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Sample records for amorphous silicon flat-panel

  1. Multidetector-row CT with a 64-row amorphous silicon flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Edward G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Daley, Earl T.; Job, Isaias D.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Mollov, Todor I.; Pavkovich, John M.; Roos, Pieter G.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Tognina, Carlo A.

    2007-03-01

    A unique 64-row flat panel (FP) detector has been developed for sub-second multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The intent was to explore the image quality achievable with relatively inexpensive amorphous silicon (a-Si) compared to existing diagnostic scanners with discrete crystalline diode detectors. The FP MDCT system is a bench-top design that consists of three FP modules. Each module uses a 30 cm x 3.3 cm a-Si array with 576 x 64 photodiodes. The photodiodes are 0.52 mm x 0.52 mm, which allows for about twice the spatial resolution of most commercial MDCT scanners. The modules are arranged in an overlapping geometry, which is sufficient to provide a full-fan 48 cm diameter scan. Scans were obtained with various detachable scintillators, e.g. ceramic Gd IIO IIS, particle-in-binder Gd IIO IIS:Tb and columnar CsI:Tl. Scan quality was evaluated with a Catphan-500 performance phantom and anthropomorphic phantoms. The FP MDCT scans demonstrate nearly equivalent performance scans to a commercial 16-slice MDCT scanner at comparable 10 - 20 mGy/100mAs doses. Thus far, a high contrast resolution of 15 lp/cm and a low contrast resolution of 5 mm @ 0.3 % have been achieved on 1 second scans. Sub-second scans have been achieved with partial rotations. Since the future direction of MDCT appears to be in acquiring single organ coverage per scan, future efforts are planned for increasing the number of detector rows beyond the current 64- rows.

  2. The performance of an amorphous silicon flat panel for neutron imaging at the PSI NEUTRA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estermann, Mirko; Frei, Gabriel; Lehmann, Eberhard; Vontobel, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Commonly applied imaging methods in neutron radiography use a CCD camera in conjunction with a scintillator or imaging plates. CCDs and imaging plates have desirable properties concerning resolution, linearity, dynamic range and signal-to-noise ratio ( S/ N) but both techniques have the disadvantage of a slow read out and for the CCD camera, an additional disadvantage is the loss of light through the optical system. Amorphous silicon detectors, originally developed for medical and industrial X-ray imaging, generally do not have the above-mentioned disadvantages. These detectors have a much faster readout and, in comparison to the generally used crystalline silicon, can be put directly in the X-ray or neutron beam without being damaged. This type of detector also does not require any optical interface, minimizing possible light loss. The detector is operated at room temperature, which has some influence on the noise. Using the whole dynamic range with a low gain, results in a S/ N of up to 30, for normal applications, however, a S/ N of about 15-20 is typical. The main drawback of this imaging device is the dynamic range of only 12 bits and the relatively complicated operating system in which different operation modes can be chosen. In 2003, successful experiments were performed with this new device, but it is still in its fledgling stages and improvements from the manufacturer as well as the experience from the NEUTRA team will help to advance this technique for neutron imaging in a most efficient way.

  3. [Full-field digital mammography with amorphous silicon-based flat- panel detector: physical imaging characteristics and signal detection].

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Tadamitsu; Higashida, Yoshiharu; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Ohki, Masafumi; Nakamura, Satoru; Yoshida, Akira; Takagi, Rie; Hatano, Hirohide; Kuwahara, Rie; Toyonaga, Makiko; Tanaka, Isamu; Toyofuku, Fukai

    2004-03-01

    The physical characteristics of a clinical amorphous silicon-based flat-panel imager for full-field digital mammography were investigated. Pre-sampled modulation transfer functions (MTF) were measured by using a slit method. Noise power spectra were determined for different input exposures by fast Fourier transform. The MTFs of full-field digital mammography systems showed significantly higher values than those of the computed radiography (CR) system. The full-field digital mammography system showed a lower noise level than that of the CR system under the same exposure conditions. Contrast detail analysis has been performed to compare the detectability of the full-field digital mammography system with that of the screen-film (Min-R 2000/Min-R 2000) system. The average contrast-detail curves of digital and film images were obtained from the results of observation. Image quality figures (IQF) were also calculated from the individual observer performance tests. The results indicated that the digital contrast-detail curves and IQF, on average, are superior to those of the screen-film system.

  4. Multiple-gain-ranging readout method to extend the dynamic range of amorphous silicon flat-panel imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Pieter G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Mollov, Ivan; Munro, Peter; Pavkovich, John; Seppi, Edward J.; Shapiro, Edward G.; Tognina, Carlo A.; Virshup, Gary F.; Yu, J. Micheal; Zentai, George; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Matsinos, Evangelos; Richters, Jeroen; Riem, Heinrich

    2004-05-01

    The dynamic range of many flat panel imaging systems are fundamentally limited by the dynamic range of the charge amplifier and readout signal processing. We developed two new flat panel readout methods that achieve extended dynamic range by changing the read out charge amplifier feedback capacitance dynamically and on a real-time basis. In one method, the feedback capacitor is selected automatically by a level sensing circuit, pixel-by-pixel, based on its exposure level. Alternatively, capacitor selection is driven externally, such that each pixel is read out two (or more) times, each time with increased feedback capacitance. Both methods allow the acquisition of X-ray image data with a dynamic range approaching the fundamental limits of flat panel pixels. Data with an equivalent bit depth of better than 16 bits are made available for further image processing. Successful implementation of these methods requires careful matching of selectable capacitor values and switching thresholds, with the imager noise and sensitivity characteristics, to insure X-ray quantum limited operation over the whole extended dynamic range. Successful implementation also depends on the use of new calibration methods and image reconstruction algorithms, to insure artifact free rebuilding of linear image data by the downstream image processing systems. The multiple gain ranging flat panel readout method extends the utility of flat panel imagers and paves the way to new flat panel applications, such as cone beam CT. We believe that this method will provide a valuable extension to the clinical application of flat panel imagers.

  5. DQE(f) of an amorphous-silicon flat-panel x-ray detector: detector parameter influences and measurement methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granfors, Paul R.; Aufrichtig, Richard

    2000-04-01

    We discuss how the frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency [DQE(f)] in a well-designed amorphous silicon flat panel detector is affected by several phenomena that reduce the DQE in other types of medical imaging detectors. The detector examined employs a CsI(Tl) scintillator and is designed for general diagnostic x-ray imaging applications. We consider DQE degradation due to incomplete x-ray absorption, secondary quantum noise, Swank factor, Lubberts effect, spatial variation in gain, noise aliasing, and additive system noise. The influences of detector design parameters on the frequency- and exposure-dependent DQE are also examined. We find that the DQE does not depend directly on MTF and that DQE is independent of exposure within the detector's operating range, except at the lowest exposures. Likewise the signal per absorbed x-ray, which contains the fill factor as one of several multiplicative components, does not affect DQE except at the lowest exposures. A methodology for determining DQE(f) from measurements of MTF(f), noise power spectrum (NPS), average signal, and x-ray exposure is presented. We find that it is important to incorporate several corrections in the NPS measurement procedure in order to obtain accurate results. These include corrections for lag, non-linearity, response variation from pixel to pixel, and use of a finite number of flat-field images. MTF, NPS, and DQE results are presented for a 41 X 41-cm2 flat panel detector designed for radiographic applications.

  6. Solid-state flat panel imager with avalanche amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Howansky, Adrian; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Levéille, Sébastien; Tanioka, K.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have become the dominant detector technology for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. For low dose imaging, electronic noise from the amorphous silicon thin film transistor (TFT) array degrades imaging performance. We have fabricated the first prototype solid-state AMFPI using a uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor to amplify the signal to eliminate the effect of electronic noise. We have previously developed a large area solid-state avalanche a-Se sensor structure referred to as High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) capable of achieving gains of 75. In this work we successfully deposited this HARP structure onto a 24 x 30 cm2 TFT array with a pixel pitch of 85 μm. An electric field (ESe) up to 105 Vμm-1 was applied across the a-Se layer without breakdown. Using the HARP layer as a direct detector, an X-ray avalanche gain of 15 +/- 3 was achieved at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. In indirect mode with a 150 μm thick structured CsI scintillator, an optical gain of 76 +/- 5 was measured at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. Image quality at low dose increases with the avalanche gain until the electronic noise is overcome at a constant exposure level of 0.76 mR. We demonstrate the success of a solid-state HARP X-ray imager as well as the largest active area HARP sensor to date.

  7. Comparison of an amorphous silicon/cesium iodide flat-panel digital chest radiography system with screen/film and computed radiography systems--a contrast-detail phantom study.

    PubMed

    Rong, X J; Shaw, C C; Liu, X; Lemacks, M R; Thompson, S K

    2001-11-01

    Flat-panel (FP) based digital radiography systems have recently been introduced as a new and improved digital radiography technology; it is important to evaluate and compare this new technology with currently widely used conventional screen/film (SF) and computed radiography (CR) techniques. In this study, the low-contrast performance of an amorphous silicon/cesium iodide (aSi/Csl)-based flat-panel digital chest radiography system is compared to those of a screen/film and a computed radiography system by measuring their contrast-detail curves. Also studied were the effects of image enhancement in printing the digital images and dependence on kVp and incident exposure. It was found that the FP system demonstrated significantly better low-contrast performance than the SF or CR systems. It was estimated that a dose savings of 70%-90% could be achieved to match the low-contrast performance of the FP images to that of the SF images. This dose saving was also found to increase with the object size. No significant difference was observed in low-contrast performances between the SF and CR systems. The use of clinical enhancement protocols for printing digital images was found to be essential and result in better low-contrast performance. No significant effects were observed for different kVps. From the results of this contrast-detail phantom study, the aSi/CsI-based flat-panel digital chest system should perform better under clinical situations for detection of low-contrast objects such as lung nodules. However, proper processing prior to printing would be essential to realizing this better performance.

  8. Dose reduction in skeletal and chest radiography using a large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide: technical background, basic image quality parameters, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Völk, Markus; Hamer, Okka W; Feuerbach, Stefan; Strotzer, Michael

    2004-05-01

    The two most frequently performed diagnostic X-ray examinations are those of the extremities and of the chest. Thus, dose reduction in the field of conventional skeletal and chest radiography is an important issue and there is a need to reduce man-made ionizing radiation. The large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide provides a significant reduction of radiation dose in skeletal and chest radiography compared with traditional imaging systems. This article describes the technical background and basic image quality parameters of this 43 x 43-cm digital system, and summarizes the available literature (years 2000-2003) concerning dose reduction in experimental and clinical studies. Due to its high detective quantum efficiency and dynamic range compared with traditional screen-film systems, a dose reduction of up to 50% is possible without loss of image quality.

  9. Should 3K zoom function be used for detection of pneumothorax in cesium iodide/amorphous silicon flat-panel detector radiographs presented on 1K-matrix soft copies?

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Karin A; Bonél, H M; Stäbler, A; Voelk, M; Strotzer, M; Zech, C J; Reiser, M F

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate observer performance in the detection of pneumothorax with cesium iodide and amorphous silicon flat-panel detector radiography (CsI/a-Si FDR) presented as 1K and 3K soft-copy images. Forty patients with and 40 patients without pneumothorax diagnosed on previous and subsequent digital storage phosphor radiography (SPR, gold standard) had follow-up chest radiographs with CsI/a-Si FDR. Four observers confirmed or excluded the diagnosis of pneumothorax according to a five-point scale first on the 1K soft-copy image and then with help of 3K zoom function (1K monitor). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed for each modality (1K and 3K). The area under the curve (AUC) values for each observer were 0.7815, 0.7779, 0.7946 and 0.7066 with 1K-matrix soft copies and 0.8123, 0.7997, 0.8078 and 0.7522 with 3K zoom. Overall detection of pneumothorax was better with 3K zoom. Differences between the two display methods were not statistically significant in 3 of 4 observers (p-values between 0.13 and 0.44; observer 4: p = 0.02). The detection of pneumothorax with 3K zoom is better than with 1K soft copy but not at a statistically significant level. Differences between both display methods may be subtle. Still, our results indicate that 3K zoom should be employed in clinical practice.

  10. Design and feasibility of active matrix flat panel detector using avalanche amorphous selenium for protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Afrin; Reznik, Alla; Karim, Karim S; Rowlands, J A

    2008-10-01

    Protein crystallography is the most important technique for resolving the three-dimensional atomic structure of protein by measuring the intensity of its x-ray diffraction pattern. This work proposes a large area flat panel detector for protein crystallography based on direct conversion x-ray detection technique using avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) as the high gain photoconductor, and active matrix readout using amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistors. The detector employs avalanche multiplication phenomenon of a-Se to make the detector sensitive to each incident x ray. The advantages of the proposed detector over the existing imaging plate and charge coupled device detectors are large area, high dynamic range coupled to single x-ray detection capability, fast readout, high spatial resolution, and inexpensive manufacturing process. The optimal detector design parameters (such as detector size, pixel size, and thickness of a-Se layer), and operating parameters (such as electric field across the a-Se layer) are determined based on the requirements for protein crystallography application. The performance of the detector is evaluated in terms of readout time (<1 s), dynamic range (approximately 10(5)), and sensitivity (approximately 1 x-ray photon), thus validating the detector's efficacy for protein crystallography.

  11. Scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) implemented with an amorphous selenium flat-panel detector: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinming; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Han, Tao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Shen, Youtao; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C

    2009-11-21

    It is well recognized in projection radiography that low-contrast detectability suffers in heavily attenuating regions due to excessively low x-ray fluence to the image receptor and higher noise levels. Exposure equalization can improve image quality by increasing the x-ray exposure to heavily attenuating regions, resulting in a more uniform distribution of exposure to the detector. Image quality is also expected to be improved by using the slot-scan geometry to reject scattered radiation effectively without degrading primary x-rays. This paper describes the design of a prototype scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) system implemented with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) array-based flat-panel detector. With this system, slot-scan geometry with alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) technique was used to achieve scatter rejection. A seven-segment beam height modulator assembly was mounted onto the fore collimator to regulate exposure regionally for chest radiography. The beam modulator assembly, consisting of micro linear motors, lead screw cartridge with lead (Pb) beam blockers attached, position feedback sensors and motor driver circuitry, has been tested and found to have an acceptable response for exposure equalization in chest radiography. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged in the posterior-anterior (PA) view under clinical conditions. Scatter component, primary x-rays, scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs) and primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs) were measured in the SEDR images to evaluate the rejection and redistribution of scattered radiation, and compared with those for conventional full-field imaging with and without anti-scatter grid methods. SPR reduction ratios (SPRRRs, defined as the differences between the non-grid full-field SPRs and the reduced SPRs divided by the former) yielded approximately 59% for the full-field imaging with grid and 82% for the SEDR technique in the lungs, and 77% for the full

  12. Clinical evaluation of digital radiography based on a large-area cesium iodide-amorphous silicon flat-panel detector compared with screen-film radiography for skeletal system and abdomen.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Terue; Tanaka, Saori; Koyama, Koichi; Norihumi, Nishida; Daikokuya, Hideo; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Kishimoto, Kenji; Hatagawa, Masakatsu; Kudoh, Hiroaki; Yamada, Ryusaku

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to compare the image quality of digital radiography using the new digital Bucky system based on a flat-panel detector with that of a conventional screen-film system for the skeletal structure and the abdomen. Fifty patients were examined using digital radiography with a flat-panel detector and screen-film systems, 25 for the skeletal structures and 25 for the abdomen. Six radiologists judged each paired image acquired under the same exposure parameters concerning three observation items for the bone and six items for the abdomen. Digital radiographic images for the bone were evaluated to be similar to screen-film images at the mean of 42.2%, to be superior at 50.2%, and to be inferior at 7.6%. Digital radiographic images for the abdomen were judged to be similar to screen-film images at the mean of 43.4%, superior at 52.4%, and inferior at 4.2%; thus, digital radiographic images were estimated to be either similar as or superior to screen-film images at over 92% for the bone and abdomen. On the statistical analysis, digital radiographic images were also judged to be preferred significantly in the most items for the bone and abdomen. In conclusion, the image quality of digital radiography with a flat-panel detector was superior to that of a screen-film system under the same exposure parameters, suggesting that dose reduction is possible with digital radiography.

  13. Amorphous and polycrystalline photoconductors for direct conversion flat panel x-ray image sensors.

    PubMed

    Kasap, Safa; Frey, Joel B; Belev, George; Tousignant, Olivier; Mani, Habib; Greenspan, Jonathan; Laperriere, Luc; Bubon, Oleksandr; Reznik, Alla; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Karim, Karim S; Rowlands, John A

    2011-01-01

    In the last ten to fifteen years there has been much research in using amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors as x-ray photoconductors in various x-ray image sensor applications, most notably in flat panel x-ray imagers (FPXIs). We first outline the essential requirements for an ideal large area photoconductor for use in a FPXI, and discuss how some of the current amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors fulfill these requirements. At present, only stabilized amorphous selenium (doped and alloyed a-Se) has been commercialized, and FPXIs based on a-Se are particularly suitable for mammography, operating at the ideal limit of high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Further, these FPXIs can also be used in real-time, and have already been used in such applications as tomosynthesis. We discuss some of the important attributes of amorphous and polycrystalline x-ray photoconductors such as their large area deposition ability, charge collection efficiency, x-ray sensitivity, DQE, modulation transfer function (MTF) and the importance of the dark current. We show the importance of charge trapping in limiting not only the sensitivity but also the resolution of these detectors. Limitations on the maximum acceptable dark current and the corresponding charge collection efficiency jointly impose a practical constraint that many photoconductors fail to satisfy. We discuss the case of a-Se in which the dark current was brought down by three orders of magnitude by the use of special blocking layers to satisfy the dark current constraint. There are also a number of polycrystalline photoconductors, HgI(2) and PbO being good examples, that show potential for commercialization in the same way that multilayer stabilized a-Se x-ray photoconductors were developed for commercial applications. We highlight the unique nature of avalanche multiplication in a-Se and how it has led to the development of the commercial HARP video-tube. An all solid state version of the HARP has been

  14. Amorphous and Polycrystalline Photoconductors for Direct Conversion Flat Panel X-Ray Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kasap, Safa; Frey, Joel B.; Belev, George; Tousignant, Olivier; Mani, Habib; Greenspan, Jonathan; Laperriere, Luc; Bubon, Oleksandr; Reznik, Alla; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Karim, Karim S.; Rowlands, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In the last ten to fifteen years there has been much research in using amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors as x-ray photoconductors in various x-ray image sensor applications, most notably in flat panel x-ray imagers (FPXIs). We first outline the essential requirements for an ideal large area photoconductor for use in a FPXI, and discuss how some of the current amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors fulfill these requirements. At present, only stabilized amorphous selenium (doped and alloyed a-Se) has been commercialized, and FPXIs based on a-Se are particularly suitable for mammography, operating at the ideal limit of high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Further, these FPXIs can also be used in real-time, and have already been used in such applications as tomosynthesis. We discuss some of the important attributes of amorphous and polycrystalline x-ray photoconductors such as their large area deposition ability, charge collection efficiency, x-ray sensitivity, DQE, modulation transfer function (MTF) and the importance of the dark current. We show the importance of charge trapping in limiting not only the sensitivity but also the resolution of these detectors. Limitations on the maximum acceptable dark current and the corresponding charge collection efficiency jointly impose a practical constraint that many photoconductors fail to satisfy. We discuss the case of a-Se in which the dark current was brought down by three orders of magnitude by the use of special blocking layers to satisfy the dark current constraint. There are also a number of polycrystalline photoconductors, HgI2 and PbO being good examples, that show potential for commercialization in the same way that multilayer stabilized a-Se x-ray photoconductors were developed for commercial applications. We highlight the unique nature of avalanche multiplication in a-Se and how it has led to the development of the commercial HARP video-tube. An all solid state version of the HARP has been

  15. Crystallization of silicon films on glass: a comparison of methods. [Flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, R.A.; Bosch, M.A.; Herbst, D.

    1982-01-01

    The lure of flat panel displays has stimulated much research on the crystallization of silicon films deposited on large-area transparent substrates. In most respects, fused quartz is ideal. It has high purity, thermal shock resistance, and a softening point above the silicon melting temperature. Unfortunately, fused quartz has such a small thermal expansion that the silicon film cracks as it cools. This problem has been attacked by patterning with islands or moats before and after crystallization, by capping, and by using silicate glass substrates that match the thermal expansion of silicon. The relative merits of these methods are compared. Melting of the silicon film to achieve high mobility has been accomplished by a variety of methods including lasers, electron beams, and strip heaters. For low melting temperature glasses, surface heating with a laser or electron beam is essential. Larger grains are obtained with the high bias temperature, strip heater techniques. The low-angle grain boundaries characteristic of these films may be caused by constitutional undercooling. A model is developed to predict the boundary spacing as a function of scan rate and temperature gradient. 11 figures.

  16. Image performance of a new amorphous selenium flat panel x-ray detector designed for digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, L. K.; Jing, Z.; Bogdanovich, S.; Golden, K.; Robinson, S.; Beliaevskaia, E.; Parikh, S.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to report the performance of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) based flat-panel x-ray imager under development for application in digital breast tomosynthesis. This detector is designed to perform both in the conventional Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) mode and the tomosynthesis mode. The large area 24 x 29 cm detector achieves rapid image acquisition rates of up to 4 frames per second with minimal trapped charge induced effects such as ghost or lag images of previously acquired objects. In this work, a new a-Se/TFT detector layer structure is evaluated. The design uses a top conductive layer in direct contact with the a-Se x-ray detection layer. The simple structure has few layers and minimal hole and electron trapping effects. Prototype detectors were built to investigate the basic image performance of this new a-Se/TFT detector. Image signal generation, image ghosting, image lag, and detector DQE were studied. For digital mammography applications, the residual image ghosting was less than 1% at 30 seconds elapsed time. DQE, measured at a field of 5.15 V/um, showed significantly higher values over previously reported data, especially at low exposure levels. For digital breast tomosynthesis, the image lag at dynamic readout rate was < 0.6 % at 0.5-second elapsed time. A prototype tomosynthesis system is being developed utilizing this new a-Se/TFT detector.

  17. Microcavity effects in the photoluminescence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpenguzel, Ali; Aydinli, Atilla; Bek, Alpan

    1998-07-01

    Fabry-Perot microcavities are used for the alteration of photoluminescence in hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride grown with and without ammonia. The photoluminescence is red-near-infrared for the samples grown without ammonia, and blue-green for the samples grown with ammonia. In the Fabry- Perot microcavities, the amplitude of the photoluminescence is enhanced, while its linewidth is reduced with respect to the bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride. The microcavity was realized by a metallic back mirror and a hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride--air or a metallic front mirror. The transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance spectra were also measured and calculated. The calculated spectra agree well with the experimental spectra. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride microcavity has potential for becoming a versatile silicon based optoelectronic device such as a color flat panel display, a resonant cavity enhanced light emitting diode, or a laser.

  18. Stereoscopic Flat Panel Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    the display of stereo imagery have been demonstrated. Stereoscopic displays typically require the user to wear special headgear. Autostereoscopic ...components and the resulting changes in the encoding algorithm. Keywords: Stereoscopic display, LCD, 3D , polarization encoding, flat panel 1...panel display when viewing non-stereoscopic imagery or data. Remotely operated vehicles do not represent the only potential application for 3D

  19. Quantitative comparison using generalized relative object detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution microangiographic fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; Shankar, A.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Ionita, C. N.; Scott, C.; Karim, K. S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25μm pixel pitch, and 1000μm thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/μm bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-pre-whitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal- spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide break- through abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  20. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  1. TU-F-18C-02: Increasing Amorphous Selenium Thickness in Direct Conversion Flat-Panel Imagers for Contrast-Enhanced Dual-Energy Breast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Scaduto, DA; Hu, Y-H; Zhao, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Contrast-enhanced (CE) breast imaging using iodinated contrast agents requires imaging with x-ray spectra at energies greater than those used in mammography. Optimizing amorphous selenium (a-Se) flat panel imagers (FPI) for this higher energy range may increase lesion conspicuity. Methods: We compare imaging performance of a conventional FPI with 200 μm a-Se conversion layer to a prototype FPI with 300 μm a-Se layer. Both detectors are evaluated in a Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system using low-energy (W/Rh 28 kVp) and high-energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) x-ray spectra. Detectability of iodinated lesions in dual-energy images is evaluated using an iodine contrast phantom. Effects of beam obliquity are investigated in projection and reconstructed images using different reconstruction methods. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio is used as a figure-of-merit to predict the optimal a-Se thickness for CE lesion detectability without compromising conventional full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and DBT performance. Results: Increasing a-Se thickness from 200 μm to 300 μm preserves imaging performance at typical mammographic energies (e.g. W/Rh 28 kVp), and improves the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for high energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) by 30%. While the more penetrating high-energy x-ray photons increase geometric blur due to beam obliquity in the FPI with thicker a-Se layer, the effect on lesion detectability in FBP reconstructions is negligible due to the reconstruction filters employed. Ideal observer SNR for CE objects shows improvements in in-plane detectability with increasing a-Se thicknesses, though small lesion detectability begins to degrade in oblique projections for a-Se thickness above 500 μm. Conclusion: Increasing a-Se thickness in direct conversion FPI from 200 μm to 300 μm improves lesion detectability in CE breast imaging with virtually no cost to conventional FFDM and DBT. This work was partially

  2. Investigations of a flat-panel detector for quality assurance measurements in ion beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Bernadette; Telsemeyer, Julia; Huber, Lucas; Ackermann, Benjamin; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-01-07

    Increased accuracy in radiation delivery to a patient provided by scanning particle beams leads to high demands on quality assurance (QA). To meet the requirements, an extensive quality assurance programme has been implemented at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center. Currently, high-resolution radiographic films are used for beam spot position measurements and homogeneity measurements for scanned fields. However, given that using this film type is time and equipment demanding, considerations have been made to replace the radiographic films in QA by another appropriate device. In this study, the suitability of the flat-panel detector RID 256 L based on amorphous silicon was investigated as an alternative method. The currently used radiographic films were taken as a reference. Investigations were carried out for proton and carbon ion beams. The detectors were irradiated simultaneously to allow for a direct comparison. The beam parameters (e.g. energy, focus, position) currently used in the daily QA procedures were applied. Evaluation of the measurements was performed using newly implemented automatic routines. The results for the flat-panel detector were compared to the standard radiographic films. Additionally, a field with intentionally decreased homogeneity was applied to test the detector's sensitivities toward possible incorrect scan parameters. For the beam position analyses, the flat-panel detector results showed good agreement with radiographic films. For both detector types, deviations between measured and planned spot distances were found to be below 1% (1 mm). In homogeneously irradiated fields, the flat-panel detector showed a better dose response homogeneity than the currently used radiographic film. Furthermore, the flat-panel detector is sensitive to field irregularities. The flat-panel detector was found to be an adequate replacement for the radiographic film in QA measurements. In addition, it saves time and equipment because no post

  3. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.

    1998-01-01

    A microgap flat panel display which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y "pixel" strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a "pixel" in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel.

  4. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.

    1998-12-08

    A microgap flat panel display is disclosed which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y ``pixel`` strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a ``pixel`` in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel. 6 figs.

  5. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  6. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  7. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  8. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Karthik

    2011-12-01

    Silicon Photonics is quickly proving to be a suitable interconnect technology for meeting the future goals of on-chip bandwidth and low power requirements. However, it is not clear how silicon photonics will be integrated into CMOS chips, particularly microprocessors. The issue of integrating photonic circuits into electronic IC fabrication processes to achieve maximum flexibility and minimum complexity and cost is an important one. In order to minimize usage of chip real estate, it will be advantageous to integrate in three-dimensions. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is emerging as a promising material for the 3-D integration of silicon photonics for on-chip optical interconnects. In addition, a-Si:H film can be deposited using CMOS compatible low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at any point in the fabrication process allowing maximum flexibility and minimal complexity. In this thesis, we demonstrate a-Si:H as a high performance alternate platform to crystalline silicon, enabling backend integration of optical interconnects in a hybrid photonic-electronic network-on-chip architecture. High quality passive devices are fabricated on a low-loss a-Si:H platform enabling wavelength division multiplexing schemes. We demonstrate a broadband all-optical modulation scheme based on free-carrier absorption effect, which can enable compact electro-optic modulators in a-Si:H. Furthermore, we comprehensively characterize the optical nonlinearities in a-Si:H and observe that a-Si:H exhibits enhanced nonlinearities as compared to crystalline silicon. Based on the enhanced nonlinearities, we demonstrate low-power four-wave mixing in a-Si:H waveguides enabling high speed all-optical devices in an a-Si:H platform. Finally, we demonstrate a novel data encoding scheme using thermal and all-optical tuning of silicon waveguides, increasing the spectral efficiency in an interconnect link.

  9. Amorphous Silicon: Flexible Backplane and Display Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri R.

    Advances in the science and technology of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H, also referred to as a-Si) and the associated devices including thin-film transistors (TFT) during the past three decades have had a profound impact on the development and commercialization of major applications such as thin-film solar cells, digital image scanners and X-ray imagers and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Particularly, during approximately the past 15 years, a-Si TFT-based flat panel AMLCDs have been a huge commercial success. a-Si TFT-LCD has enabled the note book PCs, and is now rapidly replacing the venerable CRT in the desktop monitor and home TV applications. a-Si TFT-LCD is now the dominant technology in use for applications ranging from small displays such as in mobile phones to large displays such as in home TV, as well-specialized applications such as industrial and avionics displays.

  10. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

  11. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  12. Flat panel planar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-11-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic Display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic class sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  13. Microcalcification detection using cone-beam CT mammography with a flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xing; Vedula, Aruna A; Glick, Stephen J

    2004-06-07

    The purpose of this study was to investigate microcalcification detectability using CT mammography with a flat-panel imager. To achieve this, a computer simulation was developed to model an amorphous-silicon, CsI based flat-panel imager system using a linear cascaded model. The breast was modelled as a hemi-ellipsoid shape with composition of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissue. Microcalcifications were modelled as small spheres having a composition of calcium carbonate. The results show that with a mean glandular dose equivalent to that typically used in two-view screening mammography, CT mammography with a flat-panel detector is capable of providing images where most microcalcifications are detectable. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was conducted by five physicist observers viewing simulated CT mammography reconstructions. The results suggest that the microcalcification with its diameter equal to or greater than 0.175 mm can be detected with an average area under the ROC curve (AUC) greater than 0.95 using 0.1 or 0.2 mm pixelized detectors. The results also indicate that the optimal pixel size of the detector is around 0.2 mm for microcalcification detection, based on the trade-off between detectability of microcalcifications and the time required for data acquisition and reconstruction.

  14. Flat panel display Impurity doping technology for flat panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2005-08-01

    Features of the flat panel displays (FPDs) such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, etc. using low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) are briefly reviewed comparing with other FPDs. The requirements for fabricating TFTs used for high performance FPDs and system on glass (SoG) are addressed. This paper focuses on the impurity doping technology, which is one of the key technologies together with crystallization by laser annealing, formation of high quality gate insulator and gate-insulator/poly-Si interface. The issues to be solved in impurity doping technology for state of the art and future TFTs are clarified.

  15. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-03-13

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III-V or II-VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X-Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs.

  16. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III–V or II–VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X–Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs. PMID:20123746

  17. Nanocrystalline silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Fauchet, P.M.; Tsybeskov, L.; Zacharias, M. |; Hirschman, K. |

    1998-12-31

    Thin layers made of densely packed silicon nanocrystals sandwiched between amorphous silicon dioxide layers have been manufactured and characterized. An amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattice is first grown by CVD or RF sputtering. The a-Si layers are recrystallized in a two-step procedure (nucleation + growth) for form layers of nearly identical nanocrystals whose diameter is given by the initial a-Si layer thickness. The recrystallization is monitored using a variety of techniques, including TEM, X-Ray, Raman, and luminescence spectroscopies. When the a-Si layer thickness decreases (from 25 nm to 2.5 nm) or the a-SiO{sub 2} layer thickness increases (from 1.5 nm to 6 nm), the recrystallization temperature increases dramatically compared to that of a single a-Si film. The removal of the a-Si tissue present between the nanocrystals, the passivation of the nanocrystals, and their doping are discussed.

  18. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  19. Plasma technology and its use in flat panel digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Zur, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Plasma DR technology is used to produce a cost effective flat panel x-ray detector that acquires digital x-ray images with excellent diagnostic quality. The detector is radiation hard and permanently zero defect, with a full virtual pixel matrix that has no dead lines, pixels, or dead pixel clusters. The technology also allows the full potential of large area amorphous Selenium imaging to finally be realized (see Figure 4).

  20. [Canon's flat-panel detector].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masao; Sumida, Iori; Ideguchi, Tadamitsu; Kawaji, Yasuyuki; Himuro, Kazuhiko

    2002-01-01

    We measured and evaluated digital, pre-sampling and overall imaging properties (characteristic curve, modulation transfer function (MTF), Wiener spectrum (WS), noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) ) for Cannon's flat-panel detector (FPD), Fuji computed radiography (FCR) and screen-film (S/F) systems, respectively. First, the digital and overall characteristic curves of FPD and FCR systems were more wide dynamic range than that of the S/F system. Second, the pre-sampling and overall MTF of FPD system were better than those of FCR system a little at lower spatial frequencies than 0.8 mm(-1), but the overall MTF of FPD and FCR systems were worse than that of S/F system a little at all spatial frequencies. Third, the digital and overall WS of FPD system were similar or better than those of FCR system, but the overall WS of FPD and FCR systems were worse than that of S/F system. Fourth, the pre-sampling and overall NEQ of FPD system were better than those of FCR system a little at lower spatial frequencies than 1.6 mm(-1), but the overall NEQ of FPD and FCR systems were worse than that of S/F system at all spatial frequencies. Comparison of chest phantom images showed that the FPD produced images with quality comparable to or higher than those of the FCR system. From these results, we can expect that the FPD is useful machine by using digital image processing and so on in the radiology department.

  1. [Hologic's Flat-Panel Detector].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yuji; Matsumoto, Masao; Suekane, Koji

    2002-01-01

    We measured and evaluated digital, pre-sampling and overall imaging properties (characteristic curve, Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Wiener spectrum (WS), Noise Equivalent Quanta (NEQ) and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE)) for Hologic's direct type and Cannon's indirect type of Flat-Panel Detector (FPD). First, the digital and overall characteristic curves of both types of FPD were more wide dynamic range than that of the S/F system. Second, the pre-sampling and overall MTF of the direct-type FPD system were superior to those of the indirect-type FPD system. Third, for identical exposures, the digital and overall WS of the direct-type FPD system were similar or worse than those of the indirect-type FPD system, and for larger exposure, the digital WS of the both types of FPD system were smaller, but the overall WS of the both types of FPD systems were larger. Fourth, the digital and overall NEQ and DQE of the direct-type FPD system were worse than those of the indirect-type FPD system at lower spatial frequencies than 1.75 - 2.0 mm(-1), but were worse at higher spatial frequencies than 1.75 - 2.0 mm(-1). We show radiographs made with the direct type of FPD system. Radiographs of square wave chart show the difference in MTF and contrast of the both types of FPD systems. As the result of evaluation of radiographs of chest phantom in point of noise by radiologists and radiological technologists, the direct type of FPD system needed double or more exposure dose than own standard condition, this dose was same as the indirect-type FPD system. And radiologists evaluated radiographs of human body, spatial resolution was very good, but contrast was much more likely to high at standard parameter. Therefore we have to consider exposure condition and image processing for the direct type of FPD system.

  2. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, Stephen E.; Orvis, William J.; Caporaso, George J.; Wieskamp, Ted F.

    1996-01-01

    A device which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density.

  3. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.; Orvis, W.J.; Caporaso, G.J.; Wieskamp, T.F.

    1996-04-16

    A device is disclosed which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density. 6 figs.

  4. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  5. High voltage protection in active matrix flat-panel imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Joerg; Zhao, Wei

    2006-03-01

    Various direct and indirect active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPI) are being investigated for x-ray imaging. In both direct AMFPI and indirect AMFPI with avalanche gain, a bias potential up to several thousand volts is required to operate the photoconductor. Under the condition of a large amount of radiation exposure between subsequent readout, a potential >80 V could appear across the amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film transistor (TFT) and cause permanent damage. The purpose of this paper is to investigate a simple pixel design for high voltage protection. The pixel electrode acts as an additional gate for the top channel of an a-Si TFT to drain excess image charge from the pixel electrode until an equilibrium is reached where the TFT channel current equals the detector signal current at a predetermined safe maximum value V Pmax for the pixel potential. This "dual-gate" TFT structure without additional protective device simplifies the TFT array design and improves yield. However special care is required to understand the characteristics of both the top and the bottom gates to ensure sufficient detector dynamic range as well as reliable high voltage protection. A physical model for dual-gate a-Si TFTs was developed and device parameters were determined by fitting the model to measured characteristics from a dual-gate TFT array. Our results showed that compared to the bottom (normal) gate, the protective gate has a shallower transfer characteristics (i.e. channel current as a function of gate voltage) due to a higher density of states in the top interface. Nevertheless it provides adequate protection of the TFT with V Pmax of ~40 V for typical radiographic exposures.

  6. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  7. Amorphous silicon based radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Qureshi, S.; Wildermuth, D. ); Fujieda, I.; Street, R.A. )

    1991-07-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin(1 {mu}m) and thick (>30{mu}m) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and {gamma} rays. For x-ray, {gamma} ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Compensated amorphous-silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, G.

    1982-06-21

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the elecrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF/sub 3/ doped intrinsic layer.

  9. Method of producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    DOEpatents

    Wiesmann, Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, from a tungsten or carbon foil heated to a temperature of about 1400.degree.-1600.degree. C., in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-6 to 19.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseos mixture onto a substrate independent of and outside said source of thermal decomposition, to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The presence of an ammonia atmosphere in the vacuum chamber enhances the photoconductivity of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon film.

  10. Flat panel displays in an underwater cockpit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, Kenneth E.

    1999-08-01

    This paper reports on a highly unusual application of flat panel displays in a cockpit. The cockpit is found in a mini- submarine of the Advanced SEAL Delivery System (ASDS), a state-of-the-art military platform designed to deliver U.S. Navy SEALs, and other special forces, to their mission locations. For security reasons, the presentation details are intentionally kept minimal.

  11. Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Progress in identification of strengths and weaknesses of amorphous-silicon technology detailed. Report describes achievements in testing reliability of solar-power modules made of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic cells. Based on investigation of modules made by U.S. manufacturers. Modules subjected to field tests, to accelerated-aging tests in laboratory, and to standard sequence of qualification tests developed for modules of crystalline-silicon cells.

  12. [Present state and future of flat panel detector in Japan].

    PubMed

    Higashida, Yoshiharu

    2002-01-01

    In our country, the introduction of flat panel detector is carried out in the diagnosis region since before several years. In flat panel detector with the high image characteristic, large expectation is being placed. In this paper, image characteristic of flat panel detector and effectiveness of clinical application were reviewed. It is anticipated that flat panel detector with the excellent image characteristic gives large effect in the radiological diagnosis.

  13. Phosphors for flat panel emissive displays

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.T.; Walko, R.J.; Phillips, M.L.F.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of emissive display technologies is presented. Display types briefly described include: cathode ray tubes (CRTs), field emission displays (FEDs), electroluminescent displays (ELDs), and plasma display panels (PDPs). The critical role of phosphors in further development of the latter three flat panel emissive display technologies is outlined. The need for stable, efficient red, green, and blue phosphors for RGB fall color displays is emphasized.

  14. Quantitative carbon ion beam radiography and tomography with a flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Telsemeyer, Julia; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-12-07

    High dose gradients are inherent to ion beam therapy. This results in high sensitivity to discrepancies between planned and delivered dose distributions. Therefore an accurate knowledge of the ion stopping power of the traversed tissue is critical. One proposed method to ensure high quality dose deposition is to measure the stopping power by ion radiography. Although the idea of imaging with highly energetic ions is more than forty years old, there is a lack of simple detectors suitable for this purpose. In this study the performance of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector, originally designed for photon imaging, was investigated for quantitative carbon ion radiography and tomography. The flat-panel detector was exploited to measure the water equivalent thickness (WET) and water equivalent path length (WEPL) of a phantom at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). To do so, the ambiguous correlation of detector signal to particle energy was overcome by active or passive variation of carbon ion beam energy and measurement of the signal-to-beam energy correlation. The active method enables one to determine the WET of the imaged object with an uncertainty of 0.5 mm WET. For tomographic WEPL measurements the passive method was exploited resulting in an accuracy of 0.01 WEPL. The developed imaging technique presents a method to measure the two-dimensional maps of WET and WEPL of phantoms with a simple and commercially available detector. High spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 mm(2) is given by the detector design. In the future this powerful tool will be used to evaluate the performance of the treatment planning algorithm by studying WET uncertainties.

  15. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  16. Performance of advanced a-Si/CsI-based flat-panel x-ray detectors for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albagli, Douglas; Hudspeth, Heather; Possin, George E.; Lee, Ji Ung; Granfors, Paul R.; Giambattista, Brian W.

    2003-06-01

    The GE Senographe 2000D, the first full field digital mammography system based on amorphous Silicon (a-Si) flat panel arrays and a Cesium-Iodide (CsI) scintillator, has been in clinical use for several years. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate and quantify improvements in the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for both typical screening and ultra-low exposure levels for this technology platform. A new figure of merit, the electronic noise factor, is introduced to explicitly quantify the influence of the electronic noise, conversion factor, modulation transfer function (MTF), and pixel pitch towards the reduction of DQE at low exposure levels. Methods to improve the DQE through an optimization of both the flat panel design and the scintillator deposition process are discussed. The results show a substantial improvement in the DQE(f) at all frequencies and demonstrate the potential for DQE(0) to exceed 80%. The combination of high DQE at ultra low exposures and the inherent fast read-out capability makes this technology platform ideal for both current clinical procedures and advanced applications that may use multiple projections (tomosynthesis) or contrast media to enhance digital mammography.

  17. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  18. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-05-13

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material.

  19. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  20. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  1. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski <111> silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  2. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  3. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  4. High-performance low-noise 128-channel readout-integrated circuit for flat-panel x-ray detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuville, Eric J.; Belding, Mark; Costello, Adrienne N.; Hansen, Randy; Petronio, Susan M.

    2004-05-01

    A silicon mixed-signal integrated circuit is needed to extract and process x-ray induced signals from a coated flat panel thin film transistor array (TFT) in order to generate a digital x-ray image. Indigo Systems Corporation has designed, fabricated, and tested such a readout integrated circuit (ROIC), the ISC9717. This off-the-shelf, high performance, low-noise, 128-channel device is fully programmable with a multistage pipelined architecture and a 9 to 14-bit programmable A/D converter per channel, making it suitable for numerous X-ray medical imaging applications. These include high-resolution radiography in single frame mode and fluoroscopy where high frame rates are required. The ISC9717 can be used with various flat panel arrays and solid-state detectors materials: Selenium (Se), Cesium Iodide (CsI), Silicon (Si), Amorphous Silicon, Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe). The 80-micron pitch ROIC is designed to interface (wire bonding or flip-chip) along one or two sides of the x-ray panel, where ROICs are abutted vertically, each reading out charge from pixels multiplexed onto 128 horizontal read lines. The paper will present the design and test results of the ROIC, including the mechanical and electrical interface to a TFT array, system performance requirements, output multiplexing of the digital signals to an off-board processor, and characterization test results from fabricated arrays.

  5. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H.

  6. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  7. Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

  8. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  9. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects.

  10. Comparison of concentrating collectors to tracking flat panels

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Two-axis tracking appears to be the economic optimum for photovoltaic flat-panel technology. This requires a new comparison of flat-panel and concentrator arrays using the most competitive flat-panel option. The array field costs for a two-axis tracking flat-panel should be nearly identical to the costs for a concentrator. Therefore, module costs for the two technologies can be compared directly, simplifying the analysis. For example, at southwestern sites, characterized by a high direct-to-diffuse insolation ratio, 12% flat-panels are found to be equivalent to 15% concentrators of the same cost ($/m/sup 2/). For regions with more diffuse radiation the concentrator must be over 18% efficient to be equivalent.

  11. Thermal and Cold Neutron Computed Tomography at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center Using an Amorphous Silicon Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Schwab, M.J.; Farnum, E.H.; McDonald, T.E.; Summa, D.A.; Sheats, M.J.; Stupin, D.M.; Sievers, W.L.

    1998-07-19

    The use of the EG and G-Heimann RTM 128 or dpiX FS20 amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector array for thermal neutron radiography/computed tomography has proven to be a quick and efficient means of producing high quality digital radiographic images. The resolution, although not as good as film, is about 750 pm with the RTM and 127 pm with the dpiX array with a dynamic range in excess of 2,800. In many respects using an amorphous silicon detector is an improvement over other techniques such as imaging with a CCD camera, using a storage phosphor plate or film radiography. Unlike a CCD camera, which is highly susceptible to radiation damage, a-Si detectors can be placed in the beam directly behind the object under examination and do not require any special optics or turning mirrors. The amorphous silicon detector also allows enough data to be acquired to construct a digital image in just a few seconds (minimum gate time 40 ms) whereas film or storage plate exposures can take many minutes and then need to be digitized with a scanner. The flat panel can therefore acquire a complete 3D computed tomography data set in just a few tens of minutes. While a-Si detectors have been proposed for use in imaging neutron beams, this is the first reported implementation of such a detector for neutron imaging.

  12. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, L. L.; Hay, J. C.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides the properties of bulk stoichiometric silicon carbide which has been amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60°C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 × 10 25 n/m 2. Amorphization was seen in both materials as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the amorphized CVD SiC. Using measured thermal conductivity data for the CVD SiC sample, the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than ˜125°C.

  13. Structural characterization of stable amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shibin; Kong, Guanglin; Wang, Yongqian; Sheng, Shuran; Liao, Xianbo

    2002-05-01

    A kind of hydrogenated diphasic silicon films has been prepared by a new regime of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in the region adjacent to the phase transition from amorphous to crystalline state. The photoelectronic and microstructural properties of the films have been investigated by the constant photocurrent method (CPM), Raman scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Our experimental results and corresponding analyses showed that the diphasic films, incorporated with a subtle boron compensation, could gain both the fine photosensitivity and high stability, provided the crystalline fraction ( f) was controlled in the range of 0< f<0.3. When compared with the conventional hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), the diphasic films are more ordered and robust in the microstructure, and have a less clustered phase in the Si-H bond configurations.

  14. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-06-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  15. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  16. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  17. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  18. Optimization of key building blocks for a large-area radiographic and fluoroscopic dynamic digital x-ray detector based on a-Si:H/CsI:Tl flat panel technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducourant, Thierry; Michel, Marc; Vieux, Gerard; Peppler, Tobias; Trochet, J. C.; Schulz, Reiner F.; Bastiaens, Raoul J. M.; Busse, Falko

    2000-04-01

    This paper introduces the key design optimizations which have been carried out recently in Trixell in order to prepare the future family of large area, combined static (Radiography) and dynamic (Fluoroscopy, Cardio...) digital X-ray detectors based on a-Si:H/CsI:Tl flat panel technology. These optimizations have been carried out on a 16' X 12' prototype that has been designed and built in a product-oriented way. We describe the detector technology and give some of its main characteristics, as well as some preliminary measurement results.The heart of the new prototype is a Cesium Iodide scintillating screen, directly evaporated onto a 2 K X 2.5 K pixel, array of amorphous silicon photodiodes and TFTs deposited on a glass substrate. The pixel pitch is 155 micrometer. The detective flat panel is connected to dedicated electronics which provides line addressing, low-noise column readout and multiplexing into a serial electrical signal. This signal is digitized over 14 bits to provide a direct digital image output, available for the host radiology system via an optical fiber. This type of detector (flat panel + electronics) is built into a light and thin (less than 100 mm) packaging which can be easily integrated in various x-ray equipment such as R&F tables, Angiography systems (incl. Cardiology), and mobile C-arm systems.

  19. A comparison of concentrating collectors to tracking flat panels

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.J.

    1984-05-01

    Two-axis tracking appears to be the economic optimum for photovoltaic flat-panel technology. This requires a new comparison of flatpanel and concentrator arrays using the most competitive flat-panel option. The array field costs for a two-axis tracking flat-panel should be nearly identical to the costs for a concentrator. Therefore, module costs for the two technologies can be compared directly, simplifying the analysis. For example, at southwestern sites, characterized by a high direct-to-diffuse insolation ratio, 12% flat-panels are found to be equivalent to 15% concentrators of the same cost ($/M/sup 2/). For regions with more diffuse radiation the concentrator must be over 18% efficient to be equivalent.

  20. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  1. [Flat-panel detectors in X-ray systems].

    PubMed

    Spahn, M; Heer, V; Freytag, R

    2003-05-01

    For all application segments X-ray systems with flat-panel detectors increasingly enter the market. In digital radiography,mammography and cardiologic angiography flat-panel detectors are already well established while they are made ready for market introduction in general angiography and fluoroscopy. Two flat-panel detector technologies are available. One technology is based on an indirect conversion process of X-rays while the other one uses a direct conversion method. For radiography and dynamic applications the indirect method provides substantial advantages, while the direct method has some benefits for mammography. In radiography and mammography flat-panel detectors lead to clear improvements with respect to workflow, image quality and dose reduction potentials. These improvements are fostered by the immediate availability of the image, the large dynamic range and the high sensitivity to X-rays. New applications and the use of complex image processing algorithms have the potential to enlarge the present diagnostic range of applications. Up to now, image intensifiers are still the well-established technology for angiography and fluoroscopy. Nevertheless flat-panel detectors begin to enter this field, especially in cardiologic angiography. Characteristics of flat-panel detectors such as the availability of distortion-free images, the excellent contrast resolution, the large dynamic range, the high sensitivity to X-rays and the usability in magnetic fields provide the basis for improved and new diagnostic and interventional methods.

  2. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bosworth, D. Sahonta, S.-L.; Barber, Z. H.; Hadfield, R. H.

    2015-08-15

    Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using W{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (Mo{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}) offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo{sub 83}Si{sub 17}. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz), there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  3. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/.mu.c-Si) solar cells which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell.

  4. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-07-23

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/{micro}c-Si) solar cells are disclosed which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell. 4 figs.

  5. Low temperature internal friction of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Metcalf, Thomas; Jernigan, Glenn; Jugdersuren, Battogtokh; Kearney, Brian; Culberston, James

    The ubiquitous low-energy excitations, known as two-level tunnelling systems (TLS), are one of the universal phenomena of amorphous solids. These excitations dominate the acoustic, dielectric, and thermal properties of structurally disordered solids. Using the double-paddle oscillator internal friction measurement technique, we have shown that TLS can be made to almost completely disappear in e-beam deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si) as the growth temperature increased to 400°C. However, there is a mysterious broad maximum in internal friction at 2-3K, which we suspect to come from metallic contamination of our oscillators and is not related to a-Si. Our new result of a-Si, deposited in a different UHV system and on oscillators with a different type of metallic electrodes, confirms our suspicion. This lowers the upper bound of possible TLS content in a-Si, in terms of tunnelling strength, to below 10-6. Our results offer an encouraging opportunity to use growth temperature to improve the structure order of amorphous thin films and to develop high quality amorphous dielectrics for applications, such as in modern quantum devices. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  6. The use of modern electronic flat panel devices for image guided radiation therapy:. Image quality comparison, intra fraction motion monitoring and quality assurance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nill, S.; Stützel, J.; Häring, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2008-06-01

    With modern radiotherapy delivery techniques like intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) it is possible to delivery a more conformal dose distribution to the tumor while better sparing the organs at risk (OAR) compared to 3D conventional radiation therapy. Due to the theoretically high dose conformity achievable it is very important to know the exact position of the target volume during the treatment. With more and more modern linear accelerators equipped with imaging devices this is now almost possible. These imaging devices are using energies between 120kV and 6MV and therefore different detector systems are used but the vast majority is using amorphous silicon flat panel devices with different scintilator screens and build up materials. The technical details and the image quality of these systems are discussed and first results of the comparison are presented. In addition new methods to deal with motion management and quality assurance procedures are shortly discussed.

  7. Direct-conversion flat-panel x-ray imaging: reduction of noise by presampling filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, John A.; Ji, Winston G.; Zhao, Wei; Lee, Denny L. Y.

    2000-04-01

    Large area flat panel solid-state detectors are being studied for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. Such systems use active matrix arrays to readout latent charge images created either by direct conversion of x-ray energy to charge in a photoconductor or indirectly using a phosphor and individual photodiodes on the active matrix array. Our work has utilized the direct conversion method because of its simplicity and the higher resolution possible due to the electrostatic collection of secondary quanta. Aliasing of noise occurs in current designs of direct detectors based on amorphous selenium ((alpha) -Se) because of its high intrinsic resolution. This aliasing leads to a decrease in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as frequency increases. It has been predicted, using a previously developed model of the complete imaging system, that appropriately controlled spatial filtration can reduce this aliased noise and hence increase DQE at the Nyquist frequency, fNY. Our purpose is to experimentally verify this concept by implementing presampling filtration in a practical flat panel system. An (alpha) -Se based flat panel imager is modified by incorporating an insulating layer between the active matrix and the (alpha) -Se layer to introduce a predetermined amount of presampling burring. The modified imager is evaluated using standard linear analysis tools, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS) and DQE(f), and the results are compared to theoretical predictions.

  8. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Payson, J. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films were irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15 cm(-2). The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy and photoconductivity measurements. The investigations show that the radiation introduces sub-band-gap states 1.35 eV below the conduction band and the states increase supralinearly with fluence. Photoconductivity measurements suggest the density of states above the Fermi energy is not changing drastically with fluence.

