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Sample records for amorphous titanium dioxide

  1. Synthesis and electrochemical evaluation of an amorphous titanium dioxide derived from a solid state precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Christopher D.; McIntyre, Toni; Simmons, Sade; LaDuca, Holly; Breitzer, Jonathan G.; Lopez, Carmen M.; Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, J. T.

    Titanium oxides are an important class of lithium-ion battery electrodes owing to their good capacity and stability within the cell environment. Although most Ti(IV) oxides are poor electronic conductors, new methods developed to synthesize nanometer scale primary particles have achieved the higher rate capability needed for modern commercial applications. In this report, the anionic water stable titanium oxalate anion [TiO(C 2O 4) 2] 2- was isolated in high yield as the insoluble DABCO (1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) salt. Powder X-ray diffraction studies show that the titanium dioxide material isolated after annealing in air is initially amorphous, converts to N-doped anatase above 400 °C, then to rutile above 600 °C. Electrochemical studies indicate that the amorphous titanium dioxide phase within a carbon matrix has a stable cycling capacity of ∼350 mAh g -1. On crystallizing at 400 °C to a carbon-coated anatase the capacity drops to 210 mAh g -1, and finally upon carbon burn-off to 50 mAh g -1. Mixtures of the amorphous titanium dioxide and Li 4Ti 5O 12 showed a similar electrochemical profile and capacity to Li 4Ti 5O 12 but with the addition of a sloping region to the end of the discharge curve that could be advantageous for determining state-of-charge in systems using Li 4Ti 5O 12.

  2. Electronic structures and current conductivities of B, C, N and F defects in amorphous titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hieu H; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-05-01

    Although titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been extensively studied and widely used in energy and environmental areas, the amorphous form and its related defect properties are poorly understood. Recent studies, however, have emphasized the crucial role of amorphousness in producing competitively good performances in photochemical applications. In this work we have investigated for the first time the effects of various dopants (B, C, N and F) on charge carrier transport in amorphous titanium dioxide (a-TiO2), given that doping is a common technique used to tune the electronic properties of semiconductors, and that the existence of these impurities could also be unintentionally introduced during the synthesis process. The a-TiO2 model was obtained using a classical molecular dynamics method, followed by density-functional theory calculations (DFT + U, with Hubbard correction term U) on electronic structures and defect states. The formation of these impurity defects in a-TiO2 was found to be energetically more favorable by several eV than their crystal counterparts (in rutile). The contributions of these defect states to the charge transfer processes were examined by means of Marcus theory.

  3. Insertion energetics of lithium, sodium, and magnesium in crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide: A comparative first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrain, Fleur; Malyi, Oleksandr; Manzhos, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been proposed as a potential electrode material for lithium, sodium, and magnesium ion batteries. Among the phases of TiO2, anatase, rutile, and (B)-TiO2 are the most commonly used phases for electrochemical storage, while the amorphous phase has also been shown to be a promising candidate. We present a comparative density functional theory study of the insertion energetics of Li, Na, and Mg into anatase, rutile, and (B)-TiO2, as well as into the amorphous phase. Our results show that among the crystalline phases, (B)-TiO2 provides the strongest binding between TiO2 and the inserted Li/Na/Mg atom. We also find that for all Li, Na, and Mg, the amorphous phase provides insertion sites well-dispersed in energies, with a lowest energy site more thermodynamically favorable than insertion sites in the crystalline phases. We also obtain the localized Ti3+ states together with the formation of the defect states in the band gap, which are induced by the insertion, at the GGA level of theory (without the Hubbard correction).

  4. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system. PMID:27767103

  5. Genotoxicity evaluation of nanosized titanium dioxide, synthetic amorphous silica and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Ana M; Louro, Henriqueta; Antunes, Susana; Quarré, Stephanie; Simar, Sophie; De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Verleysen, Eveline; Mast, Jan; Jensen, Keld A; Norppa, Hannu; Nesslany, Fabrice; Silva, Maria João

    2014-02-01

    Toxicological characterization of manufactured nanomaterials (NMs) is essential for safety assessment, while keeping pace with innovation from their development and application in consumer products. The specific physicochemical properties of NMs, including size and morphology, might influence their toxicity and have impact on human health. The present work aimed to evaluate the genotoxicity of nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2), synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), in human lymphocytes. The morphology and size of those NMs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, while the hydrodynamic particle size-distributions were determined by dynamic light scattering. Using a standardized procedure to ensure the dispersion of the NMs and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (without metabolic activation), we observed significant increases in the frequencies of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNBCs) for some TiO2 NMs and for two MWCNTs, although no clear dose-response relationships could be disclosed. In contrast, all forms of SAS analyzed in this study were unable to induce micronuclei. The present findings increase the weight of evidence towards a genotoxic effect of some forms of TiO2 and some MWCNTs. Regarding safety assessment, the differential genotoxicity observed for closely related NMs highlights the importance of investigating the toxic potential of each NM individually, instead of assuming a common mechanism and equal genotoxic effects for a set of similar NMs.

  6. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vuuren, D. S.; Engelbrecht, A. D.; Hadley, T. D.

    2005-10-01

    The value chain of titanium products shows that the difference between the cost of titanium ingot and titanium dioxide is about 9/kg titanium. In contrast, the price of aluminum, which is produced in a similar way, is only about 1.7/kg. Electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide is therefore believed to have significant potential to reduce the cost of titanium products. The process is hampered by the high operating temperatures and sophisticated materials of construction required; the high affinity of titanium for carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen; and physical and chemical properties of the different titanium oxide species when reducing titanium from Ti4+ to metallic titanium.

  7. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  8. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  9. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  13. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  14. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  15. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  16. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  1. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  2. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  3. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  9. Influence Of Carboxymethyl Cellulose For The Transport Of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles In Clean Silica And Mineral-Coated Sands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport properties of titanium dioxide (anatase polymorph) nanoparticles encapsulated by carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were evaluated as a function of changes in the solute chemical properties in clean quartz, amorphous aluminum and iron hydroxide-coated sands. While prist...

  10. Structure of latent tracks in rutile single crystal of titanium dioxide induced by swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Awazu, Koichi; Wang, Xiaomin; Fujimaki, Makoto; Komatsubara, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Takahiro; Ohki, Yoshimichi

    2006-08-15

    The structurally damaged zone in titanium dioxide rutile single crystal induced by MeV-order heavy ions was observed using high resolution electronic microscopy (HREM). Stressed regions as well as amorphous regions were identified in the damaged areas. Both stressed and amorphous regions were etched with hydrofluoric acid. The thermal spike model was used to calculate the track radii variation versus electron stopping power. When the calculated lattice temperature did not exceed the melting point of rutile titanium dioxide (2130 K), no structural change introduced by ions, such as 90 MeV Cl, was observed by HREM. It was found that the radius of the lattice temperature over the melting point corresponded closely to the radius of the stressed region. It was concluded that both stressed and amorphous regions are the result of quenching by molten titanium dioxide.

  11. Genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Yan, Jian; Li, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs, <100 nm) are increasingly being used in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics due to the unique properties derived from their small sizes. However, their large surface-area to mass ratio and high redox potential may negatively impact human health and the environment. TiO(2)-NPs can cause inflammation, pulmonary damage, fibrosis, and lung tumors and they are possibly carcinogenic to humans. Because cancer is a disease involving mutation, there are a large number of studies on the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs. In this article, we review the results that have been reported in the literature, with a focus on data generated from the standard genotoxicity assays. The data include genotoxicity results from the Ames test, in vitro and in vivo Comet assay, in vitro and in vivo micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchange assay, mammalian cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene assay, the wing somatic mutation and recombination assay, and the mouse phosphatidylinositol glycan, class A gene assay. Inconsistent results have been found in these assays, with both positive and negative responses being reported. The in vitro systems for assessing the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs have generated a greater number of positive results than the in vivo systems, and tests for DNA and chromosome damage have produced more positive results than the assays measuring gene mutation. Nearly all tests for measuring the mutagenicity of TiO(2)-NPs were negative. The current data indicate that the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs is mediated mainly through the generation of oxidative stress in cells.

  12. Structure of molten titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, O. L. G.; Skinner, L. B.; Benmore, C. J.; Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R.

    2014-09-01

    The x-ray structure factor of molten TiO2 has been measured, enabled by the use of aerodynamic levitation and laser beam heating, to a temperature of T=2250(30)K. The Ti-O coordination number in the melt is close to nTiO=5.0(2), with modal Ti-O bond length rTiO=1.881(5)Å, both values being significantly smaller than for the high temperature stable rutile crystal structure (nTiO=6.0,rTiO=1.959Å). The structural differences between melt and crystal are qualitatively similar to those for alumina, which is rationalized in terms of the similar field strengths of Ti4+ and Al3+. The diffraction data are used to generate physically and chemically reasonable structural models, which are then compared to the predictions based on various classical molecular dynamics (MD) potentials. Interatomic potentials, suitable for modeling molten TiO2, are introduced, given the inability of existing MD models to reproduce the diffraction data. These potentials have the additional advantage of being able to predict the density and thermal expansion of the melt, as well as solid amorphous TiO2, in agreement with published results. This is of critical importance given the strong correlation between density and structural parameters such as nTiO. The large thermal expansion of the melt is associated with weakly temperature dependent structural changes, whereby simulations show that nTiO=5.85(2)-[3.0(1)×10-4]T(K ,2.75Åcutoff). The TiO2 liquid is structurally analogous to the geophysically relevant high pressure liquid silica system at around 27 GPa. We argue that the predominance of fivefold polyhedra in the melt implies the existence of as-yet-undiscovered TiO2 polymorphs, based on lower-than-octahedral coordination numbers, which are likely to be metastable under ambient conditions. Given the industrial importance of titanium oxides, experimental and computational searches for such polymorphs are well warranted.

  13. Structure of molten titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, O. L. G.; Skinner, L. B.; Benmore, C. J.; Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R.

    2014-09-18

    The x-ray structure factor of molten TiO2 has been measured for the first time, enabled by the use of aerodynamic levitation and laser beam heating, to a temperature of T = 2250(30) K. Ti-O coordination number in the melt is close to nTiO = 5.0(2), with modal Ti-O bond length rTiO = 1.881(5) Å, both values being significantly smaller than for the high temperature stable Rutile crystal structure (nTiO = 6.0, rTiO = 1.959 Å). The structural differences between melt and crystal are qualitatively similar to those for alumina, which is rationalized in terms of the similar field strengths of Ti4+ and Al3+. The diffraction data are used to generate physically and chemically reasonable structural models, which are then compared to the predictions based on various classical molecular dynamics (MD) potentials. New interatomic potentials, suitable for modelling molten TiO2, are introduced, given the inability of existing MD models to reproduce the diffraction data. These new potentials have the additional great advantage of being able to predict the density and thermal expansion of the melt, as well as solid amorphous TiO2, in agreement with published results. This is of critical importance given the strong correlation between density and structural parameters such as nTiO. The large thermal expansion of the melt is associated with weakly temperature dependent structural changes, whereby simulations show that nTiO = 5.85(2) – (3.0(1) x 10-4 )T (K, 2.75 Å cut-off). The TiO2 liquid is structurally analogous to the geophysically relevant high pressure liquid silica system at around 27 GPa. We argue that the predominance of 5-fold polyhedra in the melt implies the existence of as yet undiscovered TiO2 polymorphs, based on lowerthan-octahedral coordination numbers, which are likely to be metastable under ambient conditions. Given the industrial importance of titanium oxides, experimental and computational searches for such polymorphs are well warranted.

  14. Amorphous silica-like carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Mario; Gorelli, Federico A; Bini, Roberto; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Scandolo, Sandro; Crichton, Wilson A

    2006-06-15

    Among the group IV elements, only carbon forms stable double bonds with oxygen at ambient conditions. At variance with silica and germania, the non-molecular single-bonded crystalline form of carbon dioxide, phase V, only exists at high pressure. The amorphous forms of silica (a-SiO2) and germania (a-GeO2) are well known at ambient conditions; however, the amorphous, non-molecular form of CO2 has so far been described only as a result of first-principles simulations. Here we report the synthesis of an amorphous, silica-like form of carbon dioxide, a-CO2, which we call 'a-carbonia'. The compression of the molecular phase III of CO2 between 40 and 48 GPa at room temperature initiated the transformation to the non-molecular amorphous phase. Infrared spectra measured at temperatures up to 680 K show the progressive formation of C-O single bonds and the simultaneous disappearance of all molecular signatures. Furthermore, state-of-the-art Raman and synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on temperature-quenched samples confirm the amorphous character of the material. Comparison with vibrational and diffraction data for a-SiO2 and a-GeO2, as well as with the structure factor calculated for the a-CO2 sample obtained by first-principles molecular dynamics, shows that a-CO2 is structurally homologous to the other group IV dioxide glasses. We therefore conclude that the class of archetypal network-forming disordered systems, including a-SiO2, a-GeO2 and water, must be extended to include a-CO2. PMID:16778885

  15. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    DOEpatents

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  16. [Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: occupational exposure limits].

    PubMed

    Swidwińska-Gajewska, Anna Maria; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is produced in Poland as a high production volume chemical (HPVC). It is used mainly as a pigment for paints and coatings, plastics, paper, and also as additives to food and pharmaceuticals. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are increasingly applied in cosmetics, textiles and plastics as the ultraviolet light blocker. This contributes to a growing occupational exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles. Nanoparticles are potentially responsible for the most adverse effects of titanium dioxide. Due to the absence of separate fraction of nanoobjects and appropriate measurement methods the maximum admissible concentrations (MAC) for particles < 100 nm and nano-TiO2 cannot be established. In the world there are 2 proposals of occupational exposure levels for titanium dioxide nanoparticles: 0.3 mg/m3, proposed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and 0.6 mg/m3, proposed by experts of the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). The authors of this article, based on the available data and existing methods for hygiene standards binding in Poland, concluded that the MAC value of 0.3 mg/m3 for nanoparticles TiO2 in the workplace air can be accepted.

  17. Amorphous Alloy Surpasses Steel and Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the same way that the inventions of steel in the 1800s and plastic in the 1900s sparked revolutions for industry, a new class of amorphous alloys is poised to redefine materials science as we know it in the 21st century. Welcome to the 3rd Revolution, otherwise known as the era of Liquidmetal(R) alloys, where metals behave similar to plastics but possess more than twice the strength of high performance titanium. Liquidmetal alloys were conceived in 1992, as a result of a project funded by the California Institute of Technology (CalTech), NASA, and the U.S. Department of Energy, to study the fundamentals of metallic alloys in an undercooled liquid state, for the development of new aerospace materials. Furthermore, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center contributed to the development of the alloys by subjecting the materials to testing in its Electrostatic Levitator, a special instrument that is capable of suspending an object in midair so that researchers can heat and cool it in a containerless environment free from contaminants that could otherwise spoil the experiment.

  18. Photohole Induced Corrosion of Titanium Dioxide: Mechanism and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Liu, Tianyu; Wang, Fuxin; Zhai, Teng; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2015-10-14

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been extensively investigated as photoanode for water oxidation, as it is believed to be one of the most stable photoanode materials. Yet, we surprisingly found that TiO2 photoanodes (rutile nanowire, anatase nanotube, and P25 nanoparticle film) suffered from substantial photocurrent decay in neutral (Na2SO4) as well as basic (KOH) electrolyte solution. Photoelectrochemical measurements togehter with electron microscopy studies performed on rutile TiO2 nanowire photoanode show that the photocurrent decay is due to photohole induced corrosion, which competes with water oxidation reaction. Further studies reveal that photocurrent decay profile in neutral and basic solutions are fundamentally different. Notably, the structural reconstruction of nanowire surface occurs simultaneously with the corrosion of TiO2 in KOH solution resulting in the formation of an amorphous layer of titanium hydroxide, which slows down the photocorrosion. Based on this discovery, we demonstrate that the photoelectrochemical stability of TiO2 photoanode can be significantly improved by intentionally coating an amorphous layer of titanium hydroxide on the nanowire surface. The pretreated TiO2 photaonode exhibits an excellent photocurrent retention rate of 97% after testing in KOH solution for 72 h, while in comparison the untreated sample lost 10-20% of photocurrent in 12 h under the same measurement conditions. This work provides new insights in understanding of the photoelectrochemical stability of bare TiO2 photoanodes.

  19. Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2013-11-19

    The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

  20. Rheological Behavior of Titanium Dioxide Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua-Gui; Li, Chun-Zhong; Gu, Hong-Chen; Fang, Tu-Nan

    2001-04-01

    The rheological properties of titanium dioxide dispersed in water are measured over a wide range of powder concentrations, temperatures, and pH values. The value of intrinsic viscosity of titanium dioxide measured with an Ubbelohde capillary viscometer is 3.55, which is useful for determining the shape and aggregation property of the particles. The yield stress and steady shear viscosity of titanium dioxide with broad and narrow particle size distributions were measured over a wide range of solid volume fractions on a Brabender rheometer. It is observed that the rheological properties of the suspensions are quite different due to the difference in particle size distributions. Quemada, Casson, and Zhou's models were used to fit the experimental data and useful parameters were obtained. Calculated data are also in good agreement with the experimental data. As expected, the shear viscosity and yield stress decrease with increasing temperature. But when the temperature is around 50 degrees C, yield stress increases with increasing temperature while shear viscosity exhibits a complex behavior. The phenomena are very interesting and special. The Peclet number was used to analyze the shear thickening behavior. Models were also used to describe the shear viscosity under different temperatures and the master plots of the reduced variables eta/eta(infinity) vs t(c)gamma; at different temperatures are superimposed, which means the agreement is fair and the models are suitable to describe the rheological properties of titanium dioxide suspensions. pH effects were investigated on a Rheometrics RFS-II rheometer and it was found that pH can change the surface charge of the particles, which also affects the rheological behavior. The pH at which maximum shear viscosity and yield stress occur is in concordance with the isoelectric point. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Photoelectrochemical activity of titanium dioxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdinezhad Roshan, Aida

    Crystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films have been extensively investigated due to their various applications in a wide range of field such as photocatalysis, solar cells, gas sensors, self-cleaning windows, etc. The general objective of the present work can be categorized into two different parts. The first part of research is to acquire a fundamental understanding of thin film deposition and characterization of materials surfaces produced by Electrolytic Plasma Processing (EPP) and Magnetron Sputtering system. It has been tried to develop a crystalline layer of titanium dioxide thin film using these two techniques. Aluminum and titanium are the substrate materials. Also a part of study is to clean and roughen the substrate prior to the deposition to examine the effect of morphology. Aluminum was chosen as the substrate as well as titanium in order to enable us to get cheaper product. Second main portion of this work is to check the photoelectrochemical response of the deposited film and explore the effect of various parameters of coating process on this photoelectrochemical response.

  2. Ag-doped titanium dioxide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaei Sheini, Navid; Rohani, Mahsa

    2016-03-01

    Titanium dioxide has been utilized for the fabrication of oxygen sensitive ceramic bodies. In this work, disk-shaped TiO2 pellets are fabricated by the sintering of the press- formed anatase powder at 1000°C. Two silver contacts are printed on one of the top base of each sample. Silver wire segments are connected to the printed electrodes. It is shown that the gradual diffusion of silver into titanium dioxide from the electrodes profoundly affects the resistive properties of the ceramic samples. SEM, XRD and EDAX analyses are carried out to determine the position of the silver diffused in the structure. At 35°C, before silver diffusion, the electrical resistance of the device decreases ten times in response to the presence of 3000 ppm ethanol contamination. Sensitivity (Rair/Rgas) to reducing gases is severely affected by the silver doping level in the titanium dioxide. The progress of silver diffusion continuously decreases the sensitivity till it become less than one. Further progress in silver diffusion brings the devices to the condition at which the resistance increases at the presents of reducing gases. In this condition, inverse sensitivities (Rgas/Rair) as large as 103 are demonstrated.

  3. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  4. Magnetic susceptibility of tetragonal titanium dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Pankey, T.; Grant, F.A.

    1960-01-01

    Careful measurements have been made of the magnetic susceptibility of the rutile and anatase crystalline forms of titanium dioxide. The magnetic susceptibility of a single crystal of high-purity rutile was found to be (0.067??0.0015)??10-6 emu per gram, and was temperature-independent from 55??to 372??K. Difficulty was encountered in obtaining a good value of the magnetic susceptibility of anatase because of impurities. However, a value of 0.02??10-6 emu per gram was obtained as a maximum value for anatase powder. A discussion is given for the different values obtained for anatase and rutile. ?? 1960 The American Physical Society.

  5. Carbamazepine degradation by photolysis and titanium dioxide photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Im, Jong-Kwon; Son, Hyun-Seok; Kang, Young-Min; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the degradation of carbamazepine by photolysis/ultraviolet (UV)-C only and titanium dioxide photocatalysis. The degradation of carbamazepine by UV-only and titanium-dioxide-only (adsorption) reactions were inefficient, however, complete degradation of carbamazepine was observed by titanium dioxide photocatalysis within 30 min. The rate of degradation increased as initial carbamazepine concentration decreased, and the removal kinetics fit well with the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The addition of methanol, a radical scavenger, decreased carbamazepine removal, suggesting that the hydroxide radical played an important role during carbamazepine degradation. The addition of oxygen during titanium dioxide photocatalysis accelerated hydroxide radical production, thus improving mineralization activity. The photocatalytic degradation was more efficient at a higher pH, whereas the removal of carbamazepine and acridine (a major intermediate) were more efficient under aerobic conditions. The mineralization of carbamazepine during photocatalysis produced various ionic by-products such as ammonium and nitrate by way of nitrogen dioxide.

  6. Silver Doped Titanium Dioxide Humidity Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooshiar Zare, Ali; Mohammadi, Somayye

    2011-02-01

    The effect of silver doping on the sensitivity, dynamic range and the response time of a titanium dioxide-based resistive humidity sensor is studied. Sample pallets were prepared by sintering the dry pressed samples at 900°C in air. Silver was added to the ceramic raw material in the form of AgNO3 which was decomposed during the sintering process. Large area silver electrodes were deposited on the sintered disks by paste printing. The resistance and the response time of the various pallets containing different additive levels were measured at relative humidity range of 4-100%. Silver doping, substantially increased the sensitivity to the ambient humidity. Moreover, it resulted in faster responses; the response time of the silver added pallets were about four times shorter than the pure ones.

  7. Titanium dioxide in fuel cell technology: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, N.; Kamarudin, S. K.

    2015-03-01

    Fuel cell technology is one of the alternative energy sources for the next generation. Although this technology has proven to be one of the main methods for producing new energy sources, fuel cell technology still has some problems that hinder fuel cell commercialization. Recently, new ideas on titanium dioxide are introduced as potential solution in several applications in fuel cell technology. Thus, this article presents an overview on the applications of titanium dioxide and highlights the unique properties and benefits of titanium dioxide in fuel cell technology.

