors and transistors on high-resistivity silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, S.

    1988-06-01

    A new process for the fabrication of silicon p-i-n diode radiation detectors is described. The utilization of backside gettering in the fabrication process results in the actual physical removal of detrimental impurities from critical device regions. This reduces the sensitivity of detector properties to processing variables while yielding low diode reverse-leakage currents. In addition, gettering permits the use of processing temperatures compatible with integrated-circuit fabrication. P-channel MOSFETs and silicon p-i-n diodes have been fabricated simultaneously on 10 k..cap omega../center dot/cm<100> silicon using conventional integrated-circuit processing techniques. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Crystalline-Amorphous Silicon Nanocomposites with Reduced Thermal Conductivity for Bulk Thermoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Asuka; Zhou, Shu; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-06-24

    Responding to the need for thermoelectric materials with high efficiency in both conversion and cost, we developed a nanostructured bulk silicon thermoelectric materials by sintering silicon crystal quantum dots of several nanometers in diameters synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The material consists of hybrid structures of nanograins of crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon oxide. The percolated nanocrystalline region gives rise to high power factor with the high doping concentration realized by PECVD, and the binding amorphous region reduces thermal conductivity. Consequently, the nondimensional figure of merit reaches 0.39 at 600 °C, equivalent to the best reported value for silicon thermoelectrics. The thermal conductivity of the densely packed material is as low as 5 W m(-1) K(-1) in a wide temperature range from room temperature to 1000 °C, which is beneficial not only for the conversion efficiency but also for material cost by requiring less material to establish certain temperature gradient.

  3. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C.

    1995-02-01

    The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0{degrees}C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0{degrees}C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length.

  4. Noise performance of the D0 layer 0 silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    A new inner detector called Layer 0 has been added to the existing silicon detector for the DZero colliding beams experiment. This detector has an all carbon fiber support structure that employs thin copper clad Kapton sheets embedded in the surface of the carbon fiber structure to improve the grounding of the structure and a readout system that fully isolates the local detector ground from the rest of the detector. Initial measurements show efficiencies greater than 90% and 0.3 ADC count common mode contribution to the signal noise.

  5. Study of silicon photosensor applicability for scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khilya, V. M.; Voronov, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present work is the creation a prototype of anticoincidence system AC for gamma-telescope GAMMA-400. The detectors of AC are developed on the basis of plastic scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. This work is focuses on research of applicability of silicon photomultipliers SiPM by company SensL, type 60000 with BC-408 plastics for the prototype of anticoincidence system detector ACtop. In frame of project the assembly for measuring of the SiPM characteristics such as the linearity, boundary of saturation, the time resolution was developed. The final stage of work was the integration of the prototype of anticoincidence detector.

  6. Core-shell amorphous silicon-carbon nanoparticles for high performance anodes in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourice, Julien; Bordes, Arnaud; Boulineau, Adrien; Alper, John P.; Franger, Sylvain; Quinsac, Axelle; Habert, Aurélie; Leconte, Yann; De Vito, Eric; Porcher, Willy; Reynaud, Cécile; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Haon, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    Core-shell silicon-carbon nanoparticles are attractive candidates as active material to increase the capacity of Li-ion batteries while mitigating the detrimental effects of volume expansion upon lithiation. However crystalline silicon suffers from amorphization upon the first charge/discharge cycle and improved stability is expected in starting with amorphous silicon. Here we report the synthesis, in a single-step process, of amorphous silicon nanoparticles coated with a carbon shell (a-Si@C), via a two-stage laser pyrolysis where decomposition of silane and ethylene are conducted in two successive reaction zones. Control of experimental conditions mitigates silicon core crystallization as well as formation of silicon carbide. Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy show a carbon shell about 1 nm in thickness, which prevents detrimental oxidation of the a-Si cores. Cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that the core-shell composite reaches its maximal lithiation during the first sweep, thanks to its amorphous core. After 500 charge/discharge cycles, it retains a capacity of 1250 mAh.g-1 at a C/5 rate and 800 mAh.g-1 at 2C, with an outstanding coulombic efficiency of 99.95%. Moreover, post-mortem observations show an electrode volume expansion of less than 20% and preservation of the nanostructuration.

  7. Stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells with low hydrogen content

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, C.M.; Hegedus, S.S. )

    1992-12-01

    Results and conclusions obtained during a research program of the investigation of amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon based alloy materials and solar cells fabricated by photo-chemical vapor and glow discharge depositions are reported. Investigation of the effects of the hydrogen content in a-si:H i-layers in amorphous silicon solar cells show that cells with lowered hydrogen content i-layers are more stable. A classical thermodynamic formulation of the Staebler-Wronski effect has been developed for standard solar cell operating temperatures and illuminations. Methods have been developed to extract a lumped equivalent circuit from the current voltage characteristic of a single junction solar cell in order to predict its behavior in a multijunction device.

  8. Radial junction amorphous silicon solar cells on PECVD-grown silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linwei; O'Donnell, Benedict; Foldyna, Martin; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2012-05-17

    Constructing radial junction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells on top of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) represents a promising approach towards high performance and cost-effective thin film photovoltaics. We here develop an all-in situ strategy to grow SiNWs, via a vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism on top of ZnO-coated glass substrate, in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) reactor. Controlling the distribution of indium catalyst drops allows us to tailor the as-grown SiNW arrays into suitable size and density, which in turn results in both a sufficient light trapping effect and a suitable arrangement allowing for conformal coverage of SiNWs by subsequent a-Si:H layers. We then demonstrate the fabrication of radial junction solar cells and carry on a parametric study designed to shed light on the absorption and quantum efficiency response, as functions of the intrinsic a-Si:H layer thickness and the density of SiNWs. These results lay a solid foundation for future structural optimization and performance ramp-up of the radial junction thin film a-Si:H photovoltaics.

  9. Photoemission studies of amorphous silicon induced by P + ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petö, G.; Kanski, J.

    1995-12-01

    An amorphous Si layer was formed on a Si (1 0 0) surface by P + implantation at 80 keV. This layer was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting spectra are different from earlier spectra on amorphous Si prepared by e-gun evaporation or cathode sputtering. The differences consist of a decreased intensity in the spectral region corresponding to p-states, and appearace of new states at higher binding energy. Qualitativity similar results have been reported for Sb implanted amorphous Ge and the modification seems to be due to the changed short range order.

  10. N-type crystalline silicon films free of amorphous silicon deposited on glass by HCl addition using hot wire chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yung-Bin; Park, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Song, Jean-Ho; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2011-09-01

    Since n-type crystalline silicon films have the electric property much better than those of hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films, they can enhance the performance of advanced electronic devices such as solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). Since the formation of amorphous silicon is unavoidable in the low temperature deposition of microcrystalline silicon on a glass substrate at temperatures less than 550 degrees C in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition and hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD), crystalline silicon films have not been deposited directly on a glass substrate but fabricated by the post treatment of amorphous silicon films. In this work, by adding the HCl gas, amorphous silicon-free n-type crystalline silicon films could be deposited directly on a glass substrate by HWCVD. The resistivity of the n-type crystalline silicon film for the flow rate ratio of [HCl]/[SiH4] = 7.5 and [PH3]/[SiH4] = 0.042 was 5.31 x 10(-4) ohms cm, which is comparable to the resistivity 1.23 x 10(-3) ohms cm of films prepared by thermal annealing of amorphous silicon films. The absence of amorphous silicon in the film could be confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  11. In situ observation of shear-driven amorphization in silicon crystals

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yang; Zhong, Li; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Chongmin; Zhu, Ting; Mao, Scott X.

    2016-09-19

    Amorphous materials have attracted great interest in the scientific and technological fields. An amorphous solid usually forms under the externally driven conditions of melt-quenching, irradiation and severe mechanical deformation. However, its dynamic formation process remains elusive. Here we report the in situ atomic-scale observation of dynamic amorphization processes during mechanical straining of nanoscale silicon crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We observe the shear-driven amorphization (SDA) occurring in a dominant shear band. The SDA involves a sequence of processes starting with the shear-induced diamond-cubic to diamond-hexagonal phase transition that is followed by dislocation nucleation and accumulation in the newly formed phase, leading to the formation of amorphous silicon. The SDA formation through diamond-hexagonal phase is rationalized by its structural conformity with the order in the paracrystalline amorphous silicon, which maybe widely applied to diamond-cubic materials. Besides, the activation of SDA is orientation-dependent through the competition between full dislocation nucleation and partial gliding.

  12. Investigation of hydrogen plasma treatment for reducing defects in silicon quantum dot superlattice structure with amorphous silicon carbide matrix

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effects of hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on the properties of silicon quantum dot superlattice films. Hydrogen introduced in the films efficiently passivates silicon and carbon dangling bonds at a treatment temperature of approximately 400°C. The total dangling bond density decreases from 1.1 × 1019 cm-3 to 3.7 × 1017 cm-3, which is comparable to the defect density of typical hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films. A damaged layer is found to form on the surface by HPT; this layer can be easily removed by reactive ion etching. PMID:24521208

  13. In situ observation of shear-driven amorphization in silicon crystals.

    PubMed

    He, Yang; Zhong, Li; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Chongmin; Zhu, Ting; Mao, Scott X

    2016-10-01

    Amorphous materials are used for both structural and functional applications. An amorphous solid usually forms under driven conditions such as melt quenching, irradiation, shock loading or severe mechanical deformation. Such extreme conditions impose significant challenges on the direct observation of the amorphization process. Various experimental techniques have been used to detect how the amorphous phases form, including synchrotron X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy, but a dynamic, atomistic characterization has remained elusive. Here, by using in situ high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), we show the dynamic amorphization process in silicon nanocrystals during mechanical straining on the atomic scale. We find that shear-driven amorphization occurs in a dominant shear band starting with the diamond-cubic (dc) to diamond-hexagonal (dh) phase transition and then proceeds by dislocation nucleation and accumulation in the newly formed dh-Si phase. This process leads to the formation of an amorphous Si (a-Si) band, embedded with dh-Si nanodomains. The amorphization of dc-Si via an intermediate dh-Si phase is a previously unknown pathway of solid-state amorphization.

  14. In situ observation of shear-driven amorphization in silicon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Zhong, Li; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Chongmin; Zhu, Ting; Mao, Scott X.

    2016-10-01

    Amorphous materials are used for both structural and functional applications. An amorphous solid usually forms under driven conditions such as melt quenching, irradiation, shock loading or severe mechanical deformation. Such extreme conditions impose significant challenges on the direct observation of the amorphization process. Various experimental techniques have been used to detect how the amorphous phases form, including synchrotron X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy, but a dynamic, atomistic characterization has remained elusive. Here, by using in situ high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), we show the dynamic amorphization process in silicon nanocrystals during mechanical straining on the atomic scale. We find that shear-driven amorphization occurs in a dominant shear band starting with the diamond-cubic (dc) to diamond-hexagonal (dh) phase transition and then proceeds by dislocation nucleation and accumulation in the newly formed dh-Si phase. This process leads to the formation of an amorphous Si (a-Si) band, embedded with dh-Si nanodomains. The amorphization of dc-Si via an intermediate dh-Si phase is a previously unknown pathway of solid-state amorphization.

  15. Silicon position sensitive detectors for the HELIOS (NA34) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beuttenmuller, R.; Bisi, V.; Chesi, E.; Di Nardo, R.P.; Esten, M.J.; Giubellino, P.; Kraner, H.W.; Ludlam, T.W.; Meddi, F.; Piuz, F.

    1986-03-01

    Silicon detectors having both ''pad'' and strip position sensitive configurations have been fabricated for the HELIOS experiment which requires an elaborate pulse height-dependent trigger as well as one dimensional silicon strip position sensing. The trigger detector is a 400 element, 30 mm diameter detector with readout connections from a ceramic overlay board. Tests with full prototype detectors have shown essentially 100% detection efficiency and excellent pulse height resolution well capable of delineating 0, 1 or 2 hits per pad. Strip detectors with 25 ..mu..m pitch and a varying readout pitch have been tested, which utilize both capacitive and resistive charge division. Techniques for realization of required interstrip resistors will be discussed and results which may compare these readout methods will be reported. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Elastic behavior of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite: An atomistic view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suvankar; Dutta, Amlan

    2017-01-01

    In the context of mechanical properties, nanocomposites with homogeneous chemical composition throughout the matrix and the dispersed phase are of particular interest. In this study, the elastic moduli of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite have been estimated using atomistic simulations. A comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the elastic behavior is significantly influenced by the crystal-amorphous interphase. On observing the effect of volume-fraction of the crystalline phase, an anomalous trend for the bulk modulus is obtained. This phenomenon is attributed to the relaxation displacements of the amorphous atoms.

  17. Amorphization and nanocrystallization of silicon under laser shock compression: bridging experiment with atomic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Hahn, Eric; Remington, Bruce; Wehrenberg, Christopher; Bringa, Eduardo; Huntington, Channing; Park, Hye-Sook; More, Karren; Meyers, Marc

    Terawatt, nanosecond-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon unveiled remarkable structural changes above a pressure threshold. Two distinct amorphous regions were identified: (a) a bulk amorphous layer close to the surface and (b) amorphous bands initially aligned with {111}slip planes. Further increase of the laser energy leads to the re-crystallization of amorphous silicon into nanocrystals with high concentration of nano-twins. Shock-induced defects play a very important role in the onset of amorphization. Calculations of the free energy changes with pressure and shear, using the Patel-Cohen methodology, are in agreement with the experimental results. Molecular dynamics simulation corroborates the amorphization, showing that it is initiated by the nucleation and propagation of partial dislocations. The nucleation of amorphization is analyzed by classical nucleation theory. This research is funded by a UC Research Laboratories Grant (09-LR-06-118456-MEYM) and a National Laser Users Facility (NLUF) Grant (PE-FG52-09NA-29043).

  18. Electrodeposition at room temperature of amorphous silicon and germanium nanowires in ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martineau, F.; Namur, K.; Mallet, J.; Delavoie, F.; Endres, F.; Troyon, M.; Molinari, M.

    2009-11-01

    The electrodeposition at room temperature of silicon and germanium nanowires from the air- and water-stable ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (P1,4) containing SiCl4 as Si source or GeCl4 as Ge source is investigated by cyclic voltammetry. By using nanoporous polycarbonate membranes as templates, it is possible to reproducibly grow pure silicon and germanium nanowires of different diameters. The nanowires are composed of pure amorphous silicon or germanium. The nanowires have homogeneous cylindrical shape with a roughness of a few nanometres on the wire surfaces. The nanowires' diameters and lengths well match with the initial membrane characteristics. Preliminary photoluminescence experiments exhibit strong emission in the near infrared for the amorphous silicon nanowires.

  19. Graphene as a transparent electrode for amorphous silicon-based solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vaianella, F. Rosolen, G.; Maes, B.

    2015-06-28

    The properties of graphene in terms of transparency and conductivity make it an ideal candidate to replace indium tin oxide (ITO) in a transparent conducting electrode. However, graphene is not always as good as ITO for some applications, due to a non-negligible absorption. For amorphous silicon photovoltaics, we have identified a useful case with a graphene-silica front electrode that improves upon ITO. For both electrode technologies, we simulate the weighted absorption in the active layer of planar amorphous silicon-based solar cells with a silver back-reflector. The graphene device shows a significantly increased absorbance compared to ITO-based cells for a large range of silicon thicknesses (34.4% versus 30.9% for a 300 nm thick silicon layer), and this result persists over a wide range of incidence angles.

  20. Electrically Active Defects In Solar Cells Based On Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction After Irradiation By Heavy Xe Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmatha, Ladislav; Mikolášek, Miroslav; Stuchlíková, L'ubica; Kósa, Arpád; Žiška, Milan; Hrubčín, Ladislav; Skuratov, Vladimir A.

    2015-11-01

    The contribution is focused on the diagnostics of structures with a heterojunction between amorphous and crystalline silicon prepared by HIT (Heterojunction with an Intrinsic Thin layer) technology. The samples were irradiated by Xe ions with energy 167 MeV and doses from 5 × 108 cm-2 to 5 × 1010 cm-2. Radiation defects induced in the bulk of Si and at the hydrogenated amorphous silicon and crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) interface were identified by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS). Radiation induced A-centre traps, boron vacancy traps and different types of divacancies with a high value of activation energy were observed. With an increased fluence of heavy ions the nature and density of the radiation induced defects was changed.

  1. Development of a New Silicon Drift Detector Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welter, Edmund; Hansen, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    A novel 7 cell Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) module for X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) and similar methods is developed at the Hamburger Synchrotron Strahlungslabor at Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron. The monolithic 7 cell SDD detector chips were delivered by PN Sensors (Munich, Germany). Each cell has an active area of 7 mm2. In this paper we report results from the spatially resolved spectroscopic characterization of the SDD and their consequences for the final design of the complete detector modules. A specialized read out chip is currently developed at DESY and will make it possible to achieve a maximum count rate of 600 Kcps/detector cell.