  9. Do LCDs have a chance to keep a leading position on flat panel display market?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Jerzy; Olifierczuk, Marek

    2004-09-01

    A lot of significant discoveries and inventions in the field of technology of displays were made in the latter part of the twentieth century. Apart from well-known CRT, the plasma-, luminescence- and liquid crystal-displays are commercially available. One can notice that a leading position on that flat panel displays market belong to LCD. But the progress in Organic LED materials and devices is impressive. Threshold voltage for light emission have fallen from several thousands V to just 2 - 3 V for today's OLEDs (polymer and small molecule). Luminous efficiency has increased from 0,01 to more than 10 lm/W. These improvements have brought PLED technology to the point where serious consideration is being given to OLED graphic and video display product. The question given some years ago by Dr. M. E. Becker, [Display Metrology and Systems]: "...is the current OLED enthusiasm justified because OLED displays feature significant improvements in visual and ergonomic performance, and because they are much cheaper to manufacture; Or it is just another hope for those who missed the LCD train?...," is trite. During SID Conference in Baltimore in 2003 two companies claiming to have built the largest organic LED. International Display Technology demonstrated a 20 inch display driven by "super amorphous silicon" technology; Sony showed off its 24 inch screen, which consists of a 2x2 tiled array of OLED displays. The presented work will be oriented towards specifying the characteristic features of liquid crystal and electro luminescence organic compounds which make these groups of displays so attractive and prospective among other imagery systems devices existing nowadays.

  10. Image quality assessment of a pre-clinical flat-panel volumetric micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Louise Y.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2006-03-01

    Small animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. Current micro-CT systems are capable of achieving spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. However, the speed of data acquisition of these systems is relatively slow, when compared with clinical CT systems. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging has proven to be a powerful tool clinically in detecting and diagnosing cancer, stroke, pulmonary and ischemic heart diseases. In order to perform this technique in mice and rats, quantitative CT images must be acquired at a rate of at least 1 Hz. Recently, a research pre-clinical CT scanner (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare) has been designed specifically for dynamic perfusion imaging in small animals. Using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector and a clinical slip-ring gantry, this system is capable of acquiring volumetric image data at a rate of 1 Hz, with in-plane resolution of 150 μm, while covering the entire thoracic region of a mouse or whole organs of a rat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the principal imaging performance of the micro-CT system, in terms of spatial resolution, image uniformity, linearity, dose and voxel noise for the feasibility of imaging mice and rats. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.7 line pairs per mm and noise of 42 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 seconds at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  11. Relative dosimetry using active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology.

    PubMed

    El-Mohri, Y; Antonuk, L E; Yorkston, J; Jee, K W; Maolinbay, M; Lam, K L; Siewerdsen, J H

    1999-08-01

    The first examination of the use of active matrix flat-panel arrays for dosimetry in radiotherapy is reported. Such arrays are under widespread development for diagnostic and radiotherapy imaging. In the current study, an array consisting of 512 x 512 pixels with a pixel pitch of 508 microm giving an area of 26 x 26 cm2 has been used. Each pixel consists of a light sensitive amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photodiode coupled to an a-Si:H thin-film transistor. Data was obtained from the array using a dedicated electronics system allowing real-time data acquisition. In order to examine the potential of such arrays as quality assurance devices for radiotherapy beams, field profile data at photon energies of 6 and 15 MV were obtained as a function of field size and thickness of overlying absorbing material (solid water). Two detection configurations using the array were considered: a configuration (similar to the imaging configuration) in which an overlying phosphor screen is used to convert incident radiation to visible light photons which are detected by the photodiodes; and a configuration without the screen where radiation is directly sensed by the photodiodes. Compared to relative dosimetry data obtained with an ion chamber, data taken using the former configuration exhibited significant differences whereas data obtained using the latter configuration was generally found to be in close agreement. Basic signal properties, which are pertinent to dosimetry, have been investigated through measurements of individual pixel response for fluoroscopic and radiographic array operation. For signal levels acquired within the first 25% of pixel charge capacity, the degree of linear response with dose was found to be better than 99%. The independence of signal on dose rate was demonstrated by means of stability of pixel response over the range of dose rates allowed by the radiation source (80-400 MU/min). Finally, excellent long-term stability in pixel response, extending over a 2

  12. Comparison measurements of DQE for two flat panel detectors: fluoroscopic detector vs. cone beam CT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Benítez, Ricardo; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David

    2006-03-01

    The physical performance of two flat panel detectors (FPD) has been evaluated using a standard x-ray beam quality set by IEC, namely RQA5. The FPDs evaluated in this study are based on an amorphous silicon photodiode array that is coupled to a thallium-doped Cesium Iodide scintillator and to a thin film transistor (TFT) array. One detector is the PaxScan 2520 that is designed for fluoro imaging, and has a small dynamic range and a large image lag. The other detector is the PaxScan 4030CB that is designed for cone beam CT, and has a large dynamic range (>16-bit), a reduced image lag and many imaging modes. Varian Medical Systems manufactured both detectors. The linearity of the FPDs was investigated by using an ionization chamber and aluminum filtration in order to obtain the beam quality. Since the FPDs are used in fluoroscopic mode, image lag of the FPD was measured in order to investigate its effect on this study, especially its effect on DQE. The spatial resolution of the FPDs was determined by obtaining the pre-sampling modulation transfer function for each detector. A sharp edge was used in accordance to IEC 62220-1. Next, the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) was calculated for various exposures levels at RQA5 radiation quality. Finally, the DQE of each FPD was obtained with a modified version of the international standard set by IEC 62220-1. The results show that the physical performance in DQE and MTF of the PaxScan 4030CB is superior to that of PaxScan2520.

  13. Structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Lee, Y.H.; Chen, C.; Pang, T.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon (a-Si) using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method. The most significant difference between vacancies in a-Si and those in crystalline silicon (c-Si) is that the deep gap states do not show up in a-Si. This difference is explained through the unusual behavior of the structural relaxation near the vacancies in a-Si, which enhances the sp{sup 2} + p bonding near the band edges. They have also observed that the vacancies do not migrate below 450 K although some of them can still be annihilated, particularly at high defect density due to large structural relaxation.

  14. Instability measurements in amorphous hydrogenated silicon using capacitance-voltage techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Flewitt, A. J.; Milne, W. I.; Robertson, J.

    2005-05-01

    In the field of flat panel displays, the current leading technology is the active matrix liquid-crystal display; this uses an amorphous hydrogen silicon (a-Si:H) based thin-film transistors (TFTs) as the switching element in each pixel. However, under gate bias a-Si :H TFTs suffer from instability, as is evidenced by a shift in the gate threshold voltage. The shift in the gate threshold voltage is generally measured from the gate transfer characteristics, after subjecting the TFT to prolonged gate bias. However, a major drawback of this measurement method is that it cannot distinguish whether the shift is caused by the change in the midgap states in the a-Si :H channel or by charge trapping in the gate insulator. In view of this, we have developed a capacitance-voltage method to measure the shift in threshold voltage. We employ metal-insulator-semiconductor structures to investigate the threshold voltage shift as they are simpler to fabricate than TFTs.

  15. The future of amorphous silicon photovoltaic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, R; Luft, W

    1995-06-01

    Amorphous silicon modules are commercially available. They are the first truly commercial thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Well-defined production processes over very large areas (>1 m{sup 2}) have been implemented. There are few environmental issues during manufacturing, deployment in the field, or with the eventual disposal of the modules. Manufacturing safety issues are well characterized and controllable. The highest measured initial efficiency to date is 13.7% for a small triple-stacked cell and the highest stabilized module efficiency is 10%. There is a consensus among researchers, that in order to achieve a 15% stabilized efficiency, a triple-junction amorphous silicon structure is required. Fundamental improvements in alloys are needed for higher efficiencies. This is being pursued through the DOE/NREL Thin-Film Partnership Program. Cost reductions through improved manufacturing processes are being pursued under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory/US Department of Energy (NREL/DOE)-sponsored research in manufacturing technology (PVMaT). Much of the work in designing a-Si devices is a result of trying to compensate for the Staebler-Wronski effect. Some new deposition techniques hold promise because they have produced materials with lower stabilized defect densities. However, none has yet produced a high efficiency device and shown it to be more stable than those from standard glow discharge deposited material.

  16. Endurance Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.; Sugimura, Russell S.

    1989-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in high-power service studied. Report discusses factors affecting endurance of amorphous-silicon solar cells. Based on field tests and accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules. Concludes that aggressive research needed if amorphous-silicon modules to attain 10-year life - value U.S. Department of Energy established as goal for photovoltaic modules in commercial energy-generating plants.

  17. Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rajeewa R.

    1988-01-12

    Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

  18. Active noise control using a distributed mode flat panel loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Rajamani, R; Dudney, J; Stelson, K A

    2003-07-01

    A flat panel distributed mode loudspeaker (DML) has many advantages over traditional cone speakers in terms of its weight, size, and durability. However, its frequency response is uneven and complex, thus bringing its suitability for active noise control (ANC) under question. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the effective use of panel DML speakers in an ANC application. Both feedback and feedforward control techniques are considered. Effective feedback control with a flat panel speaker could open up a whole range of new noise control applications and has many advantages over feedforward control. The paper develops a new control algorithm to attenuate tonal noise of a known frequency by feedback control. However, due to the uneven response of the speakers, feedback control is found to be only moderately effective even for this narrow-band application. Feedforward control proves to be most capable for the flat panel speaker. Using feedforward control, the sound pressure level can be significantly reduced in close proximity to an error microphone. The paper demonstrates an interesting application of the flat panel in which the panel is placed in the path of sound and effectively used to block sound transmission using feedforward control. This is a new approach to active noise control enabled by the use of flat panels and can be used to prevent sound from entering into an enclosure in the first place rather than the traditional approach of attempting to cancel sound after it enters the enclosure.

  19. Switching in coplanar amorphous hydrogenated silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, A.; Asomoza, R.

    2000-01-01

    Switching has been observed in a wide variety of materials and devices. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon has become one of the most important cases because of interest in neural network applications. Although there are many reports regarding this phenomenon, not all of the physical processes involved are still determined precisely. Therefore, some more experimental information is needed in order to achieve this task. Much of the behavior of the devices has been ascribed to the existence of a filamentary region which is produced after the first switching process, called forming. We observed this filamentary region in its full extension by producing forming in amorphous silicon devices with coplanar metallic contacts placed near each other (˜5 μm). The I-V characteristics, filament optical and atomic force microscopy images and chemical etching led us to correlate changes in resistance to metal inclusion into the amorphous film. There are two stages: the first is related to contact stabilization, the second to metal transport into the film bulk. Optical images show a permanent filamentary region after forming. AFM images of these filaments showed that they are formed essentially by material accumulation between the contacts. This material tends to get some atomic arrangement, becoming a polycrystalline solid. If the device was led to breakdown, such accumulation becomes either a hillock or a thin conducting channel connecting both contacts. In the case of a switching filament, the accumulation tends to be a chain of smaller hillocks along the conduction path. Metal from the contacts remains in the conduction path after forming and chemical etching indicated that it is placed near the path core. Before forming, a tunneling transport process can be ascribed to the non-ohmic behavior of the samples during the first stage of metallic inclusion.

  20. Tritiated amorphous silicon films and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosteski, Tome

    The do saddle-field glow discharge deposition technique has been used to bond tritium within an amorphous silicon thin film network using silane and elemental tritium in the glow discharge. The concentration of tritium is approximately 7 at. %. Minimal outgassing of tritium from tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) at room temperature suggests that tritium is bonded stably. Tritium effusion only occurred at temperatures above the film's growth temperature. The radioactive decay of tritium results in the production of high-energy beta particles. Each beta particle can generate on average approximately 1300 electron-hole pairs in a-Si:H:T. Electrical conductivity of a-Si:H:T is shown to be due to a thermally activated process and due to the generation of excess carriers by the beta particles. p-i-n betavoltaic devices have been made with a-Si:H:T in the intrinsic (i-) region. The i-region consisted of either a-Si:H:T, or a thin section of a-Si:H:T (a Delta layer) sandwiched between undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The excess carriers generated in the i-region are separated by the device's built-in electric field. Short-circuit currents (Isc ), open-circuit voltages (Voc), and power have been measured and correlated to the generation of excess carriers in the i-region. Good devices were made at a substrate temperature of 250°C and relatively large flow rates of silane and tritium; this ensures that there are more monohydride bonds than dihydride bonds. Under dark conditions, Isc, and Voc have been found to decrease rapidly. This is consistent with the production of silicon neutral dangling bonds (5 x 1017cm-3 per day) from the loss of tritium due to its transmutation into helium. Dangling bonds reduce carrier lifetime and weaken the electric field in the i-region. The short-circuit current from Delta layer devices decreased more slowly and settled to higher values for narrower Delta layers. This is because the dangling bonds are

  1. Deuterium magnetic resonance studies in amorphous and crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzi, Raffaella

    Hydrogenation is essential for useful amorphous silicon films and devices. We used deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) to investigate the hydrogen microstructure in amorphous and crystalline silicon. DMR line shapes analyses and longitudinal relaxation time studies can distinguish silicon-bonded deuterons from molecular deuterons. Our comparisons between crystalline and amorphous silicon have yielded new perspectives on the characterization of molecular hydrogen sites including interstitial tetragonal T-sites, and microvoids. Quantitative analyses of DMR line shapes and spin populations show that the fraction of interstitially trapped molecular hydrogen increases with increasing photovoltaic quality of the films.

  2. Technical advances of interventional fluoroscopy and flat panel image receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2008-11-01

    In the past decade, various radiation reducing devices and control circuits have been implemented on fluoroscopic imaging equipment. Because of the potential for lengthy fluoroscopic procedures in interventional cardiovascular angiography, these devices and control circuits have been developed for the cardiac catheterization laboratories and interventional angiography suites. Additionally, fluoroscopic systems equipped with image intensifiers have benefited from technological advances in x-ray tube, x-ray generator, and spectral shaping filter technologies. The high heat capacity x-ray tube, the medium frequency inverter generator with high performance switching capability, and the patient dose reduction spectral shaping filter had already been implemented on the image intensified fluoroscopy systems. These three underlying technologies together with the automatic dose rate and image quality (ADRIQ) control logic allow patients undergoing cardiovascular angiography procedures to benefit from "lower patient dose" with "high image quality." While photoconductor (or phosphor plate) x-ray detectors and signal capture thin film transistor (TFT) and charge coupled device (CCD) arrays are analog in nature, the advent of the flat panel image receptor allowed for fluoroscopy procedures to become more streamlined. With the analog-to-digital converter built into the data lines, the flat panel image receptor appears to become a digital device. While the transition from image intensified fluoroscopy systems to flat panel image receptor fluoroscopy systems is part of the on-going "digitization of imaging," the value of a flat panel image receptor may have to be evaluated with respect to patient dose, image quality, and clinical application capabilities. The advantage of flat panel image receptors has yet to be fully explored. For instance, the flat panel image receptor has its disadvantages as compared to the image intensifiers; the cost of the equipment is probably the most

  3. Theoretical studies of amorphous silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon with molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, I.

    1991-12-20

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. The structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of these materials have been studied with computer-generated structural models and compare well with experimental observations. The stability of a-si and a-Si:H have been studied with the aim of understanding microscopic mechanisms underlying light-induced degradation in a-Si:H (the Staebler-Wronski effect). With a view to understanding thin film growth processes, a-Si films have been generated with molecular dynamics simulations by simulating the deposition of Si-clusters on a Si(111) substrate. A new two- and three-body interatomic potential for Si-H interactions has been developed. The structural properties of a-Si:H networks are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The presence of H atoms reduces strain and disorder relative to networks without H.

  4. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  5. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  6. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold.

  7. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payson, J. Scott; Woodyard, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15/sq cm is presented. The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy, transmission and reflection spectroscopy, and photoconductivity and annealing measurements. Large changes were observed in the subband-gap optical absorption for energies between 0.9 and 1.7 eV. The steady-state photoconductivity showed decreases of almost five orders of magnitude for a fluence of 1E15/sq cm, but the slope of the intensity dependence of the photoconductivity remained almost constant for all fluences. Substantial annealing occurs even at room temperature, and for temperatures greater than 448 K the damage is completely annealed. The data are analyzed to describe the defects and the density of states function.

  8. Energy landscape of relaxed amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiquette, Francis; Mousseau, Normand

    2003-09-01

    We analyze the structure of the energy landscape of a well-relaxed 1000-atom model of amorphous silicon using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). Generating more than 40 000 events starting from a single minimum, we find that activated mechanisms are local in nature, that they are distributed uniformly throughout the model, and that the activation energy is limited by the cost of breaking one bond, independently of the complexity of the mechanism. The overall shape of the activation-energy-barrier distribution is also insensitive to the exact details of the configuration, indicating that well-relaxed configurations see essentially the same environment. These results underscore the localized nature of relaxation in this material.

  9. Spectrometric characterization of amorphous silicon PIN detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, A.; Ramírez, F. J.; Ortega, Y.; Estrada, M.; Cabal, A.; Cerdeira, A.; Díaz, A.

    2000-10-01

    During the last years, much interest has been dedicated to the use of amorphous silicon PIN diodes as particle and radiation detectors for medical applications. This work presents the spectrometric characterization of PECVD high deposition rate diodes fabricated at our laboratory, with thickness up to 17.5 μm. Results show that the studied devices detect the Am241 alpha particles and the medical X-rays generated by a mammograph model Senographe 700T from General Electric Possible reasons of the observed energy losses are discussed in the text. Using the SRIM2000 program, the transit of 5.5 MeV alpha particles through a diode was simulated, determining the optimum thickness for these particles to deposit their energy in the intrinsic layer of the diode.

  10. Development of CT and 3D-CT Using Flat Panel Detector Based Real-Time Digital Radiography System

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindran, V. R.; Sreelakshmi, C.; Vibin

    2008-09-26

    The application of Digital Radiography in the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of space vehicle components is a recent development in India. A Real-time DR system based on amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector has been developed for the NDE of solid rocket motors at Rocket Propellant Plant of VSSC in a few years back. The technique has been successfully established for the nondestructive evaluation of solid rocket motors. The DR images recorded for a few solid rocket specimens are presented in the paper. The Real-time DR system is capable of generating sufficient digital X-ray image data with object rotation for the CT image reconstruction. In this paper the indigenous development of CT imaging based on the Realtime DR system for solid rocket motor is presented. Studies are also carried out to generate 3D-CT image from a set of adjacent CT images of the rocket motor. The capability of revealing the spatial location and characterisation of defect is demonstrated by the CT and 3D-CT images generated.

  11. Development of CT and 3D-CT Using Flat Panel Detector Based Real-Time Digital Radiography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, V. R.; Sreelakshmi, C.; Vibin, Vibin

    2008-09-01

    The application of Digital Radiography in the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of space vehicle components is a recent development in India. A Real-time DR system based on amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector has been developed for the NDE of solid rocket motors at Rocket Propellant Plant of VSSC in a few years back. The technique has been successfully established for the nondestructive evaluation of solid rocket motors. The DR images recorded for a few solid rocket specimens are presented in the paper. The Real-time DR system is capable of generating sufficient digital X-ray image data with object rotation for the CT image reconstruction. In this paper the indigenous development of CT imaging based on the Realtime DR system for solid rocket motor is presented. Studies are also carried out to generate 3D-CT image from a set of adjacent CT images of the rocket motor. The capability of revealing the spatial location and characterisation of defect is demonstrated by the CT and 3D-CT images generated.

  12. Direct-patterned optical waveguides on amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Steve; Bond, Tiziana C.; Bond, Steven W.; Pocha, Michael D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2005-08-02

    An optical waveguide structure is formed by embedding a core material within a medium of lower refractive index, i.e. the cladding. The optical index of refraction of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polycrystalline silicon (p-Si), in the wavelength range between about 1.2 and about 1.6 micrometers, differ by up to about 20%, with the amorphous phase having the larger index. Spatially selective laser crystallization of amorphous silicon provides a mechanism for controlling the spatial variation of the refractive index and for surrounding the amorphous regions with crystalline material. In cases where an amorphous silicon film is interposed between layers of low refractive index, for example, a structure comprised of a SiO.sub.2 substrate, a Si film and an SiO.sub.2 film, the formation of guided wave structures is particularly simple.

  13. Computer-assisted infrared spectra interpretation for amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavak, Hamide; Esen, Ramazan

    2005-12-01

    A computer program for the structural interpretation of the infrared (IR) spectra is developed and tested. The interpretation of the IR spectra is made by using an hybrid system which includes library search and rule-based interpretation methods together. The computer programs were written in Pascal Codes. The prototype IR library of silicon alloys includes amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiOx), amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4) and amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) references. The known spectra of these compounds were fed into the system as an unknown samples. The performance of the developed program was evaluated on a test set of 157 spectra and the percentages of successful identification ranged between 78% and 99% for different alloys.

  14. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  15. Excimer laser crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Yongbing; Xu Zhongyang; Wang Changan; Zhang Shaoqiang; An Chengwu; Li Xingjiao; Wan Xinheng; Ding Hui

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films have been crystallized by the irradiations of XeCl excimer laser. The crystallized films have been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and conductivity measurements to clarify their morphologies, structure and electrical properties. The results show that a high conductive super thin layer is formed by a single pulse laser irradiation with the energy density of 75mJ/cm{sup 2}. The conductivity increases quickly at laser energy density threshold which decreases when the hydrogen in a-Si:H films is removed by pre-annealing. During crystallization process, oxygen atoms from the air ambient have been introduced into the films and such an introducing process is hindered by the hydrogen eruption. When the oxygen content is high enough, the carrier-transport mechanism includes thermionic emission (TE) and thermionic field emission (TFE) in the vicinity of room temperature, which is similar to semi-insulating polycrystalline silicon (SIPOS).

  16. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphousmore » silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.« less

  17. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Peter E. D.; Pugar, Eloise A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of "whiskers" or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900.degree. C.

  18. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, P.E.D.; Pugar, E.A.

    1985-11-12

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of whiskers'' or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900 C to about 1,200 C to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900 C. 6 figs.

  19. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  20. Proton NMR studies of PECVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and HWCVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberg, Julie Lynn

    This dissertation discusses a new understanding of the internal structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Recent research in our group has included nuclear spin echo double resonance (SEDOR) measurements on device quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaic films. Using the SEDOR pulse sequence with and without the perturbing 29Si pulse, we obtain Fourier transform spectra for film at 80K that allows us to distinguish between molecular hydrogen and hydrogen bonded to silicon. Using such an approach, we have demonstrated that high quality a-Si:H films produced by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) from SiH 4 contains about ten atomic percent hydrogen, nearly 40% of which is molecular hydrogen, individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of tetragonal sites (T-sites). The main objective of this dissertation is to examine the difference between a-Si:H made by PECVD techniques and a-Si:H made by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) techniques. Proton NMR and 1H- 29Si SEDOR NMR are used to examine the hydrogen structure of HWCVD a-Si:H films prepared at the University of Utrecht and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Past NMR studies have shown that high quality PECVD a-Si:H films have geometries in which 40% of the contained hydrogen is present as H2 molecules individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of T-sites. A much smaller H2 fraction sometimes is physisorbed on internal surfaces. In this dissertation, similar NMR methods are used to perform structural studies of the two HWCVD aSi:H samples. The 3kHz resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole-burn behavior similar to that found for PECVD a-Si:H films as does the 24kHz FWHM line from clustered hydrogen bonded to silicon. Radio frequency hole-burning is a tool to distinguish between inhomogenous and homogeneous broadening. In the hole-burn experiments, the 3kHz FWHM resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole

  1. Construction and characterization of amorphous-silicon test structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, L.N.; Milgram, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    The central goal of the project was to qualify amorphous silicon, a newly developed semiconductor material, as the basis for economical large-area photoconductive detectors of penetrating radiation. The thrust of the project was to establish the feasibility of constructing photoconductive amorphous-silicon devices whose electronic properties supported the radiation detection application. This issue of feasibility was successfully resolved by construction and experimental characterization of amorphous-silicon test pieces representative of the existing state-of-the-art. The focus of this work was the measurement of material electronic properties known to affect the performance of solid-state radiation detectors, and the investigation of candidate junction-device architectures. The construction and experimental evaluation of prototype radiation detectors based on amorphous silicon was beyond the scope of the current effort, and will form the core of work to be accomplished within a Phase II continuation of the project.

  2. Polarization effects in femtosecond laser induced amorphization of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Feng; Li, Hong-Jin; Huang, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Wen-Zhong; Pan, Huai-Hai; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Jing; Li, Yang-Bo; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate monocrystalline silicon wafer. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of ablation surface indicates horizontally polarized laser beam shows an enhancement in amorphization efficiency by a factor of 1.6-1.7 over the circularly polarized laser ablation. This demonstrates that one can tune the amorphization efficiency through the polarization of irradiation laser.

  3. Hydrogen effusion from tritiated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kherani, N. P.; Liu, B.; Virk, K.; Kosteski, T.; Gaspari, F.; Shmayda, W. T.; Zukotynski, S.; Chen, K. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the effusion and outgassing of tritium from tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) films are presented. The samples were grown by dc-saddle field glow discharge at various substrate temperatures between 150 and 300°C. The tracer property of radioactive tritium is used to detect tritium release. Tritium effusion measurements are performed in a nonvacuum ion chamber and are found to yield similar results as reported for standard high vacuum technique. The results suggest for decreasing substrate temperature the growth of material with an increasing concentration of voids. These data are corroborated by analysis of infrared absorption data in terms of microstructure parameters. For material of low substrate temperature (and high void concentration) tritium outgassing in air at room temperature was studied, and it was found that after 600h about 0.2% of the total hydrogen (hydrogen+tritium) content is released. Two rate limiting processes are identified. The first process, fast tritium outgassing with a time constant of 15h, seems to be related to surface desorption of tritiated water (HTO) with a free energy of desorption of 1.04eV. The second process, slow tritium outgassing with a time constant of 200-300h, appears to be limited by oxygen diffusivity in a growing oxide layer. This material of lowest H stability would lose half of the hydrogen after 60years.

  4. Silicon heterojunction solar cell and crystallization of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meijun

    The rapid growth of photovoltaics in the past decade brings on the soaring price and demand for crystalline silicon. Hence it becomes necessary and also profitable to develop solar cells with over 20% efficiency, using thin (˜100mum) silicon wafers. In this respect, diffused junction cells are not the best choice, since the inescapable heating in the diffusion process not only makes it hard to handle thin wafers, but also reduces carriers' bulk lifetime and impairs the crystal quality of the substrate, which could lower cell efficiency. An alternative is the heterojunction cells, such as amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cell, where the emitter layer can be grown at low temperature (<200°C). In first part of this dissertation, I will introduce our work on front-junction SHJ solar cell, including the importance of intrinsic buffer layer; the discussion on the often observed anomalous "S"-shaped J-V curve (low fill factor) by using band diagram analysis; the surface passivation quality of intrinsic buffer and its relationship to the performance of front-junction SHJ cells. Although the a-Si:H is found to help to achieve high efficiency in c-Si heterojuntion solar cells, it also absorbs short wavelength (<600 nm) light, leading to non-ideal blue response and lower short circuit currents (JSC) in the front-junction SHJ cells. Considering this, heterojunction with both a-Si:H emitter and base contact on the back side in an interdigitated pattern, i.e. interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell, is developed. This dissertation will show our progress in developing IBC-SHJ solar cells, including the structure design; device fabrication and characterization; two dimensional simulation by using simulator Sentaurus Device; some special features of IBC-SHJ solar cells; and performance of IBC-SHJ cells without and with back surface buffer layers. Another trend for solar cell industry is thin film solar cells, since

  5. Musculoskeletal applications of flat-panel volume CT.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Benjamin; Sarwar, Ammar; Bartling, Soenke H; Cheung, Arnold; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Bredella, Miriam A; Brady, Thomas J; Gupta, Rajiv

    2008-12-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT) is a recent development in imaging. We discuss some of the musculoskeletal applications of a high-resolution flat-panel CT scanner. FpVCT has four main advantages over conventional multidetector computed tomography (MDCT): high-resolution imaging; volumetric coverage; dynamic imaging; omni-scanning. The overall effective dose of fpVCT is comparable to that of MDCT scanning. Although current fpVCT technology has higher spatial resolution, its contrast resolution is slightly lower than that of MDCT (5-10HU vs. 1-3HU respectively). We discuss the efficacy and potential utility of fpVCT in various applications related to musculoskeletal radiology and review some novel applications for pediatric bones, soft tissues, tumor perfusion, and imaging of tissue-engineered bone growth. We further discuss high-resolution CT and omni-scanning (combines fluoroscopic and tomographic imaging).

  6. 75 FR 51286 - Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... COMMISSION Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... importation of certain flat panel digital televisions and components thereof by reason of infringement of... certain flat panel digital televisions and components thereof that infringe one or more of claims 22-25...

  7. [Flat-panel detector technology -State-of-the-art and future prospects-].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya

    2002-01-01

    A flat-panel detector (FPD) is a long-awaited technology to implement the digital X-ray imaging technology into the radiological department. This paper describes the state-of-the-art technology and future prospects on the FPD technology. State-of-the-art technology was reviewed taking the CXDI series as an example. Several FPD-based systems have been introduced into the Japanese market since CXDI-11 opened it in November 1998. Accompanying CXDI-C2 for control, CXDI-22 for table position and CXDI-31 for portable, the CXDI series fulfills the requirement of the radiography room being a fully digitalized room. The FPD on the CXDI series is comprised of a scintillator (Gd(2)O(2)S:Tb(3+)) as a primary sensor in which the X-ray is captured and an amorphous silicon detector (LANMIT) as a secondary sensor in which the fluorescent light is detected. Since the scintillator is identical to that of the screen-film systems, it can be said as proven, durable and chemically stable and it is expected to produce the same image quality as the screen-film systems. CXDI-31, a portable FPD-based system, was developed targeting thinner dimensions, lightweight, durability and high spatial resolution. Thoroughly re-designing the mechanical structure and reducing the power consumption at the readout IC realized thinner dimensions. Introducing the portable note PC technologies successfully combined lightweight with durability. Improving the sensor process and re-designing the layout made the sensor high resolution without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio. Future prospects were overviewed in the aspect of technology and applications. Sensitivity, spatial resolution, frame rate and portability were described as the upcoming technology. Increasing gain and reducing noise will realize higher sensitivity, especially by adopting the PbI(2), HgI(2) or such photoconductor materials as the primary sensor. Pixelized amplifier will also achieve higher sensitivity. Layered sensor designed such

  8. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection.

  9. Flat panel planar optic display. Revision 4/95

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-05-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic glass sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  10. Flat panel display test and evaluation: procedures, standards, and facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Timothy W.; Daniels, Reginald; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1997-07-01

    This paper addresses flat panel display test and evaluation via a discussion of procedures, standards and facilities. Procedures need to be carefully developed and documented to ensure that test accomplished in separate laboratories produce comparable results. The tests themselves must not be a source of inconsistency in test results when such comparisons are made in the course of procurements or new technology prototype evaluations. Standards are necessary to expedite the transition of the new display technologies into applications and to lower the costs of custom parts applied across disparate applications. The flat panel display industry is in the course of ascertaining and formulating such standards as they are of value to designers, manufacturers, marketers and users of civil and military products and equipment. Additionally, in order to inform the DoD and industry, the test and evaluation facilities of the Air Force Research Laboratory Displays Branch are described. These facilities are available to support procurements involving flat panel displays and to examine new technology prototypes. Finally, other government display testing facilities within the Navy and the Army are described.

  11. Unfolding X-ray spectra using a flat panel detector.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Sergio; Juste, Belén; Pozuelo, Fausto; Ródenas, José; Querol, Andrea; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to measure the energy spectrum of X-ray tubes due to the pile up effect produced by the high fluence of photons. Using attenuating materials, appropriate detector devices and the Monte Carlo method, primary X-ray spectrum of these devices can be estimated. In this work, a flat panel detector with a PMMA wedge has been used to obtain a dose curve corresponding to certain working conditions of a radiodiagnostic X-ray tube. The relation between the dose curve recorded by the flat panel and the primary X-ray spectrum is defined by a response function. Normally this function can be approximated by a matrix, which can be obtained by means of the Monte Carlo method. Knowing the measured dose curve and the response matrix, the primary X-ray spectrum can be unfolded. However, there are some problems that strongly affect the applicability of this method: i.e. technical features of the flat panel and inherent characteristics of the involved radiation physics (ill-posed problem). Both aspects are analyzed in this work, concluding that the proposed method can be applied with an acceptable accuracy for spectra without characteristic lines, for instance, tungsten anode in the 50-70 kVp range.

  12. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: Fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Wei; Li Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B.J.M.; Hunt, D.C.; Rowlands, J.A.; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-15

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d{sub Se} and the applied electric field E{sub Se} of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E{sub Se} dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 {mu}m HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E{sub Se}: (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 {mu}m can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy.

  13. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B J M; Hunt, D C; Rowlands, J A; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-01

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d(Se) and the applied electric field E(Se) of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E(Se) dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 microm HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E(Se): (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 microm can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy.

  14. Electrical characteristics of amorphous iron-tungsten contacts on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finetti, M.; Pan, E. T.-S.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Suni, I.

    1983-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of amorphous Fe-W contacts have been determined on both p-type and n-type silicon. The amorphous films were obtained by cosputtering from a composite target. Contact resistivities of 1 x 10 to the -7th and 2.8 x 10 to the -6th were measured on n(+) and p(+) silicon, respectively. These values remain constant after thermal treatment up to at least 500 C. A barrier height of 0.61 V was measured on n-type silicon.

  15. Theoretical studies of amorphous and paracrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhmanson, Serge M.

    Until recently, structural models used to represent amorphous silicon (a-Si) in computer simulations were either perfectly fourfold connected random networks or random networks containing only miscoordinated atoms. These models are an approximation to the structure of the real material and do not uniformly comply with all the experimental data for a-Si. In this dissertation we make an attempt to go beyond this approximation and construct and examine models that have two major types of defects, encountered in real material, in their structure---nanovoids and crystalline grains. For our study of voids in a-Si we have calculated vibrational properties of structural models of a-Si with and without voids using ab initio and empirical molecular dynamics techniques. A small 216 atom and a large 4096 atom continuous random network (CRN) models for a-Si have been employed as starting points for our a-Si models with voids. Our calculations show that the presence of voids leads to an emergence of localized low-energy states in the vibrational spectrum of the model system. Moreover, it appears that these states are responsible for the anomalous behavior of system's specific heat at very low temperatures. To our knowledge these are the first numerical simulations that provide adequate agreement with experiment for the very low-temperature properties of specific heat in disordered materials within the limits of harmonic approximation. For our study of crystalline grains in a-Si we have developed a new procedure for the preparation of physically realistic models of paracrystalline silicon based on a modification of the bond-switching method of Wooten, Winer, and Weaire. Our models contain randomly oriented c-Si grains embedded in a disordered matrix. Our technique creates interfaces between the crystalline and disordered phases of Si with an extremely low concentration of coordination defects. The resulting models possess structural and vibrational properties comparable with

  16. A real-time flat-panel X-ray pixel imaging system for low-dose medical diagnostics and craniofacial applications.

    PubMed

    Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, D; Dimcovski, Z; Grigoriev, E; Grob, E; Ligier, Y; Pachoud, M; Riondel, F; Rüfenacht, D; Sayegh, C; Terrier, F; Valley, J F; Verdun, F R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate on-line performance of a real-time digital imaging system based on amorphous silicon technology and to compare it with conventional film-screen equipment. The digital detecting imager consists of (1) a converter, which transforms the energy of the incident X rays into light; (2) a real-time digital detecting system, capable of producing as many as 10 pictures per second using a large-area pixel matrix (20 x 20 cm2) based on solid-state amorphous silicon sensor technology with a pitch of 400 microns; and (3) appropriate computer tools for control, real-time image treatment, data representation, and off-line analysis. Different phantoms were used for qualitative comparison with the conventional film-screen technique, with images obtained with both systems at the normal dose (used as a reference), as well as with dose reduction by a factor of 10 to 100. Basic image quality parameters evaluated showed that the response of the detector is linear in a wide range of entrance air kerma; the dynamic range is higher compared with the conventional film-screen combination; the spatial resolution is 1.25 lp per millimeter, as expected from the pixel size; and good image quality is ensured at doses substantially lower than for the film-screen technique. The flat-panel X-ray imager based on amorphous silicon technology implemented in standard radiographic equipment permits acquisition of real-time images in radiology (as many as 10 images per second) of diagnostic quality with a marked reduction of dose (as much as 100 times) and better contrast compared with the standard film technique. Preliminary results obtained with a 100-micron pitch imager based on the same technology show better quality but a less substantial dose reduction. Applications in craniofacial surgery look promising.

  17. Electronic structure and localized states in a model amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, G.; Delerue, C.; Lannoo, M.

    1998-03-01

    The electronic structure of a model amorphous silicon (a-Si) represented by a supercell of 4096 silicon atoms [B.R. Djordjevic, M.F. Thorpe, and F. Wooten, Phys. Rev. B 52, 5685 (1995)] and of a model hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) that we have built from the a-Si model are calculated in the tight-binding approximation. The band edges near the gap are characterized by exponential tails of localized states induced mainly by the variations in bond angles. The spatial localization of the states is compared between a-Si and a-Si:H. Comparison with experiments suggests that the structural models give good descriptions of the amorphous materials.

  18. Determination of the detective quantum efficiency of a prototype, megavoltage indirect detection, active matrix flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    El-Mohri, Y; Jee, K W; Antonuk, L E; Maolinbay, M; Zhao, Q

    2001-12-01

    After years of aggressive development, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) have recently become commercially available for radiotherapy imaging. In this paper we report on a comprehensive evaluation of the signal and noise performance of a large-area prototype AMFPI specifically developed for this application. The imager is based on an array of 512 x 512 pixels incorporating amorphous silicon photodiodes and thin-film transistors offering a 26 x 26 cm2 active area at a pixel pitch of 508 microm. This indirect detection array was coupled to various x-ray converters consisting of a commercial phosphor screen (Lanex Fast B, Lanex Regular, or Lanex Fine) and a 1 mm thick copper plate. Performance of the imager in terms of measured sensitivity, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is reported at beam energies of 6 and 15 MV and at doses of 1 and 2 monitor units (MU). In addition, calculations of system performance (NPS, DQE) based on cascaded-system formalism were reported and compared to empirical results. In these calculations, the Swank factor and spatial energy distributions of secondary electrons within the converter were modeled by means of EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations. Measured MTFs of the system show a weak dependence on screen type (i.e., thickness), which is partially due to the spreading of secondary radiation. Measured DQE was found to be independent of dose for the Fast B screen, implying that the imager is input-quantum-limited at 1 MU, even at an extended source-to-detector distance of 200 cm. The maximum DQE obtained is around 1%--a limit imposed by the low detection efficiency of the converter. For thinner phosphor screens, the DQE is lower due to their lower detection efficiencies. Finally, for the Fast B screen, good agreement between calculated and measured DQE was observed.

  19. Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.

    1984-11-29

    A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

  20. Amorphous silicon oxide window layers for high-efficiency silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter Seif, Johannes; Descoeudres, Antoine; Filipič, Miha; Smole, Franc; Topič, Marko; Charles Holman, Zachary; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells, optical losses can be mitigated by replacing the amorphous silicon films by wider bandgap amorphous silicon oxide layers. In this article, we use stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon oxide as front intrinsic buffer layers and show that this increases the short-circuit current density by up to 0.43 mA/cm2 due to less reflection and a higher transparency at short wavelengths. Additionally, high open-circuit voltages can be maintained, thanks to good interface passivation. However, we find that the gain in current is more than offset by losses in fill factor. Aided by device simulations, we link these losses to impeded carrier collection fundamentally caused by the increased valence band offset at the amorphous/crystalline interface. Despite this, carrier extraction can be improved by raising the temperature; we find that cells with amorphous silicon oxide window layers show an even lower temperature coefficient than reference heterojunction solar cells (-0.1%/°C relative drop in efficiency, compared to -0.3%/°C). Hence, even though cells with oxide layers do not outperform cells with the standard design at room temperature, at higher temperatures—which are closer to the real working conditions encountered in the field—they show superior performance in both experiment and simulation.

  1. Theoretical estimation of static charge fluctuation in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugler, Sándor; Surján, Péter R.; Náray-Szabó, Gábor

    1988-05-01

    A quantum-chemical method has been developed to determine charge fluctuations in finite aperiodic clusters of amorphous silicon. Calculated atomic net charges are in a close linear relationship to bond-angle distortions involving first and second neighbors. Applying this relationship to a continuous-random-network model of 216 silicon atoms proposed by Wooten et al., we obtained 0.021 electron units for the rms deviation from charge neutrality.

  2. Gamma radiation effects in amorphous silicon and silicon nitride photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Du, Qingyang; Huang, Yizhong; Ogbuu, Okechukwu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Junying; Singh, Vivek; Agarwal, Anuradha M; Hu, Juejun

    2017-02-01

    Understanding radiation damage is of significant importance for devices operating in radiation-harsh environments. In this Letter, we present a systematic study on gamma radiation effects in amorphous silicon and silicon nitride guided wave devices. It is found that gamma radiation increases the waveguide modal effective indices by as much as 4×10-3 in amorphous silicon and 5×10-4 in silicon nitride at 10 Mrad dose. This Letter further reveals that surface oxidation and radiation-induced densification account for the observed index change.

  3. Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenon ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface of strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56 eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature-dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV silicon ions at 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340 {+-} 10K.

  4. Laterally inherently thin amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R. Kherani, Nazir P.

    2014-12-29

    This article reports on an amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell concept wherein the heterojunction regions are laterally narrow and distributed amidst a backdrop of well-passivated crystalline silicon surface. The localized amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunctions consisting of the laterally thin emitter and back-surface field regions are precisely aligned under the metal grid-lines and bus-bars while the remaining crystalline silicon surface is passivated using the recently proposed facile grown native oxide–plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride passivation scheme. The proposed cell concept mitigates parasitic optical absorption losses by relegating amorphous silicon to beneath the shadowed metallized regions and by using optically transparent passivation layer. A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.6% is obtained for an untextured proof-of-concept cell illuminated under AM 1.5 global spectrum; the specific cell performance parameters are V{sub OC} of 666 mV, J{sub SC} of 29.5 mA-cm{sup −2}, and fill-factor of 69.3%. Reduced parasitic absorption, predominantly in the shorter wavelength range, is confirmed with external quantum efficiency measurement.

  5. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: Feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI

    SciTech Connect

    Wronski, M. M.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-12-15

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10{sup -7}-10{sup -2} R/frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct

  6. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI.

    PubMed

    Wronski, M M; Rowlands, J A

    2008-12-01

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10(-7)-10(-2) R/frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct interaction

  7. Integral bypass diodes in an amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Flaisher, H.

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film, tandem-junction, amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules were constructed in which a part of the a-Si alloy cell material is used to form bypass protection diodes. This integral design circumvents the need for incorporating external, conventional diodes, thus simplifying the manufacturing process and reducing module weight.

  8. Ultrasonic attenuation in amorphous silicon at 50 and 100 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondongwa, D. B.; Daly, B. C.; Norris, T. B.; Yan, B.; Yang, J.; Guha, S.

    2011-03-01

    We have measured the attenuation of longitudinal acoustic waves in a series of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon films using picosecond ultrasonics. The films were grown using a modified very high frequency glow discharge method on steel substrates. The deposition conditions were similar to that used in the fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells. The film thicknesses were varied so we could distinguish between interface losses and intrinsic losses within the silicon films. We determine the attenuation of amorphous Si to be 780 ± 160 cm-1 at 100 GHz and 340 ± 120 cm-1 at 50 GHz, values that are lower than those predicted by theories based on anharmonic interactions of the sound wave with localized phonons or extended resonant modes. We determine the attenuation of nanocrystalline Si at 50 GHz to be nearly an order of magnitude higher than amorphous Si (2600 ± 660 cm-1) and compare that value to a simple Rayleigh scattering prediction.

  9. Silicon nanoparticle optimization and integration into amorphous silicon via PECVD for use in photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klafehn, Grant W.

    An alternative approach to traditional growth methods of nanocrystalline material is co-deposition by injection of separately synthesized silicon nanoparticles into amorphous silicon. Current methods of co-deposition of silicon nanoparticles and amorphous silicon via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition allow the two reactors' pressures to affect each other, leading to either poor amorphous silicon quality or uncontrollable nanoparticle size and deposition rate. In this thesis, a technique for greater control of stand-alone silicon nanoparticle size and quality grown was achieved by using a slit nozzle. The nozzle was used to separate the nanoparticle and amorphous reactors, allowing for the ability to control nanoparticle size, crystallinity, and deposition rate during co-deposition, while still allowing for high quality amorphous silicon growth. Changing the width of the nozzle allowed for control of the size of the nanoparticles from 10 to 4.5 nm in diameter, and allowed for the precursor gas flow rate, and thus deposition rate, to be changed with only a 6 % change in size estimated from luminescence emission wavelength. Co-deposited samples were grown within a broad range of flow rates for the silicon nanoparticle precursor gas, resulting in each sample having a different crystal fraction. FTIR, PL, Raman, and XRD were used to analyze their composition. The silicon nanoparticle synthesis was separately optimized to control size and crystallinity, and the influence of the nanoparticle process gases on amorphous silicon growth was also explored. Finally, COMSOL simulations were performed to support and possibly predict Si-NP growth variables that pertain to Si-NP size.

  10. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Mahan, Archie H.; Carapella, Jeffrey C.; Gallagher, Alan C.

    1995-01-01

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH.sub.4) over a high temperature, 2000.degree. C., tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400.degree. C., substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20-30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content.

  11. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

    1995-03-14

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

  12. Computer models for amorphous silicon hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    1990-02-01

    A procedure for generating fully coordinated model structures appropriate to hydrogenated amorphous semiconductors is described. The hydrogen is incorporated into an amorphous matrix using a bond-switching process similar to that proposed by Wooten, Winer, and Weaire, which ensures that fourfold coordination is preserved. After each inclusion of hydrogen, the structure is relaxed using a finite-temperature Monte Carlo algorithm. The method is applied to a-Si:H at various hydrogen concentrations. The resulting model structures are found to be in excellent agreement with recent neutron-scattering measurements on a sample with 12 at. % H. Our prescription, which is essentially nonlocal, allows great flexibility and can easily be extended to related systems.

  13. Heat-Induced Agglomeration of Amorphous Silicon Nanoparticles Toward the Formation of Silicon Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bo Yun; Kim, Ja Young; Seo, Gyeongju; Shin, Chae-Ho; Ko, Chang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The thermal behavior of silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs) was investigated for the preparation of silicon thin film using a solution process. TEM analysis of Si NPs, synthesized by inductively coupled plasma, revealed that the micro-structure of the Si NPs was amorphous and that the Si NPs had melted and merged at a comparatively low temperature (~750 °C) considering bulk melting temperature of silicon (1414 °C). A silicon ink solution was prepared by dispersing amorphous Si NPs in propylene glycol (PG). It was then coated onto a silicon wafer and a quartz plate to form a thin film. These films were annealed in a vacuum or in an N₂ environment to increase their film density. N2 annealing at 800 °C and 1000 °C induced the crystallization of the amorphous thin film. An elemental analysis by the SIMS depth profile showed that N₂annealing at 1000 °C for 180 min drastically reduced the concentrations of carbon and oxygen inside the silicon thin film. These results indicate that silicon ink prepared using amorphous Si NPs in PG can serve as a proper means of preparing silicon thin film via solution process.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Transistors for Flat Panel Display Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xuelei; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising materials for both high performance transistors for high speed computing and thin film transistors for macroelectronics, which can provide more functions at low cost. Among macroelectronics applications, carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFT) are expected to be used soon for backplanes in flat panel displays (FPDs) due to their superior performance. In this paper, we review the challenges of CNT-TFT technology for FPD applications. The device performance of state-of-the-art CNT-TFTs are compared with the requirements of TFTs for FPDs. Compatibility of the fabrication processes of CNT-TFTs and current TFT technologies are critically examined. Though CNT-TFT technology is not yet ready for backplane production line of FPDs, the challenges can be overcome by close collaboration between research institutes and FPD manufacturers in the short term.

  15. Improving the diversity of manufacturing electroluminescent flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, T.S.; Samuels, J.A.; Smith, D.C.

    1995-09-01

    Crystalline calcium thiogallate with a cerium dopant has been deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) at temperatures below 600{degrees}C on a low cost glass substrate. An EL luminance of 1.05 fL was observed 40 volts above threshold at 60 Hz. This is more than an order of magnitude improvement over earlier crystalline-as-deposited thiogallate materials. These results pave the way for the use of MOCVD as a potential method for processing full color thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) flat panel displays. The formation of the CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Ce phosphor requires precise control over a number of deposition parameters including flow rates, substrate temperature, and reactor pressure. The influence of these parameters will be discussed in terms of structure, uniformity, and TFEL device performance.

  16. Flat-panel, full-color, electroluminescent display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, James B.

    1987-08-01

    This invention relates to a flat-panel, electroluminescent display capable of achieving full color and is particularly useful in achieving a bright display with high resolution. The invention uses red, green and blue phosphors in two layers separated by layers of insulating material and layers of electrodes that are used to excite the phosphors. In operation, the display is addressed by supplying sufficient voltage between selected electrodes. This places an electric field across the phosphor at each picture element located between the overlap of the selected electrodes causing the phosphor to emit light at this location. These and other matrix-addressed displays can be addressed line-at-a-time (row or column) fashion in rapid enough sequence to display information at standard TV frame rates.

  17. EMI investigation and modeling of a flat panel display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Satyajeet

    It is often important to carry out EMI analysis in the design phase of an electronic product to predict the radiated emissions. An EMI analysis is important to predict if the product complies with the FCC regulations as well as to gain an understanding of the noise coupling and radiation mechanisms. EMI analysis and prediction of radiated emissions in electronic products that have an electrically large chassis, pose a challenge due to the presence of multiple resonant structures and noise-coupling mechanisms. The study focusses on the investigation of the main noise coupling mechanisms, the approach and methods used for the modeling of a flat panel display. Full-wave simulation models are a powerful tool for the prediction of radiated emissions and the visualization of coupling paths within the product. The first part deals with the measurement of radiated emissions from the display under standard test conditions and the identification of the main noise sources using near-field scanning. The contribution of the chassis components - frame, back cover and the back panel, to the radiated emission is analyzed using shielding measurements. Noise coupling from the main board, flex cables, display driver boards and the display is analyzed from measurements. The second part deals with the full-wave modeling of the components - main board, flex cables, chassis and the display driver boards. The modeling approach is demonstrated by highlighting some of the challenges in modeling larger structures having many details. The simulation model contains the main components of the TV that contribute to far-field radiation. The full-wave modeling is done using the CST Microwave Studio. Two sets of simulation models are described - the common mode models and the complete models. The use of the common mode models for the identification of the resonant structures is demonstrated. The far-field radiated emissions along with the coupling mechanism within the flat panel display can be

  18. Diffractive optics for compact flat panel displays. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.; DeLong, K.

    1997-04-29

    Three years ago LLNL developed a practical method to dramatically reduce the chromatic aberration in single element diffractive imaging lenses. High efficiency, achromatic imaging lenses have been fabricated for human vision correction. This LDRD supported research in applying our new methods to develop a unique, diffraction-based optical interface with solid state, microelectronic imaging devices. Advances in microelectronics have led to smaller, more efficient components for optical systems. There have, however, been no equivalent advances in the imaging optics associated with these devices. The goal of this project was to replace the bulky, refractive optics in typical head-mounted displays with micro-thin diffractive optics to directly image flat-panel displays into the eye. To visualize the system think of the lenses of someone`s eyeglasses becoming flat-panel displays. To realize this embodiment, we needed to solve the problems of large chromatic aberrations and low efficiency that are associated with diffraction. We have developed a graceful tradeoff between chromatic aberrations and the diffractive optic thickness. It turns out that by doubling the thickness of a micro-thin diffractive lens we obtain nearly a two-times improvement in chromatic performance. Since the human eye will tolerate one diopter of chromatic aberration, we are able to achieve an achromatic image with a diffractive lens that is only 20 microns thick, versus 3 mm thickness for the comparable refractive lens. Molds for the diffractive lenses are diamond turned with sub-micron accuracy; the final lenses are cast from these molds using various polymers. We thus retain both the micro- thin nature of the diffractive optics and the achromatic image quality of refractive optics. During the first year of funding we successfully extended our earlier technology from 1 cm diameter optics required for vision applications up to the 5 cm diameter optics required for this application. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  20. Color Flat Panel Displays: 3D Autostereoscopic Brassboard and Field Sequential Illumination Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    DTI has advanced autostereoscopic and field sequential color (FSC) illumination technologies for flat panel displays. Using a patented backlight...technology, DTI has developed prototype 3D flat panel color display that provides stereoscopic viewing without the need for special glasses or other... autostereoscopic viewing. Discussions of system architecture, critical component specifications and resultant display characteristics are provided. Also

  1. Excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon on metallic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delachat, F.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Cayron, C.; Ducros, C.; Lerat, J.-F.; Emeraud, T.; Negru, R.; Huet, K.; Reydet, P.-L.

    2013-06-01

    An attempt has been made to achieve the crystallization of silicon thin film on metallic foils by long pulse duration excimer laser processing. Amorphous silicon thin films (100 nm) were deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on a commercial metallic alloy (N42-FeNi made of 41 % of Ni) coated by a tantalum nitride (TaN) layer. The TaN coating acts as a barrier layer, preventing the diffusion of metallic impurities in the silicon thin film during the laser annealing. An energy density threshold of 0.3 J cm-2, necessary for surface melting and crystallization of the amorphous silicon, was predicted by a numerical simulation of laser-induced phase transitions and witnessed by Raman analysis. Beyond this fluence, the melt depth increases with the intensification of energy density. A complete crystallization of the layer is achieved for an energy density of 0.9 J cm-2. Scanning electron microscopy unveils the nanostructuring of the silicon after laser irradiation, while cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals the crystallites' columnar growth.