  8. Ferromagnetism in cobalt-doped titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Alexandre Francois

    Semiconductor spintronics is a promising new field of study in the ongoing quest to make electronic devices faster, cheaper, and more efficient. While current spintronics utilizes the spin property of electrons to achieve greater functionality, the integration of spintronics into conventional semiconductor electronics will lead to advances in opto-electronics, quantum computing, and other emerging fields of technology. This integration relies on effective generation, injection, transport, and detection of spin polarized electron currents. To these ends, the successful synthesis of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors is mandatory. In this work, we study the properties of cobalt-doped titanium dioxide, a room temperature dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor discovered in 2001. We characterize the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) of Co-doped TiO2 thin films, including the substrate-induced stabilization of the anatase structure of TiO2. We also confirm the substitutional nature of cobalt on titanium sites by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. The ferromagnetic interaction mechanism remains controversial. Yet, we provide experimental evidence for the polaron mediated ferromagnetic coupling mechanism recently suggested to mediate ferromagnetic interactions in this, and other magnetically doped oxides, in the dilute regime (approximately 0 to 3%). Our evidence is related to a previously unobserved and unreported XAS spectral feature. Finally, we demonstrate the surprising absence of an X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) signature at the cobalt L edge.

  9. Aggregation stability of titanium dioxide hydrosols

    SciTech Connect

    Grishchenko, L.I.; Medvedkova, N.G.; Nazarov, V.V.; Frolov, Yu.G.

    1994-03-01

    Titanium dioxide based ceramic membranes have recently attracted great interest because of their catalytic and photocatalytic abilities and other advantages typical of the ceramic membranes. For the preparation of the selective layer of the ultrafiltration ceramic TiO{sub 2}-based membranes, hydrosol, as a rule, is used as a starting material. The synthesis of a selective layer of the membrane with predetermined properties requires data on the colloid-chemical properties of these sols, which are rather scarce. The electrophoretic mobility and the size of the scattering centers of the TiO{sub 2} hydrosols obtained through titanium tetraethoxide hydrolysis were measured at 0.5-3.0 pH units. Coagulation thresholds were estimated in the presence of NaNO{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Under the conditions investigated, the aggregation stability was shown to be mainly dependent on the structural component of the disjoining pressure. The existence of a hydrated gel-layer on the surface of sol particles was proposed.

  10. Dichloromethane photodegradation using titanium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, J.F.; Suib, S.L.; Coughlin, R.W. )

    1989-06-01

    The use of titanium dioxide and titanium aluminosilicates in the photocatalytic destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbons is investigated. Titanium-exchanged clays, titanium-pillared clays, and titanium dioxide in the amorphous, anatase, and rutile forms are used to photocatalytically degrade dichloromethane to hydrochloric acid and carbon dioxide. Bentonite clays pillared by titanium dioxide are observed to be more catalytically active than titanium-exchanged clays. Clays pillared by titanium aluminum polymeric cations display about the same catalytic activity as that of titanium-exchanged clays. The rutile form of titanium dioxide is the most active catalyst studied for the dichloromethane degradation reaction. The anatase form of titanium dioxide supported on carbon felt was also used as a catalyst. This material is about five times more active than titanium dioxide-pillared clays. Degradation of dichloromethane using any of these catalysts can be enhanced by oxygen enrichment of the reaction solution or by preirradiating the catalyst with light.

  11. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause genotoxicity in human lung epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products is steadily increasing. However, the health effects of exposure to these nanoparticles are not thoroughly understood. This study investigated the genotoxicity of six titanium dioxide and two cerium oxide nanoparticles of va...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of nano-manganese dioxide and titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddi, Sasya

    Nano sized manganese dioxide was synthesized using hydrothermal and co-precipitation methods by the reduction of hydrogen peroxide and potassium permanganate in respective methods. The co-precipitation method of synthesis was expanded to synthesize nano sized Titanium Dioxide. Characterization of the synthesized material was carried out by Elemental Analysis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM analysis showed that the MnO2 prepared by hydrothermal method is made of spherical nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 15 nm--30 nm and the MnO2 prepared by co-precipitation method showed nanospheres of 20 nm--100 nm with several nano disks incorporated in these sphere of about 5 nm--50 nm in diameter. X-ray revealed that the MnO2 prepared by hydrothermal shows two different transitions from amorphous MnO2 to crystalline Mn2O3 and Mn2O3- Mn2O 3 Bixbyte with substantial amount of unreacted PVP in it, which is lost when heated to higher temperatures which are supported by data from DTA and TGA. In co-precipitation only one transition is observed that is from amorphous MnO2 to crystalline Mn2O3 Bixbyte and traces of unreacted PVP. Titanium Dioxide synthesized using PVP led to uniform spherical nano particles of 20 nm--100 nm with some unreacted PVP. X-Ray analysis shows one transition from amorphous TiO2 to crystalline TiO 2 Anatase. The TiO2 prepared without PVP is poorly crystalline to X-rays and identified as Brookite when heated to higher temperature. The SEM micrographs of TiO2 without PVP did not show any uniformity in particle size and shape distribution and lost homogeneity. The results from our study suggest that the clean, uniform and homogeneous nanoparticles can be prepared using a simple, room temperature, non-expensive co-precipitation method using PVP.

  13. Correlation of lattice distortion with photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xia; Shui Miao Li Rongsheng; Song Yue

    2008-08-04

    The photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide dispersions on X-3B pigment degradation has been investigated. A variety of factors that would influence the photocatalytic activity such as crystallite size, lattice distortion, and anatase content are discussed in detail. It is found that lattice distortion is the most important one among these factors and is expected to inhibit the hole and electron pair recombination. It determines, to some extent, the photocatalytic efficiency of titanium dioxide dispersions.

  14. The immunomodulatory effects of titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lappas, Courtney M

    2015-11-01

    Due to their characteristic physical, chemical and optical properties, titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles are attractive tools for use in a wide range of applications. The use of nanoparticles for biological applications is, however, dependent upon their biocompatibility with living cells. Because of the importance of inflammation as a modulator of human health, the safe and efficacious in vivo use of titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles is inherently linked to a favorable interaction with immune system cells. However, both titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles have demonstrated potential to exert immunomodulatory and immunotoxic effects. Titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles are readily internalized by immune system cells, may accumulate in peripheral lymphoid organs, and can influence multiple manifestations of immune cell activity. Although the factors influencing the biocompatibility of titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles with immune system cells have not been fully elucidated, nanoparticle core composition, size, concentration and the duration of cell exposure seem to be important. Because titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles are widely utilized in pharmaceutical, commercial and industrial products, it is vital that their effects on human health and immune system function be more thoroughly evaluated.

  15. Evaluation of concrete containing photocatalytic titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Shannon

    The air pollution inversions in the mountain west are a societal problem that require a large-scale solution. With the more stringent Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations established in 2010, and the recent discovery of the photocatalytic pollution reduction capabilities of titanium dioxide (TiO2), interest has developed to create pollution-reducing construction materials. Over the last decade, a number of laboratory studies have been performed and a few field studies have occurred around the world. There are commercially available photocatalytic materials that can be used in concrete construction; however, the materials are often cost prohibitive. This study investigated both practical application techniques and the effects of the climatic environment around the specimens. When concrete specimens were exposed to the weather for 120-days, the specimen's photocatalytic efficiency decreased significantly. Rejuvenation methods were investigated; however, no methods tested were able to increase the photocatalytic efficiency of the specimens to preweathered condition. The final element of this study focused on identifying practical and cost-effective methods of adding TiO2 to current production methods by working with a local precast manufacturer. This research is a stepping stone to develop methodologies to minimize the decline of photocatalytic efficiency due to the exposure to the environment. This element is critical in understanding this complex technology and identifying problems that need to be addressed before products are ready for widespread use.

  16. Toxicology of nanosized titanium dioxide: an update.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaochen; Li, Wen; Yang, Zhuo

    2015-12-01

    Nanosized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) has tremendous potential for a host of applications, and TiO2 nanoparticles (NP) possess different physicochemical properties compared to their fine particle analogs, which might alter their bioactivity. Their adverse effects on living cells have raised serious concerns recently for their use in health care and consumer sectors such as sunscreens, cosmetics, pharmaceutical additives and implanted biomaterials. Many researches have demonstrated that the physicochemical properties including shape, size, surface characteristics and inner structure of nano-TiO2 particles have different degrees of toxicity to different organism groups under different conditions. Some former reports have demonstrated that nano-TiO2 materials could enter into human body through different routes such as inhalation, dermal penetration and ingestion. After being taken by human body, NP might induce oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, inflammation and cell apoptosis ultimately in mammal organs and systems. Here, we summarized the update about toxicity of nano-TiO2 and aimed to supply a safety usage guideline of this nanomaterial.

  17. Electrical Characterization of Flexible Titanium Dioxide Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosborough, Victoria; Gergel-Hackett, Nadine

    2012-02-01

    The memristor is a new fundamental circuit element with a resistance that depends on the magnitude and polarity of the voltage applied to it and the length of time that voltage is applied. Memristors are also nonvolatile, which means that when the bias is removed, a memristor retains its last resistive state. While memristors have potential applications ranging from alternative computer architectures to memory in inexpensive lightweight wearable sensors, the mechanism behind its switching is not well understood. One of the major questions to be resolved is whether memristive switching is electric field dependent or charge dependent. In the former case, a minimum bias is needed for switching to occur. In the latter case, a minimum amount of charge needs to pass through the device to cause switching. I will present the results of electrically characterizing flexible memristors that consist of a nm-thick layer of titanium dioxide sandwiched between two metal contacts in an effort to help establish whether their switching is charge or field-driven.

  18. Cadmium Telluride-Titanium Dioxide Nanocomposite for Photodegradation of Organic Substance.

    PubMed

    Ontam, Areeporn; Khaorapapong, Nithima; Ogawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium telluride-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was prepared by hydrothermal reaction of sol-gel derived titanium dioxide and organically modified cadmium telluride. The crystallinity of titanium dioxide in the nanocomposite was higher than that of pure titanium dioxide obtained by the reaction under the same temperature and pressure conditions, showing that cadmium telluride induced the crystallization of titanium dioxide. Diffuse reflectance spectrum of the nanocomposite showed the higher absorption efficiency in the UV-visible region due to band-gap excitation of titanium dioxide. The nanocomposite significantly showed the improvement of photocatalytic activity for 4-chlorophenol with UV light.

  19. Cytotoxicity of titanium and silicon dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Stefanie; Münzer, Simon; Behrens, Peter; Scheper, Thomas; Bahnemann, Detlef; Kasper, Cornelia

    2009-05-01

    Different TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles have been tested concerning their toxicity on selected mammalian cell lines. Various powders and suspensions, all of which consist of titanium or silicon dioxide nanoparticles have been examined. These particles differ in the crystal structure, the size and the BET-surface area. There was also a classification in fixed particles and in particles easily accessible in solution. With focus on the possible adsorption of the nanoparticles into the human organism, via skin and via respiratory tract, the effects on fibroblasts (NIH-3T3) and on a human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line were examined. Additionally, the particles were tested with HEP-G2 cells, which are often used as model cell line for biocompatibility tests, and PC-12 cells, a rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cell line. The viability of the cells was examined by the MTT-test. The viability results were found to partly depend on the type of cells used. The experimental results show that the adhesion of the cells on the different powders strongly depends on the type of cell lines as well as on the type of powder. It was found that the lower viability of some cells on the powder coatings is not only caused by a cytotoxicity effect of the powders, but is also due to a lower adhesion of the cells on the particle surfaces. Furthermore, it could be shown that the physical properties of the powders cannot be easily correlated to any observed biological effect. While some powders show a significant suppression of the cell growth, others with similar physical properties indicate no toxic effect.

  20. Biological Activity of Mesoporous Dendrimer-Coated Titanium Dioxide: Insight on the Role of the Surface-Interface Composition and the Framework Crystallinity.

    PubMed

    Milowska, Katarzyna; Rybczyńska, Aneta; Mosiolek, Joanna; Durdyn, Joanna; Szewczyk, Eligia M; Katir, Nadia; Brahmi, Younes; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bousmina, Mosto; Bryszewska, Maria; El Kadib, Abdelkrim

    2015-09-16

    Hitherto, the field of nanomedicine has been overwhelmingly dominated by the use of mesoporous organosilicas compared to their metal oxide congeners. Despite their remarkable reactivity, titanium oxide-based materials have been seldom evaluated and little knowledge has been gained with respect to their "structure-biological activity" relationship. Herein, a fruitful association of phosphorus dendrimers (both "ammonium-terminated" and "phosphonate-terminated") and titanium dioxide has been performed by means of the sol-gel process, resulting in mesoporous dendrimer-coated nanosized crystalline titanium dioxide. A similar organo-coating has been reproduced using single branch-mimicking dendrimers that allow isolation of an amorphous titanium dioxide. The impact of these materials on red blood cells was evaluated by studying cell hemolysis. Next, their cytotoxicity toward B14 Chinese fibroblasts and their antimicrobial activity were also investigated. Based on their variants (cationic versus anionic terminal groups and amorphous versus crystalline titanium dioxide phase), better understanding of the role of the surface-interface composition and the nature of the framework has been gained. No noticeable discrimination was observed for amorphous and crystalline material. In contrast, hemolysis and cytotoxicity were found to be sensitive to the nature of the interface composition, with the ammonium-terminated dendrimer-coated titanium dioxide being the most hemolytic and cytotoxic material. This surface-functionalization opens the door for creating a new synergistic machineries mechanism at the cellular level and seems promising for tailoring the biological activity of nanosized organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

  1. Biomimetic titanium dioxide film with structural color and extremely stable hydrophilicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Zhongze; Fujishima, Akira; Sato, Osamu

    2004-11-22

    We biomimeticly fabricated titanium dioxide films with three-dimensionally ordered structure. These films exhibit structural color, photocatalysis, and photoinduced superhydrophilicity. In addition, this biomimetic approach solves the problem of the stability of the superhydrophilicity of titanium dioxide.

  2. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    This work compares and models the adsorption of selenium and other anions on a neutral to alkaline surface (amorphous iron oxyhydroxide) and an acidic surface (manganese dioxide). Selenium adsorption on these oxides is examined as a function of pH, particle concentration, oxidation state, and competing anion concentration in order to assess how these factors might influence the mobility of selenium in the environment. The data indicate that 1. 1) amorphous iron oxyhydroxide has a greater affinity for selenium than manganese dioxide, 2. 2) selenite [Se(IV)] adsorption increases with decreasing pH and increasing particle concentration and is stronger than selenate [Se(VI)] adsorption on both oxides, and 3. 3) selenate does not adsorb on manganese dioxide. The relative affinity of selenate and selenite for the oxides and the lack of adsorption of selenate on a strongly acidic surface suggests that selenate forms outer-sphere complexes while selenite forms inner-sphere complexes with the surfaces. The data also indicate that the competition sequence of other anions with respect to selenite adsorption at pH 7.0 is phosphate > silicate > molybdate > fluoride > sulfate on amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and molybdate ??? phosphate > silicate > fluoride > sulfate on manganese dioxide. The adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on these oxides as a function of pH indicates that the competition sequences reflect the relative affinities of these anions for the surfaces. The Triple Layer surface complexation model is used to provide a quantitative description of these observations and to assess the importance of surface site heterogeneity on anion adsorption. The modeling results suggest that selenite forms binuclear, innersphere complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and monodentate, inner-sphere complexes with manganese dioxide and that selenate forms outer-sphere, monodentate complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. The heterogeneity of the oxide surface sites

  3. 40 CFR 415.220 - Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... titanium dioxide production subcategory. 415.220 Section 415.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Dioxide Production Subcategory § 415.220 Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  4. 40 CFR 415.220 - Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... titanium dioxide production subcategory. 415.220 Section 415.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Dioxide Production Subcategory § 415.220 Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  5. 40 CFR 415.220 - Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... titanium dioxide production subcategory. 415.220 Section 415.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Dioxide Production Subcategory § 415.220 Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  6. 40 CFR 415.220 - Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... titanium dioxide production subcategory. 415.220 Section 415.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Dioxide Production Subcategory § 415.220 Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  7. 40 CFR 415.220 - Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... titanium dioxide production subcategory. 415.220 Section 415.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Dioxide Production Subcategory § 415.220 Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  8. Photocatalytic oxidation mechanism of alkanes in contact with titanium dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formenti, M.; Juillet, F.; Teichner, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    Isobutane was photooxidized on titanium dioxide between -16 and +180 C in tertiary butanol and acetone. The formation of tertiary butanol preceded the formation of acetone. Above 20 C the latter compound became clearly predominant. The reaction kinetics obeyed a steady state model of oxygen chemisorption with the involvement of isobutane in the physisorbed phase.

  9. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This draft document presents two case studies of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) used (1) to remove arsenic from drinking water and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. The draft case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental asses...

  10. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Titanium dioxide in the anatase crystalline form was used as a photocatalyst to generate hydroxyl radicals in a flowthrough water reactor. Experiments were performed on pure cultures of Escherichia coli in dechlorinated tap water and a surface water sample to evaluate the disinfe...

  11. Silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause pregnancy complications in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Kohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Mimura, Kazuya; Morishita, Yuki; Nozaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Ogura, Toshinobu; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Kamada, Haruhiko; Monobe, Youko; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Aoshima, Hisae; Shishido, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Yuichi; Mayumi, Tadanori; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Itoh, Norio; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Yanagihara, Itaru; Saito, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2011-05-01

    The increasing use of nanomaterials has raised concerns about their potential risks to human health. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles can cross the placenta barrier in pregnant mice and cause neurotoxicity in their offspring, but a more detailed understanding of the effects of nanoparticles on pregnant animals remains elusive. Here, we show that silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm and 35 nm, respectively, can cause pregnancy complications when injected intravenously into pregnant mice. The silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were found in the placenta, fetal liver and fetal brain. Mice treated with these nanoparticles had smaller uteri and smaller fetuses than untreated controls. Fullerene molecules and larger (300 and 1,000 nm) silica particles did not induce these complications. These detrimental effects are linked to structural and functional abnormalities in the placenta on the maternal side, and are abolished when the surfaces of the silica nanoparticles are modified with carboxyl and amine groups.

  12. Oxidation of Tyrosine-Phosphopeptides by Titanium Dioxide Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ruokolainen, Miina; Ollikainen, Elisa; Sikanen, Tiina; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-06-22

    Protein phosphorylation has a key role in cell regulation. Oxidation of proteins, in turn, is related to many diseases and to aging, but the effects of phosphorylation on the oxidation of proteins and peptides have been rarely studied. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanistic effect of phosphorylation on peptide oxidation induced by titanium dioxide photocatalysis. The effect of phosphorylation was compared between nonphosphorylated and tyrosine phosphorylated peptides using electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. We observed that tyrosine was the most preferentially oxidized amino acid, but the oxidation reaction was significantly inhibited by its phosphorylation. The study also shows that titanium dioxide photocatalysis provides a fast and easy method to study oxidation reactions of biomolecules, such as peptides.

  13. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    DOEpatents

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  14. Studies of photokilling of bacteria using titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tsuang, Yang-Hwei; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Huang, Yu-Chen; Lu, Chung-Hsin; Chang, Walter Hong-Shong; Wang, Chien-Che

    2008-02-01

    Metal pins used to apply skeletal traction or external fixation devices protruding through skin are susceptible to the increased incidence of pin site infection. In this work, we tried to establish the photokilling effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on an orthopedic implant with an in vitro study. In these photocatalytic experiments, aqueous TiO2 was added to the tested microorganism. The time effect of TiO2 photoactivation was evaluated, and the loss of viability of five different bacteria suspensions (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus hirae, and Bacteroides fragilis) was examined by the viable count procedure. The bactericidal effect of TiO2 nanoparticle-coated metal plates was also tested. The ultraviolet (UV) dosage used in this experiment did not affect the viability of bacteria, and all bacteria survived well in the absence of TiO2 nanoparticles. The survival curve of microorganisms in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles showed that nearly complete killing was achieved after 50 min of UV illumination. The formation of bacterial colonies above the TiO2 nanoparticle-coated metal plates also decreased significantly. In this study, we clearly demonstrated the bactericidal effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. In the presence of UV light, the titanium dioxide nanoparticles can be applicable to medical facilities where the potential for infection should be controlled. PMID:18269355

  15. Milestones in Functional Titanium Dioxide Thermal Spray Coatings: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardon, M.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Titanium dioxide has been the most investigated metal oxide due to its outstanding performance in a wide range of applications, chemical stability and low cost. Coating processes that can produce surfaces based on this material have been deeply studied. Nevertheless, the necessity of coating large areas by means of rapid manufacturing processes renders laboratory-scale techniques unsuitable, leading to a noteworthy interest from the thermal spray (TS) community in the development of significant intellectual property and a large number of scientific publications. This review unravels the relationship between titanium dioxide and TS technologies with the aim of providing detailed information related to the most significant achievements, lack of knowhow, and performance of TS TiO2 functional coatings in photocatalytic, biomedical, and other applications. The influence of thermally activated techniques such as atmospheric plasma spray and high-velocity oxygen fuel spray on TiO2 feedstock based on powders and suspensions is revised; the influence of spraying parameters on the microstructural and compositional changes and the final active behavior of the coating have been analyzed. Recent findings on titanium dioxide coatings deposited by cold gas spray and the capacity of this technology to prevent loss of the nanostructured anatase metastable phase are also reviewed.

  16. Nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and cerium dioxide-titanium dioxide composite thin films on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Uzma; Dunnill, Charles W.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    2009-11-01

    Two series of composite thin films were deposited on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD)—nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and nanoparticulate cerium dioxide embedded in a titanium dioxide matrix. The films were analysed by a range of techniques including UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis by X-rays. The AACVD prepared films showed the functional properties of photocatalysis and super-hydrophilicity. The CeO 2 nanoparticle thin films displaying photocatalysis and photo-induced hydrophilicity almost comparable to that of anatase titania.

  17. Synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes from electrospun fiber templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yejun; Yu, Jie

    2008-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2) nanotubes were synthesized by impregnating stabilized electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers with titanium tetrachloride (TiCl 4) solution and subsequent calcination. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to characterize the structure and composition of the products. The resulting TiO 2 nanotubes are of high purity with anatase structure. The average diameter of the nanotubes is 220 nm with very thin walls about 20 nm. The tube walls are composed of many nanoparticles of about 10 nm. Due to the increased surface area and small crystal size, the present TiO 2 nanotubes may possess high catalytic properties.

  18. Titanium Dioxide Volatility in High Temperature Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QynhGiao N.

    2008-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) containing materials are of high interest to the aerospace industry due to its high temperature capability, strength, and light weight. As with most metals an exterior oxide layer naturally exists in environments that contain oxygen (i.e. air). At high temperatures, water vapor plays a key role in the volatility of materials including oxide surfaces. This study will evaluate cold pressed titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder pellets at a temperature range of 1400 C - 1200 C in water containing environments to determine the volatile hydroxyl species using the transpiration method. The water content ranged from 0-76 mole% and the oxygen content range was 0-100 mole % during the 20-250 hour exposure times. Preliminary results indicate that oxygen is not a key contributor at these temperatures and the following reaction is the primary volatile equation for all three temperatures: TiO2 (s) + H2O (g) = TiO(OH)2 (g).

  19. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P.