  2. Antihydrogen annihilation reconstruction with the ALPHA silicon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Hayano, R. S.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Sarid, E.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Yamazaki, Y.; Alpha Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The ALPHA experiment has succeeded in trapping antihydrogen, a major milestone on the road to spectroscopic comparisons of antihydrogen with hydrogen. An annihilation vertex detector, which determines the time and position of antiproton annihilations, has been central to this achievement. This detector, an array of double-sided silicon microstrip detector modules arranged in three concentric cylindrical tiers, is sensitive to the passage of charged particles resulting from antiproton annihilation. This article describes the method used to reconstruct the annihilation location and to distinguish the annihilation signal from the cosmic ray background. Recent experimental results using this detector are outlined.

  3. Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Hu, Jianhua; Musher, J.; Giunta, C.

    1991-02-01

    The specific objectives of this research are to: (1) deposit and characterize textured zinc oxide with improved conductivities (less than 8 ohms/square sheet resistance) and optical transmission (greater than 85 percent for 450 to 700 nm), for use as front and back contacts in hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n devices; (2) study the surface morphology of zinc oxide films deposited by chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure (APCVD), their crystallite sizes, shapes and orientations, and their nucleation (early growth) as a function of chemical precursors and reaction conditions; (3) optimize the growth process to produce structures that provide good light trapping in an amorphous silicon film deposited on the zinc oxide film; (4) study the deposition rate of zinc oxide films as a function of temperature, and concentration and types of reactants; (5) maximize the growth rate, subject to the conditions of maintaining satisfactory film properties, including high transparency (85 percent), high conductivity (8 ohm/square sheet resistance), and good light trapping; (6) develop techniques for deposition of fluorinated zinc oxide films by APCVD on amorphous silicon films in the temperature range of 250 to 280 C for use as back contacts; (7) deposit titanium nitride films at a temperature of about 250 C by APCVD on amorphous silicon as diffusion barrier, and then deposit highly reflective metals such as aluminum or silver; (8) anneal samples and test for metal diffusion through the TiN into the silicon; (9) optimize the TiN film for minimum diffusion consistent with maintaining desirable TiN film properties; and (10) incorporate the front and back contacts including the TiN barrier layer developed under this research into amorphous silicon p-i-n devices and determine the film parameters that provide the greatest improvement in the device solar energy conversion efficiency.

  4. First-principles study of the mechanical and optical properties of amorphous hydrogenated silicon and silicon-rich silicon oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondi, Robert J.; Lee, Sangheon; Hwang, Gyeong S.

    2010-05-01

    We use first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations to predict mechanical and optical property variation with composition for hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) ( at.%H=0 , 5.9, 11.1, and 15.8) and a-SiOx ( x=0 , 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0). A better understanding of the properties of a-Si:H and amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiOx) is technologically important, particularly for photovoltaic and optoelectronic device applications, respectively. However, relatively little reliable property information is available for these amorphous materials except for the well-studied end-point cases of a-Si and a-SiO2 . Our DFT calculations within the generalized gradient approximation predict that addition of H to a-Si monotonically reduces the elastic modulus (Y) by 18% and bulk modulus (B) by 16% as H incorporation increases to 15.8at.% in a-Si:H. Similarly, addition of O to a-Si monotonically reduces Y by 35% and B by 38% as x increases to 2.0 in a-SiOx . Our optical spectra for the complex dielectric function, ɛ(ω) , exhibit intensity reduction in the E2 transition peak of Im[ɛ(ω)] and reduction in the low-frequency dielectric constant {ɛo=limω→0Re[ɛ(ω)]} as either H or O are added to a-Si while the a-SiOx spectra additionally resolve a vivid blueshift of both the fundamental absorption edge and E2 transition energy as O content increases. Considering the large variation in reported experimental measurements and the limited availability of previous computational results, our property predictions provide valuable insight into the mechanical and optical behavior of a-Si:H and a-SiOx materials.

  5. Direct Simulation of Ion Beam Induced Stressing and Amorphization of Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1999-05-02

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the authors investigate the mechanical response of silicon to high dose ion-irradiation. The authors employ a realistic model to directly simulate ion beam induced amorphization. Structural properties of the amorphized sample are compared with experimental data and results of other simulation studies. The authors find the behavior of the irradiated material is related to the rate at which it can relax. Depending upon the ability to deform, the authors observe either the generation of a high compressive stress and subsequent expansion of the material, or generation of tensile stress and densification. The authors note that statistical material properties, such as radial distribution functions are not sufficient to differentiate between the different densities of the amorphous samples. For any reasonable deformation rate, the authors observe an expansion of the target upon amorphization in agreement with experimental observations. This is in contrast to simulations of quenching which usually result in a denser structure relative to crystalline Si. The authors conclude that although there is substantial agreement between experimental measurements and simulation results, the amorphous structures being investigated may have fundamental differences; the difference in density can be attributed to local defects within the amorphous network. Finally the authors show that annealing simulations of their amorphized samples can lead to a reduction of high energy local defects without a large scale rearrangement of the amorphous network. This supports the proposal that defects in a-Si are analogous to those in c-Si.

  6. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, R. A.; Dugad, S. R.; Garde, C. S.; Gopal, A. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Prabhu, S. S.

    2014-02-01

    The emergence of high position resolution (˜10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 - σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper.

  7. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, R. A.; Dugad, S. R. Gopal, A. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Prabhu, S. S.; Garde, C. S.

    2014-02-15

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 − σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper.

  8. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors.

    PubMed

    Shukla, R A; Dugad, S R; Garde, C S; Gopal, A V; Gupta, S K; Prabhu, S S

    2014-02-01

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 - σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper.

  9. Charging/discharging behavior and mechanism of silicon quantum dots embedded in amorphous silicon carbide films

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xixing; Zeng, Xiangbin Zheng, Wenjun; Liao, Wugang; Feng, Feng

    2015-01-14

    The charging/discharging behavior of Si quantum dots (QDs) embedded in amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC{sub x}) was investigated based on the Al/insulating layer/Si QDs embedded in a-SiC{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si (metal-insulator-quantum dots-oxide-silicon) multilayer structure by capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G-V) measurements. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy measurements reveal the microstructure and distribution of Si QDs. The occurrence and shift of conductance peaks indicate the carrier transfer and the charging/discharging behavior of Si QDs. The multilayer structure shows a large memory window of 5.2 eV at ±8 V sweeping voltage. Analysis of the C-V and G-V results allows a quantification of the Coulomb charging energy and the trapped charge density associated with the charging/discharging behavior. It is found that the memory window is related to the size effect, and Si QDs with large size or low Coulomb charging energy can trap two or more electrons by changing the charging voltage. Meanwhile, the estimated lower potential barrier height between Si QD and a-SiC{sub x}, and the lower Coulomb charging energy of Si QDs could enhance the charging and discharging effect of Si QDs and lead to an enlarged memory window. Further studies of the charging/discharging mechanism of Si QDs embedded in a-SiC{sub x} can promote the application of Si QDs in low-power consumption semiconductor memory devices.

  10. High-energy neutron spectroscopy with thick silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinnison, James D.; Maurer, Richard H.; Roth, David R.; Haight, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The high-energy neutron component of the space radiation environment in thick structures such as the International Space Station contributes to the total radiation dose received by an astronaut. Detector design constraints such as size and mass have limited the energy range of neutron spectrum measurements in orbit to about 12 MeV in Space Shuttle studies. We present a new method for high-energy neutron spectroscopy using small silicon detectors that can extend these measurements to more than 500 MeV. The methodology is based on measurement of the detector response function for high-energy neutrons and inversion of this response function with measured deposition data to deduce neutron energy spectra. We also present the results of an initial shielding study performed with the thick silicon detector system for high-energy neutrons incident on polyethylene.

  11. Evolution of amorphous selenium nanoballs in silicone oil and their solvent induced morphological transformation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Arun Kumar; Sasmal, Anup Kumar; Mehetor, Shyamal Kumar; Pradhan, Mukul; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-12-25

    Selenium generally exhibits preferential habitual 1D growth as a result of redox reactions of selenium compounds. Commercial Se powder melts in silicone oil under refluxing conditions and upon subsequent cooling evolve amorphous Se nanoballs (SNBs). Further ultrapure crystalline 1D Se grows from SNBs due to solvent mediated oriented attachment.

  12. Fabrication and Modeling of Ambipolar Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin Film Transistors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    provided by the Air Force Academy and the Air Force Institute of Technology for this research. In addition, the funding from Delco Electronics for... REVIEW ................................................... 3 2.1 Introduction... technology . In particular, with the realization that hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) could be prepared with a low density of localized states in

  13. SIMS Study of Elemental Diffusion During Solid Phase Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R. C.; Young, D.; Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2005-11-01

    Crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films deposited on low-cost substrates shows potential for solar cell applications. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to study impurity incorporation, hydrogen evolution, and dopant diffusion during the crystallization process

  14. Amorphous silicon research. Annual subcontract report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Arya, R R; Bennett, M; Bradley, D

    1996-02-01

    The major effort in this program is to develop cost-effective processes which satisfy efficiency, yield, and material usage criteria for mass production of amorphous silicon-based multijunction modules. New and improved processes were developed for the component cells and a more robust rear contact was developed for better long term stability.

  15. Method of forming semiconducting amorphous silicon films from the thermal decomposition of fluorohydridodisilanes

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Kenneth G.; D'Errico, John J.

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of forming amorphous, photoconductive, and semiconductive silicon films on a substrate by the vapor phase thermal decomposition of a fluorohydridodisilane or a mixture of fluorohydridodisilanes. The invention is useful for the protection of surfaces including electronic devices.

  16. Hybrid method of making an amorphous silicon P-I-N semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Morel, Don L.; Abeles, Benjamin

    1983-10-04

    The invention is directed to a hydrogenated amorphous silicon PIN semiconductor device of hybrid glow discharge/reactive sputtering fabrication. The hybrid fabrication method is of advantage in providing an ability to control the optical band gap of the P and N layers, resulting in increased photogeneration of charge carriers and device output.

  17. Noise performance of the D0 layer 0 silicon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M.; D0 Collaboration

    2007-09-01

    A new inner detector called Layer 0 has been added to the existing silicon detector for the DZero colliding beams experiment [V.M. Abazoz et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 565 (2006) 463]. This detector has an all carbon fiber support structure that employs thin copper clad Kapton sheets embedded in the surface of the carbon fiber structure to improve the grounding of the structure and a readout system that fully isolates the local detector ground from the rest of the detector. Initial measurements show efficiencies greater than 90% and 0.3 ADC count (240 e) common mode contribution to the signal noise. The total detector capacitance is 24 pF so this corresponds to 2 μV of common mode voltage.

  18. Laser annealing study of PECVD deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscia, U.; Ambrosone, G.; Gesuele, F.; Grossi, V.; Parisi, V.; Schutzmann, S.; Basa, D. K.

    2007-12-01

    The influence of carbon content on the crystallization process has been investigated for the excimer laser annealed hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) technique, using silane methane gas mixture diluted in helium, as well as for the hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon carbon alloy films prepared by PECVD from silane methane gas mixture highly diluted in hydrogen, for comparison. The study demonstrates clearly that the increase in the carbon content prevents the crystallization process in the hydrogen diluted samples while the crystallization process is enhanced in the laser annealing of amorphous samples because of the increase in the absorbed laser energy density that occurs for the amorphous films with the higher carbon content. This, in turn, facilitates the crystallization for the laser annealed samples with higher carbon content, resulting in the formation of SiC crystallites along with Si crystallites.

  19. Size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; Braun, Jeffrey L.; Baker, Christopher H.; Elahi, Miraz; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Norris, Pamela M.; Leseman, Zayd Chad; Gaskins, John T.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Giri, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate thickness-limited size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon thin films ranging from 3 to 1636 nm grown via sputter deposition. While exhibiting a constant value up to ~100 nm, the thermal conductivity increases with film thickness thereafter. The thickness dependence we demonstrate is ascribed to boundary scattering of long wavelength vibrations and an interplay between the energy transfer associated with propagating modes (propagons) and nonpropagating modes (diffusons). A crossover from propagon to diffuson modes is deduced to occur at a frequency of ~1.8 THz via simple analytical arguments. These results provide empirical evidence of size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon and systematic experimental insight into the nature of vibrational thermal transport in amorphous solids.

  20. Size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; Braun, Jeffrey L.; Baker, Christopher H.; ...

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate thickness-limited size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon thin films ranging from 3 to 1636 nm grown via sputter deposition. While exhibiting a constant value up to ~100 nm, the thermal conductivity increases with film thickness thereafter. The thickness dependence we demonstrate is ascribed to boundary scattering of long wavelength vibrations and an interplay between the energy transfer associated with propagating modes (propagons) and nonpropagating modes (diffusons). A crossover from propagon to diffuson modes is deduced to occur at a frequency of ~1.8 THz via simple analytical arguments. These results provide empirical evidencemore » of size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon and systematic experimental insight into the nature of vibrational thermal transport in amorphous solids.« less

  1. Performance of silicon microdosimetry detectors in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Bradley, P D; Rosenfeld, A B; Allen, B; Coderre, J; Capala, J

    1999-03-01

    Reverse-biased silicon p-n junction arrays using Silicon-On-Insulator technology have been proposed as microdosimeters. The performance of such detectors in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is discussed. This work provides the first reported measurements using boron-coated silicon diode arrays as microdosimeters in BNCT. Results are in good agreement with measurements with gas proportional counters. Various boron-coating options are investigated along with device orientation effects. Finally, a 235U coating is tested to simulate the behavior of the device in a heavy-ion therapy beam.

  2. Design of an advanced readout chip for silicon strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, T.; Sarraj, M.; Yarema, R.

    1992-11-01

    Work was begun in 1990 on the development of an advanced readout chip (ARC) for silicon strip detectors. Features of the proposed device include compatibility with close bunch spacing and double sided detectors, and on chip analog storage, digitization, and data sparsification. Chip have been designed to check all of these concepts, fabricated in the VTI 2 micron process, and tested. The circuit configurations and test results are presented in this paper.

  3. Low-temperature Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Silicon Materials and Thin-film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, Andrei; Striakhilev, Denis; Nathan, Arokia

    Low-temperature processing and characterization of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) materials and devices are reviewed. An overview of silicon-based low-temperature thin-film dielectrics is given in the context of thin-film transistor (TFT) device operation. The low-temperature growth and synthesis of these materials are also presented and compared to conventionally fabricated high-temperature processed devices. The effect of using nc-Si contacts on a-Si:H TFTs and the stability of nc-Si TFTs is reviewed.

  4. High-Gain Avalanche Rushing amorphous Photoconductor (HARP) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanioka, K.

    2009-09-01

    We have been studying a very sensitive image sensor since the early 1980s. In 1985, the author found for the first time that an experimental pickup tube with an amorphous selenium photoconductive target exhibits high sensitivity with excellent picture quality because of a continuous and stable avalanche multiplication phenomenon. We named the pickup tube with an amorphous photoconductive layer operating in the avalanche-mode "HARP": High-gain Avalanche Rushing amorphous Photoconductor. A color camera equipped with the HARP pickup tubes has a maximum sensitivity of 11 lx at F8. This means that the HARP camera is about 100 times as sensitive as that of CCD camera for broadcasting. This ultrahigh-sensitivity HARP pickup tube is a powerful tool for reporting breaking news at night and other low-light conditions, the production of scientific programs, and numerous other applications, including medical diagnoses, biotech research, and nighttime surveillance. In addition, since the HARP target can convert X-rays into electrons directly, it should be possible to exploit this capability to produce X-ray imaging devices with unparalleled levels of resolution and sensitivity.

  5. EMC Diagnosis and Corrective Actions for Silicon Strip Tracker Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Arteche, F.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2006-06-06

    The tracker sub-system is one of the five sub-detectors of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment under construction at CERN for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator. The tracker subdetector is designed to reconstruct tracks of charged sub-atomic particles generated after collisions. The tracker system processes analogue signals from 10 million channels distributed across 14000 silicon micro-strip detectors. It is designed to process signals of a few nA and digitize them at 40 MHz. The overall sub-detector is embedded in a high particle radiation environment and a magnetic field of 4 Tesla. The evaluation of the electromagnetic immunity of the system is very important to optimize the performance of the tracker sub-detector and the whole CMS experiment. This paper presents the EMC diagnosis of the CMS silicon tracker sub-detector. Immunity tests were performed using the final prototype of the Silicon Tracker End-Caps (TEC) system to estimate the sensitivity of the system to conducted noise, evaluate the weakest areas of the system and take corrective actions before the integration of the overall detector. This paper shows the results of one of those tests, that is the measurement and analysis of the immunity to CM external conducted noise perturbations.

  6. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  7. Thin epitaxial silicon PIN detectors for thermal neutron detection with improved gamma (γ) discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Arvind Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-23

    In order to improve the gamma discrimination capability for thermal neutron measurements using silicon PIN detectors, a novel approach of use of thin epitaxial silicon PIN detectors was investigated. Thin epitaxial silicon detectors with thickness of 15 µm were developed and their performance was tested with thermal neutrons using {sup 10}B converter. The performance of this detector was compared with the performance of a 300 µm silicon detector. The results of experiments presented in this paper indicate that thin epitaxial silicon detectors can significantly improve γ discrimination for thermal neutron measurements.