  2. Use of Tritium in the Study of defects in Amorphous Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Costea, S.; Pisana, S.; Kherani, N.P.; Gaspari, F.; Kosteski, T.; Shmayda, W.T.; Zukotynski, S.

    2005-11-28

    Hydrogen is known to strongly affect the physical properties of amorphous semiconductors. Indeed hydrogen is introduced during the growth of amorphous silicon films, used in active matrix displays and solar cells, to passivate silicon dangling bonds and to relax the lattice thereby reducing the density of states in the energy gap by several orders of magnitude and giving rise to device grade material. Ideally, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a continuous covalently bonded random network of silicon-silicon and silicon-hydrogen atoms, with the predominant nearest neighbour environment similar to that of crystalline silicon.

  3. Electrochemical degradation of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques of module electrochemical corrosion research, developed during reliability studies of crystalline-silicon modules (C-Si), have been applied to this new investigation into amorphous-silicon (a-Si) module reliability. Amorphous-Si cells, encapsulated in the polymers polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), were exposed for more than 1200 hours in a controlled 85 C/85 percent RH environment, with a constant 500 volts applied between the cells and an aluminum frame. Plotting power output reduction versus charge transferred reveals that about 50 percent a-Si cell failures can be expected with the passage of 0.1 to 1.0 Coulomb/cm of cell-frame edge length; this threshold is somewhat less than that determined for C-Si modules.

  4. Spherical silicon photonic microcavities: From amorphous to polycrystalline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenollosa, R.; Garín, M.; Meseguer, F.

    2016-06-01

    Shaping silicon as a spherical object is not an obvious task, especially when the object size is in the micrometer range. This has the important consequence of transforming bare silicon material in a microcavity, so it is able to confine light efficiently. Here, we have explored the inside volume of such microcavities, both in their amorphous and in their polycrystalline versions. The synthesis method, which is based on chemical vapor deposition, causes amorphous microspheres to have a high content of hydrogen that produces an onionlike distributed porous core when the microspheres are crystallized by a fast annealing regime. This substantially influences the resonant modes. However, a slow crystallization regime does not yield pores, and produces higher-quality-factor resonances that could be fitted to the Mie theory. This allows the establishment of a procedure for obtaining size calibration standards with relative errors of the order of 0.1%.

  5. Quantum efficiencies exceeding unity in amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vanmaekelbergh, D.; Lagemaat, J. van de; Schropp, R.E.I.

    1994-12-31

    The experimental observation of internal quantum efficiencies above unity in crystalline silicon solar cells has brought up the question whether the generation of multiple electron/hole pairs has to be taken into consideration also in solar cells based on direct gap amorphous semiconductors. To study photogenerated carrier dynamics, the authors have applied Intensity Modulated Photocurrent Spectroscopy (IMPS) to hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells. In the reverse voltage bias region at low illumination intensities it has been observed that the low frequency limit of the AC quantum yield Y increases significantly above unit with decreasing light intensity, indicating that more than one electron per photon is detected in the external circuit. This phenomenon can be explained by considering trapping and thermal emission of photogenerated carriers at intragap atmospheric dangling bond defect centers.

  6. The reliability and stability of multijunction amorphous silicon PV modules

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.E.

    1995-11-01

    Solarex is developing a manufacturing process for the commercial production of 8 ft{sup 2} multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV modules starting in 1996. The device structure used in these multijunction modules is: glass/textured tin oxide/p-i-n/p-i-n/ZnO/Al/EVA/Tedlar where the back junction of the tandem structure contains an amorphous silicon germanium alloy. As an interim step, 4 ft{sup 2} multijunction modules have been fabricated in a pilot production mode over the last several months. The distribution of initial conversion efficiencies for an engineering run of 67 modules (4 ft{sup 2}) is shown. Measurements recently performed at NREL indicate that the actual efficiencies are about 5% higher than those shown, and thus exhibit an average initial conversion efficiency of about 9.5%. The data indicates that the process is relatively robust since there were no modules with initial efficiencies less than 7.5%.

  7. Detection of charged particles in amorphous silicon layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, S.N.; Morel, J.R.; Mulera, T.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Schnurmacher, G.; Street, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    The successful development of radiation detectors made from amorphous silicon could offer the possibility for relatively easy construction of large area position-sensitive detectors. We have conducted a series of measurements with prototype detectors, on signals derived from alpha particles. The measurement results are compared with simple model calculations, and projections are made of potential applications in high-energy and nuclear physics. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Amorphous Ternary Diffusion Barriers for Silicon Metallizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Jason Sven

    1995-01-01

    Reactively sputtered from transition-metal silicide or boride targets in Ar/N_2 discharges, thin amorphous films of TM-Si-N (TM = Mo, Ta, Ti, or W) and W-B-N are investigated. Resistivity, density, stress, and structure are given as functions of composition, and in some cases, temperature. Transmission electron microscopy shows that most of the films are marginally amorphous with the scale of local order ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 nm. Small -angle scattering measurements reveal chemically dissimilary regions in the films. When fully nitrided, Si appears to be preferentially bonded to nitrogen in the form of Si_3N_4 in the TM-Si-N films, according to extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) measurements. By tests on shallow-junction diodes, 100-nm thick TM-Si-N barriers are able to prevent aluminum overlayers from spiking the Si substrate at temperatures above aluminum's melting point, 660^circC. The exceptional stability is partly attributable to a 3 nm, self-sealing AlN layer which grows at the TM-Si-N/Al interface. The performance of the TM-Si-N and W-B-N barriers with copper overlayers is equally impressive. At the proper compositions, 100-nm barriers prevent copper from diffusing into the junction at 800^circC or higher for a 30-min vacuum annealing. Diode failure typically corresponds to the crystallization temperature of the barrier, which can be reduced by the presence of copper. Preliminary diffusion measurements of Cu in Ta _{36}Si_ {14}N_{50} films by SIMS yield an approximate diffusivity constant of D_{CU} = (0.014 cm ^2/s) times exp(-2.7 eV/kT). A 10-nm-thick TM-Si-N barrier with a Cu overlayer on MOS capacitors reveals no penetration of Cu into SiO_2 during an 80 h bias-thermal-stress at 300^circ C and 1 MV/cm applied field. Through a microscopic four-point probe lithographically defined on a Cu/barrier/Cu trilayer stack, the specific contact resistances of barrier/Cu interfaces are determined for TM-Si-N, TiN, and W barriers. In all instances, the

  9. Hybrid photovoltaics based on semiconductor nanocrystals and amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baoquan; Findikoglu, Alp T; Sykora, Milan; Werder, Donald J; Klimov, Victor I

    2009-03-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are promising materials for applications in photovoltaic (PV) structures that could benefit from size-controlled tunability of absorption spectra, the ease of realization of various tandem architectures, and, perhaps, increased conversion efficiency in the ultraviolet region through carrier multiplication. The first practical step toward utilization of the unique properties of NCs in PV technologies could be through their integration into traditional silicon-based solar cells. Here, we demonstrate an example of such hybrid PV structures that combine colloidal NCs with amorphous silicon. In these structures, NCs and silicon are electronically coupled, and the regime of this coupling can be tuned by altering the alignment of NC energy states with regard to silicon band edges. For example, using wide-gap CdSe NCs we demonstrate a photoresponse which is exclusively due to the NCs. On the other hand, in devices comprising narrow-gap PbS NCs, both the NCs and silicon contribute to photocurrent, which results in PV response extending from the visible to the near-infrared region. The hybrid silicon/PbS NC solar cells show external quantum efficiencies of approximately 7% at infrared energies and 50% in the visible and a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.9%. This work demonstrates the feasibility of hybrid PV devices that combine advantages of mature silicon fabrication technologies with the unique electronic properties of semiconductor NCs.

  10. Two-phase electrochemical lithiation in amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang Wei; He, Yu; Fan, Feifei; Liu, Xiao Hua; Xia, Shuman; Liu, Yang; Harris, C Thomas; Li, Hong; Huang, Jian Yu; Mao, Scott X; Zhu, Ting

    2013-02-13

    Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized portable electronics and will be a key to electrifying transport vehicles and delivering renewable electricity. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is being intensively studied as a high-capacity anode material for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. Its lithiation has been widely thought to occur through a single-phase mechanism with gentle Li profiles, thus offering a significant potential for mitigating pulverization and capacity fade. Here, we discover a surprising two-phase process of electrochemical lithiation in a-Si by using in situ transmission electron microscopy. The lithiation occurs by the movement of a sharp phase boundary between the a-Si reactant and an amorphous Li(x)Si (a-Li(x)Si, x ~ 2.5) product. Such a striking amorphous-amorphous interface exists until the remaining a-Si is consumed. Then a second step of lithiation sets in without a visible interface, resulting in the final product of a-Li(x)Si (x ~ 3.75). We show that the two-phase lithiation can be the fundamental mechanism underpinning the anomalous morphological change of microfabricated a-Si electrodes, i.e., from a disk shape to a dome shape. Our results represent a significant step toward the understanding of the electrochemically driven reaction and degradation in amorphous materials, which is critical to the development of microstructurally stable electrodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Cryogenic flat-panel gas-gap heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, S.; Keijzer, R.; Buitelaar, P.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    A compact additive manufactured flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at cryogenic temperature is reported in this paper. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductance of the heat switch with the heat sink temperature in the range of 100-180 K. The apparatus is cooled by a two-stage GM cooler and the temperature is controlled with a heater and a braided copper wire connection. A thermal guard is mounted on the hot side of the device to confine the heat flow axially through the sample. A gas handling system allows testing the device with different gas pressures in the heat switch. Experiments are performed at various heat sink temperatures, by varying gas pressure in the gas-gap and with helium, hydrogen and nitrogen gas. The measured off-conductance with a heat sink temperature of 115 K and the hot plate at 120 K is 0.134 W/K, the on-conductance with helium and hydrogen gases at the same temperatures is 4.80 W/K and 4.71 W/K, respectively. This results in an on/off conductance ratio of 37 ± 7 and 35 ± 6 for helium and hydrogen respectively. The experimental results matches fairly well with the predicted heat conductance at cryogenic temperatures.

  12. Second generation large area microchannel plate flat panel phototubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertley, C. D.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Tedesco, J.; Minot, M. J.; O'Mahony, A.; Craven, C. A.; Popecki, M.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Foley, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    Very large (20 cm × 20 cm) flat panel phototubes are being developed which employ novel microchannel plates (MCPs). The MCPs are manufactured using borosilicate microcapillary arrays which are functionalized by the application of resistive and secondary emissive layers using atomic layer deposition (ALD). This allows the operational parameters to be set by tailoring sequential ALD deposition processes. The borosilicate substrates are robust, including the ability to be produced in large formats (20 cm square). ALD MCPs have performance characteristics (gain, pulse amplitude distributions, and imaging) that are equivalent or better than conventional MCPs. They have low intrinsic background (0.045 events cm-2 sec-1)., high open area ratios (74% for the latest generation of borosilicate substrates), and stable gain during >7 C cm-2 charge extraction after preconditioning (vacuum bake and burn-in). The tube assemblies use a pair of 20 cm × 20 cm ALD MCPs comprised of a borosilicate entrance window, a proximity focused bialkali photocathode, and a strip-line readout anode. The second generation design employs an all glass body with a hot indium seal and a transfer photocathode. We have achieved >20% quantum efficiency and good gain uniformity over the 400 cm2 field of view, spatial resolution of <1 cm and obtained event timing accuracy of close to 100 ps FWHM.

  13. Sarnoff JND Vision Model for Flat-Panel Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brill, Michael H.; Lubin, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    This document describes adaptation of the basic Sarnoff JND Vision Model created in response to the NASA/ARPA need for a general-purpose model to predict the perceived image quality attained by flat-panel displays. The JND model predicts the perceptual ratings that humans will assign to a degraded color-image sequence relative to its nondegraded counterpart. Substantial flexibility is incorporated into this version of the model so it may be used to model displays at the sub-pixel and sub-frame level. To model a display (e.g., an LCD), the input-image data can be sampled at many times the pixel resolution and at many times the digital frame rate. The first stage of the model downsamples each sequence in time and in space to physiologically reasonable rates, but with minimum interpolative artifacts and aliasing. Luma and chroma parts of the model generate (through multi-resolution pyramid representation) a map of differences-between test and reference called the JND map, from which a summary rating predictor is derived. The latest model extensions have done well in calibration against psychophysical data and against image-rating data given a CRT-based front-end. THe software was delivered to NASA Ames and is being integrated with LCD display models at that facility,

  14. Light sharing in multi-flat-panel-PMT PEM detectors.

    PubMed

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Mayhugh, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Large are a detectors, such as those used in positron emission mammography (PEM) and scintimammography, utilize arrays of discrete semtillator elements mounted on arrays of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT). Scintillator elements can be packed very densely (minimizing area between elements), allowing good detection sensitivity and spatial resolution. And, while new flat panel PSPMTS have minimal inactive edges, when they are placed in arrays significant dead spaces where scintillation light is undetectable are created. To address this problem, a light guide is often placed between the detector and PSPMT array to spread scintillation light so that these gaps can be bridged. In this investigation we studied the effect of light guides of various thickness on system performance. A 10x10 element array of LYSO detector elements was coupled to the center of a 2x2 array of PSPMTs through varying thicknesses (1 to 4 mm) of UV glass. The spot size of the imaged elements and distortions in the regular square pattern of the imaged scintillator arrays were evaluated. Energy resolution was measured by placing single elements of LYSO at several locations of the PSPMT array. Spatial distortions in the images of the array were reduced by using thicker light guides (3-4 mm). Use of thicker light guides, however, resulted in reduced pixel resolution and slight degradation of energy resolution. Therefore, some loss of pixel and energy resolution will accompany the use of thick light guides (minimum of 3 mm) required for optimum identification of detector elements.

  15. An alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) method for implementing slot-scan imaging technique with a flat-panel detector--initial experiences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinming; Shaw, Chris C; Altunbas, Mustafa C; Wang, Tianpeng

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes and demonstrates an electronic collimation method, referred to as the alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) technique, for implementing slot-scan digital radiography technique with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) array based flat-panel detector. An amorphus selenium (a-Se) flat-panel detector was modified to implement the ALER technique for slot-scan imaging. A stepping-motor driven fore-collimator was mounted in front of an X-ray tube to generate a scanning X-ray fan beam. The scanning speed and magnification were adjusted to synchronize the fan beam motion with the image line readout rate. The image lines on the leading and trailing edges of the fan beam were tracked and alternately reset and read out, respectively. The former operation resulted in the erasure of the scatter signals accumulated in the leading edge image line prior to the arrival of the fan beam. The latter operation resulted in the acquisition of fan beam exposure data integrated in the trailing edge image line right after the fan beam passed. To demonstrate the scatter rejection capability of this technique, an anthropomorphic chest phantom was placed in PA position and scanned at a speed of 576 lines (8.0 cm)/s at 117 kVp and 32 mA. A tungsten bar is placed at the entrance side of the chest phantom to measure the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), scatter reduction factor (SRF), and contrast-to-noise ratio degradation factor (CNRDF) in the slot-scan images to evaluate the effectiveness of scatter rejection and the resultant improvement of image quality. SPR and CNRDF in the open-field images were also measured and used as the reference for comparison. A scatter reduction by 86.4 to 95.4% across lower lung and heart regions has been observed with slot-scan imaging. The CNRs have been found to be improved by a factor of 2 in the mediastinum areas over the open-field image as well.

  16. Enhanced crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films using embedded silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Curtis Michael

    This thesis is concerned with the production of silicon thin films for photovoltaic applications. Much research has been carried out to find a stable, more efficient alternative to amorphous silicon, resulting in a number of various amorphous/crystalline mixed-phase film structures with properties superior to amorphous silicon. This thesis work details a completely new approach to mixed-phase film deposition, focusing on the fast crystallization of these films. The deposition of amorphous silicon films with embedded nanocrystals was carried out via a dual-plasma system. It is known that plasma conditions to produce high quality films are much different from those to produce particles. Hence the experimental system used here involved two separate plasmas to allow the optimum production of the crystalline nanoparticles and the amorphous film. Both plasmas use 13.56 MHz excitation voltage with diluted silane as the silicon precursor. The nanoparticle production reactor is a flow-through device that can be altered to control the size of the particles from around 5--30 nm average diameter. The film production reactor is a parallel-plate capacitively-coupled plasma system, into which the aerosol-suspended nanoparticles were injected. The nanocrystals could either be "co-deposited" simultaneously with the amorphous film, or be deposited separately in a layer-by-layer technique; both approaches are discussed in detail. Measurements of the film conductivity provide for the first time unambiguous evidence that the presence of nanocrystallites above 5 nm in the amorphous film have a direct impact on the electronic properties of co-deposited films. Further measurements of the film structure by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate clearly the effect of embedded nanocrystals on the annealed crystallization process; the immediate growth of the crystal seeds has been observed. Additionally, a newly discovered mechanism of film crystallization

  17. Flexible amorphous silicon PIN diode x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, Michael; Bawolek, Edward; Smith, Joseph T.; Raupp, Gregory B.; Morton, David

    2013-05-01

    A low temperature amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film transistor (TFT) and amorphous silicon PIN photodiode technology for flexible passive pixel detector arrays has been developed using active matrix display technology. The flexible detector arrays can be conformed to non-planar surfaces with the potential to detect x-rays or other radiation with an appropriate conversion layer. The thin, lightweight, and robust backplanes may enable the use of highly portable x-ray detectors for use in the battlefield or in remote locations. We have fabricated detector arrays up to 200 millimeters along the diagonal on a Gen II (370 mm x 470 mm rectangular substrate) using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) a-Si as the active layer and PECVD silicon nitride (SiN) as the gate dielectric and passivation. The a-Si based TFTs exhibited an effective saturation mobility of 0.7 cm2/V-s, which is adequate for most sensing applications. The PIN diode material was fabricated using a low stress amorphous silicon (a-Si) PECVD process. The PIN diode dark current was 1.7 pA/mm2, the diode ideality factor was 1.36, and the diode fill factor was 0.73. We report on the critical steps in the evolution of the backplane process from qualification of the low temperature (180°C) TFT and PIN diode process on the 150 mm pilot line, the transfer of the process to flexible plastic substrates, and finally a discussion and demonstration of the scale-up to the Gen II (370 x 470 mm) panel scale pilot line.

  18. A ghost story: spatio-temporal response characteristics of an indirect-detection flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    Siewerdsen, J H; Jaffray, D A

    1999-08-01

    Spatial and temporal imaging characteristics of an amorphous silicon flat-panel imager (FPI) were investigated in terms relevant to the application of such devices in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and other x-ray imaging modalities, including general radiography, fluoroscopy, mammography, radiotherapy portal imaging, and nondestructive testing. Specifically, issues of image lag (including the magnitude, spatial uniformity, temporal-frequency characteristics, and dependence upon exposure and frame time) and long-term image persistence ("ghosts") were investigated. As part of the basic characterization of the FPI, pixel dark signal and noise (magnitude, temporal stability, and spatial uniformity) as well as radiation response (signal size, linearity, gain, and reciprocity) were also measured. Image lag was analyzed as a function of frame time and incident exposure. First-frame lag (i.e., the relative residual signal in the first frame following readout of an exposure) was approximately 2-10%, depending upon incident exposure and was spatially nonuniform to a slight degree across the FPI; second-, third-, and fourth-frame lag were approximately 0.7%, 0.4%, and 0.3%, respectively (at 25% sensor saturation). Image lag was also analyzed in terms of the temporal-frequency-dependent transfer function derived from the radiation response, allowing a quantitative description of system components contributing to lag. Finally, the contrast of objects as a function of time following an exposure was measured in order to examine long-term image persistence ("ghosts"). Ghosts were found to persist up to 30 min or longer, depending upon the exposure and frame time. Two means of reducing the apparent contrast of ghost images were tested: (i) rapid scanning of the FPI at maximum frame rate, and (ii) flood-field exposure of the FPI; neither was entirely satisfactory. These results pose important considerations for application of FPIs in CBCT as well as other x-ray imaging

  19. Improved method of preparing p-i-n junctions in amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.

    1984-12-10

    A method of preparing p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junctions for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes depositing amorphous silicon on a thin layer of trivalent material, such as aluminum, indium, or gallium at a temperature in the range of 200/sup 0/C to 250/sup 0/C. At this temperature, the layer of trivalent material diffuses into the amorphous silicon to form a graded p/sup +/-i junction. A layer of n-type doped material is then deposited onto the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer in a conventional manner to finish forming the p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junction.

  20. The U.S. and Japanese amorphous silicon technology programs A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Amorphous Silicon (a-Si) Solar Cell Program performs R&D on thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon for eventual development of stable amorphous silicon cells with 12 percent efficiency by 1988. The Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Program in Japan is sponsored by the Sunshine Project to develop an alternate energy technology. While the objectives of both programs are to eventually develop a-Si photovoltaic modules and arrays that would produce electricity to compete with utility electricity cost, the U.S. program approach is research oriented and the Japanese is development oriented.

  1. Electron-beam-induced information storage in hydrogenated amorphous silicon devices

    DOEpatents

    Yacobi, B.G.

    1985-03-18

    A method for recording and storing information in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, comprising: depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate to form a charge collection device; and generating defects in the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, wherein the defects act as recombination centers that reduce the lifetime of carriers, thereby reducing charge collection efficiency and thus in the charge collection mode of scanning probe instruments, regions of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device that contain the defects appear darker in comparison to regions of the device that do not contain the defects, leading to a contrast formation for pattern recognition and information storage.

  2. Flowing damage in ion-implanted amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Pothier, Jean-Christophe; Schiettekatte, Francois; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2011-06-15

    Using molecular-dynamics simulations, we have studied the creation and evolution of damage in crystalline and amorphous silicon following the implantation of energetic keV ions. A method is proposed to identify anomalous atoms based on a weighted combination of local, atomic-scale properties, which applies to both Si phases. For crystalline Si, the passage of the ions causes compact amorphous regions to form, while no evidence for melting is observed. The relaxation of the amorphouslike regions proceeds initially by the rapid recrystallization of smaller clusters and isolated atoms, followed by a long period of steplike changes in the number of defects due to spontaneous annealing of damage pockets at the crystalline-amorphous interface. In amorphous Si, the initial stage of damage annealing (which lasts a few picoseconds) resembles closely that observed in crystalline Si; on larger time scales, however, the damage is found to ''percolate,'' or flow, through the system, inducing damage away from the collision cascade, thus causing an overall ''derelaxation'' of the material.

  3. Motion-compensated defect interpolation for flat-panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aach, Til; Barth, Erhardt; Mayntz, Claudia

    2004-05-01

    One advantage of flat-panel X-ray detectors is the immediate availability of the acquired images for display. Current limitations in large-area active-matrix manufacturing technology, however, require that the images read out from such detectors be processed to correct for inactive pixels. In static radiographs, these defects can only be interpolated by spatial filtering. Moving X-ray image modalities, such as fluoroscopy or cine-angiography, permit to use temporal information as well. This paper describes interframe defect interpolation algorithms based on motion compensation and filtering. Assuming the locations of the defects to be known, we fill in the defective areas from past frames, where the missing information was visible due to motion. The motion estimator is based on regularized block matching, with speedup obtained by successive elimination and related measures. To avoid the motion estimator locking on to static defects, these are cut out of each block during matching. Once motion is estimated, three methods are available for defect interpolation: direct filling-in by the motion-compensated predecessor, filling-in by a 3D-multilevel median filtered value, and spatiotemporal mean filtering. Results are shown for noisy fluoroscopy sequences acquired in clinical routine with varying amounts of motion and simulated defects up to six lines wide. They show that the 3D-multilevel median filter appears as the method of choice since it causes the least blur of the interpolated data, is robust with respect to motion estimation errors and works even in non-moving areas.

  4. Heat Transfar Properties of Flat-Panel Evacuated Porous Insrlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneno, Hirosyi; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    Flat Panel evacuated porous insulators have been produced by filling powder or fiber (such as perlite powder, diatomaceous earth powder, silica aerogel powder, g lass fiber and ceramic fiber) in film-like laminated plastic container and by evacuating to form vacuum in it is interior. Heat transfer properties of these evacuated insulators have been studied under various conditions (such as particle diameter, surface area, packing density, solid volume fraction and void dimension). The apparent mean thermal conductivity has been measured for the boundary surface temperature at cold face temperature 13°C and hot face temperature 35°. The effect of air pressure ranging from 1 Pa to one atomosphere (105 Pa) was examined. The results were as follows. (1) For each powder the apparent mean thermal conductivity decreases with decreasing residual air pressure, and at very low pressure bellow 1 -103 Pa the conductivity becomes indeqendent of pressure. The thermal conductivity at 1.3Pa is 0.0053 W/mK for perlite powder, 0.0048W/mK for diatomaceous earth powder, 0.0043 W/mK for silica aerogel powder and 0.0029W/mK for glass fiber. (2) With decreasing particle size, the apparent mean thermal conductivity is constant independent of residual air pressure in higher pressure region. It is that void dimension continues to decrease with particle size and the mean free path of air becomes comparable with void dimension. (3) In the range of minor solid volume fraction, the apparent mean thermal conductivity at very low precreases with decreasing particle size. This shows the thermal contact resistance of the solid particle increases with decreasing particle size.

  5. Focal spot measurements using a digital flat panel detector

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Amit; Panse, A.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Focal spot size is one of the crucial factors that affect the image quality of any x-ray imaging system. It is, therefore, important to measure the focal spot size accurately. In the past, pinhole and slit measurements of x-ray focal spots were obtained using direct exposure film. At present, digital detectors are replacing film in medical imaging so that, although focal spot measurements can be made quickly with such detectors, one must be careful to account for the generally poorer spatial resolution of the detector and the limited usable magnification. For this study, the focal spots of a diagnostic x-ray tube were measured with a 10-μm pinhole using a 194-μm pixel flat panel detector (FPD). The two-dimensional MTF, measured with the Noise Response (NR) Method was used for the correction for the detector blurring. The resulting focal spot sizes based on the FWTM (Full Width at Tenth Maxima) were compared with those obtained with a very high resolution detector with 8-μm pixels. This study demonstrates the possible effect of detector blurring on the focal spot size measurements with digital detectors with poor resolution and the improvement obtained by deconvolution. Additionally, using the NR method for measuring the two-dimensional MTF, any non-isotropies in detector resolution can be accurately corrected for, enabling routine measurement of non-isotropic x-ray focal spots. This work presents a simple, accurate and quick quality assurance procedure for measurements of both digital detector properties and x-ray focal spot size and distribution in modern x-ray imaging systems. PMID:25302004

  6. Focal spot measurements using a digital flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amit; Panse, A.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Focal spot size is one of the crucial factors that affect the image quality of any x-ray imaging system. It is, therefore, important to measure the focal spot size accurately. In the past, pinhole and slit measurements of x-ray focal spots were obtained using direct exposure film. At present, digital detectors are replacing film in medical imaging so that, although focal spot measurements can be made quickly with such detectors, one must be careful to account for the generally poorer spatial resolution of the detector and the limited usable magnification. For this study, the focal spots of a diagnostic x-ray tube were measured with a 10-μm pinhole using a 194-μm pixel flat panel detector (FPD). The twodimensional MTF, measured with the Noise Response (NR) Method was used for the correction for the detector blurring. The resulting focal spot sizes based on the FWTM (Full Width at Tenth Maxima) were compared with those obtained with a very high resolution detector with 8-μm pixels. This study demonstrates the possible effect of detector blurring on the focal spot size measurements with digital detectors with poor resolution and the improvement obtained by deconvolution. Additionally, using the NR method for measuring the two-dimensional MTF, any non-isotropies in detector resolution can be accurately corrected for, enabling routine measurement of non-isotropic x-ray focal spots. This work presents a simple, accurate and quick quality assurance procedure for measurements of both digital detector properties and x-ray focal spot size and distribution in modern x-ray imaging systems.

  7. Focal spot measurements using a digital flat panel detector.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Panse, A; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-19

    Focal spot size is one of the crucial factors that affect the image quality of any x-ray imaging system. It is, therefore, important to measure the focal spot size accurately. In the past, pinhole and slit measurements of x-ray focal spots were obtained using direct exposure film. At present, digital detectors are replacing film in medical imaging so that, although focal spot measurements can be made quickly with such detectors, one must be careful to account for the generally poorer spatial resolution of the detector and the limited usable magnification. For this study, the focal spots of a diagnostic x-ray tube were measured with a 10-μm pinhole using a 194-μm pixel flat panel detector (FPD). The two-dimensional MTF, measured with the Noise Response (NR) Method was used for the correction for the detector blurring. The resulting focal spot sizes based on the FWTM (Full Width at Tenth Maxima) were compared with those obtained with a very high resolution detector with 8-μm pixels. This study demonstrates the possible effect of detector blurring on the focal spot size measurements with digital detectors with poor resolution and the improvement obtained by deconvolution. Additionally, using the NR method for measuring the two-dimensional MTF, any non-isotropies in detector resolution can be accurately corrected for, enabling routine measurement of non-isotropic x-ray focal spots. This work presents a simple, accurate and quick quality assurance procedure for measurements of both digital detector properties and x-ray focal spot size and distribution in modern x-ray imaging systems.

  8. Flat panel CT detectors for sub-second volumetric scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeth, Richard E.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Roos, Pieter G.; Shapiro, Edward G.

    2005-04-01

    This paper explores the potential of flat panel detectors in sub-second CT scanning applications. Using a PaxScan 4030CB with 600um thick CsI(Tl), a central section of the panel (16 to 32 rows), was scanned at frame rates up to 1000fps. Using this platform, fundamental issues related to high speed scanning were characterized. The offset drift of the imager over 60 seconds was found to be less than 0.014 ppm/sec relative to full scale. The gain stability over a 10 hour period is better than +/- .45%, which is at the resolution limit of the measurement. Two different types of lag measurements were performed in order to separate the photodiode array lag from the CsI afterglow. The panel lag was found to be 0.41% 1st frame and 0.054% 25th frame at 1000fps. The CsI(Tl) afterglow, however, is roughly an order of magnitude higher, dominating the lag for sub-second scans. At 1000fps the 1st frame lag due to afterglow was 3.3% and the 25th frame lag was 0.34%. Both the lag and afterglow are independent of signal level and each follows a simple power law evolution versus time. Reconstructions of anatomical phantoms and the CATPHAN 500 phantom are presented. With a 2 second, 1200 projection scan of the CATPHAN phantom at 600fps in 32 slice mode, using 120kVp and CTDI100 of 43.2mGy, 0.3% contrast resolution for a 6mm diameter target, can be visualized. In addition, 15lp/cm spatial resolution was achieved with a 2mm slice and a central CTDI100 of 10.8mGy.

  9. Studies on Amorphizing Silicon Using Silicon Ion Implantation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    130-200 keV ions with doses of 5 x 1014 to 2 x 1015 2 15 2ions/cm and for 0.5 micron films, 260-300 keV ions at 1-2 x 10 ions/cm . Svensson et al...Vol. 42, pp. 707-709, 1983. 17. B. Svensson , J. Linnros & G. Holmen, "Ion Beam Induced Annealing of Radiation Damage in Silicon on Sapphire," Nucl...Mayer, Lennart Eriksson & John A. Davies, Ion Implantation in Semiconductors, Academic Press, NY, 1970. 21. L. T. Chadderton & F. H. Eisen, editors. Ion

  10. Impurity-defect complexes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.H. ); Fong, C.Y. . Dept. of Physics); Nichols, C.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-11-01

    The two most outstanding features observed for dopants in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) -- a shift in the Fermi level accompanied by an increase in the defect density and an absence of degenerate doping -- have previously been postulated to stem from the formation of substitutional dopant-dangling bond complexes. Using first-principles self-consistent pseudopotential calculation in conjunction with a supercell model for the amorphous network and the ability of network relaxation from the first-principles results, we have studied the electronic and structural properties of substitutional fourfold-coordinated phosphorus and boron at the second neighbor position to a dangling bond defect. We demonstrate that such impurity-defect complexes can account for the general features observed experimentally in doped a-Si:H. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. FTIR study of silicon carbide amorphization by heavy ion irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Miro, Sandrine; Pluchery, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    We have measured at room temperature (RT) the Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) absorption spectra of ion-irradiated thin epitaxial films of cubic silicon carbide (3C–SiC) with 1.1 µm thickness on a 500 µm thick (1 0 0) silicon wafer substrate. Irradiations were carried out at RT with 2.3 MeV 28Si+ ions and 3.0 MeV 84Kr+ ions for various fluences in order to induce amorphization of the SiC film. Ion projected ranges were adjusted to be slightly larger than the film thickness so that the whole SiC layers were homogeneously damaged. FTIR spectra of virgin and irradiated samples were recorded for various incidence angles from normal incidence to Brewster’s angle. We show that the amorphization process in ion-irradiated 3C–SiC films can be monitored non-destructively by FTIR absorption spectroscopy without any major interference of the substrate. The compared evolutions of TO and LO peaks upon ion irradiation yield valuable information on the damage process. Complementary test experiments were also performed on virgin silicon nitride (Si3N4) self-standing films for similar conditions. Asymmetrical shapes were found for TO peaks of SiC, whereas Gaussian profiles are found for LO peaks. Skewed Gaussian profiles, with a standard deviation depending on wave number, were used to fit asymmetrical peaks for both materials. A new methodology for following the amorphization process is proposed on the basis of the evolution of fitted IR absorption peak parameters with ion fluence. Results are discussed with respect to Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling and Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  12. Enhanced electrochemical etching of ion irradiated silicon by localized amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Z. Y.; Breese, M. B. H.; Lin, Y.; Tok, E. S.; Vittone, E.

    2014-05-12

    A tailored distribution of ion induced defects in p-type silicon allows subsequent electrochemical anodization to be modified in various ways. Here we describe how a low level of lattice amorphization induced by ion irradiation influences anodization. First, it superposes a chemical etching effect, which is observable at high fluences as a reduced height of a micromachined component. Second, at lower fluences, it greatly enhances electrochemical anodization by allowing a hole diffusion current to flow to the exposed surface. We present an anodization model, which explains all observed effects produced by light ions such as helium and heavy ions such as cesium over a wide range of fluences and irradiation geometries.

  13. A 4096 atom model of amorphous silicon: Structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Joseph L.; Bickham, Scott R.; Davidson, Brian N.; Wooten, Frederick

    1997-03-01

    We present structural and lattice dynamical information for a 4096 atom model of amorphous silicon. The structural model was obtained, similarly to previously published smaller models, using periodic boundary conditions, the Wooten-Winer-Weaire bond-switching algorithm, and the Broughton-Li relaxation with respect to the Stillinger-Weber potential. The structure is dynamically stable and there is no evidence in the radial distribution function of medium range order. For examining this large model, we use a 1000 processor Connection Machine to compute all the eigenvalues and eigenvectors exactly. The phonon density of states and inverse participation ratio are compared with results for related 216, 432 and 1000-atom models.

  14. Molecular-dynamics simulation of thermal conductivity in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Hee; Biswas, R.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Wang, C. Z.; Chan, C. T.; Ho, K. M.

    1991-03-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivity κ(T) of amorphous silicon has been calculated from equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations using the time correlations of the heat flux operator in which anharmonicity is explicitly incorporated. The Stillinger-Weber two- and three-body Si potential and the Wooten-Weaire-Winer a-Si model were utilized. The calculations correctly predict an increasing thermal conductivity at low temperatures (below 400 K). The κ(T), for T>400 K, is affected by the thermally generated coordination-defect states. Comparisons to both experiment and previous calculations will be described.

  15. Progress in amorphous silicon PV technology: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W; Branz, H M; Dalal, V L; Hegedus, S S; Schiff, E A

    1995-07-01

    To reach the 15% stabilized efficiency goal for amorphous silicon (a-Si) modules by the year 2005, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has established four research teams. The teams -- with members from industry, universities, and NREL -- have been in operation for 2.5 years now. Consensus has been reached that a triple-junction a-Si structure is needed to reach the efficiency goal. Performance parameter goals for the overall structure and the three component cells have been formulated. All four teams have generated their own development plans. Individual team progress relative to the plans is reported.

  16. Structural properties of amorphous silicon produced by electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, J.; Takeda, S.

    1999-07-01

    The structural properties of the amorphous Si (a-Si), which was created from crystalline silicon by 2 MeV electron irradiation at low temperatures about 25 K, are examined in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The peak positions in the radial distribution function (RDF) of the a-Si correspond well to those of a-Si fabricated by other techniques. The electron-irradiation-induced a-Si returns to crystalline Si after annealing at 550 C.

  17. Ultralight amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic modules for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Chen, Englade; Fulton, C.; Myatt, A.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Ultralight and ultrathin, flexible, rollup monolithic PV modules have been developed consisting of multijunction, amorphous silicon alloys for either terrestrial or aerospace applications. The rate of progress in increasing conversion efficiency of stable multijunction and multigap PV cells indicates that arrays of these modules can be available for NASA's high power systems in the 1990's. Because of the extremely light module weight and the highly automated process of manufacture, the monolithic a-Si alloy arrays are expected to be strongly competitive with other systems for use in NASA's space station or in other large aerospace applications.

  18. Thermopower and conductivity activation energies in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Dyalsingh, H.M.; Kakalios, J.

    1996-12-31

    The long range fluctuation model has been widely used to account for the difference in activation energies seen experimentally in dark conductivity and thermopower measurements in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The authors report on a test of this model using measurements of the conductivity and thermoelectric effects carried out in both open and short circuit configurations. While the thermopower activation energy is less than that of the dark conductivity, the short circuit Seebeck conductivity is found to be nearly identical to the dark conductivity in both activation energy and magnitude, consistent with the long range fluctuation model.

  19. Comment on ``Electron drift mobility in doped amorphous silicon''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overhof, H.; Silver, M.

    1989-05-01

    Experimental drift-mobility data obtained by different methods in doped amorphous silicon are compared. It is shown that the presence of a long-range random potential will lead to a modification of the drift mobility in one experiment while the corresponding values in other experiments are virtually unaffected. It is shown that this effect accounts for the apparent discrepancy between the results of these experiments rather than the shift of the mobility edge upon doping which was recently proposed by Street, Kakalios, and Hack [Phys. Rev. B 38, 5603 (1988)] in order to understand their data.

  20. Realistic modeling of the electronic properties of doped amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, M.; Street, R.A.

    1988-09-19

    In this letter we describe a fundamental approach to calculating the electronic properties of doped amorphous silicon which takes into account the thermal history of the material. Above the equilibrium temperature, the material is in a thermodynamically stable state, and this is derived by minimizing the free energy using a simple density of states model. The calculations are based on the defect compensation model of doping, introducing distributions of formation energies for neutral dangling bonds and fourfold dopant atoms while preserving charge neutrality. Our results are in good agreement with experimental data providing a realistic model for use in device simulation programs.

  1. Evaluation of flat panel detector cone beam CT breast imaging with different sizes of breast phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Lu, Xianghua; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Yong; Schiffhauer, Linda; Cullinan, Jeanne

    2005-04-01

    The sensitivity to detect small breast cancers and the specificity of conventional mammography (CM) remain limited owing to an overlap in the appearances of lesions and surrounding structure. We propose to address the limitations accompanying CM using flat panel detector (FPD)-based cone beam CT breast imaging (CBCTBI). The purpose of the study is to determine optimal x-ray operation ranges for different sizes of normal breasts and corresponding glandular dose levels. The current CBCT prototype consists of a modified GE HighSpeed Advantage CT gantry, an x-ray tube, a Varian PaxScan 4030CB FPD, a CT table and a PC. Two uncompressed breast phantoms, with the diameters of 10.8 and 13.8 cm, consist of three inserts: a layer of silicone jell simulating a background structure, a lucite plate on which five simulated carcinomas are mounted, and a plate on which six calcifications are attached. With a single scan, 300 projections were acquired for all phantom scans. The optimal x-ray techniques for different phantom sizes were determined. The total mean glandular doses for different size phantoms were measured using a CT pencil ionization chamber. With the optimal x-ray techniques that result in the maximal dose efficiency for the different tissue thickness, the image quality with two different phantoms was evaluated. The results demonstrate that the CBCTBI can detect a few millimeter-size simulated carcinoma and ~ 0.2 mm calcification with clinically acceptable mean glandular doses for different size breasts.

  2. Feasibility of Flat Panel Detector CT in Perfusion Assessment of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations: Initial Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M; Okell, T W; Gloor, M; Chappell, M A; Jezzard, P; Bieri, O; Byrne, J V

    2017-02-16

    The different results from flat panel detector CT in various pathologies have provoked some discussion. Our aim was to assess the role of flat panel detector CT in brain arteriovenous malformations, which has not yet been assessed. Five patients with brain arteriovenous malformations were studied with flat panel detector CT, DSC-MR imaging, and vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling. In glomerular brain arteriovenous malformations, perfusion was highest next to the brain arteriovenous malformation with decreasing values with increasing distance from the lesion. An inverse tendency was observed in the proliferative brain arteriovenous malformation. Flat panel detector CT, originally thought to measure blood volume, correlated more closely with arterial spin-labeling-CBF and DSC-CBF than with DSC-CBV. We conclude that flat panel detector CT perfusion depends on the time point chosen for data collection, which is triggered too early in these patients (ie, when contrast agent appears in the superior sagittal sinus after rapid shunting through the brain arteriovenous malformation). This finding, in combination with high data variability, makes flat panel detector CT inappropriate for perfusion assessment in brain arteriovenous malformations.

  3. Determining the Onset of Amorphization of Crystalline Silicon due to Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, C. Shane; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2009-03-01

    Atomistic simulations were performed to study a hypervelocity impactor striking a silicon/silicon nitride interface with varying silicon substrate thicknesses. Visualization indicates that the crystalline silicon amorphizes upon impact. The objective of the present study is to determine where the boundary between amorphous and crystalline silicon occurrs. In the analysis, the silicon substrate is separated into sixty layers and for each layer the average z displacement is determined. Our results show that the boundary between amorphous and crystalline silicon occurs between layers 20 and 22 for an impactor traveling at 5 km/s. This corresponds to a depth of approximately 32 Angstroms into the silicon. More detailed analyses reveals that the z displacement is noticeably larger for the layers that do not have a silicon atom bonded beneath them compared to the ones that do.

  4. Characterization of bias induced metastability of amorphous silicon thin film transistor based passive pixel sensor switch and its impact on biomedical x-ray imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Afrin; Safavian, N.; Izadi, M. H.; Karim, K. S.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2009-02-01

    Active Matrix Flat Panel Imagers (AMFPIs) based on amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor (TFT) array is the most promising technology for large area biomedical x-ray imaging. a-Si:H TFT exhibits a metastable shift in its characteristics when subject to prolonged gate bias that results in a change in its threshold voltage (VΤ) and a corresponding change in ON resistance (RON). If not properly accounted for, the VΤ shift can be a major constraint in imaging applications as it contributes to the fixed pattern noise in the imager. In this work, we investigated the timedependent shift in VΤ (ΔVΤ) of a-Si:H TFTs stressed with the same bipolar pulsed bias used for static (chest radiography, mammography, and static protein crystallography) and real time imaging (low dose fluoroscopy at 15, 30 and 60 frames/second, and dynamic protein crystallography). We used the well known power law model of time dependent ΔVT to estimate the change in RON over time. Our calculation showed that RON can be decreased ~ 0.03 % per frame and ~ 5 % over 10,000 hours at 30 frames/second. We verified the theoretical results with measurement data. The implication of TFT metastability on the performance (NPS, and DQE) of biomedical imagers is discussed.

  5. A magnesium/amorphous silicon passivating contact for n-type crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yimao; Samundsett, Chris; Yan, Di; Allen, Thomas; Peng, Jun; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Xinyu; Bullock, James; Cuevas, Andres

    2016-09-01

    Among the metals, magnesium has one of the lowest work functions, with a value of 3.7 eV. This makes it very suitable to form an electron-conductive cathode contact for silicon solar cells. We present here the experimental demonstration of an amorphous silicon/magnesium/aluminium (a-Si:H/Mg/Al) passivating contact for silicon solar cells. The conduction properties of a thermally evaporated Mg/Al contact structure on n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) are investigated, achieving a low resistivity Ohmic contact to moderately doped n-type c-Si (˜5 × 1015 cm-3) of ˜0.31 Ω cm2 and ˜0.22 Ω cm2 for samples with and without an amorphous silicon passivating interlayer, respectively. Application of the passivating cathode to the whole rear surface of n-type front junction c-Si solar cells leads to a power conversion efficiency of 19% in a proof-of-concept device. The low thermal budget of the cathode formation, its dopant-less nature, and the simplicity of the device structure enabled by the Mg/Al contact open up possibilities in designing and fabricating low-cost silicon solar cells.

  6. Electrical characteristics of amorphous molybdenum-nickel contacts to silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kung, K. T.-Y.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Suni, I.

    1984-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of sputtered, amorphous Mo-Ni contacts have been measured on both p- and n-type Si, as functions of composition (30, 54, and 58 at. percent Mo). The contact resistivity on both p(+) and n(+) Si is in the 0.00000 ohm sq cm range. The barrier height for as-deposited samples varies between phi-bp = 0.47-0.42 V on p-type Si and between phi-bn = 0.63-0.68 V on n-type Si, as the composition of the amorphous layer goes from Ni-rich to Mo-rich. The sum phi-bp + phi-bn always equals 1.12 V, within experimental error. After thermal treatment at 500 C for 1/2 h, the contact resistivity changes by a factor of two or less, while the barrier height changes by at most approximately 0.05 V. In light of these results, the amorphous Mo-Ni film makes good ohmic contacts to silicon.

  7. Sputtered pin amorphous silicon semi-conductor device and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Friedman, Robert A.

    1983-11-22

    A high efficiency amorphous silicon PIN semi-conductor device is constructed by the sequential sputtering of N, I and P layers of amorphous silicon and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode. A method of construction produces a PIN device, exhibiting enhanced physical integrity and facilitates ease of construction in a singular vacuum system and vacuum pump down procedure.

  8. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors.

  9. Electron-beam-induced information storage in hydrogenated amorphous silicon device

    DOEpatents

    Yacobi, Ben G.

    1986-01-01

    A method for recording and storing information in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, comprising: depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate to form a charge-collection device; and generating defects in the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, wherein the defects act as recombination centers that reduce the lifetime of carriers, thereby reducing charge-collection efficiency; and thus in the charge-collection mode of scanning probe instruments, regions of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device that contain the defects appear darker in comparison to regions of the device that do not contain the defects, leading to a contrast formation for pattern recognition and information storage, in the device, which darkened areas can be restored to their original charge-collection efficiency by heating the hydrogenated amorphous silicon to a temperature of about 100.degree. C. to 250.degree. C. for a sufficient period of time to provide for such restoration.

  10. Highly featured amorphous silicon nanorod arrays for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani-Amiri, Samaneh; Safiabadi Tali, Seied Ali; Azimi, Soheil; Sanaee, Zeinab; Mohajerzadeh, Shamsoddin

    2014-11-10

    High aspect-ratio vertical structures of amorphous silicon have been realized using hydrogen-assisted low-density plasma reactive ion etching. Amorphous silicon layers with the thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm were deposited using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Standard photolithography and nanosphere colloidal lithography were employed to realize ultra-small features of the amorphous silicon. The performance of the patterned amorphous silicon structures as a lithium-ion battery electrode was investigated using galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The patterned structures showed a superior Li-ion battery performance compared to planar amorphous silicon. Such structures are suitable for high current Li-ion battery applications such as electric vehicles.

  11. NMR structural studies of PECVD amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Thomas Sidley, Jr.

    The properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) amorphous semiconductor films vary depending upon preparation conditions and doping. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films (a-Si:H) have some properties that make these films desirable for use in solar cells and photoreceptor devices. Maximizing electronic and structural properties of such films is key to their success. Nuclear magnetic resonance, and in particular deuterium magnetic resonance (DMR) for a-Si:H,D films, is a useful means to study the morphology of such samples. The location and motions of hydrogen and the chemically equivalent deuterium within an amorphous semiconductor film can be observed with NMR. The information from the NMR studies can be correlated with electronic properties studies to determine whether a given sample would make a successful photovoltaic device. This thesis focuses on three aspects of study: comparison of two samples that differ in the bias applied to the substrate upon which the amorphous films were grown; derivation of relaxation parameters for covalently bonded deuterium; development of a new pulse sequence "incremental spin echo double resonance (SEDOR)" to study the number of unlike spins that contribute to the local field of a given nuclei. Four significant conclusions can be drawn. First, the electronic quality as measured by the photoresponse product etamutau correlates with the broad Gaussian DMR spectral feature which arises from molecular hydrogen in sites that restrict motion. Second, the relaxation of nuclear magnetization under extreme inhomogeneous broadening can be modeled very well as the relaxation without spin diffusion to faster relaxing species within a sample. Third, incremental SEDOR has either a quantum mechanical or classical behavior depending upon the length of the pulse spacing in comparison to the spin-spin relaxation time. Fourth, the local field at the hydrogen of an HD pair within an a-Si:H,D sample is determined on average by

  12. Layered amorphous silicon as negative electrodes in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Leyi; Dvorak, D. J.; Obrovac, M. N.

    2016-11-01

    Chemical delithiation is used to prepare bulk quantities of amorphous silicon powder from lithium-silicon compounds. The amorphous silicon materials formed are air and water stable and are found to have layered structures. When cycled in Li-ion half cells, coatings containing layered amorphous silicon are found to have significantly lower volume expansion during lithiation and improved cycling characteristics compared to that of bulk crystalline Si. We suggest chemical delithiation as a convenient method to synthesize bulk quantities of Si powders containing self-organized void spaces that can accommodate volume expansion during lithiation.

  13. The design and imaging characteristics of dynamic, solid-state, flat-panel x-ray image detectors for digital fluoroscopy and fluorography.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Davies, A G; Sivananthan, M U

    2008-10-01

    Dynamic, flat-panel, solid-state, x-ray image detectors for use in digital fluoroscopy and fluorography emerged at the turn of the millennium. This new generation of dynamic detectors utilize a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material superimposed upon an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Dynamic solid-state detectors come in two basic designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor based). This review explains the underlying principles and enabling technologies associated with these detector designs, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing their performance against the long established x-ray image intensifier television (TV) system. Solid-state detectors afford a number of physical imaging benefits compared with the latter. These include zero geometrical distortion and vignetting, immunity from blooming at exposure highlights and negligible contrast loss (due to internal scatter). They also exhibit a wider dynamic range and maintain higher spatial resolution when imaging over larger fields of view. The detective quantum efficiency of indirect-conversion, dynamic, solid-state detectors is superior to that of both x-ray image intensifier TV systems and direct-conversion detectors. Dynamic solid-state detectors are playing a burgeoning role in fluoroscopy-guided diagnosis and intervention, leading to the displacement of x-ray image intensifier TV-based systems. Future trends in dynamic, solid-state, digital fluoroscopy detectors are also briefly considered. These include the growth in associated three-dimensional (3D) visualization techniques and potential improvements in dynamic detector design.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Luminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon (ap-Si) Nanoparticles via unconventional Stain Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchalala, M. R.; El-Demellawi, J. K.; Mughal, A. J.; Chaieb, S.

    2016-10-01

    Starting from crystalline silicon we synthesised bright suspensions of amorphous porous silicon nanoparticles through unconventional stain etching. Upon excitation with UV light, this novel nanostructured material gives rise to an intense red photoluminescence (PL) which resembles that of some silicon nanostructures. We studied the properties of the prepared nanoparticles using a number of cutting-edge characterization techniques such as TEM, SEM and EDX. The complete crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition, confirmed by the morphological studies, seems fortuitous.

  15. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: design and operation of the avalanche photoconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, Brian; Hunt, D. C.; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Rowlands, J. A.

    2005-04-01

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP. The final electronic image can be read out using either an array of thin film transistors (TFT) or field emitters (FE). The advantage of the proposed detector is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. This paper investigates the important design considerations for HARP such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness dSe and the applied electric field ESe. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the ESe dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 μm HARP layer. The results were applied to a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and non-avalanche modes as a function of ESe: (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; and (4) gain non-uniformity resulting from thickness non-uniformity. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 μm can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy.

  16. Approximate ab initio calculations of electronic structure of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, M.; Drabold, D. A.; Mousseau, N.

    2000-12-01

    We report on ab initio calculations of electronic states of two large and realistic models of amorphous silicon generated using a modified version of the Wooten-Winer-Weaire algorithm and relaxed, in both cases, with a Keating and a modified Stillinger-Weber potentials. The models have no coordination defects and a very narrow bond-angle distribution. We compute the electronic density-of-states and pay particular attention to the nature of the band-tail states around the electronic gap. All models show a large and perfectly clean optical gap and realistic Urbach tails. Based on these results and the extended quasi-one-dimensional stringlike structures observed for certain eigenvalues in the band tails, we postulate that the generation of model a-Si without localized states might be achievable under certain circumstances.

  17. Model investigation of the Raman spectra of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, M.; Zotov, N.

    1997-02-01

    A model for calculating the first-order Raman spectra of amorphous silicon (a-Si) without adjustable parameters is proposed. Calculations on the original 216-atom model of a-Si, generated by the algorithm of Wooten, Winer, and Weaire (WWW) are in very good agreement with experimental spectra and give further indication that the WWW cluster is a realistic model of moderately disordered a-Si. The TA-TO assignment of the low and high frequency bands is supported by direct numerical calculations of the phase quotient and the stretching character of the vibrational modes. The calculated participation ratios and correlation lengths of the vibrational modes indicate that the high-frequency TO-like modes are strongly localized on defects. The relative intensities of the TA-, LA-, and LO-like bands depend on the intermediate-range order, while that of the TO-like band mainly on the short-range order.