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  20. Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The article contains a summary of factors pertinent to titanium use. Geology and exploitation, production processes, global production, titanium dioxide and alloy applications, and the titanium market are reviewed. Potential applications outlined are for oil and gas equipment and for the automotive industry. Titanium alloys were selected for drilling risers for North Sea oil and gas drilling platforms due to a high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. These properties also make titanium alloys attractive for auto parts, although the cost is currently prohibitive.

  1. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Food and Personal Care Products

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Alex; Westerhoff, Paul; Fabricius, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide is a common additive in many food, personal care, and other consumer products used by people, which after use can enter the sewage system, and subsequently enter the environment as treated effluent discharged to surface waters or biosolids applied to agricultural land, incinerated wastes, or landfill solids. This study quantifies the amount of titanium in common food products, derives estimates of human exposure to dietary (nano-) TiO2, and discusses the impact of the nanoscale fraction of TiO2 entering the environment. The foods with the highest content of TiO2 included candies, sweets and chewing gums. Among personal care products, toothpastes and select sunscreens contained 1% to >10% titanium by weight. While some other crèmes contained titanium, despite being colored white, most shampoos, deodorants, and shaving creams contained the lowest levels of titanium (<0.01 μg/mg). For several high-consumption pharmaceuticals, the titanium content ranged from below the instrument detection limit (0.0001 μg Ti/mg) to a high of 0.014 μg Ti/mg. Electron microscopy and stability testing of food-grade TiO2 (E171) suggests that approximately 36% of the particles are less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and that it readily disperses in water as fairly stable colloids. However, filtration of water solubilized consumer products and personal care products indicated that less than 5% of the titanium was able to pass through 0.45 or 0.7 μm pores. Two white paints contained 110 μg Ti/mg while three sealants (i.e., prime coat paint) contained less titanium (25 to 40 μg Ti/mg). This research showed that while many white-colored products contained titanium, it was not a prerequisite. Although several of these product classes contained low amounts of titanium, their widespread use and disposal down the drain and eventually to WWTPs deserves attention. A Monte Carlo human exposure analysis to TiO2 through foods identified children as having the highest

  2. Doped titanium dioxide nanocrystalline powders with high photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.L.; Jumas, J.-C.; Costa, F.M.

    2009-07-15

    Doped titanium dioxide nanopowders (M:TiO{sub 2}; M=Fe, Co, Nb, Sb) with anatase structure were successfully synthesized through an hydrothermal route preceded by a precipitation doping step. Structural and morphological characterizations were performed by powder XRD and TEM. Thermodynamic stability studies allowed to conclude that the anatase structure is highly stable for all doped TiO{sub 2} prepared compounds. The photocatalytic efficiency of the synthesized nanopowders was tested and the results showed an appreciable enhancement in the photoactivity of the Sb:TiO{sub 2} and Nb:TiO{sub 2}, whereas no photocatalytic activity was detected for the Fe:TiO{sub 2} and Co:TiO{sub 2} nanopowders. These results were correlated to the doping ions oxidation states, determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetization data. - Graphical abstract: Doped titanium dioxide nanopowders (M:TiO{sub 2}; M=Fe, Co, Nb, Sb) with highly stable anatase structure were successfully synthesized through an hydrothermal route. The photocatalytic efficiencies of the synthesized nanopowders were tested and the results show an appreciable enhancement in the photoactivity of the Sb:TiO{sub 2} and Nb:TiO{sub 2}.

  3. Deformation-Induced Amorphization of Copper-Titanium Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askenazy, Philip Douglas

    Two methods of inducing amorphization in Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds by mechanical means have been investigated. Ingots of compositions Cu_{35}Ti _{65} and Cu_ {33.3}Ti_{66.7} were rapidly quenched into ribbons. The microstructure consisted largely of microcrystals in an amorphous matrix, which were either quenched in or grown by annealing. The ribbons were cold-rolled, which reduced their effective thickness by a factor of about 8. The status of the intermetallic compound CuTi_2 was monitored by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystals were found to amorphize as rolling progressed. This behavior was not reproduced in polycrystalline samples that had no amorphous matrix present initially. The presence of the amorphous phase is thus necessary for amorphization of the crystal: it eliminates the need to nucleate the new glass, and it prevents the ribbon from disintegrating at high deformation stages. It may also change the deformation mechanism that occurs in the crystals, retarding the onset of amorphization. Diffuse scattering in close-packed directions is similar to that seen in electron irradiation experiments. It is postulated that the chemical disorder present in antiphase boundaries caused by deformation raises the free energy of the crystal higher than that of the amorphous phase. Ingots of the same compound were worn against each other in a custom-built wear apparatus. The design eliminates iron contamination of the wear sample and requires relatively small quantities of material. Alteration of the surface structure was monitored by plane-view and cross -sectional TEM. Larger subsurface crystals exhibit diffuse scattering, similar to that found in the rolled samples. A wide range of grain sizes was observed, due to the inhomogeneous nature of the wear process. An unusual phase was observed at the surface, consisting of a nanometer-scale mixture of aligned nanocrystalline regions and disordered areas. Some amorphous phase is

  4. Chemical vapour deposition of nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, S E; Baryshnikova, M V; Filatov, L A; Shahmin, A L; Andreeva, V D

    2011-09-01

    Nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide is often considered as a promising nanomaterial for photocatalytic applications. Here we report the first results of a study of APCVD of N-doped TiO2 thin films prepared with the use of ammonia as a source of nitrogen and titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as a source of Ti and O atoms. The obtained films were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. It was found that the film growth rate in the TTIP-NH3-Ar reaction system varied insignificantly with substrate temperature in the range of 450,..., 750 degrees C and did not exceed 4.4 nm/min. Yellow and orange layers with nitrogen content of about 7.6% were formed at the deposition temperature higher than 600 degrees C. The results of the structure analysis of the deposited films showed that addition of ammonia led to stabilization of the amorphous phase in the films. The effect of ammonia on optical and photocatalytic properties was also considered. PMID:22097568

  5. Epidemiologic study of workers exposed to titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.L.; Fayerweather, W.E.

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether workers exposed to titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) had significantly higher risks of lung cancer, chronic respiratory disease, pleural thickening/plaques, or pulmonary fibrosis than referent groups. A total of 1,576 employees exposed to TiO/sub 2/ were observed from 1956 through 1985 for cancer and chronic respiratory disease incidence, and from 1935 through 1983 for mortality. A cross-sectional sample of 398 employees was evaluated for chest roentgenogram abnormalities. Cohort analyses suggested that the risks of developing lung cancer and other fatal respiratory diseases were no higher for TiO/sub 2/-exposed employees than for the referent groups. Nested case-control analyses found no statistically significant associations between TiO/sub 2/ exposure and risk of lung cancer, chronic respiratory disease, and chest roentgenogram abnormalities. No cases of pulmonary fibrosis were observed among TiO/sub 2/-exposed employees.

  6. Toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Czajka, Magdalena; Sawicki, Krzysztof; Sikorska, Katarzyna; Popek, Sylwia; Kruszewski, Marcin; Kapka-Skrzypczak, Lucyna

    2015-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have found many practical applications in industry and daily life. A widespread application of TiO2 NPs rises the question about safety of their use in the context of potential occupational, environmental and intentional exposure of humans and biota. TiO2 NPs easily enter the body through inhalation, cross blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the brain, especially in the cortex and hippocampus. Toxicity of these NPs and the molecular mechanisms of their action have been studied extensively in recent years. Studies showed that TiO2 NPs exposure resulted in microglia activation, reactive oxygen species production, activation of signaling pathways involved in inflammation and cell death, both in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, such action led to neuroinflammation, further brain injury. A spatial recognition memory and locomotor activity impairment has been also observed.

  7. Highly reliable spin-coated titanium dioxide dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sandip; Kumar, Arvind; Rao, K. S. R. Koteswara; Venkataraman, V.

    2016-05-01

    Dielectric degradation as low as 0.3 % has been observed for a highly reliable Titanium dioxide (TiO2) film after constant voltage stressing (CVS) with - 4 V for 105 second at room temperature (300 K). The film was fabricated by sol -gel spin - coating method on a lightly doped p-Si (~1015 cm-3) substrate. The equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) is 7 nm with a dielectric constant 33 (at 1 MHz). Metal - Oxide - Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors have been fabricated with an optimum annealing temperature of 800°C for one hour in a preheated furnace. The dielectric degradation is annealing temperature dependent. A degradation of 1.4 %, 1.2 % and 1.1 % has been observed for 400°C, 600°C and 1000°C temperature annealed MOS respectively. The dielectric degradation increases below or above the optimum temperature of annealing.

  8. Physical properties of epoxy resin/titanium dioxide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; More, Karren Leslie

    2011-01-01

    A polymeric nanocomposite system (nanodielectric) was fabricated, and its mechanical properties were determined. The fabricated nanocomposite was composed of low concentrations of monodispersed titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles and an epoxy resin specially designed for cryogenic applications. The monodispersed TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution of titanium chloride and polyethylene glycol and subsequently dispersed in a commercial-grade epoxy resin (Araldite{reg_sign} 5808). Nanocomposite thin sheets were prepared at several weight fractions of TiO{sub 2}. The morphology of the composites, determined by transmission electron microscopy, showed that the nanoparticles aggregated to form particle clusters. The influence of thermal processing and the effect of filler dispersion on the structure-property relationships were identified by differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis at a broad range of temperatures. The effect of the aggregates on the electrical insulation properties was determined by dielectric breakdown measurements. The optical properties of the nanocomposites and their potential use as filters in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) range were determined by UV-vis spectroscopy.

  9. Bioaccumulation of ionic titanium and titanium dioxide nanoparticles in zebrafish eleutheroembryos.

    PubMed

    López-Serrano Oliver, Ana; Muñoz-Olivas, Riansares; Sanz Landaluze, Jon; Rainieri, Sandra; Cámara, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The production of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2) NPs) for commercial applications has greatly increased over the last years and consequently the potential risk for human health. There is a growing awareness of the need to understand the behavior and influence these nanoparticles exert on the environment. Bioaccumulation serves as a good integrator to assess chemical exposure in aquatic systems and is dependent on factors, such as the exposure routes, diet and the aqueous medium. We analyzed the experimental bioaccumulation capability of ionic titanium and TiO(2) NPs by zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleutheroembryos through bioconcentration factors (BCFs), after 48 or 72 h of exposure. The stability of both chemical forms in an aquatic medium was fully characterized for further bioaccumulation studies. Several stabilizing agents (humic acids, soluble starch, polyethylene glycol, Na(4)P(2)O(7) and Na(2)HPO(4)) for anatase and rutile, the two allotrophs of TiO(2) NPs, were evaluated to check the evolution of the aggregation process. Around 60% of TiO(2) NPs remained disaggregated under simulated environmental conditions with the addition of 50 mg L(-1) of humic acids. However, the presence of eleutheroembryos in the exposure medium increased TiO(2) NPs aggregation in the experimental tests. The BCFs values obtained in all cases were <100, which classifies ionic titanium and TiO(2) NPs as non-bioaccumulative substances, under the REACH regulations.

  10. Rapid reduction of titanium dioxide nano-particles by reduction with a calcium reductant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Masumi; Matsuura, Shiki; Natsui, Shungo; Tsuji, Etsuji; Habazaki, Hiroki; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-09-01

    Micro-, submicron-, and nano-scale titanium dioxide particles were reduced by reduction with a metallic calcium reductant in calcium chloride molten salt at 1173 K, and the reduction mechanism of the oxides by the calcium reductant was explored. These oxide particles, metallic calcium as a reducing agent, and calcium chloride as a molten salt were placed in a titanium crucible and heated under an argon atmosphere. Titanium dioxide was reduced to metallic titanium through a calcium titanate and lower titanium oxide, and the materials were sintered together to form a micro-porous titanium structure in molten salt at high temperature. The reduction rate of titanium dioxide was observed to increase with decreasing particle size; accordingly, the residual oxygen content in the reduced titanium decreases. The obtained micro-porous titanium appeared dark gray in color because of its low surface reflection. Micro-porous metallic titanium with a low oxygen content (0.42 wt%) and a large surface area (1.794 m2 g-1) can be successfully obtained by reduction under optimal conditions.

  11. Titanium dioxide thin film deposited on flexible substrate by multi-jet electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Daihong; Yi, Wuming; Cao, Zhoubin; Gu, Wenhua

    2015-10-01

    Titanium dioxide thin film plays an important role in thin film solar cells, and has promising future in everyday applications including air cleaning and self-cleaning glass. With the concepts of flexible solar cells and wearable devices being more and more popular, there is increasing interest to coat titanium dioxide thin films on flexible substrates, such as aluminum foils. Many methods have been used to fabricate titanium dioxide thin films, such as dip-coating, spin coating, aerosol spray, plasma-assisted coating, electrospraying, and so on. Among them, electrospraying is especially suitable for thin film deposition on flexible substrates. This work reports fabrication of dense and uniform titanium dioxide thin films on glass as well as flexible aluminum foil using multi-jet electrospraying technique.

  12. Facile hydrothermal preparation of titanium dioxide decorated reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Betty Yea Sze; Huang, Nay Ming; An’amt, Mohd Nor; Marlinda, Abdul Rahman; Norazriena, Yusoff; Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat; Harrison, Ian; Lim, Hong Ngee; Chia, Chin Hua

    2012-01-01

    A simple single-stage approach, based on the hydrothermal technique, has been introduced to synthesize reduced graphene oxide/titanium dioxide nanocomposites. The titanium dioxide nanoparticles are formed at the same time as the graphene oxide is reduced to graphene. The triethanolamine used in the process has two roles. It acts as a reducing agent for the graphene oxide as well as a capping agent, allowing the formation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution (~20 nm). Transmission electron micrographs show that the nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the reduced graphene oxide nanosheet. Thermogravimetric analysis shows the nanocomposites have an enhanced thermal stability over the original components. The potential applications for this technology were demonstrated by the use of a reduced graphene oxide/titanium dioxide nanocomposite-modified glassy carbon electrode, which enhanced the electrochemical performance compared to a conventional glassy carbon electrode when interacting with mercury(II) ions in potassium chloride electrolyte. PMID:22848166

  13. Titanium-based zeolitic imidazolate framework for chemical fixation of carbon dioxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    A titanium-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (Ti-ZIF) with high surface area and porous morphology was synthesized and itsefficacy was demonstrated in the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide.

  14. Study on titanium foil coated with partial reduction titanium dioxide as bipolar lead-acid battery's substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Dianlong; Tang, Shenzhi; Zhu, Junsheng; Guo, Chenfeng

    2014-12-01

    Pure titanium foil cannot be directly as the substrate for the bipolar lead-acid battery due to its surface oxidized into titanium dioxide in the cell cycle. The poor electronic conductivity of titanium dioxide will increase substrate's ohmic resistance and can affect the cell's electrochemical performances. In this paper, titanium foil's surface is coated with a lay of partial reduction titanium dioxide (TiO2-x) which has excellent chemical stability and high electronic conductivity by means of sol-gel method. Through XRD, SEM and four-probe test, it shows that the modified titanium's surface has the most superior crystal structure and morphology and the highest electronic conductivity in the sintering temperature of 800 °C. We subsequently assemble bipolar lead-acid batteries with Ti coated by TiO2-x as the substrate material. The batteries are discovered that when charged and discharged in 3.5 V-4.84 V at 0.5C the voltage between the charge and discharge voltage platform is 0.3 V, and the initial discharge specific capacity can reach 80 mAh g-1. When the current rate is up to 1C and 2C, the initial discharge specific capacity is 70 mAh g-1and 60 mAh g-1. After 100 cycles, the initial specific capacity only decreases 12.5%.

  15. Liquid-solid transition of water confined in nanoporous titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Gang; Li, Chenxi; Hu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we performed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments to investigate the phase transition temperature and the molar enthalpy of the absorbed water confined in porous titanium dioxide. The porous titanium dioxide with three different pore size distribution and different filling fraction of the absorbed water were examined. We found that both the pore size of the examined samples and the filling fraction of the absorbed water affected the water’s phase transition temperature and its molar enthalpy.

  16. Photoinduced Electron Accumulation of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Modified Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kensho; Kurashina, Masaru; Kanezaki, Eiji

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (Nps) were prepared by the hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in 2-propanol with different water contents (0.5 vol% to 7.2 vol%) at 45 °C. The diameter of the Nps was estimated to be 1.5±0.5 nm (L-TiO2) and 3.0±0.6 nm (S-TiO2) from the onset wavelength in the absorption spectra and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A modified Pt electrode with a three-layered sandwich structure was prepared; the outermost and innermost layers were composed of S-TiO2 and L-TiO2, respectively, and the middle layer contained 1, 1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridyl (MV2+)/Nafion®. Irradiation by a 500 W superhigh-pressure mercury lamp produced electrons in the conduction band of TiO2. An anodic current was observed after turning off the light. The mechanism by which anodic current is generated after turning off the radiation involves the reduction of MV2+ to MV+. by photogenerated electrons on the Nps and the diffusion of MV+. in the middle layer. After turning off the irradiation, MV+. transferred an electron to the Pt electrode via holes in the innermost layer or the conduction band of S-TiO2 coincidentally localized on the Pt electrode, resulting in the generation of the anodic current. The generation of MV+. was confirmed by the absorption spectra of MV+.. As a sacrificial reagent, 2-propanol (0.1 M) was used.

  17. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO2 nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO2-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants. PMID:26927080

  18. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-02-26

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO₂ nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO₂-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants.

  19. Modification of titanium and titanium dioxide surfaces by ion implantation: Combined XPS and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Korotin, D. M.; Efremov, A. V.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Borchers, Ch.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Gunderov, D. V.; Valiev, R. Z.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2015-04-01

    The results of XPS measurements (core levels and valence bands) of P+, Ca+, P+Ca+ and Ca+P+ ion implanted (E=30 keV, D=1x1017 cm-2) commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations demonstrates formation of various structural defects in titanium dioxide films formed on the surface of implanted materials. We have found that for double implantation (Ti:P+,Ca+ and Ti:Ca+,P+) the outermost surface layer formed mainly by Ca and P, respectively, i.e. the implantation sequence is very important. The DFT calculations show that under P+ and Ca+P+ ion implantation the formation energies for both cation (P-Ti) and anion (P-O) substitutions are comparable which can induce the creation of [PO4]3- and Ti-P species. For Ca+ and P+Ca+-ion implantation the calculated formation energies correspond to Ca2+-Ti4+ cation substitution. This conclusion is in agreement with XPS Ca 2p and Ti 2p core levels and valence band measurements and DFT calculations of electronic structure of related compounds. The conversion of implanted ions to Ca2+ and [PO4]3- species provides a good biocompatibility of cp-Ti for further formation of hydroxyapatite.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of silicon, silicon dioxide, titanium and ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng

    Various silicon-based thin films (such as epitaxial, polycrystalline and amorphous silicon thin films, silicon dioxide thin films and silicon nitride thin films), titanium thin film and various ferroelectric thin films (such as BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin films) play critical roles in the manufacture of microelectronics circuits. For the past few years, there have been tremendous interests to search for cheap, safe and easy-to-use methods to develop those thin films with high quality and good step coverage. Silane is a critical chemical reagent widely used to deposit silicon-based thin films. Despite its wide use, silane is a dangerous material. It is pyrophoric, extremely flammable and may explode from heat, shock and/or friction. Because of the nature of silane, serious safety issues have been raised concerning the use, transportation, and storage of compressed gas cylinders of silane. Therefore it is desired to develop safer ways to deposit silicon-based films. In chapter III, I present the results of our research in the following fields: (1) Silane generator, (2) Substitutes of silane for deposition of silicon and silicon dioxide thin films, (3) Substitutes of silane for silicon dioxide thin film deposition. In chapter IV, hydropyridine is introduced as a new ligand for use in constructing precursors for chemical vapor deposition. Detachement of hydropyridine occurs by a low-temperature reaction leaving hydrogen in place of the hydropyridine ligands. Hydropyridine ligands can be attached to a variety of elements, including main group metals, such as aluminum and antimony, transition metals, such as titanium and tantalum, semiconductors such as silicon, and non-metals such as phosphorus and arsenic. In this study, hydropyridine-containing titanium compounds were synthesized and used as chemical vapor deposition precursors for deposition of titanium containing thin films. Some other titanium compounds were also studied for comparison. In chapter V, Chemical Vapor

  1. Carbon-coated rutile titanium dioxide derived from titanium-metal organic framework with enhanced sodium storage behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Guoqiang; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chao; Huang, Zhaodong; Li, Simin; Liao, Hanxiao; Wang, Jufeng; Ji, Xiaobo

    2016-09-01

    Carbon-coated rutile titanium dioxide (CRT) was fabricated through an in-situ pyrolysis of titanium-based metal organic framework (Ti8O8(OH)4[O2CC6H4CO2]6) crystals. Benefiting from the Tisbnd Osbnd C skeleton structure of titanium-based metal organic framework, the CRT possesses abundant channels and micro/mesopores with the diameters ranging from 1.06 to 4.14 nm, shows larger specific surface area (245 m2 g-1) and better electronic conductivity compared with pure titanium dioxide (12.8 m2 g-1). When applied as anode material for sodium-ion batteries, the CRT electrode exhibits a high cycling performance with a reversible capacity of ∼175 mAh g-1 at 0.5 C-rate after 200 cycles, and obtains an excellent rate capability of ∼70 mAh g-1 after 2000 cycles even at a specific current of 3360 mA g-1(20 C-rate). The outstanding rate capability can be attributed to the carbon-coated structure, which may effectively prevent aggregation of the titanium dioxide nanoparticles, accelerate the mass transfer of Na+ and speed up the charge transfer rate. Considering these advantages of this particular framework structure, the CRT can serve as an alternative anode material for the industrial application of SIBs.

  2. Characterization of electroforming-free titanium dioxide memristors

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, John Paul; Yang, J Joshua; Montoro, L A; Ospina, C A; Kilcoyne, A L D; Medeiros-Ribeiro, Gilberto

    2013-01-01

    Summary Metal–insulator–metal (MIM) structures based on titanium dioxide have demonstrated reversible and non-volatile resistance-switching behavior and have been identified with the concept of the memristor. Microphysical studies suggest that the development of sub-oxide phases in the material drives the resistance changes. The creation of these phases, however, has a number of negative effects such as requiring an elevated voltage, increasing the device-to-device variability, damaging the electrodes due to oxygen evolution, and ultimately limiting the device lifetime. In this work we show that the deliberate inclusion of a sub-oxide layer in the MIM structure maintains the favorable switching properties of the device, while eliminating many of the negative effects. Electrical and microphysical characterization of the resulting structures was performed, utilizing X-ray and electron spectroscopy and microscopy. In contrast to structures which are not engineered with a sub-oxide layer, we observed dramatically reduced microphysical changes after electrical operation. PMID:23946916

  3. Digital Printing of Titanium Dioxide for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cherrington, Ruth; Wood, Benjamin Michael; Salaoru, Iulia; Goodship, Vannessa

    2016-05-04

    Silicon solar cell manufacturing is an expensive and high energy consuming process. In contrast, dye sensitized solar cell production is less environmentally damaging with lower processing temperatures presenting a viable and low cost alternative to conventional production. This paper further enhances these environmental credentials by evaluating the digital printing and therefore additive production route for these cells. This is achieved here by investigating the formation and performance of a metal oxide photoelectrode using nanoparticle sized titanium dioxide. An ink-jettable material was formulated, characterized and printed with a piezoelectric inkjet head to produce a 2.6 µm thick layer. The resultant printed layer was fabricated into a functioning cell with an active area of 0.25 cm(2) and a power conversion efficiency of 3.5%. The binder-free formulation resulted in a reduced processing temperature of 250 °C, compatible with flexible polyamide substrates which are stable up to temperatures of 350 ˚C. The authors are continuing to develop this process route by investigating inkjet printing of other layers within dye sensitized solar cells.