  8. Amorphous Silicon Carbide Passivating Layers to Enable Higher Processing Temperature in Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2015-04-06

    "Very efficient crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have been demonstrated when thin layers of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are used for passivation and carrier selectivity in a heterojunction device. One limitation of this device structure is the (parasitic) absorption in the front passivation/collection a-Si:H layers; another is the degradation of the a-Si:H-based passivation upon temperature, limiting the post-processes to approximately 200°C thus restricting the contacting possibilities and potential tandem device fabrication. To alleviate these two limitations, we explore the potential of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), a widely studied material in use in standard a-Si:H thin-film solar cells, which is known for its wider bandgap, increased hydrogen content and stronger hydrogen bonding compared to a-Si:H. We study the surface passivation of solar-grade textured n-type c-Si wafers for symmetrical stacks of 10-nm-thick intrinsic a-SiC:H with various carbon content followed by either p-doped or n-doped a-Si:H (referred to as i/p or i/n stacks). For both doping types, passivation (assessed through carrier lifetime measurements) is degraded by increasing the carbon content in the intrinsic a-SiC:H layer. Yet, this hierarchy is reversed after annealing at 350°C or more due to drastic passivation improvements upon annealing when an a-SiC:H layer is used. After annealing at 350°C, lifetimes of 0.4 ms and 2.0 ms are reported for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, when using an intrinsic a-SiC:H layer with approximately 10% of carbon (initial lifetimes of 0.3 ms and 0.1 ms, respectively, corresponding to a 30% and 20-fold increase, respectively). For stacks of pure a-Si:H material the lifetimes degrade from 1.2 ms and 2.0 ms for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, to less than 0.1 ms and 1.1 ms (12-fold and 2-fold decrease, respectively). For complete solar cells using pure a-Si:H i/p and i/n stacks, the open-circuit voltage (Voc

  9. Amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation: Ambient-temperature dependence and implications for solar cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Seif, Johannes P.; Krishnamani, Gopal; Demaurex, Benedicte; Ballif, Christophe; Wolf, Stefaan De

    2015-03-02

    Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells feature amorphous silicon passivation films, which enable very high voltages. We report how such passivation increases with operating temperature for amorphous silicon stacks involving doped layers and decreases for intrinsic-layer-only passivation. We discuss the implications of this phenomenon on the solar cell's temperature coefficient, which represents an important figure-of-merit for the energy yield of devices deployed in the field. We show evidence that both open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are affected by these variations in passivation and quantify these temperature-mediated effects, compared with those expected from standard diode equations. We confirm that devices with high Voc values at 25°C show better high-temperature performance. Thus, we also argue that the precise device architecture, such as the presence of charge-transport barriers, may affect the temperature-dependent device performance as well.

  10. Amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation: Ambient-temperature dependence and implications for solar cell performance

    DOE PAGES

    Seif, Johannes P.; Krishnamani, Gopal; Demaurex, Benedicte; ...

    2015-03-02

    Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells feature amorphous silicon passivation films, which enable very high voltages. We report how such passivation increases with operating temperature for amorphous silicon stacks involving doped layers and decreases for intrinsic-layer-only passivation. We discuss the implications of this phenomenon on the solar cell's temperature coefficient, which represents an important figure-of-merit for the energy yield of devices deployed in the field. We show evidence that both open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are affected by these variations in passivation and quantify these temperature-mediated effects, compared with those expected from standard diode equations. We confirm that devicesmore » with high Voc values at 25°C show better high-temperature performance. Thus, we also argue that the precise device architecture, such as the presence of charge-transport barriers, may affect the temperature-dependent device performance as well.« less

  11. Integrated Amorphous Silicon p-i-n Temperature Sensor for CMOS Photonics.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sandro; Pangallo, Giovanni; Della Corte, Francesco Giuseppe

    2016-01-06

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) shows interesting optoelectronic and technological properties that make it suitable for the fabrication of passive and active micro-photonic devices, compatible moreover with standard microelectronic devices on a microchip. A temperature sensor based on a hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diode integrated in an optical waveguide for silicon photonics applications is presented here. The linear dependence of the voltage drop across the forward-biased diode on temperature, in a range from 30 °C up to 170 °C, has been used for thermal sensing. A high sensitivity of 11.9 mV/°C in the bias current range of 34-40 nA has been measured. The proposed device is particularly suitable for the continuous temperature monitoring of CMOS-compatible photonic integrated circuits, where the behavior of the on-chip active and passive devices are strongly dependent on their operating temperature.

  12. Dose effects on amorphous silicon sputtering by argon ions: A molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, L.A.; Rubio, J.E.; Jaraiz, M.; Bailon, L.A.; Barbolla, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    We have investigated, using molecular dynamics techniques, the sputtering yield enhancement of amorphous silicon produced by argon ion accumulation within the target. Several amorphous silicon samples, with different argon contents, were bombarded with 1 keV argon ions at normal incidence. To study the influence of the target structure, we considered samples with different argon arrangements, either uniformly distributed or within solid bubbles. We have observed that silicon sputtering yield increases linearly with dose until steady state conditions are reached. This enhancement is produced by the shallow argon atoms through the weakening of Si{endash}Si bonds. We have also observed that argon release takes place even long after the end of the collisional phase, and it is produced by ion-induced desorption and bubble destabilization. This enhanced argon yield determines the dose where target saturation and steady state conditions are reached. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Ultrafast optical control using the Kerr nonlinearity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon microcylindrical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, N.; Healy, N.; Suhailin, F. H.; Mehta, P.; Day, T. D.; Badding, J. V.; Peacock, A. C.

    2013-10-01

    Microresonators are ideal systems for probing nonlinear phenomena at low thresholds due to their small mode volumes and high quality (Q) factors. As such, they have found use both for fundamental studies of light-matter interactions as well as for applications in areas ranging from telecommunications to medicine. In particular, semiconductor-based resonators with large Kerr nonlinearities have great potential for high speed, low power all-optical processing. Here we present experiments to characterize the size of the Kerr induced resonance wavelength shifting in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon resonator and demonstrate its potential for ultrafast all-optical modulation and switching. Large wavelength shifts are observed for low pump powers due to the high nonlinearity of the amorphous silicon material and the strong mode confinement in the microcylindrical resonator. The threshold energy for switching is less than a picojoule, representing a significant step towards advantageous low power silicon-based photonic technologies.

  14. Silicon technologies for the CLIC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spannagel, S.

    2017-06-01

    CLIC is a proposed linear e+e- collider designed to provide particle collisions at center-of-mass energies of up to 3 TeV. Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark and the Higgs boson, as well as searches for Beyond the Standard Model physics require a highly performant CLIC detector. In particular the vertex detector must provide a single point resolution of only a few micrometers while not exceeding the envisaged material budget of around 0.2% X0 per layer. Beam-beam interactions and beamstrahlung processes impose an additional requirement on the timestamping capabilities of the vertex detector of about 10 ns. These goals can only be met by using novel techniques in the sensor and ASIC design as well as in the detector construction. The R&D program for the CLIC vertex detector explores various technologies in order to meet these demands. The feasibility of planar sensors with a thickness of 50-150 μm, including different active edge designs, are evaluated using Timepix3 ASICs. First prototypes of the CLICpix readout ASIC, implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology and with a pixel size of 25×25μm 2, have been produced and tested in particle beams. An updated version of the ASIC with a larger pixel matrix and improved precision of the time-over-threshold and time-of-arrival measurements has been submitted. Different hybridization concepts have been developed for the interconnection between the sensor and readout ASIC, ranging from small-pitch bump bonding of planar sensors to capacitive coupling of active HV-CMOS sensors. Detector simulations based on Geant 4 and TCAD are compared with experimental results to assess and optimize the performance of the various designs. This contribution gives an overview of the R&D program undertaken for the CLIC vertex detector and presents performance measurements of the prototype detectors currently under investigation.

  15. The Silicon Detector (SiD) And Linear Collider Detector R&D in Asia And North America

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Fujii, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-11

    In Asia and North America research and development on a linear collider detector has followed complementary paths to that in Europe. Among the developments in the US has been the conception of a detector built around silicon tracking, which relies heavily on a pixel (CCD) vertex detector, and employs a silicon tungsten calorimeter. Since this detector is quite different from the TESLA detector, we describe it here, along with some of the sub-system specific R&D in these regions.

  16. The development of a silicon multiplicity detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Kraner, H.W.; Lissauer, D.; Makowiecki, D.; Polychronakos, V.; Radeka, V.; Sondericker, J.; Stephani, D.; Barrette, J.; Hall, J.; Mark, S.K.; Pruneau, C.A.; Wolfe, D.; Borenstein, S.R.

    1991-12-31

    The physics program and the design criteria for a Silicon Pad Detector at RHIC are reviewed. An end cap double sided readout detector configuration for RHIC is presented. Its performance as an on-line and off-line centrality tagging device is studied by means of simulations with Fritiof as the event generator. The results of an in-beam test of a prototype double-sided Si-detector are presented. Good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained with front junction and the resistive back side readout. Good separation between one and two minimum-ionizing particle signals is achieved.

  17. Digital Images of Breast Biopsies using a Silicon Strip Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Montano, Luis M.; Diaz, Claudia C.; Leyva, Antonio; Cabal, Fatima

    2006-09-08

    In our study we have used a silicon strip detector to obtain digital images of some breast tissues with micro calcifications. Some of those images will be shown and we will discuss the perspectives of using this technique as an improvement of breast cancer diagnostics.

  18. Advanced Silicon Detectors for High Energy Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, George

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the development of silicon detectors for high energy astrophysics missions is presented. The topics include: 1) Background: Motivation for Event-Driven CCD; 2) Report of Grant Activity; 3) Packaged EDCCD; 4) Measured X-ray Energy Resolution of the Gen1 EDCCDs Operated in "Conventional Mode"; and 5) EDCCD Gen 1.5-Lot 1 Planning.

  19. A 16 x 16 element extrinsic silicon detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Two bismuth-doped silicon accumulation-mode charge-injection device (AMCID) infrared detector arrays are studied. The geometry and composition of the arrays, and a description of the cold and warm electronics components of the system are described. Instructions for setting up and operating the array system, plus results of a functional test, are included.

  20. Silicon Detector Studies with an Interferometric Thickness Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milliken, B.; Leske, R. A.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    Cosmic ray isotopic composition studies aboard satellites are normally based on energy detection measurements which require a precise knowledge of matter thickness particle penetration. A laser- interferometer system has been developed to precisely map the thick- ness variations of large-area silicon detectors. Design, operation, and the data processing to derive thickness maps is described.

  1. Advanced Silicon Detectors for High Energy Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, George

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the development of silicon detectors for high energy astrophysics missions is presented. The topics include: 1) Background: Motivation for Event-Driven CCD; 2) Report of Grant Activity; 3) Packaged EDCCD; 4) Measured X-ray Energy Resolution of the Gen1 EDCCDs Operated in "Conventional Mode"; and 5) EDCCD Gen 1.5-Lot 1 Planning.

  2. Sub-amorphous thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline silicon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Matthew C; Kwon, Soonshin; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos; Xiang, Jie; Chen, Renkun

    2015-04-08

    Thermal transport behavior in nanostructures has become increasingly important for understanding and designing next generation electronic and energy devices. This has fueled vibrant research targeting both the causes and ability to induce extraordinary reductions of thermal conductivity in crystalline materials, which has predominantly been achieved by understanding that the phonon mean free path (MFP) is limited by the characteristic size of crystalline nanostructures, known as the boundary scattering or Casimir limit. Herein, by using a highly sensitive measurement system, we show that crystalline Si (c-Si) nanotubes (NTs) with shell thickness as thin as ∼5 nm exhibit a low thermal conductivity of ∼1.1 W m(-1) K(-1). Importantly, this value is lower than the apparent boundary scattering limit and is even about 30% lower than the measured value for amorphous Si (a-Si) NTs with similar geometries. This finding diverges from the prevailing general notion that amorphous materials represent the lower limit of thermal transport but can be explained by the strong elastic softening effect observed in the c-Si NTs, measured as a 6-fold reduction in Young's modulus compared to bulk Si and nearly half that of the a-Si NTs. These results illustrate the potent prospect of employing the elastic softening effect to engineer lower than amorphous, or subamorphous, thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline nanostructures.

  3. A Comparison of Photo-Induced Hysteresis Between Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous IGZO Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Cho, Won-Ju; Chung, Hong-Bay; Koo, Sang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    We investigate photo-induced instability in thin-film transistors (TFTs) consisting of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) as active semiconducting layers by comparing with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). An a-IGZO TFT exhibits a large hysteresis window in the illuminated measuring condition but no hysteresis window in the dark condition. On the contrary, a large hysteresis window measured in the dark condition in a-Si:H was not observed in the illuminated condition. Even though such materials possess the structure of amorphous phase, optical responses or photo instability in TFTs looks different from each other. Photo-induced hysteresis results from initially trapped charges at the interface between semiconductor and dielectric films or in the gate dielectric which possess absorption energy to interact with deep trap-states and affect the movement of Fermi energy level. In order to support our claim, we also perform CV characteristics in photo-induced hysteresis and demonstrate thermal-activated hysteresis. We believe that this work can provide important information to understand different material systems for optical engineering which includes charge transport and band transition.

  4. Heavy flavour physics at colliders with silicon strip vertex detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Andreas S.

    1994-03-01

    The physics of heavy flavours has played a dominant role in high energy physics research ever since the discovery of charm in 1974, followed by the τ lepton in 1975 and bottom in 1977. With the startup of the large experiments at the e+e- colliders LEP and the SLC a new type of detector system has now come into operation which has a major impact on the studies of heavy flavours: the silicon strip vertex detector. The basic design priciples of these novel detector systems are outlined and three representative experimental realizations are discussed. The impact of these detectors on the studies of the properties of heavy flavours is just emerging and focuses on the measurement of lifetimes and the tagging of the presence of heavy flavour hadrons in hadronic events. The tools that are being developed for these studies are described as well as details of representative analyses. The potential of these devices and the associated technological developments that were necessary for their application in the colding beam environment is reflected in a plethora of new proposals to build sophisticated silicon detector systems for a large variety of future high energy physics applications. Two examples will be briefly sketched, a vertex detector for an asymmetric e+e- bottom factory and a large scale tracking system for a multipurpose detector at one of the new large hadron colliders.

  5. Ground Calibration of the Silicon Drift Detectors for NICER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamarr, Beverly; Prigozhin, Gregory; Remillard, Ronald; Malonis, Andrew; Gendreau, Keith C.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Markwardt, Craig B.; Baumgartner, Wayne H.

    2016-01-01

    The Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is set to be deployed on the International Space Station (ISS) in early 2017. It will use an array of 56 Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) to detect soft X-rays (0.2 - 12 keV) with 100 nanosecond timing resolution. Here we describe the e ort to calibrate the detectors in the lab primarily using a Modulated X-ray Source (MXS). The MXS that was customized for NICER provides more than a dozen emission lines spread over the instrument bandwidth, providing calibration measurements for detector gain and spectral resolution. In addition, the fluorescence source in the MXS was pulsed at high frequency to enable measurement of the delay due to charge collection in the silicon and signal processing in the detector electronics. A second chamber, designed to illuminate detectors with either 55Fe, an optical LED, or neither, provided additional calibration of detector response, optical blocking, and effectiveness of background rejection techniques. The overall ground calibration achieved total operating time that was generally in the range of 500-1500 hours for each of the 56 detectors.

  6. Ground calibration of the Silicon Drift Detectors for NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMarr, Beverly; Prigozhin, Gregory; Remillard, Ronald; Malonis, Andrew; Gendreau, Keith C.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Markwardt, Craig B.; Baumgartner, Wayne H.

    2016-07-01

    The Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is set to be deployed on the International Space Station (ISS) in early 2017. It will use an array of 56 Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) to detect soft X-rays (0.2 - 12 keV) with 100 nanosecond timing resolution. Here we describe the effort to calibrate the detectors in the lab primarily using a Modulated X-ray Source (MXS). The MXS that was customized for NICER provides more than a dozen emission lines spread over the instrument bandwidth, providing calibration measurements for detector gain and spectral resolution. In addition, the fluorescence source in the MXS was pulsed at high frequency to enable measurement of the delay due to charge collection in the silicon and signal processing in the detector electronics. A second chamber, designed to illuminate detectors with either 55Fe, an optical LED, or neither, provided additional calibration of detector response, optical blocking, and effectiveness of background rejection techniques. The overall ground calibration achieved total operating time that was generally in the range of 500-1500 hours for each of the 56 detectors.

  7. Portable triple silicon detector telescope spectrometer for skin dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Larsen, H. E.; Christensen, P.

    1999-12-01

    The features of a newly developed portable beta telescope spectrometer are described. The detector probe uses three silicon detectors with the thickness: 50μm/150μm/7000μm covered by a 2μm thick titanium window. Rejection of photon contributions from mixed beta/photon exposures is achieved by coincidence requirements between the detector signals. The silicon detectors, together with cooling aggregate, bias supplies, preamplifiers and charge generation for calibration are contained in a handy detector probe. Through a 3- or 10-m cable the detector unit is connected to a compact, portable processing unit including a laptop computer executing control, monitor, histogram and display tasks. The use of digital signal processing at an early stage of the signal chain has facilitated the achievement of a compact, low-weight device. 256 channels are available for each of the three detectors. The LabVIEWTM software distributed by National Instruments was used for all program developments for the spectrometer, comprising also the capability of evaluating the absorbed dose rates from the measured beta spectra. The report describes the capability of the telescope spectrometer to measure beta and photon spectra as well as beta dose rates in mixed beta/photon radiation fields. It also describes the main features of the digital signal-processing electronics.