  18. Radiation Resistance Studies of Amorphous Silicon Alloy Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys was investigated. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were insensitive to proton fluences below 1E12 sq cm. The parameters of the irradiated cells were restored with annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters for fluences below lE14 sq cm require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed in dark I-V measurements. The current mechanisms were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  19. Mobility-lifetime products in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, R.S. ); Balberg, I. )

    1991-02-04

    The most important parameters characterizing the photoelectronic quality of a semiconductor are its charge-carrier mobility lifetime, {mu}{tau}, products. The two common experimental methods used to determine these parameters in hydrogenated amorphous silicon, {ital a}-Si:H, are the steady-state photoconductivity measurement and the life-of-flight charge-collection measurement. The two methods yield quite different results. We show that the difference can be resolved by an understanding of the physics involved in each of the measurements. We show that the steady-state {mu}{tau} is expected to be up to three orders of magnitude larger than the time-of-flight {mu}{tau} in undoped {ital a}-Si:H. This prediction is in excellent agreement with the corresponding experimental results.

  20. High Performance Molybdenum Disulfide Amorphous Silicon Heterojunction Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili-Rad, Mohammad R.; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2013-01-01

    One important use of layered semiconductors such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) could be in making novel heterojunction devices leading to functionalities unachievable using conventional semiconductors. Here we demonstrate a metal-semiconductor-metal heterojunction photodetector, made of MoS2 and amorphous silicon (a-Si), with rise and fall times of about 0.3 ms. The transient response does not show persistent (residual) photoconductivity, unlike conventional a-Si devices where it may last 3–5 ms, thus making this heterojunction roughly 10X faster. A photoresponsivity of 210 mA/W is measured at green light, the wavelength used in commercial imaging systems, which is 2−4X larger than that of a-Si and best reported MoS2 devices. The device could find applications in large area electronics, such as biomedical imaging, where a fast response is critical. PMID:23907598

  1. Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S. )

    1992-09-01

    This report describes research on semiconductor and non-semiconductor materials to enhance the performance of multi-band-gap, multijunction panel with an area greater than 900 cm[sup 2] by 1992. Double-junction and triple-junction cells are mode on a Ag/ZnO back reflector deposited on stainless steel substrates. An a-SiGe alloy is used for the i-layer in the bottom and the middle cells; the top cell uses an amorphous silicon alloy. After the evaporation of an antireflection coating, silver grids and bus bars are put on the top surface and the panel is encapsulated in an ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA)/Tefzel structure to make a 1-ft[sup 2] monolithic module.

  2. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic device trimming by UV-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lipka, Timo; Kiepsch, Melanie; Trieu, Hoc Khiem; Müller, Jörg

    2014-05-19

    A method to compensate for fabrication tolerances and to fine-tune individual photonic circuit components is inevitable for wafer-scale photonic systems even with most-advanced CMOS-fabrication tools. We report a cost-effective and highly accurate method for the permanent trimming of hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic devices by UV-irradiation. Microring resonators and Mach-Zehnder-interferometers were utilized as photonic test devices. The MZIs were tuned forth and back over their complete free spectral range of 5.5 nm by locally trimming the two MZI-arms. The trimming range exceeds 8 nm for compact ring resonators with trimming accuracies of 20 pm. Trimming speeds of ≥ 10 GHz/s were achieved. The components did not show any substantial device degradation.

  3. Photoluminescence in erbium doped amorphous silicon oxycarbide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, Spyros; Huang, Mengbing; Efstathiadis, Harry; Eisenbraun, Eric; Kaloyeros, Alain E.; Nyein, Ei Ei; Hommerich, Uwe

    2005-08-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) in Er-doped amorphous silicon oxycarbide (a-SiCxOy:Er) thin films, synthesized via thermal chemical vapor deposition, was investigated for carbon and oxygen concentrations in the range of 0-1.63. Intense room-temperature PL was observed at 1540 nm, with the PL intensity being dependent on the carbon and oxygen content. The strongest PL intensity was detected for a-SiC0.53O0.99:Er when pumped at 496.5 nm, with ˜20 times intensity enhancement as compared to a-SiO2:Er. Broadband excitation in the visible was observed for a-SiC0.53O0.99:Er. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses suggest that the formation of Si-C-O networks plays an important role in enhancing the Er optical activity in a-SiCxOy:Er films.

  4. Light-induced metastability in pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Queen, D. R.; Liu, X.; Karel, J.; Wang, Q.; Crandall, R. S.; Metcalf, T. H.; Hellman, F.

    2015-10-01

    Light soaking is found to increase the specific heat C and internal friction Q-1 of pure (a-Si) and hydrogenated (a-Si:H) amorphous silicon. At the lowest temperatures, the increases in C and Q-1 are consistent with an increased density of two-level systems (TLS). The light-induced increase in C persists to room temperature. Neither the sound velocity nor shear modulus change with light soaking indicating that the Debye specific heat is unchanged which suggests that light soaking creates localized vibrational modes in addition to TLS. The increase can be reversibly added and removed by light soaking and annealing, respectively, suggesting that it is related to the Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE), even in a-Si without H, and involves a reversible nanoscale structural rearrangement that is facilitated by, but does not require, H to occur.

  5. Monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmer, D.P. )

    1992-03-01

    This report examines manufacturing monolithic amorphous silicon modules on a continuous polymer substrate. Module production costs can be reduced by increasing module performance, expanding production, and improving and modifying production processes. Material costs can be reduced by developing processes that use a 1-mil polyimide substrate and multilayers of low-cost material for the front encapsulant. Research to speed up a-Si and ZnO deposition rates is needed to improve throughputs. To keep throughput rates compatible with depositions, multibeam fiber optic delivery systems for laser scribing can be used. However, mechanical scribing systems promise even higher throughputs. Tandem cells and production experience can increase device efficiency and stability. Two alternative manufacturing processes are described: (1) wet etching and sheet handling and (2) wet etching and roll-to-roll fabrication.

  6. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon (a-Si:H) Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Justin T.; Hueso, Jose L.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2010-12-14

    Colloidal particles of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) were synthesized by decomposition of trisilane (Si{sub 3}H{sub 8}) in supercritical n-hexane (sc-hexane) at temperatures ranging from 380 to 550 °C. The reaction temperature, pressure and Si{sub 3}H{sub 8} concentration have a significant influence on the average particle size, Si bond order and hydrogen content. The particle diameter could be varied from 170 nm to 1.7 μm, with hydrogen loadings between 10% and 58%. Raman spectroscopy of the particles revealed significant differences in Si bond order that correlated with hydrogen content, with the lowest reaction temperatures yielding particles with the least structural order and most associated hydrogen. Particles synthesized at temperatures higher than 420 °C had sufficient bond order to allow crystallization under the Raman laser probe.

  7. C-arm CT with XRIIs and digital flat panels: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrig, Rebecca; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Starman, Jared D.; Strobel, Norbert K.

    2004-10-01

    C-arm CT first emerged as a useful high-contrast imaging modality in the late 1990s, using an XRII as the large area x-ray detector. To date, the C-arm approach to intra-procedural 3D imaging has primarily been used for high-contrast imaging tasks. The emerging goal for these systems is to extend the imaging range into the area of soft-tissue, and it is thought that digital flat-panel detectors may help. Flat panels replace the analog image intensifier, the camera optics, the pickup tube and the analog-to-digital converter with an all-digital detector. Flat panel detectors have a linear response, do not require distortion correction, do not suffer from veiling glare or blooming, and have higher dynamic range that current XRIIs. On the other hand, XRIIs have greater flexibility in FOV, and could support higher frame rates at high resolution, thereby reducing the effects of view aliasing. We have experience with a typical XRII-based C-arm imaging system and a new high-end C-arm equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Initial investigations show that when projection pixel size, acquisition geometry and focal spot size are matched, the flat-panel-based system produces reconstructions with improved MTF, primarily due to the additional interpolation step required for XRII warp correction. Investigations of artifact levels and comparison with in vivo CT images are presented.

  8. Flat-panel-detector-based volume tomographic angiography imaging: detector evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Ruola; Zhang, Dinghua; Chen, Biao; Conover, David L.; Yu, Rongfeng

    1999-09-01

    Recent development of large area flat panel solid state detector arrays indicates that flat panel image sensors have some common potential advantages: compactness, absence of geometric distortion and veiling glare with the benefits of high resolution, high DQE, high frame rate and high dynamic range, small image lag (less than 1%) and excellent linearity (approximately 1%). The advantages of the new flat-panel detector make it a promising candidate for cone beam volume tomographic angiography imaging. The purpose of this study is to characterize a Selenium thin film transistor (STFT) flat panel detector-based imaging system for cone beam volume tomographic angiography imaging applications. A prototype STFT detector-based cone beam volume tomographic angiography imaging system has been designed and constructed based on the modification of a GE 8800 CT scanner. This system is evaluated using a vascular phantom with different x-ray spectra, different sizes of vessels and different iodine concentration levels. The results indicate that with the currently available STFT flat panel detector, 90 kVp is the optimal kVp to achieve the highest signal-to-noise ratio for volume tomographic angiography imaging and the low contrast resolution of the system is 4 mg/ml iodine for a 2 mm vessel.

  9. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulraheem, Yaser; Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef

    2014-05-01

    An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties -including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc) bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause of the observed

  10. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulraheem, Yaser; Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef

    2014-05-15

    An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc) bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause of the observed

  11. Chest radiography with a large-area detector based on cesium-iodide/amorphous-silicon technology: image quality and dose requirement in comparison with an asymmetric screen-film system.

    PubMed

    Strotzer, M; Völk, M; Reiser, M; Lenhart, M; Manke, C; Gmeinwieser, J; Holzknecht, N; Link, J; Feuerbach, S

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a large-area, flat-panel X-ray detector, which uses cesium-iodide (CsI) and amorphous silicon (a-Si). Conventional images were compared with digital images acquired with equal dose (2.5 microGy) and with 50% dose reduction. Fifteen consecutive patients were studied prospectively using an asymmetric screen-film system (detector dose, 2.5 microGy). Digital images were taken from the same patients in a posteroanterior view with detector doses of 2.5 and 1.25 microGy, respectively. The CsI/a-Si active-matrix imager had a panel-size of 43 x 43 cm, a matrix of 3 x 3k, and a pixel-pitch of 143 microm. Hard copies were presented in a random order to eight independent observers, who rated image quality according to six subjective quality criteria. Statistical significance of differences was evaluated with Student's t test for paired samples (confidence level, 95%). Digital radiographs with 2.5 and 1.25 microGy were superior to conventional images regarding all quality criteria. Statistically significant differences were observed for five of six criteria at a detector dose of 2.5 microGy and for only one quality feature at 1.25 microGy. Flat-panel digital imagers based on CsI/a-Si technique have the potential to replace conventional systems and might allow a reduction of radiation dose by 50% without loss of image quality.

  12. Laser induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summonte, C.; Rizzoli, R.; Servidori, M.; Milita, S.; Nicoletti, S.; Bianconi, M.; Desalvo, A.; Iencinella, D.

    2004-10-01

    Laser induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy (a-Si1-xCx:H) films has been investigated by means of synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The a-Si1-xCx:H films were deposited on (100) silicon wafers by very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 100MHz in hydrogen diluted silane-methane gas mixtures. The substrate was kept at 250°C or 350°C and the stoichiometry was changed from x =0.20 to 0.63. The structural characterization of the as-grown films has been carried out by Rutherford backscattering (hydrogen concentration) and infrared spectroscopy (film ordering). The films were irradiated by a KrF excimer laser (248nm ) with varying energy density and number of pulses. After irradiation, the formation of SiC crystallites has been revealed by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Besides SiC nanocrystals, the formation of crystalline Si and graphite is observed for under- (x <0.50) and over-stoichiometric (x>0.50) samples, respectively. The essential role played by hydrogen concentration and hydrogen bonding configuration in determining the melting threshold and the consequent SiC grain formation is highlighted.

  13. Time evolution of charged defect states in tritiated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costea, Stefan; Kherani, Nazir P.; Zukotynski, Stefan

    2007-11-01

    Tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) thin films were deposited on crystalline silicon and high resistivity glass substrates. The time evolution of the density of defect states in these films was studied using the constant photocurrent method (CPM) and isothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (ICTS). The density of defect states was found to change with time and to recover upon thermal annealing. The ICTS results revealed that, following thermal annealing, in a sample with approximately 1at.% tritium, the concentration of positively charged dangling bonds (D+) decreased by more than an order of magnitude over a period of 300h. The CPM results showed that, over the same period of time, the concentration of negatively charged dangling bonds (D-) increased by over two orders of magnitude. The D+ and D- concentrations followed exponential functions of time, but the rate was different than that of tritium decay. At the same time, the Urbach energy was found to decrease with time to about 1/2 of its postanneal value. The change in the D+ and D- concentrations is primarily the result of capture of the beta particle generated electrons in dangling bonds and weak bonds, with steady state achieved through the development of a balance between carrier generation and carrier capture processes. The role of excess carriers was confirmed by CPM experiments under electrical bias.

  14. Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.; Truher, Joel B.; Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900.degree. C.), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180.degree. C. for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180.degree. C.) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide.

  15. Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Truher, J.B.; Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1994-09-13

    A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate is disclosed. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900 C), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180 C for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180 C) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide. 5 figs.

  16. Flat-panel see-through three-dimensional display based on integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Yuta

    2015-04-15

    This study proposes a technique to construct a flat-panel see-through three-dimensional (3D) display based on integral imaging. This display consists of multiple lens arrays, a transparent flat-panel display, and a light-blocking wall (LBW). Rays behind the display are reconstructed in front of it by combination of the lens arrays and the LBW to provide the see-through function. The combination of one of the lens arrays and the transparent flat-panel display produces full-parallax 3D images, which are superimposed on background images. The experimental system is constructed to verify the proposed technique. The see-through and superposition capabilities of the experimental system are demonstrated.

  17. Interplay of amorphous silicon disorder and hydrogen content with interface defects in amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, T. F.; Beushausen, H. N.; Leendertz, C.; Dobrich, A.; Rech, B.; Korte, L.

    2010-06-01

    We analyze the dependence of the interface defect density Dit in amorphous/crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterojunctions on the microscopic properties of ultrathin (10 nm) undoped a-Si:H passivation layers. It is shown that the hydrogen bonding and network disorder, probed by infrared- and photoelectron spectroscopy, govern the initial Dit and its behavior upon a short thermal treatment at 200 °C. While the initial Dit is determined by the local and nonequilibrated interface structure, the annealed Dit is defined by the bulk a-Si:H network strain. Thus it appears that the equilibrated a-Si:H/c-Si interface does not possess unique electronic properties but is governed by the a-Si:H bulk defects.

  18. Test of an amorphous silicon detector in medical proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martišíková, M.; Hesse, B. M.; Nairz, O.; Jäkel, O.

    2011-05-01

    Ion beam radiation therapy for cancer treatment allows for improved dose confinement to the target in comparison with the standard radiation therapy using high energy photons. Dose delivery to the patient using focused ion beam scanning over the target volume is going to be increasingly used in the upcoming years. The high precision of the dose delivery achieved in this way has to be met by practical methods for beam monitoring with sufficient spatial resolution in two dimensions. Flat panel detectors, used for photon portal imaging at the newest medical linear accelerators, are an interesting candidate for this purpose. Initial detector tests presented here were performed using proton beams with the highest available energy. The investigations include measurements of beam profiles at different beam intensities and for different beam width, as well as the signal linearity. Radiation damage was also investigated. The obtained results show that the detector is a promising candidate to be used in the therapeutic proton beams.

  19. Nanopattern-guided growth of single-crystal silicon on amorphous substrates and high-performance sub-100 nm thin-film transistors for three-dimensional integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian

    This thesis explores how nanopatterns can be used to control the growth of single-crystal silicon on amorphous substrates at low temperature, with potential applications on flat panel liquid-crystal display and 3-dimensional (3D) integrated circuits. I first present excimer laser annealing of amorphous silicon (a-Si) nanostructures on thermally oxidized silicon wafer for controlled formation of single-crystal silicon islands. Preferential nucleation at pattern center is observed due to substrate enhanced edge heating. Single-grain silicon is obtained in a 50 nm x 100 nm rectangular pattern by super lateral growth (SLG). Narrow lines (such as 20-nm-wide) can serve as artificial heterogeneous nucleation sites during crystallization of large patterns, which could lead to the formation of single-crystal silicon islands in a controlled fashion. In addition to eximer laser annealing, NanoPAtterning and nickel-induced lateral C&barbelow;rystallization (NanoPAC) of a-Si lines is presented. Single-crystal silicon is achieved by NanoPAC. The line width of a-Si affects the grain structure of crystallized silicon lines significantly. Statistics show that single-crystal silicon is formed for all lines with width between 50 nm to 200 nm. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nickel-induced lateral crystallization (Ni-ILC) of a-Si inside a pattern is revealed; lithography-constrained single seeding (LISS) is proposed to explain the single-crystal formation. Intragrain line and two-dimensional defects are also studied. To test the electrical properties of NanoPAC silicon films, sub-100 nm thin-film transistors (TFTs) are fabricated using Patten-controlled crystallization of Ṯhin a-Si channel layer and H&barbelow;igh temperature (850°C) annealing, coined PaTH process. PaTH TFTs show excellent device performance over traditional solid phase crystallized (SPC) TFTs in terms of threshold voltage, threshold voltage roll-off, leakage current, subthreshold swing, on

  20. Specific energy yield comparison between crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon based PV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferenczi, Toby; Stern, Omar; Hartung, Marianne; Mueggenburg, Eike; Lynass, Mark; Bernal, Eva; Mayer, Oliver; Zettl, Marcus

    2009-08-01

    As emerging thin-film PV technologies continue to penetrate the market and the number of utility scale installations substantially increase, detailed understanding of the performance of the various PV technologies becomes more important. An accurate database for each technology is essential for precise project planning, energy yield prediction and project financing. However recent publications showed that it is very difficult to get accurate and reliable performance data of theses technologies. This paper evaluates previously reported claims the amorphous silicon based PV modules have a higher annual energy yield compared to crystalline silicon modules relative to their rated performance. In order to acquire a detailed understanding of this effect, outdoor module tests were performed at GE Global Research Center in Munich. In this study we examine closely two of the five reported factors that contribute to enhanced energy yield of amorphous silicon modules. We find evidence to support each of these factors and evaluate their relative significance. We discuss aspects for improvement in how PV modules are sold and identify areas for further study further study.

  1. Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Wronski, Christopher R.

    1979-01-01

    A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

  2. Energy level of the nitrogen dangling bond in amorphous silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.L. ); Kanicki, J. ); Robertson, J. ); Lenahan, P.M. )

    1991-09-30

    The composition dependence and room-temperature metastability of the paramagnetic nitrogen dangling-bond center is amorphous silicon nitride suggest that its energy level lies close to the N {ital p}{pi} states, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  3. RF sputtering for controlling dihydride and monohydride bond densities in amorphous silicon hydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffery, F.R.; Shanks, H.R.

    1980-08-26

    A process is described for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicone produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous solicone hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  4. Analysis of a free-running synchronization artifact correction for MV-imaging with aSi:H flat panels

    SciTech Connect

    Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Sedlmayer, Felix; Deutschmann, Heinz; Huber, Stefan

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Solid state flat panel electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are widely used for megavolt (MV) photon imaging applications in radiotherapy. In addition to their original purpose in patient position verification, they are convenient to use in quality assurance and dosimetry to verify beam geometry and dose deposition or to perform linear accelerator (linac) calibration procedures. However, native image frames from amorphous silicon (aSi:H) detectors show a range of artifacts which have to be eliminated by proper correction algorithms. When a panel is operated in free-running frame acquisition mode, moving vertical stripes (periodic synchronization artifacts) are a disturbing feature in image frames. Especially for applications in volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or motion tracking, the synchronization (sync) artifacts are the limiting factor for potential and accuracy since they become even worse at higher frame rates and at lower dose rates, i.e., linac pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs). Methods: The authors introduced a synchronization correction method which is based on a theoretical model describing the interferences of the panel's readout clocking with the linac's dose pulsing. Depending on the applied PRF, a certain number of dose pulses is captured per frame which is readout columnwise, sequentially. The interference of the PRF with the panel readout is responsible for the period and the different gray value levels of the sync stripes, which can be calculated analytically. Sync artifacts can then be eliminated multiplicatively in precorrected frames without additional information about radiation pulse timing. Results: For the analysis, three aSi:H EPIDs of various types were investigated with 6 and 15 MV photon beams at varying PRFs of 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 pulses per second. Applying the sync correction at panels with gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators improved single frame flood field image quality drastically

  5. Performance Study of an aSi Flat Panel Detector for Fast Neutron Imaging of Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, M.; Mauerhofer, E.; Engels, R.; Kemmerling, G.; Frank, M.; Havenith, A.; Kettler, J.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, T.; Schitthelm, O.

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive waste must be characterized to check its conformance for intermediate storage and final disposal according to national regulations. For the determination of radio-toxic and chemo-toxic contents of radioactive waste packages non-destructive analytical techniques are preferentially used. Fast neutron imaging is a promising technique to assay large and dense items providing, in complementarity to photon imaging, additional information on the presence of structures in radioactive waste packages. Therefore the feasibility of a compact Neutron Imaging System for Radioactive waste Analysis (NISRA) using 14 MeV neutrons is studied in a cooperation framework of Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, RWTH Aachen University and Siemens AG. However due to the low neutron emission of neutron generators in comparison to research reactors the challenging task resides in the development of an imaging detector with a high efficiency, a low sensitivity to gamma radiation and a resolution sufficient for the purpose. The setup is composed of a commercial D-T neutron generator (Genie16GT, Sodern) with a surrounding shielding made of polyethylene, which acts as a collimator and an amorphous silicon flat panel detector (aSi, 40 x 40 cm{sup 2}, XRD-1642, Perkin Elmer). Neutron detection is achieved using a general propose plastic scintillator (EJ-260, Eljen Technology) linked to the detector. The thermal noise of the photodiodes is reduced by employing an entrance window made of aluminium. Optimal gain and integration time for data acquisition are set by measuring the response of the detector to the radiation of a 500 MBq {sup 241}Am-source. Detector performance was studied by recording neutron radiography images of materials with various, but well known, chemical compositions, densities and dimensions (Al, C, Fe, Pb, W, concrete, polyethylene, 5 x 8 x 10 cm{sup 3}). To simulate gamma-ray emitting waste radiographs in presence of a gamma-ray sources ({sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241

  6. Optimization of large amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations of energetic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samela, Juha; Norris, Scott A.; Nordlund, Kai; Aziz, Michael J.

    2011-07-01

    A practical method to create optimized amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations is developed and tested. The method is based on the Wooten, Winer, and Weaire algorithm and combination of small optimized blocks to larger structures. The method makes possible to perform simulations of either very large cluster hypervelocity impacts on amorphous targets or small displacements induced by low energy ion impacts in silicon.

  7. Laser-induced amorphization of silicon during pulsed-laser irradiation of TiN/Ti/polycrystalline silicon/SiO2/silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. F.; Pey, K. L.; Wee, A. T. S.; Thompson, M. O.; Tung, C. H.; See, A.

    2002-11-01

    In this letter, we report on the complex solidification structures formed during laser irradiation of a titanium nitride/titanium/polycrystalline silicon/silicon dioxide/silicon film stack. Due to enhanced optical coupling, the titanium nitride/titanium capping layer increases the melt depth of polycrystalline silicon by more than a factor of 2. It is found that the titanium atoms diffuse through the entire polycrystalline silicon layer during irradiation. Contrary to the expected polycrystalline silicon growth, distinct regions of polycrystalline and amorphous silicon are formed instead. Possible mechanisms for the formation of these microstructures are proposed.

  8. Laser assisted patterning of hydrogenated amorphous silicon for interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vecchi, S.; Desrues, T.; Souche, F.; Muñoz, D.; Lemiti, M.

    2012-10-01

    This work reports on the elaboration of a new industrial process based on laser selective ablation of dielectric layers for Interdigitated Back Contact Silicon Heterojunction (IBC Si-HJ) solar cells fabrication. Choice of the process is discussed and cells are processed to validate its performance. A pulsed green laser (515nm) with 10-20ns pulse duration is used for hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers patterning steps, whereas metallization is made by screen printed. High Open-Circuit Voltage (Voc=699mV) and Fill Factor (FF=78.5%) values are obtained simultaneously on IBC Si-HJ cells, indicating a high surface passivation level and reduced resistive losses. An efficiency of 19% on non textured 26 cm² solar cells has been reached with this new industrial process.

  9. Recrystallization of silicon-on-sapphire structures at various amorphization-ion-beam energies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, P. A. Demakov, K. D.; Shemardov, S. G.; Kuznetsov, Yu. Yu.

    2013-02-15

    Silicon films on sapphire substrates are grown via recrystallization from the silicon-sapphire interface. An amorphous layer is formed using ion implantation with silicon ion energies of 90-150 keV. An X-ray rocking curve is used to estimate the crystalline perfection of the silicon films. After recrystallization, the silicon layer consists of two parts with different crystalline quality. The recrystallized silicon-on-sapphire structures have a highly perfect upper layer (for fabricating microelectronic devices) and a lower layer adjacent to the sapphire substrate containing a large number of defects.

  10. ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgeway, R G; Hegedus, S S; Podraza, N J

    2012-08-31

    Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both CSi and Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

  11. 76 FR 9360 - In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of a... within the United States after importation of certain flat panel digital televisions and components... named the following respondents: LG Electronics, Inc. of South Korea and LG Electronics, Inc....

  12. Laminated Amorphous Silicon Neutron Detector (pre-print)

    SciTech Connect

    Harry McHugh, Howard Branz, Paul Stradins, and Yueqin Xu

    2009-01-29

    An internal R&D project was conducted at the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) of National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), to determine the feasibility of developing a multi-layer boron-10 based thermal neutron detector using the amorphous silicon (AS) technology currently employed in the manufacture of liquid crystal displays. The boron-10 neutron reaction produces an alpha that can be readily detected. A single layer detector, limited to an approximately 2-micron-thick layer of boron, has a theoretical sensitivity of about 3%; hence a thin multi-layer device with high sensitivity can theoretically be manufactured from single layer detectors. Working with National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), an AS PiN diode alpha detector was developed and tested. The PiN diode was deposited on a boron-10 coated substrate. Testing confirmed that the neutron sensitivity was nearly equal to the theoretical value of 3%. However, adhesion problems with the boron-10 coating prevented successful development of a prototype detector. Future efforts will include boron deposition work and development of integrated AS signal processing circuitry.

  13. Hot wire deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, A.H.; Iwaniczko, E.; Nelson, B.P.; Reedy, R.C. Jr.; Crandall, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    This paper details the results of a study in which low H content, high deposition rate hot wire (HW) deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has been incorporated into a substrate solar cell. The authors find that the treatment of the top surface of the HW i layer while it is being cooled from its high deposition temperature is crucial to device performance. They present data concerning these surface treatments, and correlate these treatments with Schottky device performance. The authors also present first generation HW n-i-p solar cell efficiency data, where a glow discharge (GD) {mu}c-Si(p) layer was added to complete the partial devices. No light trapping layer was used to increase the device Jsc. Their preliminary investigations have yielded efficiencies of up to 6.8% for a cell with a 4000 {Angstrom} thick HW i-layer, which degrade less than 10% after a 900 hour light soak. The authors suggest avenues for further improvement of their devices.

  14. Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A.; Chen, E.; Clough, R.; Glatfelter, T.; Guha, S.; Hammond, G.; Hopson, M.; Jackett, N.; Lycette, M.; Noch, J.; Palmer, T.; Pawlikiewicz, A.; Rosenstein, I.; Ross, R.; Wolf, D.; Xu, X.; Yang, J.; Younan, K.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the progress made during Phase 1 of research and development program to obtain high-efficiency amorphous silicon alloy multijunction modules. Using a large-area deposition system, double-and triple-junction cells were made on stainless steel substrates of over 1 ft{sup 2} area with Ag and ZnO predeposited back reflector. Modules of over 1 ft{sup 2} were produced with between 9.2% and 9.9 initial aperture-area efficiencies as measured under a USSC Spire solar simulator. Efficiencies as measured under the NREL Spire solar simulator were found to be typically 15% to 18% lower. The causes for this discrepancy are now being investigated. The modules show about 15% degradation after 600 hours of one-sun illumination at 50{degrees}C. To optimize devices for higher stabilized efficiency, a new method was developed by which the performance of single-junction cells after long-term, one-sun exposure at 50{degrees}C can be predicted by exposing cells to short-term intense light at different temperatures. This method is being used to optimize the component cells of the multijunction structure to obtain the highest light-degraded efficiency.

  15. Characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films obtained from rice husk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, K. C.; Mukherjee, D.; Biswas, A. K.; Acharya, H. N.

    1991-08-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon ( a-Si: H) films were prepared by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of silanes generated by the acid hydrolysis of magnesium silicide (Mg 2Si) obtained from rice husk. The films were deposited at various substrate temperatures ( Ts) ranging from 430 to 520°C. The results show that the films have room temperature (294 K) dark conductivity (σ d) of the order of 10 -8 - 10 -10 (ohm-cm) -1 with single activation energy (Δ Ed) and the photoconductivity (σ ph) decreases with increase of Ts. Optical band gap ( Eopt) lies between 1.60-1.73 eV and hydrogen content ( CH) in the films is at best 8.3 at %. Au/ a-Si: H junction shows that it acts as a rectifier contact with Schottky barrier height ( VB) 0.69 eV. The films are contaminated by traces of impurities like Na, K, Al, Cl and O as revealed by secondary ion mass spectrometric (SIMS) analysis.

  16. Temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Haberl, B.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.

    2014-03-21

    High temperature nanoindentation has been performed on pure ion-implanted amorphous silicon (unrelaxed a-Si) and structurally relaxed a-Si to investigate the temperature dependence of mechanical deformation, including pressure-induced phase transformations. Along with the indentation load-depth curves, ex situ measurements such as Raman micro-spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the residual indents reveal the mode of deformation under the indenter. While unrelaxed a-Si deforms entirely via plastic flow up to 200 °C, a clear transition in the mode of deformation is observed in relaxed a-Si with increasing temperature. Up to 100 °C, pressure-induced phase transformation and the observation of either crystalline (r8/bc8) end phases or pressure-induced a-Si occurs in relaxed a-Si. However, with further increase of temperature, plastic flow rather than phase transformation is the dominant mode of deformation. It is believed that the elevated temperature and pressure together induce bond softening and “defect” formation in structurally relaxed a-Si, leading to the inhibition of phase transformation due to pressure-releasing plastic flow under the indenter.

  17. Deployable aerospace PV array based on amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Walter, Lee; Dobias, David; Flaisher, Harvey

    1989-01-01

    The development of the first commercial, ultralight, flexible, deployable, PV array for aerospace applications is discussed. It is based on thin-film, amorphous silicon alloy, multijunction, solar cells deposited on a thin metal or polymer by a proprietary, roll-to-roll process. The array generates over 200 W at AM0 and is made of 20 giant cells, each 54 cm x 29 cm (1566 sq cm in area). Each cell is protected with bypass diodes. Fully encapsulated array blanket and the deployment mechanism weigh about 800 and 500 g, respectively. These data yield power per area ratio of over 60 W/sq m specific power of over 250 W/kg (4 kg/kW) for the blanket and 154 W/kg (6.5 kg/kW) for the power system. When stowed, the array is rolled up to a diameter of 7 cm and a length of 1.11 m. It is deployed quickly to its full area of 2.92 m x 1.11 m, for instant power. Potential applications include power for lightweight space vehicles, high altitude balloons, remotely piloted and tethered vehicles. These developments signal the dawning of a new age of lightweight, deployable, low-cost space arrays in the range from tens to tens of thousands of watts for near-term applications and the feasibility of multi-100 kW to MW arrays for future needs.

  18. Amorphous silicon cell array powered solar tracking apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    An array of an even number of amorphous silicon solar cells are serially connected between first and second terminals of opposite polarity. The terminals are connected to one input terminal of a DC motor whose other input terminal is connected to the mid-cell of the serial array. Vane elements are adjacent the end cells to selectively shadow one or the other of the end cells when the array is oriented from a desired attitude relative to the sun. The shadowing of one cell of a group of cells on one side of the mid-cell reduces the power of that group substantially so that full power from the group of cells on the other side of the mid-cell drives the motor to reorient the array to the desired attitude. The cell groups each have a full power output at the power rating of the motor. When the array is at the desired attitude the power output of the two groups of cells balances due to their opposite polarity so that the motor remains unpowered.

  19. Effects of relaxation on the energy landscape of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallel, Houssem; Mousseau, Normand; Schiettekatte, Francois

    2008-03-01

    Amorphous silicon is used in many devices around us, included as a thin-film transistor in most flat screens, it also serves as the reference for the study of disordered network systems. Recently, differential scanning calorimetry and nanocalorimetry measurements (DSC) ^1 have shown that the heat released as the temperature of the sample is raised following implantation, is temperature independent. To understand this behaviour, we characterize the energy landscape of model a-Si. Using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) with the modified Stillinger-Weber potential, we generate models at four levels of relaxation and identify the relaxation mechanisms by analysing 100 000 events for each model. We find that while the distribution of the activation barriers shifts to higher energy as the system is relaxed, the distribution of the relaxation energies is almost unchanged. The relation between these two phenomena is consistent with the DSC measurements. This work is supported, in part, by NSERC, FQRNT and the CRC Foundation. HK is grateful for a scholarship from the Tunisian Ministry of Higher Education, Scientific Research and Technology. ^1 R. Karmouch et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 075304 (2007)

  20. Power change in amorphous silicon technology by low temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Ankit; Rennhofer, Marcus; Dangel, Angelika; Duman, Bogdan; Schlosser, Victor

    2015-07-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is one of the best established thin-film solar-cell technologies. Despite its long history of research, it still has many critical issues because of its defect rich material and its susceptibility to degrade under light also called as Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE). This leads to an increase in the defect density of a-Si, but as a metastable effect it can be completely healed at temperatures above 170 °C. Our study is focused on investigating the behavior of annealing of different a-Si modules under low temperature conditions below 80 °C indicated by successive change of module power. These conditions reflect the environmental temperature impact of the modules in the field, or integrated in buildings as well. The power changes were followed by STC power rating and investigation of module-power evolution under low irradiance conditions at 50 W/m2. Our samples were recovered close to their initial state of power, reaching as high as 99% from its degraded value. This shows the influence of low temperature annealing and light on metastable module behavior in a-Si thin-film modules.

  1. The influence of pressure on defects in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Jeffrey; Wagner, Lucas

    2009-03-01

    Amorphous silicon(a-Si) thin-film solar cells are promising materials for solar cells, but they suffer from the Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE), in which the efficiency degrades over the course of a few hours of light exposure. While there has been progress in mitigating this effect through sample preparation, there is still no clear microscopic explanation for the degradation. We have used first principles density functional theory and highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations to investigate the effect of pressure on different types of defects present in a-Si. Our calculations show that the effect of pressure on a-Si is strongly dependent on the particular type of defect, and they further may provide new ways to experimentally determine the dominant defect type. We also report on the effect of pressure on the simplest reaction in a-Si: a bond switch between two neighboring Si atoms, which could be an important element in the understanding of the SWE [1]. [1] L.K. Wagner and J.C. Grossman. PRL (in press)

  2. Nanohole Structuring for Improved Performance of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Johlin, Eric; Al-Obeidi, Ahmed; Nogay, Gizem; Stuckelberger, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-06-22

    While low hole mobilities limit the current collection and efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic devices, attempts to improve mobility of the material directly have stagnated. Herein, we explore a method of utilizing nanostructuring of a-Si:H devices to allow for improved hole collection in thick absorber layers. This is achieved by etching an array of 150 nm diameter holes into intrinsic a-Si:H and then coating the structured material with p-type a-Si:H and a conformal zinc oxide transparent conducting layer. The inclusion of these nanoholes yields relative power conversion efficiency (PCE) increases of ∼45%, from 7.2 to 10.4% PCE for small area devices. Comparisons of optical properties, time-of-flight mobility measurements, and internal quantum efficiency spectra indicate this efficiency is indeed likely occurring from an improved collection pathway provided by the nanostructuring of the devices. Finally, we estimate that through modest optimizations of the design and fabrication, PCEs of beyond 13% should be obtainable for similar devices.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of PIN hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keya, Kimitaka; Torigoe, Yoshihiro; Toko, Susumu; Yamashita, Daisuke; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Light-induced degradation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a key issue for enhancing competitiveness in solar cell market. A-Si:H films with a lower density of Si-H2 bonds shows higher stability. Here we identified Si-H2 bonds in PIN a-Si:H solar cells fabricated by plasma CVD using Raman spectroscopy. A-Si:H solar cell has a structure of B-doped μc-SiC:H (12.5 nm)/ non-doped a-Si:H (250nm)/ P-doped μc-Si:H (40 nm) on glass substrates (Asahi-VU). By irradiating HeNe laser light from N-layer, peaks correspond to Si-H2 bonds (2100 cm-1) and Si-H bonds (2000 cm-1) have been identified in Raman scattering spectra. The intensity ratio of Si-H2 and Si-H ISiH2/ISiH is found to correlate well to light induced degradation of the cells Therefore, Raman spectroscopy is a promising method for studying origin of light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells.

  4. Deployable aerospace PV array based on amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Walter, Lee; Dobias, David; Flaisher, Harvey

    1989-04-01

    The development of the first commercial, ultralight, flexible, deployable, PV array for aerospace applications is discussed. It is based on thin-film, amorphous silicon alloy, multijunction, solar cells deposited on a thin metal or polymer by a proprietary, roll-to-roll process. The array generates over 200 W at AM0 and is made of 20 giant cells, each 54 cm x 29 cm (1566 sq cm in area). Each cell is protected with bypass diodes. Fully encapsulated array blanket and the deployment mechanism weigh about 800 and 500 g, respectively. These data yield power per area ratio of over 60 W/sq m specific power of over 250 W/kg (4 kg/kW) for the blanket and 154 W/kg (6.5 kg/kW) for the power system. When stowed, the array is rolled up to a diameter of 7 cm and a length of 1.11 m. It is deployed quickly to its full area of 2.92 m x 1.11 m, for instant power. Potential applications include power for lightweight space vehicles, high altitude balloons, remotely piloted and tethered vehicles. These developments signal the dawning of a new age of lightweight, deployable, low-cost space arrays in the range from tens to tens of thousands of watts for near-term applications and the feasibility of multi-100 kW to MW arrays for future needs.

  5. Wide gap microcrystalline silicon carbide emitter for amorphous silicon oxide passivated heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomaska, Manuel; Richter, Alexei; Lentz, Florian; Niermann, Tore; Finger, Friedhelm; Rau, Uwe; Ding, Kaining

    2017-02-01

    Wide gap n-type microcrystalline silicon carbide [µc-SiC:H(n)] is highly suitable as window layer material for silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells due to its high optical transparency combined with high electrical conductivity. However, the hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of highly crystalline µc-SiC:H(n) requires a high hydrogen radical density in the gas phase that gives rise to strong deterioration of the intrinsic amorphous silicon oxide [a-SiO x :H(i)] surface passivation. Introducing an n-type microcrystalline silicon oxide [µc-SiO x :H(n)] protection layer between the µc-SiC:H(n) and the a-SiO x :H(i) prevents the deterioration of the passivation by providing an etch resistance and by blocking the diffusion of hydrogen radicals. We fabricated solar cells with µc-SiC:H(n)/µc-SiO x :H(n)/a-SiO x :H(i) stack for the front side and varied the µc-SiO x :H(n) material properties by changing the microstructure of the µc-SiO x :H(n) to evaluate the potential of such stack implemented in SHJ solar cells and to identify the limiting parameters of the protection layer in the device. With this approach we achieved a maximum open circuit voltage of 677 mV and a maximum energy conversion efficiency of 18.9% for a planar solar cell.

  6. Preparation of fine silicon particles from amorphous silicon monoxide by the disproportionation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamiya, Mikito; Takei, Humihiko; Kikuchi, Masae; Uyeda, Chiaki

    2001-07-01

    Fine Si particles have been prepared by the disproportionation reaction of silicon monoxide (SiO), that is: 2SiO→Si+SiO 2. Amorphous powders of SiO are heated between 900°C and 1400°C in a flow of Ar and the obtained specimens are analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The treatments between 1000°C and 1300°C for more than 0.5 h result in origination of Si particles dispersed in amorphous oxide media. The particle size varies from 1-3 to 20-40 nm, depending on the heating temperature. Kinetic analyses of the reaction reveal that the activation energy is 1.1 eV (82.1 kJ mol -1). The specimens annealed above 1350°C changes into a mixture of Si and cristobalite, suggesting a solid state transformation in the surrounding oxides from the amorphous to crystalline states.

  7. Realistic inversion of diffraction data for an amorphous solid: The case of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anup; Biswas, Parthapratim; Bhattarai, Bishal; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    We apply a method called "force-enhanced atomic refinement" (FEAR) to create a computer model of amorphous silicon (a -Si) based upon the highly precise x-ray diffraction experiments of Laaziri et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3460 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.3460]. The logic underlying our calculation is to estimate the structure of a real sample a -Si using experimental data and chemical information included in a nonbiased way, starting from random coordinates. The model is in close agreement with experiment and also sits at a suitable energy minimum according to density-functional calculations. In agreement with experiments, we find a small concentration of coordination defects that we discuss, including their electronic consequences. The gap states in the FEAR model are delocalized compared to a continuous random network model. The method is more efficient and accurate, in the sense of fitting the diffraction data, than conventional melt-quench methods. We compute the vibrational density of states and the specific heat, and we find that both compare favorably to experiments.

  8. Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells incorporating a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells which incorporate a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer adjacent to the junction forming metal layer exhibit increased open circuit voltages compared to standard rectifying junction metal devices, i.e., Schottky barrier devices, and rectifying junction metal insulating silicon devices, i.e., MIS devices.

  9. Relaxation and derelaxation of pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon during thermal annealing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kail, F.; Farjas, J.; Roura, P.; Secouard, C.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J.; Alzina, F.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2010-07-01

    The structural relaxation of pure amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) materials, that occurs during thermal annealing experiments, has been analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Unlike a-Si, the heat evolved from a-Si:H cannot be explained by relaxation of the Si-Si network strain but it reveals a derelaxation of the bond angle strain. Since the state of relaxation after annealing is very similar for pure and hydrogenated materials, our results give strong experimental support to the predicted configurational gap between a-Si and crystalline silicon.

  10. Production Of Tandem Amorphous Silicon Alloy Solar Cells In A Continuous Roll-To-Roll Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izu, Masat; Ovshinsky, Stanford R.

    1983-09-01

    A roll-to-roll plasma deposition machine for depositing multi-layered amorphous alloys has been developed. The plasma deposition machine (approximately 35 ft. long) has multiple deposition areas and processes 16-inch wide stainless steel substrate continuously. Amorphous photovoltaic thin films (less than 1pm) having a six layered structure (PINPIN) are deposited on a roll of 16-inch wide 1000 ft. long stainless steel substrate, continu-ously, in a single pass. Mass production of low-cost tandem amorphous solar cells utilizing roll-to-roll processes is now possible. A commercial plant utilizing this plasma deposition machine for manufacturing tandem amorphous silicon alloy solar cells is now in operation. At Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD), one of the major tasks of the photovoltaic group has been the scale-up of the plasma deposition process for the production of amorphous silicon alloy solar cells. Our object has been to develop the most cost effective way of producing amorphous silicon alloy solar cells having the highest efficiency. The amorphous silicon alloy solar cell which we produce has the following layer structure: 1. Thin steel substrate. 2. Multi-layered photovoltaic amorphous silicon alloy layers (approximately 1pm thick; tandem cells have six layers). 3. ITO. 4. Grid pattern. 5. Encapsulant. The deposition of the amorphous layer is technologically the key process. It was clear to us from the beginning of this scale-up program that amorphous silicon alloy solar cells produced in wide width, continuous roll-to-roll production process would be ultimate lowest cost solar cells according to the following reasons. First of all, the material cost of our solar cells is low because: (1) the total thickness of active material is less than 1pm, and the material usage is very small; (2) silicon, fluorine, hydrogen, and other materials used in the device are abundant and low cost; (3) thin, low-cost substrate is used; and (4) product yield is high. In

  11. Amorphous and crystalline silicon based heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüttauf, J. A.

    2011-10-01

    In this thesis, research on amorphous and crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells is described. Probably the most important feature of SHJ solar cells is a thin intrinsic amorphous silicion (a-Si:H) layer that is deposited before depositing the doped emitter and back surface field. The passivation properties of such intrinsic layers made by three different chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have been investigated. For layers deposited at 130°C, all techniques show a strong reduction in surface recombination velocity (SRV) after annealing. Modelling indicates that dangling bond saturation by atomic hydrogen is the predominant mechanism. We obtain outstanding carrier lifetimes of 10.3 ms, corresponding to SRVs of 0.56 cm/s. For a-Si:H films made at 250°C, an as-deposited minority carrier lifetime of 2.0 ms is observed. In contrast to a-Si:H films fabricated at 130°C, however, no change in passivation quality upon thermal annealing is observed. These films were fabricated for the first time using a continuous in-line HWCVD mode. Wafer cleaning before a-Si:H deposition is a crucial step for c-Si surface passivation. We tested the influence of an atomic hydrogen treatment before a-Si:H deposition on the c-Si surface. The treatments were performed in a new virgin chamber to exclude Si deposition from the chamber walls. Subsequently, we deposited a-Si:H layers onto the c-Si wafers and measured the lifetime for different H treatment times. We found that increasing hydrogen treatment times led to lower effective lifetimes. Modelling of the measured minority carrier lifetime data shows that the decreased passivation quality is caused by an increased defect density at the amorphous-crystalline interface. Furtheremore, the passivation of different a-Si:H containing layers have been tested. For intrinsic films and intrinsic/n-type stacks, an improvement in passivation up to 255°C and 270°C is observed. This improvement is attributed to dangling bond

  12. Dynamics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon flexural resonators for enhanced performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouro, J.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin-film flexural resonators with sub-micron actuation gaps are fabricated by surface micromachining on glass substrates. Experimentally, the resonators are electrostatically actuated and their motion is optically detected. Three different configurations for the electrostatic excitation force are used to study the dynamics of the resonators. In the first case, a dc voltage (Vdc) is added to an ac voltage with variable excitation frequency (Vac(ω)) and harmonic, superharmonic, and subharmonic resonances of different orders are observed. The second case consists on mixing the dc voltage (Vdc) with an ac voltage applied at a fixed frequency of twice the natural frequency of the resonator (V(2ω0)). High-amplitude parametric resonance is excited at the natural frequency of the system, ω0. This configuration allows a separation between the frequencies of the excitation and the mechanical motion. Finally, in the third case, the dc voltage (Vdc) is combined with both ac voltages, Vac(ω) and V(2ω0), and parametric resonance is excited and emerges from the fundamental harmonic resonance peak. The single-degree-of-freedom equation of motion is modeled and discussed for each case. The nonlinearity inherent to the electrostatic force is responsible for modulating the spring constant of the system at different frequencies, giving rise to parametric resonance. These equations of motion are simulated in the time and frequency domains, providing a consistent explanation of the experimentally observed phenomena. A wide variety of possible resonance modes with different characteristics can be used advantageously in MEMS device design.

  13. Stabilization of amorphous structure in silicon thin film by adding germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, Nobuaki; Shigeta, Yukichi

    2015-06-21

    The stabilization of the amorphous structure in amorphous silicon film by adding Ge atoms was studied using Raman spectroscopy. Amorphous Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} (x = 0.0, 0.03, 0.14, and 0.27) films were deposited on glass substrates from electron beam evaporation sources and annealed in N{sub 2} atmosphere. The change in the amorphous states and the phase transition from amorphous to crystalline were characterized using the TO, LO, and LA phonons in the Raman spectra. The temperature of the transition from the amorphous phase to the crystalline phase was higher for the a-Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} (x = 0.03, 0.14) films, and the crystallization was hindered. The reason why the addition of a suitable quantity of Ge atoms into the three-dimensional amorphous silicon network stabilizes its amorphous structure is discussed based on the changes in the Raman signals of the TO, LO, and LA phonons during annealing. The characteristic bond length of the Ge atoms allows them to stabilize the random network of the amorphous Si composed of quasi-tetrahedral Si units, and obstruct its rearrangement.

  14. Fiber Optic Excitation of Silicon Microspheres in Amorphous and Crystalline Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Huzeyfe; Yılmaz, Hasan; Sharif Murib, Mohammed; Serpengüzel, Ali

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the optical resonance spectra of free-standing monolithic single crystal silicon microspheres immersed in various amorphous fluids, such as air, water, ethylene glycol, and 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl nematic liquid crystal. For the various amorphous fluids, morphology-dependent resonances with quality factors on the order of 105 are observed at 1428 nm. The mode spacing is always on the order of 0.23 nm. The immersion in various amorphous fluids affects the spectral response of the silicon microsphere and heralds this technique for use in novel optofluidics applications. Even though the nematic liquid crystal is a highly birefringent, scattering, and high-index optical medium, morphology-dependent resonances with quality factors on the order of 105 are observed at 1300 nm in the elastic scattering spectra of the silicon microsphere, realizing a liquid-crystal-on-silicon geometry. The relative refractive index and the size parameter of the silicon microsphere are the parameters that affect the resonance structure. The more 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl interacting with the silicon microsphere, the lower the quality factor of the resonances is. The more 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl is interacting with the silicon microsphere, the lower the mode spacing Δλ of the resonances is. The silicon microspheres wetted with nematic liquid crystal can be used for optically addressed liquid-crystal-on-silicon displays, light valve applications, or reconfigurable optical networks.

  15. Formation of amorphous silicon by light ion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Y.C.

    1985-12-01

    Amorphization by implantation of boron ions (which is the lightest element generally used in I.C. fabrication processes) has been systematically studied for various temperatures, various voltages and various dose rates. Based on theoretical considerations and experimental results, a new amorphization model for light and intermediate mass ion damage is proposed consisting of two stages. The role of interstitial type point defects or clusters in amorphization is emphasized. Due to the higher mobility of interstitials out-diffusion to the surface particularly during amorphization with low energy can be significant. From a review of the idealized amorphous structure, diinterstitial-divacancy pairs are suggested to be the embryos of amorphous zones formed during room temperature implantation. The stacking fault loops found in specimens implanted with boron at room temperature are considered to be the origin of secondary defects formed during annealing.

  16. Passivation of c-Si surfaces by sub-nm amorphous silicon capped with silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao Yan, Di; Bullock, James; Zhang, Xinyu; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-12-07

    A sub-nm hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film capped with silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) is shown to provide a high level passivation to crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. When passivated by a 0.8 nm a-Si:H/75 nm SiN{sub x} stack, recombination current density J{sub 0} values of 9, 11, 47, and 87 fA/cm{sup 2} are obtained on 10 Ω·cm n-type, 0.8 Ω·cm p-type, 160 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused, and 120 Ω/sq boron-diffused silicon surfaces, respectively. The J{sub 0} on n-type 10 Ω·cm wafers is further reduced to 2.5 ± 0.5 fA/cm{sup 2} when the a-Si:H film thickness exceeds 2.5 nm. The passivation by the sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thermally stable at 400 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 min on all four c-Si surfaces. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a reduction in interface defect density and film charge density with an increase in a-Si:H thickness. The nearly transparent sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thus demonstrated to be a promising surface passivation and antireflection coating suitable for all types of surfaces encountered in high efficiency c-Si solar cells.

  17. Flat panel display using Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Schmid, Anthony P.

    2002-01-01

    Thin films of Ti--Cr--Al--O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti--Cr--Al--O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti--Cr--Al--O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti--Cr--Al--O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

  18. Second-generation flat panel displays for the enhanced Abrahms M1 battlefield tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi, Ken F.; Wyrembelski, Rick J.; Hatton, Terry J.

    1997-07-01

    The Abrams M1 Battlefield Tank has undergone several phases of performance enhancements since its introduction, improvements have covered updates to all the major components of the vehicle with major emphasis on the vetronics and man-machine interface. Through these enhancements of M1 has pioneered the utilization of flat panel display (FPD) technologies and the M1A2 version has an FPD at both the driver and gunner stations and a third at the commander position. These FPDs all employ electroluminescent (EL) imaging technology that is well suited for the severe vetronics environment. The latest M1A2 enhancements, being introduced as part of the M1A2 System Enhancement Package, include a flat panel AMLCD color tactical display which supersedes the earlier monochrome EL FPD used in this application, and a high resolution monochrome EL FPD for the second generation FLIR sensor, which supersedes the earlier bulky CRT display.

  19. Performance improvement in amorphous silicon based uncooled microbolometers through pixel design and materials development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajmera, Sameer; Brady, John; Hanson, Charles; Schimert, Tom; Syllaios, A. J.; Taylor, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometers have been established as a field-worthy technology for a broad range of applications where performance and form factor are paramount, such as soldier-borne systems. Recent developments in both bolometer materials and pixel design at L-3 in the 17μm pixel node have further advanced the state-of-the-art. Increasing the a-Si material temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) has the impact of improving NETD sensitivity without increasing thermal time constant (TTC), leading to an improvement in the NETD×TTC product. By tuning the amorphous silicon thin-film microstructure using hydrogen dilution during deposition, films with high TCR have been developed. The electrical properties of these films have been shown to be stable even after thermal cycling to temperatures greater than 300oC enabling wafer-level vacuum packaging currently performed at L-3 to reduce the size and weight of the vacuum packaged unit. Through appropriate selection of conditions during deposition, amorphous silicon of ~3.4% TCR has been integrated into the L-3 microbolometer manufacturing flow. By combining pixel design enhancements with improvements to amorphous silicon thin-film technology, L-3's amorphous silicon microbolometer technology will continue to provide the performance required to meet the needs to tomorrow's war-fighter.