  4. Investigation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles toxicity and uptake by plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, C.; Khodja, H.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Brisset, F.; Flank, A. M.; Fayard, B.; Chaillou, S.; Carrière, M.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) are introduced in a growing number of commercial products and their production may lead to their release in the environment. Plants may be a potential entry point for NP in the food chain. Up to now, results describing NP phytotoxical effects and plant accumulation are scarce and contradictory. To increase knowledge on titanium dioxide NP (TiO2-NPs) accumulation and impact on plants, we designed a study on three plant species, namely wheat (Triticum aestivum), oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and Arabidopsis thaliana. These plants were exposed in hydroponics to a panel of well-characterized TiO2-NPs, with diameters ranging from 12 to 140 nm, either anatase or rutile. Their accumulation in plant tissues is currently being assessed by complementary imaging techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-μ-XRF) imaging and micro-particle induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) imaging. Moreover, the impact of TiO2-NP exposure on germination rate, root elongation, dry biomass and evapotranspiration is evaluated. Preliminary results are presented here, with data collected on wheat plants exposed to 12 nm and 25 nm anatase TiO2-NPs. These results show that TiO2-NPs are taken up by plants, and do not significantly alter their germination and root elongation. These results underline the necessity of deeper evaluation of nanoparticle ecotoxicity, and particularly on their interaction with plants.

  5. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles produce phototoxicity in the developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bar-Ilan, Ofek; Louis, Kacie M; Yang, Sarah P; Pedersen, Joel A; Hamers, Robert J; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2012-09-01

    Exposure of humans and other organisms to nanomaterials is increasing exponentially. It is important, but difficult, to predict the biological consequences of these exposures. We hypothesized that the unique chemical properties that make nanoparticles useful might also be the key in predicting their biological impact. To investigate this, we chose titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2)NPs) and developing zebrafish embryos as model systems. TiO(2)NPs absorb photons to generate electron-hole pairs that react with water and oxygen to form cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we show that the exposure of zebrafish embryos to TiO(2)NPs produces malformation and death, but only if the fish are also illuminated. TiO(2)NPs are taken up into the developing fish, but the egg chorion is a barrier to uptake until the embryos hatch. Chemical probes and a transgenic reporter line confirm photo-dependent production of ROS in vivo, and the addition of an ROS scavenger rescues fish embryos from toxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show a photo-dependent toxic response in a whole organism from exposure to TiO(2)NPs. Of further significance, our study highlights the relationship between the property of the material that makes it useful and the biological effect that is produced. This concept should serve as a guide for future nanotoxicological studies aiming to identify potential hazardous effects on organisms.

  6. Digital Printing of Titanium Dioxide for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cherrington, Ruth; Wood, Benjamin Michael; Salaoru, Iulia; Goodship, Vannessa

    2016-01-01

    Silicon solar cell manufacturing is an expensive and high energy consuming process. In contrast, dye sensitized solar cell production is less environmentally damaging with lower processing temperatures presenting a viable and low cost alternative to conventional production. This paper further enhances these environmental credentials by evaluating the digital printing and therefore additive production route for these cells. This is achieved here by investigating the formation and performance of a metal oxide photoelectrode using nanoparticle sized titanium dioxide. An ink-jettable material was formulated, characterized and printed with a piezoelectric inkjet head to produce a 2.6 µm thick layer. The resultant printed layer was fabricated into a functioning cell with an active area of 0.25 cm(2) and a power conversion efficiency of 3.5%. The binder-free formulation resulted in a reduced processing temperature of 250 °C, compatible with flexible polyamide substrates which are stable up to temperatures of 350 ˚C. The authors are continuing to develop this process route by investigating inkjet printing of other layers within dye sensitized solar cells. PMID:27166761

  7. Titanium-dioxide nanotube p-n homojunction diode

    SciTech Connect

    Alivov, Yahya E-mail: pnagpal@colorado.edu; Ding, Yuchen; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant E-mail: pnagpal@colorado.edu

    2014-12-29

    Application of semiconductors in functional optoelectronic devices requires precise control over their doping and formation of junction between p- and n-doped semiconductors. While doped thin films have led to several semiconductor devices, need for high-surface area nanostructured devices for photovoltaic, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic applications has been hindered by lack of desired doping in nanostructures. Here, we show titanium-dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotubes doped with nitrogen (N) and niobium (Nb) as acceptors and donors, respectively, and formation of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes p-n homojunction. This TiO{sub 2}:N/TiO{sub 2}:Nb homojunction showed distinct diode-like behaviour with rectification ratio of 1115 at ±5 V and exhibited good photoresponse for ultraviolet light (λ = 365 nm) with sensitivity of 0.19 A/W at reverse bias of −5 V. These results can have important implications for development of nanostructured metal-oxide solar-cells, photodiodes, LED's, photocatalysts, and photoelectrochemical devices.

  8. Simple and fast annealing synthesis of titanium dioxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hansoo; Park, Jongbok; Ryu, Yeontack; Yu, Choongho

    2010-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been intensively studied due to its useful applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells and electrodes in lithium ion batteries. In this study diverse TiO2 nanostructures were synthesized by a simplified synthetic method. Since it does not require a high reaction temperature or complicated processes it can be useful for producing a large quantity of TiO2 nanomaterials at very low temperatures. Crucial synthesis conditions such as eutectic catalyst (copper), growth temperatures, and annealing time were systematically investigated. Only 30 minutes annealing at 850 ^oC was enough to produce densely-packed ˜ 10 μm long nanowires (˜ 100 nm diameter), and a longer reaction time changed morphology from wires to belts. The nanostructures were identified to be rutile structure with the 110 growth direction by x-ray and electron diffraction. Our simple but effective method can be utilized for other metal oxide nanowires, especially with materials of a high melting temperature. )

  9. Toxicological Characteristics of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xuhong; Xie, Yanxin; Wu, Jianru; Tang, Meng; Wang, Bei

    2015-02-01

    In an effort to examine liver, heart and kidney injury, immune response, and other physiological effect in rats caused by intratracheal instillation of nano titanium dioxide (TiO2) for 28 days, we assessed T lymphocytes counts, hematological indices, biochemical parameters, cytokines assay and histopathological changes in nano TiO2 treated rats. Indeed, rats treated with nano TiO2 displayed a reduction in body weight and coefficients of the hearts. Edema and loose cytoplasm on liver cells were found in nano groups. The results showed that a statistically significant increased in the BUN, HTC and AST levels than those in control group. Our data suggested that the immunologically competent cells of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ caused by nano TiO2 32 mg/kg group were significantly lower than control group. The ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ from the nano 32 mg/kg group was significantly increased and showed a disturbance of cellular immune function. But ELISA analysis showed that no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 were observed throughout the experimental period in this study. PMID:26353623

  10. Cubic titanium dioxide photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Jinho; Kang, Misook

    Following from the recently evolved concept of significantly improving the photovoltaic efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) by reducing the loss of electrons on the spherical surface of titanium dioxide, this study examines the synthesis of cubic TiO 2 with a special morphology to overcome this electron loss and investigates its application to DSSCs. Cubic TiO 2 is synthesized by an advanced rapid hydrothermal method, with the addition of an amine species additive. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirm the cubic shape of the TiO 2 particles with a diameter less than 5-10 nm. Using N719 dye under illumination with 100 mW cm -2 simulated sunlight, the application of cubic TiO 2 to DSSCs affords an energy conversion efficiency of approximately 9.77% (4.0-μm thick TiO 2 film), which is considerably enhanced compared with that achieved using a commercial, spherical TiO 2. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and impedance analyses reveal that the electrons are transferred more rapidly to the surface of a cubic TiO 2 film than on a spherical TiO 2 film.

  11. Biosensing applications of titanium dioxide coated graphene modified disposable electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kuralay, Filiz; Tunç, Selma; Bozduman, Ferhat; Oksuz, Lutfi; Oksuz, Aysegul Uygun

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, preparation of titanium dioxide coated graphene (TiO2/graphene) and the use of this nanocomposite modified electrode for electrochemical biosensing applications were detailed. The nanocomposite was prepared with radio frequency (rf) rotating plasma method which serves homogeneous distribution of TiO2 onto graphene. TiO2/graphene was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Then, this nanocomposite was dissolved in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) and modified onto disposable pencil graphite electrode (PGE) by dip coating for the investigation of the biosensing properties of the prepared electrode. TiO2/graphene modified PGE was characterized with SEM, EDS and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The sensor properties of the obtained surface were examined for DNA and DNA-drug interaction. The detection limit was calculated as 1.25mgL(-1) (n=3) for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). RSD% was calculated as 2.4% for three successive determinations at 5mgL(-1) dsDNA concentration. Enhanced results were obtained compared to the ones obtained with graphene and unmodified (bare) electrodes. PMID:27591620

  12. Photocatalytic oxidation of cadmium-EDTA with titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.P.; Green, D.L.

    1999-02-15

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) forms stable complexes with toxic metals such as cadmium. Metal-EDTA chelates are chemically stable and occur in a number of waste situations. The viability of using photocatalytic oxidation with titanium dioxide to degrade Cd-EDTA was examined at concentrations from 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup {minus}3} M at pH from 3 to 8. Initially a portion of the complex was adsorbed onto the TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst at low pH. However, independent of the degree of initial adsorption, Cd-EDTA was rapidly destroyed with little dependence on pH. Concurrently, in most cases cadmium was liberated as Cd{sup 2+} with no affiliation with organic reaction products; its fate depended on suspension pH. At low pH, Cd{sub aq}{sup 2+} was released into solution. Also, organic carbon was released into solution as oxidation of adsorbed EDTA occurred. At higher pH the Cd was adsorbed onto the TiO{sub 2} at adsorption equilibrium levels. Major products detected include formaldehyde, formic acid, and acetic acid. Nitrate and glyoxylic, malonic, and oxalic acids were detected, but concentrations were low. The incomplete carbon balance and the lack of nitrate production suggest the production of organic amines from the degradation of Cd-EDTA. Release of the Cd as Cd{sup 2+} occurs after mineralization of only about half of the organic carbon.

  13. INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT TREATMENT USING IONIZING RADIATION COMBINED TO TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, C.L.; Oikawa, H.; Mori, M.N.; Sampa, M.H.O.

    2004-10-04

    The Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) with OH radicals are the most efficient to mineralize organic compounds, and there are various methods to generate OH radicals as the use of ozone, hydrogen peroxide and ultra-violet radiation and ionizing radiation. The irradiation of aqueous solutions with high-energy electrons results in the excitation and ionizing of the molecules and rapid (10{sup -14} - 10{sup -9} s) formation of reactive intermediates. These reactive species will react with organic compounds present in industrial effluent inducing their decomposition. Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) catalyzed photoreaction is used to remove a wide range of pollutants in air and water media, combined to UV/VIS light, FeO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, but as far as known there is no report on the combination with ionizing radiation. In some recent studies, the removal of organic pollutants in industrial effluent, such as Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene from petroleum production using ionizing radiation was investigated. It has been ob served that none of the methods can be used individually in wastewater treatment applications with good economics and high degree of energy efficiency. In the present work, the efficiency of ionizing radiation in presence of TiO{sub 2} to treat industrial effluent was evaluated. The main aim to combine these technologies is to improve the efficiency for very hard effluents and to reduce the processing cost for future implementation to large-scale design.

  14. Characterization of titanium dioxide: Factors affecting photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Presley, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    Titanium dioxide is being evaluated as a photocatalyst in the destruction of contaminants in aqueous waste streams. Commercial samples of TiO{sub 2} powder have been obtained for base line studies of the photocatalytic destruction of salicylic acid standards. These commercial samples have been prepared by flame hydrolysis and aerosol or spray pyrolysis. Additional samples of TiO{sub 2} have been prepared in house by precipitation from TiCl{sub 4} in aqueous solution, some with the addition of dopants. X-ray powder diffraction data analysis indicates the predominate phase of these commercial and prepared powders to be anatase. A minor amount of the rutile crystalline phase of TiO{sub 2} was observed at various levels in some of these catalysts. The broadness of the x-ray diffraction bands varied among the samples analyzed and indicated the primary particle size to be within the 500 to 1,000 angstrom range with the product produced in house having the smallest crystallite size. Experiments were then performed to assess the photocatalytic performance of these various types of catalyst in the destruction of 30 ppm salicylic acid in deionized water.

  15. Kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation of organic solutes over titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.W.

    1988-06-01

    The kinetics of photooxidation to CO/sub 2/ of 22 organic solutes over a UV illuminated film of Degussa P25 titanium dioxide have been studied over a 100-fold concentration range for each solute, generally from about 1 to 100 mg/liter. The dependence of the photooxidation rate on concentration obeyed a simple two-coefficient Langmuir expression for each solute. The coefficients reflecting the degree of adsorption on the TiO/sub 2/ and the limiting rate at high concentrations enable the prediction of photocatalytic rates in any TiO/sub 2/-based photoreactor of a similar type once a reference rate has been determined for one of the solutes. A reaction mechanism is proposed for the oxidation of aromatic compounds involving peroxyhydroxycyclohexadienyl- and mucondialdehyde-type compounds as important intermediates. The solutes studied were benzoic acid, salicylic acid, phenol, biphthalate, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, monochlorobenzene, nitrobenzene, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, 2-propanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, acetic acid, formic acid, sucrose, 2-naphthol, umbelliferone, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and dichloroethane.

  16. Effects of boric acid and borax on titanium dioxide genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Turkez, Hasan

    2008-07-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) is a potential carcinogenic/mutagenic agent although it is used in many areas including medical industries and cosmetics. Boron (as boric acid and borax) has also well-described biological effects and therapeutic benefits. In a previous study, sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and micronuclei (MN) rates were assessed in control and TiO(2)-treated (1, 2, 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) human whole blood cultures. The results showed that the rates of SCE (at 2, 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) and MN (at 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) formation in peripheral lymphocytes were increased significantly by TiO(2) compared with the controls. The present study also investigated the genetic effects of boric acid and borax (2.5, 5 and 10 microm) on cultures with and without TiO(2) addition. No significant increase in SCE and MN frequencies were observed at all concentrations of boron compounds. However, TiO(2)-induced SCE and MN could be reduced significantly by the presence of boric acid and borax. In conclusion, this study indicated for the first time that boric acid and borax led to an increased resistance of DNA to damage induced by TiO(2).

  17. Photocatalytically active titanium dioxide nanopowders: Synthesis, photoactivity and magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkanen, J.-P.; Heinonen, S.; Huttunen Saarivirta, E.; Honkanen, M.; Levänen, E.

    2013-12-01

    Two approaches were used to obtain nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst powders. Firstly, low-temperature synthesis method and secondly liquid flame spraying. The structural properties of the produced powders were determined with X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption tests. The photocatalytic properties of the powders were studied with methylene blue (MB) discoloration tests. After discolorations tests, TiO2 was coagulated with magnetite particles using FeCl3·6 H2O at a fixed pH value. Magnetic separation of coagulated TiO2 and magnetite was carried out by a permanent magnet. The obtained results showed that the particle size of the powders synthesized at low-temperature was very small and the specific surface area high. The phase content of the powder was also shown to depend greatly on the acidity of the synthesis solution. Powder synthesized by liquid flame spraying was mixture of anatase and rutile phases with essentially larger particle size and lower specific surface area than those of low-temperature synthesized powders. The MB discoloration test showed that photocatalytic activity depends on the phase structure as well as the specific surface area of the synthesized TiO2 powder. The magnetic separation of TiO2-magnetite coagulate from solution proved to be efficient around pH:8.

  18. Digital Printing of Titanium Dioxide for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cherrington, Ruth; Wood, Benjamin Michael; Salaoru, Iulia; Goodship, Vannessa

    2016-01-01

    Silicon solar cell manufacturing is an expensive and high energy consuming process. In contrast, dye sensitized solar cell production is less environmentally damaging with lower processing temperatures presenting a viable and low cost alternative to conventional production. This paper further enhances these environmental credentials by evaluating the digital printing and therefore additive production route for these cells. This is achieved here by investigating the formation and performance of a metal oxide photoelectrode using nanoparticle sized titanium dioxide. An ink-jettable material was formulated, characterized and printed with a piezoelectric inkjet head to produce a 2.6 µm thick layer. The resultant printed layer was fabricated into a functioning cell with an active area of 0.25 cm2 and a power conversion efficiency of 3.5%. The binder-free formulation resulted in a reduced processing temperature of 250 °C, compatible with flexible polyamide substrates which are stable up to temperatures of 350 ˚C. The authors are continuing to develop this process route by investigating inkjet printing of other layers within dye sensitized solar cells. PMID:27166761

  19. The photocatalytic and cytotoxic effects of titanium dioxide particles used in sunscreen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampaul, Ashti

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are used in sunscreens to reflect UV radiation from the skin. However, titanium dioxide as anatase and rutile crystal forms is a well-known photocatalyst. The nanoparticles are surface coated with inert inorganic oxides such as silica and alumina or organics such as organosilanes or silicone polymers and more recently, have been doped with manganese oxide. These modifications to the titanium dioxide particles are purported to prevent the production of harmful reactive oxygen species. A range of sunscreens was tested with crystal form and modification type identified via XRD, Raman Spectroscopy, XPS and SSNMR. The particle modification and crystal form determined whether the particles were inert or rapidly degraded methylene blue dye, and killed or protected cultured human epithelium cells. Novel solid state Electron Paramagnetic Resonance analysis showed that the greatest amount of superoxide anions was formed during UVA irradiation of the mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms coated with an organosilane. These particles also degraded methylene blue at a similar rate to Degussa P25, a standard uncoated titanium dioxide powder and produced an increase in UVA induced apoptosis of human keratinocytes. Double Stranded Breaks were observed extensively in cells exposed to UVA irradiated mixed anatase and rutile titanium dioxide with organosilane. A new apoptotic-like cell death mechanism may have been recognised during the UVA irradiation of animal and human cells in the presence of titanium dioxide. This research concludes that mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms of titanium dioxide coated with organosilane or dimethicone may not be safe to use in sunscreen lotions. A less harmful alternative for sunscreen formulations is the manganese doped rutile particles or the alumina coated rutile powders, both of which exhibited a protective effect on cultured epithelial cells.

  20. Enhancement in the photocatalytic nature of nitrogen-doped PVD-grown titanium dioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Tavares, C. J.; Marques, S. M.; Viseu, T.; Teixeira, V.; Carneiro, J. O.; Alves, E.; Barradas, N. P.; Munnik, F.; Girardeau, T.; Riviere, J.-P.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide semiconductor photocatalytic thin films have been deposited by unbalanced reactive magnetron physical vapor deposition on glass substrates for self-cleaning applications. In order to increase the photocatalytic efficiency of the titania coatings, it is important to enhance the catalysts absorption of light from the solar spectra. Bearing this fact in mind, a reduction in the titania semiconductor band-gap has been attempted by using nitrogen doping from a coreactive gas mixture of N{sub 2}:O{sub 2} during the titanium sputtering process. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy was used in order to assess the composition of the titania thin films, whereas heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis granted the evaluation of the doping level of nitrogen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provided valuable information about the cation-anion binding within the semiconductor lattice. The as-deposited thin films were mostly amorphous, however, after a thermal annealing in vacuum at 500 deg. C the crystalline polymorph anatase and rutile phases have been developed, yielding an enhancement in the crystallinity. Spectroscopic ellipsometry experiments enabled the determination the refractive index of the thin films as a function of the wavelength, while from the optical transmittance it was possible to estimate the semiconductor indirect band-gap of these coatings, which has been proven to decrease as the N-doping increases. The photocatalytic performance of the titania films has been characterized by the degradation rate of an organic reactive dye under UV/visible irradiation. It has been found that for a certain critical limit of 1.19 at. % of nitrogen doping in the titania anatase crystalline lattice enhances the photocatalytic behavior of the thin films and it is in accordance with the observed semiconductor band-gap narrowing to 3.18 eV. By doping the titania lattice with nitrogen, the photocatalytic activity is enhanced under both UV and

  1. Trojan-Like Internalization of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles by Human Osteoblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A R; Gemini-Piperni, S; Travassos, R; Lemgruber, L; Silva, R C; Rossi, A L; Farina, M; Anselme, K; Shokuhfar, T; Shahbazian-Yassar, R; Borojevic, R; Rocha, L A; Werckmann, J; Granjeiro, J M

    2016-01-01

    Dentistry and orthopedics are undergoing a revolution in order to provide more reliable, comfortable and long-lasting implants to patients. Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys have been used in dental implants and total hip arthroplasty due to their excellent biocompatibility. However, Ti-based implants in human body suffer surface degradation (corrosion and wear) resulting in the release of metallic ions and solid wear debris (mainly titanium dioxide) leading to peri-implant inflammatory reactions. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the biological interactions with titanium dioxide nanoparticles is still very limited. Taking this into consideration, this study focuses on the internalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on primary bone cells, exploring the events occurring at the nano-bio interface. For the first time, we report the selective binding of calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P) and proteins from cell culture medium to anatase nanoparticles that are extremely important for nanoparticle internalization and bone cells survival. In the intricate biological environment, anatase nanoparticles form bio-complexes (mixture of proteins and ions) which act as a kind of 'Trojan-horse' internalization by cells. Furthermore, anatase nanoparticles-induced modifications on cell behavior (viability and internalization) could be understand in detail. The results presented in this report can inspire new strategies for the use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in several regeneration therapies. PMID:27021687

  2. Trojan-Like Internalization of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles by Human Osteoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, A. R.; Gemini-Piperni, S.; Travassos, R.; Lemgruber, L.; C. Silva, R.; Rossi, A. L.; Farina, M.; Anselme, K.; Shokuhfar, T.; Shahbazian-Yassar, R.; Borojevic, R.; Rocha, L. A.; Werckmann, J.; Granjeiro, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dentistry and orthopedics are undergoing a revolution in order to provide more reliable, comfortable and long-lasting implants to patients. Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys have been used in dental implants and total hip arthroplasty due to their excellent biocompatibility. However, Ti-based implants in human body suffer surface degradation (corrosion and wear) resulting in the release of metallic ions and solid wear debris (mainly titanium dioxide) leading to peri-implant inflammatory reactions. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the biological interactions with titanium dioxide nanoparticles is still very limited. Taking this into consideration, this study focuses on the internalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on primary bone cells, exploring the events occurring at the nano-bio interface. For the first time, we report the selective binding of calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P) and proteins from cell culture medium to anatase nanoparticles that are extremely important for nanoparticle internalization and bone cells survival. In the intricate biological environment, anatase nanoparticles form bio-complexes (mixture of proteins and ions) which act as a kind of ‘Trojan-horse’ internalization by cells. Furthermore, anatase nanoparticles-induced modifications on cell behavior (viability and internalization) could be understand in detail. The results presented in this report can inspire new strategies for the use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in several regeneration therapies. PMID:27021687

  3. Trojan-Like Internalization of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles by Human Osteoblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A R; Gemini-Piperni, S; Travassos, R; Lemgruber, L; Silva, R C; Rossi, A L; Farina, M; Anselme, K; Shokuhfar, T; Shahbazian-Yassar, R; Borojevic, R; Rocha, L A; Werckmann, J; Granjeiro, J M

    2016-03-29

    Dentistry and orthopedics are undergoing a revolution in order to provide more reliable, comfortable and long-lasting implants to patients. Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys have been used in dental implants and total hip arthroplasty due to their excellent biocompatibility. However, Ti-based implants in human body suffer surface degradation (corrosion and wear) resulting in the release of metallic ions and solid wear debris (mainly titanium dioxide) leading to peri-implant inflammatory reactions. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the biological interactions with titanium dioxide nanoparticles is still very limited. Taking this into consideration, this study focuses on the internalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on primary bone cells, exploring the events occurring at the nano-bio interface. For the first time, we report the selective binding of calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P) and proteins from cell culture medium to anatase nanoparticles that are extremely important for nanoparticle internalization and bone cells survival. In the intricate biological environment, anatase nanoparticles form bio-complexes (mixture of proteins and ions) which act as a kind of 'Trojan-horse' internalization by cells. Furthermore, anatase nanoparticles-induced modifications on cell behavior (viability and internalization) could be understand in detail. The results presented in this report can inspire new strategies for the use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in several regeneration therapies.