  8. Reactive Infiltration of Silicon Melt Through Microporous Amorphous Carbon Preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangsuwan, P.; Tewari, S. N.; Gatica, J. E.; Singh, M.; Dickerson, R.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of unidirectional capillary infiltration of silicon melt into microporous carbon preforms have been investigated as a function of the pore morphology and melt temperature. The infiltrated specimens showed alternating bands of dark and bright regions, which corresponded to the unreacted free carbon and free silicon regions, respectively. The decrease in the infiltration front velocity for increasing infiltration distances, is in qualitative agreement with the closed-form solution of capillarity driven fluid flow through constant cross section cylindrical pores. However, drastic changes in the thermal response and infiltration front morphologies were observed for minute differences in the preforms microstructure. This suggests the need for a dynamic percolation model that would account for the exothermic nature of the silicon-carbon chemical reaction and the associated pore closing phenomenon.

  9. In situ laser reflectometry study of the amorphization of silicon carbide by MeV ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, T.; Heera, V.; Kögler, R.; Skorupa, W.

    1998-09-01

    In situ laser reflectometry and ex situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry have been used to investigate the ion fluence and temperature dependence of the amorphization process in silicon carbide induced by 3 MeV I2+ irradiation. A comparative study in silicon showed that damage accumulation in silicon carbide proceeds more gradually in the preliminary stage of amorphization. The amorphization fluence depends weakly on temperature below 300 K but strongly above 300 K. Silicon carbide is amorphized more quickly than silicon at elevated temperatures. At very low temperatures a higher ion fluence for the amorphization of silicon carbide is required in comparison to silicon. Owing to this behavior, different mechanisms of damage growth are assumed to be present in these semiconductors. A critical energy density of 5.6×1024 eV/cm3 for the amorphization of the silicon carbide crystal up to the surface has been found at room temperature. Experimental results are compared with predictions of the models proposed by Carter as well as by Morehead and Crowder.

  10. Porous Silicon-Based Quantum Dot Broad Spectrum Radiation Detector

    PubMed Central

    Urdaneta, M.; Stepanov, P.; Weinberg, I. N.; Pala, I. R.; Brock, S.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon is a convenient and inexpensive platform for radiation detection, but has low stopping power for x-rays and gamma-rays with high energy (e.g., 100 keV, as used in computed tomography and digital radiography, or 1 MeV, as desired for detection of nuclear materials). We have effectively increased the stopping power of silicon detectors by producing a layer of porous or micro-machined silicon, and infusing this layer with semiconductor quantum dots made of electron-dense materials. Results of prototype detectors show sensitivity to infrared, visible light, and x-rays, with dark current of less than 1 nA/mm2. PMID:24432047

  11. Silicon carbide detector for laser-generated plasma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Donatella; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Lanzieri, Claudio

    2013-05-01

    We present the performance of a Silicon Carbide (SiC) detector in the acquisition of the radiation emitted by laser generated plasmas. The detector has been employed in time of flight (TOF) configuration within an experiment performed at the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS). The detector is a 5 mm2 area 100 nm thick circular Nisbnd SiC Schottky junction on a high purity 4Hsbnd SiC epitaxial layer 115 μm thick. Current signals from the detector with amplitudes up to 1.6 A have been measured, achieving voltage signals over 80 V on a 50 Ω load resistance with excellent signal to noise ratios. Resolution of few nanoseconds has been experimentally demonstrated in TOF measurements. The detector has operated at 250 V DC bias under extreme operating conditions with no observable performance degradation.

  12. Silicon as an Unconventional Detector in Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Clinthorne, N.H.; Brzezinski, K.; Chesi, E.; Cochran, E.; Grkovski, M.; Grošičar, B.; Honscheid, K.; Huh, S.; Kagan, H.; Lacasta, C.; Linhart, V.; Mikuž, M.; Smith, S.; Stankova, V.; Studen, A.; Weilhammer, P.; žontar, D.

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a widely used technique in medical imaging and in studying small animal models of human disease. In the conventional approach, the 511 keV annihilation photons emitted from a patient or small animal are detected by a ring of scintillators such as LYSO read out by arrays of photodetectors. Although this has been a successful in achieving ~5mm FWHM spatial resolution in human studies and ~1mm resolution in dedicated small animal instruments, there is interest in significantly improving these figures. Silicon, although its stopping power is modest for 511 keV photons, offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional approaches. Foremost is its high spatial resolution in 3D: our past studies show that there is little diffculty in localizing 511 keV photon interactions to ~0.3mm. Since spatial resolution and reconstructed image noise trade off in a highly non-linear manner that depends on the PET instrument response, if high spatial resolution is the goal, silicon may outperform standard PET detectors even though it has lower sensitivity to 511 keV photons. To evaluate silicon in a variety of PET “magnifying glass” configurations, an instrument has been constructed that consists of an outer partial-ring of PET scintillation detectors into which various arrangements of silicon detectors can be inserted to emulate dual-ring or imaging probe geometries. Recent results have demonstrated 0.7 mm FWHM resolution using pad detectors having 16×32 arrays of 1.4mm square pads and setups have shown promising results in both small animal and PET imaging probe configurations. Although many challenges remain, silicon has potential to become the PET detector of choice when spatial resolution is the primary consideration. PMID:23230345

  13. Silicon pixel detector prototyping in SOI CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Roma; Bugiel, Szymon; Idzik, Marek; Kapusta, Piotr; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Turala, Michal

    2016-12-01

    The Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) CMOS is one of the most advanced and promising technology for monolithic pixel detectors design. The insulator layer that is implemented inside the silicon crystal allows to integrate sensors matrix and readout electronic on a single wafer. Moreover, the separation of electronic and substrate increases also the SOI circuits performance. The parasitic capacitances to substrate are significantly reduced, so the electronic systems are faster and consume much less power. The authors of this presentation are the members of international SOIPIX collaboration, that is developing SOI pixel detectors in 200 nm Lapis Fully-Depleted, Low-Leakage SOI CMOS. This work shows a set of advantages of SOI technology and presents possibilities for pixel detector design SOI CMOS. In particular, the preliminary results of a Cracow chip are presented.

  14. Broadband terahertz imaging with highly sensitive silicon CMOS detectors.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Franz; Coquillat, Dominique; Videlier, Hadley; Sakowicz, Maciej; Teppe, Frédéric; Dussopt, Laurent; Giffard, Benoît; Skotnicki, Thomas; Knap, Wojciech

    2011-04-11

    This paper investigates terahertz detectors fabricated in a low-cost 130 nm silicon CMOS technology. We show that the detectors consisting of a nMOS field effect transistor as rectifying element and an integrated bow-tie coupling antenna achieve a record responsivity above 5 kV/W and a noise equivalent power below 10 pW/Hz(0.5) in the important atmospheric window around 300 GHz and at room temperature. We demonstrate furthermore that the same detectors are efficient for imaging in a very wide frequency range from ~0.27 THz up to 1.05 THz. These results pave the way towards high sensitivity focal plane arrays in silicon for terahertz imaging.

  15. Directed dewetting of amorphous silicon film by a donut-shaped laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; In, Jung Bin; Zheng, Cheng; Sakellari, Ioanna; Raman, Rajesh N.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Elhadj, Selim; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2015-04-01

    Irradiation of a thin film with a beam-shaped laser is proposed to achieve site-selectively controlled dewetting of the film into nanoscale structures. As a proof of concept, the laser-directed dewetting of an amorphous silicon thin film on a glass substrate is demonstrated using a donut-shaped laser beam. Upon irradiation of a single laser pulse, the silicon film melts and dewets on the substrate surface. The irradiation with the donut beam induces an unconventional lateral temperature profile in the film, leading to thermocapillary-induced transport of the molten silicon to the center of the beam spot. Upon solidification, the ultrathin amorphous silicon film is transformed to a crystalline silicon nanodome of increased height. This morphological change enables further dimensional reduction of the nanodome as well as removal of the surrounding film material by isotropic silicon etching. These results suggest that laser-based dewetting of thin films can be an effective way for scalable manufacturing of patterned nanostructures.

  16. Megavoltage image contrast with low-atomic number target materials and amorphous silicon electronic portal imagers.

    PubMed

    Orton, E J; Robar, J L

    2009-03-07

    Low-atomic number (Z) targets have been shown to improve contrast in megavoltage (MV) images when using film-screen detection systems. This research aims to quantify the effect of low-Z targets on MV image contrast using an amorphous silicon electronic portal image detector (a-Si EPID) through both experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Experimental beams were produced with the linac running in the 6 MeV electron mode and with a 1.0 cm aluminum (Al, Z = 13) target replacing flattening filtration in the carousel, (6 MeV/Al). A 2100EX Varian linac equipped with an aS500 EPID was used with the QC3 MV phantom for the majority of contrast measurements. The BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC package was used to build a model of the full imaging system including beam generation (linac head), the a-Si detector and the contrast phantom. The model accurately reproduces contrast measurements to within 2.5% for both the standard 6 MV therapy beam and the 6 MeV/Al beam. The contrast advantage of 6 MeV/Al over 6 MV, as quantified with the QC3 phantom, ranged from a factor increase of 1.6 +/- 0.1 to 2.8 +/- 0.2. Only a modest improvement in contrast was seen when the incident electron energy was reduced to 4 MeV (up to factor of 1.2 +/- 0.1 over 6 MeV/Al) or with removal of the copper build-up layer in the detector, (up to factor of 1.2 +/- 0.1 over 6 MeV/Al). Further decreasing the target Z, to beryllium (Be, Z = 4), at 4 MeV showed no significant improvement over 4 MeV/Al. Experimentally, the contrast advantage of 6 MeV/Al over 6 MV was found to decrease with increasing patient thickness, as can be expected due to selective attenuation of low-energy photons. At head and neck-like thicknesses, the low-Z advantage is a factor increase of 1.7 +/- 0.1.

  17. A new detector concept for silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadigov, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Ahmadov, G.; Ariffin, A.; Khorev, S.; Sadygov, Z.; Suleymanov, S.; Zerrouk, F.; Madatov, R.

    2016-07-01

    A new design and principle of operation of silicon photomultipliers are presented. The new design comprises a semiconductor substrate and an array of independent micro-phototransistors formed on the substrate. Each micro-phototransistor comprises a photosensitive base operating in Geiger mode and an individual micro-emitter covering a small part of the base layer, thereby creating, together with this latter, a micro-transistor. Both micro-emitters and photosensitive base layers are connected with two respective independent metal grids via their individual micro-resistors. The total value of signal gain in the proposed silicon photomultiplier is a result of both the avalanche gain in the base layer and the corresponding gain in the micro-transistor. The main goals of the new design are: significantly lower both optical crosstalk and after-pulse effects at high signal amplification, improve speed of single photoelectron pulse formation, and significantly reduce the device capacitance.

  18. Unusually High and Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity in Amorphous Silicon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonshin; Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C; Cui, Shuang; Chen, Renkun

    2017-02-02

    Amorphous Si (a-Si) nanostructures are ubiquitous in numerous electronic and optoelectronic devices. Amorphous materials are considered to possess the lower limit to the thermal conductivity (κ), which is ∼1 W·m(-1) K(-1) for a-Si. However, recent work suggested that κ of micrometer-thick a-Si films can be greater than 3 W·m(-1) K(-1), which is contributed to by propagating vibrational modes, referred to as "propagons". However, precise determination of κ in a-Si has been elusive. Here, we used structures of a-Si nanotubes and suspended a-Si films that enabled precise in-plane thermal conductivity (κ∥) measurement within a wide thickness range of 5 nm to 1.7 μm. We showed unexpectedly high κ∥ in a-Si nanostructures, reaching ∼3.0 and 5.3 W·m(-1) K(-1) at ∼100 nm and 1.7 μm, respectively. Furthermore, the measured κ∥ is significantly higher than the cross-plane κ on the same films. This unusually high and anisotropic thermal conductivity in the amorphous Si nanostructure manifests the surprisingly broad propagon mean free path distribution, which is found to range from 10 nm to 10 μm, in the disordered and atomically isotropic structure. This result provides an unambiguous answer to the century-old problem regarding mean free path distribution of propagons and also sheds light on the design and performance of numerous a-Si based electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  19. An amorphous silicon photodiode with 2 THz gain-bandwidth product based on cycling excitation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lujiang; Yu, Yugang; Zhang, Alex Ce; Hall, David; Niaz, Iftikhar Ahmad; Raihan Miah, Mohammad Abu; Liu, Yu-Hsin; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2017-09-01

    Since impact ionization was observed in semiconductors over half a century ago, avalanche photodiodes (APDs) using impact ionization in a fashion of chain reaction have been the most sensitive semiconductor photodetectors. However, APDs have relatively high excess noise, a limited gain-bandwidth product, and high operation voltage, presenting a need for alternative signal amplification mechanisms of superior properties. As an amplification mechanism, the cycling excitation process (CEP) was recently reported in a silicon p-n junction with subtle control and balance of the impurity levels and profiles. Realizing that CEP effect depends on Auger excitation involving localized states, we made the counter intuitive hypothesis that disordered materials, such as amorphous silicon, with their abundant localized states, can produce strong CEP effects with high gain and speed at low noise, despite their extremely low mobility and large number of defects. Here, we demonstrate an amorphous silicon low noise photodiode with gain-bandwidth product of over 2 THz, based on a very simple structure. This work will impact a wide range of applications involving optical detection because amorphous silicon, as the primary gain medium, is a low-cost, easy-to-process material that can be formed on many kinds of rigid or flexible substrates.

  20. Crystalline-amorphous core-shell silicon nanowires for high capacity and high current battery electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li-Feng; Ruffo, Riccardo; Chan, Candace K; Peng, Hailin; Cui, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Silicon is an attractive alloy-type anode material for lithium ion batteries because of its highest known capacity (4200 mAh/g). However silicon's large volume change upon lithium insertion and extraction, which causes pulverization and capacity fading, has limited its applications. Designing nanoscale hierarchical structures is a novel approach to address the issues associated with the large volume changes. In this letter, we introduce a core-shell design of silicon nanowires for highpower and long-life lithium battery electrodes. Silicon crystalline-amorphous core-shell nanowires were grown directly on stainless steel current collectors by a simple one-step synthesis. Amorphous Si shells instead of crystalline Si cores can be selected to be electrochemically active due to the difference of their lithiation potentials. Therefore, crystalline Si cores function as a stable mechanical support and an efficient electrical conducting pathway while amorphous shells store Li(+) ions. We demonstrate here that these core-shell nanowires have high charge storage capacity ( approximately 1000 mAh/g, 3 times of carbon) with approximately 90% capacity retention over 100 cycles. They also show excellent electrochemical performance at high rate charging and discharging (6.8 A/g, approximately 20 times of carbon at 1 h rate).

  1. Ammonia sensitivity of amorphous carbon film/silicon heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xili; Xue Qingzhong; Hao Lanzhong; Zheng Qingbin; Li Qun

    2007-09-17

    The amorphous carbon film/n-Si (a-C/Si) junctions have been fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The results show that these junctions have good rectifying properties and high ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas sensitivity. For a given reverse bias voltage, the resistance of the junction can increase by 100 times rapidly when exposed to NH{sub 3} gas. This phenomenon may be attributed to the change of the space charge width of the junction, which is caused by the adsorption of NH{sub 3} gas molecules. This study shows that these a-C/Si junctions have potential application as NH{sub 3} gas detect sensors.

  2. Device-size atomistic models of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, R. L. C.; Barkema, G. T.; Stijnman, M. A.; Bisseling, R. H.

    2001-12-01

    The atomic structure of amorphous materials is believed to be well described by the continuous-random-network model. We present an algorithm for the generation of large, high-quality continuous random networks. The algorithm is a variation of the sillium approach introduced by Wooten, Winer, and Weaire [Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 1392 (1985)]. By employing local relaxation techniques, local atomic rearrangements can be tried that scale almost independently of system size. This scaling property of the algorithm paves the way for the generation of realistic device-size atomic networks.

  3. Ultrasmooth growth of amorphous silicon films through ion-induced long-range surface correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; Gago, R.; Vazquez, L.

    2011-01-03

    Ultrasmooth amorphous silicon films with a constant roughness below 0.2 nm were produced for film thickness up to {approx}1 {mu}m by magnetron sputtering under negative voltage substrate biasing (100-400 V). In contrast, under unbiased conditions the roughness of the resulting mounded films increased linearly with growth time due to shadowing effects. A detailed analysis of the amorphous film growth dynamics proves that the bias-induced ultrasmoothness is produced by a downhill mass transport process that leads to an extreme surface leveling inducing surface height correlations up to lateral distances close to 0.5 {mu}m.

  4. Increased medium-range order in amorphous silicon with increased substrate temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, P. M.; Gerbi, J. E.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Gibson, J. M.; Aberlson, J. R.