  20. Proton and deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance studies of amorphous hydrogenated silicon, carbon, and carbon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernan, Mary Jane Wurth

    Despite the profound influence of semiconductors and the changes they have produced, many fundamental questions remain unanswered. We have used proton and deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to explore the role of hydrogens in amorphous silicon and amorphous carbon and carbon alloy films. In the carbon films, dipolar filtering techniques reveal a two-component shifted lineshape in the proton NMR spectra and deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) data demonstrate a feedstock gas dependence in the film deposition process. In these measurements, DMR is used to examine the effect of hydrogen on the photovoltaic properties of amorphous silicon thin films. We have measured the effects of photoillumination on amorphous silicon, particularly with respect to the process of metastable defect formation (the Staebler-Wronski effect). The creation and passivation of dangling silicon bonds is observed and quantified. We report large-scale light-induced atomic rearrangements which produce shifts and broadenings of the DMR lineshapes. The deuterium NMR lineshape component most affected by atomic rearrangements is a broad central feature which is shown to be molecular in origin. This spectral feature includes hydrogens trapped and immobile on surfaces created by strains and dislocations in the material. Narrowing of the lineshape at elevated temperatures indicates motion with a small activation energy. The substantial population represented by this feature is shown to account for at least 15% of the total hydrogens in high-quality amorphous silicon samples.

  1. Attenuated phase-shift mask (PSM) blanks for flat panel display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Kagehiro; Mochizuki, Satoru; Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    The fine pattern exposure techniques are required for Flat Panel display applications as smart phone, tablet PC recently. The attenuated phase shift masks (PSM) are being used for ArF and KrF photomask lithography technique for high end pattern Semiconductor applications. We developed CrOx based large size PSM blanks that has good uniformity on optical characteristics for FPD applications. We report the basic optical characteristics and uniformity, stability data of large sized CrOx PSM blanks.

  2. Development of Design, Test and Acquisition Criteria for Aircraft Dot-Matrix Flat Panel Display Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    SUB. R Flat-Panel Dot-Matrix Displays, Color, Alphanumeric, 23 07 Video, LED, Grey Scale, Luminance, Optical Coupling, 23 11 Contrast, Legibility...based flight simulations and bench test experiments. SPECIFICS Method Utilizing the bottom-up methodology, the electro- optical % characteristics and...switches, with emphasis on the optical effects of fingerprints, and on techniques for optimizing the interpret- ability of rapidly time changing numeric

  3. Qualification test results for DOE solar photovoltaic flat panel procurement - PRDA 38

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Twelve types of prototypes modules for the DOE Photovoltaic Flat Panel Procurement (PRDA 38) were subjected to qualification tests at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory according to a new specification. Environmental exposures were carried out separately and included temperature cycling, humidity, wind simulation, and hail. The most serious problems discovered were reduced insulation resistance to ground and ground continuity of the metal frames, electrical degradation, erratic power readings, and delamination. The electrical and physical characteristics of the newly received modules are also given.

  4. Crystalline-Amorphous Silicon Nanocomposites with Reduced Thermal Conductivity for Bulk Thermoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Asuka; Zhou, Shu; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-06-24

    Responding to the need for thermoelectric materials with high efficiency in both conversion and cost, we developed a nanostructured bulk silicon thermoelectric materials by sintering silicon crystal quantum dots of several nanometers in diameters synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The material consists of hybrid structures of nanograins of crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon oxide. The percolated nanocrystalline region gives rise to high power factor with the high doping concentration realized by PECVD, and the binding amorphous region reduces thermal conductivity. Consequently, the nondimensional figure of merit reaches 0.39 at 600 °C, equivalent to the best reported value for silicon thermoelectrics. The thermal conductivity of the densely packed material is as low as 5 W m(-1) K(-1) in a wide temperature range from room temperature to 1000 °C, which is beneficial not only for the conversion efficiency but also for material cost by requiring less material to establish certain temperature gradient.

  5. Construction and characterization of amorphous-silicon test structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, L.N.; Milgram, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    Semiconductor device fabrication and characterization work indicates that construction of amorphous-Si photoconductive radiation detectors is feasible. Amorphous Si films are mechanically stable and adhere well to candidate electrode materials; form Schottky-type rectifying junctions with several electrode metals. Materials exist for forming ohmic contacts on amorphous-Si films. Fabrication facilities accessible to ARACOR produce material of nominal band-gap energy, dangling bond density, and dielectric constant. Modification of amorphous-Si conductivity is feasible and supports the construction of PIN devices. Significant photoconductive response is observed for both Schottky-type and PIN devices, with the latter providing superior performance. It is recommended that construction and experimental evaluation of prototype amorphous-Si radiation detectors be persued in Phase II.

  6. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung Cha, Bo; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Jeon, Seongchae; Huh, Young

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80-120 kVp, and different current (10-50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  7. High-performance flat-panel solar thermoelectric generators with high thermal concentration.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Daniel; Poudel, Bed; Feng, Hsien-Ping; Caylor, J Christopher; Yu, Bo; Yan, Xiao; Ma, Yi; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Dezhi; Muto, Andrew; McEnaney, Kenneth; Chiesa, Matteo; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2011-05-01

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity has been dominated by photovoltaic and solar thermal power generation. Photovoltaic cells are deployed widely, mostly as flat panels, whereas solar thermal electricity generation relying on optical concentrators and mechanical heat engines is only seen in large-scale power plants. Here we demonstrate a promising flat-panel solar thermal to electric power conversion technology based on the Seebeck effect and high thermal concentration, thus enabling wider applications. The developed solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) achieved a peak efficiency of 4.6% under AM1.5G (1 kW m(-2)) conditions. The efficiency is 7-8 times higher than the previously reported best value for a flat-panel STEG, and is enabled by the use of high-performance nanostructured thermoelectric materials and spectrally-selective solar absorbers in an innovative design that exploits high thermal concentration in an evacuated environment. Our work opens up a promising new approach which has the potential to achieve cost-effective conversion of solar energy into electricity.

  8. A new x-ray imaging technique for radiography mode of flat-panel imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Ikeda, S.; Ueda, K.; Baba, R.

    2007-03-01

    A digital radiography system using a flat-panel imager, which has a novel imaging technique for a radiography mode, has been developed. A radiographic image captured by the new imaging technique has a wide dynamic range in comparison with conventional radiographic images. The purpose of this presentation is to show the basic performance of the image quality acquired by the new imaging technique and compare it with an image taken by a conventional technique. The flat-panel imager has a gain switching capability, normally used in a dynamic imaging mode for a cone-beam CT study. The gain switching method has two gain settings and switches between them automatically, depending on the incident dose to each pixel of flat-panel imager. As a result of the gain switching method, an image having wide dynamic range is achieved. In this study, we applied the gain switching method to the radiography mode, and achieved a radiographic image with wider dynamic range than a conventional radiograph. Furthermore, we have also developed an algorithm for calibration of the gain switching method in radiography mode.

  9. Rotational flat-panel computed tomography in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Dörfler, A; Struffert, T; Engelhorn, T; Richter, G

    2008-10-01

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range than available with X-ray film or film-screen combinations, flat-panel detector technology has become widely accepted for neuroangiographic imaging. In particular flat-panel detector computed tomography (FD-CT) which uses rotational C-arm-mounted flat-panel detector technology is capable of volumetric imaging with high spatial resolution. As "Angiographic CT" FD-CT may be helpful during many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures, i.e. intracranial stenting for cerebrovascular stenoses, stent-assisted coil embolization of wide-necked cerebral aneurysms and embolizations of arteriovenous malformations. By providing morphologic, CT-like images of the brain within the angio suite, FD-CT is able to rapidly visualize periprocedural hemorrhage and may thus improve rapid complication management without the need for patient transfer. In addition, myelography and postmyelographic FD-CT imaging can be carried out using a single machine. Spinal interventions, such as kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty might also benefit from FD-CT. This paper briefly reviews the technical principles of FD technology and then focuses on possible applications in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology.

  10. Evaluation of image quality and dose on a flat-panel CT-scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Suess, Ch.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Flohr, T.

    2005-04-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) scanner. We focused on improving the image quality using different detector settings and reducing x-ray scatter intensities. For the presented results we used a Varian 4030CB flat-panel detector mounted in a multislice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Systems). The scatter intensities may severely impair image quality in flat-panel detector CT systems. To reduce the impact of scatter we tested bowtie shaped filters, anti-scatter grids and post-processing correction algorithms. We evaluated the improvement of image quality by each method and also by a combination of the several methods. To achieve an extended dynamic range in the projection data, we implemented a novel dynamic gain-switching mode. The read out charge amplifier feedback capacitance is changing dynamically in this mode, depending on the signal level. For this scan mode dedicated corrections in the offset and gain calibration are required. We compared image quality in terms of low contrast for both, the dynamic mode and the standard fixed gain mode. VCT scanners require different types of dose parameters. We measured the dose in a 16 cm CTDI phantom and free air in the scanners iso-center and defined a new metric for a VCT dose index (VCTDI). The dose for a high quality VCT scan of this prototype scanner varied between 15 and 40 mGy.

  11. Core-shell amorphous silicon-carbon nanoparticles for high performance anodes in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourice, Julien; Bordes, Arnaud; Boulineau, Adrien; Alper, John P.; Franger, Sylvain; Quinsac, Axelle; Habert, Aurélie; Leconte, Yann; De Vito, Eric; Porcher, Willy; Reynaud, Cécile; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Haon, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    Core-shell silicon-carbon nanoparticles are attractive candidates as active material to increase the capacity of Li-ion batteries while mitigating the detrimental effects of volume expansion upon lithiation. However crystalline silicon suffers from amorphization upon the first charge/discharge cycle and improved stability is expected in starting with amorphous silicon. Here we report the synthesis, in a single-step process, of amorphous silicon nanoparticles coated with a carbon shell (a-Si@C), via a two-stage laser pyrolysis where decomposition of silane and ethylene are conducted in two successive reaction zones. Control of experimental conditions mitigates silicon core crystallization as well as formation of silicon carbide. Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy show a carbon shell about 1 nm in thickness, which prevents detrimental oxidation of the a-Si cores. Cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that the core-shell composite reaches its maximal lithiation during the first sweep, thanks to its amorphous core. After 500 charge/discharge cycles, it retains a capacity of 1250 mAh.g-1 at a C/5 rate and 800 mAh.g-1 at 2C, with an outstanding coulombic efficiency of 99.95%. Moreover, post-mortem observations show an electrode volume expansion of less than 20% and preservation of the nanostructuration.

  12. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, Michael A.; Raupp, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm2 and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate. PMID:27472329

  13. Stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells with low hydrogen content

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, C.M.; Hegedus, S.S. )

    1992-12-01

    Results and conclusions obtained during a research program of the investigation of amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon based alloy materials and solar cells fabricated by photo-chemical vapor and glow discharge depositions are reported. Investigation of the effects of the hydrogen content in a-si:H i-layers in amorphous silicon solar cells show that cells with lowered hydrogen content i-layers are more stable. A classical thermodynamic formulation of the Staebler-Wronski effect has been developed for standard solar cell operating temperatures and illuminations. Methods have been developed to extract a lumped equivalent circuit from the current voltage characteristic of a single junction solar cell in order to predict its behavior in a multijunction device.

  14. Radial junction amorphous silicon solar cells on PECVD-grown silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linwei; O'Donnell, Benedict; Foldyna, Martin; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2012-05-17

    Constructing radial junction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells on top of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) represents a promising approach towards high performance and cost-effective thin film photovoltaics. We here develop an all-in situ strategy to grow SiNWs, via a vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism on top of ZnO-coated glass substrate, in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) reactor. Controlling the distribution of indium catalyst drops allows us to tailor the as-grown SiNW arrays into suitable size and density, which in turn results in both a sufficient light trapping effect and a suitable arrangement allowing for conformal coverage of SiNWs by subsequent a-Si:H layers. We then demonstrate the fabrication of radial junction solar cells and carry on a parametric study designed to shed light on the absorption and quantum efficiency response, as functions of the intrinsic a-Si:H layer thickness and the density of SiNWs. These results lay a solid foundation for future structural optimization and performance ramp-up of the radial junction thin film a-Si:H photovoltaics.

  15. Photoemission studies of amorphous silicon induced by P + ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petö, G.; Kanski, J.

    1995-12-01

    An amorphous Si layer was formed on a Si (1 0 0) surface by P + implantation at 80 keV. This layer was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting spectra are different from earlier spectra on amorphous Si prepared by e-gun evaporation or cathode sputtering. The differences consist of a decreased intensity in the spectral region corresponding to p-states, and appearace of new states at higher binding energy. Qualitativity similar results have been reported for Sb implanted amorphous Ge and the modification seems to be due to the changed short range order.

  16. Evaluation of the mechanical stability of a megavoltage imaging system using a new flat panel positioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, O.; Chen, J.; Aubin, M.; Pouliot, J.

    2005-04-01

    Mega-Voltage systems are used in radiation oncology both for external radiation delivery and patient positioning prior to treatment. A pair of portal images compared with digitally reconstructed radiographs is currently the gold standard for positioning but new developments have made possible the use of Mega-Voltage Cone Beam CT for better 3D setup. The non-ideal imaging geometry of the treatment unit has a direct impact on both methods. It led to the use of a reticule attachment as reference for the scale and the isocenter position on the portal images. The reticule has limited precision and occasionally super-imposes anatomical information. As for Cone Beam, the image quality crucially depends on the knowledge of the scan geometry during the acquisition. The reproducibility of the detector position at each angle will affect the image reconstruction and determine how frequently geometrical calibration must be performed. The objectives of this study are to measure the flex of the detector and evaluate its reproducibility. A RID 1640 Perkin Elmer a-Si Flat Panel is installed on a Siemens Primus linear accelerator with a positioner similar the the one used in the Oncor product. Three original methods are used to investigate the behavior in space and time of the imaging system. A reticule and a Plumb Bob tip are placed along the line formed by the isocenter and the source. Their positions projected on the flat panel for different gantry positions are used to calculate the mechanical flex. Projection matrices obtained in a geometrical Cone Beam calibration are also used to quantify the flat panel sagging. Six full sets of data were acquired over a period of 5 months and recorded overall mechanical flexes of 1 and 3 mm for the transversal and longitudinal directions respectively. The absolute magnitude of the flat panel displacement varies slightly with the method used but the discrepancy stays within the laser precision used for alignment. The small standard deviations

  17. N-type crystalline silicon films free of amorphous silicon deposited on glass by HCl addition using hot wire chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yung-Bin; Park, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Song, Jean-Ho; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2011-09-01

    Since n-type crystalline silicon films have the electric property much better than those of hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films, they can enhance the performance of advanced electronic devices such as solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). Since the formation of amorphous silicon is unavoidable in the low temperature deposition of microcrystalline silicon on a glass substrate at temperatures less than 550 degrees C in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition and hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD), crystalline silicon films have not been deposited directly on a glass substrate but fabricated by the post treatment of amorphous silicon films. In this work, by adding the HCl gas, amorphous silicon-free n-type crystalline silicon films could be deposited directly on a glass substrate by HWCVD. The resistivity of the n-type crystalline silicon film for the flow rate ratio of [HCl]/[SiH4] = 7.5 and [PH3]/[SiH4] = 0.042 was 5.31 x 10(-4) ohms cm, which is comparable to the resistivity 1.23 x 10(-3) ohms cm of films prepared by thermal annealing of amorphous silicon films. The absence of amorphous silicon in the film could be confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  18. In situ observation of shear-driven amorphization in silicon crystals

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yang; Zhong, Li; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Chongmin; Zhu, Ting; Mao, Scott X.

    2016-09-19

    Amorphous materials have attracted great interest in the scientific and technological fields. An amorphous solid usually forms under the externally driven conditions of melt-quenching, irradiation and severe mechanical deformation. However, its dynamic formation process remains elusive. Here we report the in situ atomic-scale observation of dynamic amorphization processes during mechanical straining of nanoscale silicon crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We observe the shear-driven amorphization (SDA) occurring in a dominant shear band. The SDA involves a sequence of processes starting with the shear-induced diamond-cubic to diamond-hexagonal phase transition that is followed by dislocation nucleation and accumulation in the newly formed phase, leading to the formation of amorphous silicon. The SDA formation through diamond-hexagonal phase is rationalized by its structural conformity with the order in the paracrystalline amorphous silicon, which maybe widely applied to diamond-cubic materials. Besides, the activation of SDA is orientation-dependent through the competition between full dislocation nucleation and partial gliding.

  19. Investigation of hydrogen plasma treatment for reducing defects in silicon quantum dot superlattice structure with amorphous silicon carbide matrix

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effects of hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on the properties of silicon quantum dot superlattice films. Hydrogen introduced in the films efficiently passivates silicon and carbon dangling bonds at a treatment temperature of approximately 400°C. The total dangling bond density decreases from 1.1 × 1019 cm-3 to 3.7 × 1017 cm-3, which is comparable to the defect density of typical hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films. A damaged layer is found to form on the surface by HPT; this layer can be easily removed by reactive ion etching. PMID:24521208

  20. In situ observation of shear-driven amorphization in silicon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Zhong, Li; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Chongmin; Zhu, Ting; Mao, Scott X.

    2016-10-01

    Amorphous materials are used for both structural and functional applications. An amorphous solid usually forms under driven conditions such as melt quenching, irradiation, shock loading or severe mechanical deformation. Such extreme conditions impose significant challenges on the direct observation of the amorphization process. Various experimental techniques have been used to detect how the amorphous phases form, including synchrotron X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy, but a dynamic, atomistic characterization has remained elusive. Here, by using in situ high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), we show the dynamic amorphization process in silicon nanocrystals during mechanical straining on the atomic scale. We find that shear-driven amorphization occurs in a dominant shear band starting with the diamond-cubic (dc) to diamond-hexagonal (dh) phase transition and then proceeds by dislocation nucleation and accumulation in the newly formed dh-Si phase. This process leads to the formation of an amorphous Si (a-Si) band, embedded with dh-Si nanodomains. The amorphization of dc-Si via an intermediate dh-Si phase is a previously unknown pathway of solid-state amorphization.

  1. Elastic behavior of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite: An atomistic view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suvankar; Dutta, Amlan

    2017-01-01

    In the context of mechanical properties, nanocomposites with homogeneous chemical composition throughout the matrix and the dispersed phase are of particular interest. In this study, the elastic moduli of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite have been estimated using atomistic simulations. A comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the elastic behavior is significantly influenced by the crystal-amorphous interphase. On observing the effect of volume-fraction of the crystalline phase, an anomalous trend for the bulk modulus is obtained. This phenomenon is attributed to the relaxation displacements of the amorphous atoms.

  2. Amorphization and nanocrystallization of silicon under laser shock compression: bridging experiment with atomic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Hahn, Eric; Remington, Bruce; Wehrenberg, Christopher; Bringa, Eduardo; Huntington, Channing; Park, Hye-Sook; More, Karren; Meyers, Marc

    Terawatt, nanosecond-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon unveiled remarkable structural changes above a pressure threshold. Two distinct amorphous regions were identified: (a) a bulk amorphous layer close to the surface and (b) amorphous bands initially aligned with {111}slip planes. Further increase of the laser energy leads to the re-crystallization of amorphous silicon into nanocrystals with high concentration of nano-twins. Shock-induced defects play a very important role in the onset of amorphization. Calculations of the free energy changes with pressure and shear, using the Patel-Cohen methodology, are in agreement with the experimental results. Molecular dynamics simulation corroborates the amorphization, showing that it is initiated by the nucleation and propagation of partial dislocations. The nucleation of amorphization is analyzed by classical nucleation theory. This research is funded by a UC Research Laboratories Grant (09-LR-06-118456-MEYM) and a National Laser Users Facility (NLUF) Grant (PE-FG52-09NA-29043).

  3. Graphene as a transparent electrode for amorphous silicon-based solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vaianella, F. Rosolen, G.; Maes, B.

    2015-06-28

    The properties of graphene in terms of transparency and conductivity make it an ideal candidate to replace indium tin oxide (ITO) in a transparent conducting electrode. However, graphene is not always as good as ITO for some applications, due to a non-negligible absorption. For amorphous silicon photovoltaics, we have identified a useful case with a graphene-silica front electrode that improves upon ITO. For both electrode technologies, we simulate the weighted absorption in the active layer of planar amorphous silicon-based solar cells with a silver back-reflector. The graphene device shows a significantly increased absorbance compared to ITO-based cells for a large range of silicon thicknesses (34.4% versus 30.9% for a 300 nm thick silicon layer), and this result persists over a wide range of incidence angles.

  4. Electrodeposition at room temperature of amorphous silicon and germanium nanowires in ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martineau, F.; Namur, K.; Mallet, J.; Delavoie, F.; Endres, F.; Troyon, M.; Molinari, M.

    2009-11-01

    The electrodeposition at room temperature of silicon and germanium nanowires from the air- and water-stable ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (P1,4) containing SiCl4 as Si source or GeCl4 as Ge source is investigated by cyclic voltammetry. By using nanoporous polycarbonate membranes as templates, it is possible to reproducibly grow pure silicon and germanium nanowires of different diameters. The nanowires are composed of pure amorphous silicon or germanium. The nanowires have homogeneous cylindrical shape with a roughness of a few nanometres on the wire surfaces. The nanowires' diameters and lengths well match with the initial membrane characteristics. Preliminary photoluminescence experiments exhibit strong emission in the near infrared for the amorphous silicon nanowires.

  5. Electrically Active Defects In Solar Cells Based On Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction After Irradiation By Heavy Xe Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmatha, Ladislav; Mikolášek, Miroslav; Stuchlíková, L'ubica; Kósa, Arpád; Žiška, Milan; Hrubčín, Ladislav; Skuratov, Vladimir A.

    2015-11-01

    The contribution is focused on the diagnostics of structures with a heterojunction between amorphous and crystalline silicon prepared by HIT (Heterojunction with an Intrinsic Thin layer) technology. The samples were irradiated by Xe ions with energy 167 MeV and doses from 5 × 108 cm-2 to 5 × 1010 cm-2. Radiation defects induced in the bulk of Si and at the hydrogenated amorphous silicon and crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) interface were identified by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS). Radiation induced A-centre traps, boron vacancy traps and different types of divacancies with a high value of activation energy were observed. With an increased fluence of heavy ions the nature and density of the radiation induced defects was changed.

  6. Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Hu, Jianhua; Musher, J.; Giunta, C.

    1991-02-01

    The specific objectives of this research are to: (1) deposit and characterize textured zinc oxide with improved conductivities (less than 8 ohms/square sheet resistance) and optical transmission (greater than 85 percent for 450 to 700 nm), for use as front and back contacts in hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n devices; (2) study the surface morphology of zinc oxide films deposited by chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure (APCVD), their crystallite sizes, shapes and orientations, and their nucleation (early growth) as a function of chemical precursors and reaction conditions; (3) optimize the growth process to produce structures that provide good light trapping in an amorphous silicon film deposited on the zinc oxide film; (4) study the deposition rate of zinc oxide films as a function of temperature, and concentration and types of reactants; (5) maximize the growth rate, subject to the conditions of maintaining satisfactory film properties, including high transparency (85 percent), high conductivity (8 ohm/square sheet resistance), and good light trapping; (6) develop techniques for deposition of fluorinated zinc oxide films by APCVD on amorphous silicon films in the temperature range of 250 to 280 C for use as back contacts; (7) deposit titanium nitride films at a temperature of about 250 C by APCVD on amorphous silicon as diffusion barrier, and then deposit highly reflective metals such as aluminum or silver; (8) anneal samples and test for metal diffusion through the TiN into the silicon; (9) optimize the TiN film for minimum diffusion consistent with maintaining desirable TiN film properties; and (10) incorporate the front and back contacts including the TiN barrier layer developed under this research into amorphous silicon p-i-n devices and determine the film parameters that provide the greatest improvement in the device solar energy conversion efficiency.

  7. First-principles study of the mechanical and optical properties of amorphous hydrogenated silicon and silicon-rich silicon oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondi, Robert J.; Lee, Sangheon; Hwang, Gyeong S.

    2010-05-01

    We use first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations to predict mechanical and optical property variation with composition for hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) ( at.%H=0 , 5.9, 11.1, and 15.8) and a-SiOx ( x=0 , 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0). A better understanding of the properties of a-Si:H and amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiOx) is technologically important, particularly for photovoltaic and optoelectronic device applications, respectively. However, relatively little reliable property information is available for these amorphous materials except for the well-studied end-point cases of a-Si and a-SiO2 . Our DFT calculations within the generalized gradient approximation predict that addition of H to a-Si monotonically reduces the elastic modulus (Y) by 18% and bulk modulus (B) by 16% as H incorporation increases to 15.8at.% in a-Si:H. Similarly, addition of O to a-Si monotonically reduces Y by 35% and B by 38% as x increases to 2.0 in a-SiOx . Our optical spectra for the complex dielectric function, ɛ(ω) , exhibit intensity reduction in the E2 transition peak of Im[ɛ(ω)] and reduction in the low-frequency dielectric constant {ɛo=limω→0Re[ɛ(ω)]} as either H or O are added to a-Si while the a-SiOx spectra additionally resolve a vivid blueshift of both the fundamental absorption edge and E2 transition energy as O content increases. Considering the large variation in reported experimental measurements and the limited availability of previous computational results, our property predictions provide valuable insight into the mechanical and optical behavior of a-Si:H and a-SiOx materials.

  8. Direct Simulation of Ion Beam Induced Stressing and Amorphization of Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1999-05-02

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the authors investigate the mechanical response of silicon to high dose ion-irradiation. The authors employ a realistic model to directly simulate ion beam induced amorphization. Structural properties of the amorphized sample are compared with experimental data and results of other simulation studies. The authors find the behavior of the irradiated material is related to the rate at which it can relax. Depending upon the ability to deform, the authors observe either the generation of a high compressive stress and subsequent expansion of the material, or generation of tensile stress and densification. The authors note that statistical material properties, such as radial distribution functions are not sufficient to differentiate between the different densities of the amorphous samples. For any reasonable deformation rate, the authors observe an expansion of the target upon amorphization in agreement with experimental observations. This is in contrast to simulations of quenching which usually result in a denser structure relative to crystalline Si. The authors conclude that although there is substantial agreement between experimental measurements and simulation results, the amorphous structures being investigated may have fundamental differences; the difference in density can be attributed to local defects within the amorphous network. Finally the authors show that annealing simulations of their amorphized samples can lead to a reduction of high energy local defects without a large scale rearrangement of the amorphous network. This supports the proposal that defects in a-Si are analogous to those in c-Si.

  9. Charging/discharging behavior and mechanism of silicon quantum dots embedded in amorphous silicon carbide films

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xixing; Zeng, Xiangbin Zheng, Wenjun; Liao, Wugang; Feng, Feng

    2015-01-14

    The charging/discharging behavior of Si quantum dots (QDs) embedded in amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC{sub x}) was investigated based on the Al/insulating layer/Si QDs embedded in a-SiC{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si (metal-insulator-quantum dots-oxide-silicon) multilayer structure by capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G-V) measurements. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy measurements reveal the microstructure and distribution of Si QDs. The occurrence and shift of conductance peaks indicate the carrier transfer and the charging/discharging behavior of Si QDs. The multilayer structure shows a large memory window of 5.2 eV at ±8 V sweeping voltage. Analysis of the C-V and G-V results allows a quantification of the Coulomb charging energy and the trapped charge density associated with the charging/discharging behavior. It is found that the memory window is related to the size effect, and Si QDs with large size or low Coulomb charging energy can trap two or more electrons by changing the charging voltage. Meanwhile, the estimated lower potential barrier height between Si QD and a-SiC{sub x}, and the lower Coulomb charging energy of Si QDs could enhance the charging and discharging effect of Si QDs and lead to an enlarged memory window. Further studies of the charging/discharging mechanism of Si QDs embedded in a-SiC{sub x} can promote the application of Si QDs in low-power consumption semiconductor memory devices.

  10. Dual-exposure technique for extending the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors.

    PubMed

    Sisniega, A; Abella, M; Desco, M; Vaquero, J J

    2014-01-20

    This work presents an approach to extend the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors by combining two acquisitions of the same sample taken with two different x-ray photon flux levels and the same beam spectral configuration. In order to combine both datasets, the response of detector pixels was modelled in terms of mean and variance using a linear model. The model was extended to take into account the effect of pixel saturation. We estimated a joint probability density function (j-pdf) of the pixel values by assuming that each dataset follows an independent Gaussian distribution. This j-pdf was used for estimating the final pixel value of the high-dynamic-range dataset using a maximum likelihood method. The suitability of the pixel model for the representation of the detector signal was assessed using experimental data from a small-animal cone-beam micro-CT scanner equipped with a flat panel detector. The potential extension in dynamic range offered by our method was investigated for generic flat panel detectors using analytical expressions and simulations. The performance of the proposed dual-exposure approach in realistic imaging environments was compared with that of a regular single-exposure technique using experimental data from two different phantoms. Image quality was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and analysis of profiles drawn on the images. The dynamic range, measured as the ratio between the exposure for saturation and the exposure equivalent to instrumentation noise, was increased from 76.9 to 166.7 when using our method. Dual-exposure results showed higher contrast-to-noise ratio and contrast resolution than the single-exposure acquisitions for the same x-ray dose. In addition, image artifacts were reduced in the combined dataset. This technique to extend the dynamic range of the detector without increasing the dose is particularly suited to image samples that contain both low and high attenuation regions.

  11. Dual-exposure technique for extending the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Abella, M.; Desco, M.; Vaquero, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an approach to extend the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors by combining two acquisitions of the same sample taken with two different x-ray photon flux levels and the same beam spectral configuration. In order to combine both datasets, the response of detector pixels was modelled in terms of mean and variance using a linear model. The model was extended to take into account the effect of pixel saturation. We estimated a joint probability density function (j-pdf) of the pixel values by assuming that each dataset follows an independent Gaussian distribution. This j-pdf was used for estimating the final pixel value of the high-dynamic-range dataset using a maximum likelihood method. The suitability of the pixel model for the representation of the detector signal was assessed using experimental data from a small-animal cone-beam micro-CT scanner equipped with a flat panel detector. The potential extension in dynamic range offered by our method was investigated for generic flat panel detectors using analytical expressions and simulations. The performance of the proposed dual-exposure approach in realistic imaging environments was compared with that of a regular single-exposure technique using experimental data from two different phantoms. Image quality was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and analysis of profiles drawn on the images. The dynamic range, measured as the ratio between the exposure for saturation and the exposure equivalent to instrumentation noise, was increased from 76.9 to 166.7 when using our method. Dual-exposure results showed higher contrast-to-noise ratio and contrast resolution than the single-exposure acquisitions for the same x-ray dose. In addition, image artifacts were reduced in the combined dataset. This technique to extend the dynamic range of the detector without increasing the dose is particularly suited to image samples that contain both low and high attenuation regions.

  12. Designing, Modeling, Constructing, and Testing a Flat Panel Speaker and Sound Diffuser for a Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, model, build, and test a flat panel speaker and frame for a spherical dome structure being made into a simulator. The simulator will be a test bed for evaluating an immersive environment for human interfaces. This project focused on the loud speakers and a sound diffuser for the dome. The rest of the team worked on an Ambisonics 3D sound system, video projection system, and multi-direction treadmill to create the most realistic scene possible. The main programs utilized in this project, were Pro-E and COMSOL. Pro-E was used for creating detailed figures for the fabrication of a frame that held a flat panel loud speaker. The loud speaker was made from a thin sheet of Plexiglas and 4 acoustic exciters. COMSOL, a multiphysics finite analysis simulator, was used to model and evaluate all stages of the loud speaker, frame, and sound diffuser. Acoustical testing measurements were utilized to create polar plots from the working prototype which were then compared to the COMSOL simulations to select the optimal design for the dome. The final goal of the project was to install the flat panel loud speaker design in addition to a sound diffuser on to the wall of the dome. After running tests in COMSOL on various speaker configurations, including a warped Plexiglas version, the optimal speaker design included a flat piece of Plexiglas with a rounded frame to match the curvature of the dome. Eight of these loud speakers will be mounted into an inch and a half of high performance acoustic insulation, or Thinsulate, that will cover the inside of the dome. The following technical paper discusses these projects and explains the engineering processes used, knowledge gained, and the projected future goals of this project

  13. Hybrid method of making an amorphous silicon P-I-N semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Morel, Don L.; Abeles, Benjamin

    1983-10-04

    The invention is directed to a hydrogenated amorphous silicon PIN semiconductor device of hybrid glow discharge/reactive sputtering fabrication. The hybrid fabrication method is of advantage in providing an ability to control the optical band gap of the P and N layers, resulting in increased photogeneration of charge carriers and device output.

  14. Method of forming semiconducting amorphous silicon films from the thermal decomposition of fluorohydridodisilanes

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Kenneth G.; D'Errico, John J.

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of forming amorphous, photoconductive, and semiconductive silicon films on a substrate by the vapor phase thermal decomposition of a fluorohydridodisilane or a mixture of fluorohydridodisilanes. The invention is useful for the protection of surfaces including electronic devices.

  15. Amorphous silicon research. Annual subcontract report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Arya, R R; Bennett, M; Bradley, D

    1996-02-01

    The major effort in this program is to develop cost-effective processes which satisfy efficiency, yield, and material usage criteria for mass production of amorphous silicon-based multijunction modules. New and improved processes were developed for the component cells and a more robust rear contact was developed for better long term stability.

  16. SIMS Study of Elemental Diffusion During Solid Phase Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R. C.; Young, D.; Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2005-11-01

    Crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films deposited on low-cost substrates shows potential for solar cell applications. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to study impurity incorporation, hydrogen evolution, and dopant diffusion during the crystallization process

  17. Converting films for X-ray detectors, applied to amorphous silicon arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, S.; Zentai, G.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents results from the on-going efforts to characterize semiconductor thin films for direct X-ray conversion. The authors deposit these thin films onto an amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) readout array with the overall goal of developing a large area X-ray detector for protein crystallography, and for other X-ray imaging fields.

  18. Converting films for x-ray detectors, applied to amorphous silicon arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, S.; Zentai, G.

    1997-12-05

    This paper presents results from our on-going efforts to characterize semiconductor thin films for direct x-ray conversion. We deposit these thin films onto an amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) readout array with the overall goal of developing a large area x-ray detector for protein crystallography, and for other x-ray imaging fields.

  19. Autostereoscopic 3D flat panel display using an LCD-pixel-associated parallax barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, En-guo; Guo, Tai-liang

    2014-05-01

    This letter reports an autostereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) flat panel display system employing a newly designed LCD-pixel-associated parallax barrier (LPB). The barrier's parameters can be conveniently determined by the LCD pixels and can help to greatly simplify the conventional design. The optical system of the proposed 3D display is built and simulated to verify the design. For further experimental demonstration, a 508-mm autostereoscopic 3D display prototype is developed and it presents good stereoscopic images. Experimental results agree well with the simulation, which reveals a strong potential for 3D display applications.

  20. [Screening chest X-ray examination with kinetic analysis using flat-panel detector].

    PubMed

    Sanada, Shigeru; Tanaka, Rie; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Inoue, Hitoshi

    2003-11-01

    We are developing dynamic screening radiography to provide kinetic information for lung respiratory examination using a flat-panel-detector (FPD) system. We modified the FPD system (CANON CXDI-22) to take sequential images for a short period of time (10 seconds, 3 frames/sec). Sequential chest radiographs from full inspiration to expiration were taken and analyzed for diaphragm movement and density changes in local lung areas to objectively detect respiratory anomalies. Our methods derived some respiratory functions such as regional air passage and lung structure movement, and suggested that the degree of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial pneumonia could be evaluated quantitatively.

  1. High-speed readout for the H8500 flat panel PSPMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsolini Cencelli, Valentino; de Notaristefani, Francesco; D'Abramo, Enrico

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we present a new readout system for the H8500 flat panel photomultiplier. The system is based on the MAX1320 analog-to-digital converter and reads all of 64 anodic signals simultaneously at a rate that approaches the 250 ksample/s typical of MAX1320 with a resolution of 14 bits. The data are read through an FPGA by a chip computer, the ETRAX 100LX, and either transmitted via Ethernet or stored on a USB mass storage device.

  2. Size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; Braun, Jeffrey L.; Baker, Christopher H.; Elahi, Miraz; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Norris, Pamela M.; Leseman, Zayd Chad; Gaskins, John T.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Giri, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate thickness-limited size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon thin films ranging from 3 to 1636 nm grown via sputter deposition. While exhibiting a constant value up to ~100 nm, the thermal conductivity increases with film thickness thereafter. The thickness dependence we demonstrate is ascribed to boundary scattering of long wavelength vibrations and an interplay between the energy transfer associated with propagating modes (propagons) and nonpropagating modes (diffusons). A crossover from propagon to diffuson modes is deduced to occur at a frequency of ~1.8 THz via simple analytical arguments. These results provide empirical evidence of size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon and systematic experimental insight into the nature of vibrational thermal transport in amorphous solids.

  3. Size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; Braun, Jeffrey L.; Baker, Christopher H.; ...

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate thickness-limited size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon thin films ranging from 3 to 1636 nm grown via sputter deposition. While exhibiting a constant value up to ~100 nm, the thermal conductivity increases with film thickness thereafter. The thickness dependence we demonstrate is ascribed to boundary scattering of long wavelength vibrations and an interplay between the energy transfer associated with propagating modes (propagons) and nonpropagating modes (diffusons). A crossover from propagon to diffuson modes is deduced to occur at a frequency of ~1.8 THz via simple analytical arguments. These results provide empirical evidencemore » of size effects on the thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon and systematic experimental insight into the nature of vibrational thermal transport in amorphous solids.« less

  4. Low-temperature Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Silicon Materials and Thin-film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, Andrei; Striakhilev, Denis; Nathan, Arokia

    Low-temperature processing and characterization of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) materials and devices are reviewed. An overview of silicon-based low-temperature thin-film dielectrics is given in the context of thin-film transistor (TFT) device operation. The low-temperature growth and synthesis of these materials are also presented and compared to conventionally fabricated high-temperature processed devices. The effect of using nc-Si contacts on a-Si:H TFTs and the stability of nc-Si TFTs is reviewed.

  5. Amorphous Silicon Carbide Passivating Layers to Enable Higher Processing Temperature in Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2015-04-06

    "Very efficient crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have been demonstrated when thin layers of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are used for passivation and carrier selectivity in a heterojunction device. One limitation of this device structure is the (parasitic) absorption in the front passivation/collection a-Si:H layers; another is the degradation of the a-Si:H-based passivation upon temperature, limiting the post-processes to approximately 200°C thus restricting the contacting possibilities and potential tandem device fabrication. To alleviate these two limitations, we explore the potential of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), a widely studied material in use in standard a-Si:H thin-film solar cells, which is known for its wider bandgap, increased hydrogen content and stronger hydrogen bonding compared to a-Si:H. We study the surface passivation of solar-grade textured n-type c-Si wafers for symmetrical stacks of 10-nm-thick intrinsic a-SiC:H with various carbon content followed by either p-doped or n-doped a-Si:H (referred to as i/p or i/n stacks). For both doping types, passivation (assessed through carrier lifetime measurements) is degraded by increasing the carbon content in the intrinsic a-SiC:H layer. Yet, this hierarchy is reversed after annealing at 350°C or more due to drastic passivation improvements upon annealing when an a-SiC:H layer is used. After annealing at 350°C, lifetimes of 0.4 ms and 2.0 ms are reported for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, when using an intrinsic a-SiC:H layer with approximately 10% of carbon (initial lifetimes of 0.3 ms and 0.1 ms, respectively, corresponding to a 30% and 20-fold increase, respectively). For stacks of pure a-Si:H material the lifetimes degrade from 1.2 ms and 2.0 ms for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, to less than 0.1 ms and 1.1 ms (12-fold and 2-fold decrease, respectively). For complete solar cells using pure a-Si:H i/p and i/n stacks, the open-circuit voltage (Voc

  6. Integrated Amorphous Silicon p-i-n Temperature Sensor for CMOS Photonics.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sandro; Pangallo, Giovanni; Della Corte, Francesco Giuseppe

    2016-01-06

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) shows interesting optoelectronic and technological properties that make it suitable for the fabrication of passive and active micro-photonic devices, compatible moreover with standard microelectronic devices on a microchip. A temperature sensor based on a hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diode integrated in an optical waveguide for silicon photonics applications is presented here. The linear dependence of the voltage drop across the forward-biased diode on temperature, in a range from 30 °C up to 170 °C, has been used for thermal sensing. A high sensitivity of 11.9 mV/°C in the bias current range of 34-40 nA has been measured. The proposed device is particularly suitable for the continuous temperature monitoring of CMOS-compatible photonic integrated circuits, where the behavior of the on-chip active and passive devices are strongly dependent on their operating temperature.

  7. Amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation: Ambient-temperature dependence and implications for solar cell performance

    DOE PAGES

    Seif, Johannes P.; Krishnamani, Gopal; Demaurex, Benedicte; ...

    2015-03-02

    Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells feature amorphous silicon passivation films, which enable very high voltages. We report how such passivation increases with operating temperature for amorphous silicon stacks involving doped layers and decreases for intrinsic-layer-only passivation. We discuss the implications of this phenomenon on the solar cell's temperature coefficient, which represents an important figure-of-merit for the energy yield of devices deployed in the field. We show evidence that both open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are affected by these variations in passivation and quantify these temperature-mediated effects, compared with those expected from standard diode equations. We confirm that devicesmore » with high Voc values at 25°C show better high-temperature performance. Thus, we also argue that the precise device architecture, such as the presence of charge-transport barriers, may affect the temperature-dependent device performance as well.« less

  8. Dose effects on amorphous silicon sputtering by argon ions: A molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, L.A.; Rubio, J.E.; Jaraiz, M.; Bailon, L.A.; Barbolla, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    We have investigated, using molecular dynamics techniques, the sputtering yield enhancement of amorphous silicon produced by argon ion accumulation within the target. Several amorphous silicon samples, with different argon contents, were bombarded with 1 keV argon ions at normal incidence. To study the influence of the target structure, we considered samples with different argon arrangements, either uniformly distributed or within solid bubbles. We have observed that silicon sputtering yield increases linearly with dose until steady state conditions are reached. This enhancement is produced by the shallow argon atoms through the weakening of Si{endash}Si bonds. We have also observed that argon release takes place even long after the end of the collisional phase, and it is produced by ion-induced desorption and bubble destabilization. This enhanced argon yield determines the dose where target saturation and steady state conditions are reached. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation: Ambient-temperature dependence and implications for solar cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Seif, Johannes P.; Krishnamani, Gopal; Demaurex, Benedicte; Ballif, Christophe; Wolf, Stefaan De

    2015-03-02

    Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells feature amorphous silicon passivation films, which enable very high voltages. We report how such passivation increases with operating temperature for amorphous silicon stacks involving doped layers and decreases for intrinsic-layer-only passivation. We discuss the implications of this phenomenon on the solar cell's temperature coefficient, which represents an important figure-of-merit for the energy yield of devices deployed in the field. We show evidence that both open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are affected by these variations in passivation and quantify these temperature-mediated effects, compared with those expected from standard diode equations. We confirm that devices with high Voc values at 25°C show better high-temperature performance. Thus, we also argue that the precise device architecture, such as the presence of charge-transport barriers, may affect the temperature-dependent device performance as well.

  10. Sub-amorphous thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline silicon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Matthew C; Kwon, Soonshin; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos; Xiang, Jie; Chen, Renkun

    2015-04-08

    Thermal transport behavior in nanostructures has become increasingly important for understanding and designing next generation electronic and energy devices. This has fueled vibrant research targeting both the causes and ability to induce extraordinary reductions of thermal conductivity in crystalline materials, which has predominantly been achieved by understanding that the phonon mean free path (MFP) is limited by the characteristic size of crystalline nanostructures, known as the boundary scattering or Casimir limit. Herein, by using a highly sensitive measurement system, we show that crystalline Si (c-Si) nanotubes (NTs) with shell thickness as thin as ∼5 nm exhibit a low thermal conductivity of ∼1.1 W m(-1) K(-1). Importantly, this value is lower than the apparent boundary scattering limit and is even about 30% lower than the measured value for amorphous Si (a-Si) NTs with similar geometries. This finding diverges from the prevailing general notion that amorphous materials represent the lower limit of thermal transport but can be explained by the strong elastic softening effect observed in the c-Si NTs, measured as a 6-fold reduction in Young's modulus compared to bulk Si and nearly half that of the a-Si NTs. These results illustrate the potent prospect of employing the elastic softening effect to engineer lower than amorphous, or subamorphous, thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline nanostructures.

  11. Perfusion analysis using a wide coverage flat-panel volume CT: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Klotz, E.; Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T.

    2007-03-01

    We developed a Flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) prototype scanner with large z-coverage. In that prototype scanner a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector was mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions) which provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at isocenter. The large volume covered in one rotation can be used for visualization of complete organs of small animals, e.g. rabbits. By implementing a mode with continuous scanning, we are able to reconstruct the complete volume at any point in time during the propagation of a contrast bolus. Multiple volumetric reconstructions over time elucidate the first pass dynamics of a bolus of contrast resulting in 4-D angiography and potentially allowing whole organ perfusion analysis. We studied to which extent pixel based permeability and blood volume calculation with a modified Patlak approach was possible. Experimental validation was performed by imaging evolution of contrast bolus in New Zealand rabbits. Despite the short circulation time of a rabbit, the temporal resolution was sufficient to visually resolve various phases of the first pass of the contrast bolus. Perfusion imaging required substantial spatial smoothing but allowed a qualitative discrimination of different types of parenchyma in brain and liver. If a true quantitative analysis is possible, requires further studies.

  12. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  13. Investigation of forming curved ablative panels from flat panels for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of reforming flat ablative panels to a curved configuration. The study indicated that if the panels could be shaped to a radius of 2.54 m (100 in.) then 88.7% of the surface area of the orbiter could be covered, and that if they could be shaped to a radius of 3.81 m (150 in.) then 77.2% of the surface could be covered. Two basic approaches were followed to determine the best method for forming the flat panels to a curved shape. The first was to determine if partially cured panels could be formed, allowing the forming heat cycle to complete the curing of the ablator. The second method was to form fully cured flat panels into the desired curvature through a secondary heat cycle. Measurements made on the panels during storage indicated that they continued to straighten out over time. This was attributed to residual stresses locked into the panels that had not been fully relaxed by the heat cycle.

  14. Flat-panel detector-based cone beam volume CT breast imaging: detector evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong; Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola

    2003-06-01

    Preliminary evaluation of large-area flat panel detectors (FPDs) indicates that FPDs have some potential advantages over film-screen and CCD-based imagers: compactness, high resolution, high frame rate, large dynamic range, small image lag (<1%), and excellent linearity (~1%). A real time large-area flat panel detector (FPD) Varian PaxScan 2520 was evaluated for cone-beam volume breast imaging (CBVCTBI) in terms of dynamic range, linearity, image lag, and spatial as well as low contrast resolution. In addition, specially made breast phantoms were imaged with our prototyped CBVCTBI system to provide real outcomes to evaluate the detector under full imaging system conditions including the x-ray source, gantry geometry, x-ray technique selection, data acquisition system and reconstruction algorithms. We have concentrated on the low kVp range (30 to 80 kVp) in the context of the breast-imaging task. For ~288 images/scan the exposure required was ~2.5mR/projection. This is equivalent to that of a conventional mammography screening exam. The results indicate that the FPD-based CBVCTBI system can achieve sufficient high- and low-contrast resolution for diagnostic CBVCT breast imaging with a clinically acceptable exposure level. The advantages of the new FPD make it a promising candidate for CBVCTBI.

  15. View-dependent geometric calibration for offset flat-panel cone beam computed tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang

    2016-04-01

    Geometric parameters that define the geometry of imaging systems are crucial for image reconstruction and image quality in x-ray computed tomography (CT). The problem of determining geometric parameters for an offset flat-panel cone beam CT (CBCT) system, a recently introduced modality with a large field of view, with the assumption of an unstable mechanism and geometric parameters that vary in each view, is considered. To accurately and rapidly find the geometric parameters for each projection view, we use the projection matrix method and design a dedicated phantom that is partially visible in all projection views. The phantom consists of balls distributed symmetrically in a cylinder to ensure the inclusion of the phantom in all views, and a large portion of the phantom is covered in the projection image. To efficiently use calibrated geometric information in the reconstruction process and get rid of approximation errors, instead of decomposing the projection matrix into actual geometric parameters that are manually corrected before being used in reconstruction, as in conventional methods, we directly use the projection matrix and its pseudo-inverse in projection and backprojection operations of reconstruction algorithms. The experiments illustrate the efficacy of the proposed method with a real offset flat-panel CBCT system in dental imaging.

  16. Physical properties of a new flat panel detector with cesium-iodide technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Andreas; Penchev, Petar; Fiebich, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Flat panel detectors have become the standard technology in projection radiography. Further progress in detector technology will result in an improvement of MTF and DQE. The new detector (DX-D45C; Agfa; Mortsel/Belgium) is based on cesium-iodine crystals and has a change in the detector material and the readout electronics. The detector has a size of 30 cm x 24 cm and a pixel matrix of 2560 x 2048 with a pixel pitch of 124 μm. The system includes an automatic exposure detector, which enables the use of the detector without a connection to the x-ray generator. The physical properties of the detector were determined following IEC 62220-1-1 in a laboratory setting. The MTF showed an improvement compared to the previous version of cesium-iodine based flat-panel detectors. Thereby the DQE is also improved especially for the higher frequencies. The new detector showed an improvement in the physical properties compared to the previous versions. This enables a potential for further dose reductions in clinical imaging.

  17. An iterative algorithm for soft tissue reconstruction from truncated flat panel projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langan, D.; Claus, B.; Edic, P.; Vaillant, R.; De Man, B.; Basu, S.; Iatrou, M.

    2006-03-01

    The capabilities of flat panel interventional x-ray systems continue to expand, enabling a broader array of medical applications to be performed in a minimally invasive manner. Although CT is providing pre-operative 3D information, there is a need for 3D imaging of low contrast soft tissue during interventions in a number of areas including neurology, cardiac electro-physiology, and oncology. Unlike CT systems, interventional angiographic x-ray systems provide real-time large field of view 2D imaging, patient access, and flexible gantry positioning enabling interventional procedures. However, relative to CT, these C-arm flat panel systems have additional technical challenges in 3D soft tissue imaging including slower rotation speed, gantry vibration, reduced lateral patient field of view (FOV), and increased scatter. The reduced patient FOV often results in significant data truncation. Reconstruction of truncated (incomplete) data is known an "interior problem", and it is mathematically impossible to obtain an exact reconstruction. Nevertheless, it is an important problem in 3D imaging on a C-arm to address the need to generate a 3D reconstruction representative of the object being imaged with minimal artifacts. In this work we investigate the application of an iterative Maximum Likelihood Transmission (MLTR) algorithm to truncated data. We also consider truncated data with limited views for cardiac imaging where the views are gated by the electrocardiogram(ECG) to combat motion artifacts.

  18. A Comparison of Photo-Induced Hysteresis Between Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous IGZO Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Cho, Won-Ju; Chung, Hong-Bay; Koo, Sang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    We investigate photo-induced instability in thin-film transistors (TFTs) consisting of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) as active semiconducting layers by comparing with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). An a-IGZO TFT exhibits a large hysteresis window in the illuminated measuring condition but no hysteresis window in the dark condition. On the contrary, a large hysteresis window measured in the dark condition in a-Si:H was not observed in the illuminated condition. Even though such materials possess the structure of amorphous phase, optical responses or photo instability in TFTs looks different from each other. Photo-induced hysteresis results from initially trapped charges at the interface between semiconductor and dielectric films or in the gate dielectric which possess absorption energy to interact with deep trap-states and affect the movement of Fermi energy level. In order to support our claim, we also perform CV characteristics in photo-induced hysteresis and demonstrate thermal-activated hysteresis. We believe that this work can provide important information to understand different material systems for optical engineering which includes charge transport and band transition.

  19. AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: physics of flat-panel fluoroscopy systems: Survey of modern fluoroscopy imaging: flat-panel detectors versus image intensifiers and more.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, Edward Lee

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the design and operation of both flat-panel detector (FPD) and image intensifier fluoroscopy systems. The different components of each imaging chain and their functions are explained and compared. FPD systems have multiple advantages such as a smaller size, extended dynamic range, no spatial distortion, and greater stability. However, FPD systems typically have the same spatial resolution for all fields of view (FOVs) and are prone to ghosting. Image intensifier systems have better spatial resolution with the use of smaller FOVs (magnification modes) and tend to be less expensive. However, the spatial resolution of image intensifier systems is limited by the television system to which they are coupled. Moreover, image intensifier systems are degraded by glare, vignetting, spatial distortions, and defocusing effects. FPD systems do not have these problems. Some recent innovations to fluoroscopy systems include automated filtration, pulsed fluoroscopy, automatic positioning, dose-area product meters, and improved automatic dose rate control programs. Operator-selectable features may affect both the patient radiation dose and image quality; these selectable features include dose level setting, the FOV employed, fluoroscopic pulse rates, geometric factors, display software settings, and methods to reduce the imaging time.

  20. Reactive Infiltration of Silicon Melt Through Microporous Amorphous Carbon Preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangsuwan, P.; Tewari, S. N.; Gatica, J. E.; Singh, M.; Dickerson, R.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of unidirectional capillary infiltration of silicon melt into microporous carbon preforms have been investigated as a function of the pore morphology and melt temperature. The infiltrated specimens showed alternating bands of dark and bright regions, which corresponded to the unreacted free carbon and free silicon regions, respectively. The decrease in the infiltration front velocity for increasing infiltration distances, is in qualitative agreement with the closed-form solution of capillarity driven fluid flow through constant cross section cylindrical pores. However, drastic changes in the thermal response and infiltration front morphologies were observed for minute differences in the preforms microstructure. This suggests the need for a dynamic percolation model that would account for the exothermic nature of the silicon-carbon chemical reaction and the associated pore closing phenomenon.