  4. Trojan-Like Internalization of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles by Human Osteoblast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A. R.; Gemini-Piperni, S.; Travassos, R.; Lemgruber, L.; C. Silva, R.; Rossi, A. L.; Farina, M.; Anselme, K.; Shokuhfar, T.; Shahbazian-Yassar, R.; Borojevic, R.; Rocha, L. A.; Werckmann, J.; Granjeiro, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    Dentistry and orthopedics are undergoing a revolution in order to provide more reliable, comfortable and long-lasting implants to patients. Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys have been used in dental implants and total hip arthroplasty due to their excellent biocompatibility. However, Ti-based implants in human body suffer surface degradation (corrosion and wear) resulting in the release of metallic ions and solid wear debris (mainly titanium dioxide) leading to peri-implant inflammatory reactions. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the biological interactions with titanium dioxide nanoparticles is still very limited. Taking this into consideration, this study focuses on the internalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on primary bone cells, exploring the events occurring at the nano-bio interface. For the first time, we report the selective binding of calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P) and proteins from cell culture medium to anatase nanoparticles that are extremely important for nanoparticle internalization and bone cells survival. In the intricate biological environment, anatase nanoparticles form bio-complexes (mixture of proteins and ions) which act as a kind of ‘Trojan-horse’ internalization by cells. Furthermore, anatase nanoparticles-induced modifications on cell behavior (viability and internalization) could be understand in detail. The results presented in this report can inspire new strategies for the use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in several regeneration therapies.

  5. A review on potential neurotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bin; Liu, Jia; Feng, Xiaoli; Wei, Limin; Shao, Longquan

    2015-08-01

    As the rapid development of nanotechnology in the past three decades, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), for their peculiar physicochemical properties, are widely applied in consumer products, food additives, cosmetics, drug carriers, and so on. However, little is known about their potential exposure and neurotoxic effects. Once NPs are unintentionally exposed to human beings, they could be absorbed, and then accumulated in the brain regions by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or through the nose-to-brain pathway, potentially leading to dysfunctions of central nerve system (CNS). Besides, NPs may affect the brain development of embryo by crossing the placental barrier. A few in vivo and in vitro researches have demonstrated that the morphology and function of neuronal or glial cells could be impaired by TiO2 NPs which might induce cell necrosis. Cellular components, such as mitochondrial, lysosome, and cytoskeleton, could also be influenced as well. The recognition ability, spatial memory, and learning ability of TiO2 NPs-treated rodents were significantly impaired, which meant that accumulation of TiO2 NPs in the brain could lead to neurodegeneration. However, conclusions obtained from those studies were not consistent with each other as researchers may choose different experimental parameters, including administration ways, dosage, size, and crystal structure of TiO2 NPs. Therefore, in order to fully understand the potential risks of TiO2 NPs to brain health, figure out research areas where further studies are required, and improve its bio-safety for applications in the near future, how TiO2 NPs interact with the brain is investigated in this review by summarizing the current researches on neurotoxicity induced by TiO2 NPs.

  6. Removal of arsenic from groundwater by granular titanium dioxide adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Bang, Sunbaek; Patel, Manish; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2005-07-01

    A novel granular titanium dioxide (TiO2) was evaluated for the removal of arsenic from groundwater. Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent and the effect of anions on arsenic removal. Batch experimental results showed that more arsenate [As(V)] was adsorbed on TiO2 than arsenite [As(III)] in US groundwater at pH 7.0. The adsorption capacities for As(V) and As(III) were 41.4 and 32.4 mgg(-1) TiO2, respectively. However, the adsorbent had a similar adsorption capacity for As(V) and As(III) (approximately 40 mgg(-1)) when simulated Bangladesh groundwater was used. Silica (20 mgl(-1)) and phosphate (5.8 mgl(-1)) had no obvious effect on the removal of As(V) and As(III) by TiO2 at neutral pH. Point-of-entry (POE) filters containing 3 l of the granular adsorbent were tested for the removal of arsenic from groundwater in central New Jersey, USA. Groundwater was continuously passed through the filters at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 3 min. Approximately 45,000 bed volumes of groundwater containing an average of 39 microgl(-1) of As(V) was treated by the POE filter before the effluent arsenic concentration increased to 10 microgl(-1). The total treated water volumes per weight of adsorbent were about 60,000 l per 1 kg of adsorbent. The field filtration results demonstrated that the granular TiO2 adsorbent was very effective for the removal of arsenic in groundwater. PMID:15924958

  7. Titanium dioxide in our everyday life; is it safe?

    PubMed Central

    Skocaj, Matej; Filipic, Metka; Petkovic, Jana; Novak, Sasa

    2011-01-01

    Background Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is considered as an inert and safe material and has been used in many applications for decades. However, with the development of nanotechnologies TiO2 nanoparticles, with numerous novel and useful properties, are increasingly manufactured and used. Therefore increased human and environmental exposure can be expected, which has put TiO2 nanoparticles under toxicological scrutiny. Mechanistic toxicological studies show that TiO2 nanoparticles predominantly cause adverse effects via induction of oxidative stress resulting in cell damage, genotoxicity, inflammation, immune response etc. The extent and type of damage strongly depends on physical and chemical characteristics of TiO2 nanoparticles, which govern their bioavailability and reactivity. Based on the experimental evidence from animal inhalation studies TiO2 nanoparticles are classified as “possible carcinogenic to humans” by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and as occupational carcinogen by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The studies on dermal exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles, which is in humans substantial through the use of sunscreens, generally indicate negligible transdermal penetration; however data are needed on long-term exposure and potential adverse effects of photo-oxidation products. Although TiO2 is permitted as an additive (E171) in food and pharmaceutical products we do not have reliable data on its absorption, distribution, excretion and toxicity on oral exposure. TiO2 may also enter environment, and while it exerts low acute toxicity to aquatic organisms, upon long-term exposure it induces a range of sub-lethal effects. Conclusions Until relevant toxicological and human exposure data that would enable reliable risk assessment are obtained, TiO2 nanoparticles should be used with great care. PMID:22933961

  8. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: a review of current toxicological data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) are manufactured worldwide in large quantities for use in a wide range of applications. TiO2 NPs possess different physicochemical properties compared to their fine particle (FP) analogs, which might alter their bioactivity. Most of the literature cited here has focused on the respiratory system, showing the importance of inhalation as the primary route for TiO2 NP exposure in the workplace. TiO2 NPs may translocate to systemic organs from the lung and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) although the rate of translocation appears low. There have also been studies focusing on other potential routes of human exposure. Oral exposure mainly occurs through food products containing TiO2 NP-additives. Most dermal exposure studies, whether in vivo or in vitro, report that TiO2 NPs do not penetrate the stratum corneum (SC). In the field of nanomedicine, intravenous injection can deliver TiO2 nanoparticulate carriers directly into the human body. Upon intravenous exposure, TiO2 NPs can induce pathological lesions of the liver, spleen, kidneys, and brain. We have also shown here that most of these effects may be due to the use of very high doses of TiO2 NPs. There is also an enormous lack of epidemiological data regarding TiO2 NPs in spite of its increased production and use. However, long-term inhalation studies in rats have reported lung tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the toxicology of TiO2 NPs and points out areas where further information is needed. PMID:23587290

  9. Strength and tribology of bulk and electroformed nickel amorphized by implantation of titanium and carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Dugger, M.T.; Christenson, T.R.

    1997-10-01

    Dual ion implantation of titanium and carbon was shown to produce an amorphous layer of exceptional strength within annealed bulk Ni and electroformed Ni and Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} materials used in micro-electromechanical systems. The intrinsic elastic and plastic mechanical properties of the implanted region were quantified using nanoindentation testing in conjunction with finite-element modeling, and the results were interpreted in the light of microstructures observed by electron microscopy. The implantation treatment was found to produce substantial reductions in unlubricated friction and wear.

  10. Infrared Spectroscopic Evidence of Surface Speciation of Amino Acids on Titanium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, C. M.; Jonsson, C. L.; Parikh, S. J.; Sverjensky, D. A.; Cleaves, H. J.; Hazen, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Interactions that occur at the interface between molecules and mineral surfaces in the presence of water are integral to many chemical and physical processes, including the behavior of pollutants in the environment, metal implants in the human body, and perhaps the origin of life. During the emergence of life, mineral surfaces may have played a role in the selection of amino acids, leading to the formation of proteins that are essential building blocks of life. To investigate this hypothesis, we are studying two amino acids, glutamic (Glu) and aspartic (Asp) acid, and their adsorption to the rutile form of titanium dioxide as a function of pH and surface coverage in electrolyte solutions. The objective is to get a fundamental understanding of the speciation and coordination chemistry of these amino acids at the rutile surface. We used attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to investigate the adsorption of Glu on rutile, and a previously published ATR-FTIR study [1] of Asp and Glu adsorption on an amorphous titanium dioxide film was used as a guide to peak assignment and interpretation of our FTIR spectra. Binding of Glu to both surfaces occurs primarily through one or both of the carboxyl groups, implying that at least two types of surface complexes are formed in a proportion presumably dependent on surface coverage and pH. The interpretation of our results suggests that Glu binds to rutile in a mixed chelating-monodentate fashion involving both carboxyl groups (Glu lying down at the surface), and in a chelating fashion involving only the gamma carboxyl group (Glu standing up at the surface). FTIR results also show that the intensity of the amine peak increases with sorption, which is possibly a consequence of the amine group being brought closer to the surface but not binding directly to it. Glu adsorption on rutile is favored at low pH, based on results from batch adsorption experiments. We have commenced a systematic

  11. Surface characteristics and photoactivity of silver-modified palygorskite clays coated with nanosized titanium dioxide particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Difang . E-mail: zdf6910@163.com; Zhou Jie; Liu Ning

    2007-03-15

    This paper presents the results of a study in which nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) crystal particles were coated onto the surface of palygorskite fibrous clay which had been modified by silver ions using titanium tetrachloride as a precursor. Coated TiO{sub 2} particles with the anatase structure were formed after calcining at 400 deg. C for 2 h in air. Various analytical techniques were used to characterize the surface properties of titanium dioxide particles on the palygorskite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses showed that TiO{sub 2} particles were supported on the surface of the palygorskite clays and their size was in the range of 3-6 nm. The titanium oxide coatings were found to be very active for the photocatalytic decomposition of methylene blue.

  12. Nitrate formation from atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen photocatalysed by nano-sized titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shi-Jie; Chen, Jie-Jie; Lin, Zhi-Qi; Li, Wen-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of nitrate in aquatic systems is rising with the development of modern industry and agriculture, causing a cascade of environmental problems. Here we describe a previously unreported nitrate formation process. Both indoor and outdoor experiments are conducted to demonstrate that nitrate may be formed from abundant atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen on nano-sized titanium dioxide surfaces under UV or sunlight irradiation. We suggest that nitric oxide is an intermediate product in this process, and elucidate its formation mechanisms using first-principles density functional theory calculations. Given the expanding use of titanium dioxide worldwide, such a titanium dioxide-mediated photocatalysis process may reveal a potentially underestimated source of nitrate in the environment, which on one hand may lead to an increasing environmental pollution concern, and on the other hand may provide an alternative, gentle and cost-effective method for nitrate production.

  13. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Humidity Microsensors Integrated with Circuitry on-a-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Chih; Dai, Ching-Liang; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2014-01-01

    A humidity microsensor integrated with a readout circuit on-a-chip fabricated using the commercial 0.18 μm CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) process was presented. The integrated sensor chip consists of a humidity sensor and a readout circuit. The humidity sensor is composed of a sensitive film and interdigitated electrodes. The sensitive film is titanium dioxide prepared by the sol-gel method. The titanium dioxide is coated on the interdigitated electrodes. The humidity sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial layer and to coat the titanium dioxide. The resistance of the sensor changes as the sensitive film absorbs or desorbs vapor. The readout circuit is employed to convert the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the integrated humidity sensor has a sensitivity of 4.5 mV/RH% (relative humidity) at room temperature. PMID:24594612

  14. Peroxide-modified titanium dioxide: a chemical analog of putative Martian soil oxidants.

    PubMed

    Quinn, R C; Zent, A P

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide chemisorbed on titanium dioxide (peroxide-modified titanium dioxide) is investigated as a chemical analog to the putative soil oxidants responsible for the chemical reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments. When peroxide-modified titanium dioxide (anatase) was exposed to a solution similar to the Viking labeled release (LR) experiment organic medium, CO2 gas was released into the sample cell headspace. Storage of these samples at 10 degrees C for 48 hr prior to exposure to organics resulted in a positive response while storage for 7 days did not. In the Viking LR experiment, storage of the Martian surface samples for 2 sols (approximately 49 hr) resulted in a positive response while storage for 141 sols essentially eliminated the initial rapid release of CO2. Heating the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide to 50 degrees C prior to exposure to organics resulted in a negative response. This is similar to, but not identical to, the Viking samples where heating to approximately 46 degrees C diminished the response by 54-80% and heating to 51.5 apparently eliminated the response. When exposed to water vapor, the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide samples release O2 in a manner similar to the release seen in the Viking gas exchange experiment (GEx). Reactivity is retained upon heating at 50 degrees C for three hours, distinguishing this active agent from the one responsible for the release of CO2 from aqueous organics. The release of CO2 by the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide is attributed to the decomposition of organics by outer-sphere peroxide complexes associated with surface hydroxyl groups, while the release of O2 upon humidification is attributed to more stable inner-sphere peroxide complexes associated with Ti4+ cations. Heating the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide to 145 degrees C inhibited the release of O2, while in the Viking experiments heating to this temperature diminished but did not eliminated the response. Although the

  15. Peroxide-modified titanium dioxide: a chemical analog of putative Martian soil oxidants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. C.; Zent, A. P.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide chemisorbed on titanium dioxide (peroxide-modified titanium dioxide) is investigated as a chemical analog to the putative soil oxidants responsible for the chemical reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments. When peroxide-modified titanium dioxide (anatase) was exposed to a solution similar to the Viking labeled release (LR) experiment organic medium, CO2 gas was released into the sample cell headspace. Storage of these samples at 10 degrees C for 48 hr prior to exposure to organics resulted in a positive response while storage for 7 days did not. In the Viking LR experiment, storage of the Martian surface samples for 2 sols (approximately 49 hr) resulted in a positive response while storage for 141 sols essentially eliminated the initial rapid release of CO2. Heating the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide to 50 degrees C prior to exposure to organics resulted in a negative response. This is similar to, but not identical to, the Viking samples where heating to approximately 46 degrees C diminished the response by 54-80% and heating to 51.5 apparently eliminated the response. When exposed to water vapor, the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide samples release O2 in a manner similar to the release seen in the Viking gas exchange experiment (GEx). Reactivity is retained upon heating at 50 degrees C for three hours, distinguishing this active agent from the one responsible for the release of CO2 from aqueous organics. The release of CO2 by the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide is attributed to the decomposition of organics by outer-sphere peroxide complexes associated with surface hydroxyl groups, while the release of O2 upon humidification is attributed to more stable inner-sphere peroxide complexes associated with Ti4+ cations. Heating the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide to 145 degrees C inhibited the release of O2, while in the Viking experiments heating to this temperature diminished but did not eliminated the response. Although the

  16. Deposition and characterization of titanium dioxide and hafnium dioxide thin films for high dielectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Meeyoung

    The industry's demand for higher integrated circuit density and performance has forced the gate dielectric layer thickness to decrease rapidly. The use of conventional SiO2 films as gate oxide is reaching its limit due to the rapid increase in tunneling current. Therefore, a need for a high dielectric material to produce large oxide capacitance and low leakage current has emerged. Metal-oxides such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2) are attractive candidates for gate dielectrics due to their electrical and physical properties suitable for high dielectric applications. MOCVD of TiO2 using titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) precursor on p-type Si(100) has been studied. Insertion of a TiO x buffer layer, formed by depositing metallic Ti followed by oxidation, at the TiO2/Si interface has reduced the carbon contamination in the TiO2 film. Elemental Ti films, analyzed by in-situ AES, were found to grow according to Stranski-Krastanov mode on Si(100). Carbon-free, stoichiometric TiO2 films were successfully produced on Si(100) without any parasitic SiO2 layers at the TiO 2/Si interface. Electron-beam deposition of HfO2 films on Si(100) has also been investigated in this work. HfO2 films are formed by depositing elemental Hf on Si(100) and then oxidizing it either in O2 or O 3. XPS results reveal that with oxidation Hf(4f) peak shifts +3.45eV with 02 and +3.65eV with O3 oxidation. LEED and AFM studies show that the initially ordered crystalline Hf becomes disordered after oxidation. The thermodynamic stability of HfO2 films on Si has been studied using a unique test-bed structure of Hf/O3/Si. Post-Oxidation of Layer Deposition (POLD) has been employed to produce HfO2 films with a desired thickness. XPS results indicate that stoichiometric HfO 2 films were successfully produced using the POLD process. The investigation of the growth and thin film properties of TiO 2 and HfO2 using oxygen and ozone has laid a foundation for the application of these metal

  17. Identification of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria Using Titanium Dioxide Photocatalysis-Assisted Photoacoustic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Delgado, F.; Marín, E.; Calderón, A.

    2013-09-01

    The effect of titanium dioxide photocatalysis against bacteria that are dangerous for human health has been investigated in the past, suggesting the possibility of using a specific behavior for each microorganism during this process for its discrimination. In this study, the behavior of some plants’ growth promoting bacteria ( Burkholderia unamae (Strain MTI 641), Acetobacter diazotrophicus (Strain PAl 5T), A. diazotrophicus (Strain CFN-Cf 52), and B. unamae (Strain TATl-371)) interacting with light and bactericidal titanium dioxide films have been analyzed using the photoacoustic technique. The monitoring of these interactions shows particular characteristics that could serve for identifying these species.

  18. Phototoxic effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on Daphnia magna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Charles M.