    2000-08-15

    Using fluctuation electron microscopy, the authors have measured the medium-range order of magnetron sputtered silicon thin films as a function of substrate temperature from the amorphous to polycrystalline regimes. They find a smooth increase in the medium-range order of the samples, which they interpret in the context of the paracrystalline structural model as an increase in the size of and/or volume fraction occupied by the paracrystalline grains. These data are counter to the long-standing belief that there is a sharp transition between amorphous and polycrystalline structures as a function of substrate temperature.

  5. Absence of an abrupt phase change from polycrystalline to amorphous in silicon with deposition temperature.

    PubMed

    Voyles, P M; Gerbi, J E; Treacy, M M; Gibson, J M; Abelson, J R

    2001-06-11

    Using fluctuation electron microscopy, we have observed an increase in the mesoscopic spatial fluctuations in the diffracted intensity from vapor-deposited silicon thin films as a function of substrate temperature from the amorphous to polycrystalline regimes. We interpret this increase as an increase in paracrystalline medium-range order in the sample. A paracrystal consists of topologically crystalline grains in a disordered matrix; in this model the increase in ordering is caused by an increase in the grain size or density. Our observations are counter to the previous belief that the amorphous to polycrystalline transition is a discontinuous disorder-order phase transition.

  6. Characterization of silicon carbide and diamond detectors for neutron applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, M.; Lohstroh, A.; Sellin, P.; Thomas, D.

    2017-10-01

    The presence of carbon atoms in silicon carbide and diamond makes these materials ideal candidates for direct fast neutron detectors. Furthermore the low atomic number, strong covalent bonds, high displacement energies, wide bandgap and low intrinsic carrier concentrations make these semiconductor detectors potentially suitable for applications where rugged, high-temperature, low-gamma-sensitivity detectors are required, such as active interrogation, electronic personal neutron dosimetry and harsh environment detectors. A thorough direct performance comparison of the detection capabilities of semi-insulating silicon carbide (SiC–SI), single crystal diamond (D–SC), polycrystalline diamond (D–PC) and a self-biased epitaxial silicon carbide (SiC–EP) detector has been conducted and benchmarked against a commercial silicon PIN (Si–PIN) diode, in a wide range of alpha (Am-241), beta (Sr/Y-90), ionizing photon (65 keV to 1332 keV) and neutron radiation fields (including 1.2 MeV to 16.5 MeV mono-energetic neutrons, as well as neutrons from AmBe and Cf-252 sources). All detectors were shown to be able to directly detect and distinguish both the different radiation types and energies by using a simple energy threshold discrimination method. The SiC devices demonstrated the best neutron energy discrimination ratio (E\\max (n=5 MeV)/E\\max (n=1 MeV)  ≈5), whereas a superior neutron/photon cross-sensitivity ratio was observed in the D–PC detector (E\\max (AmBe)/E\\max (Co-60)  ≈16). Further work also demonstrated that the cross-sensitivity ratios can be improved through use of a simple proton-recoil conversion layer. Stability issues were also observed in the D–SC, D–PC and SiC–SI detectors while under irradiation, namely a change of energy peak position and/or count rate with time (often referred to as the polarization effect). This phenomenon within the detectors was non-debilitating over the time period tested (> 5 h) and, as such, stable

  7. Silicon-Germanium Alloys for Infrared Detectors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    crystals, aiming at improved crystallinity and higher resistivity and to extend the Czochralski growth method to indium-doped Si-Ge alloys. Our intention...of the disappointingly high boron concentrations achieved in Czochralski growth, we decided to explore a crucible-free method for preparing Si-Ge...material was not high enough to allow an adequately long depletion region in a p-i-n detector. It does not appear that any Czochralski -type growth method

  8. Preliminary Results on Compton Electrons in Silicon Drift Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conka-Nurdan, T.; Nurdan, K.; Laihem, K.; Walenta, A. H.; Fiorini, C.; Freisleben, B.; Hornel, N.; Pavel, N. A.; Struder, L.

    2004-10-01

    Silicon drift detectors (SDD) with on-chip electronics have found many applications in different fields. A detector system has recently been designed and built to study the electrons from Compton scatter events in such a detector. The reconstruction of the Compton electrons is a crucial issue for Compton imaging. The equipment consists of a monolithic array of 19 channel SDDs and an Anger camera. Photons emitted from a finely collimated source undergo Compton scattering within the SDD where the recoil electron is absorbed. The scattered photon is subsequently observed by photoelectric absorption in the second detector. The coincidence events are used to get the energy, position, and direction of the Compton electrons. Because the on-chip transistors provide the first stage amplification, the SDDs provide outstanding noise performance and fast shaping, so that very good energy resolution can be obtained even at room temperature. The drift detectors require a relatively low number of readout channels for large detector areas. Custom-designed analog and digital electronics provide fast readout of the SDDs. The equipment is designed such that the measurements can be done in all detector orientations and kinematical conditions. The first results obtained with this detector system will be presented in this paper.

  9. Scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) implemented with an amorphous Selenium flat-panel detector: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinming; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Han, Tao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Shen, Youtao; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2010-01-01

    It is well recognized in projection radiography that low-contrast detectability suffered in heavily attenuating regions due to excessively low x-ray fluence to the image receptor and higher noise levels. Exposure equalization can improve image quality by increasing the x-ray exposure to heavily attenuating regions, resulting in a more uniform distribution of exposure to the detector. Image quality is also expected to be improved by using the slot-scan geometry to reject scattered radiation effectively without degrading primary x-rays. This paper describes the design of prototype scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) system implemented with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) array based flat-panel detector. With this system, the slot-scan geometry with the alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) technique was used to achieve scatter rejection. A seven-segment beam height modulator assembly was mounted onto the fore-collimator to regulate exposure regionally for chest radiography. The beam modulator assembly, consisting of micro linear motors, lead screw cartridge with lead beam blocks attached, position feedback sensors, and motor driver circuitry, has been tested and found to have an acceptable response for exposure equalization in chest radiography. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged in the posterior-anterior (PA) view under clinical conditions. Scatter component, primary x-rays, scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs), and primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs) were measured in the SEDR images to evaluate the rejection and redistribution of scattered radiation, and compared with those for conventional full-field imaging with and without anti-scatter grid methods. SPR reduction ratios (SPRRRs, defined as the differences between the non-grid full-field SPRs and the reduced SPRs divided by the former) yielded approximately 59% for the full-field imaging with grid and 82% for SEDR technique in the lungs; and 77% for the full

  10. Scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) implemented with an amorphous selenium flat-panel detector: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinming; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Han, Tao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Shen, Youtao; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C

    2009-11-21

    It is well recognized in projection radiography that low-contrast detectability suffers in heavily attenuating regions due to excessively low x-ray fluence to the image receptor and higher noise levels. Exposure equalization can improve image quality by increasing the x-ray exposure to heavily attenuating regions, resulting in a more uniform distribution of exposure to the detector. Image quality is also expected to be improved by using the slot-scan geometry to reject scattered radiation effectively without degrading primary x-rays. This paper describes the design of a prototype scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) system implemented with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) array-based flat-panel detector. With this system, slot-scan geometry with alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) technique was used to achieve scatter rejection. A seven-segment beam height modulator assembly was mounted onto the fore collimator to regulate exposure regionally for chest radiography. The beam modulator assembly, consisting of micro linear motors, lead screw cartridge with lead (Pb) beam blockers attached, position feedback sensors and motor driver circuitry, has been tested and found to have an acceptable response for exposure equalization in chest radiography. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged in the posterior-anterior (PA) view under clinical conditions. Scatter component, primary x-rays, scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs) and primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs) were measured in the SEDR images to evaluate the rejection and redistribution of scattered radiation, and compared with those for conventional full-field imaging with and without anti-scatter grid methods. SPR reduction ratios (SPRRRs, defined as the differences between the non-grid full-field SPRs and the reduced SPRs divided by the former) yielded approximately 59% for the full-field imaging with grid and 82% for the SEDR technique in the lungs, and 77% for the full

  11. Innovative Characterization of Amorphous and Thin-Film Silicon for Improved Module Performance: 1 February 2005 - 31 July 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P. C.; Williams, G. A.

    2009-09-01

    Electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance was done on amorphous silicon samples (modules with a-Si:H and a-SixGe1-x:H intrinsic layer) to study defects that contribute to Staebler-Wronski effect.

  12. Fabrication of high-quality amorphous silicon film from cyclopentasilane by vapor deposition between two parallel substrates.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongrong; Masuda, Takashi; Takagishi, Hideyuki; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2015-03-14

    Cyclopentasilane converts into amorphous silicon film between two parallel substrates under atmospheric pressure by thermal decomposition at 350-400 °C, which combines the advantages of high throughput with cost reduction and high quality film formation.

  13. Study on the fabrication of silicon nanoparticles in an amorphous silicon light absorbing layer for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joo Hyung; Song, Jinsoo; Lee, Jae Hee; Lee, Jeong Chul

    2012-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous-silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film solar cells have advantages of relatively simple technology, less material consumption, higher absorption ratio compared to crystalline silicon, and low cost due to the use of cheaper substrates rather than silicon wafers. However, together with those advantages, amorphous-silicon thin-film solar cells face several issues such as a relatively lower efficiency, a relatively wider bandgap, and the Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE) compared to other competing materials ( i.e., crystalline silicon, CdTe, Cu(In x Ga(1- x))Se2 (CIGS), etc.). As a remedy for those drawbacks and a way to enhance the cell conversion efficiency at the same time, the employment of crystalline silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs) in the a-Si matrix is proposed to organize the quantum-dot (QD) structure as the light-absorbing layer. This structure of the light absorbing layer consists of single-crystal Si-NPs in an a-Si:H thin-film matrix. The single-crystal Si-NPs are synthesized by using SiH4 gas decomposition with CO2 laser pyrolysis, and the sizes of Si-NPs are calibrated to control their bandgaps. The synthesized size-controlled Si-NPs are directly transferred to another chamber to form a QD structure by using co-deposition of the Si-NPs and the a-Si:H matrix. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses are employed to verify the sizes and the crystalline properties of the Si-NPs alone and of the Si-NPs in the a-Si:H matrix. The TEM results show successful co-deposition of size-controlled Si-NPs in the a-Si:H matrix, which is meaningful because it suggests the possibility of further enhancement of the a-Si:H solar-cell structure and of tandem structure applications by using a single element.

  14. Electromagnetic Shower Reconstruction for theSilicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, N.

    2005-12-08

    This report presents a two-pass reconstruction algorithm for electromagnetic showers, based on studies with simulated photons in the highly segmented Silicon Tungsten calorimeter of the Silicon Detector concept for the International Linear Collider. It is shown that the initial reconstruction and identification of the dense shower cores allows shower separation down to 3 cm distance between two photons on the calorimeter surface. First results are shown for the subsequent collection of unassociated hits around the shower cores necessary to reconstruct complete energy deposits by individual particles.

  15. Beam test of CSES silicon strip detector module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Li; Lu, Hong; Wang, Huan-Yu; Li, Xin-Qiao; Xu, Yan-Bing; An, Zheng-Hua; Yu, Xiao-xia; Wang, Hui; Shi, Feng; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Xiao-Yun

    2017-05-01

    The silicon-strip tracker of the China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite (CSES) consists of two double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs) which provide incident particle tracking information. A low-noise analog ASIC VA140 was used in this study for DSSD signal readout. A beam test on the DSSD module was performed at the Beijing Test Beam Facility of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) using a 400-800 MeV/c proton beam. The pedestal analysis results, RMSE noise, gain correction, and intensity distribution of incident particles of the DSSD module are presented. Supported by the XXX Civil Space Programme

  16. The structure of band-tail states in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabold, D. A.; Dong, Jianjun

    1997-03-01

    We compute and analyze the electronic eigenstates of the realistic and large (4096) atom model of Djordjevic, Thorpe and Wooten(B. R. Djordjevic, M. F. Thorpe and F. Wooten, Phys. Rev. B 52) 5685 (1995) in the vicinity of the gap. We discuss the structure, localization, and conductivity (from the Kubo formula) for states from midgap, well into the interior of the valence band. Tight-binding and ab initio (LDA) approximations for the states are discussed; comparisons are made to total yield photoelectron spectroscopy measurements(S. Aljisji, J. D. Cohen, S. Jin and L. Ley, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64), 2811 (1990). This is an extension of our earlier work on amorphous diamond( J. Dong and D. A. Drabold, Phys. Rev. B 54) 10284 (1996) to a-Si.

  17. Measuring fluence of fast neutrons with planar silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamyatin, N. I.; Cheremukhin, A. E.; Shafronovskaya, A. I.

    2017-09-01

    The results of measurements of 1-MeV (Si) equivalent fast neutron fluence with silicon planar detectors are reported. The measurement method is based on the linear dependence of the reverse detector current increment on the neutron fluence: ΔI = α I × Φ × V. This technique provides an opportunity to measure the equivalent fluence in a wide dynamic range from 108 to 1016 cm-2 with an unknown neutron energy spectrum and without detector calibration. The proposed method was used for monitoring in radiation resistance tests of different detector types at channel no. 3 of IBR-2 and for determining the fluence of fission and leakage neutrons at the KVINTA setup.

  18. Efficient Crystalline Si Solar Cell with Amorphous/Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction as Back Contact: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, B.; Wang, Q.; Shan, W.

    2012-06-01

    We study an amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction (Si HJ) as a back contact in industrial standard p-type five-inch pseudo-square wafer to replace Al back surface field (BSF) contact. The best efficiency in this study is over 17% with open-circuit (Voc) of 0.623 V, which is very similar to the control cell with Al BSF. We found that Voc has not been improved with the heterojunction structure in the back. The typical minority carrier lifetime of these wafers is on the order of 10 us. We also found that the doping levels of p-layer affect the FF due to conductivity and band gap shifting, and an optimized layer is identified. We conclude that an amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction can be a very promising structure to replace Al BSF back contact.

  19. Corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility of biodegradable surgical magnesium alloy coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yunchang; Jiang, Jiang; Huo, Kaifu; Tang, Guoyi; Tian, Xiubo; Chu, Paul K

    2009-06-01

    The fast degradation rates in the physiological environment constitute the main limitation for the applications of surgical magnesium alloys as biodegradable hard-tissue implants. In this work, a stable and dense hydrogenated amorphous silicon coating (a-Si:H) with desirable bioactivity is deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy using magnetron sputtering deposition. Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveal that the coating is mainly composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The hardness of the coated alloy is enhanced significantly and the coating is quite hydrophilic as well. Potentiodynamic polarization results show that the corrosion resistance of the coated alloy is enhanced dramatically. In addition, the deterioration process of the coating in simulated body fluids is systematically investigated by open circuit potential evolution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The cytocompatibility of the coated Mg is evaluated for the first time using hFOB1.19 cells and favorable biocompatibility is observed.

  20. Solid-phase epitaxy of silicon amorphized by implantation of the alkali elements rubidium and cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, R.; Haeublein, V.; Ryssel, H.; Voellm, H.; Feili, D.; Seidel, H.; Frey, L.

    2012-11-06

    The redistribution of implanted Rb and Cs profiles in amorphous silicon during solid-phase epitaxial recrystallization has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. For the implantation dose used in these experiments, the alkali atoms segregate at the a-Si/c-Si interface during annealing resulting in concentration peaks near the interface. In this way, the alkali atoms are moved towards the surface. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in ion channeling configuration was performed to measure average recrystallization rates of the amorphous silicon layers. Preliminary studies on the influence of the alkali atoms on the solid-phase epitaxial regrowth rate reveal a strong retardation compared to the intrinsic recrystallization rate.

  1. Label-Free Direct Electronic Detection of Biomolecules with Amorphous Silicon Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lund, John; Mehta, Ranjana; Parviz, Babak A.

    2007-01-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of a nano-scale sensor made of amorphous silicon for the label-free, electronic detection of three classes of biologically important molecules: ions, oligonucleotides, and proteins. The sensor structure has an active element which is a 50 nm wide amorphous silicon semicircle and has a total footprint of less than 4 μm2. We demonstrate the functionalization of the sensor with receptor molecules and the electronic detection of three targets: H+ ions, short single-stranded DNAs, and streptavidin. The sensor is able to reliably distinguish single base-pair mismatches in 12 base long strands of DNA and monitor the introduction and identification of straptavidin in real-time. The versatile sensor structure can be readily functionalized with a wide range of receptor molecules and is suitable for integration with high-speed electronic circuits as a post-process on an integrated circuit chip. PMID:17292148

  2. Carbon nanotube-amorphous silicon hybrid solar cell with improved conversion efficiency.

    PubMed

    Funde, Adinath M; Nasibulin, Albert G; Syed, Hashmi Gufran; Anisimov, Anton S; Tsapenko, Alexey; Lund, Peter; Santos, J D; Torres, I; Gandía, J J; Cárabe, J; Rozenberg, A D; Levitsky, Igor A

    2016-05-06

    We report a hybrid solar cell based on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) interfaced with amorphous silicon (a-Si). The high quality carbon nanotube network was dry transferred onto intrinsic a-Si forming Schottky junction for metallic SWNT bundles and heterojunctions for semiconducting SWNT bundles. The nanotube chemical doping and a-Si surface treatment minimized the hysteresis effect in current-voltage characteristics allowing an increase in the conversion efficiency to 1.5% under an air mass 1.5 solar spectrum simulator. We demonstrated that the thin SWNT film is able to replace a simultaneously p-doped a-Si layer and transparent conductive electrode in conventional amorphous silicon thin film photovoltaics.