  1. Directed dewetting of amorphous silicon film by a donut-shaped laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; In, Jung Bin; Zheng, Cheng; Sakellari, Ioanna; Raman, Rajesh N.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Elhadj, Selim; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2015-04-01

    Irradiation of a thin film with a beam-shaped laser is proposed to achieve site-selectively controlled dewetting of the film into nanoscale structures. As a proof of concept, the laser-directed dewetting of an amorphous silicon thin film on a glass substrate is demonstrated using a donut-shaped laser beam. Upon irradiation of a single laser pulse, the silicon film melts and dewets on the substrate surface. The irradiation with the donut beam induces an unconventional lateral temperature profile in the film, leading to thermocapillary-induced transport of the molten silicon to the center of the beam spot. Upon solidification, the ultrathin amorphous silicon film is transformed to a crystalline silicon nanodome of increased height. This morphological change enables further dimensional reduction of the nanodome as well as removal of the surrounding film material by isotropic silicon etching. These results suggest that laser-based dewetting of thin films can be an effective way for scalable manufacturing of patterned nanostructures.

  2. Unusually High and Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity in Amorphous Silicon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonshin; Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C; Cui, Shuang; Chen, Renkun

    2017-02-02

    Amorphous Si (a-Si) nanostructures are ubiquitous in numerous electronic and optoelectronic devices. Amorphous materials are considered to possess the lower limit to the thermal conductivity (κ), which is ∼1 W·m(-1) K(-1) for a-Si. However, recent work suggested that κ of micrometer-thick a-Si films can be greater than 3 W·m(-1) K(-1), which is contributed to by propagating vibrational modes, referred to as "propagons". However, precise determination of κ in a-Si has been elusive. Here, we used structures of a-Si nanotubes and suspended a-Si films that enabled precise in-plane thermal conductivity (κ∥) measurement within a wide thickness range of 5 nm to 1.7 μm. We showed unexpectedly high κ∥ in a-Si nanostructures, reaching ∼3.0 and 5.3 W·m(-1) K(-1) at ∼100 nm and 1.7 μm, respectively. Furthermore, the measured κ∥ is significantly higher than the cross-plane κ on the same films. This unusually high and anisotropic thermal conductivity in the amorphous Si nanostructure manifests the surprisingly broad propagon mean free path distribution, which is found to range from 10 nm to 10 μm, in the disordered and atomically isotropic structure. This result provides an unambiguous answer to the century-old problem regarding mean free path distribution of propagons and also sheds light on the design and performance of numerous a-Si based electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  3. Device-size atomistic models of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, R. L. C.; Barkema, G. T.; Stijnman, M. A.; Bisseling, R. H.

    2001-12-01

    The atomic structure of amorphous materials is believed to be well described by the continuous-random-network model. We present an algorithm for the generation of large, high-quality continuous random networks. The algorithm is a variation of the sillium approach introduced by Wooten, Winer, and Weaire [Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 1392 (1985)]. By employing local relaxation techniques, local atomic rearrangements can be tried that scale almost independently of system size. This scaling property of the algorithm paves the way for the generation of realistic device-size atomic networks.

  4. Ammonia sensitivity of amorphous carbon film/silicon heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xili; Xue Qingzhong; Hao Lanzhong; Zheng Qingbin; Li Qun

    2007-09-17

    The amorphous carbon film/n-Si (a-C/Si) junctions have been fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The results show that these junctions have good rectifying properties and high ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas sensitivity. For a given reverse bias voltage, the resistance of the junction can increase by 100 times rapidly when exposed to NH{sub 3} gas. This phenomenon may be attributed to the change of the space charge width of the junction, which is caused by the adsorption of NH{sub 3} gas molecules. This study shows that these a-C/Si junctions have potential application as NH{sub 3} gas detect sensors.

  5. Ultrasmooth growth of amorphous silicon films through ion-induced long-range surface correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; Gago, R.; Vazquez, L.

    2011-01-03

    Ultrasmooth amorphous silicon films with a constant roughness below 0.2 nm were produced for film thickness up to {approx}1 {mu}m by magnetron sputtering under negative voltage substrate biasing (100-400 V). In contrast, under unbiased conditions the roughness of the resulting mounded films increased linearly with growth time due to shadowing effects. A detailed analysis of the amorphous film growth dynamics proves that the bias-induced ultrasmoothness is produced by a downhill mass transport process that leads to an extreme surface leveling inducing surface height correlations up to lateral distances close to 0.5 {mu}m.

  6. Absence of an abrupt phase change from polycrystalline to amorphous in silicon with deposition temperature.

    PubMed

    Voyles, P M; Gerbi, J E; Treacy, M M; Gibson, J M; Abelson, J R

    2001-06-11

    Using fluctuation electron microscopy, we have observed an increase in the mesoscopic spatial fluctuations in the diffracted intensity from vapor-deposited silicon thin films as a function of substrate temperature from the amorphous to polycrystalline regimes. We interpret this increase as an increase in paracrystalline medium-range order in the sample. A paracrystal consists of topologically crystalline grains in a disordered matrix; in this model the increase in ordering is caused by an increase in the grain size or density. Our observations are counter to the previous belief that the amorphous to polycrystalline transition is a discontinuous disorder-order phase transition.

  7. Fabrication of high-quality amorphous silicon film from cyclopentasilane by vapor deposition between two parallel substrates.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongrong; Masuda, Takashi; Takagishi, Hideyuki; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2015-03-14

    Cyclopentasilane converts into amorphous silicon film between two parallel substrates under atmospheric pressure by thermal decomposition at 350-400 °C, which combines the advantages of high throughput with cost reduction and high quality film formation.

  8. Innovative Characterization of Amorphous and Thin-Film Silicon for Improved Module Performance: 1 February 2005 - 31 July 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P. C.; Williams, G. A.

    2009-09-01

    Electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance was done on amorphous silicon samples (modules with a-Si:H and a-SixGe1-x:H intrinsic layer) to study defects that contribute to Staebler-Wronski effect.

  9. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation of amorphous silicon to increase the temperature processing window of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianwei; Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2016-07-01

    The dehydrogenation of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) at temperatures above approximately 300 °C degrades its ability to passivate silicon wafer surfaces. This limits the temperature of post-passivation processing steps during the fabrication of advanced silicon heterojunction or silicon-based tandem solar cells. We demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma can rehydrogenate intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layers that have been dehydrogenated by annealing. The hydrogen plasma treatment fully restores the effective carrier lifetime to several milliseconds in textured crystalline silicon wafers coated with 8-nm-thick intrinsic a-Si:H layers after annealing at temperatures of up to 450 °C. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation also translates to complete solar cells: A silicon heterojunction solar cell subjected to annealing at 450 °C (following intrinsic a-Si:H deposition) had an open-circuit voltage of less than 600 mV, but an identical cell that received hydrogen plasma treatment reached a voltage of over 710 mV and an efficiency of over 19%.

  10. The structure of band-tail states in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabold, D. A.; Dong, Jianjun

    1997-03-01

    We compute and analyze the electronic eigenstates of the realistic and large (4096) atom model of Djordjevic, Thorpe and Wooten(B. R. Djordjevic, M. F. Thorpe and F. Wooten, Phys. Rev. B 52) 5685 (1995) in the vicinity of the gap. We discuss the structure, localization, and conductivity (from the Kubo formula) for states from midgap, well into the interior of the valence band. Tight-binding and ab initio (LDA) approximations for the states are discussed; comparisons are made to total yield photoelectron spectroscopy measurements(S. Aljisji, J. D. Cohen, S. Jin and L. Ley, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64), 2811 (1990). This is an extension of our earlier work on amorphous diamond( J. Dong and D. A. Drabold, Phys. Rev. B 54) 10284 (1996) to a-Si.

  11. Solid-phase crystallization of amorphous silicon nanowire array and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Ryousuke; Kato, Shinya; Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2014-02-01

    An amorphous silicon nanowire (a-SiNW) array perpendicular to a glass substrate can be successfully obtained through the metal-assisted chemical etching of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films. The solid-phase crystallization of a-SiNWs was carried out by thermal annealing in a forming gas in the temperature range from 600 to 900 °C. The effects of hydrogen in the film and the film morphology on the crystallization of a-SiNWs were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A higher hydrogen concentration of a-SiNWs reduced the crystallization temperature, as in a-Si thin films. It was also revealed that the large surface area of the a-SiNW array affected the crystallization process. We also studied the optical property of the fabricated SiNW array and demonstrated its high potential as an active layer in solar cells.

  12. Label-free direct electronic detection of biomolecules with amorphous silicon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lund, John; Mehta, Ranjana; Parviz, Babak A

    2006-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of a nano-scale sensor made of amorphous silicon for the label-free, electronic detection of three classes of biologically important molecules: ions, oligonucleotides, and proteins. The sensor structure has an active element which is a 50 nm wide amorphous silicon semicircle and has a total footprint of less than 4 microm2. We demonstrate the functionalization of the sensor with receptor molecules and the electronic detection of three targets: H(+) ions, short single-stranded DNAs, and streptavidin. The sensor is able to reliably distinguish single base-pair mismatches in 12 base long strands of DNA and monitor the introduction and identification of straptavidin in real-time. The versatile sensor structure can be readily functionalized with a wide range of receptor molecules and is suitable for integration with high-speed electronic circuits as a post-process on an integrated circuit chip.

  13. Solid-phase epitaxy of silicon amorphized by implantation of the alkali elements rubidium and cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, R.; Haeublein, V.; Ryssel, H.; Voellm, H.; Feili, D.; Seidel, H.; Frey, L.

    2012-11-06

    The redistribution of implanted Rb and Cs profiles in amorphous silicon during solid-phase epitaxial recrystallization has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. For the implantation dose used in these experiments, the alkali atoms segregate at the a-Si/c-Si interface during annealing resulting in concentration peaks near the interface. In this way, the alkali atoms are moved towards the surface. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in ion channeling configuration was performed to measure average recrystallization rates of the amorphous silicon layers. Preliminary studies on the influence of the alkali atoms on the solid-phase epitaxial regrowth rate reveal a strong retardation compared to the intrinsic recrystallization rate.

  14. Corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility of biodegradable surgical magnesium alloy coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yunchang; Jiang, Jiang; Huo, Kaifu; Tang, Guoyi; Tian, Xiubo; Chu, Paul K

    2009-06-01

    The fast degradation rates in the physiological environment constitute the main limitation for the applications of surgical magnesium alloys as biodegradable hard-tissue implants. In this work, a stable and dense hydrogenated amorphous silicon coating (a-Si:H) with desirable bioactivity is deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy using magnetron sputtering deposition. Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveal that the coating is mainly composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The hardness of the coated alloy is enhanced significantly and the coating is quite hydrophilic as well. Potentiodynamic polarization results show that the corrosion resistance of the coated alloy is enhanced dramatically. In addition, the deterioration process of the coating in simulated body fluids is systematically investigated by open circuit potential evolution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The cytocompatibility of the coated Mg is evaluated for the first time using hFOB1.19 cells and favorable biocompatibility is observed.

  15. Highly efficient ultrathin-film amorphous silicon solar cells on top of imprinted periodic nanodot arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wensheng Gu, Min; Tao, Zhikuo; Ong, Thiam Min Brian

    2015-03-02

    The addressing of the light absorption and conversion efficiency is critical to the ultrathin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. We systematically investigate ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells with a 100 nm absorber on top of imprinted hexagonal nanodot arrays. Experimental evidences are demonstrated for not only notable silver nanodot arrays but also lower-cost ITO and Al:ZnO nanodot arrays. The measured external quantum efficiency is explained by the simulation results. The J{sub sc} values are 12.1, 13.0, and 14.3 mA/cm{sup 2} and efficiencies are 6.6%, 7.5%, and 8.3% for ITO, Al:ZnO, and silver nanodot arrays, respectively. Simulated optical absorption distribution shows high light trapping within amorphous silicon layer.

  16. An alternative system for mycotoxin detection based on amorphous silicon sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, D.; de Cesare, G.; De Rossi, P.; Fanelli, C.; Nascetti, A.; Ricelli, A.; Scipinotti, R.

    2007-05-01

    In this work we investigate, for the first time, the performances of a system based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon photosensors for the detection of Ochratoxin A. The sensor is a n-type/intrinsic/p-type amorphous silicon stacked structure deposited on a glass substrate. The mycotoxin is deposited on a thin layer chromatographic plate and aligned with the sensor. An ultraviolet radiation excites the ochratoxin A, whose fluorescence produces a photocurrent in the sensor. The photocurrent value is proportional to the deposited mycotoxin quantity. An excellent linearity of the detector response over more than two orders of magnitude of ochratoxin A amount is observed. The minimum detected mycotoxin quantity is equal to 0.1ng, suggesting that the presented detection system could be a good candidate to perform rapid and analytical ochratoxin A analysis in different kind of samples.

  17. Carbon nanotube-amorphous silicon hybrid solar cell with improved conversion efficiency.

    PubMed

    Funde, Adinath M; Nasibulin, Albert G; Syed, Hashmi Gufran; Anisimov, Anton S; Tsapenko, Alexey; Lund, Peter; Santos, J D; Torres, I; Gandía, J J; Cárabe, J; Rozenberg, A D; Levitsky, Igor A

    2016-05-06

    We report a hybrid solar cell based on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) interfaced with amorphous silicon (a-Si). The high quality carbon nanotube network was dry transferred onto intrinsic a-Si forming Schottky junction for metallic SWNT bundles and heterojunctions for semiconducting SWNT bundles. The nanotube chemical doping and a-Si surface treatment minimized the hysteresis effect in current-voltage characteristics allowing an increase in the conversion efficiency to 1.5% under an air mass 1.5 solar spectrum simulator. We demonstrated that the thin SWNT film is able to replace a simultaneously p-doped a-Si layer and transparent conductive electrode in conventional amorphous silicon thin film photovoltaics.

  18. Plasmonic effects in amorphous silicon thin film solar cells with metal back contacts.

    PubMed

    Palanchoke, Ujwol; Jovanov, Vladislav; Kurz, Henning; Obermeyer, Philipp; Stiebig, Helmut; Knipp, Dietmar

    2012-03-12

    Plasmonic effects in amorphous silicon thin film solar cells with randomly textured metal back contact were investigated experimentally and numerically. The influence of different metal back contacts with and without ZnO interlayer was studied and losses in the individual layers of the solar cell were quantified. The amorphous silicon thin film solar cells were prepared on randomly textured substrates using large area production equipment and exhibit conversion efficiencies approaching 10%. The optical wave propagation within the solar cells was studied by Finite Difference Time Domain simulations. The quantum efficiency of solar cells with and without ZnO interlayer was simulated and the interplay between the reflection, quantum efficiency and absorption in the back contact will be discussed.

  19. Atomistic modeling of amorphous silicon carbide using a bond-order potential

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2007-02-16

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed with a Brenner-type bond-order potential to study the melting of silicon carbide (SiC), the structure of amorphous SiC produced by quenching from the melt, and the evolution of the amorphous state after isochronal annealing at elevated temperatures. The simulations reveal that SiC melts above 3700 K with an enthalpy of fusion of about 0.6 eV/atom. The density of the quenched liquid is about 2820 kg/m3, in excellent agreement with the experimental value for SiC amorphized by neutron irradiation. In addition to the loss of long-range order, the quenched liquid shows short-range disorder as measured by the C homonuclear bond ratio. Upon annealing, there is partial recovery of shortrange order.

  20. Nanoscale solely amorphous layer in silicon wafers induced by a newly developed diamond wheel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Guo, Liangchao; Cui, Junfeng; Wang, Bo; Kang, Renke; Guo, Dongming

    2016-10-13

    Nanoscale solely amorphous layer is achieved in silicon (Si) wafers, using a developed diamond wheel with ceria, which is confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). This is different from previous reports of ultraprecision grinding, nanoindentation and nanoscratch, in which an amorphous layer at the top, followed by a crystalline damaged layer beneath. The thicknesses of amorphous layer are 43 and 48 nm at infeed rates of 8 and 15 μm/min, respectively, which is verified using HRTEM. Diamond-cubic Si-I phase is verified in Si wafers using selected area electron diffraction patterns, indicating the absence of high pressure phases. Ceria plays an important role in the diamond wheel for achieving ultrasmooth and bright surfaces using ultraprecision grinding.

  1. Nanoscale solely amorphous layer in silicon wafers induced by a newly developed diamond wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Guo, Liangchao; Cui, Junfeng; Wang, Bo; Kang, Renke; Guo, Dongming

    2016-10-01

    Nanoscale solely amorphous layer is achieved in silicon (Si) wafers, using a developed diamond wheel with ceria, which is confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). This is different from previous reports of ultraprecision grinding, nanoindentation and nanoscratch, in which an amorphous layer at the top, followed by a crystalline damaged layer beneath. The thicknesses of amorphous layer are 43 and 48 nm at infeed rates of 8 and 15 μm/min, respectively, which is verified using HRTEM. Diamond-cubic Si-I phase is verified in Si wafers using selected area electron diffraction patterns, indicating the absence of high pressure phases. Ceria plays an important role in the diamond wheel for achieving ultrasmooth and bright surfaces using ultraprecision grinding.

  2. Nanoscale solely amorphous layer in silicon wafers induced by a newly developed diamond wheel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Guo, Liangchao; Cui, Junfeng; Wang, Bo; Kang, Renke; Guo, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale solely amorphous layer is achieved in silicon (Si) wafers, using a developed diamond wheel with ceria, which is confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). This is different from previous reports of ultraprecision grinding, nanoindentation and nanoscratch, in which an amorphous layer at the top, followed by a crystalline damaged layer beneath. The thicknesses of amorphous layer are 43 and 48 nm at infeed rates of 8 and 15 μm/min, respectively, which is verified using HRTEM. Diamond-cubic Si-I phase is verified in Si wafers using selected area electron diffraction patterns, indicating the absence of high pressure phases. Ceria plays an important role in the diamond wheel for achieving ultrasmooth and bright surfaces using ultraprecision grinding. PMID:27734934

  3. Medium-range order in hydrogenated amorphous silicon measured by fluctuation microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, P. M.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Jin, H.-C.; Abelson, J. R.; Gibson, J. M.; Guha, S.; Crandall, R. S.

    2000-04-17

    The authors have characterized with fluctuation electron microscopy the medium-range order of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films deposited by a variety of methods. Films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering, hot-wire chemical vapor deposition, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with and without H{sub 2} dilution of the SiH{sub 4} precursor gas. All of the films show the signature of the paracrystalline structure typical of amorphous Si. There are small variations in the degree of medium-range order with deposition methods and H{sub 2} content. The PECVD film grown with high H{sub 2} dilution contains Si crystals {approximately} 5 nm in diameter at a density of {approximately} 10{sup 9} cm{sup 2}. The amorphous matrix surrounding these crystals shows no difference in medium-range order from the standard PECVD film.

  4. The role of hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide buffer layer on improving the performance of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium single-junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharathikhun, Jaran; Inthisang, Sorapong; Krajangsang, Taweewat; Krudtad, Patipan; Jaroensathainchok, Suttinan; Hongsingtong, Aswin; Limmanee, Amornrat; Sriprapha, Kobsak

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (a-Si1-xOx:H) film was used as a buffer layer at the p-layer (μc-Si1-xOx:H)/i-layer (a-Si1-xGex:H) interface for a narrow band gap hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium (a-Si1-xGex:H) single-junction solar cell. The a-Si1-xOx:H film was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 40 MHz in a same processing chamber as depositing the p-type layer. An optimization of the thickness of the a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layer and the CO2/SiH4 ratio was performed in the fabrication of the a-Si1-xGex:H single junction solar cells. By using the wide band gap a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layer with optimum thickness and CO2/SiH4 ratio, the solar cells showed an improvement in the open-circuit voltage (Voc), fill factor (FF), and short circuit current density (Jsc), compared with the solar cells fabricated using the conventional a-Si:H buffer layer. The experimental results indicated the excellent potential of the wide-gap a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layers for narrow band gap a-Si1-xGex:H single junction solar cells.

  5. A typical flat-panel membrane bioreactor with a composite membrane for sulfur removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jian; Xiao, Yuan; Song, Jimin; Miao, Junhe

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a concrete study to understand the effects of operation on biofilm morphology and microstructure and degradation efficiency for the disposal of sulfur dioxide produced by coal-fired power plants. For this purpose, a flat-panel reactor-membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a composite membrane consisting of a dense layer and a support layer was designed; the membrane bioreactors inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were further conducted for the removal of sulfur dioxide. Dry weight, active biomass, pressure drop, removal efficiency, morphology and structure of the formed biofilms were investigated and analyzed over period of biofilm formation. The results found that the dry weight, biomass, pressure drops and removal efficiency increased rapidly during biofilm formation, remained relatively stable in the stabilization period of biofilm growth, and finally reached 0.085 g, 7.00 μg, 180 Pa, and 78%, respectively. Our results suggested the MBR is available for flue-gas desulfurization.

  6. Performance requirements for electronic displays of color moving images using flat panel technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, William E.

    1994-04-01

    The initial market for flat panel displays has been dominated by the laptop computer. This is a very attractive entry market for the newer technologies. The technical requirements for computer displays are much easier to satisfy then for high definition entertainment displays. While the resolutions are similar, the other requirements of contrast ratio, cost, light output, response time, uniformity, gray scale, size and color purity are all much less demanding than those for the display of real-time moving images for entertainment. However, if the panels being developed for computers could meet the requirements of entertainment television, they could be used as light valves in large screen projectors. In this way the investment in development and in manufacturing facilities can be amortized over a much larger market. This paper will review a comparison of the requirements for both applications.

  7. Response of laminated composite flat panels to sonic boom and explosive blast loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Nosier, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper deals with a theoretical analysis of the dynamic response of shear deformable symmetrically laminated rectangular composite flat panels exposed to sonic boom and explosive blast loadings. The pertinent governing equations incorporating transverse shear deformation, transverse normal stress, as well as the higher-order effects are solved by using the integral-transform technique. The obtained results are compared with their counterparts obtained within the framework of the first-order transverse shear deformation and the classical plate theories and some conclusions concerning their range of applicability are outlined. The paper also contains a detailed analysis of the influence played by the various parameters characterizing the considered pressure pulses as well as the material and geometry of the plate.

  8. An improved method for flat-field correction of flat panel x-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Alexander L C; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2006-02-01

    In this Technical Note, the effects of different flat-field techniques are examined for a cesium iodide flat panel detector, which exhibited a slightly nonlinear exposure response. The results indicate that the variable flat-field correction method with the appropriate polynomial fit provides excellent correction throughout the entire exposure range. The averaged normalized variation factor, used to assess the nonuniformity of the flat-field correction, decreased from 30.76 for the fixed correction method to 4.13 for the variable flat-field correction method with a fourth-order polynomial fit for the 60 kVp spectrum, and from 16.42 to 3.97 for the 95 kVp spectrum.

  9. Test and Analysis of Foam Impacting a 6x6 Inch RCC Flat Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Wendy B.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the testing and analyses of a foam projectile impacting onto thirteen 6x6 inch flat panels at a 90 degrees incidence angle. The panels tested in this investigation were fabricated of Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon material and were used to aid in the validation of an existing material model, MAT58. The computational analyses were performed using LS-DYNA, which is a physics-based, nonlinear, transient, finite element code used for analyzing material responses subjected to high impact forces and other dynamic conditions. The test results were used to validate LS-DYNA predictions and to determine the threshold of damage generated by the MAT58 cumulative damage material model. The threshold of damage parameter represents any external or internal visible RCC damage detectable by nondestructive evaluation techniques.

  10. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    Spacers for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate.

  11. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.

    1997-08-19

    Spacers are disclosed for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate. 3 figs.

  12. Estimation of the adequacy of the fractal model of the atomic structure of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Golodenko, A. B.

    2010-01-15

    A method of constructing a fractal model of noncrystalline solid substance is considered using the example of amorphous silicon. In systems of iteration functions, the physical meaning of dihedral and valence angles of the elementary crystallographic cell is assigned to arguments. The model adequacy is estimated by the radial distribution function, the atomic structure density, the distribution of valence and dihedral angles, and the density of dangling interatomic bonds.

  13. Tandem solar cells made from amorphous silicon and polymer bulk heterojunction sub-cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Heum; Shin, Insoo; Kim, Kwang Ho; Street, Robert; Roy, Anshuman; Heeger, Alan J

    2015-01-14

    A tandem solar cell based on a combination of an amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polymer solar cell (PSC) is demonstrated. As these tandem devices can be readily fabricated by low-cost methods, they require only a minor increase in the total manufacturing cost. Therefore, a combination of a-Si and PSC provides a compelling solution to reduce the cost of electricity produced by photovoltaics.

  14. High electric field effects on the thermal generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ilie, A.; Equer, B.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the electric field dependence of the electron-hole thermal generation process in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. A model was developed which takes into account the Poole-Frenkel effect and the thermally assisted tunneling. In order to explain the experimental results it was necessary to consider a strong electron-lattice interaction describing the carrier tunneling mechanism. Deep defects relaxation is also discussed.

  15. Electronic transport in mixed-phase hydrogenated amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienkes, Lee Raymond

    Interest in mixed-phase silicon thin film materials, composed of an amorphous semiconductor matrix in which nanocrystalline inclusions are embedded, stems in part from potential technological applications, including photovoltaic and thin film transistor technologies. Conventional mixed-phase silicon films are produced in a single plasma reactor, where the conditions of the plasma must be precisely tuned, limiting the ability to adjust the film and nanoparticle parameters independently. The films presented in this thesis are deposited using a novel dual-plasma co-deposition approach in which the nanoparticles are produced separately in an upstream reactor and then injected into a secondary reactor where an amorphous silicon film is being grown. The degree of crystallinity and grain sizes of the films are evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction respectively. I describe detailed electronic measurements which reveal three distinct conduction mechanisms in n-type doped mixed-phase amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films over a range of nanocrystallite concentrations and temperatures, covering the transition from fully amorphous to ~30% nanocrystalline. As the temperature is varied from 470 to 10 K, we observe activated conduction, multiphonon hopping (MPH) and Mott variable range hopping (VRH) as the nanocrystal content is increased. The transition from MPH to Mott-VRH hopping around 100K is ascribed to the freeze out of the phonon modes. A conduction model involving the parallel contributions of these three distinct conduction mechanisms is shown to describe both the conductivity and the reduced activation energy data to a high accuracy. Additional support is provided by measurements of thermal equilibration effects and noise spectroscopy, both done above room temperature (>300 K). This thesis provides a clear link between measurement and theory in these complex materials.

  16. Method of controllong the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon and apparatus therefor

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1985-06-25

    An improved method and apparatus for the controlled deposition of a layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate. Means is provided for the illumination of the coated surface of the substrate and measurement of the resulting photovoltage at the outermost layer of the coating. Means is further provided for admixing amounts of p type and n type dopants to the reactant gas in response to the measured photovoltage to achieve a desired level and type of doping of the deposited layer.

  17. Combination of CT scanning and fluoroscopy imaging on a flat-panel CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Suess, Ch.; Schmidt, B.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Brady, T.; Flohr, T.

    2006-03-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (fpVCT) scanner. The fpVCT scanner consists of a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions). It provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at the isocenter. In addition to the standard tomographic scanning, fpVCT allows two new scan modes: (1) fluoroscopic imaging from any arbitrary rotation angle, and (2) continuous, time-resolved tomographic scanning of a dynamically changing viewing volume. Fluoroscopic imaging is feasible by modifying the standard CT gantry so that the imaging chain can be oriented along any user-selected rotation angle. Scanning with a stationary gantry, after it has been oriented, is equivalent to a conventional fluoroscopic examination. This scan mode enables combined use of high-resolution tomography and real-time fluoroscopy with a clinically usable field of view in the z direction. The second scan mode allows continuous observation of a timeevolving process such as perfusion. The gantry can be continuously rotated for up to 80 sec, with the rotation time ranging from 3 to 20 sec, to gather projection images of a dynamic process. The projection data, that provides a temporal log of the viewing volume, is then converted into multiple image stacks that capture the temporal evolution of a dynamic process. Studies using phantoms, ex vivo specimens, and live animals have confirmed that these new scanning modes are clinically usable and offer a unique view of the anatomy and physiology that heretofore has not been feasible using static CT scanning. At the current level of image quality and temporal resolution, several clinical applications such a dynamic angiography, tumor enhancement pattern and vascularity studies, organ perfusion, and interventional applications are in reach.

  18. Development of next generation digital flat panel catheterization system: design principles and validation methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, B.; Betraoui, F.; Dhawale, P.; Gopinath, P.; Tegzes, Pal; Vagvolgyi, B.

    2006-03-01

    The design principles that drove the development of a new cardiovascular x-ray digital flat panel (DFP) detector system are presented, followed by assessments of imaging and dose performance achieved relative to other state of the art FPD systems. The new system (GE Innova 2100 IQ TM) incorporates a new detector with substantially improved DQE at fluoroscopic (73%@1μR) and record (79%@114uR) doses, an x-ray tube with higher continuous fluoro power (3.2kW), a collimator with a wide range of copper spectral filtration (up to 0.9mm), and an improved automatic x-ray exposure management system. The performance of this new system was compared to that of the previous generation GE product (Innova 2000) and to state-of-the art cardiac digital x-ray flat panel systems from two other major manufacturers. Performance was assessed with the industry standard Cardiac X-ray NEMA/SCA and I phantom, and a new moving coronary artery stent (MCAS) phantom, designed to simulate cardiac clinical imaging conditions, composed of an anthropomorphic chest section with stents moving in a manner simulating normal coronary arteries. The NEMA/SCA&I phantom results showed the Innova 2100 IQ to exceed or equal the Innova 2000 in all of the performance categories, while operating at 28% lower dose on average, and to exceed the other DFP systems in most of the performance categories. The MCAS phantom tests showed the Innova 2100 IQ to be significantly better (p << 0.05) than the Innova 2000, and significantly better than the other DFP systems in most cases at comparable or lower doses, thereby verifying excellent performance against design goals.

  19. Interfacial modification of amorphous substrates for microcrystalline silicon growth with in situ hydrogen plasma pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Bae; Rhee, Shi-Woo; Li, Xiaodong

    2005-10-01

    Microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films have been deposited onto hydrogenated and amorphous Si-rich silicon nitride and thermal oxide substrates with silane (SiH4)-hydrogen (H2) in remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RPECVD) at 250 °C, and these films have been investigated. It is found that in situ hydrogen plasma pretreatment of the amorphous substrates prior to μc-Si:H deposition is effective in reducing the interfacial amorphous transition region. It is believed that this hydrogen plasma pretreatment gives adsorption and nucleation sites by breaking weak Si-N and Si-Si bonds and also removes native Si-O x and hydrocarbon impurities. In the case of SiNx:H surface, surface roughening from atomic hydrogen etching and surface cleaning effects are greater than those for stable thermal oxide. Surface crystallization at the initial stage of the growth can be obtained on amorphous substrate at low temperature without an a-Si transition layer.

  20. CW laser induced crystallization of thin amorphous silicon films deposited by EBE and PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said-Bacar, Z.; Prathap, P.; Cayron, C.; Mermet, F.; Leroy, Y.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Fogarassy, E.

    2012-09-01

    This work presents the Continuous Wave (CW) laser crystallization of thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) films deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and by Electron Beam Evaporation (EBE) on low cost glass substrate. The films are characterized by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and by Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to evaluate the hydrogen content. Analysis shows that the PECVD films contain a high hydrogen concentration (˜10 at.%) while the EBE films are almost hydrogen-free. It is found that the hydrogen is in a bonding configuration with the a-Si network and in a free form, requiring a long thermal annealing for exodiffusion before the laser treatment to avoid explosive effusion. The CW laser crystallization process of the amorphous silicon films was operated in liquid phase regime. We show by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) that polysilicon films with large grains can be obtained with EBE as well as for the PECVD amorphous silicon provided that for the latest the hydrogen content is lower than 2 at.%.

  1. Application of amorphous carbon based materials as antireflective coatings on crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, D. S.; Côrtes, A. D. S.; Oliveira, M. H.; Motta, E. F.; Viana, G. A.; Mei, P. R.; Marques, F. C.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the investigation of the potential application of different forms of amorphous carbon (a-C and a-C:H) as an antireflective coating for crystalline silicon solar cells. Polymeric-like carbon (PLC) and hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) was deposited by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique. Those three different amorphous carbon structures were individually applied as single antireflective coatings on conventional (polished and texturized) p-n junction crystalline silicon solar cells. Due to their optical properties, good results were also obtained for double-layer antireflective coatings based on PLC or ta-C films combined with different materials. The results are compared with a conventional tin dioxide (SnO2) single-layer antireflective coating and zinc sulfide/magnesium fluoride (ZnS/MgF2) double-layer antireflective coatings. An increase of 23.7% in the short-circuit current density, Jsc, was obtained using PLC as an antireflective coating and 31.7% was achieved using a double-layer of PLC with a layer of magnesium fluoride (MgF2). An additional increase of 10.8% was obtained in texturized silicon, representing a total increase (texturization + double-layer) of about 40% in the short-circuit current density. The potential use of these materials are critically addressed considering their refractive index, optical bandgap, absorption coefficient, hardness, chemical inertness, and mechanical stability.

  2. Integrated radiotherapy imaging system (IRIS): design considerations of tumour tracking with linac gantry-mounted diagnostic x-ray systems with flat-panel detectors.

    PubMed

    Berbeco, Ross I; Jiang, Steve B; Sharp, Gregory C; Chen, George T; Mostafavi, Hassan; Shirato, Hiroki

    2004-01-21

    The design of an integrated radiotherapy imaging system (IRIS), consisting of gantry mounted diagnostic (kV) x-ray tubes and fast read-out flat-panel amorphous-silicon detectors, has been studied. The system is meant to be capable of three main functions: radiographs for three-dimensional (3D) patient set-up, cone-beam CT and real-time tumour/marker tracking. The goal of the current study is to determine whether one source/panel pair is sufficient for real-time tumour/marker tracking and, if two are needed, the optimal position of each relative to other components and the isocentre. A single gantry-mounted source/imager pair is certainly capable of the first two of the three functions listed above and may also be useful for the third, if combined with prior knowledge of the target's trajectory. This would be necessary because only motion in two dimensions is visible with a single imager/source system. However, with previously collected information about the trajectory, the third coordinate may be derived from the other two with sufficient accuracy to facilitate tracking. This deduction of the third coordinate can only be made if the 3D tumour/marker trajectory is consistent from fraction to fraction. The feasibility of tumour tracking with one source/imager pair has been theoretically examined here using measured lung marker trajectory data for seven patients from multiple treatment fractions. The patients' selection criteria include minimum mean amplitudes of the tumour motions greater than 1 cm peak-to-peak. The marker trajectory for each patient was modelled using the first fraction data. Then for the rest of the data, marker positions were derived from the imager projections at various gantry angles and compared with the measured tumour positions. Our results show that, due to the three dimensionality and irregular trajectory characteristics of tumour motion, on a fraction-to-fraction basis, a 'monoscopic' system (single source/imager) is inadequate for

  3. Integrated radiotherapy imaging system (IRIS): design considerations of tumour tracking with linac gantry-mounted diagnostic x-ray systems with flat-panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbeco, Ross I.; Jiang, Steve B.; Sharp, Gregory C.; Chen, George T. Y.; Mostafavi, Hassan; Shirato, Hiroki

    2004-01-01

    The design of an integrated radiotherapy imaging system (IRIS), consisting of gantry mounted diagnostic (kV) x-ray tubes and fast read-out flat-panel amorphous-silicon detectors, has been studied. The system is meant to be capable of three main functions: radiographs for three-dimensional (3D) patient set-up, cone-beam CT and real-time tumour/marker tracking. The goal of the current study is to determine whether one source/panel pair is sufficient for real-time tumour/marker tracking and, if two are needed, the optimal position of each relative to other components and the isocentre. A single gantry-mounted source/imager pair is certainly capable of the first two of the three functions listed above and may also be useful for the third, if combined with prior knowledge of the target's trajectory. This would be necessary because only motion in two dimensions is visible with a single imager/source system. However, with previously collected information about the trajectory, the third coordinate may be derived from the other two with sufficient accuracy to facilitate tracking. This deduction of the third coordinate can only be made if the 3D tumour/marker trajectory is consistent from fraction to fraction. The feasibility of tumour tracking with one source/imager pair has been theoretically examined here using measured lung marker trajectory data for seven patients from multiple treatment fractions. The patients' selection criteria include minimum mean amplitudes of the tumour motions greater than 1 cm peak-to-peak. The marker trajectory for each patient was modelled using the first fraction data. Then for the rest of the data, marker positions were derived from the imager projections at various gantry angles and compared with the measured tumour positions. Our results show that, due to the three dimensionality and irregular trajectory characteristics of tumour motion, on a fraction-to-fraction basis, a 'monoscopic' system (single source/imager) is inadequate for

  4. Amorphous silicon thin films: The ultimate lightweight space solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vendura, G. J., Jr.; Kruer, M. A.; Schurig, H. H.; Bianchi, M. A.; Roth, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Progress is reported with respect to the development of thin film amorphous (alpha-Si) terrestrial solar cells for space applications. Such devices promise to result in very lightweight, low cost, flexible arrays with superior end of life (EOL) performance. Each alpha-Si cell consists of a tandem arrangement of three very thin p-i-n junctions vapor deposited between film electrodes. The thickness of this entire stack is approximately 2.0 microns, resulting in a device of negligible weight, but one that must be mechanically supported for handling and fabrication into arrays. The stack is therefore presently deposited onto a large area (12 by 13 in), rigid, glass superstrate, 40 mil thick, and preliminary space qualification testing of modules so configured is underway. At the same time, a more advanced version is under development in which the thin film stack is transferred from the glass onto a thin (2.0 mil) polymer substrate to create large arrays that are truly flexible and significantly lighter than either the glassed alpha-Si version or present conventional crystalline technologies. In this paper the key processes for such effective transfer are described. In addition, both glassed (rigid) and unglassed (flexible) alpha-Si cells are studied when integrated with various advanced structures to form lightweight systems. EOL predictions are generated for the case of a 1000 W array in a standard, 10 year geosynchronous (GEO) orbit. Specific powers (W/kg), power densities (W/sq m) and total array costs ($/sq ft) are compared.

  5. Amorphous silicon thin films: The ultimate lightweight space solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Vendura, G.J. Jr.; Kruer, M.A.; Schurig, H.H.; Bianchi, M.A.; Roth, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Progress is reported with respect to the development of thin film amorphous (alpha-Si) terrestrial solar cells for space applications. Such devices promise to result in very lightweight, low cost, flexible arrays with superior end of life (EOL) performance. Each alpha-Si cell consists of a tandem arrangement of three very thin p-i-n junctions vapor deposited between film electrodes. The thickness of this entire stack is approximately 2.0 microns, resulting in a device of negligible weight, but one that must be mechanically supported for handling and fabrication into arrays. The stack is therefore presently deposited onto a large area (12 by 13 in), rigid, glass superstrate, 40 mil thick, and preliminary space qualification testing of modules so configured is underway. At the same time, a more advanced version is under development in which the thin film stack is transferred from the glass onto a thin (2.0 mil) polymer substrate to create large arrays that are truly flexible and significantly lighter than either the glassed alpha-Si version or present conventional crystalline technologies. In this paper the key processes for such effective transfer are described. In addition, both glassed (rigid) and unglassed (flexible) alpha-Si cells are studied when integrated with various advanced structures to form lightweight systems. EOL predictions are generated for the case of a 1000 W array in a standard, 10 year geosynchronous (GEO) orbit. Specific powers (W/kg), power densities (W/sq m) and total array costs ($/sq ft) are compared.

  6. Effect of Ion Bombardment on the Growth and Properties of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Jérôme; Takeda, Yoshihiko; Hirano, Naoto; Matsuura, Hideharu; Matsuda, Akihisa

    1989-01-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the effect of ion bombardment during the growth of amorphous silicon-germanium alloy films from silane and germane rf-glow discharge. Independent control of the plasma and the ion flux and energy is obtained by using a triode configuration. The ion contribution to the total deposition rate can reach 20% on negatively biased substrates. Although the Si and Ge composition of the film does not depend on the ion flux and energy, the optical, structural and electronic properties are drastically modified at low deposition temperatures when the maximum ion energy increases up to 50 eV, and remain constant above 50 eV. For a Ge atomic concentration of 37% and a temperature of 135°C, the optical gap decreases from 1.67 to 1.45 eV. This is correlated with a modification of hydrogen bonding configurations. Silicon dihydride sites disappear and preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon is reduced in favour of germanium. Moreover the photoconductivity increases which shows that ion bombardment is a key parameter to optimize the quality of low band gap amorphous silicon-germanium alloys.

  7. Bandgap and Carrier Transport Engineering of Quantum Confined Mixed Phase Nanocrystalline/Amorphous Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Tianyuan; Klafehn, Grant; Kendrick, Chito; Theingi, San; Airuoyo, Idemudia; Lusk, Mark T.; Stradins, Paul; Taylor, Craig; Collins, Reuben T.

    2016-11-21

    Mixed phase nanocrystalline/amorphous-silicon (nc/a-Si:H) thin films with band-gap higher than bulk silicon are prepared by depositing silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs), prepared in a separate deposition zone, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), simultaneously. Since the two deposition phases are well decoupled, optimized parameters for each component can apply to the growth process. Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) shows that the embedded SiNPs are small enough to exhibit quantum confinement effects. The low temperature PL measurements on the mixed phase reveal a dominant emission feature, which is associated with SiNPs surrounded by a-Si:H. In addition, we compare time dependent low temperature PL measurements for both a-Si:H and mixed phase material under intensive laser exposure for various times up to two hours. The PL intensity of a-Si:H with embedded SiNPs degrades much less than that of pure a-Si:H. We propose this improvement of photostability occurs because carriers generated in the a-Si:H matrix quickly transfer into SiNPs and recombine there instead of recombining in a-Si:H and creating defect states (Staebler-Wronski Effect).

  8. 75 FR 51285 - In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of... that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission's TDD terminal on...

  9. Infrared and Magnetic Studies of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Germanium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, Jonathan Randall

    In pure, sputtered a-Si or a-Ge the large defect density resulting from dangling bonds pins the Fermi level (E(,f)) and generally dominates the electronic properties of the material. Our group at Harvard theorized that H added to the sputtering plasma during film growth might be incorporated into the amorphous network to compensate theses dangling bonds: (1) IR studies of local Ge-H vibrational modes confirmed the presence of bonded H in the a-network and quantified its concentration, (2) A technique for high accuracy spin density (N(,s)) measurements was developed and used to monitor the dramatic defect density reduction with H incorporation, (3) The N(,s) reduction with increasing H incorporation was correlated with the integrated intensity increase of one IR feature, allowing a model of H incorporation kinetics to be developed and, (4) Plausible H incorporation configurations were identified. Sputtered a-S:H and a -Ge:H can be doped with significant E(,f) movement and are usable for device fabrication. The magnetic properties observed in the process of performing N(,s) measurements uncovered significant new information: (1) The EPR linewidth ((DELTA)H(,pp)) versus N(,s) variation at low temperatures indicated the presence of strong exchange interaction narrowing and a clustering of spins, (2) From the presence of a strong exchange interaction a spin ordering was predicted and an antiferromagnetic ordering was experimentally observed, (3) The (DELTA)H(,pp) temperature dependence was shown to be a result of lifetime broadening via carrier hopping near E(,f); using theoretical work of the Marburg group hopping times and the width of the hopping distribution could be directly estimated, (4) A photo-EPR effect was discovered and its spectral dependence provided a new type of spectroscopy for gap states and, (5) Photo-EPR effects and g-value shifts upon doping indicated the presence of another defect with properties different from those of the dangling bond. Thus

  10. Integration of epitaxially-grown InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers with hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides on silicon.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2008-03-31

    The monolithic integration of epitaxially-grown InGaAs/GaAs self-organized quantum dot lasers with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a:Si-H) waveguides on silicon substrates is demonstrated. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides, formed by plasma-enhanced-chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD), exhibit a propagation loss of approximately 10 dB/cm at a wavelength of 1.05 microm. The laser-waveguide coupling, with coupling coefficient of 22%, is achieved through a 3.2 microm-width groove etched by focused-ion-beam (FIB) milling which creates high-quality etched GaAs facets.

  11. 2D wavelet-analysis-based calibration technique for flat-panel imaging detectors: application in cone beam volume CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    1999-05-01

    The application of the newly developed flat panel x-ray imaging detector in cone beam volume CT has attracted increasing interest recently. Due to an imperfect solid state array manufacturing process, however, defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image unavoidably exist in all kinds of flat panel x-ray imaging detectors, which will cause severe streak and ring artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image and severely degrade image quality. A calibration technique, in which the artifacts resulting from the defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image can be reduced significantly, is presented in this paper. The detection of defective elements is distinctively based upon two-dimensional (2D) wavelet analysis. Because of its inherent localizability in recognizing singularities or discontinuities, wavelet analysis possesses the capability of detecting defective elements over a rather large x-ray exposure range, e.g., 20% to approximately 60% of the dynamic range of the detector used. Three-dimensional (3D) images of a low-contrast CT phantom have been reconstructed from projection images acquired by a flat panel x-ray imaging detector with and without calibration process applied. The artifacts caused individually by defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image have been separated and investigated in detail, and the correlation with each other have also been exposed explicitly. The investigation is enforced by quantitative analysis of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the image uniformity of the cone beam reconstruction image. It has been demonstrated that the ring and streak artifacts resulting from the imperfect performance of a flat panel x-ray imaging detector can be reduced dramatically, and then the image qualities of a cone beam reconstruction image, such as contrast resolution and image uniformity are improved significantly. Furthermore, with little modification, the calibration technique presented here is also applicable

  12. Percolation network in resistive switching devices with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanhong; Gao, Ping; Bi, Kaifeng; Peng, Wei; Jiang, Xuening; Xu, Hongxia

    2014-01-27

    Conducting pathway of percolation network was identified in resistive switching devices (RSDs) with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon (Ag/a-Si/p-Si) based on its gradual RESET-process and the stochastic complex impedance spectroscopy characteristics (CIS). The formation of the percolation network is attributed to amounts of nanocrystalline Si particles as well as defect sites embedded in a-Si layer, in which the defect sites supply positions for Ag ions to nucleate and grow. The similar percolation network has been only observed in Ag-Ge-Se based RSD before. This report provides a better understanding for electric properties of RSD based on the percolation network.

  13. Study of stacked-emitter layer for high efficiency amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngseok; Kim, Heewon; Iftiquar, S. M.; Kim, Sunbo; Kim, Sangho; Ahn, Shihyun; Lee, Youn-Jung; Dao, Vinh Ai; Yi, Junsin

    2014-12-01

    A modified emitter, of stacked two layer structure, was investigated for high-efficiency amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction (HJ) solar cells. Surface area of the cells was 181.5 cm2. The emitter was designed to achieve a high open circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF). When doping of the emitter layer was increased, it was observed that the silicon dihydride related structural defects within the films increased, and the Voc of the HJ cell decreased. On the other hand, while the doping concentration of the emitter was reduced the FF of the cell reduced. Therefore, a combination of a high conductivity and low defects of a single emitter layer appears difficult to obtain, yet becomes necessary to improve the cell performance. So, we investigated a stacked-emitter with low-doped/high-doped double layer structure. A low-doped emitter with reduced defect density was deposited over the intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon passivation layer, while the high-doped emitter with high conductivity was deposited over the low-doped emitter. The effects of doping and defect density of the emitter, on the device performance, were elucidated by using computer simulation and an optimized device structure was formulated. The simulation was performed with the help of Automat for the Simulation of Heterostructures simulation software. Finally, based on the simulation results, amorphous/crystalline heterojunction silicon solar cells were optimized by reducing density of defect states in the stacked-emitter structure and we obtained 725 mV, 77.41%, and 19.0% as the open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and photo-voltaic conversion efficiency of the device, respectively.

  14. Comparison of ring artifact removal methods using flat panel detector based CT images

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ring artifacts are the concentric rings superimposed on the tomographic images often caused by the defective and insufficient calibrated detector elements as well as by the damaged scintillator crystals of the flat panel detector. It may be also generated by objects attenuating X-rays very differently in different projection direction. Ring artifact reduction techniques so far reported in the literature can be broadly classified into two groups. One category of the approaches is based on the sinogram processing also known as the pre-processing techniques and the other category of techniques perform processing on the 2-D reconstructed images, recognized as the post-processing techniques in the literature. The strength and weakness of these categories of approaches are yet to be explored from a common platform. Method In this paper, a comparative study of the two categories of ring artifact reduction techniques basically designed for the multi-slice CT instruments is presented from a common platform. For comparison, two representative algorithms from each of the two categories are selected from the published literature. A very recently reported state-of-the-art sinogram domain ring artifact correction method that classifies the ring artifacts according to their strength and then corrects the artifacts using class adaptive correction schemes is also included in this comparative study. The first sinogram domain correction method uses a wavelet based technique to detect the corrupted pixels and then using a simple linear interpolation technique estimates the responses of the bad pixels. The second sinogram based correction method performs all the filtering operations in the transform domain, i.e., in the wavelet and Fourier domain. On the other hand, the two post-processing based correction techniques actually operate on the polar transform domain of the reconstructed CT images. The first method extracts the ring artifact template vector using a homogeneity

  15. A low Z linac and flat panel imager: comparison with the conventional imaging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. A.; Hansen, V. N.; Niven, A. C.; Thompson, M. G.; Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2008-11-01

    Experimental and Monte Carlo simulations were conducted for an Elekta Ltd Precise Treatment System linac fitted with a low Z insert of sufficient thickness to remove all primary electrons. A variety of amorphous silicon based panels employing different scintillators were modelled to determine their response to a variety of x-ray spectra and produce an optimized portal imaging system. This study has shown that in a low Z configuration the vast majority of x-rays are produced in the nickel electron window, and with a combination of a carbon insert and caesium iodide based XVI-panel, significant improvement in the object contrast was achieved. For thin, head and neck-type geometries, contrast is 4.62 times greater for 1.6 cm bone in 5.8 cm water than the standard 6 MV/iViewGT system. For thicker, pelvis-type geometries contrast increases by a factor of 1.3 for 1.6 cm of bone in 25.8 cm water. To obtain images with the same signal-to-noise ratio as the 6 MV/iViewGT system, dose reductions of a factor of 15 and 4.2 are possible for 5.8 cm and 25.8 cm phantoms respectively. This design has the advantage of being easily implemented on a standard linac and provides a portal image directly from the therapy beam aperture.

  16. Development of thin-film flat-panel arrays for diagnostic and radiotherapy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Boudry, John M.; Yorkston, John; Morton, E. J.; Huang, Weidong; Street, Robert A.

    1992-06-01

    Since the design and fabrication of the first pixelated, two-dimensional, hydrogenated amorphous silicon image sensor arrays at Xerox, PARC, in 1988, a variety of milestones have been achieved including the first demonstration of high quality radiographic images of low- contrast, anatomical detail. Current array configurations and design rules offer the prospect of 100 micrometers pixel pitches over 30 by 30 cm2 areas in the next few years. Beyond this, present attempts to extend the size of the substrates to 100 cm on the diagonal by 1996 coupled with the possibility of three-dimensional thin-film electronics could eventually result in a revolution in many forms of x-ray imaging. Such arrays will present challenges in the design of the fast, analog, and digital electronic readout systems required to precisely match the characteristics of the arrays to those of the imaging needs. For such arrays, one of the most important parameters is the dynamic range. Early results are reported for the measured limits on this quantity as obtained through measurements from individual sensors and FETs as well as an improved lower limit as obtained by direct measurements of array pixels.

  17. Achieving high-resolution in flat-panel imagers for digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Jeffrey T.; Lemmi, Francesco; Lu, Jeng-Ping; Mei, Ping; Street, Robert A.; Ready, Steve E.; Ho, Jackson; Apte, Raj B.; Van Schuylenbergh, Koenraad; Lau, Rachel; Weisfield, Richard L.; Lujan, Rene; Boyce, James B.

    1999-10-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) matrix-addressed imager sensors are the leading new technology for digital medical x-ray imaging. Large-area systems are now commercially available with good resolution and large dynamic range. These systems image x-rays either by detecting light emission from a phosphor screen onto an a-Si:H photodiode, or by collecting ionization charge in a thick x-ray absorbing photoconductor with as selenium, and both approaches have been widely discussed in the literature. While these systems meet the performance needs for general radiographic imaging, further improvements in sensitivity, noise and resolution are needed to fully satisfy the requirements for fluoroscopy and mammography. The approach taken for this paper uses indirect detection, with a phosphor layer for x-ray conversion. The thin a-Si:H photodiode layer for detects the scintillation light. In contrast with the present generation of devices, which have a mesa-isolated sensor at each pixel, these imagers use a continuous sensor covering the entire front surface of the array. The p+ and i layers of a-Si:H are continuous, while the n+ contact has been patterned to isolate adjacent pixels. The continuous photodiode layer maximizes light absorption from the phosphor and provides high x-ray conversion efficiency.

  18. On the thermodynamically stable amorphous phase of polymer-derived silicon oxycarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liping; Raj, Rishi

    2015-09-01

    A model for the thermodynamic stability of amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) is presented. It builds upon the reasonably accepted model of SiCO which is conceived as a nanodomain network of graphene. The domains are expected to be filled with SiO2 molecules, while the interface with graphene is visualized to contain mixed bonds described as Si bonded to C as well as to O atoms. Normally these SiCO compositions would be expected to crystallize. Instead, calorimetric measurements have shown that the amorphous phase is thermodynamically stable. In this article we employ first-principles calculations to estimate how the interfacial energy of the graphene networks is favorably influenced by having mixed bonds attached to them. We analyze the ways in which this reduction in interfacial energy can stabilize the amorphous phase. The approach highlights how density functional theory computations can be combined with the classical analysis of phase transformations to explain the behavior of a complex material. In addition we discover a two-dimensional lattice structure, with the composition Si2C4O3 that is constructed from a single layer of graphene congruent with silicon and oxygen bonds on either side.