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) are one of the most abundantly utilized nanomaterials in the world. Studies have demonstrated the mechanism of acute toxicity in TiO2-NP to be the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress and mortality in exposed organisms. It has also been demonstrated that the anatase crystalline conformation is capable of catalyzing the cleavage of water molecules to further increase the concentration of ROS in the presence of ultraviolet radiation. This photoenhanced toxicity significantly lowers the toxicity threshold of TiO2-NP to environmentally relevant concentrations (ppb). The goal of this study was to determine whether dietary uptake and accumulation of TiO2-NP in the aquatic filter feeder Daphnia magna resulted in photoenhanced toxicity. D. magna and S. caprincornatum were exposed to aqueous solutions of 20ppm and 200ppm TiO2-NP for 24hrs and then transferred to clean moderately hard water. Samples were taken at various time points, dried, and TiO 2 quantified using ICP-MS. Toxicity assays were run on D. magna using three TiO2-NP (20ppm, 200ppm) exposure protocols and two ultraviolet radiation treatments. The first exposure group was exposed to aqueous solutions of TiO2-NP for the duration of the test. The second exposure group was exposed to TiO2-NP for an hour and then transferred to clean water. The third exposure group was fed S. capricornatum that had been allowed to adsorb TiO2-NP. All samples were then placed in an outdoor UV exposure system and exposed to either full spectrum sunlight (with UV) or filtered sunlight (no UV). Here we show that TiO2 uptake peaked at one hour of exposure likely due to sedimentation of the particles out of suspension, thus decreasing bioavailability for the duration of the test. Interestingly, when D. magna were moved to clean water, aqueous concentrations of TiO2 increase as a result of depuration from the gut tract. Data also suggests these excreted particles

  19. Shape-Related Toxicity of Titanium Dioxide Nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Allegri, Manfredi; Bianchi, Massimiliano G; Chiu, Martina; Varet, Julia; Costa, Anna L; Ortelli, Simona; Blosi, Magda; Bussolati, Ovidio; Poland, Craig A; Bergamaschi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanofibres are a novel fibrous nanomaterial with increasing applications in a variety of fields. While the biological effects of TiO2 nanoparticles have been extensively studied, the toxicological characterization of TiO2 nanofibres is far from being complete. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of commercially available anatase TiO2 nanofibres using TiO2 nanoparticles (NP) and crocidolite asbestos as non-fibrous or fibrous benchmark materials. The evaluated endpoints were cell viability, haemolysis, macrophage activation, trans-epithelial electrical resistance (an indicator of the epithelial barrier competence), ROS production and oxidative stress as well as the morphology of exposed cells. The results showed that TiO2 nanofibres caused a cell-specific, dose-dependent decrease of cell viability, with larger effects on alveolar epithelial cells than on macrophages. The observed effects were comparable to those of crocidolite, while TiO2 NP did not decrease cell viability. TiO2 nanofibres were also found endowed with a marked haemolytic activity, at levels significantly higher than those observed with TiO2 nanoparticles or crocidolite. Moreover, TiO2 nanofibres and crocidolite, but not TiO2 nanoparticles, caused a significant decrease of the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of airway cell monolayers. SEM images demonstrated that the interaction with nanofibres and crocidolite caused cell shape perturbation with the longest fibres incompletely or not phagocytosed. The expression of several pro-inflammatory markers, such as NO production and the induction of Nos2 and Ptgs2, was significantly increased by TiO2 nanofibres, as well as by TiO2 nanoparticles and crocidolite. This study indicates that TiO2 nanofibres had significant toxic effects and, for most endpoints with the exception of pro-inflammatory changes, are more bio-active than TiO2 nanoparticles, showing the relevance of shape in determining the toxicity of nanomaterials

  20. Photocatalytic production of hydrogen from fixed titanium dioxide thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoye, Njideka Helen

    This thesis is focused on further developing of an efficient method for the photocatalytic hydrogen production. The research aimed to use thin films deposited with TiO2 and doped with Pt in order to substitute slurry solutions that are currently being used. A new depositing experimental approach to manufacture the thin films was proposed and tested for both physical properties and chemical reactivity. Therefore, the experiment was designed into two parts: The first part was on the manufacturing and the physical characterization of titanium dioxide deposited on glass surfaces and the second part was focused on the ability of the thin film to produce hydrogen. For the second part, a photochemical reactor vessel was used to properly place the glass slides to UV-irradiation. This was yielded by a mercury lamp located at the centre of the reactor. The thesis is organized into five different chapters including introduction, literature review, characterization of TiO2 coated surface, experimental design and hydrogen production, finally conclusive observations and future work. Hydrogen production by photodecomposition of water into H2 and O2 has a very low efficiency due to rapid reverse reaction and, as mentioned above, it usually requires a slurry type of solution. This needs additional processing steps such as filtration and recycling of particles. Therefore, it is important to develop an efficient process for hydrogen production. TiO2 coated surfaces could be an excellent technological alternative. In this study, a sol-gel method was used to produce a transparent TiO 2 thin film which was deposited on a glass substrate by using a new coating technique introduced in this work for H2 production. The TiO2 deposited film on a glass substrate by using the spraying method of coating was characterized for physical analysis (surface characteristics, size of nanoparticles and distribution, etc.) by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission

  1. Shape-Related Toxicity of Titanium Dioxide Nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Allegri, Manfredi; Bianchi, Massimiliano G; Chiu, Martina; Varet, Julia; Costa, Anna L; Ortelli, Simona; Blosi, Magda; Bussolati, Ovidio; Poland, Craig A; Bergamaschi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanofibres are a novel fibrous nanomaterial with increasing applications in a variety of fields. While the biological effects of TiO2 nanoparticles have been extensively studied, the toxicological characterization of TiO2 nanofibres is far from being complete. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of commercially available anatase TiO2 nanofibres using TiO2 nanoparticles (NP) and crocidolite asbestos as non-fibrous or fibrous benchmark materials. The evaluated endpoints were cell viability, haemolysis, macrophage activation, trans-epithelial electrical resistance (an indicator of the epithelial barrier competence), ROS production and oxidative stress as well as the morphology of exposed cells. The results showed that TiO2 nanofibres caused a cell-specific, dose-dependent decrease of cell viability, with larger effects on alveolar epithelial cells than on macrophages. The observed effects were comparable to those of crocidolite, while TiO2 NP did not decrease cell viability. TiO2 nanofibres were also found endowed with a marked haemolytic activity, at levels significantly higher than those observed with TiO2 nanoparticles or crocidolite. Moreover, TiO2 nanofibres and crocidolite, but not TiO2 nanoparticles, caused a significant decrease of the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of airway cell monolayers. SEM images demonstrated that the interaction with nanofibres and crocidolite caused cell shape perturbation with the longest fibres incompletely or not phagocytosed. The expression of several pro-inflammatory markers, such as NO production and the induction of Nos2 and Ptgs2, was significantly increased by TiO2 nanofibres, as well as by TiO2 nanoparticles and crocidolite. This study indicates that TiO2 nanofibres had significant toxic effects and, for most endpoints with the exception of pro-inflammatory changes, are more bio-active than TiO2 nanoparticles, showing the relevance of shape in determining the toxicity of nanomaterials

  2. Shape-Related Toxicity of Titanium Dioxide Nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Allegri, Manfredi; Bianchi, Massimiliano G.; Chiu, Martina; Varet, Julia; Costa, Anna L.; Ortelli, Simona; Blosi, Magda; Bussolati, Ovidio; Poland, Craig A.; Bergamaschi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanofibres are a novel fibrous nanomaterial with increasing applications in a variety of fields. While the biological effects of TiO2 nanoparticles have been extensively studied, the toxicological characterization of TiO2 nanofibres is far from being complete. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of commercially available anatase TiO2 nanofibres using TiO2 nanoparticles (NP) and crocidolite asbestos as non-fibrous or fibrous benchmark materials. The evaluated endpoints were cell viability, haemolysis, macrophage activation, trans-epithelial electrical resistance (an indicator of the epithelial barrier competence), ROS production and oxidative stress as well as the morphology of exposed cells. The results showed that TiO2 nanofibres caused a cell-specific, dose-dependent decrease of cell viability, with larger effects on alveolar epithelial cells than on macrophages. The observed effects were comparable to those of crocidolite, while TiO2 NP did not decrease cell viability. TiO2 nanofibres were also found endowed with a marked haemolytic activity, at levels significantly higher than those observed with TiO2 nanoparticles or crocidolite. Moreover, TiO2 nanofibres and crocidolite, but not TiO2 nanoparticles, caused a significant decrease of the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of airway cell monolayers. SEM images demonstrated that the interaction with nanofibres and crocidolite caused cell shape perturbation with the longest fibres incompletely or not phagocytosed. The expression of several pro-inflammatory markers, such as NO production and the induction of Nos2 and Ptgs2, was significantly increased by TiO2 nanofibres, as well as by TiO2 nanoparticles and crocidolite. This study indicates that TiO2 nanofibres had significant toxic effects and, for most endpoints with the exception of pro-inflammatory changes, are more bio-active than TiO2 nanoparticles, showing the relevance of shape in determining the toxicity of nanomaterials

  3. Prediction of Failure Due to Thermal Aging, Corrosion and Environmental Fracture in Amorphous and Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C

    2003-04-15

    DARPA is exploring a number of advanced materials for military applications, including amorphous metals and titanium-based alloys. Equipment made from these materials can undergo degradation due to thermal aging, uniform corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, denting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, hydrogen induced cracking and microbial influenced corrosion. Amorphous alloys have exceptional resistance to corrosion, due in part to the absence of grain boundaries, but can undergo crystallization and other phase instabilities during heating and welding. Titanium alloys are extremely corrosion resistant due to the formation of a tenacious passive film of titanium oxide, but is prone to hydrogen absorption in crevices, and hydrogen induced cracking after hydrogen absorption. Accurate predictions of equipment reliability, necessary for strategic planning, requires integrated models that account for all relevant modes of attack, and that can make probabilistic predictions. Once developed, model parameters must be determined experimentally, and the validity of models must be established through careful laboratory and field tests. Such validation testing requires state-of-the-art surface analytical techniques, as well as electrochemical and fracture mechanics tests. The interaction between those processes that perturb the local environment on a surface and those that alter metallurgical condition must be integrated in predictive models. The material and environment come together to drive various modes of corrosive attack (Figure 1). Models must be supported through comprehensive materials testing capabilities. Such capabilities are available at LLNL and include: the Long Term Corrosion Test Facility (LTCTF) where large numbers of standard samples can be exposed to realistic test media at several temperature levels; a reverse DC machine that can be used to monitor the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in situ; and banks of potentiostats with

  4. In Vitro Phototoxicity and Hazard Identification of Nano-scale Titanium Dioxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nano-titanium dioxide (nano-Ti02) catalyzes many reactions under UV radiation and is hypothesized to cause phototoxicity. A human-derived line of retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) was treated with six different samples of nano-Ti02 and exposed to UVA radiation. The Ti02 ...

  5. Biotemplated Synthesis of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles via Lignocellulosic Waste Material

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Samira; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2014-01-01

    Anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) were synthesized by sol-gel method using rice straw as a soft biotemplate. Rice straw, as a lignocellulosic waste material, is a biomass feedstock which is globally produced in high rate and could be utilized in an innovative approach to manufacture a value-added product. Rice straw as a reliable biotemplate has been used in the sol-gel method to synthesize ultrasmall sizes of TiO2-NPs with high potential application in photocatalysis. The physicochemical properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles were investigated by a number of techniques such as X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), ultraviolet visible spectra (UV-Vis), and surface area and pore size analysis. All results consensually confirmed that particle sizes of synthesized titanium dioxide were template-dependent, representing decrease in the nanoparticles sizes with increase of biotemplate concentration. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles as small as 13.0 ± 3.3 nm were obtained under our experimental conditions. Additionally, surface area and porosity of synthesized TiO2-NPs have been enhanced by increasing rice straw amount which results in surface modification of nanoparticles and potential application in photocatalysis. PMID:25126547

  6. Nano Titanium Dioxide Environmental Matters: State of the Science Literature Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to compile and summarize currently-available information pertaining to the manufacturing, processing, use, and end-of-life for nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2). The focus of the report is to identify, summarize, and present informat...

  7. Photocatalytic ROS production and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles is dependent on solar UV radiation spectrum

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) and its consequent phototoxicity to Daphnia magna were measured under different solar UV radiation spectrum by applying a series of optical filters in a solar simulator. Removing UVB (280-32...

  8. Effect of Coating and Packaging Materials on Photocatalytic and Antimicrobial Activities of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food safety or foodborne pathogen contamination is a major concern in food industry. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a photocatalyst and can inactivate a wide spectrum of microorganisms under UV illumination. There is significant interest in the development of TiO2-coated or –incorporated food packaging ...

  9. Polymorph-dependent titanium dioxide nanoparticle dissolution in acidic and alkali digestions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple polymorphs (anatase, brookite and rutile) of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) with variable structures were quantified in environmental matrices via microwave-based hydrofluoric (HF) and nitric (HNO3) mixed acid digestion and muffle furnace (MF)-based potassium ...

  10. Phenotypic and genomic responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis germinants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of exposure to two nanoparticles (NPs) -titanium dioxide (nano-titania) and cerium oxide (nano-ceria) at 500 mg NPs L-1 on gene expression and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana germinants were studied using microarrays and phenotype studies. After 12 days post treatment,...

  11. NOVEL EMBEDDED CERAMIC ELECTRODE SYSTEM TO ACTIVATE NANOSTRUCTURED TITANIUM DIOXIDE FOR DEGRADATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel reactor combining a flame-deposited nanostructured titanium dioxide film and a set of embedded ceramic electrodes was designed, developed and tested for degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in water. On applying a voltage to the ceramic electrodes, a surface coro...

  12. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  13. Human in vivo and in vitro studies on gastrointestinal absorption of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kate; Morton, Jackie; Smith, Ian; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Harding, Anne-Helen; Evans, Gareth

    2015-03-01

    The study was designed to conduct human in vivo and in vitro studies on the gastrointestinal absorption of nanoparticles, using titanium dioxide as a model compound, and to compare nanoparticle behaviour with that of larger particles. A supplier's characterisation data may not fully describe a particle formulation. Most particles tested agreed with their supplied characterisation when assessed by particle number but significant proportions of 'nanoparticle formulations' were particles >100nm when assessed by particle weight. Oral doses are measured by weight and it is therefore important that the weight characterisation is taken into consideration. The human volunteer studies demonstrated that very little titanium dioxide is absorbed gastrointestinally after an oral challenge. There was no demonstrable difference in absorption for any of the three particle sizes tested. All tested formulations were shown to agglomerate in simulated gastric fluid, particularly in the smaller particle formulations. Further agglomeration was observed when dispersing formulations in polymeric or elemental foods. Virtually no translocation of titanium dioxide particles across the cell layer was demonstrated. This study found no evidence that nanoparticulate titanium dioxide is more likely to be absorbed in the gut than micron-sized particles.

  14. Supporting nanomaterial risk assessment by case studies of nano-titanium dioxide using comprehensive environmental assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we describe a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) approach for two case studies of nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) in real world applications: water treatment and sunscreen. CEA combines a product life cycle framework with the risk assessment paradigm.

  15. Comparison of the properties of titanium dioxide films prepared by various techniques.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J M; Pelletier, E; Albrand, G; Borgogno, J P; Lazarides, B; Carniglia, C K; Schmell, R A; Allen, T H; Tuttle-Hart, T; Guenther, K H; Saxer, A

    1989-08-15

    Fourteen university, government, and industrial laboratories prepared a total of twenty pairs of single-layer titanium dioxide films. Several laboratories analyzed the coatings to determine their optical properties, thickness, surface roughness, absorption, wetting contact angle, and crystalline structure. Wide variations were found in the optical and physical properties of the films, even among films produced by nominally the same deposition techniques.

  16. Impact of natural organic matter on particle behavior and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to their inherent phototoxicity and inevitable environmental release, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) are increasingly studied in the field of aquatic toxicology. One of the particular interests is the interactions between nano-TiO2 and natural organic matter (NOM)...

  17. Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Nanoparticle uptake in cells may be an important determinant of their potential cytotoxic and inflammatory effects. Six commercial TiO2 NP (A=Alfa Aesar,10nm, A*=Alfa Aesar 32nm, B=P25 27...

  18. Electrical Properties of a Thermoplastic Polyurethane Filled with Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Koerner, Hilmar; Kidder, Michelle; Vaia, Richard; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R

    2010-01-01

    In this study we report a nanodielectric system composed of pre-synthesized nanoparticles embedded in an elastomer. Nanoparticles of titanium dioxide were synthesized in an aqueous solution of titanium chloride and polyethylene glycol. The nanoparticles were blended in a twin screw extruder with a thermoplastic, polyurethane (Morthane PS455-203), to form nanodielectrics at three different weight fractions of titanium dioxide. Impedance spectroscopy was employed to study polymer dynamics and the influence of nanoparticles on relaxation. The segmental relaxation associated with the glass transition of the polyurethane matrix, and the local relaxations associated with short range motions of polar groups were investigated at wide ranges of frequency (20 Hz-1 MHz) and temperature (300-20 K). The dielectric breakdown strength of the nanodielectrics was also measured to characterize their insulating properties and their potential for use in high voltage applications.

  19. Effect of chromium and phosphorus on the physical properties of iron and titanium-based amorphous metallic alloy films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Distefano, S.; Rameshan, R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous iron and titanium-based alloys containing various amounts of chromium, phosphorus, and boron exhibit high corrosion resistance. Some physical properties of Fe and Ti-based metallic alloy films deposited on a glass substrate by a dc-magnetron sputtering technique are reported. The films were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, stress analysis, SEM, XRD, SIMS, electron microprobe, and potentiodynamic polarization techniques.

  20. Biomimetic approach to the formation of titanium dioxide thin films by using poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate).

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung Ho; Kang, Kyungtae; Choi, Insung S

    2008-12-01

    We demonstrate that the biomimetic method-which has been used for the formation of silica thin films-also could be applied directly to the formation of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) thin films, which are technologically important materials because of their applications to photocatalytic purifiers, photochemical solar cells, and others. After generation of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) films on gold surfaces by surface-initiated polymerization, titanium bis(ammonium lactato)dihydroxide was used as a precursor of TiO(2). The TiO(2)/PDMAEMA films were successfully formed on the surfaces in aqueous solution at neutral pH (pH 6.7) and room temperature, and were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. The formed TiO(2) films have an amorphous nature and large area uniformity in thickness. The degree of crystallization was controlled by annealing. We also investigated the pH effect and the phosphate incorporation in the films by using phosphate-buffered solutions. The TiO(2) films were formed in all the employed pH values in the range of 2 to 12, but phosphate anions were found to be incorporated into the films facilely only at low pH.

  1. Monolithic co-aerogels of carbon/titanium dioxide as three dimensional nanostructured electrodes for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sungwoo; Cai, Yue; Cheng, Yingwen; Varanasi, C. V.; Liu, Jie

    2012-11-01

    Conductive fillers, such as amorphous carbon, carbon nanotube and graphene etc., are generally mixed with nanostructured metal oxide materials to improve the performance of electrode materials in energy storage devices. However, the conductive framework that provides path for electric conduction does not normally form a well-connected and robust 3-D network to ensure optimized ions transport. Here, we report a convenient, inexpensive and scalable method for synthesizing hybrid carbon and titanium dioxide co-gels and co-aerogels to improve the electrochemical capacity by combining both the lithium insertion and the surface storage mechanisms in Li ion batteries (LIBs) anodes. A monolithic piece of a hybrid C/TiO2 co-aerogel can be directly used as an active electrode without the addition of binders, such as polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). As a result, the performance of LIB anodes using the hybrid co-aerogel is significantly improved over current LIBs based on carbon/titanium oxide composites. The reversible discharge capacity was stabilized at ˜400 mAh g-1 at a 168 mA g-1 scan rate and an operating voltage between 3.0 and 0.05 V vs. Li+/Li with excellent cyclic capacity retention. This approach, however, is not limited to only C/TiO2 system but can be extended to other metal oxides to form co-gels with carbon to improve their potential use in numerous electrochemical, photocatalytic, and photoelectronic devices.

  2. Optical constants of amorphous, transparent titanium-doped tungsten oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Ramana, C V; Baghmar, Gaurav; Rubio, Ernesto J; Hernandez, Manuel J

    2013-06-12

    We report on the optical constants and their dispersion profiles determined from spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) analysis of the 20%-titanium (Ti) doped of tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films grown by sputter-deposition. The Ti-doped WO3 films grown in a wide range of temperatures (25-500 °C) are amorphous and optically transparent. SE data indicates that there is no significant interdiffusion at the film-substrate interface for a W-Ti oxide film growth of ~90 nm. The index refraction (n) at λ = 550 nm vary in the range of 2.17-2.31 with a gradual increase in growth temperature. A correlation between the growth conditions and optical constants is discussed. PMID:23682744

  3. Complex compound polyvinyl alcohol-titanic acid/titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosanov, I. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    A complex compound polyvinyl alcohol-titanic acid has been produced and investigated by means of IR and Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and synchronous thermal analysis. It is claimed that it represents an interpolymeric complex of polyvinyl alcohol and hydrated titanium oxide.

  4. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar; Subbiah, Ramesh; Thangavel, Elangovan; Arumugam, Madhankumar; Park, Kwideok; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp2 bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  5. Analysis of metal surfaces coated with europium-doped titanium dioxide by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Głogocka, Daria; Noculak, Agnieszka; Pucińska, Joanna; Jopek, Wojciech; Podbielska, Halina; Langner, Marek; Przybyło, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The surface passivation with titanium sol-gel coatings is a frequently used technique to control the adsorption of selected biological macromolecules and to reduce the exposure of the bulk material to biological matter. Due to the increasing number of new coating-preparation methods and new gel compositions with various types of additives, the quality and homogeneity determination of the surface covering is a critical factor affecting performance of any implanted material. While coating thickness is easy to determine, the homogeneity of the surface distribution of coating materials requires more elaborate methodologies. In the paper, the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based method, capable to quantitate the homogeneity and uniformity of the europium in titanium dioxide sol-gel coatings on stainless steel surfaces prepared with two different procedures: spin-coating and dip-coating, is presented. The emission intensity of titanium has been used to determine the coating thickness whereas the relative values of europium and titanium emission intensities provide data on the coating homogeneity. The obtained results show that the spin-coating technique provides better surface coverage with titanium dioxide. However, when the surface coating compositions were compared the dip-coating technique was more reliable.

  6. Analysis of metal surfaces coated with europium-doped titanium dioxide by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Głogocka, Daria; Noculak, Agnieszka; Pucińska, Joanna; Jopek, Wojciech; Podbielska, Halina; Langner, Marek; Przybyło, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The surface passivation with titanium sol-gel coatings is a frequently used technique to control the adsorption of selected biological macromolecules and to reduce the exposure of the bulk material to biological matter. Due to the increasing number of new coating-preparation methods and new gel compositions with various types of additives, the quality and homogeneity determination of the surface covering is a critical factor affecting performance of any implanted material. While coating thickness is easy to determine, the homogeneity of the surface distribution of coating materials requires more elaborate methodologies. In the paper, the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based method, capable to quantitate the homogeneity and uniformity of the europium in titanium dioxide sol-gel coatings on stainless steel surfaces prepared with two different procedures: spin-coating and dip-coating, is presented. The emission intensity of titanium has been used to determine the coating thickness whereas the relative values of europium and titanium emission intensities provide data on the coating homogeneity. The obtained results show that the spin-coating technique provides better surface coverage with titanium dioxide. However, when the surface coating compositions were compared the dip-coating technique was more reliable. PMID:26687457

  7. Amorphous alumina thin films deposited on titanium: Interfacial chemistry and thermal oxidation barrier properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baggetto, Loic; Charvillat, Cedric; Thebault, Yannick; Esvan, Jerome; Lafont, Marie-Christine; Scheid, Emmanuel; Veith, Gabriel M.; Vahlas, Constantin

    2015-12-02

    Ti/Al2O3 bilayer stacks are used as model systems to investigate the role of atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to prepare 30-180 nm thick amorphous alumina films as protective barriers for the medium temperature oxidation (500-600⁰C) of titanium, which is employed in aeronautic applications. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the films produced from the direct liquid injection (DLI) CVD of aluminum tri-isopropoxide (ATI) are poor oxygen barriers. The films processed using the ALD of trimethylaluminum (TMA) show good barrier properties but an extensive intermixing with Ti which subsequently oxidizes. In contrast, the films prepared from dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide (DMAI) by CVD are excellent oxygen barriers and show little intermixing with Ti. Overall, these measurements correlate the effect of the alumina coating thickness, morphology, and stoichiometry resulting from the preparation method to the oxidation barrier properties, and show that compact and stoichiometric amorphous alumina films offer superior barrier properties.

  8. Amorphous alumina thin films deposited on titanium: Interfacial chemistry and thermal oxidation barrier properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baggetto, Loic; Charvillat, Cedric; Thebault, Yannick; Esvan, Jerome; Lafont, Marie-Christine; Scheid, Emmanuel; Veith, Gabriel M.; Vahlas, Constantin

    2015-12-02

    Ti/Al2O3 bilayer stacks are used as model systems to investigate the role of atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to prepare 30-180 nm thick amorphous alumina films as protective barriers for the medium temperature oxidation (500-600⁰C) of titanium, which is employed in aeronautic applications. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the films produced from the direct liquid injection (DLI) CVD of aluminum tri-isopropoxide (ATI) are poor oxygen barriers. The films processed using the ALD of trimethylaluminum (TMA) show good barrier properties butmore » an extensive intermixing with Ti which subsequently oxidizes. In contrast, the films prepared from dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide (DMAI) by CVD are excellent oxygen barriers and show little intermixing with Ti. Overall, these measurements correlate the effect of the alumina coating thickness, morphology, and stoichiometry resulting from the preparation method to the oxidation barrier properties, and show that compact and stoichiometric amorphous alumina films offer superior barrier properties.« less

  9. Photoelectrochemical water splitting at titanium dioxide nanotubes coated with tungsten trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong Hyeok; Park, O Ok; Kim, Sungwook

    2006-10-16

    The photocatalytic splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen using solar light is a potentially clean and renewable source for hydrogen fuel. Titanium oxide nanotubes coated with tungsten oxide were prepared to harvest more solar light for the first time and characterized their water splitting efficiency. The tungsten trioxide coatings significantly enhanced the visible spectrum absorption of the titanium dioxide nanotube array, as well as their solar-spectrum induced photocurrents. For the sample, upon white light illumination at 150 mW/cm{sup 2}, hydrogen gas generated at the overall conversion efficiency of 0.87%.