  3. Highly efficient ultrathin-film amorphous silicon solar cells on top of imprinted periodic nanodot arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wensheng Gu, Min; Tao, Zhikuo; Ong, Thiam Min Brian

    2015-03-02

    The addressing of the light absorption and conversion efficiency is critical to the ultrathin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. We systematically investigate ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells with a 100 nm absorber on top of imprinted hexagonal nanodot arrays. Experimental evidences are demonstrated for not only notable silver nanodot arrays but also lower-cost ITO and Al:ZnO nanodot arrays. The measured external quantum efficiency is explained by the simulation results. The J{sub sc} values are 12.1, 13.0, and 14.3 mA/cm{sup 2} and efficiencies are 6.6%, 7.5%, and 8.3% for ITO, Al:ZnO, and silver nanodot arrays, respectively. Simulated optical absorption distribution shows high light trapping within amorphous silicon layer.

  4. Solid-phase crystallization of amorphous silicon nanowire array and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Ryousuke; Kato, Shinya; Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2014-02-01

    An amorphous silicon nanowire (a-SiNW) array perpendicular to a glass substrate can be successfully obtained through the metal-assisted chemical etching of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films. The solid-phase crystallization of a-SiNWs was carried out by thermal annealing in a forming gas in the temperature range from 600 to 900 °C. The effects of hydrogen in the film and the film morphology on the crystallization of a-SiNWs were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A higher hydrogen concentration of a-SiNWs reduced the crystallization temperature, as in a-Si thin films. It was also revealed that the large surface area of the a-SiNW array affected the crystallization process. We also studied the optical property of the fabricated SiNW array and demonstrated its high potential as an active layer in solar cells.

  5. Label-free direct electronic detection of biomolecules with amorphous silicon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lund, John; Mehta, Ranjana; Parviz, Babak A

    2006-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of a nano-scale sensor made of amorphous silicon for the label-free, electronic detection of three classes of biologically important molecules: ions, oligonucleotides, and proteins. The sensor structure has an active element which is a 50 nm wide amorphous silicon semicircle and has a total footprint of less than 4 microm2. We demonstrate the functionalization of the sensor with receptor molecules and the electronic detection of three targets: H(+) ions, short single-stranded DNAs, and streptavidin. The sensor is able to reliably distinguish single base-pair mismatches in 12 base long strands of DNA and monitor the introduction and identification of straptavidin in real-time. The versatile sensor structure can be readily functionalized with a wide range of receptor molecules and is suitable for integration with high-speed electronic circuits as a post-process on an integrated circuit chip.

  6. Plasmonic effects in amorphous silicon thin film solar cells with metal back contacts.

    PubMed

    Palanchoke, Ujwol; Jovanov, Vladislav; Kurz, Henning; Obermeyer, Philipp; Stiebig, Helmut; Knipp, Dietmar

    2012-03-12

    Plasmonic effects in amorphous silicon thin film solar cells with randomly textured metal back contact were investigated experimentally and numerically. The influence of different metal back contacts with and without ZnO interlayer was studied and losses in the individual layers of the solar cell were quantified. The amorphous silicon thin film solar cells were prepared on randomly textured substrates using large area production equipment and exhibit conversion efficiencies approaching 10%. The optical wave propagation within the solar cells was studied by Finite Difference Time Domain simulations. The quantum efficiency of solar cells with and without ZnO interlayer was simulated and the interplay between the reflection, quantum efficiency and absorption in the back contact will be discussed.

  7. Medium-range order in hydrogenated amorphous silicon measured by fluctuation microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, P. M.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Jin, H.-C.; Abelson, J. R.; Gibson, J. M.; Guha, S.; Crandall, R. S.

    2000-04-17

    The authors have characterized with fluctuation electron microscopy the medium-range order of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films deposited by a variety of methods. Films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering, hot-wire chemical vapor deposition, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with and without H{sub 2} dilution of the SiH{sub 4} precursor gas. All of the films show the signature of the paracrystalline structure typical of amorphous Si. There are small variations in the degree of medium-range order with deposition methods and H{sub 2} content. The PECVD film grown with high H{sub 2} dilution contains Si crystals {approximately} 5 nm in diameter at a density of {approximately} 10{sup 9} cm{sup 2}. The amorphous matrix surrounding these crystals shows no difference in medium-range order from the standard PECVD film.

  8. Atomistic modeling of amorphous silicon carbide using a bond-order potential

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2007-02-16

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed with a Brenner-type bond-order potential to study the melting of silicon carbide (SiC), the structure of amorphous SiC produced by quenching from the melt, and the evolution of the amorphous state after isochronal annealing at elevated temperatures. The simulations reveal that SiC melts above 3700 K with an enthalpy of fusion of about 0.6 eV/atom. The density of the quenched liquid is about 2820 kg/m3, in excellent agreement with the experimental value for SiC amorphized by neutron irradiation. In addition to the loss of long-range order, the quenched liquid shows short-range disorder as measured by the C homonuclear bond ratio. Upon annealing, there is partial recovery of shortrange order.

  9. Nanoscale solely amorphous layer in silicon wafers induced by a newly developed diamond wheel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Guo, Liangchao; Cui, Junfeng; Wang, Bo; Kang, Renke; Guo, Dongming

    2016-10-13

    Nanoscale solely amorphous layer is achieved in silicon (Si) wafers, using a developed diamond wheel with ceria, which is confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). This is different from previous reports of ultraprecision grinding, nanoindentation and nanoscratch, in which an amorphous layer at the top, followed by a crystalline damaged layer beneath. The thicknesses of amorphous layer are 43 and 48 nm at infeed rates of 8 and 15 μm/min, respectively, which is verified using HRTEM. Diamond-cubic Si-I phase is verified in Si wafers using selected area electron diffraction patterns, indicating the absence of high pressure phases. Ceria plays an important role in the diamond wheel for achieving ultrasmooth and bright surfaces using ultraprecision grinding.

  10. Nanoscale solely amorphous layer in silicon wafers induced by a newly developed diamond wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Guo, Liangchao; Cui, Junfeng; Wang, Bo; Kang, Renke; Guo, Dongming

    2016-10-01

    Nanoscale solely amorphous layer is achieved in silicon (Si) wafers, using a developed diamond wheel with ceria, which is confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). This is different from previous reports of ultraprecision grinding, nanoindentation and nanoscratch, in which an amorphous layer at the top, followed by a crystalline damaged layer beneath. The thicknesses of amorphous layer are 43 and 48 nm at infeed rates of 8 and 15 μm/min, respectively, which is verified using HRTEM. Diamond-cubic Si-I phase is verified in Si wafers using selected area electron diffraction patterns, indicating the absence of high pressure phases. Ceria plays an important role in the diamond wheel for achieving ultrasmooth and bright surfaces using ultraprecision grinding.

  11. Nanoscale solely amorphous layer in silicon wafers induced by a newly developed diamond wheel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Guo, Liangchao; Cui, Junfeng; Wang, Bo; Kang, Renke; Guo, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale solely amorphous layer is achieved in silicon (Si) wafers, using a developed diamond wheel with ceria, which is confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). This is different from previous reports of ultraprecision grinding, nanoindentation and nanoscratch, in which an amorphous layer at the top, followed by a crystalline damaged layer beneath. The thicknesses of amorphous layer are 43 and 48 nm at infeed rates of 8 and 15 μm/min, respectively, which is verified using HRTEM. Diamond-cubic Si-I phase is verified in Si wafers using selected area electron diffraction patterns, indicating the absence of high pressure phases. Ceria plays an important role in the diamond wheel for achieving ultrasmooth and bright surfaces using ultraprecision grinding. PMID:27734934

  12. Argon Dilution as an Alternative to Hydrogen Dilution for the Preparation of Large Area Device Quality Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layek, Animesh; Middya, Somnath; Ray, Partha Pratim

    2011-07-01

    In stead of using silane-hydrogen mixture we have used silane-argon mixture to develop device quality amorphous silicon on large area for solar cell application. Although silane-hydrogen mixture gives very good material, it increases the risk of fire hazard. On the other hand argon-silane mixture promotes a much safer process. In this work large area (20×20 cm2) device quality amorphous silicon have been developed by argon dilution method for industrial use.

  13. The role of hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide buffer layer on improving the performance of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium single-junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharathikhun, Jaran; Inthisang, Sorapong; Krajangsang, Taweewat; Krudtad, Patipan; Jaroensathainchok, Suttinan; Hongsingtong, Aswin; Limmanee, Amornrat; Sriprapha, Kobsak

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (a-Si1-xOx:H) film was used as a buffer layer at the p-layer (μc-Si1-xOx:H)/i-layer (a-Si1-xGex:H) interface for a narrow band gap hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium (a-Si1-xGex:H) single-junction solar cell. The a-Si1-xOx:H film was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 40 MHz in a same processing chamber as depositing the p-type layer. An optimization of the thickness of the a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layer and the CO2/SiH4 ratio was performed in the fabrication of the a-Si1-xGex:H single junction solar cells. By using the wide band gap a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layer with optimum thickness and CO2/SiH4 ratio, the solar cells showed an improvement in the open-circuit voltage (Voc), fill factor (FF), and short circuit current density (Jsc), compared with the solar cells fabricated using the conventional a-Si:H buffer layer. The experimental results indicated the excellent potential of the wide-gap a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layers for narrow band gap a-Si1-xGex:H single junction solar cells.

  14. Novel detectors for silicon based microdosimetry, their concepts and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of the development of semiconductor microdosimetry and the most current (state-of-the-art) Silicon on Insulator (SOI) detectors for microdosimetry based mainly on research and development carried out at the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP) at the University of Wollongong with collaborators over the last 18 years. In this paper every generation of CMRP SOI microdosimeters, including their fabrication, design, and electrical and charge collection characterisation are presented. A study of SOI microdosimeters in various radiation fields has demonstrated that under appropriate geometrical scaling, the response of SOI detectors with the well-known geometry of microscopically sensitive volumes will record the energy deposition spectra representative of tissue cells of an equivalent shape. This development of SOI detectors for microdosimetry with increased complexity has improved the definition of microscopic sensitive volume (SV), which is modelling the deposition of ionising energy in a biological cell, that are led from planar to 3D SOI detectors with an array of segmented microscopic 3D SVs. The monolithic ΔE-E silicon telescope, which is an alternative to the SOI silicon microdosimeter, is presented, and as an example, applications of SOI detectors and ΔE-E monolithic telescope for microdosimetery in proton therapy field and equivalent neutron dose measurements out of field are also presented. An SOI microdosimeter "bridge" with 3D SVs can derive the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in 12C ion radiation therapy that matches the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) quite well, but with outstanding spatial resolution. The use of SOI technology in experimental microdosimetry offers simplicity (no gas system or HV supply), high spatial resolution, low cost, high count rates, and the possibility of integrating the system onto a single device with other types of detectors.

  15. Tandem solar cells made from amorphous silicon and polymer bulk heterojunction sub-cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Heum; Shin, Insoo; Kim, Kwang Ho; Street, Robert; Roy, Anshuman; Heeger, Alan J

    2015-01-14

    A tandem solar cell based on a combination of an amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polymer solar cell (PSC) is demonstrated. As these tandem devices can be readily fabricated by low-cost methods, they require only a minor increase in the total manufacturing cost. Therefore, a combination of a-Si and PSC provides a compelling solution to reduce the cost of electricity produced by photovoltaics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Polarized electroabsorption spectra and light soaking of solar cells based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lin; Wang, Qi; Schiff, E. A.; Guha, S.; Yang, J.

    1998-03-01

    We present grazing-incidence measurements of polarized electroabsorption spectra in p-i-n solar cells based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). We find a significantly stronger polarization dependence in the present measurements compared with earlier work based on electroabsorption detected using coplanar electrodes on a-Si:H thin films. We do not find any significant dependence of the polarized electroabsorption upon light soaking, although this effect was found in previous work with coplanar electrodes.

  17. High electric field effects on the thermal generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ilie, A.; Equer, B.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the electric field dependence of the electron-hole thermal generation process in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. A model was developed which takes into account the Poole-Frenkel effect and the thermally assisted tunneling. In order to explain the experimental results it was necessary to consider a strong electron-lattice interaction describing the carrier tunneling mechanism. Deep defects relaxation is also discussed.

  18. Electronic transport in mixed-phase hydrogenated amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienkes, Lee Raymond

    Interest in mixed-phase silicon thin film materials, composed of an amorphous semiconductor matrix in which nanocrystalline inclusions are embedded, stems in part from potential technological applications, including photovoltaic and thin film transistor technologies. Conventional mixed-phase silicon films are produced in a single plasma reactor, where the conditions of the plasma must be precisely tuned, limiting the ability to adjust the film and nanoparticle parameters independently. The films presented in this thesis are deposited using a novel dual-plasma co-deposition approach in which the nanoparticles are produced separately in an upstream reactor and then injected into a secondary reactor where an amorphous silicon film is being grown. The degree of crystallinity and grain sizes of the films are evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction respectively. I describe detailed electronic measurements which reveal three distinct conduction mechanisms in n-type doped mixed-phase amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films over a range of nanocrystallite concentrations and temperatures, covering the transition from fully amorphous to ~30% nanocrystalline. As the temperature is varied from 470 to 10 K, we observe activated conduction, multiphonon hopping (MPH) and Mott variable range hopping (VRH) as the nanocrystal content is increased. The transition from MPH to Mott-VRH hopping around 100K is ascribed to the freeze out of the phonon modes. A conduction model involving the parallel contributions of these three distinct conduction mechanisms is shown to describe both the conductivity and the reduced activation energy data to a high accuracy. Additional support is provided by measurements of thermal equilibration effects and noise spectroscopy, both done above room temperature (>300 K). This thesis provides a clear link between measurement and theory in these complex materials.

  19. Fluctuating defect density probed with noise spectroscopy in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Verleg, P.A.W.E.; Uca, O.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    1997-07-01

    Resistance fluctuations have been studied in hydrogenated amorphous silicon in the temperature range between 300 K and 450 K. The primary noise source has a power spectrum of approximately 1/f and is ascribed to hydrogen motion. Hopping of weakly bound hydrogen is thermally activated at such low temperatures with an average activation energy of 0.85 eV. The attempt rate amounts to 7 {center_dot} 10{sup 12} s{sup {minus}1}.

  20. Estimation of the adequacy of the fractal model of the atomic structure of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Golodenko, A. B.

    2010-01-15

    A method of constructing a fractal model of noncrystalline solid substance is considered using the example of amorphous silicon. In systems of iteration functions, the physical meaning of dihedral and valence angles of the elementary crystallographic cell is assigned to arguments. The model adequacy is estimated by the radial distribution function, the atomic structure density, the distribution of valence and dihedral angles, and the density of dangling interatomic bonds.

  1. Photocapacitance and hole drift mobility measurements in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)

    SciTech Connect

    Nurdjaja, I.; Schiff, E.A.

    1997-07-01

    The authors present measurements of the photocapacitance in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) Schottky barrier diodes under reverse bias. A calculation relating photocapacitance to hole drift mobility measurements is also presented; the calculation incorporates the prominent dispersion effect for holes in a-Si:H usually attributed to valence bandtail trapping. The calculation accounts quantitatively for the magnitude and voltage-dependence of the photocapacitance.

  2. Method of controllong the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon and apparatus therefor

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1985-06-25

    An improved method and apparatus for the controlled deposition of a layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate. Means is provided for the illumination of the coated surface of the substrate and measurement of the resulting photovoltage at the outermost layer of the coating. Means is further provided for admixing amounts of p type and n type dopants to the reactant gas in response to the measured photovoltage to achieve a desired level and type of doping of the deposited layer.

  3. Performance of Thin-Window Silicon Drift Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Carini, , G.A.; Chen, W.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Gaskin, J.A.; Keister; J.W.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Rehak, P.; Siddons, D.P.

    2008-10-20

    Several sets of hexagonal Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) arrays were produced at BNL and by a commercial vendor, KETEK. Each array consists of 14 independent detectors (pixels) and two additional test pixels at two of the corners. The side of the detector upon which the X-ray radiation is incident (window side) has a thin junction covering the entire active area. The opposite side (device side) contains a drift-field electrode structure in the form of a hexagonal spiral and an electron collecting anode. There are 4 guard rings surrounding the 14-pixel array area on both sides of the detector. Within each array, 7 of the pixels have an aluminum field plate - interrupted spirals that stabilize the electric potential under the Si-SiO2 interface, while the other 7 do not. The drift field in the silicon volume is controlled by three biases: one is applied to a rectifying contact, one to the detector entrance window, and the third to a contact on the outer portion of the spiral common to all pixels in the array. Some arrays have been newly measured in NSLS beam line U3C at BNL. The complete assemblies were installed in the vacuum and cooled to ?27 C. During this run, spectra for energies ranging between 400 and 900 eV were collected in several pixels, some with field plates and others without. The detailed testing results of several arrays are reported here.