  19. Reaction of amorphous Ni-W and Ni-N-W films with substrate silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, M.F.; Suni, I.; Nicolet, M.; Sands, T.

    1984-11-15

    Amorphous films of Ni-W and Ni-N-W were deposited on single-crystal silicon with discharge gases of Ar or Ar+N/sub 2/ by rf cosputtering of Ni and W. The reaction of these Ni-W and Ni-N-W films with the Si substrate were studied in the temperature range of 450--750 /sup 0/C by a combination of backscattering spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and resistivity measurements. Films with composition Ni/sub 36/W/sub 64/ are stable below 500 /sup 0/C. NiSi and NiSi/sub 2/ form at 500 /sup 0/C, and WSi/sub 2/ forms rapidly in the temperature range of 625--650 /sup 0/C. The nickel silicide forms adjacent to and within the silicon, while the outer layer becomes a mixture of WSi/sub 2/ and NiSi/sub 2/. The morphologies of the reacted layers are revealed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The crystallization temperature of amorphous Ni/sub 36/W/sub 64/ films on SiO/sub 2/ is near 650 /sup 0/C also. Adding nitrogen to form amorphous Ni/sub 30/N/sub 21/W/sub 49/ films lowers the crystallization temperature, but raises the reaction temperature with Si to 750 /sup 0/C.

  20. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  1. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications. PMID:26785682

  2. On the thermodynamically stable amorphous phase of polymer-derived silicon oxycarbide

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Liping; Raj, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    A model for the thermodynamic stability of amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) is presented. It builds upon the reasonably accepted model of SiCO which is conceived as a nanodomain network of graphene. The domains are expected to be filled with SiO2 molecules, while the interface with graphene is visualized to contain mixed bonds described as Si bonded to C as well as to O atoms. Normally these SiCO compositions would be expected to crystallize. Instead, calorimetric measurements have shown that the amorphous phase is thermodynamically stable. In this article we employ first-principles calculations to estimate how the interfacial energy of the graphene networks is favorably influenced by having mixed bonds attached to them. We analyze the ways in which this reduction in interfacial energy can stabilize the amorphous phase. The approach highlights how density functional theory computations can be combined with the classical analysis of phase transformations to explain the behavior of a complex material. In addition we discover a two-dimensional lattice structure, with the composition Si2C4O3 that is constructed from a single layer of graphene congruent with silicon and oxygen bonds on either side. PMID:26419962

  3. Investigation of time-resolved proton radiography using x-ray flat-panel imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, K.-W.; Zhang, R.; Bentefour, E. H.; Doolan, P. J.; Cascio, E.; Sharp, G.; Flanz, J.; Lu, H.-M.

    2017-03-01

    Proton beam therapy benefits from the Bragg peak and delivers highly conformal dose distributions. However, the location of the end-of-range is subject to uncertainties related to the accuracy of the relative proton stopping power estimates and thereby the water-equivalent path length (WEPL) along the beam. To remedy the range uncertainty, an in vivo measurement of the WEPL through the patient, i.e. a proton-range radiograph, is highly desirable. Towards that goal, we have explored a novel method of proton radiography based on the time-resolved dose measured by a flat panel imager (FPI). A 226 MeV pencil beam and a custom-designed range modulator wheel (MW) were used to create a time-varying broad beam. The proton imaging technique used exploits this time dependency by looking at the dose rate at the imager as a function of time. This dose rate function (DRF) has a unique time-varying dose pattern at each depth of penetration. A relatively slow rotation of the MW (0.2 revolutions per second) and a fast image acquisition (30 frames per second, ~33 ms sampling) provided a sufficient temporal resolution for each DRF. Along with the high output of the CsI:Tl scintillator, imaging with pixel binning (2  ×  2) generated high signal-to-noise data at a very low radiation dose (~0.1 cGy). Proton radiographs of a head phantom and a Gammex CT calibration phantom were taken with various configurations. The results of the phantom measurements show that the FPI can generate low noise and high spatial resolution proton radiographs. The WEPL values of the CT tissue surrogate inserts show that the measured relative stopping powers are accurate to ~2%. The panel did not show any noticeable radiation damage after the accumulative dose of approximately 3831 cGy. In summary, we have successfully demonstrated a highly practical method of generating proton radiography using an x-ray flat panel imager.

  4. Absorption enhancement in amorphous silicon thin films via plasmonic resonances in nickel silicide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachtel, Jordan; Shen, Xiao; Pantelides, Sokrates; Sachan, Ritesh; Gonzalez, Carlos; Dyck, Ondrej; Fu, Shaofang; Kalnayaraman, Ramki; Rack, Phillip; Duscher, Gerd

    2013-03-01

    Silicon is a near ideal material for photovoltaics due to its low cost, abundance, and well documented optical properties. The sole detriment of Si in photovoltaics is poor absorption in the infrared. Nanoparticle surface plasmon resonances are predicted to increase absorption by scattering to angles greater than the critical angle for total internal reflection (16° for a Si/air interface), trapping the light in the film. Experiments confirm that nickel silicide nanoparticles embedded in amorphous silicon increases absorption significantly in the infrared. However, it remains to be seen if electron-hole pair generation is increased in the solar cell, or whether the light is absorbed by the nanoparticles themselves. The nature of the absorption is explored by a study of the surface plasmon resonances through electron energy loss spectrometry and scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments, as well as first principles density functional theory calculations. Initial experimental results do not show strong plasmon resonances on the nanoparticle surfaces. Calculations of the optical properties of the nickel silicide particles in amorphous silicon are performed to understand why this resonance is suppressed. Work supported by NSF EPS 1004083 (TN-SCORE).

  5. Bimetallic non-alloyed NPs for improving the broadband optical absorption of thin amorphous silicon substrates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We propose the use of bimetallic non-alloyed nanoparticles (BNNPs) to improve the broadband optical absorption of thin amorphous silicon substrates. Isolated bimetallic NPs with uniform size distribution on glass and silicon are obtained by depositing a 10-nm Au film and annealing it at 600°C; this is followed by an 8-nm Ag film annealed at 400°C. We experimentally demonstrate that the deposition of gold (Au)-silver (Ag) bimetallic non-alloyed NPs (BNNPs) on a thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) film increases the film's average absorption and forward scattering over a broad spectrum, thus significantly reducing its total reflection performance. Experimental results show that Au-Ag BNNPs fabricated on a glass substrate exhibit resonant peaks at 437 and 540 nm and a 14-fold increase in average forward scattering over the wavelength range of 300 to 1,100 nm in comparison with bare glass. When deposited on a 100-nm-thin a-Si film, Au-Ag BNNPs increase the average absorption and forward scattering by 19.6% and 95.9% compared to those values for Au NPs on thin a-Si and plain a-Si without MNPs, respectively, over the 300- to 1,100-nm range. PMID:24725390

  6. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeongwoon; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Kim, Seungchul

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV). As the incident energy decreases, the ratio of sp2 carbons increases, that of sp3 decreases, and the carbon films become more porous. The films prepared with very low incident energy contain lithium-ion conducting channels. Also, those films are electrically conductive to supplement the poor conductivity of silicon and can restore their structure after large deformation to accommodate the volume change during the operations. As a result of this study, we suggest that graphite-like porous carbon coating on silicon will extend the lifetime of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries.

  7. Crystallization of amorphous silicon by self-propagation of nanoengineered thermites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Maruf; Subramanian, Senthil; Bhattacharya, Shantanu; Gao, Yuanfang; Apperson, Steve; Shende, Rajesh; Guha, Suchi; Arif, Mohammad; Bai, Mengjun; Gangopadhyay, Keshab; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2007-03-01

    Crystallization of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film occurred by the self-propagation of copper oxide/aluminum thermite nanocomposites. Amorphous Si films were prepared on glass at a temperature of 250°C by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The platinum heater was patterned on the edge of the substrate and the CuO /Al nanoengineered thermite was spin coated on the substrate that connects the heater and the a-Si film. A voltage source was used to ignite the thermites followed by a piranha solution (4:1 of H2SO4:H2O2) etch for the removal of residual products of thermite reaction. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the crystallization of a-Si.

  8. Can the crystallization rate be independent from the crystallization enthalpy? The case of amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Kail, F; Molera, J; Farjas, J; Roura, P; Secouard, C; Roca i Cabarrocas, P

    2012-03-07

    The crystallization enthalpy measured in a large series of amorphous silicon (a-Si) materials varies within a factor of 2 from sample to sample (Kail et al 2011 Phys. Status Solidi RRL 5 361). According to the classical theory of nucleation, this variation should produce large differences in the crystallization kinetics leading to crystallization temperatures and activation energies exceeding 550 °C and 1.7 eV, respectively, the 'standard' values measured for a-Si obtained by self-implantation. In contrast, the observed crystallization kinetics is very similar for all the samples studied and has no correlation with the crystallization enthalpy. This discrepancy has led us to propose that crystallization in a-Si begins in microscopic domains that are almost identical in all samples, independently of their crystallization enthalpy. Probably the existence of microscopic inhomogeneities also plays a crucial role in the crystallization kinetics of other amorphous materials and glasses.

  9. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O`Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with 68Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  10. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O’Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC’s active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4 × 4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16 × 16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92 × 0.92 × 3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8 × 16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4 × 8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm × 14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with Ge-68 source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module’s mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, +/−0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules. PMID:26085702

  11. Quantitative analysis of performance of selenium flat-panel detector for interventional mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debrie, Anne; Polischuk, Brad T.; Rougeot, Henri; Hansroul, Marc; Poliquin, Eric; Caron, Mario; Wong, Kerwin; Shukri, Ziad; Martin, Jean-Pierre

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the image quality of a selenium-based flat panel detector suited for digital interventional mammography. To characterize the image quality, the DQE was measured at various x-ray exposures. The results indicate that when the detector is quantum noise limited, the DQE is independent of the exposure. A measurement of the quantum detection efficiency of 90% indicates that an electrostatic field shaping effect within the selenium layer gives a greater collection efficiency than that predicted simply by the geometric fill factor of each pixel collection electrode. Measurements were also conducted to determine the relative strength of ghost images on the detector. An image of a high contrast object using an exposure of 183 mR was acquired, followed by a low exposure 6 mR flat field image. No visual indication of a ghost could be found in the latter image even after appropriate windowing and leveling of the image was performed. A subjective comparison of image quality between film/screen and the detector was conducted by acquiring images of the ACR phantom under various exposure conditions. The digital images were printed on film using optimally adjusted LUT's. The resulting images were randomly presented to 15 non-trained observers, who assessed a score for each image. The comparison results show that the image quality obtained with the digital detector is superior to the images acquired with film/screen.

  12. Effect of oblique X-ray incidence in flat-panel computed tomography of the breast.

    PubMed

    Badano, Aldo; Kyprianou, Iacovos S; Freed, Melanie; Jennings, Robert J; Sempau, Josep

    2009-05-01

    We quantify the variation in resolution due to anisotropy caused by oblique X-ray incidence in indirect flat-panel detectors for computed tomography breast imaging systems. We consider a geometry and detector type utilized in breast computed tomography (CT) systems currently being developed. Our methods rely on mantis, a combined X-ray, electron, and optical Monte Carlo transport open source code. The physics models are the most accurate available in general-purpose Monte Carlo packages in the diagnostic energy range. We consider maximum-obliquity angles of 10 ( degrees ) and 13 ( degrees ) at the centers of the 30 and 40 cm detector edges, respectively, and 16 ( degrees ) at the corner of the detector. Our results indicate that blur is asymmetric and that the resolution properties vary significantly with the angle (or location) of incidence. Our results suggest that the asymmetry can be as high as a factor of 2.6 between orthogonal directions. Anisotropy maps predicted by mantis provide an understanding of the effect that such variations have on the imaging system and allow more accurate modeling and optimization of breast CT systems. These maps of anisotropy across the detector could lead to improved reconstruction and help motivate physics-based strategies for computer detection of breast lesions.

  13. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Geiger, B; Schreiner, A; Back, C; Beissel, J

    2005-12-07

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 microGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min(-1) (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  14. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  15. Potential applications of flat-panel volumetric CT in morphologic and functional small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Greschus, Susanne; Kiessling, Fabian; Lichy, Matthias P; Moll, Jens; Mueller, Margareta M; Savai, Rajkumar; Rose, Frank; Ruppert, Clemens; Günther, Andreas; Luecke, Marcus; Fusenig, Norbert E; Semmler, Wolfhard; Traupe, Horst

    2005-08-01

    Noninvasive radiologic imaging has recently gained considerable interest in basic and preclinical research for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic efficacy. In this report, we introduce flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT) as a powerful new tool for noninvasive imaging of different organ systems in preclinical research. The three-dimensional visualization that is achieved by isotropic high-resolution datasets is illustrated for the skeleton, chest, abdominal organs, and brain of mice. The high image quality of chest scans enables the visualization of small lung nodules in an orthotopic lung cancer model and the reliable imaging of therapy side effects such as lung fibrosis. Using contrast-enhanced scans, fpVCT displayed the vascular trees of the brain, liver, and kidney down to the subsegmental level. Functional application of fpVCT in dynamic contrast-enhanced scans of the rat brain delivered physiologically reliable data of perfusion and tissue blood volume. Beyond scanning of small animal models as demonstrated here, fpVCT provides the ability to image animals up to the size of primates.

  16. Temporal-spatial characteristic evaluation in a dynamic flat-panel detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, H.; Tanaka, R.; Matsubara, K.; Ichikawa, K.; Sakuta, K.; Minami, S.; Hayashi, N.; Sanada, S.; Kawamura, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    2010-04-01

    This report presents the fundamental temporospatial characteristics of a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system. We investigated the relationship between pixel value and X-ray pulse output, and examined reproducibility, dependence on pulse width, tube voltage, and pulse rate. Sequential images were obtained using a direct conversion-type dynamic FPD. The exposure conditions were: 110 kV, 80 mA, 6.3 ms, 7.5 fps, source-to-image distance (SID) 1.5 m. X-ray pulse output was measured using a dosimetry system with a sampling interval of 70 μs, to determine temporal changes in each X-ray pulse output. Temporal changes in pixel value were measured in the obtained images, and the relationship between pixel value and X-ray pulse output was examined. Reproducibility was assessed by comparing the results in two sequential images obtained under the same exposure conditions. Moreover, the relationships and properties were evaluated by changing the pulse width (12 ms and 25 ms), tube voltage (80 kV, 90 kV, and 100 kV), and pulse rate (3.75 fps and 15 fps). The results showed a good correlation between the X-ray pulse output and pixel values. Fluctuation of the pixel value measured in sequential images is thought to be mainly due to changes in X-ray pulse output, and is not caused by FPD.

  17. Flat panel detector-based cone beam CT for dynamic imaging: system evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Cai, Weixing; Yang, Dong; Lu, Xianghua

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize a newly built flat panel detector (FPD)-based cone beam CT (CBCT) prototype for dynamic imaging. A CBCT prototype has been designed and constructed by completely modifying a GE HiSpeed Advantage (HSA) CT gantry, incorporating a newly acquired large size real-time FPD (Varian PaxScan 4030CB), a new x-ray generator and a dual focal spot angiography x-ray tube that allows the full coverage of the detector. During data acquisition, the x-ray tube and the FPD can be rotated on the gantry over Nx360 degrees due to integrated slip ring technology with the rotation speed of one second/revolution. With a single scan time of up to 40 seconds , multiple sets of reconstructions can be performed for dynamic studies. The upgrade of this system has been completed. The prototype was used for a series of preliminary phantom studies: different sizes of breast phantoms, a Humanoid chest phantom and scatter correction studies. The results of the phantom studies demonstrate that good image quality can be achieved with this newly built prototype.

  18. Breathing chest radiography using a dynamic flat-panel detector combined with computer analysis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Suzuki, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Matsui, Takeshi; Inoue, Hitoshi; Yoshihisa, Nakano

    2004-08-01

    Kinetic information is crucial when evaluating certain pulmonary diseases. When a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) can be used for a chest examination, kinetic information can be obtained simply and cost-effectively. The purpose of this study was to develop methods for analyzing respiratory kinetics, such as movement of the diaphragm and lung structures, and the respiratory changes in x-ray translucency in local lung fields. Postero-anterior dynamic chest radiographs during respiration were obtained with a modified FPD, which provided dynamic chest radiographs at a rate of 3 frames/s. Image registration for correction of physical motion was followed by measurement of the distance from the lung apex to the diaphragm. Next, we used a cross-correlation technique to measure the vectors of respiratory movement in specific lung areas. Finally, the average pixel value for a given local area was calculated by tracing the same local area in the lung field. This method of analysis was used for six healthy volunteers and one emphysema patient. The results reported here represent the initial stage in the development of a method that may constitute a new method for diagnosing certain pulmonary diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, fibroid lung, and pneumonia. A clinical evaluation of our method is now in progress.

  19. Dynamic chest radiography with a flat-panel detector (FPD): ventilation-perfusion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Fujimura, M.; Yasui, M.; Tsuji, S.; Hayashi, N.; Okamoto, H.; Nanbu, Y.; Matsui, O.

    2011-03-01

    Pulmonary ventilation and blood flow are reflected in dynamic chest radiographs as changes in X-ray translucency, i.e., pixel values. This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) study based on the changes in pixel value. Sequential chest radiographs of a patient with ventilation-perfusion mismatch were obtained during respiration using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system. The lung area was recognized and average pixel value was measured in each area, tracking and deforming the region of interest. Inter-frame differences were then calculated, and the absolute values were summed in each respiratory phase. The results were visualized as ventilation, blood flow, V/Q ratio distribution map and compared to distribution of radioactive counts on ventilation and perfusion scintigrams. In the results, abnormalities were appeared as a reduction of changes in pixel values, and a correlation was observed between the distribution of changes in pixel value and those of radioactivity counts (Ventilation; r=0.78, Perfusion; r=0.77). V/Q mismatch was also indicated as mismatch of changes in pixel value, and a correlation with V/Q calculated by radioactivity counts (r=0.78). These results indicated that the present method is potentially useful for V/Q study as an additional examination in conventional chest radiography.

  20. Quality control phantom for flat panel detector X-ray systems.

    PubMed

    Chida, Koichi; Kaga, Yuji; Haga, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Ken; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    X-ray equipment should be routinely checked for optimal imaging performance and appropriate radiation dose. Recently, the use of diagnostic x-ray equipment with flat panel detectors (FPDs) has increased instead of image intensifier (II) and/or screen film systems. In addition, it is necessary to maintain the performance of FPD systems. Unfortunately, no simple quality control (QC) phantom is available for easy evaluation of FPD image performance. This manuscript suggests a novel simple and inexpensive QC phantom for radiography and fluoroscopy. The authors made a new QC phantom for FPD systems to evaluate the spatial resolution, low-contrast resolution, and dynamic range on single (one-shot) x-ray exposures. The phantom consists of three copper thicknesses (0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 mm), an aluminum stepwedge (0.1-2.7 mm), and piano wire of various diameters (0.08-0.5 mm). They also performed an initial check of the new phantom using a FPD system (fluoroscopic and radiographic images). The new phantom is simple and inexpensive to make. This simple phantom is very useful for QC of FPD systems because a visual evaluation of image performance in three thicknesses of copper (low, intermediate, and high attenuation) is readily available with a single exposure. This simple method for daily checking of FPD systems (radiography and fluoroscopy) using the phantom constitutes an easy way to routinely check image performance and will be useful for QC.

  1. Ultra-high resolution flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, design architecture, and system characterization.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv; Grasruck, Michael; Suess, Christoph; Bartling, Soenke H; Schmidt, Bernhard; Stierstorfer, Karl; Popescu, Stefan; Brady, Tom; Flohr, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    Digital flat-panel-based volume CT (VCT) represents a unique design capable of ultra-high spatial resolution, direct volumetric imaging, and dynamic CT scanning. This innovation, when fully developed, has the promise of opening a unique window on human anatomy and physiology. For example, the volumetric coverage offered by this technology enables us to observe the perfusion of an entire organ, such as the brain, liver, or kidney, tomographically (e.g., after a transplant or ischemic event). By virtue of its higher resolution, one can directly visualize the trabecular structure of bone. This paper describes the basic design architecture of VCT. Three key technical challenges, viz., scatter correction, dynamic range extension, and temporal resolution improvement, must be addressed for successful implementation of a VCT scanner. How these issues are solved in a VCT prototype and the modifications necessary to enable ultra-high resolution volumetric scanning are described. The fundamental principles of scatter correction and dose reduction are illustrated with the help of an actual prototype. The image quality metrics of this prototype are characterized and compared with a multi-detector CT (MDCT).

  2. Thermal Reactor Model for Large-Scale Algae Cultivation in Vertical Flat Panel Photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Endres, Christian H; Roth, Arne; Brück, Thomas B

    2016-04-05

    Microalgae can grow significantly faster than terrestrial plants and are a promising feedstock for sustainable value added products encompassing pharmaceuticals, pigments, proteins and most prominently biofuels. As the biomass productivity of microalgae strongly depends on the cultivation temperature, detailed information on the reactor temperature as a function of time and geographical location is essential to evaluate the true potential of microalgae as an industrial feedstock. In the present study, a temperature model for an array of vertical flat plate photobioreactors is presented. It was demonstrated that mutual shading of reactor panels has a decisive effect on the reactor temperature. By optimizing distance and thickness of the panels, the occurrence of extreme temperatures and the amplitude of daily temperature fluctuations in the culture medium can be drastically reduced, while maintaining a high level of irradiation on the panels. The presented model was developed and applied to analyze the suitability of various climate zones for algae production in flat panel photobioreactors. Our results demonstrate that in particular Mediterranean and tropical climates represent favorable locations. Lastly, the thermal energy demand required for the case of active temperature control is determined for several locations.

  3. CRT and flat panel inspection via personal computer-based image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melson, John

    1988-12-01

    The light output inspection process of cathode ray tubes, flat panels and other displays often requires extremely precise and time-consuming manual steps. This paper describes the PR-900 Video Photometer, a PC-based photometric, spatial and colorimetric instrument which automates this inspeCtion process - eliminating operator error and greatly reducing measurement time. The PR-900 digitizes the displayed image as acquired in video form and converts the data into an accurate NBS-traceable measurement. The IBM PC/AT-based photometer is designed for speed and resolution. The system includes a personal computer, an image digitizer, a customized CCD-array Video Sensor Assembly (VSA), interwhangeable objective lenses and proprietary VideoView software. Optionally, an automatic VSA Positioning Stage is added for Automatic Test Environment (ATE) applications. With its modular approach, the hardware and software of the video photometer is readily optimized to meet diverse measurement requirements. This versatile instrument is used to calculate such a wide scope of parameters as luminance (brightness) uniformity, line width, luminance profiles, character size, spot contours, modulation transfer function (MTF), misconvergence, geometric distortion and relative chromaticity (color) coordinates.

  4. Compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krielaart, M. A. R.; Vermeer, C. H.; Vanapalli, S.

    2015-11-01

    Heat switches are devices that can change from a thermally conducting (on-) state to an insulating (off-) state whenever the need arises. They enable adaptive thermal management strategies in which cooling rates are altered either spatially or temporally, leading to a substantial reduction in the energy and mass budget of a large range of systems. State-of-the-art heat switches are only rarely employed in thermal system architectures, since they are rather bulky and have a limited thermal performance (expressed as the heat transfer ratio between the on- and off-state heat conductance). Using selective laser melting additive manufacturing technology, also known as 3D printing, we developed a compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch that offers superior thermal performance, is simpler and more economic to produce and assemble, contains no moving parts, and is more reliable because it lacks welded joints. The manufactured rectangular panel heat switch has frontal device dimensions of 10 cm by 10 cm, thickness of 3.2 mm and weighs just 121 g. An off heat conductance of 0.2 W/K and on-off heat conductance ratio of 38 is observed at 295 K.

  5. Planar cone-beam computed tomography with a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. W.; Youn, H.; Kim, D.; Kam, S.; Jeon, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    For a dedicated x-ray inspection of printed-circuit boards (PCBs), a bench-top planar cone-beam computed tomography (pCT) system with a flat-panel detector has been built in the laboratory. The system adopts the tomosynthesis technique that can produce cross-sectional images parallel to the axis of rotation for a limited angular range. For the optimal operation of the system and further improvement in the next design, we have evaluated imaging performances, such as modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, and noise-equivalent number of quanta. The performances are comparatively evaluated with the coventional cone-beam CT (CBCT) acquisition for various scanning angular ranges, applied tube voltages, and geometrical magnification factors. The pCT scan shows a poorer noise performance than the conventional CBCT scan because of less number of projection views used for reconstruction. However, the pCT shows a better spatial-resolution performance than the CBCT. Because the image noise can be compensated by an elevated exposure level during scanning, the pCT can be a useful modality for the PCB inspection that requires higher spatial-resolution performance.

  6. Astaxanthin induction in Microalga H. pluvialis with flat panel airlift photobioreactors under indoor and outdoor conditions.

    PubMed

    Poonkum, Woradej; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Pavasant, Prasert

    2015-01-01

    Astaxanthin was induced from Haematococcus pluvialis (NIES-144) under indoor and outdoor conditions using 17-, 50-, and 90-L flat-panel airlift photobioreactors (FP-APBRs). Preliminary experiments in 1.5-L bubble column photobioreactors (BC-PBRs) revealed that sterilized clean water with 3% CO2 aeration (1.47 cm(3) s(-1) CO2 loading) could best encourage astaxanthin accumulation at 18.21 g m(-3) (3.63% by weight). Operating 17-L FP-APBRs with these bubble column parameters under indoor conditions could further enhance astaxanthin to 26.63 g m(-3) (5.34% by weight). This was potentially due to the inherited up-lift force from the reactor that helped avoid cell precipitation by allowing the cells to be circulated within the reactor. In addition, the various sizes of FP-APBRs exhibited similar performance, implying a potential scale-up opportunity. However, similar operation under outdoor condition exhibited slightly poorer performance due to the light inhibition effect. The best outdoor performance was obtained with the FP-APBR covered with one layer of shading net, where 20.11 g m(-3) (4.47% by weight) of astaxanthin was resulted.

  7. Motion gated small animal imaging with a flat-panel CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Bartling, S.; Dinkel, J.; Kiessling, F.; Semmler, W.; Stierstorfer, K.; Schmidt, B.

    2008-03-01

    Small animal CT gains increasing interest in preclinical research. However, physiological motion compensation like in clinical CT has seldom been employed so far. We present different methods of retrospective motion correction for small animal imaging despite their high respiratory and heart rate. Beside respiratory gating alone the combination of respiratory and simultaneous cardiac gating is shown. In vivo data are acquired with an experimental flat-panel based CT scanner*(Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim Germany). Whole mice or rats fit in the available FOV of 25 * 25 * 4 cm 3, while acquisition rate is 100fps. Extrinsic gating is realized by tracing the physiological motion from a small animal monitoring system with a pneumatic pillow for respiratory motion and ECG for heart motion. At the alternative intrinsic method, the lung motion is directly correlated to the movement of the center of gravity in the acquired projection data. As an advantage of the second method the even low preparation effort per scan is reduced. As long as the rotation time of the gantry is far below the cycle time of heart or the lung a multi-segment reconstruction is used in both methods. Motion artifacts are largely suppressed after gating. While in non gated images, the diaphragm, heart contours, bronchi and lung vessels are already visible, they are more sharply defined in the gated datasets. Four-dimensional assessment of lung motion is possible and lung volume in several phases such as peak inspiration and expiration could be segmented, quantified and compared.

  8. Practical expressions describing detective quantum efficiency in flat-panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. K.

    2011-11-01

    In radiology, image quality excellence is a balance between system performance and patient dose, hence x-ray systems must be designed to ensure the maximum image quality is obtained for the lowest consistent dose. The concept of detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is widely used to quantify, understand, measure, and predict the performance of x-ray detectors and imaging systems. Cascaded linear-systems theory can be used to estimate DQE based on the system design parameters and this theoretical DQE can be utilized for determining the impact of various physical processes, such as secondary quantum sinks, noise aliasing, reabsorption noise, and others. However, the prediction of DQE usually requires tremendous efforts to determine each parameter consisting of the cascaded linear-systems model. In this paper, practical DQE formalisms assessing both the photoconductor- and scintillator-based flat-panel detectors under quantum-noise-limited operation are described. The developed formalisms are experimentally validated and discussed for their limits. The formalisms described in this paper would be helpful for the rapid prediction of the DQE performances of developing systems as well as the optimal design of systems.

  9. Performance of cone-beam CT using a flat-panel imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masahiro; Tsunoo, Takanori; Satoh, Kazumasa; Matsusita, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Masahiro; Fukuda, Yasushi

    2001-06-01

    An active matrix flat-panel imager (FPI) is a good candidate for the 2-dimensional detector of cone beam CT (CBCT), because it has a wider dynamic range and less geometrical distortion than video-fluoroscopic system so far employed. However the performance of FPI-based CBCT has not been sufficiently examined yet. The aim of this work is to examine the performance of CBCT using a FPI with several phantoms. An X-ray tube, a phantom and a FPI were aligned on an experimental table. The FPI was PaxScan2520 provided by Varian Medical Systems. It has an active area of approximately 180x240mm and the pixel size is 127 micrometer. CsI is used as a scintillator. The phantom was rotated with 1-degree steps while 360 projection frames (1408x1888 active pixels each frame) were collected. 2x2 pixels were combined into a single pixel to reduce noise. 512x512x512 voxels were reconstructed with the Feldkamp method. The comparison was made between reconstructed images with or without scatter rejecting grid. The uniformity and linearity of reconstruction value was drastically improved with the grid. Scatter rejection using a thin-vane collimator was also examined, and it showed more effective than the grid.

  10. [Physical imaging properties of a flat panel X-ray detector system].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akira; Nakamura, Satoru; Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Kohama, Chiyuki; Takahata, Akira; Fujikawa, Kouichi

    2002-01-01

    We report the physical imaging properties of a flat panel detector (FPD) designed for radiographic imaging applications (Revolution XQ/i digital chest imaging system, G.E. Medical Systems). The imaging properties of the detector were evaluated through measurements of the characteristic curve, modulation transfer function (MTF), and Wiener spectrum. The digital characteristic curves of the FPD system were measured for the two tube voltages (80 kV and 120 kV). They showed that the correlation between the pixel values of FPD and the incident exposure to the FPD was a linear correlation. The dynamic range of characteristic curves had a range from about 0.003 to 2 microC/kg at the exposure. The presampling MTFs for different tube voltage were almost the same, when we measured the MTFs at 80 kV and 120 kV. And also, there was no significant difference between the MTFs measured with the slit in the direction parallel to the horizontal direction and with the slit in the perpendicular direction. The relative resolution of the FPD system was a 46% higher than that of ST-V imaging plate of FCR (Fuji Computed Radiography) system at 2 cycles/mm. The digital Wiener spectrum of the FPD system was about 1/10 lower than that of the CR system. Thus the FPD system can provide superior imaging performance due to both high resolution and low noise.

  11. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography.

  12. [Reproducibility of dynamic chest radiography with a flat-panel detector - respiratory changes in pixel value].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru

    2009-06-20

    Dynamic chest radiography using a flat panel detector (FPD) with a large field of view is expected to be a useful pulmonary functional evaluation method based on the respiratory changes in pixel value. For clinical use as a follow-up and therapeutic evaluation tool, the system must have a high degree of reproducibility in measurements of pixel values. The present study was performed to investigate the reproducibility of respiratory changes in pixel values. Dynamic chest radiographs of five normal subjects and one patient were obtained. Imaging was performed twice in each subject. The slope (X-ray translucency variation) was then calculated from the changes in pixel value from distance lung apex-diaphragm, and the slopes of two sequences were compared. The results showed there were no significant differences in changes in pixel value between the two sequences in all normal subject (5 males, p>0.05). The results indicated that the present method has reproducibility for measuring pulmonary function and also has potential as a tool for follow-up and therapeutic evaluation.

  13. Continuous production of diatom Entomoneis sp. in mechanically stirred tank and flat-panel airlift photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Viriyayingsiri, Thunyaporn; Sittplangkoon, Pantaporn; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Nootong, Kasidit

    2016-10-02

    Continuous production of diatom Entomonies sp. was performed in mechanically stirred tank and flat-panel airlift photobioreactors (FPAP). The maximum specific growth rate of diatom from the batch experiment was 0.98 d(-1). A series of dilution rate and macronutrient concentration adjustments were performed in a stirred tank photobioreactor and found that the dilution rate ranged from 0.7 to 0.8 d(-1) and modified F/2 growth media containing nitrate at 3.09 mg N/L, phosphate at 2.24 mg P/L, and silicate at 11.91 mg Si/L yielded the maximum cell number density. Finally, the continuous cultivation of Entomonies sp. was conducted in FPAP using the optimal conditions determined earlier, resulting in the maximum cell number density of 19.69 × 10(4) cells/mL, which was approximately 47 and 73% increase from the result using the stirred tank photobioreactor fed with modified and standard F/2 growth media, respectively.

  14. Consequences of zero-point motion to the radial distribution function of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Joseph L.; Bernstein, Noam; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitris A.; Mehl, Michael J.

    2004-11-01

    While there have been many studies based on models of amorphous silicon, there have been surprisingly few (perhaps only one) that have seriously addressed the radial distribution function at low temperature. Our work is based in part on the so-called NRL tight binding method using parameters for silicon determined by Bernstein et al. As we have recently shown in the case of 216-atom models, upon including zero-point motion good agreement is obtained with very accurate low temperature x-ray diffraction measurements by Laaziri et al of the radial distribution function, although, as also found by Herrero who used the Stillinger-Weber potential, a slight asymmetry of the first peak in the RDF is predicted and this asymmetry has not been observed experimentally. Upon use of an estimate of zero-point broadening from our previous work we show here that 1000-atom models lead to good agreement with experiment for the RDF. Perhaps fortuitously, we obtain models that agree with the experimentally determined second peak in the RDF for both annealed and unannealed samples: our tight binding relaxed models based on topologies derived from the Wooten-Winer-Weaire method and the Barkema-Mousseau method yield unannealed-sample results, whereas our tight binding relaxed model based on an MD quench of the liquid using the semi-empirical interatomic potential, EDIP, of Kaxiras and coworkers yield the annealed-sample results. Finally, the significant effect of zero-point motion on the first peak in the radial distribution that we obtain in the case of amorphous silicon could also have implications for other amorphous materials, e.g. SiO2.

  15. Tight binding calculations of vibrational and thermal properties of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, Michael; Feldman, Joseph; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitris; Bernstein, Noam

    2006-03-01

    By displacing atoms by different amounts and computing atomic forces within the NRL tight binding method we obtain all second order (harmonic) and some third order (anharmonic) coupling constants of a 1000 atom TB-relaxed Wooten CRN model of amorphous silicon. The harmonic force constant results allow us to study various properties including vibrational density of states, dynamic structure factors, specific heat and thermal conductivity within Kubo theory. We shall present results of these applications and compare to experiment and previous work based on the Stillinger Weber potential.

  16. Photoelectrochemical and photovoltaic characteristics of amorphous-silicon-based tandem cells as photocathodes for water splitting.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jürgen; Kaiser, Bernhard; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Urbain, Félix; Becker, Jan-Philipp; Smirnov, Vladimir; Finger, Friedhelm

    2014-12-15

    In this study amorphous silicon tandem solar cells are successfully utilized as photoelectrodes in a photoelectrochemical cell for water electrolysis. The tandem cells are modified with various amounts of platinum and are combined with a ruthenium oxide counter electrode. In a two-electrode arrangement this system is capable of splitting water without external bias with a short-circuit current of 4.50 mA cm(-2). On the assumption that no faradaic losses occur, a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 5.54% is achieved. In order to identify the relevant loss processes, additional three-electrode measurements were performed for each involved half-cell.

  17. Self-aligned imprint lithography for top-gate amorphous silicon thin-film transistor fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lausecker, E.; Huang, Y.; Fromherz, T.; Sturm, J. C.; Wagner, S.

    2010-06-01

    We developed self-aligned imprint lithography (SAIL) for top-gate amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistors (TFTs). Our SAIL process enables a device pattern definition in a single imprint step that uses a three-level mold. The various levels of the mold are defined by a stepwise opening of a chromium hardmask and subsequent dry-etching. For TFT fabrication we imprint, and consecutively etch the imprint resist levels and device layers. The imprinted top-gate a-Si TFTs have nickel silicide source/drain self-aligned to the gate with mobilities of ˜0.4 cm2/V s.

  18. Measurement of the specific heat and determination of the thermodynamic functions of relaxed amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roura, P.; Taïr, F.; Farjas, J.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2013-05-01

    The specific heat, cp, of two amorphous silicon (a-Si) samples has been measured by differential scanning calorimetry in the 100-900 K temperature range. When the hydrogen content is reduced by thermal annealing, cp approaches the value of crystalline Si (c-Si). Within experimental accuracy, we conclude that cp of relaxed pure a-Si coincides with that of c-Si. This result is used to determine the enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy of defect-free relaxed a-Si. Finally, the contribution of structural defects on these quantities is calculated and the melting point of several states of a-Si is predicted.

  19. Thin metal layer as transparent electrode in n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theuring, Martin; Geissendörfer, Stefan; Vehse, Martin; von Maydell, Karsten; Agert, Carsten

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, transparent electrodes, based on a thin silver film and a capping layer, are investigated. Low deposition temperature, flexibility and low material costs are the advantages of this type of electrode. Their applicability in structured n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells is demonstrated in simulation and experiment. The influence of the individual layer thicknesses on the solar cell performance is discussed and approaches for further improvements are given. For the silver film/capping layer electrode, a higher solar cell efficiency could be achieved compared to a reference ZnO:Al front contact.

  20. High-stability transparent amorphous oxide TFT with a silicon-doped back-channel layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyoung-Rae; Park, Jea-Gun

    2014-10-01

    We significantly reduced various electrical instabilities of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) by using the co-deposition of silicon on an a-IGZO back channel. This process showed improved stability of the threshold voltage ( V th ) under high temperature and humidity and negative gate-bias illumination stress (NBIS) without any reduction of IDS. The enhanced stability was achieved with silicon, which has higher metal-oxide bonding strengths than gallium does. Additionally, SiO X distributed on the a-IGZO surface reduced the adsorption and the desorption of H2O and O2. This process is applicable to the TFT manufacturing process with a variable sputtering target.

  1. Identification of infrared absorption peaks of amorphous silicon-carbon alloy by thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Liang; Tsai, Hsiung-Kuang; Lee, Si-Chen; Sah, Wen-Jyh; Tzeng, Wen-Jer

    1987-12-01

    Amorphous silicon-carbon hydrogen alloy was prepared by radio frequency glow discharge decomposition of a silane-methane mixture. The infrared absorption spectra were measured at various stages of thermal annealing. By observing the change of relative intensities between these peaks the hydrogen bonding responsible for the absorption peaks could be assigned more accurately, for example, the stretching mode of monohydride Si-H is determined by its local environment, which supports H. Wagner's and W. Beyer's results [Solid State Commun. 48, 585 (1983)] but is inconsistent with the commonly believed view. It is also found that a significant fraction of carbon atoms are introduced into the film in -CH3 configuration which forms a local void and enhances the formation of polysilane chain and dangling bond defects. Only after high-temperature annealing are the hydrogen atoms driven out, and Si and C start to form a better silicon carbide network.

  2. Effect of antireflection coating on the crystallization of amorphous silicon films by flash lamp annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, Yuki; Ohdaira, Keisuke

    2017-04-01

    We succeed in decreasing the fluence of a flash-lamp pulse required for the crystallization of electron-beam (EB)-evaporated amorphous silicon (a-Si) films using silicon nitride (SiN x ) antireflection films. The antireflection effect of SiN x is confirmed not only when SiN x is placed on the surface of a-Si or flash lamp annealing (FLA) is performed from the film side, but also when SiN x is inserted between glass and a-Si and a flash pulse is supplied from the glass side. We also quantitatively confirm, by calculating flash-lamp pulse energies actually reaching a-Si films using reflectance spectra, that the reduction in the fluence of a flash-lamp pulse for the crystallization of a-Si films is due to the antireflection effect of SiN x .

  3. Phase transitions from semiconductive amorphous to conductive polycrystalline in indium silicon oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Da, Bo; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nabatame, Toshihide; Takahashi, Makoto; Ito, Kazuhiro; Kizu, Takio; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2016-11-01

    The enhancement in electrical conductivity and optical transparency induced by a phase transition from amorphous to polycrystalline in lightly silicon-doped indium oxide (InSiO) thin films is studied. The phase transition caused by simple thermal annealing transforms the InSiO thin films from semiconductors to conductors. Silicon atoms form SiO4 tetrahedra in InSiO, which enhances the overlap of In 5s orbitals as a result of the distortion of InO6 octahedral networks. Desorption of weakly bonded oxygen releases electrons from deep subgap states and enhances the electrical conductivity and optical transparency of the films. Optical absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reveal that the phase transition causes a Fermi energy shift of ˜0.2 eV.

  4. Two-dimensional modeling of the back amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction (BACH) photovoltaic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R.; Chutinan, Alongkarn; Gougam, Adel B.; Kherani, Nazir P.; Zukotynski, Stefan

    2010-06-01

    Back Amorphous-Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction (BACH)1 solar cell can be fabricated using low temperature processes while integrating high efficiency features of heterojunction silicon solar cells and back-contact homojunction solar cells. This article presents a two-dimensional modeling study of the BACH cell concept. A parametric study of the BACH cell has been carried out using Sentaurus after benchmarking the software. A detailed model describing the optical generation is defined. Solar cell efficiency of 24.4% is obtained for AM 1.5 global spectrum with VOC of greater than 720 mV and JSC exceeding 40 mA/cm2, considering realistic surface passivation quality and other dominant recombination processes.

  5. Stopping power of rare gases in amorphous silicon for MeV helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, F.; Komaki, K.; Optuka, A.; Kawatsura, K.; Ozawa, K.; Shimada, T.; Katayama, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The stopping cross sections of argon, krypton and xenon inside amorphous silicon for alpha particle, in which the concentrations of argon, krypton and xenon were 8,7, and 4 at %, respectively, were measured by the Rutherford backscattering method in the incident energy range from 1.0 to 2.6 MeV for argon and 1.0 to 1.6 MeV for krypton and xenon. If the stopping cross section of silicon given by Ziegler is used and Bragg's rule is assumed, the obtained values of each rare gas were about 30% lower than those for gaseous state given by Ziegler in the energy region near to 1 MeV.

  6. Recombination and thin film properties of silicon nitride and amorphous silicon passivated c-Si following ammonia plasma exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao; Thomson, Andrew F.; Cuevas, Andres; McIntosh, Keith R.

    2015-01-26

    Recombination at silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) passivated crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces is shown to increase significantly following an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) plasma exposure at room temperature. The effect of plasma exposure on chemical structure, refractive index, permittivity, and electronic properties of the thin films is also investigated. It is found that the NH{sub 3} plasma exposure causes (i) an increase in the density of Si≡N{sub 3} groups in both SiN{sub x} and a-Si films, (ii) a reduction in refractive index and permittivity, (iii) an increase in the density of defects at the SiN{sub x}/c-Si interface, and (iv) a reduction in the density of positive charge in SiN{sub x}. The changes in recombination and thin film properties are likely due to an insertion of N–H radicals into the bulk of SiN{sub x} or a-Si. It is therefore important for device performance to minimize NH{sub 3} plasma exposure of SiN{sub x} or a-Si passivating films during subsequent fabrication steps.

  7. Method for sputtering a PIN microcrystalline/amorphous silicon semiconductor device with the P and N-layers sputtered from boron and phosphorous heavily doped targets

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Maruska, H. Paul

    1985-04-02

    A silicon PIN microcrystalline/amorphous silicon semiconductor device is constructed by the sputtering of N, and P layers of silicon from silicon doped targets and the I layer from an undoped target, and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode.

  8. Strong enhancement of spontaneous emission in amorphous-silicon-nitride photonic crystal based coupled-microcavity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayindir, M.; Tanriseven, S.; Aydinli, A.; Ozbay, E.

    We investigated photoluminescence (PL) from one-dimensional photonic band gap structures. The photonic crystals, a Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator and a coupled-microcavity (CMC) structure, were fabricated by using alternating hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-nitride and hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-oxide layers. It was observed that these structures strongly modify the PL spectra from optically active amorphous-silicon-nitride thin films. Narrow-band and wide-band PL spectra were achieved in the FP microcavity and the CMC structure, respectively. The angle dependence of PL peak of the FP resonator was also investigated. We also observed that the spontaneous emission increased drastically at the coupled-cavity band edge of the CMC structure due to extremely low group velocity and long photon lifetime. The measurements agree well with the transfer-matrix method results and the prediction of the tight-binding approximation.

  9. SAPHIRE: A New Flat-Panel Digital Mammography Detector With Avalanche Photoconductor and High-Resolution Field Emitter Readout

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    array of TFTs, simi- lar to that in existing AMFPI. The proposed detector is named SHARP-AMFPI scintillator-HARP active matrix flat-panel imager...the wavelength of the incident photon. It was found by Pai and Enck that the ESe and dependence of photogeneration in a-Se follow the Onsager ...mechanism.25 Onsager theory states that every absorbed photon creates a pair of thermalized carriers bound by their Coulombic attrac- tion. The initial

  10. A flat-panel detector based micro-CT system: performance evaluation for small-animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung; Chun, In Kon; Hye Cho, Myung; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung

    2003-12-01

    A dedicated small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been developed to screen laboratory small animals such as mice and rats. The micro-CT system consists of an indirect-detection flat-panel x-ray detector with a field-of-view of 120 × 120 mm2, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder and a parallel data processing system. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array fabricated by a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) process coupled to a CsI:Tl (thallium-doped caesium iodide) scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. Principal imaging performances of the micro-CT system have been evaluated in terms of image uniformity, voxel noise and spatial resolution. It has been found that the image non-uniformity mainly comes from the structural non-uniform sensitivity pattern of the flat-panel detector and the voxel noise is about 48 CT numbers at the voxel size of 100 × 100 × 200 µm3 and the air kerma of 286 mGy. When the magnification ratio is 2, the spatial resolution of the micro-CT system is about 14 lp/mm (line pairs per millimetre) that is almost determined by the flat-panel detector showing about 7 lp/mm resolving power. Through low-contrast phantom imaging studies, the minimum resolvable contrast has been found to be less than 36 CT numbers at the air kerma of 95 mGy. Some laboratory rat imaging results are presented.

  11. 76 FR 45296 - In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Display Devices, and Products Containing the Same; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... sale for importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain flat panel.... Patent No. 6,281,955 (``the `955 patent''); U.S. Patent No. 7,697,093 (``the `093 patent''); U.S. Patent No. 7,286,192 (``the `192 patent''); U.S. Patent No. 6,818,967 (``the `967 patent''); U.S. Patent...

  12. Assessment of the CO2 fixation capacity of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 outdoor cultures in vertical flat-panel reactors.

    PubMed

    Clares, Marta E; Moreno, José; Guerrero, Miguel G; García-González, Mercedes

    2014-10-10

    The extent of biological CO2 fixation was evaluated for outdoor cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047. Culture conditions were optimized indoors in bubble-column photochemostats operating in continuous mode, subjected to irradiance cycles mimicking the light regime outdoors. Highest values achieved for CO2 fixation rate and biomass productivity were 1 and 0.6 g L(-1) day(-1), respectively. The comparison among different reactors operating simultaneously - open pond, horizontal tubular reactor and vertical flat-panel - allowed to assess their relative efficiency for the outdoor development of Anabaena cultures. Despite the higher volumetric CO2 fixation capacity (and biomass productivity) exhibited by the tubular photobioreactor, yield of the flat-panel reactor was 50% higher than that of the tubular option on a per area basis, reaching values over 35 g CO2 fixed m(-2) d(-1). The flat-panel reactor actually represents a most suitable system for CO2 capture coupled to the generation of valuable biomass by Anabaena cultures.

  13. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited amorphous hydrogenated films on silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the friction and wear behavior of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films in sliding contact with silicon nitride pins in both dry nitrogen and humid air environments. Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films approximately 0.06 micron thick were deposited on silicon nitride flat substrates by using the 30 kHz ac glow discharge of a planar plasma reactor. The results indicate that an increase in plasma deposition power gives an increase in film density and hardness. The high-density a-C:H films deposited behaved tribologically much like bulk diamond. In the dry nitrogen environment, a tribochemical reaction produced a substance, probably a hydrocarbon-rich layer, that decreased the coefficient of friction. In the humid air environment, tribochemical interactions drastically reduced the wear life of a-C:H films and water vapor greatly increased the friction. Even in humid air, effective lubrication is possible with vacuum-annealed a-C:H films. The vacuum-annealed high-density a-C:H film formed an outermost superficial graphitic layer, which behaved like graphite, on the bulk a-C:H film. Like graphite, the annealed a-C:H film with the superficial graphitic layer showed low friction when adsorbed water vapor was present.

  14. Solid state photochemistry. Subpanel A-2(b): Metastability in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.

    1996-09-01

    All device quality amorphous silicon based materials exhibit degradation in electronic properties when exposed to sunlight. The photo-induced defects are associated with Si dangling bonds that are created by the recombination and/or trapping of photogenerated carriers. The defects are metastable and can be annealed out at temperatures of about 150 to 200 degrees Centigrade. The density of metastable defects is larger in films that are contaminated with > 10{sup 19} per cubic cm of impurities such as oxygen, carbon and nitrogen. However, recent experimental results indicate that some metastable defects are still present in films with very low impurity concentrations. The photo-induced defects typically saturate after 100 to 1000 hours of exposure to one sun illumination depending on the deposition conditions. There is also experimental evidence that photo-induced structural changes are occurring in the amorphous silicon based materials and that hydrogen may be playing an important role in both the photo-induced structural changes and in the creation of metastable defects.

  15. Lattice Dynamics at Low Frequency: Resonant and Excess Modes in Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, J. L.; Allen, Philip B.; Bickham, S. R.

    1998-03-01

    We study lattice vibrations in amorphous silicon by simulations and exact diagonalizations on finite-size models (216, 1000, and 4096 atoms) built by Wooten using the algorithm of Wooten, Winer, and Weaire. The lowest energy vibrations are at (9.1, 5.4, and 3.4meV) respectively, close to the relevant energy range where ``excess modes'' (``Excess modes'' appear in what is sometimes called the ``Boson peak.'') are found in many glasses. The finite size causes a discrete spectrum rather than the continuous spectrum of a macroscopic sample. Because Q is an approximate quantum number at low frequency, modes tend to bunch into quasi-degenerate groups corresponding to the degeneracies of the small size-quantized Q's. However, approximately 10--20% of low energy modes have frequencies split off from quasi-degenerate groups, and eigenvectors with no good Q, but instead ``quasilocalized'' or ``resonant.'' There is a possible connection with the ``excess vibrations'' and also with anomalously big Grüneisen constants deduced from thermal expansion. Here we report our efforts to extrapolate macroscopic information about low frequency modes. We find a satisfactory fit using an extrapolation which yields only propagating damped acoustic waves with no ``excess modes.'' Therefore we suggest that either amorphous silicon has no excess vibrations or else that excess vibrations are associated with mesoscopic defects such as voids which are absent in our model.

  16. High performance uncooled amorphous silicon VGA IRFPA with 17-µm pixel-pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.; Durand, A.; Garret, Th.; Minassian, C.; Robert, P.; Tinnes, S.; Vilain, M.

    2010-04-01

    The high level of accumulated expertise by ULIS and CEA/LETI on uncooled microbolometers made from amorphous silicon enables ULIS to develop VGA IRFPA formats with 17μm pixel-pitch to build up the currently available product catalog. This detector keeps all the innovations developed on the 25 μm pixel-pitch ROIC (detector configuration by serial link, low power consumption and wide electrical dynamic range). The specific appeal of this unit lies in the high spatial resolution it provides. The reduction of the pixel-pitch turns this TEC-less VGA array into a product well adapted for high resolution and compact systems. In the last part of the paper, we will look more closely at the high electro-optical performances of this IRFPA and the rapid performance enhancement. We will insist on NETD trade-off with wide thermal dynamic range, as well as the high characteristics uniformity, achieved thanks to the mastering of the amorphous silicon technology coupled with the ROIC design. This technology node paves the way to high end products as well as low end compact smaller formats like 160 x 120 or smaller.

  17. Label-free photonic biosensors fabricated with low-loss hydrogenated amorphous silicon resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipka, Timo; Wahn, Lennart; Trieu, Hoc Khiem; Hilterhaus, Lutz; Müller, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    The precise detection of chemicals and biomolecules is of great interest in the areas of biotechnology and medical diagnostics. Thus, there is a need for highly sensitive, small area, and low-cost sensors. We fabricated and optically characterized hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic resonators for label-free lab-on-chip biosensors. The sensing was performed with small-footprint microdisk and microring resonators that detect a refractive-index change via the evanescent electric field. Homogeneous sensing with NaCl and surface-sensing experiments with immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) were carried out. A sensitivity as high as 460 nm/RIU was measured for NaCl dissolved in deionized water for the disk, whereas about 50 nm/RIU was determined for the ring resonator. The intrinsic limits of detection were calculated to be 3.3×10 and 3.2×10 at 1550-nm wavelength. We measured the binding of BSA to functionalized ring resonators and found that molecular masses can be detected down to the clinically relevant femtogram regime. The detection and quantification of related analytes with hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic sensors can be used in medical healthcare diagnostics like point-of-care-testing and biotechnological screening.