  10. Characterization of anodized titanium for hydrometallurgical applications—Evidence for the reduction of cupric on titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Alfantazi, Akram; Asselin, Edouard

    2013-10-01

    Anodic oxide films (AOFs) were potentiostatically formed on commercially pure titanium in 0.5 M sulfuric acid solutions at various anodizing voltages (up to 80 V) at room temperature. The subject of this study was the corrosion resistance of the AOFs in synthetic copper sulfide leaching solutions containing 30 g L-1 sulfuric acid as well as 12 g L-1 Cl-, 15 g L-1 Cu2+ and 1 g L-1 Fe3+. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurement, linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to study the corrosion response of the AOFs in copper sulfide leaching solutions up to 85 °C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the morphology of the AOFs before and after 12 h of immersion at 85 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to examine the surface chemistry of the AOFs after immersion. OCP measurements showed that the final failure of the AOFs occurred in 2 h in de-aerated 30 g L-1 H2SO4 and 12 g L-1 Cl- solutions at 85 °C. Both LPR and EIS results showed a significant increase in the corrosion resistance of the anodized titanium versus that of freshly polished titanium. Electrochemical results were confirmed by SEM analysis, where the AOF formed at 80 V lead to the best improvement in corrosion resistance. XPS measurements revealed that Cu2+ was reduced to Cu or Cu+ within the titanium oxide film. It was further confirmed that the presence of leaching oxidants would inhibit the reduction of Cu2+ on titanium dioxide in chloride containing copper sulfide leaching solutions.

  11. Electrochemical response of carbon paste electrode modified with mixture of titanium dioxide/zirconium dioxide in the detection of heavy metals: lead and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong Khanh Quoc; Lunsford, Suzanne K

    2012-11-15

    A novel carbon modified electrode was developed by incorporating titanium dioxide/zirconium dioxide into the graphite carbon paste electrode to detect heavy metals-cadmium and lead. In this work, the development of the novel titanium dioxide/zirconium dioxide modified carbon paste electrode was studied to determine the optimum synthesis conditions related to the temperature, heating duration, amount and ratio of titanium dioxide/zirconium dioxide, and amount of surfactant, to create the most reproducible results. Using cyclic voltammetric (CV) analysis, this study has proven that the novel titanium dioxide/zirconium dioxide can be utilized to detect heavy metals-lead and cadmium, at relatively low concentrations (7.6×10(-6) M and 1.1×10(-5) M for Pb and Cd, respectively) at optimum pH value (pH=3). From analyzing CV data the optimal electrodes surface area was estimated to be 0.028 (±0.003) cm(2). Also, under the specific experimental conditions, electron transfer coefficients were estimated to be 0.44 and 0.33 along with the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants of 5.64×10(-3) and 2.42×10(-3) (cm/s) for Pb and Cd, respectively.

  12. Photocatalytic oxidation mechanism of isobutane in contact with titanium dioxide (TiO2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formenti, M.; Juillet, F.; Teichner, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The photocatalytic oxidation of isobutane to acetone in the presence of irradiated ultraviolet irradiated titanium dioxide was found to occur in several steps. Insertion of an oxygen atom onto the tertiary carbon transforming the isobutane into tertiary butanol occurred first. This step implied the photonic formation of the 02- species and its reaction with positive holes. The tertiary butanol was then dehydrated to isobutene which is oxidized acetone and carbon dioxide. Insertion of an oxygen atom onto the primary carbon led to isobutanal after oxidation to the alcohol. An analogous reaction scheme was proposed for all alkanes.

  13. An investigation of adhesive/adherend and fiber/matrix interactions. Part A: Surface characterization of titanium dioxide, titantium and titanium 6% Al to 4% V powders: Interaction with water, hydrogen chloride and polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siriwardane, R. V.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The titanium dioxide surface is discussed. Polymer adhesive are also discussed. Titanium powders are considered. Characterization techniques are also considered. Interactions with polymers, water vapor, and HCl are reported. Adsorbents are characterized.

  14. Defective titanium dioxide single crystals exposed by high-energy {001} facets for efficient oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Dan-Ni; Gong, Li; Zhang, Ai-Yong; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Jie-Jie; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The cathodic material plays an essential role in oxygen reduction reaction for energy conversion and storage systems. Titanium dioxide, as a semiconductor material, is usually not recognized as an efficient oxygen reduction electrocatalyst owning to its low conductivity and poor reactivity. Here we demonstrate that nano-structured titanium dioxide, self-doped by oxygen vacancies and selectively exposed with the high-energy {001} facets, exhibits a surprisingly competitive oxygen reduction activity, excellent durability and superior tolerance to methanol. Combining the electrochemical tests with density-functional calculations, we elucidate the defect-centred oxygen reduction reaction mechanism for the superiority of the reductive {001}-TiO2−x nanocrystals. Our findings may provide an opportunity to develop a simple, efficient, cost-effective and promising catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in energy conversion and storage technologies. PMID:26493365

  15. Defective titanium dioxide single crystals exposed by high-energy {001} facets for efficient oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Pei, Dan-Ni; Gong, Li; Zhang, Ai-Yong; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Jie-Jie; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The cathodic material plays an essential role in oxygen reduction reaction for energy conversion and storage systems. Titanium dioxide, as a semiconductor material, is usually not recognized as an efficient oxygen reduction electrocatalyst owning to its low conductivity and poor reactivity. Here we demonstrate that nano-structured titanium dioxide, self-doped by oxygen vacancies and selectively exposed with the high-energy {001} facets, exhibits a surprisingly competitive oxygen reduction activity, excellent durability and superior tolerance to methanol. Combining the electrochemical tests with density-functional calculations, we elucidate the defect-centred oxygen reduction reaction mechanism for the superiority of the reductive {001}-TiO2-x nanocrystals. Our findings may provide an opportunity to develop a simple, efficient, cost-effective and promising catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in energy conversion and storage technologies.

  16. Human lung epithelial cell A549 proteome data after treatment with titanium dioxide and carbon black.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Ngoc Q; Goegan, Patrick; Mohottalage, Susantha; Breznan, Dalibor; Ariganello, Marianne; Williams, Andrew; Elisma, Fred; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Premkumari

    2016-09-01

    Here, we have described the dataset relevant to the A549 cellular proteome changes after exposure to either titanium dioxide or carbon black particles as compared to the non-exposed controls, "Proteomic changes in human lung epithelial cells (A549) in response to carbon black and titanium dioxide exposures" (Vuong et al., 2016) [1]. Detailed methodologies on the separation of cellular proteins by 2D-GE and the subsequent mass spectrometry analyses using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS are documented. Particle exposure-specific protein expression changes were measured via 2D-GE spot volume analysis. Protein identification was done by querying mass spectrometry data against SwissProt and RefSeq protein databases using Mascot search engine. Two-way ANOVA analysis data provided information on statistically significant A549 protein expression changes associated with particle exposures. PMID:27508218

  17. Influence of alumina and titanium dioxide coatings on abrasive wear resistance of AISI 1045 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A.; Remolina, A.; Marulanda, J.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to compare the behaviour of an AISI 1045 steel's abrasive wear resistance when is covered with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) or Titanium dioxide (TiO2), of nanometric size, using the technique of thermal hot spray, which allows to directly project the suspension particles on the used substrate. The tests are performed based on the ASTM G65-04 standard (Standard Test Method for Measuring Abrasion Using the Dry Sand/Rubber Apparatus). The results show that the amount of, lost material increases linearly with the travelled distance; also determined that the thermal treatment of hardening-tempering and the alumina and titanium dioxide coatings decrease in average a 12.9, 39.6 and 29.3% respectively the volume of released material during abrasive wear test.

  18. Human lung epithelial cell A549 proteome data after treatment with titanium dioxide and carbon black.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Ngoc Q; Goegan, Patrick; Mohottalage, Susantha; Breznan, Dalibor; Ariganello, Marianne; Williams, Andrew; Elisma, Fred; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Premkumari

    2016-09-01

    Here, we have described the dataset relevant to the A549 cellular proteome changes after exposure to either titanium dioxide or carbon black particles as compared to the non-exposed controls, "Proteomic changes in human lung epithelial cells (A549) in response to carbon black and titanium dioxide exposures" (Vuong et al., 2016) [1]. Detailed methodologies on the separation of cellular proteins by 2D-GE and the subsequent mass spectrometry analyses using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS are documented. Particle exposure-specific protein expression changes were measured via 2D-GE spot volume analysis. Protein identification was done by querying mass spectrometry data against SwissProt and RefSeq protein databases using Mascot search engine. Two-way ANOVA analysis data provided information on statistically significant A549 protein expression changes associated with particle exposures.

  19. Selective growth of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures inside carbon nanotube membranes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid nanostructured arrays based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) and palladium or titanium dioxide materials have been synthesized using self-supported and silicon-supported anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as nanoporous template. It is well demonstrated that carbon nanotubes can be grown using these membranes and hydrocarbon precursors that decompose at temperatures closer to 600°C without the use of a metal catalyst. In this process, carbonic fragments condensate to form stacked graphitic sheets, which adopt the shape of the pores, yielding from these moulds' multi-walled carbon nanotubes. After this process, the ends of the tubes remain open and accessible to other substances, whereas the outer walls are protected by the alumina. Taking advantage of this fact, we have performed the synthesis of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures selectively inside carbon nanotubes using these CNT-AAO membranes as nanoreactors. PMID:22731888

  20. Effects of porous films on the light reflectivity of pigmentary titanium dioxide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yong; Qiao, Bing; Wang, Tig-Jie; Gao, Han; Yu, Keyi

    2016-11-01

    The light reflectivity of the film-coated titanium dioxide particles (TiO2) as a function of the film refractive index was derived and calculated using a plane film model. For the refractive index in the range of 1.00-2.15, the lower the film refractive index is, the higher is the light reflectivity of the film. It is inferred that the lower apparent refractive index of the porous film resulted in the higher reflectivity of light, i.e., the higher hiding power of the titanium dioxide particles. A dense film coating on TiO2 particles with different types of oxides, i.e., SiO2, Al2O3, MgO, ZnO, ZrO2, TiO2, corresponding to different refractive indices of the film from 1.46 to 2.50, was achieved, and the effects of refractive index on the hiding power from the model prediction were confirmed. Porous film coating of TiO2 particles was achieved by adding the organic template agent triethanolamine (TEA). The hiding power of the coated TiO2 particles was increased from 88.3 to 90.8 by adding the TEA template to the film coating (5-20 wt%). In other words, the amount of titanium dioxide needed was reduced by approximately 10% without a change in the hiding power. It is concluded that the film structure coated on TiO2 particle surface affects the light reflectivity significantly, namely, the porous film exhibits excellent performance for pigmentary titanium dioxide particles with high hiding power.

  1. Antimicrobial polymers - The antibacterial effect of photoactivated nano titanium dioxide polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Huppmann, T. Leonhardt, S. E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Krampe, E. E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Wintermantel, E.; Yatsenko, S. Radovanovic, I. E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de; Bastian, M. E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de

    2014-05-15

    To obtain a polymer with antimicrobial properties for medical and sanitary applications nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) particles have been incorporated into a medical grade polypropylene (PP) matrix with various filler contents (0 wt %, 2 wt %, 10 wt % and 15 wt %). The standard application of TiO{sub 2} for antimicrobial efficacy is to deposit a thin TiO{sub 2} coating on the surface. In contrast to the common way of applying a coating, TiO{sub 2} particles were applied into the bulk polymer. With this design we want to ensure antimicrobial properties even after application of impact effects that could lead to surface defects. The filler material (Aeroxide® TiO{sub 2} P25, Evonik) was applied via melt compounding and the compounding parameters were optimized with respect to nanoscale titanium dioxide. In a next step the effect of UV-irradiation on the compounds concerning their photocatalytic activity, which is related to the titanium dioxide amount, was investigated. The photocatalytic effect of TiO{sub 2}-PP-composites was analyzed by contact angle measurement, by methylene blue testing and by evaluation of inactivation potential for Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria. The dependence of antimicrobial activity on the filler content was evaluated, and on the basis of different titanium dioxide fractions adequate amounts of additives within the compounds were discussed. Specimens displayed a higher photocatalytic and also antimicrobial activity and lower contact angles with increasing titania content. The results suggest that the presence of titania embedded in the PP matrix leads to a surface change and a photocatalytic effect with bacteria killing result.

  2. Photoelectrochemical and physical properties of titanium dioxide films obtained by aerosol pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Belaidi, A.; Chaqour, S.M.; Gorochov, O.; Neumann-Spallart, M

    2004-04-02

    Aerosol pyrolysis (AP) was used to prepare thin films of titanium dioxide on various substrates. The films were characterized by SEM, SIMS, XRD, and thickness measurements, and by photoelectrochemical response before and after annealing in various ambients. Pinhole-free anatase films of thickness up to 1000 nm were prepared. Incident photon to current efficiencies (IPCEs) of up to 20% at 365 nm were obtained for thick films under depletion conditions, in aqueous electrolytes.

  3. Photocatalytic aptitude of titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads for the reduction of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Hasmath Farzana, M; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the photo-reduction of heavy metal Cr(VI) in aqueous solution using titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads (TCB) in the presence of UV irradiation. The synergistic role of TCB results in excellent photocatalytic behavior. The reduction of Cr(VI) by the TCB is mainly due to adsorption coupled photocatalytic reduction mechanism. The characterization of TCB was made by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectral studies, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDAX) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. The kinetics of photo-reduction of Cr(VI) is explained on the basis of Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. A comparative study on the percentage removal of chromium using chitosan (CS), titanium dioxide (TiO2) and titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads (TCB) in the presence of UV irradiation at 60 min of contact time have been found to be 19.4%, 54.8% and 91.4% respectively. Effects of experimental parameters such as irradiation time, dose, pH, initial concentration, and co-ions were optimized for Cr(VI) removal. Suitability of TCB at field condition was tested with a sample taken from a nearby industrial area.

  4. High Anatase Rate Titanium Dioxide Coating Deposition by Low Power Microwave Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redza, Ahmad; Kondo, Toshiki; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Titanium dioxide is a promising photocatalyst material because of the magnificent properties of this material where it is able to remove the air pollution substance and the deodorizing function. Generally, the deposition method of a titanium dioxide coating is carried out by an organic system binder but the powerful photocatalytic reaction will degrades the binder. Therefore, thermal spray is considered to be the alternative method but this method will induce crystallization transformation of titanium dioxide from anatase phase with high photocatalytic activity to rutile phase with low photocatalyst which caused by high heat input. Since our microwave plasma spraying device is operable at low power comparing with conventional high power plasma spray, the reduce effect of the heat input onto the particles at the time of spraying can be achieved and coating deposition with high rate of anatase phase is expected. Therefore, in this research, the coating deposition by controlling the heat input into the spray particle which can be resulted in high rate of anatase phase with high photocatalytic activity was conducted. By controlled condition, coating with optimum anatase rate of 83% is able to be fabricated by this method.

  5. Photocatalytic aptitude of titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads for the reduction of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Hasmath Farzana, M; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the photo-reduction of heavy metal Cr(VI) in aqueous solution using titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads (TCB) in the presence of UV irradiation. The synergistic role of TCB results in excellent photocatalytic behavior. The reduction of Cr(VI) by the TCB is mainly due to adsorption coupled photocatalytic reduction mechanism. The characterization of TCB was made by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectral studies, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDAX) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. The kinetics of photo-reduction of Cr(VI) is explained on the basis of Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. A comparative study on the percentage removal of chromium using chitosan (CS), titanium dioxide (TiO2) and titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads (TCB) in the presence of UV irradiation at 60 min of contact time have been found to be 19.4%, 54.8% and 91.4% respectively. Effects of experimental parameters such as irradiation time, dose, pH, initial concentration, and co-ions were optimized for Cr(VI) removal. Suitability of TCB at field condition was tested with a sample taken from a nearby industrial area. PMID:25277118

  6. Self-assembled monolayers and titanium dioxide: From surface patterning to potential applications.

    PubMed

    Paz, Yaron

    2011-01-01

    The ability to control the properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) attached to solid surfaces and the rare photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide provide a rationale for the study of systems comprising both. Such systems can be realized in the form of SAMs grown on TiO(2) or, in a complementary manner, as TiO(2) grown on SAMs. Accordingly, the current status of knowledge regarding SAMs on TiO(2) is described. Photocatalytic phenomena that are of specific relevance to SAMs, such as remote degradation, and cases where SAMs were used to study photocatalytic phenomena, are discussed as well. Mastering of micro-patterning is a key issue en route to a successful assimilation of a variety of titanium dioxide based devices. Accordingly, particular attention is given to the description of a variety of methods and techniques aimed at utilizing the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide for patterning. Reports on a variety of applications are discussed. These examples, representing the areas of photovoltaics, microelectronics, microelectromechanics, photocatalysis, corrosion prevention and even biomedicine should be regarded as appetizers paving the way for further studies to be performed.

  7. Self-assembled monolayers and titanium dioxide: From surface patterning to potential applications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary The ability to control the properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) attached to solid surfaces and the rare photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide provide a rationale for the study of systems comprising both. Such systems can be realized in the form of SAMs grown on TiO2 or, in a complementary manner, as TiO2 grown on SAMs. Accordingly, the current status of knowledge regarding SAMs on TiO2 is described. Photocatalytic phenomena that are of specific relevance to SAMs, such as remote degradation, and cases where SAMs were used to study photocatalytic phenomena, are discussed as well. Mastering of micro-patterning is a key issue en route to a successful assimilation of a variety of titanium dioxide based devices. Accordingly, particular attention is given to the description of a variety of methods and techniques aimed at utilizing the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide for patterning. Reports on a variety of applications are discussed. These examples, representing the areas of photovoltaics, microelectronics, microelectromechanics, photocatalysis, corrosion prevention and even biomedicine should be regarded as appetizers paving the way for further studies to be performed. PMID:22259769

  8. Direct growth of carbon nanotubes onto titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dechakiatkrai, Chonlada; Chen, Jun; Lynam, Carol; Wetchakul, Natda; Phanichphant, Sukon; Wallace, Gordon G

    2009-02-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were successfully deposited on a TiO2 nanoparticle film via thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using iron(III) as the catalyst, which was loaded into the titanium isopropoxide precursor solution. The properties of the TiO2/MWNTs nanocomposite was characterized using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), 4-point probe conductivity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. Preliminary investigations on this TiO2/MWNTs nanocomposite as an anode material for Li-ion batteries shows a high reversible capacity of 268 mAh g(-1) with improved cycling stability compared with a mechanically blended composite. PMID:19441430

  9. Synthesis of Titanium Dioxide by Microwave Plasma Torch.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ta-Chin; Chen, Hua-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Kai

    2015-04-01

    In this study, TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized from titanium tetraisopropanol (TTIP) using a microwave plasma torch (MPT) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The visible light photocatalysis was studied by the decomposition of methylene blue. MB present in the aqueous solution could be almost completely (> 70%) decomposed within about 720 min of reaction time under visible light irradiation. This is due to the carbon-compounds on the surface of TiO2 (TiOC) corresponding to the results of FTIR. Furthermore, a decrease in recombination between the electron and hole was induced by the existence of TiOC. PMID:26353500

  10. Microstructural characterization of a fumed titanium dioxide photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Huang, Min; Riegel, G.; Bolton, J.R.

    1995-02-15

    The authors present observations of a fumed titania photocatalyst using high resolution TEM and X-ray diffraction. The catalyst was observed as-received and after being used for photocatalytic destruction of salicylic acid. The characterization results suggest that the photocatalyst consists of individual single crystal particles of the rutile and anatase phases of titania; no amorphous titania particles could be identified conclusively. The authors also did not detect any particles of anatase that were covered by a layer of rutile, as proposed previously by Bickley et al. No changes were seen in the titania after it was used for photocatalysis of salicylic acid at pH 6 for short times (less than 1 hr).

  11. Optimizing the photocatalytic properties and the synergistic effects of graphene and nano titanium dioxide immobilized on cotton fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Loghman; Yazdanshenas, Mohammad Esmail; Khajavi, Ramin; Rashidi, Abosaeed; Mirjalili, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    A new facile route based on cotton fabric coated with graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite is reported to produce photo-active cellulose textiles. A thin layer of graphene oxide has been produced on cotton fabrics by a dip-dry process. The graphene oxide-coated cotton fabrics were then immersed in titanium trichloride aqueous solution to yield a fabric coated with graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite. The photo-activity efficiency of the coated fabrics was tested by degradation of methylene blue in aqueous solution under UV and sunlight irradiations. To obtain the optimum condition, the response surface methodology (RSM) through the central composite design was applied and the role of both graphene oxide and titanium trichloride concentrations on photo-activity efficiency was investigated. The physicochemical properties of the prepared samples has been characterized by a series of techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of the application of graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite on the physical properties of the cotton fabric, such as tensile strength, bending rigidity and crease recovery angle has been analyzed. Other characteristics of treated fabrics such as antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxicity were also investigated. Cotton fabric coated with optimum concentrations of graphene oxide and titanium trichloride obtained significant photo-activity efficiency under UV and sunlight irradiations. Moreover, the graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite coated cotton samples proved low toxicity and possessed excellent antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  12. Determination of photocatalytic activity in amorphous and crystalline titanium oxide films prepared using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Yang; Chiang, Bo-Sheng; Chang, Springfield; Liu, Day-Shan

    2011-01-01

    Hydro-oxygenated amorphous titanium oxide (a-TiO x:OH) films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using precursors of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and oxygen. The influences of chemical states and crystal quality on the photocatalytic activity were systematically investigated in the as-deposited and post-annealed films. The degree of the photocatalytic activity was deeply correlated with the porosity related to the hydroxyl (OH) groups in the as-deposited amorphous film. The crystallized anatase structures was observed from the 200 °C-deposited a-TiO x:OH film after a post-annealing treatment at 400 °C. The photocatalytic activity related to the film with anatase structure was markedly superior to that of an amorphous film with porous structures. The larger the crystal size of the anatase structure, the higher the photocatalytic activity obtained. At elevated annealed temperatures, the inferior anatase structure due to the crystalline transformation led to a low photocatalytic activity. It was concluded that the photocatalytic activity of an amorphous TiO x film prepared using PECVD was determined by the porosity originating from the functional OH groups in the film, whereas the crystalline quality of anatase phase in the annealed poly-TiO x film was crucial to the photocatalytic activity.