  4. Silicon photomultiplier detector for atmospheric lidar applications.

    PubMed

    Riu, Jordi; Sicard, Michaël; Royo, Santiago; Comerón, Adolfo

    2012-04-01

    The viability and performance of using a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) in atmospheric lidar applications is experimentally compared against the well-established use of photomultiplier tubes. By using a modified lidar setup for simultaneous data acquisition of both types of sensors, we demonstrate that a SiPM can offer appropriate qualities for this specific application where the detection of fast, extremely low light pulses and large dynamic range signals are essential capabilities. The experimental results show that the SiPM has an appropriate behaviour offering suitable capabilities for elastic, backscatter aerosol lidars. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing SiPM for atmospheric lidar applications.

  5. Initial experience with the CDF layer 00 silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    C. Hill

    2003-03-17

    We report on initial experience with the CDF Layer 00 Detector. Layer 00 is an innovative, low-mass, silicon detector installed in CDF during the upgrade for Run 2A of the Tevatron. Noise pickup present during operation at CDF is discussed. An event-by-event pedestal correction implemented by CDF is presented. This off-line solution prevents L00 from being used in the current incarnation of the on-line displaced track trigger. Preliminary performance of Layer 00 is described.

  6. Monolithic pixel detectors in silicon on insulator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bisello, Dario

    2013-05-06

    Silicon On Insulator (SOI) is becoming an attractive technology to fabricate monolithic pixel detectors. The possibility of using the depleted resistive substrate as a drift collection volume and to connect it by means of vias through the buried oxide to the pixel electronic makes this kind of approach interesting both for particle and photon detection. In this paper I report the results obtained in the development of monolithic pixel detectors in an SOI technology by a collaboration between groups from the University and INFN of Padova (Italy) and the LBNL and the SCIPP at UCSC (USA).

  7. Picosecond dynamics of a silicon donor based terahertz detector device

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, Ellis T.; Li, Juerong; Litvinenko, K. L.; Murdin, B. N. E-mail: yuxm@pku.edu.cn; Villis, B. J.; Erfani, Morteza; Matmon, Guy; Aeppli, Gabriel; Ortega, Jean-Michel; Prazeres, Rui; Dong, Li; Yu, Xiaomei E-mail: yuxm@pku.edu.cn

    2014-07-14

    We report the characteristics of a simple complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible terahertz detector device with low response time (nanoseconds) determined using a short-pulse, high intensity free-electron laser. The noise equivalent power was 1 × 10{sup −11} W Hz{sup −1/2}. The detector has an enhanced response over narrow bands, most notably at 9.5 THz, with a continuum response at higher frequencies. Using such a device, the dynamics of donors in silicon can be explored, a system which has great potential for quantum information processing.

  8. Proton Source for Characterizing and Testing Charged Particle Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Improvements in experimental design and equipment have increased our capability for future neutron beta decay measurements. The upcoming experiments have the potential to test the Standard Model at the same level as the superallowed nuclear beta decay measurements but without the need for nuclear corrections. Part of the improvement comes from new large-area pixelated silicon detector technology. The precision and accuracy that is demanded by the neutron beta decay experiments require detailed characterization of the detectors. Such characterization can be achieved using a low current, variable energy proton beam. The design and simulation of a proton beam from source through accelerator will be presented. University of Tennessee Physics Summer Fellowship.

  9. Monolithic pixel detectors in silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisello, Dario

    2013-05-01

    Silicon On Insulator (SOI) is becoming an attractive technology to fabricate monolithic pixel detectors. The possibility of using the depleted resistive substrate as a drift collection volume and to connect it by means of vias through the buried oxide to the pixel electronic makes this kind of approach interesting both for particle and photon detection. In this paper I report the results obtained in the development of monolithic pixel detectors in an SOI technology by a collaboration between groups from the University and INFN of Padova (Italy) and the LBNL and the SCIPP at UCSC (USA).

  10. Interfacial modification of amorphous substrates for microcrystalline silicon growth with in situ hydrogen plasma pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Bae; Rhee, Shi-Woo; Li, Xiaodong

    2005-10-01

    Microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films have been deposited onto hydrogenated and amorphous Si-rich silicon nitride and thermal oxide substrates with silane (SiH4)-hydrogen (H2) in remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RPECVD) at 250 °C, and these films have been investigated. It is found that in situ hydrogen plasma pretreatment of the amorphous substrates prior to μc-Si:H deposition is effective in reducing the interfacial amorphous transition region. It is believed that this hydrogen plasma pretreatment gives adsorption and nucleation sites by breaking weak Si-N and Si-Si bonds and also removes native Si-O x and hydrocarbon impurities. In the case of SiNx:H surface, surface roughening from atomic hydrogen etching and surface cleaning effects are greater than those for stable thermal oxide. Surface crystallization at the initial stage of the growth can be obtained on amorphous substrate at low temperature without an a-Si transition layer.

  11. Application of amorphous carbon based materials as antireflective coatings on crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, D. S.; Côrtes, A. D. S.; Oliveira, M. H.; Motta, E. F.; Viana, G. A.; Mei, P. R.; Marques, F. C.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the investigation of the potential application of different forms of amorphous carbon (a-C and a-C:H) as an antireflective coating for crystalline silicon solar cells. Polymeric-like carbon (PLC) and hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) was deposited by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique. Those three different amorphous carbon structures were individually applied as single antireflective coatings on conventional (polished and texturized) p-n junction crystalline silicon solar cells. Due to their optical properties, good results were also obtained for double-layer antireflective coatings based on PLC or ta-C films combined with different materials. The results are compared with a conventional tin dioxide (SnO2) single-layer antireflective coating and zinc sulfide/magnesium fluoride (ZnS/MgF2) double-layer antireflective coatings. An increase of 23.7% in the short-circuit current density, Jsc, was obtained using PLC as an antireflective coating and 31.7% was achieved using a double-layer of PLC with a layer of magnesium fluoride (MgF2). An additional increase of 10.8% was obtained in texturized silicon, representing a total increase (texturization + double-layer) of about 40% in the short-circuit current density. The potential use of these materials are critically addressed considering their refractive index, optical bandgap, absorption coefficient, hardness, chemical inertness, and mechanical stability.

  12. Exploratory observations of random telegraphic signals and noise in homogeneous hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, W. K.; Owen, A. E.; LeComber, P. G.; Rose, M. J.

    1990-07-01

    Noise measurements on unhydrogenated and hydrogenated rf sputtered intrinsic amorphous silicon reported by D'Amico, Fortunato, and Van Vliet [Solid-State Electron. 28, 837 (1985)] have 1/f and Lorentzian spectra, respectively. Similar noise measurements on glow-discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous intrinsic silicon reported by Bathaei and Anderson [Philos. Mag. B 55, 87 (1987)] gave a 1/f m spectrum with 0.7amorphous silicon is reported. It was found that the current passing through the sample fluctuates between two easily identifiable levels with the periods of fluctuations separated by a quiescent period. The occurrence of these fluctuations is unpredictable but the current noise spectrum obtained during quiescent periods is Lorentzian, probably indicative of a generation-recombination process. Noise measurements are not possible at higher biases (>105 V/cm) as the current fluctuates chaotically and this is also the prebreakdown regime of the sample.

  13. CW laser induced crystallization of thin amorphous silicon films deposited by EBE and PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said-Bacar, Z.; Prathap, P.; Cayron, C.; Mermet, F.; Leroy, Y.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Fogarassy, E.

    2012-09-01

    This work presents the Continuous Wave (CW) laser crystallization of thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) films deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and by Electron Beam Evaporation (EBE) on low cost glass substrate. The films are characterized by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and by Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to evaluate the hydrogen content. Analysis shows that the PECVD films contain a high hydrogen concentration (˜10 at.%) while the EBE films are almost hydrogen-free. It is found that the hydrogen is in a bonding configuration with the a-Si network and in a free form, requiring a long thermal annealing for exodiffusion before the laser treatment to avoid explosive effusion. The CW laser crystallization process of the amorphous silicon films was operated in liquid phase regime. We show by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) that polysilicon films with large grains can be obtained with EBE as well as for the PECVD amorphous silicon provided that for the latest the hydrogen content is lower than 2 at.%.

  14. Electron-irradiation-induced crystallization at metallic amorphous/silicon oxide interfaces caused by electronic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagase, Takeshi; Yamashita, Ryo; Lee, Jung-Goo

    2016-04-28

    Irradiation-induced crystallization of an amorphous phase was stimulated at a Pd-Si amorphous/silicon oxide (a(Pd-Si)/SiO{sub x}) interface at 298 K by electron irradiation at acceleration voltages ranging between 25 kV and 200 kV. Under irradiation, a Pd-Si amorphous phase was initially formed at the crystalline face-centered cubic palladium/silicon oxide (Pd/SiO{sub x}) interface, followed by the formation of a Pd{sub 2}Si intermetallic compound through irradiation-induced crystallization. The irradiation-induced crystallization can be considered to be stimulated not by defect introduction through the electron knock-on effects and electron-beam heating, but by the electronic excitation mechanism. The observed irradiation-induced structural change at the a(Pd-Si)/SiO{sub x} and Pd/SiO{sub x} interfaces indicates multiple structural modifications at the metal/silicon oxide interfaces through electronic excitation induced by the electron-beam processes.

  15. Amorphous silicon image sensors for x-ray detection in NDT

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.E.

    1996-12-31

    Acquiring radiographic images in a digital format offers significant advantages over film. Besides eliminating the need for chemical processing, a digital image can be easily stored for more convenient retrieval, transmitted to remote locations for interpretation, and image processed to provide enhanced interpretation and greater latitude in exposure. Amorphous silicon image sensors, developed by dpiX, a Xerox Company, offer an improved method of acquiring digital x-ray images. Amorphous silicon image sensor technology provides the opportunity to have large format size similar to x-ray film, high resolution, and a compact package for ease of use in NDT applications. This technology can also be used to replace x-ray image intensifier tubes to provide real-time fluoroscopic imaging for capturing time related events such as x-ray examination of objects on a conveyor belt. This paper presents a description of amorphous silicon image sensor technology and provides examples of the performance that can be achieved using a system that has an 8 x 10 inch x-ray image acquisition area and 127 micron pixels for 4 lp/mm resolution.

  16. Ultraviolet /UV/ sensitive phosphors for silicon imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Cowens, M. W.; Butner, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The fluorescence properties of UV sensitive organic phosphors and the radiometric properties of phosphor coated silicon detectors in the VUV, UV, and visible wavelengths are described. With evaporated films of coronene and liumogen, effective quantum efficiencies of up to 20% have been achieved on silicon photodiodes in the vacuum UV. With thin films of methylmethacrylate (acrylic), which are doped with organic laser dyes and deposited from solution, detector quantum efficiencies of the order of 15% for wavelengths of 120-165 nm and of 40% for wavelengths above 190 nm have been obtained. The phosphor coatings also act as antireflection coatings and thereby enhance the response of coated devices throughout the visible and near IR.

  17. Performance Characteristics of Thick Silicon Double-sided Strip Detectors.

    PubMed

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; McDonald, Benjamin S; Durko, Heather L; Fritz, Mark A; Furenlid, Lars R; Peterson, Todd E

    2007-01-01

    This work presents characterization studies of thick silicon double-sided strip detectors for a high-resolution small-animal SPECT. The dimension of these detectors is 60 mm × 60 mm × 1 mm. There are 1024 strips on each side that give the coordinates of the photon interaction, with each strip processed by a separate ASIC channel. Our measurement shows that intrinsic spatial resolution equivalent to the 59 µm strip pitch is attainable. Good flood uniformity can be achieved by proper setting of a 4-bit DAC in each ASIC channel to remove trigger threshold variations. This is particularly important for triggering at low energies. The thick silicon DSSD shows high potential for small-animal SPECT imaging.

  18. Temperature dependence of the response of ultra fast silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, R.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bellora, A.; Boscardin, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Cirio, R.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Durando, S.; Fadavi, A.; Ferrero, M.; Galloway, Z.; Gruey, B.; Freeman, P.; Kramberger, G.; Mandic, I.; Monaco, V.; Obertino, M.; Pancheri, L.; Paternoster, G.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Sadrozinski, H. F. W.; Seiden, A.; Sola, V.; Spencer, N.; Staiano, A.; Wilder, M.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Ultra Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD) are a novel concept of silicon detectors based on the Low Gain Avalanche Diode (LGAD) technology, which are able to obtain time resolution of the order of few tens of picoseconds. First prototypes with different geometries (pads/pixels/strips), thickness (300 and 50 μm) and gain (between 5 and 20) have been recently designed and manufactured by CNM (Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, Barcelona) and FBK (Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento). Several measurements on these devices have been performed in laboratory and in beam test and a dependence of the gain on the temperature has been observed. Some of the first measurements will be shown (leakage current, breakdown voltage, gain and time resolution on the 300 μm from FBK and gain on the 50 μm-thick sensor from CNM) and a comparison with the theoretically predicted trend will be discussed.

  19. Performance Characteristics of Thick Silicon Double-sided Strip Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Durko, Heather L.; Fritz, Mark A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Peterson, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents characterization studies of thick silicon double-sided strip detectors for a high-resolution small-animal SPECT. The dimension of these detectors is 60 mm × 60 mm × 1 mm. There are 1024 strips on each side that give the coordinates of the photon interaction, with each strip processed by a separate ASIC channel. Our measurement shows that intrinsic spatial resolution equivalent to the 59 µm strip pitch is attainable. Good flood uniformity can be achieved by proper setting of a 4-bit DAC in each ASIC channel to remove trigger threshold variations. This is particularly important for triggering at low energies. The thick silicon DSSD shows high potential for small-animal SPECT imaging. PMID:26778911

  20. Analysis of Electrical Transport and Noise Mechanisms in Amorphous Silicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-23

    CdSe Quantum Dots (ES→Mott) [22]  Hydrogenated Graphene (ES) [23]  Carbon Nanotubes (Mott) [24 3. Organic Semiconductors e.g.P3HT...2012) 905–908. 24. Z.H. Khan, S. Husain, M. Husain, “Variable range hopping in carbon nanotubes ,” Current Nanoscience, 2010, 6, 626-641. 25. Aleshin...pixel,  is the fill factor,  is the emissivity , Adet is the area, Vdet is the detector bias voltage, and TCR is the thermal coefficient of resistance

  1. Silicon vertex detector upgrade in the ALPHA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amole, C.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Burrows, C.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Isaac, C. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Little, A.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Napoli, S. C.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sacramento, R. L.; Stracka, S.; Sampson, J. A.; Sarid, E.; Seddon, D.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Thompson, R. I.; Tharp, T.; Thornhill, J.; Tooley, M. P.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wells, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) is the main diagnostic tool in the ALPHA-experiment. It provides precise spatial and timing information of antiproton (antihydrogen) annihilation events (vertices), and most importantly, the SVD is capable of directly identifying and analysing single annihilation events, thereby forming the basis of ALPHA's analysis. This paper describes the ALPHA SVD and its upgrade, installed in the ALPHA's new neutral atom trap.

  2. Experience with parallel optical link for the CDF silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. Hou

    2003-04-11

    The Dense Optical Interface Module (DOIM) is a byte-wide optical link developed for the Run II upgrade of the CDF silicon tracking system [1]. The module consists of a transmitter with a laser-diode array for conversion of digitized detector signals to light outputs, a 22 m optical fiber ribbon cable for light transmission, and a receiver converting the light pulses back to electrical signals. We report on the design feature, characteristics, and radiation tolerance.

  3. Low energy x-ray response of Ge detectors with amorphous Ge entrance contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, P.N.; Rossington, C.S.; Wesela, M.F.

    1993-10-01

    The low energy x-ray response of GI detectors with amorphous GI entrance contacts has been evaluated. The spectral background due to near contact incomplete charge collection was found to consist of two components: a low level component which is insensitive to applied voltage and a high level step-like component which is voltage dependent. At high operating voltages, the high level component can be completely suppressed, resulting in background levels which are much lower than those previously observed using GI detectors with Pd surface barrier or B ion implanted contacts, and which also compare favorably to those obtained with Si(Li) x-ray detectors. The response of these detectors to {sup 55}Fe and 1.77 keV x-rays is shown. A qualitative explanation of the origins of the observed background components is presented.

  4. A field-shaping multi-well avalanche detector for direct conversion amorphous selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Goldan, A. H.; Zhao, W.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: A practical detector structure is proposed to achieve stable avalanche multiplication gain in direct-conversion amorphous selenium radiation detectors. Methods: The detector structure is referred to as a field-shaping multi-well avalanche detector. Stable avalanche multiplication gain is achieved by eliminating field hot spots using high-density avalanche wells with insulated walls and field-shaping inside each well. Results: The authors demonstrate the impact of high-density insulated wells and field-shaping to eliminate the formation of both field hot spots in the avalanche region and high fields at the metal-semiconductor interface. Results show a semi-Gaussian field distribution inside each well using the field-shaping electrodes, and the electric field at the metal-semiconductor interface can be one order-of-magnitude lower than the peak value where avalanche occurs. Conclusions: This is the first attempt to design a practical direct-conversion amorphous selenium detector with avalanche gain.