  18. Fluoroscopic x-ray imaging with amorphous silicon thin-film arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Ulrich W.; Conrads, Norbert; Jung, Norbert; Weibrecht, Martin; Wieczorek, Herfried K.; Zaengel, Thomas T.; Powell, M. J.; French, I. D.; Glasse, C.

    1994-05-01

    The dream of an all-solid state large area x-ray image sensor with digital readout and full dynamic performance will most probably find a first realization in 2D thin-film amorphous silicon arrays. In this paper we address in particular the evaluation of the limits of the signal/noise ratio in this concept. Using small prototype detectors measurements of MTF and noise power spectra have been made as a function of x-ray dose. The results are given in terms of the detective quantum efficiency as a function of dose and spatial frequency. We further present an analysis of the different noise sources and their dependence on the detector parameters, and we provide estimates on the maximum signals that may be achieved per unit dose. The intrinsic lag of the amorphous silicon photodiodes causes a second problem area with this type of x-ray detectors. Especially in radiography/fluoroscopy mixed applications, memory effects may not be negligible.

  19. Carbon-assisted growth and high visible-light optical reflectivity of amorphous silicon oxynitride nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Large amounts of amorphous silicon oxynitride nanowires have been synthesized on silicon wafer through carbon-assisted vapor-solid growth avoiding the contamination from metallic catalysts. These nanowires have the length of up to 100 μm, with a diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. Around 3-nm-sized nanostructures are observed to be homogeneously distributed within a nanowire cross-section matrix. The unique configuration might determine the growth of ternary amorphous structure and its special splitting behavior. Optical properties of the nanowires have also been investigated. The obtained nanowires were attractive for their exceptional whiteness, perceived brightness, and optical brilliance. These nanowires display greatly enhanced reflection over the whole visible wavelength, with more than 80% of light reflected on most of the wavelength ranging from 400 to 700 nm and the lowest reflectivity exceeding 70%, exhibiting performance superior to that of the reported white beetle. Intense visible photoluminescence is also observed over a broad spectrum ranging from 320 to 500 nm with two shoulders centered at around 444 and 468 nm, respectively. PMID:21787429

  20. Ion-beam sputtered amorphous silicon films for cryogenic precision measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Peter G.; Martin, Iain W.; Craig, Kieran; Hough, James; Robie, Raymond; Rowan, Sheila; Abernathy, Matt R.; Pershing, Teal; Penn, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Thermal noise resulting from the mechanical loss of multilayer dielectric coatings is expected to impose a limit to the sensitivities of precision measurement systems used in fundamental and applied science. In the case of gravitational wave astronomy, future interferometric gravitational wave detectors are likely to operate at cryogenic temperatures to reduce such thermal noise and ameliorate thermal loading effects, with the desirable thermomechanical properties of silicon making it an attractive mirror substrate choice for this purpose. For use in such a precision instrument, appropriate coatings of low thermal noise are essential. Amorphous silicon (a -Si ) deposited by e-beam and other techniques has been shown to have low mechanical loss. However, to date, the levels of mechanical and optical loss for a -Si when deposited by ion-beam sputtering (the technique required to produce amorphous mirrors of the specification for gravitational wave detector mirrors) are unknown. In this paper results from measurements of the mechanical loss of a series of IBS a -Si films are presented which show that reductions are possible in coating thermal noise of a factor of 1.5 at 120 K and 2.1 at 20 K over the current best IBS coatings (alternating stacks of silica and titania-doped tantala), with further reductions feasible under appropriate heat treatments.

  1. Silica nanoparticles on front glass for efficiency enhancement in superstrate-type amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sonali; Banerjee, Chandan; Kundu, Avra; Dey, Prasenjit; Saha, Hiranmay; Datta, Swapan K.

    2013-10-01

    Antireflective coating on front glass of superstrate-type single junction amorphous silicon solar cells (SCs) has been applied using highly monodispersed and stable silica nanoparticles (NPs). The silica NPs having 300 nm diameter were synthesized by Stober technique where the size of the NPs was controlled by varying the alcohol medium. The synthesized silica NPs were analysed by dynamic light scattering technique and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NPs were spin coated on glass side of fluorinated tin oxide (SnO2: F) coated glass superstrate and optimization of the concentration of the colloidal solution, spin speed and number of coated layers was done to achieve minimum reflection characteristics. An estimation of the distribution of the NPs for different optimization parameters has been done using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, the transparent conducting oxide coated glass with the layer having the minimum reflectance is used for fabrication of amorphous silicon SC. Electrical analysis of the fabricated cell indicates an improvement of 6.5% in short-circuit current density from a reference of 12.40 mA cm-2 while the open circuit voltage and the fill factor remains unaltered. A realistic optical model has also been proposed to gain an insight into the system.

  2. Comparative Study of Low-temperature PECVD of Amorphous Silicon using Mono-, Di-, Trisilane and Cyclohexasilane

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantin Pokhodnya; Joseph Sandstrom; Xuliang Dai; Philip Boudjouk; Douglas L. Schulz

    2009-06-08

    The hydrogenated amorphous silicon a-Si:H films were grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using liquid cyclohexasilane Si{sub 6}H{sub 12} (CHS). The growth rate of a-Si:H was studied as a function of substrate temperatures in the range of 30 C < T < 450 C using deposition conditions that were optimized for monosilane SiH{sub 4}. The same parameters were used for a-Si:H films grown using disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) and trisilane (Si{sub 3}H{sub 8}) precursors. It was found that the a-Si:H film growth rate for CHS is lower with respect to those for mono-, di- and trisilane in an Ar plasma. Addition of {approx}10% of H{sub 2} dramatically increases the deposition rate for CHS-based films to {_}nm/min - a 700% increase. The as-deposited films were characterized by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy to probe the hydrogen content and local bonding environment. It was found that the films grown using Ar/H{sub 2} mixtures as carrier gas have a reduced hydrogen content relative to polysilane fragments indicating higher quality amorphous silicon.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of monolithically integrated microchannel plates based on amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Franco, Andrea; Geissbühler, Jonas; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-04-04

    Microchannel plates are vacuum-based electron multipliers for particle--in particular, photon--detection, with applications ranging from image intensifiers to single-photon detectors. Their key strengths are large signal amplification, large active area, micrometric spatial resolution and picosecond temporal resolution. Here, we present the first microchannel plate made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) instead of lead glass. The breakthrough lies in the possibility of realizing amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates (AMCPs) on any kind of substrate. This achievement is based on mastering the deposition of an ultra-thick (80-120 μm) stress-controlled a-Si:H layer from the gas phase at temperatures of about 200 °C and micromachining the channels by dry etching. We fabricated AMCPs that are vertically integrated on metallic anodes of test structures, proving the feasibility of monolithic integration of, for instance, AMCPs on application-specific integrated circuits for signal processing. We show an electron multiplication factor exceeding 30 for an aspect ratio, namely channel length over aperture, of 12.5:1. This result was achieved for input photoelectron currents up to 100 pA, in the continuous illumination regime, which provides a first evidence of the a-Si:H effectiveness in replenishing the electrons dispensed in the multiplication process.

  4. An intercomparison of 11 amorphous silicon EPIDs of the same type: implications for portal dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Peter; Georg, Dietmar

    2006-09-01

    The use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for portal dosimetry requires knowledge of their dosimetric properties. The pixel value response of amorphous silicon EPIDs of type Elekta iViewGT™ is known to be nonlinear with dose. However, it is not clear whether these nonlinearities vary with time and from one detector to another, respectively. In the present study, the dose-response characteristics of 11 iViewGT EPIDs were investigated with respect to dose rate, total dose and field size. It was found that each detector needs to be individually calibrated, not only in terms of absolute sensitivity but also with respect to its relative response variations with exposure parameters. Doubling the dose rate typically increased the EPID signal between 1.4% and 2.8%. Changing the number of monitor units from 30 to 500 was accompanied by an increase in detector sensitivity between 1.7% and 2.8%. The EPID scatter factors were always within ±1%. It was observed that the dose-response behaviour was not stable with respect to time. Particularly within the first weeks of operation, detector ageing caused variations in both absolute sensitivity and relative response curves. It is recommended to establish a quality assurance programme if the amorphous silicon EPIDs are intended to be used for clinical portal dosimetry.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of monolithically integrated microchannel plates based on amorphous silicon

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Andrea; Geissbühler, Jonas; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Microchannel plates are vacuum-based electron multipliers for particle—in particular, photon— detection, with applications ranging from image intensifiers to single-photon detectors. Their key strengths are large signal amplification, large active area, micrometric spatial resolution and picosecond temporal resolution. Here, we present the first microchannel plate made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) instead of lead glass. The breakthrough lies in the possibility of realizing amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates (AMCPs) on any kind of substrate. This achievement is based on mastering the deposition of an ultra-thick (80–120 μm) stress-controlled a-Si:H layer from the gas phase at temperatures of about 200°C and micromachining the channels by dry etching. We fabricated AMCPs that are vertically integrated on metallic anodes of test structures, proving the feasibility of monolithic integration of, for instance, AMCPs on application-specific integrated circuits for signal processing. We show an electron multiplication factor exceeding 30 for an aspect ratio, namely channel length over aperture, of 12.5:1. This result was achieved for input photoelectron currents up to 100 pA, in the continuous illumination regime, which provides a first evidence of the a-Si:H effectiveness in replenishing the electrons dispensed in the multiplication process. PMID:24698955

  6. Amorphous SiC layers for electrically conductive Rugate filters in silicon based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janz, S.; Peters, M.; Künle, M.; Gradmann, R.; Suwito, D.

    2010-05-01

    The subject of this work is the development of an electrically conductive Rugate filter for photovoltaic applications. We think that the optical as well as the electrical performance of the filter can be adapted especially to the requirements of crystalline Si thin-film and amorphous/crystalline silicon tandem solar cells. We have deposited amorphous hydrogenated Silicon Carbide layers (a-SixC1-x:H) with the precursor gases methane (CH4), silane (SiH4) and diborane (B2H6) applying Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD). Through changing just the precursor flows a floating refractive index n from 1.9 to 3.5 (at 633 nm) could be achieved quite accurately. Different complex layer stacks (up to 200 layers) with a sinusoidal refractive index variation normal to the incident light were deposited in just 80 min on 100x100 mm2. Transmission measurements show good agreement between simulation and experiment which proofs our ability to control the deposition process, the good knowledge of the optical behaviour of the different SiC single layers and the advanced stage of our simulation model. The doped single layers show lateral conductivities which were extremely dependent on the Si/C ratio.

  7. Achieving thermography with a thermal security camera using uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometer image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Tesdahl, Curtis; Owens, Jim; Dorn, David

    2012-06-01

    Advancements in uncooled microbolometer technology over the last several years have opened up many commercial applications which had been previously cost prohibitive. Thermal technology is no longer limited to the military and government market segments. One type of thermal sensor with low NETD which is available in the commercial market segment is the uncooled amorphous silicon (α-Si) microbolometer image sensor. Typical thermal security cameras focus on providing the best image quality by auto tonemaping (contrast enhancing) the image, which provides the best contrast depending on the temperature range of the scene. While this may provide enough information to detect objects and activities, there are further benefits of being able to estimate the actual object temperatures in a scene. This thermographic ability can provide functionality beyond typical security cameras by being able to monitor processes. Example applications of thermography[2] with thermal camera include: monitoring electrical circuits, industrial machinery, building thermal leaks, oil/gas pipelines, power substations, etc...[3][5] This paper discusses the methodology of estimating object temperatures by characterizing/calibrating different components inside a thermal camera utilizing an uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometer image sensor. Plots of system performance across camera operating temperatures will be shown.

  8. Non-negligible Contributions to Thermal Conductivity From Localized Modes in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    2016-01-01

    Thermal conductivity is important for almost all applications involving heat transfer. The theory and modeling of crystalline materials is in some sense a solved problem, where one can now calculate their thermal conductivity from first principles using expressions based on the phonon gas model (PGM). However, modeling of amorphous materials still has many open questions, because the PGM itself becomes questionable when one cannot rigorously define the phonon velocities. In this report, we used our recently developed Green-Kubo modal analysis (GKMA) method to study amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO2). The predicted thermal conductivities exhibit excellent agreement with experiments and anharmonic effects are included in the thermal conductivity calculation for all the modes in a-SiO2 for the first time. Previously, localized modes (locons) have been thought to have a negligible contribution to thermal conductivity, due to their highly localized nature. However, in a-SiO2 our results indicate that locons contribute more than 10% to the total thermal conductivity from 400 K to 800 K and they are largely responsible for the increase in thermal conductivity of a-SiO2 above room temperature. This is an effect that cannot be explained by previous methods and therefore offers new insight into the nature of phonon transport in amorphous/glassy materials. PMID:27767082

  9. Application of mesoporous silicon dioxide and silicate in oral amorphous drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ken K; Bogner, Robin H

    2012-02-01

    Aqueous solubility of an active pharmaceutical ingredient is an important consideration to ensure successful drug development. Mesoporous materials have been investigated as an amorphous drug delivery system owing to their nanosized capillaries and large surface areas. The complex interactions of crystalline compounds with mesoporous media and their implication in drug delivery are not well understood. Molecules interacting with porous media behave very differently than those in bulk phase. Their altered dynamics and thermodynamics play an important role in the properties and product performance of the amorphous system. In this review, application of mesoporous silicon dioxide and silicates in drug amorphization is the main focus. First, as background, the nature of gas-porous media interactions is summarized. The synthesis of various types of mesoporous silica, which are used by many investigators in this field, is described. Second, the behavior of molecules confined in mesopores is compared with those in bulk, crystalline phase. The molecular dynamics of compounds due to confinement, analyzed using various techniques, and their consequences in drug delivery are discussed. Finally, the preparation and performance of drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica are examined.

  10. Wavelength prediction of laser incident on amorphous silicon detector by neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili Sani, V.; Moussavi-Zarandi, A.; Kafaee, M.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we present a method based on artificial neural networks (ANN) and the use of only one amorphous semiconductor detector to predict the wavelength of incident laser. Amorphous semiconductors and especially amorphous hydrogenated silicon, a-Si:H, are now widely used in many electronic devices, such as solar cells, many types of position sensitive detectors and X-ray imagers for medical applications. In order to study the electrical properties and detection characteristics of thin films of a-Si:H, n-i-p structures have been simulated by SILVACO software. The basic electronic properties of most of the materials used are known, but device modeling depends on a large number of parameters that are not all well known. In addition, the relationship between the shape of the induced anode current and the wavelength of the incident laser leads to complicated calculations. Soft data-based computational methods can model multidimensional non-linear processes and represent the complex input-output relation between the form of the output signal and the wavelength of incident laser.

  11. Non-negligible Contributions to Thermal Conductivity From Localized Modes in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    2016-10-01

    Thermal conductivity is important for almost all applications involving heat transfer. The theory and modeling of crystalline materials is in some sense a solved problem, where one can now calculate their thermal conductivity from first principles using expressions based on the phonon gas model (PGM). However, modeling of amorphous materials still has many open questions, because the PGM itself becomes questionable when one cannot rigorously define the phonon velocities. In this report, we used our recently developed Green-Kubo modal analysis (GKMA) method to study amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO2). The predicted thermal conductivities exhibit excellent agreement with experiments and anharmonic effects are included in the thermal conductivity calculation for all the modes in a-SiO2 for the first time. Previously, localized modes (locons) have been thought to have a negligible contribution to thermal conductivity, due to their highly localized nature. However, in a-SiO2 our results indicate that locons contribute more than 10% to the total thermal conductivity from 400 K to 800 K and they are largely responsible for the increase in thermal conductivity of a-SiO2 above room temperature. This is an effect that cannot be explained by previous methods and therefore offers new insight into the nature of phonon transport in amorphous/glassy materials.

  12. Non-negligible Contributions to Thermal Conductivity From Localized Modes in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    2016-10-21

    Thermal conductivity is important for almost all applications involving heat transfer. The theory and modeling of crystalline materials is in some sense a solved problem, where one can now calculate their thermal conductivity from first principles using expressions based on the phonon gas model (PGM). However, modeling of amorphous materials still has many open questions, because the PGM itself becomes questionable when one cannot rigorously define the phonon velocities. In this report, we used our recently developed Green-Kubo modal analysis (GKMA) method to study amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO2). The predicted thermal conductivities exhibit excellent agreement with experiments and anharmonic effects are included in the thermal conductivity calculation for all the modes in a-SiO2 for the first time. Previously, localized modes (locons) have been thought to have a negligible contribution to thermal conductivity, due to their highly localized nature. However, in a-SiO2 our results indicate that locons contribute more than 10% to the total thermal conductivity from 400 K to 800 K and they are largely responsible for the increase in thermal conductivity of a-SiO2 above room temperature. This is an effect that cannot be explained by previous methods and therefore offers new insight into the nature of phonon transport in amorphous/glassy materials.

  13. Flat panel detector-based cone-beam volume CT angiography imaging: system evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ning, R; Chen, B; Yu, R; Conover, D; Tang, X; Ning, Y

    2000-09-01

    Preliminary evaluation of recently developed large-area flat panel detectors (FPDs) indicates that FPDs have some potential advantages: compactness, absence of geometric distortion and veiling glare with the benefits of high resolution, high detective quantum efficiency (DQE), high frame rate and high dynamic range, small image lag (< 1%), and excellent linearity (approximately 1%). The advantages of the new FPD make it a promising candidate for cone-beam volume computed tomography (CT) angiography (CBVCTA) imaging. The purpose of this study is to characterize a prototype FPD-based imaging system for CBVCTA applications. A prototype FPD-based CBVCTA imaging system has been designed and constructed around a modified GE 8800 CT scanner. This system is evaluated for a CBVCTA imaging task in the head and neck using four phantoms and a frozen rat. The system is first characterized in terms of linearity and dynamic range of the detector. Then, the optimal selection of kVps for CBVCTA is determined and the effect of image lag and scatter on the image quality of the CBVCTA system is evaluated. Next, low-contrast resolution and high-contrast spatial resolution are measured. Finally, the example reconstruction images of a frozen rat are presented. The results indicate that the FPD-based CBVCT can achieve 2.75-lp/mm spatial resolution at 0% modulation transfer function (MTF) and provide more than enough low-contrast resolution for intravenous CBVCTA imaging in the head and neck with clinically acceptable entrance exposure level. The results also suggest that to use an FPD for large cone-angle applications, such as body angiography, further investigations are required.

  14. Flat-panel volumetric computed tomography in cerebral perfusion: evaluation of three rat stroke models.

    PubMed

    Juenemann, Martin; Goegel, Sinja; Obert, Martin; Schleicher, Nadine; Ritschel, Nouha; Doenges, Simone; Eitenmueller, Inka; Schwarz, Niko; Kastaun, Sabrina; Yeniguen, Mesut; Tschernatsch, Marlene; Gerriets, Tibo

    2013-09-30

    Flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT) is a non-invasive approach to three-dimensional small animal imaging. The capability of volumetric scanning and a high resolution in time and space enables whole organ perfusion studies. We aimed to assess feasibility and validity of fpVCT in cerebral perfusion measurement with impaired hemodynamics by evaluation of three well-established rat stroke models for temporary and permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to temporary (group I: suture model) and permanent (group II: suture model; III: macrosphere model) MCAO and to a control group. Perfusion scans with respect to cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV) were performed 24h post intervention by fpVCT, using a Gantry rotation time of 1s and a total scanning time of 30s. Postmortem analysis included infarct-size calculation by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. Infarct volumes did not differ significantly throughout intervention groups. After permanent MCAO, CBF significantly decreased in subcortical regions to 78.2% (group II, p=0.005) and 79.9% (group III, p=0.012) and in total hemisphere to 77.4% (group II, p=0.010) and 82.0% (group III, p=0.049). CBF was less impaired with temporary vessel occlusion. CBV measurement revealed no significant differences. Results demonstrate feasibility of cerebral perfusion quantification in rats with the fpVCT, which can be a useful tool for non-invasive dynamic imaging of cerebral perfusion in rodent stroke models. In addition to methodological advantages, CBF data confirm the macrosphere model as a useful alternative to the suture model for permanent experimental MCAO.

  15. Performance of a direct-detection active matrix flat panel dosimeter (AMFPD) for IMRT measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Moran, Jean M; Roberts, Donald A; El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E; Fraass, Benedick A

    2007-12-01

    The dosimetric performance of a direct-detection active matrix flat panel dosimeter (AMFPD) is reported for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) measurements. The AMFPD consists of a-Si : H photodiodes and thin-film transistors deposited on a glass substrate with no overlying scintillator screen or metal plate. The device is operated at 0.8 frames per second in a continuous acquisition or fluoroscopic mode. The effect of the applied bias voltage across the photodiodes on the response of the AMFPD was evaluated because this parameter affects dark signal, lag contributions, and pixel sensitivity. In addition, the AMPFD response was evaluated as a function of dose, dose rate, and energy, for static fields at 10 cm depth. In continuous acquisition mode, the AMFPD maintained a linear dose response (r2 > 0.99999) up to at least 1040 cGy. In order to obtain reliable integrated dose results for IMRT fields, the effects of lag on the radiation signal were minimized by operating the system at the highest frame rate and at an appropriate reverse bias voltage. Segmental MLC and dynamic MLC IMRT fields were measured with the AMFPD, and the results were compared to film, using standard methods for reliable film dosimetry. Both AMFPD and film measurements were independently converted to dose in cGy. Gamma and chi values were calculated as indices of agreement. The results from the AMFPD were in excellent agreement with those from film. When 2% of D(max) and 2 mm of distance to agreement were used as the criteria, 98% of the region of interest (defined as the region where dose is greater than 5% of D(max)) satisfied [chi] < or = 1 on average across the cases that were tested.

  16. Influence of Flat-Panel Fluoroscopic Equipment Variables on Cardiac Radiation Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Nickoloff, Edward L. Lu Zhengfeng; Dutta, Ajoy; So, James; Balter, Stephen; Moses, Jeffrey

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To assess the influence of physician-selectable equipment variables on the potential radiation dose reductions during cardiac catheterization examinations using modern imaging equipment. Materials. A modern bi-plane angiography unit with flat-panel image receptors was used. Patients were simulated with 15-30 cm of acrylic plastic. The variables studied were: patient thickness, fluoroscopy pulse rates, record mode frame rates, image receptor field-of-view (FoV), automatic dose control (ADC) mode, SID/SSD geometry setting, automatic collimation, automatic positioning, and others. Results. Patient radiation doses double for every additional 3.5-4.5 cm of soft tissue. The dose is directly related to the imaging frame rate; a decrease from 30 pps to 15 pps reduces the dose by about 50%. The dose is related to [(FoV){sup -N}] where 2.0 < N < 3.0. Suboptimal positioning of the patient can nearly double the dose. The ADC system provides three selections that can vary the radiation level by 50%. For pediatric studies (2-5 years old), the selection of equipment variables can result in entrance radiation doses that range between 6 and 60 cGy for diagnostic cases and between 15 and 140 cGy for interventional cases. For adult studies, the equipment variables can produce entrance radiation doses that range between 13 and 130 cGy for diagnostic cases and between 30 and 400 cGy for interventional cases. Conclusions. Overall dose reductions of 70-90% can be achieved with pediatric patients and about 90% with adult patients solely through optimal selection of equipment variables.

  17. Evaluation of the potential utility of flat panel CT for quantifying relative contrast enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. Kyle; Mahvash, Armeen

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Certain directed oncologic therapies seek to take advantage of the fact that tumors are typically more susceptible to directed therapeutic agents than normal tissue owing to their extensive networks of poorly formed, leaky vasculature. If differences between the vascularity of normal and tumor tissues could be quantified, patients could be selected for or excluded from directed treatments on the basis of this difference. However, angiographic imaging techniques such as digital subtraction angiography (DSA) yield two-dimensional data that may be inadequate for this task. As a first step, the authors evaluated the feasibility of using a commercial implementation of flat panel computed tomography (FPCT) to quantify differences in enhancement of a simulated tumor compared with normal tissue based on differences in CT number measured in precontrast and postcontrast scans. Methods: To evaluate the FPCT scanner studied, the authors scanned several phantoms containing simulated normal and tumor tissues. In the first experiment, the authors used an anthropomorphic phantom containing inclusions representing normal, tumor, and bone tissue to evaluate the constancy of CT numbers in scans repeated at clinically relevant intervals of 1 and 3 min. The authors then scanned gelatin phantoms containing dilutions of iodinated contrast to evaluate the accuracy of relative contrast enhancement measurements for a clinical FPCT system. Data were analyzed using widely available software. Results: CT numbers measured in identical locations were constant over both scan intervals evaluated. Measured relative contrast enhancement values were accurate compared with known relative contrast enhancement values. Care must be taken to avoid artifacts in reconstructed images when placing regions of interest. Conclusions: Despite its limitations, FPCT in the interventional laboratory can be used to quantify relative contrast enhancement in phantoms. This is accomplished by measuring CT

  18. The effect of discontinuous airlift mixing in outdoor flat panel photobioreactors on growth of Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Leupold, Marco; Hindersin, Stefan; Kerner, Martin; Hanelt, Dieter

    2013-11-01

    Discontinuous airlift mixing was realized by injecting pressured air at time intervals with a frequency between 0.033 and 0.25 Hz (at 80 kPa; i.e., every 4-30 s; valve opening time 800 ms) into outdoor flat panel photobioreactors ([Formula: see text]). This caused a flow velocity between 2 and 20 cm s(-1) of the culture medium within the photobioreactor and the mixing time was between 38 and 103.5 s, requiring 0.175-1.340 L(gas volume) L(photobioreactor volume)(-1) min(-1) pressured air. In order to detect the effect on growth of Scenedesmus obliquus during outdoor experiments and to be able to compare obtained results, a batch run with an airlift frequency of 0.25 Hz was simultaneously used as control. Growth at different airlift frequencies was measured by the increase of cell dry weight (CDW) during 3-5 days and biomass yield on light energy was calculated. With increasing airlift frequencies, growth increased from 52 to 91 % compared to the control. When CDW was at around 1.0-1.5 g L(-1), airlift frequency had no effect on growth, indicating that mass transfer gradients of nutrients and gas were not the limiting factors of growth. Above 1.5 g CDW L(-1), growth increased with increasing airlift frequency and light limitation for a single cell occurred. This effect was observed during low and high irradiance and it is concluded that a higher mean flow causes a better light distribution, resulting in an enhanced growth. Biomass productivity and demand of pressured air are correlated logarithmically, which enables to save mixing energy during cultivation.

  19. Functional shoulder radiography with use of a dynamic flat panel detector.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Keita; Sanada, Shigeru; Tanaka, Rie; Kitaoka, Katsuhiko; Hayashi, Norio; Matsuura, Yukihiro

    2014-07-01

    Our purpose in this study was to develop a functional form of radiography and to perform a quantitative analysis for the shoulder joint using a dynamic flat panel detector (FPD) system. We obtained dynamic images at a rate of 3.75 frames per second (fps) using an FPD system. Three patients and 5 healthy controls were studied with a clinically established frontal projection, with abduction of the arms. The arm angle, glenohumeral angle (G-angle), and scapulothoracic angle (S-angle) were measured on dynamic images. The ratio of the G-angle to the S-angle (GSR) was also evaluated quantitatively. In normal subjects, the G-angle and S-angle changed gradually along with the arm angle. The G-angle was approximately twice as large as the S-angle, resulting in a GSR of 2 throughout the abduction of the shoulder. Changes in G-angle and S-angle tended to be irregular in patients with shoulder disorders. The GSR of the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis were 3-7.5, 4-9.5, and 3.5-7.5, respectively. The GSR of the anterior serratus muscle paralysis improved to approximately 2 after orthopedic treatment. Our preliminary results indicated that functional radiography by FPD and computer-aided quantitative analysis is useful for diagnosis of some shoulder disorders, such as the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis. The technique and procedures described comprise a simple, functional shoulder radiographic method for evaluation of the therapeutic effects of surgery and/or rehabilitation.

  20. Detectability of regional lung ventilation with flat-panel detector-based dynamic radiography.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the ability of breathing chest radiography using flat-panel detector (FPD) to quantify relative local ventilation. Dynamic chest radiographs during respiration were obtained using a modified FPD system. Imaging was performed in three different positions, ie, standing and right and left decubitus positions, to change the distribution of local ventilation. We measured the average pixel value in the local lung area. Subsequently, the interframe differences, as well as difference values between maximum inspiratory and expiratory phases, were calculated. The results were visualized as images in the form of a color display to show more or less x-ray translucency. Temporal changes and spatial distribution of the results were then compared to lung physiology. In the results, the average pixel value in each lung was associated with respiratory phase. In all positions, respiratory changes of pixel value in the lower area were greater than those in the upper area (P < 0.01), which was the same tendency as the regional differences in ventilation determined by respiratory physiology. In addition, in the decubitus position, it was observed that areas with large respiratory changes in pixel value moved up in the vertical direction during expiration, which was considered to be airway closure. In conclusion, breathing chest radiography using FPD was shown to be capable of quantifying relative ventilation in local lung area and detecting regional differences in ventilation and timing of airway closure. This method is expected to be useful as a new diagnostic imaging modality for evaluating relative local ventilation.

  1. Cathode Rays in Imaging: From Nipkow Disks to Flat Panel Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardsley, J. Norman

    1997-04-01

    The two essential elements in electronic recording and display of images were discovered before 1897. In 1873 Willoughby Smith and Joseph May, working on the Atlantic telegraph cable, noted that the resistance of selenium changes when light falls on it. In 1884 Paul Nipkow patented a scanning disk, consisting of a flat circular plate with small holes arranged along spiral lines, to be spun between the scene to be scanned and a light sensitive cell. The foundation for the development of more efficient electronic detection of light was laid in the 1880's by the discovery of the photoelectric effect. Meanwhile, in 1879 Crookes had shown that the fluorescence caused by cathode rays on the tube walls could be used to create images through the use of shadow masks. The elucidation of the properties of cathode rays and confirmation that they could be deflected by electrostatic and electromagnetic forces led to the invention by Frederick Braun in 1897 of the cathode ray tube, with its electron gun and fluorescent screen. High resolution television sets capable of displaying moving pictures appeared in laboratories in the 1920's. The cathode ray tube has continued to dominate display technology, but its supremacy is now being challenged by various forms of flat panel displays. The extent to which these new technologies rely on electron dynamics and electron-induced fluorescence will be outlined and the need for further research and development will be discussed. In particular, the ways in which cathode rays are harnessed to produce images in Field-Emission Displays and Plasma Display Panels will be described.

  2. Direct measurement of free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Frank G.

    1994-01-01

    A method is introduced to measure the free-energy barrier W(sup *), the activation energy, and activation entropy to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous solids, independent of the energy barrier to growth. The method allows one to determine the temperature dependence of W(sup *), and the effect of the preparation conditions of the initial amorphous phase, the dopants, and the crystallization methds on W(sup *). The method is applied to determine the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films. For thermally induced nucleation in a-Si thin films with annealing temperatures in the range of from 824 to 983 K, the free-energy barrier W(sup *) to nucleation of silicon crystals is about 2.0 - 2.1 eV regardless of the preparation conditions of the films. The observation supports the idea that a-Si transforms into an intermediate amorphous state through the structural relaxation prior to the onset of nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. The observation also indicates that the activation entropy may be an insignificant part of the free-energy barrier for the nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. Compared with the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in undoped a-Si films, a significant reduction is observed in the free-energy barrier to nucleation in Cu-doped a-Si films. For a-Si under irradiation of Xe(2+) at 10(exp 5) eV, the free-energy barrier to ion-induced nucleation of crystallites is shown to be about half of the value associated with thermal-induced nucleation of crystallites in a-Si under the otherwise same conditions, which is much more significant than previously expected. The present method has a general kinetic basis; it thus should be equally applicable to nucleation of crystallites in any amorphous elemental semiconductors and semiconductor alloys, metallic and polymeric glasses, and to nucleation of crystallites in melts and solutions.

  3. Formation of high conductive nano-crystalline silicon embedded in amorphous silicon-carbide films with large optical band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yang; Shan, Dan; Qian, Mingqing; Xu, Jun; Li, Wei; Chen, Kunji

    2016-10-01

    High conductive phosphorus-doped nano-crystalline Si embedded in Silicon-Carbide (SiC) host matrix (nc-Si:SiC) films were obtained by thermally annealing doped amorphous Si-rich SiC materials. It was found that the room conductivity is increased significantly accompanying with the increase of doping concentrations as well as the enhanced crystallizations. The conductivity can be as high as 630 S/cm for samples with the optical band gap around 2.7 eV, while the carrier mobility is about 17.9 cm2/ V.s. Temperature-dependent conductivity and mobility measurements were performed which suggested that the carrier transport process is strongly affected by both the grain boundaries and the doping concentrations.

  4. Method of enhancing the electronic properties of an undoped and/or N-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    The dark conductivity and photoconductivity of an N-type and/or undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer fabricated by an AC or DC proximity glow discharge in silane can be increased through the incorporation of argon in an amount from 10 to about 90 percent by volume of the glow discharge atmosphere which contains a silicon-hydrogen containing compound in an amount of from about 90 to about 10 volume percent.

  5. The Synthesis and Structural Properties of Crystalline Silicon Quantum Dots upon Thermal Annealing of Hydrogenated Amorphous Si-Rich Silicon Carbide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guozhi; Zeng, Xiangbin; Li, Xianghu

    2016-08-01

    Silicon quantum dots (QDs) embedded in non-stoichiometric hydrogenated silicon carbide (SiC:H) thin films have been successfully synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and post-annealing. The chemical composition analyses have been carried out by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The bonding configurations have been deduced from Fourier transform infrared absorption measurements (FTIR). The evolution of microstructure with temperature has been characterized by glancing incident x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman diffraction spectroscopy. XPS and FTIR show that it is in Si-rich feature and there are a few hydrogenated silicon clusters in the as-grown sample. XRD and Raman diffraction spectroscopy show that it is in amorphous for the as-grown sample, while crystalline silicon QDs have been synthesized in the 900°C annealed sample. Silicon atoms precipitation from the SiC matrix or silicon phase transition from amorphous SiC is enhanced with annealing temperature increase. The average sizes of silicon QDs are about 5.1 nm and 5.6 nm, the number densities are as high as 1.7 × 1012 cm-2 and 3.2 × 1012 cm-2, and the crystalline volume fractions are about 58.3% and 61.3% for the 900°C and 1050°C annealed samples, respectively. These structural properties analyses provide an understanding about the synthesis of silicon QDs upon thermal annealing for applications in next generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  6. High-resolution secondary reconstructions with the use of flat panel CT in the clinical assessment of patients with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Pearl, M S; Roy, A; Limb, C J

    2014-06-01

    Radiologic assessment of cochlear implants can be limited because of metallic streak artifacts and the high attenuation of the temporal bones. We report on 14 patients with 18 cochlear implants (17 Med-El standard 31.5-mm arrays, 1 Med-El medium 24-mm array) who underwent flat panel CT with the use of high-resolution secondary reconstruction techniques. Flat panel CT depicted the insertion site, cochlear implant course, and all 216 individual electrode contacts. The calculated mean angular insertion depth for standard arrays was 591.9° (SD = 70.9; range, 280°). High-resolution secondary reconstructions of the initial flat panel CT dataset, by use of a manually generated field of view, Hounsfield unit kernel type, and sharp image characteristics, provided high-quality images with improved spatial resolution. Flat panel CT is a promising imaging tool for the postoperative evaluation of cochlear implant placement.

  7. A Ring Artifact Correction Method: Validation by Micro-CT Imaging with Flat-Panel Detectors and a 2D Photon-Counting Detector

    PubMed Central

    Eldib, Mohamed Elsayed; Hegazy, Mohamed; Mun, Yang Ji; Cho, Myung Hye; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an efficient ring artifact correction method for a cone-beam computed tomography (CT). In the first step, we correct the defective pixels whose values are close to zero or saturated in the projection domain. In the second step, we compute the mean value at each detector element along the view angle in the sinogram to obtain the one-dimensional (1D) mean vector, and we then compute the 1D correction vector by taking inverse of the mean vector. We multiply the correction vector with the sinogram row by row over all view angles. In the third step, we apply a Gaussian filter on the difference image between the original CT image and the corrected CT image obtained in the previous step. The filtered difference image is added to the corrected CT image to compensate the possible contrast anomaly that may appear due to the contrast change in the sinogram after removing stripe artifacts. We applied the proposed method to the projection data acquired by two flat-panel detectors (FPDs) and a silicon-based photon-counting X-ray detector (PCXD). Micro-CT imaging experiments of phantoms and a small animal have shown that the proposed method can greatly reduce ring artifacts regardless of detector types. Despite the great reduction of ring artifacts, the proposed method does not compromise the original spatial resolution and contrast. PMID:28146088

  8. A Ring Artifact Correction Method: Validation by Micro-CT Imaging with Flat-Panel Detectors and a 2D Photon-Counting Detector.

    PubMed

    Eldib, Mohamed Elsayed; Hegazy, Mohamed; Mun, Yang Ji; Cho, Myung Hye; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-01-30

    We introduce an efficient ring artifact correction method for a cone-beam computed tomography (CT). In the first step, we correct the defective pixels whose values are close to zero or saturated in the projection domain. In the second step, we compute the mean value at each detector element along the view angle in the sinogram to obtain the one-dimensional (1D) mean vector, and we then compute the 1D correction vector by taking inverse of the mean vector. We multiply the correction vector with the sinogram row by row over all view angles. In the third step, we apply a Gaussian filter on the difference image between the original CT image and the corrected CT image obtained in the previous step. The filtered difference image is added to the corrected CT image to compensate the possible contrast anomaly that may appear due to the contrast change in the sinogram after removing stripe artifacts. We applied the proposed method to the projection data acquired by two flat-panel detectors (FPDs) and a silicon-based photon-counting X-ray detector (PCXD). Micro-CT imaging experiments of phantoms and a small animal have shown that the proposed method can greatly reduce ring artifacts regardless of detector types. Despite the great reduction of ring artifacts, the proposed method does not compromise the original spatial resolution and contrast.

  9. An investigation of flat panel equipment variables on image quality with a dedicated cardiac phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragusin, O.; Bosmans, H.; Pappas, C.; Desmet, W.

    2008-09-01

    Image quality (IQ) evaluation plays a key role in the process of optimization of new x-ray systems. Ideally, this process should be supported by real clinical images, but ethical issues and differences in anatomy and pathology of patients make it impossible. Phantom studies might overcome these issues. This paper presents the IQ evaluation of 30 cineangiographic films acquired with a cardiac flat panel system. The phantom used simulates the anatomy of the heart and allows the circulation of contrast agent boluses through coronary arteries. Variables investigated with influence on IQ and radiation dose are: tube potential, detector dose, added Copper filters, dynamic density optimization (DDO) and viewing angle. The IQ evaluation consisted of scoring 4 simulated calcified lesions located on different coronary artery segments in terms of degree of visualization. Eight cardiologists rated the lesions using a five-point scale ((1) lesion not visible to (5) very good visibility). Radiation doses associated to the angiograms are expressed in terms of incident air kerma (IAK) and effective dose that has been calculated with PCXMX software (STUK, Finland) from the exposure settings assuming a standard sized patient of 70 Kg. Mean IQ scores ranged from 1.68 to 4.88. The highest IQ scores were obtained for the angiograms acquired with tube potential 80 kVp, no added Cu filters, DDO 60%, RAO and LAO views and the highest entrance detector dose that has been used in the present study, namely 0.17 μGy/im. Radiation doses (IAK ~40 mGy and effective dose of 1 mSv) were estimated for angiograms acquired at 15 frames s-1, detector field-of-view 20 cm, and a length of 5 s. The following parameters improved the IQ factor significantly: a change in tube potential from 96 to 80 kVp, detector dose from 0.10 μGy/im to 0.17 μGy/im, the absence of Copper filtration. DDO variable which is a post-processing parameter should be carefully evaluated because it alters the quality of the

  10. Impact and Penetration of Thin Aluminum 2024 Flat Panels at Oblique Angles of Incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Queitzsch, Gilbert K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    under more extreme conditions, using a projectile with a more complex shape and sharp contacts, impacting flat panels at oblique angles of incidence.

  11. A forward bias method for lag correction of an a-Si flat panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Starman, Jared; Tognina, Carlo; Partain, Larry; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Digital a-Si flat panel (FP) x-ray detectors can exhibit detector lag, or residual signal, of several percent that can cause ghosting in projection images or severe shading artifacts, known as the radar artifact, in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructions. A major contributor to detector lag is believed to be defect states, or traps, in the a-Si layer of the FP. Software methods to characterize and correct for the detector lag exist, but they may make assumptions such as system linearity and time invariance, which may not be true. The purpose of this work is to investigate a new hardware based method to reduce lag in an a-Si FP and to evaluate its effectiveness at removing shading artifacts in CBCT reconstructions. The feasibility of a novel, partially hardware based solution is also examined. Methods: The proposed hardware solution for lag reduction requires only a minor change to the FP. For pulsed irradiation, the proposed method inserts a new operation step between the readout and data collection stages. During this new stage the photodiode is operated in a forward bias mode, which fills the defect states with charge. A Varian 4030CB panel was modified to allow for operation in the forward bias mode. The contrast of residual lag ghosts was measured for lag frames 2 and 100 after irradiation ceased for standard and forward bias modes. Detector step response, lag, SNR, modulation transfer function (MTF), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measurements were made with standard and forward bias firmware. CBCT data of pelvic and head phantoms were also collected. Results: Overall, the 2nd and 100th detector lag frame residual signals were reduced 70%-88% using the new method. SNR, MTF, and DQE measurements show a small decrease in collected signal and a small increase in noise. The forward bias hardware successfully reduced the radar artifact in the CBCT reconstruction of the pelvic and head phantoms by 48%-81%. Conclusions: Overall, the

  12. Optimization of a flat-panel based real time dual-energy system for cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Ducote, Justin L; Xu, Tong; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-06-01

    A simulation study was conducted to evaluate the effects of high-energy beam filtration, dual-gain operation and noise reduction on dual-energy images using a digital flat-panel detector. High-energy beam filtration increases image contrast through greater beam separation and tends to reduce total radiation exposure and dose per image pair. It is also possible to reduce dual-energy image noise by acquiring low and high-energy images at two different detector gains. In addition, dual-energy noise reduction algorithms can further reduce image noise. The cumulative effect of these techniques applied in series was investigated in this study. The contrast from a small thickness of calcium was simulated over a step phantom of tissue equivalent material with a CsI phosphor as the image detector. The dual-energy contrast-to-noise ratio was calculated using values of energy absorption and energy variance. A figure-of-merit (FOM) was calculated from dual-energy contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and patient effective dose estimated from values of entrance exposure. Filter atomic numbers in the range of 1-100 were considered with thicknesses ranging from 0-2500 mg/cm2. The simulation examined combinations of the above techniques which maximized the FOM. The application of a filter increased image contrast by as much as 45%. Near maximal increases were seen for filter atomic numbers in the range of 40-60 and 85-100 with masses above 750 mg/cm2. Increasing filter thickness beyond 1000 mg/cm2 increased tube loading without further significant contrast enhancement. No additional FOM improvements were seen with dual gain before or after the application of any noise reduction algorithm. Narrow beam experiments were carried out to verify predictions. The measured FOM increased by more than a factor of 3.5 for a silver filter thickness of 800 microm, equal energy weighting and application of a noise clipping algorithm. The main limitation of dynamic high-energy filtration is increased

  13. An investigation of flat panel equipment variables on image quality with a dedicated cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Dragusin, O; Bosmans, H; Pappas, C; Desmet, W

    2008-09-21

    Image quality (IQ) evaluation plays a key role in the process of optimization of new x-ray systems. Ideally, this process should be supported by real clinical images, but ethical issues and differences in anatomy and pathology of patients make it impossible. Phantom studies might overcome these issues. This paper presents the IQ evaluation of 30 cineangiographic films acquired with a cardiac flat panel system. The phantom used simulates the anatomy of the heart and allows the circulation of contrast agent boluses through coronary arteries. Variables investigated with influence on IQ and radiation dose are: tube potential, detector dose, added Copper filters, dynamic density optimization (DDO) and viewing angle. The IQ evaluation consisted of scoring 4 simulated calcified lesions located on different coronary artery segments in terms of degree of visualization. Eight cardiologists rated the lesions using a five-point scale ((1) lesion not visible to (5) very good visibility). Radiation doses associated to the angiograms are expressed in terms of incident air kerma (IAK) and effective dose that has been calculated with PCXMX software (STUK, Finland) from the exposure settings assuming a standard sized patient of 70 Kg. Mean IQ scores ranged from 1.68 to 4.88. The highest IQ scores were obtained for the angiograms acquired with tube potential 80 kVp, no added Cu filters, DDO 60%, RAO and LAO views and the highest entrance detector dose that has been used in the present study, namely 0.17 microGy/im. Radiation doses (IAK approximately 40 mGy and effective dose of 1 mSv) were estimated for angiograms acquired at 15 frames s(-1), detector field-of-view 20 cm, and a length of 5 s. The following parameters improved the IQ factor significantly: a change in tube potential from 96 to 80 kVp, detector dose from 0.10 microGy/im to 0.17 microGy/im, the absence of Copper filtration. DDO variable which is a post-processing parameter should be carefully evaluated because it alters

  14. Optimization of a flat-panel based real time dual-energy system for cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ducote, Justin L.; Xu Tong; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-06-15

    A simulation study was conducted to evaluate the effects of high-energy beam filtration, dual-gain operation and noise reduction on dual-energy images using a digital flat-panel detector. High-energy beam filtration increases image contrast through greater beam separation and tends to reduce total radiation exposure and dose per image pair. It is also possible to reduce dual-energy image noise by acquiring low and high-energy images at two different detector gains. In addition, dual-energy noise reduction algorithms can further reduce image noise. The cumulative effect of these techniques applied in series was investigated in this study. The contrast from a small thickness of calcium was simulated over a step phantom of tissue equivalent material with a CsI phosphor as the image detector. The dual-energy contrast-to-noise ratio was calculated using values of energy absorption and energy variance. A figure-of-merit (FOM) was calculated from dual-energy contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and patient effective dose estimated from values of entrance exposure. Filter atomic numbers in the range of 1-100 were considered with thicknesses ranging from 0-2500 mg/cm{sup 2}. The simulation examined combinations of the above techniques which maximized the FOM. The application of a filter increased image contrast by as much as 45%. Near maximal increases were seen for filter atomic numbers in the range of 40-60 and 85-100 with masses above 750 mg/cm{sup 2}. Increasing filter thickness beyond 1000 mg/cm{sup 2} increased tube loading without further significant contrast enhancement. No additional FOM improvements were seen with dual gain before or after the application of any noise reduction algorithm. Narrow beam experiments were carried out to verify predictions. The measured FOM increased by more than a factor of 3.5 for a silver filter thickness of 800 {mu}m, equal energy weighting and application of a noise clipping algorithm. The main limitation of dynamic high-energy filtration

  15. Measurement of joint kinematics using a conventional clinical single-perspective flat-panel radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Seslija, Petar; Teeter, Matthew G.; Yuan Xunhua; Naudie, Douglas D. R.; Bourne, Robert B.; MacDonald, Steven J.; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The ability to accurately measure joint kinematics is an important tool in studying both normal joint function and pathologies associated with injury and disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, accuracy, precision, and clinical safety of measuring 3D joint motion using a conventional flat-panel radiography system prior to its application in an in vivo study. Methods: An automated, image-based tracking algorithm was implemented to measure the three-dimensional pose of a sparse object from a two-dimensional radiographic projection. The algorithm was tested to determine its efficiency and failure rate, defined as the number of image frames where automated tracking failed, or required user intervention. The accuracy and precision of measuring three-dimensional motion were assessed using a robotic controlled, tibiofemoral knee phantom programmed to mimic a subject with a total knee replacement performing a stair ascent activity. Accuracy was assessed by comparing the measurements of the single-plane radiographic tracking technique to those of an optical tracking system, and quantified by the measurement discrepancy between the two systems using the Bland-Altman technique. Precision was assessed through a series of repeated measurements of the tibiofemoral kinematics, and was quantified using the across-trial deviations of the repeated kinematic measurements. The safety of the imaging procedure was assessed by measuring the effective dose of ionizing radiation associated with the x-ray exposures, and analyzing its relative risk to a human subject. Results: The automated tracking algorithm displayed a failure rate of 2% and achieved an average computational throughput of 8 image frames/s. Mean differences between the radiographic and optical measurements for translations and rotations were less than 0.08 mm and 0.07 Degree-Sign in-plane, and 0.24 mm and 0.6 Degree-Sign out-of-plane. The repeatability of kinematics measurements performed

  16. Microstructure factor and mechanical and electronic properties of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin-films for microelectromechanical systems applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mouro, J.; Gualdino, A.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2013-11-14

    Thin-film silicon allows the fabrication of MEMS devices at low processing temperatures, compatible with monolithic integration in advanced electronic circuits, on large-area, low-cost, and flexible substrates. The most relevant thin-film properties for applications as MEMS structural layers are the deposition rate, electrical conductivity, and mechanical stress. In this work, n{sup +}-type doped hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin-films were deposited by RF-PECVD, and the influence of the hydrogen dilution in the reactive mixture, the RF-power coupled to the plasma, the substrate temperature, and the deposition pressure on the structural, electrical, and mechanical properties of the films was studied. Three different types of silicon films were identified, corresponding to three internal structures: (i) porous amorphous silicon, deposited at high rates and presenting tensile mechanical stress and low electrical conductivity, (ii) dense amorphous silicon, deposited at intermediate rates and presenting compressive mechanical stress and higher values of electrical conductivity, and (iii) nanocrystalline silicon, deposited at very low rates and presenting the highest compressive mechanical stress and electrical conductivity. These results show the combinations of electromechanical material properties available in silicon thin-films and thus allow the optimized selection of a thin silicon film for a given MEMS application. Four representative silicon thin-films were chosen to be used as structural material of electrostatically actuated MEMS microresonators fabricated by surface micromachining. The effect of the mechanical stress of the structural layer was observed to have a great impact on the device resonance frequency, quality factor, and actuation force.

  17. Ultrafast all-optical arithmetic logic based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostimirovic, Dusan; Ye, Winnie N.

    2016-03-01

    For decades, the semiconductor industry has been steadily shrinking transistor sizes to fit more performance into a single silicon-based integrated chip. This technology has become the driving force for advances in education, transportation, and health, among others. However, transistor sizes are quickly approaching their physical limits (channel lengths are now only a few silicon atoms in length), and Moore's law will likely soon be brought to a stand-still despite many unique attempts to keep it going (FinFETs, high-k dielectrics, etc.). This technology must then be pushed further by exploring (almost) entirely new methodologies. Given the explosive growth of optical-based long-haul telecommunications, we look to apply the use of high-speed optics as a substitute to the digital model; where slow, lossy, and noisy metal interconnections act as a major bottleneck to performance. We combine the (nonlinear) optical Kerr effect with a single add-drop microring resonator to perform the fundamental AND-XOR logical operations of a half adder, by all-optical means. This process is also applied to subtraction, higher-order addition, and the realization of an all-optical arithmetic logic unit (ALU). The rings use hydrogenated amorphous silicon as a material with superior nonlinear properties to crystalline silicon, while still maintaining CMOS-compatibility and the many benefits that come with it (low cost, ease of fabrication, etc.). Our method allows for multi-gigabit-per-second data rates while maintaining simplicity and spatial minimalism in design for high-capacity manufacturing potential.

  18. Stress as a governing parameter to control the crystallization of amorphous silicon films by thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Sukti; Sakata, Isao; Yamanaka, Mitsuyuki; Suzuki, Eiichi

    2002-06-01

    We have fabricated nanocrystalline dots by thermal annealing (TA) of thermal chemical-vapor-deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films. In S. Hazra, I. Sakata, M. Yamanaka, and E. Suzuki, Appl. Phys. Lett. 80, 1159 (2002), we observed that ultrathin a-Si:H films (2-10 nm) are stressed because of the presence of deformed crystallites or paracrystallites. With the increase of thickness, volume fraction of paracrystallites decreased in the films and stress in the films gradually reduced. Therefore, by changing the thickness, we can control the stress in the a-Si:H films and thereby the dimensions (in the range of 5 to 10 nm) as well as volume fractions of nanocrystallites formed by TA. On the other hand, it has been found that relaxed a-Si:H networks form polycrystalline films by TA.

  19. Optimal activation and diffusion paths of perfect events in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yinglei; Malek, Rachid; Mousseau, Normand

    2000-12-01

    Knowledge of the dynamics in amorphous silicon that occurs through a sequence of discrete activated events is essential to predict many of the associated physical and chemical properties. Using the recently introduced nudged elastic band method of Jónsson, Mills, and Jacobsen and a modified empirical Stillinger-Weber potential, we investigate, in detail, 802 perfect events generated with the activation-relaxation technique. We find that a large number of the high-energy events contain, in fact, two or more ``subevents.'' With this result included, the average barrier height goes down to about 3.0 eV, in line with experimental values and we also find that the bond-exchange mechanism of Wooten, Winer, and Weaire is, by far, the most important one for nondefect based dynamics in a-Si.

  20. Amorphous silicon-indium-zinc oxide semiconductor thin film transistors processed below 150 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Eugene; Chun, Yoon Soo; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2010-09-01

    Amorphous silicon-indium-zinc-oxide (a-SIZO) thin film transistor (TFT) was investigated with the process temperature below 150 °C. The a-SIZO TFT exhibited a field effect mobility of 21.6 cm2/V s and an on/off ratio of 107. The stabilities of a-SIZO TFT and indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) TFT were compared, and a-SIZO TFT showed 3.7 V shift for threshold voltage (Vth) compared to 10.8 V shift in IZO TFT after bias temperature stress. Si incorporation into IZO-system as a stabilizer, which was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, resulted in small shift in Vth in a-SIZO TFT without deteriorating mobility of higher than 21.6 cm2/V s.