  5. CDF Run IIb Silicon Vertex Detector DAQ Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    S. Behari et al.

    2003-12-18

    The CDF particle detector operates in the beamline of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, Batavia, IL. The Tevatron is expected to undergo luminosity upgrades (Run IIb) in the future, resulting in a higher number of interactions per beam crossing. To operate in this dense radiation environment, an upgrade of CDF's silicon vertex detector (SVX) subsystem and a corresponding upgrade of its VME-based DAQ system has been explored. Prototypes of all the Run IIb SVX DAQ components have been constructed, assembled into a test stand and operated successfully using an adapted version of CDF's network-capable DAQ software. In addition, a PCI-based DAQ system has been developed as a fast and inexpensive tool for silicon detector and DAQ component testing in the production phase. In this paper they present an overview of the Run IIb silicon DAQ upgrade, emphasizing the new features and improvements incorporated into the constituent VME boards, and discuss a PCI-based DAQ system developed to facilitate production tests.

  6. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation of amorphous silicon to increase the temperature processing window of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Jianwei; Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2016-07-19

    The dehydrogenation of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) at temperatures above approximately 300°C degrades its ability to passivate silicon wafer surfaces. This limits the temperature of post-passivation processing steps during the fabrication of advanced silicon heterojunction or silicon-based tandem solar cells. We demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma can rehydrogenate intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layers that have been dehydrogenated by annealing. The hydrogen plasma treatment fully restores the effective carrier lifetime to several milliseconds in textured crystalline siliconwafers coated with 8-nm-thick intrinsic a-Si:H layers after annealing at temperatures of up to 450°C. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation also translates to complete solar cells: A silicon heterojunction solar cell subjected to annealing at 450°C (following intrinsic a-Si:H deposition) had an open-circuit voltage of less than 600 mV, but an identical cell that received hydrogen plasma treatment reached a voltagemore » of over 710 mV and an efficiency of over 19%.« less

  7. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation of amorphous silicon to increase the temperature processing window of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jianwei; Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2016-07-19

    The dehydrogenation of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) at temperatures above approximately 300°C degrades its ability to passivate silicon wafer surfaces. This limits the temperature of post-passivation processing steps during the fabrication of advanced silicon heterojunction or silicon-based tandem solar cells. We demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma can rehydrogenate intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layers that have been dehydrogenated by annealing. The hydrogen plasma treatment fully restores the effective carrier lifetime to several milliseconds in textured crystalline siliconwafers coated with 8-nm-thick intrinsic a-Si:H layers after annealing at temperatures of up to 450°C. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation also translates to complete solar cells: A silicon heterojunction solar cell subjected to annealing at 450°C (following intrinsic a-Si:H deposition) had an open-circuit voltage of less than 600 mV, but an identical cell that received hydrogen plasma treatment reached a voltage of over 710 mV and an efficiency of over 19%.

  8. Amorphous silicon thin films: The ultimate lightweight space solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vendura, G. J., Jr.; Kruer, M. A.; Schurig, H. H.; Bianchi, M. A.; Roth, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Progress is reported with respect to the development of thin film amorphous (alpha-Si) terrestrial solar cells for space applications. Such devices promise to result in very lightweight, low cost, flexible arrays with superior end of life (EOL) performance. Each alpha-Si cell consists of a tandem arrangement of three very thin p-i-n junctions vapor deposited between film electrodes. The thickness of this entire stack is approximately 2.0 microns, resulting in a device of negligible weight, but one that must be mechanically supported for handling and fabrication into arrays. The stack is therefore presently deposited onto a large area (12 by 13 in), rigid, glass superstrate, 40 mil thick, and preliminary space qualification testing of modules so configured is underway. At the same time, a more advanced version is under development in which the thin film stack is transferred from the glass onto a thin (2.0 mil) polymer substrate to create large arrays that are truly flexible and significantly lighter than either the glassed alpha-Si version or present conventional crystalline technologies. In this paper the key processes for such effective transfer are described. In addition, both glassed (rigid) and unglassed (flexible) alpha-Si cells are studied when integrated with various advanced structures to form lightweight systems. EOL predictions are generated for the case of a 1000 W array in a standard, 10 year geosynchronous (GEO) orbit. Specific powers (W/kg), power densities (W/sq m) and total array costs ($/sq ft) are compared.

  9. Amorphous silicon thin films: The ultimate lightweight space solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Vendura, G.J. Jr.; Kruer, M.A.; Schurig, H.H.; Bianchi, M.A.; Roth, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Progress is reported with respect to the development of thin film amorphous (alpha-Si) terrestrial solar cells for space applications. Such devices promise to result in very lightweight, low cost, flexible arrays with superior end of life (EOL) performance. Each alpha-Si cell consists of a tandem arrangement of three very thin p-i-n junctions vapor deposited between film electrodes. The thickness of this entire stack is approximately 2.0 microns, resulting in a device of negligible weight, but one that must be mechanically supported for handling and fabrication into arrays. The stack is therefore presently deposited onto a large area (12 by 13 in), rigid, glass superstrate, 40 mil thick, and preliminary space qualification testing of modules so configured is underway. At the same time, a more advanced version is under development in which the thin film stack is transferred from the glass onto a thin (2.0 mil) polymer substrate to create large arrays that are truly flexible and significantly lighter than either the glassed alpha-Si version or present conventional crystalline technologies. In this paper the key processes for such effective transfer are described. In addition, both glassed (rigid) and unglassed (flexible) alpha-Si cells are studied when integrated with various advanced structures to form lightweight systems. EOL predictions are generated for the case of a 1000 W array in a standard, 10 year geosynchronous (GEO) orbit. Specific powers (W/kg), power densities (W/sq m) and total array costs ($/sq ft) are compared.

  10. Effect of Ion Bombardment on the Growth and Properties of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Jérôme; Takeda, Yoshihiko; Hirano, Naoto; Matsuura, Hideharu; Matsuda, Akihisa

    1989-01-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the effect of ion bombardment during the growth of amorphous silicon-germanium alloy films from silane and germane rf-glow discharge. Independent control of the plasma and the ion flux and energy is obtained by using a triode configuration. The ion contribution to the total deposition rate can reach 20% on negatively biased substrates. Although the Si and Ge composition of the film does not depend on the ion flux and energy, the optical, structural and electronic properties are drastically modified at low deposition temperatures when the maximum ion energy increases up to 50 eV, and remain constant above 50 eV. For a Ge atomic concentration of 37% and a temperature of 135°C, the optical gap decreases from 1.67 to 1.45 eV. This is correlated with a modification of hydrogen bonding configurations. Silicon dihydride sites disappear and preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon is reduced in favour of germanium. Moreover the photoconductivity increases which shows that ion bombardment is a key parameter to optimize the quality of low band gap amorphous silicon-germanium alloys.

  11. Bandgap and Carrier Transport Engineering of Quantum Confined Mixed Phase Nanocrystalline/Amorphous Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Tianyuan; Klafehn, Grant; Kendrick, Chito; Theingi, San; Airuoyo, Idemudia; Lusk, Mark T.; Stradins, Paul; Taylor, Craig; Collins, Reuben T.

    2016-11-21

    Mixed phase nanocrystalline/amorphous-silicon (nc/a-Si:H) thin films with band-gap higher than bulk silicon are prepared by depositing silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs), prepared in a separate deposition zone, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), simultaneously. Since the two deposition phases are well decoupled, optimized parameters for each component can apply to the growth process. Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) shows that the embedded SiNPs are small enough to exhibit quantum confinement effects. The low temperature PL measurements on the mixed phase reveal a dominant emission feature, which is associated with SiNPs surrounded by a-Si:H. In addition, we compare time dependent low temperature PL measurements for both a-Si:H and mixed phase material under intensive laser exposure for various times up to two hours. The PL intensity of a-Si:H with embedded SiNPs degrades much less than that of pure a-Si:H. We propose this improvement of photostability occurs because carriers generated in the a-Si:H matrix quickly transfer into SiNPs and recombine there instead of recombining in a-Si:H and creating defect states (Staebler-Wronski Effect).

  12. Detection of charged particles in thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers

    SciTech Connect

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Ward, W.; Street, R.A.

    1988-03-01

    We show our results in detecting particles of various linear energy transfer, including minimum ionizing electrons from a Sr-90 source with 5 to 12 micron thick n-i-p and p-i-n diodes. We measured W ( average energy to produce one electron-hole pair) using 17keV filtered xray pulses with a result W = 6.0 /+-/ 0.2eV. This is consistent with the expected value for a semiconductor with band gap of 1.7 to 1.9eV. With heavily ionizing particles such as 6 MeV alphas and 1 to 2 MeV protons, there was some loss of signal due to recombination in the particle track. The minimum ionizing electrons showed no sign of recombination. Applications to pixel and strip detectors for physics experiments and medical imaging will be discussed. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Silicon drift detector with reduced lateral diffusion:. experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šonský, J.; Valk, H.; Huizenga, J.; Hollander, R. W.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Sarro, P. M.

    2000-01-01

    In a standard multi-anode silicon drift detector electron cloud broadening during the drifting towards the anode pixels deteriorates the energy and position resolution. This makes the detector less applicable for detection of low-energy X-rays. The signal charge sharing between several anodes can be eliminated by introducing sawtooth-shaped p + field strips. The sawtooth structure results in small electric fields directed parallel to the sensor surface and perpendicular to the drift direction which produce gutters. The drifting electrons are confined in these gutters of one saw tooth period wide. For a detector with a sawtooth period of 500 μm, we have measured the maximum number of fully confined electrons as a function of the potential gutter depth induced by different sawtooth angles.

  14. p-type silicon detector for brachytherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Piermattei, A; Azario, L; Monaco, G; Soriani, A; Arcovito, G

    1995-06-01

    The sensitivity of a cylindrical p-type silicon detector was studied by means of air and water measurements using different photon beams. A lead filter cap around the diode was used to minimize the dependence of the detector response as a function of the brachytherapy photon energy. The radial dose distribution of a high-activity 192Ir source in a brachytherapy phantom was measured by means of the shielded diode and the agreement of these data with theoretical evaluations confirms the method used to compensate diode response in the intermediate energy range. The diode sensitivity was constant over a wide range of dose rates of clinical interest; this allowed one to have a small detector calibrated in terms of absorbed dose in a medium. Theoretical evaluations showed that a single shielding filter around the p-type diode is sufficient to obtain accurate dosimetry for 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co brachytherapy sources.

  15. Ion beam assisted deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubler, G. K.; Donovan, E. P.; Gossett, C. R.

    1994-06-01

    Hydrogenated silicon nitride films were produced near room temperature by electron beam evaporation of Si and simultaneous bombardment with a 500 eV ammonia ion beam from a Kaufman ion source and for a variety of ratios of incident charge to evaporant fluxes. The composition of N, Si and H in the films as a function of ion current density was measured by means of Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection analyses. Reflection and transmission spectroscopy in the wavelength range 400 nm to 3125 nm were employed to measure optical thickness and refractive index. From the data we extracted the number of nitrogen atoms in the ammonia beam per unit charge collected, the sputtering coefficient for ammonia incident on Si, and the refractive index versus composition of the alloys. At the highest N composition, the films were clear in the visible with the UV cut-off less than 400 nm, the index was 1.80 which is lower than that of pure Si3N4 and the H content was as high as 27 at.%.

  16. A Proposal to Upgrade the Silicon Strip Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard; Michael, LeVine; Jonathan, Bouchet; Stephane, Bouvier; Artemios, Geromitsos; Gerard, Guilloux; Sonia, Kabana; Christophe, Renard; Howard, Matis; Jim, Thomas; Vi Nham, Tram

    2007-11-05

    The STAR Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) was built by a collaboration of Nantes, Strasbourg and Warsaw collaborators. It is a beautiful detector; it can provide 500 mu m scale pointing resolution at the vertex when working in combination with the TPC. It was first used in Run 4, when half the SSD was installed in an engineering run. The full detector was installed for Run 5 (the Cu-Cu run) and the operation and performance of the detector was very successful. However, in preparation for Run 6, two noisy ladders (out of 20) were replaced and this required that the SSD be removed from the STAR detector. The re-installation of the SSD was not fully successful and so for the next two Runs, 6 and 7, the SSD suffered a cooling system failure that allowed a large fraction of the ladders to overheat and become noisy, or fail. (The cause of the SSD cooling failure was rather trivial but the SSD could not be removed betweens Runs 6 and 7 due to the inability of the STAR detector to roll along its tracks at that time.)

  17. Chemiluminescence lateral flow immunoassay cartridge with integrated amorphous silicon photosensors array for human serum albumin detection in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Zangheri, Martina; Di Nardo, Fabio; Mirasoli, Mara; Anfossi, Laura; Nascetti, Augusto; Caputo, Domenico; De Cesare, Giampiero; Guardigli, Massimo; Baggiani, Claudio; Roda, Aldo

    2016-12-01

    A novel and disposable cartridge for chemiluminescent (CL)-lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) with integrated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photosensors array was developed and applied to quantitatively detect human serum albumin (HSA) in urine samples. The presented analytical method is based on an indirect competitive immunoassay using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a tracer, which is detected by adding the luminol/enhancer/hydrogen peroxide CL cocktail. The system comprises an array of a-Si:H photosensors deposited on a glass substrate, on which a PDMS cartridge that houses the LFIA strip and the reagents necessary for the CL immunoassay was optically coupled to obtain an integrated analytical device controlled by a portable read-out electronics. The method is simple and fast with a detection limit of 2.5 mg L(-1) for HSA in urine and a dynamic range up to 850 mg L(-1), which is suitable for measuring physiological levels of HSA in urine samples and their variation in different diseases (micro- and macroalbuminuria). The use of CL detection allowed accurate and objective analyte quantification in a dynamic range that extends from femtomoles to picomoles. The analytical performances of this integrated device were found to be comparable with those obtained using a charge-coupled device (CCD) as a reference off-chip detector. These results demonstrate that integrating the a-Si:H photosensors array with CL-LFIA technique provides compact, sensitive and low-cost systems for CL-based bioassays with a wide range of applications for in-field and point-of-care bioanalyses. Graphical Abstract A novel integrated portable device was developed for direct quantitative detection of human serum albumin (HSA) in urine samples, exploiting a chemiluminescence lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA). The device comprises a cartridge that holds the LFIA strip and all the reagents necessary for the analysis, an array of amorphous silicon photosensors, and a custom read-out electronics.

  18. Integration of epitaxially-grown InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers with hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides on silicon.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2008-03-31

    The monolithic integration of epitaxially-grown InGaAs/GaAs self-organized quantum dot lasers with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a:Si-H) waveguides on silicon substrates is demonstrated. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides, formed by plasma-enhanced-chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD), exhibit a propagation loss of approximately 10 dB/cm at a wavelength of 1.05 microm. The laser-waveguide coupling, with coupling coefficient of 22%, is achieved through a 3.2 microm-width groove etched by focused-ion-beam (FIB) milling which creates high-quality etched GaAs facets.

  19. Infrared and Magnetic Studies of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Germanium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, Jonathan Randall

    In pure, sputtered a-Si or a-Ge the large defect density resulting from dangling bonds pins the Fermi level (E(,f)) and generally dominates the electronic properties of the material. Our group at Harvard theorized that H added to the sputtering plasma during film growth might be incorporated into the amorphous network to compensate theses dangling bonds: (1) IR studies of local Ge-H vibrational modes confirmed the presence of bonded H in the a-network and quantified its concentration, (2) A technique for high accuracy spin density (N(,s)) measurements was developed and used to monitor the dramatic defect density reduction with H incorporation, (3) The N(,s) reduction with increasing H incorporation was correlated with the integrated intensity increase of one IR feature, allowing a model of H incorporation kinetics to be developed and, (4) Plausible H incorporation configurations were identified. Sputtered a-S:H and a -Ge:H can be doped with significant E(,f) movement and are usable for device fabrication. The magnetic properties observed in the process of performing N(,s) measurements uncovered significant new information: (1) The EPR linewidth ((DELTA)H(,pp)) versus N(,s) variation at low temperatures indicated the presence of strong exchange interaction narrowing and a clustering of spins, (2) From the presence of a strong exchange interaction a spin ordering was predicted and an antiferromagnetic ordering was experimentally observed, (3) The (DELTA)H(,pp) temperature dependence was shown to be a result of lifetime broadening via carrier hopping near E(,f); using theoretical work of the Marburg group hopping times and the width of the hopping distribution could be directly estimated, (4) A photo-EPR effect was discovered and its spectral dependence provided a new type of spectroscopy for gap states and, (5) Photo-EPR effects and g-value shifts upon doping indicated the presence of another defect with properties different from those of the dangling bond. Thus

  20. Percolation network in resistive switching devices with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanhong; Gao, Ping; Bi, Kaifeng; Peng, Wei; Jiang, Xuening; Xu, Hongxia

    2014-01-27

    Conducting pathway of percolation network was identified in resistive switching devices (RSDs) with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon (Ag/a-Si/p-Si) based on its gradual RESET-process and the stochastic complex impedance spectroscopy characteristics (CIS). The formation of the percolation network is attributed to amounts of nanocrystalline Si particles as well as defect sites embedded in a-Si layer, in which the defect sites supply positions for Ag ions to nucleate and grow. The similar percolation network has been only observed in Ag-Ge-Se based RSD before. This report provides a better understanding for electric properties of RSD based on the percolation network.