  13. Non-negligible Contributions to Thermal Conductivity From Localized Modes in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    2016-01-01

    Thermal conductivity is important for almost all applications involving heat transfer. The theory and modeling of crystalline materials is in some sense a solved problem, where one can now calculate their thermal conductivity from first principles using expressions based on the phonon gas model (PGM). However, modeling of amorphous materials still has many open questions, because the PGM itself becomes questionable when one cannot rigorously define the phonon velocities. In this report, we used our recently developed Green-Kubo modal analysis (GKMA) method to study amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO2). The predicted thermal conductivities exhibit excellent agreement with experiments and anharmonic effects are included in the thermal conductivity calculation for all the modes in a-SiO2 for the first time. Previously, localized modes (locons) have been thought to have a negligible contribution to thermal conductivity, due to their highly localized nature. However, in a-SiO2 our results indicate that locons contribute more than 10% to the total thermal conductivity from 400 K to 800 K and they are largely responsible for the increase in thermal conductivity of a-SiO2 above room temperature. This is an effect that cannot be explained by previous methods and therefore offers new insight into the nature of phonon transport in amorphous/glassy materials. PMID:27767082

  14. Application of mesoporous silicon dioxide and silicate in oral amorphous drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ken K; Bogner, Robin H

    2012-02-01

    Aqueous solubility of an active pharmaceutical ingredient is an important consideration to ensure successful drug development. Mesoporous materials have been investigated as an amorphous drug delivery system owing to their nanosized capillaries and large surface areas. The complex interactions of crystalline compounds with mesoporous media and their implication in drug delivery are not well understood. Molecules interacting with porous media behave very differently than those in bulk phase. Their altered dynamics and thermodynamics play an important role in the properties and product performance of the amorphous system. In this review, application of mesoporous silicon dioxide and silicates in drug amorphization is the main focus. First, as background, the nature of gas-porous media interactions is summarized. The synthesis of various types of mesoporous silica, which are used by many investigators in this field, is described. Second, the behavior of molecules confined in mesopores is compared with those in bulk, crystalline phase. The molecular dynamics of compounds due to confinement, analyzed using various techniques, and their consequences in drug delivery are discussed. Finally, the preparation and performance of drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica are examined.

  15. Titanium Dioxide Nanofibers and Microparticles Containing Nickel Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Macossay, Javier; Kanjwal, Muzafar A.; Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Tantry, Mudasir A.; Kim, Hern

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports on the introduction of various nanocatalysts containing nickel (Ni) nanoparticles (NPs) embedded within TiO2 nanofibers and TiO2 microparticles. Typically, a sol-gel consisting of titanium isopropoxide and Ni NPs was prepared to produce TiO2 nanofibers by the electrospinning process. Similarly, TiO2 microparticles containing Ni were prepared using a sol-gel syntheses process. The resultant structures were studied by SEM analyses, which confirmed well-obtained nanofibers and microparticles. Further, the XRD results demonstrated the crystalline feature of both TiO2 and Ni in the obtained composites. Internal morphology of prepared nanofibers and microparticles containing Ni NPs was characterized by TEM, which demonstrated characteristic structures with good dispersion of Ni NPs. In addition, the prepared structures were studied as a model for hydrogen production applications. The catalytic activity of the prepared materials was studied by in situ hydrolysis of NaBH4, which indicated that the nanofibers containing Ni NPs can lead to produce higher amounts of hydrogen when compared to other microparticles, also reported in this paper. Overall, these results confirm the potential use of these materials in hydrogen production systems. PMID:24436780

  16. Titanium Dioxide as a Catalyst Support in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Samira; Muhd Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili; Bee Abd Hamid, Sharifah

    2014-01-01

    The lack of stability is a challenge for most heterogeneous catalysts. During operations, the agglomeration of particles may block the active sites of the catalyst, which is believed to contribute to its instability. Recently, titanium oxide (TiO2) was introduced as an alternative support material for heterogeneous catalyst due to the effect of its high surface area stabilizing the catalysts in its mesoporous structure. TiO2 supported metal catalysts have attracted interest due to TiO2 nanoparticles high activity for various reduction and oxidation reactions at low pressures and temperatures. Furthermore, TiO2 was found to be a good metal oxide catalyst support due to the strong metal support interaction, chemical stability, and acid-base property. The aforementioned properties make heterogeneous TiO2 supported catalysts show a high potential in photocatalyst-related applications, electrodes for wet solar cells, synthesis of fine chemicals, and others. This review focuses on TiO2 as a support material for heterogeneous catalysts and its potential applications. PMID:25383380

  17. Titanium dioxide fine structures by RF magnetron sputter method deposited on an electron-beam resist mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, Hideomi; Miyazaki, Yuta; Matsushita, Sachiko

    2013-09-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been draw attention for wide range of applications from photonic crystals for visible light range by its catalytic characteristics to tera-hertz range by its high refractive index. We present an experimental study of fabrication of fine structures of TiO2 with a ZEP electron beam resist mask followed by Ti sputter deposition techniques. A TiO2 thin layer of 150 nm thick was grown on an FTO glass substrate with a fine patterned ZEP resist mask by a conventional RF magnetron sputter method with Ti target. The deposition was carried out with argon-oxygen gases at a pressure of 5.0 x 10 -1 Pa in a chamber. During the deposition, ratio of Ar-O2 gas was kept to the ratio of 2:1 and the deposition ratio was around 0.5 Å/s to ensure enough oxygen to form TiO2 and low temperature to avoid deformation of fine pattern of the ZPU resist mask. Deposited TiO2 layers are white-transparent, amorphous, and those roughnesses are around 7 nm. Fabricated TiO2 PCs have wider TiO2 slabs of 112 nm width leaving periodic 410 x 410 nm2 air gaps. We also studied transformation of TiO2 layers and TiO2 fine structures by baking at 500 °C. XRD measurement for TiO2 shows that the amorphous TiO2 transforms to rutile and anatase forms by the baking while keeping the same profile of the fine structures. Our fabrication method can be one of a promising technique to optic devices on researches and industrial area.

  18. Disinfection of titanium dioxide nanotubes using super-oxidized water decrease bacterial viability without disrupting osteoblast behavior.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Partida, Ernesto; Valdez-Salas, Benjamín; Escamilla, Alan; Curiel, Mario; Valdez-Salas, Ernesto; Nedev, Nicola; Bastidas, Jose M

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs) on Ti6Al4V alloy were synthesized by anodization using a commercially available super-oxidized water (SOW). The NT surfaces were sterilized by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and disinfected using SOW. The adhesion and cellular morphology of pig periosteal osteoblast (PPO) cells and the behavior of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) cultured on the sterilized and disinfected surfaces were investigated. A non-anodized Ti6Al4V disc sterilized by UV irradiation (without SOW) was used as control. The results of this study reveal that the adhesion, morphology and filopodia development of PPO cells in NTs are dramatically improved, suggesting that SOW cleaning may not disrupt the benefits obtained by NTs. Significantly decreased bacterial viability in NTs after cleaning with SOW and comparing with non-cleaned NTs was seen. The results suggest that UV and SOW could be a recommendable method for implant sterilization and disinfection without altering osteoblast behavior while decreasing bacterial viability.

  19. Tunable top-down fabrication and functional surface coating of single-crystal titanium dioxide nanostructures and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seungkyu; Janissen, Richard; Ussembayev, Yera Ye; van Oene, Maarten M; Solano, Belen; Dekker, Nynke H

    2016-05-19

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a key component of diverse optical and electronic applications that exploit its exceptional material properties. In particular, the use of TiO2 in its single-crystalline phase can offer substantial advantages over its amorphous and polycrystalline phases for existing and yet-to-be-developed applications. However, the implementation of single-crystal TiO2 has been hampered by challenges in its fabrication and subsequent surface functionalization. Here, we introduce a novel top-down approach that allows for batch fabrication of uniform high-aspect-ratio single-crystal TiO2 nanostructures with targeted sidewall profiles. We complement our fabrication approach with a functionalization strategy that achieves dense, uniform, and area-selective coating with a variety of biomolecules. This allows us to fabricate single-crystal rutile TiO2 nanocylinders tethered with individual DNA molecules for use as force- and torque-transducers in an optical torque wrench. These developments provide the means for increased exploitation of the superior material properties of single-crystal TiO2 at the nanoscale.

  20. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase inflammatory responses in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Newsome, Bradley; Hennig, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Numerous risk factors for endothelial cell inflammation and the development of atherosclerosis have been identified, including inhalation of ultrafine particles. Recently, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) such as titanium (TiO2) NPs have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications. However, there are also great concerns surrounding potential adverse health effects in vascular systems. Although TiO2 NPs are known to induce oxidative stress and inflammation, the associated signaling pathways have not been well studied. The focus of this work, therefore, deals with examination of the cellular signaling pathways responsible for TiO2 NP-induced endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation. In this study, primary vascular endothelial cells were treated with TiO2 NPs for 2-16h at concentrations of 0-50 μg/mL. TiO2 NP exposure increased cellular oxidative stress and DNA binding of NF-κB. Further, phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 was increased in cells exposed to TiO2 NPs. TiO2 NPs also significantly increased induction of mRNA and protein levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Pretreatment with inhibitors for NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate), oxidative stress (epigallocatechin gallate and apocynin), Akt (LY294002), ERK (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and p38 (SB203580) significantly attenuated TiO2 NP-induced MCP-1 and VCAM-1 gene expression. These data indicate that TiO2 NPs can induce endothelial inflammatory responses via redox-sensitive cellular signaling pathways.

  1. Nano-scale analysis of titanium dioxide fingerprint-development powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, A. J.; Jones, B. J.; Sears, V.; Bowman, V.

    2008-08-01

    Titanium dioxide based powders are regularly used in the development of latent fingerprints on dark surfaces. For analysis of prints on adhesive tapes, the titanium dioxide is suspended in a surfactant and used in the form of a small particle reagent (SPR). Analysis of commercially available products shows varying levels of effectiveness of print development, with some powders adhering to the background as well as the print. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of prints developed with different powders show a range of levels of aggregation of particles. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the fingerprint powder shows TiO2 particles with a surrounding coating, tens of nanometres thick, consisting of Al and Si rich material. X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to determine the composition and chemical state of the surface of the powders; with a penetration depth of approximately 10nm, this technique demonstrates differing Ti: Al: Si ratios and oxidation states between the surfaces of different powders. Levels of titanium detected with this technique demonstrate variation in the integrity of the surface coating. The thickness, integrity and composition of the Al/Si-based coating is related to the level of aggregation of TiO2 particles and efficacy of print development.

  2. Preparation of platinum modified titanium dioxide nanoparticles with the use of laser ablation in water.

    PubMed

    Siuzdak, K; Sawczak, M; Klein, M; Nowaczyk, G; Jurga, S; Cenian, A

    2014-08-01

    We report on the preparation method of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide modified with platinum by using nanosecond laser ablation in liquid (LAL). Titania in the form of anatase crystals has been prepared in a two-stage process. Initially, irradiation by laser beam of a titanium metal plate fixed in a glass container filled with deionized water was conducted. After that, the ablation process was continued, with the use of a platinum target placed in a freshly obtained titania colloid. In this work, characterization of the obtained nanoparticles, based on spectroscopic techniques--Raman, X-ray photoelectron and UV-vis reflectance spectroscopy--is given. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to describe particle morphology. On the basis of photocatalytic studies we observed the rate of degradation process of methylene blue (MB) (a model organic pollution) in the presence of Pt modified titania in comparison to pure TiO2--as a reference case. Physical and chemical mechanisms of the formation of platinum modified titania are also discussed here. Stable colloidal suspensions containing Pt modified titanium dioxide crystalline anatase particles show an almost perfect spherical shape with diameters ranging from 5 to 30 nm. The TiO2 nanoparticles decorated with platinum exhibit much higher (up to 30%) photocatalytic activity towards the degradation of MB under UV illumination than pure titania.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and application of iodine modified titanium dioxide in phototcatalytical reactions under visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagwasi, Segomotso; Tian, Baozhu; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jinlong

    2012-02-01

    Iodine doped titanium dioxide has been successfully prepared by simple hydrolysis of tetrabutyl titanate in the presence of iodic acid. The adopted method allowed for the production of spherical iodine doped titaniun dioxide nanoparticles with varied amount of iodine content. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, Raman, transmission electron microscopy as well as UV-vis DRS revealed that titanium dioxide nanostructures were doped with iodine which existed in two different valence states I5+ and I-. The iodine in the form of I5+ is believed to have doped into the lattice whereas I- was well dispersed on the surface of TiO2 probably as iodine adducts hence rendering it to be highly absorbing in visible light region. The I-TiO2 exhibited improved photocatalytic activity toward degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7), methyl orange (MO) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) under visible light over the pristine TiO2 prepared by the same method. High catalytic properties are attributed to iodine doping which led to high specific surface area, absorption in visible region as well as alleviation of charge carrier recombination. The most probable route undertaken in the degradation of AO7 is through indirect oxidation by the hydroxyl radicals.

  4. Binding of plasma proteins to titanium dioxide nanotubes with different diameters

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Flašker, Ajda; Lokar, Maruša; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Mazare, Anca; Artenjak, Andrej; Čučnik, Saša; Kralj, Slavko; Velikonja, Aljaž; Schmuki, Patrik; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are considered to be one of the most applicable materials in medical devices because of their suitable properties, most importantly high corrosion resistance and the specific combination of strength with biocompatibility. In order to improve the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces, the current report initially focuses on specifying the topography of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs) by electrochemical anodization. The zeta potential (ζ-potential) of NTs showed a negative value and confirmed the agreement between the measured and theoretically predicted dependence of ζ-potential on salt concentration, whereby the absolute value of ζ-potential diminished with increasing salt concentrations. We investigated binding of various plasma proteins with different sizes and charges using the bicinchoninic acid assay and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results showed effective and comparatively higher protein binding to NTs with 100 nm diameters (compared to 50 or 15 nm). We also showed a dose-dependent effect of serum amyloid A protein binding to NTs. These results and theoretical calculations of total available surface area for binding of proteins indicate that the largest surface area (also considering the NT lengths) is available for 100 nm NTs, with decreasing surface area for 50 and 15 nm NTs. These current investigations will have an impact on increasing the binding ability of biomedical devices in the body leading to increased durability of biomedical devices. PMID:25733829

  5. Penetration study of formulated nanosized titanium dioxide in models of damaged and sun-irradiated skins.

    PubMed

    Miquel-Jeanjean, Corinne; Crépel, Frédéric; Raufast, Véronique; Payre, Bruno; Datas, Lucien; Bessou-Touya, Sandrine; Duplan, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic ultraviolet filters such as titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), safe to use on healthy skin, are often applied on compromised and irradiated skin. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the cutaneous penetration of TiO(2) nanoparticles (≥20 nm primary size), included in a sunscreen, in intact, damaged, irradiated, and damaged/irradiated pigskin. Cutaneous penetration and localization of TiO(2) after a 24-h sunscreen application were investigated quantitatively using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and qualitatively using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Elemental identity of the nanoparticles was evaluated by TEM-coupled Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX). In intact and damaged/irradiated skins, 102.35±4.20% and 102.84±5.67% of the titanium deposited, respectively, were found at the surface and stratum corneum (SC), whereas only 0.19±0.15% and 0.39±0.39% were found in the viable epidermis and dermis and no titanium was detected in the receptor fluid. TEM-EDX analysis confirmed the presence of titanium in the aggregates formed by TiO(2) at the SC surface, as already characterized in the sunscreen formulation. TiO(2) nanoparticles included in a sunscreen thus remain in the uppermost layers of the SC, whether in intact skin or in compromised and/or skin exposed to simulated solar radiation.

  6. Binding of plasma proteins to titanium dioxide nanotubes with different diameters.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Flašker, Ajda; Lokar, Maruša; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Mazare, Anca; Artenjak, Andrej; Čučnik, Saša; Kralj, Slavko; Velikonja, Aljaž; Schmuki, Patrik; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are considered to be one of the most applicable materials in medical devices because of their suitable properties, most importantly high corrosion resistance and the specific combination of strength with biocompatibility. In order to improve the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces, the current report initially focuses on specifying the topography of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs) by electrochemical anodization. The zeta potential (ζ-potential) of NTs showed a negative value and confirmed the agreement between the measured and theoretically predicted dependence of ζ-potential on salt concentration, whereby the absolute value of ζ-potential diminished with increasing salt concentrations. We investigated binding of various plasma proteins with different sizes and charges using the bicinchoninic acid assay and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results showed effective and comparatively higher protein binding to NTs with 100 nm diameters (compared to 50 or 15 nm). We also showed a dose-dependent effect of serum amyloid A protein binding to NTs. These results and theoretical calculations of total available surface area for binding of proteins indicate that the largest surface area (also considering the NT lengths) is available for 100 nm NTs, with decreasing surface area for 50 and 15 nm NTs. These current investigations will have an impact on increasing the binding ability of biomedical devices in the body leading to increased durability of biomedical devices.

  7. Optical and morphological properties of sol gel derived titanium dioxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. B.; Sharma, S. K.; M, Vishwas; Rao, K. Narasimha

    2015-08-01

    Titanium oxide (Titania) thin films were synthesized on different substrates via the sol-gel dip-coating method using alkoxide solution. Some selected samples were also prepared with different percentage of Lead (Pb). The influence of Pb addition in precursor sol on the optical properties of titanium dioxide thin films was studied. The optical transmittance in the visible region has increased with increase in weight percentage of lead. The refractive index was slightly decreased with Pb addition. Crystallization of these coatings was achieved through thermal annealing at temperatures above 400 °C. The structural properties and surface morphology of the crystallized coatings were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Increase in average grain size from 250 nm to 350 nm with increase in Pb concentration is observed. Films were appeared to more coarse with increase in Pb addition. An increase in Pb addition resulted increase in average roughness from 12 nm to 25 nm.

  8. Optical and morphological properties of sol gel derived titanium dioxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. B.; Sharma, S. K.; M, Vishwas; Rao, K. Narasimha

    2015-08-28

    Titanium oxide (Titania) thin films were synthesized on different substrates via the sol-gel dip-coating method using alkoxide solution. Some selected samples were also prepared with different percentage of Lead (Pb). The influence of Pb addition in precursor sol on the optical properties of titanium dioxide thin films was studied. The optical transmittance in the visible region has increased with increase in weight percentage of lead. The refractive index was slightly decreased with Pb addition. Crystallization of these coatings was achieved through thermal annealing at temperatures above 400 °C. The structural properties and surface morphology of the crystallized coatings were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Increase in average grain size from 250 nm to 350 nm with increase in Pb concentration is observed. Films were appeared to more coarse with increase in Pb addition. An increase in Pb addition resulted increase in average roughness from 12 nm to 25 nm.

  9. Synthesis of nano-titanium dioxide by sol-gel route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, Vandana; Duchaniya, R. K.; Pandel, U.

    2016-04-01

    Nanosized titanium dioxide powder was synthesised via sol-gel route by hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide with ethanol and water mixture in high acidic medium. The synthesized nanopowder was further characterized by X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and Ultraviolet Visible Spectroscopy in order to determine size, morphology and crystalline structure of the material. The synthesis of nano-TiO2 powder in anatase phase was realized by XRD. The optical studies of nano-TiO2 powder was carried out by UV-Vis spectroscopy and band gap was calculated as 3.5eV, The SEM results with EDAX confirmed that prepared nano-TiO2 particles were in nanometer range with irregular morphology. The FTIR analysis showed that only desired functional groups were present in sample. These nano-TiO2 particles have applications in solar cells, chemical sensors and paints, which are thrust areas these days.

  10. Examining the efficiency of muffle furnance-induced alkaline hydrolysis in determining the titanium content of environmental samples containing engineered titanium dioxide particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel muffle furnace (MF)-based potassium hydroxide (KOH) fusion digestion technique was developed and its comparative digestion and dissolution efficacy for different titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs)/environmental matrices was evaluated. Digestion of different enviro...

  11. Possibilities of surface coating for thermal insulation. [zirconium dioxide, titanium dioxide, and zircon coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, E.; Weisser, G.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations performed for pulsating heat sources indicate a relatively thin (200-1000 micron) coating can lower temperature both inside and on the surface of a construction material. Various coating materials (including zirconium dioxide) are discussed, together with possible thermic stresses and ways to deal with the latter.

  12. Air Stable Doping and Intrinsic Mobility Enhancement in Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide by Amorphous Titanium Suboxide Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Amritesh; Valsaraj, Amithraj; Movva, Hema C. P.; Roy, Anupam; Ghosh, Rudresh; Sonde, Sushant; Kang, Sangwoo; Chang, Jiwon; Trivedi, Tanuj; Dey, Rik; Guchhait, Samaresh; Larentis, Stefano; Register, Leonard F.; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-07-01

    To reduce Schottky-barrier-induced contact and access resistance, and the impact of charged impurity and phonon scattering on mobility in devices based on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), considerable effort has been put into exploring various doping techniques and dielectric engineering using $high-\\kappa$ oxides, respectively. The goal of this work is to demonstrate a $high-\\kappa$ dielectric that serves as an effective n-type charge transfer dopant on monolayer (ML) molybdenum disulfide ($MoS_{2}$). Utilizing amorphous titanium suboxide (ATO) as the '$high-\\kappa$ dopant', we achieved a contact resistance of ~ $180$ ${\\Omega}.{\\mu}m$ which is the lowest reported value for ML $MoS_{2}$. An ON current as high as $240$ ${\\mu}A/{\\mu}m$ and field effect mobility as high as $83$ $cm^2/V-s$ were realized using this doping technique. Moreover, intrinsic mobility as high as $102$ $cm^2/V-s$ at $300$ $K$ and $501$ $cm^2/V-s$ at $77$ $K$ were achieved after ATO encapsulation which are among the highest mobility values reported on ML $MoS_{2}$. We also analyzed the doping effect of ATO films on ML $MoS_{2}$, a phenomenon which is absent when stoichiometric $TiO_{2}$ is used, using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations which shows excellent agreement with our experimental findings. Based on the interfacial-oxygen-vacancy mediated doping as seen in the case of $high-\\kappa$ ATO - ML $MoS_{2}$, we propose a mechanism for the mobility enhancement effect observed in TMD-based devices after encapsulation in a $high-\\kappa$ dielectric environment.

  13. Hydrogen-Induced Rupture of Strained Si-O Bonds in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Al-Moatasem; Watkins, Matthew B.; Grasser, Tibor; Afanas'ev, Valery V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2015-03-01

    Using ab initio modeling we demonstrate that H atoms can break strained Si-O bonds in continuous amorphous silicon dioxide (a -SiO2 ) networks, resulting in a new defect consisting of a threefold-coordinated Si atom with an unpaired electron facing a hydroxyl group, adding to the density of dangling bond defects, such as E' centers. The energy barriers to form this defect from interstitial H atoms range between 0.5 and 1.3 eV. This discovery of unexpected reactivity of atomic hydrogen may have significant implications for our understanding of processes in silica glass and nanoscaled silica, e.g., in porous low-permittivity insulators, and strained variants of a -SiO2 .

  14. Risk assessment of amorphous silicon dioxide nanoparticles in a glass cleaner formulation.

    PubMed

    Michel, Karin; Scheel, Julia; Karsten, Stefan; Stelter, Norbert; Wind, Thorsten

    2013-08-01

    Since nanomaterials are a heterogeneous group of substances used in various applications, risk assessment needs to be done on a case-by-case basis. Here the authors assess the risk (hazard and exposure) of a glass cleaner with synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide (SAS) nanoparticles during production and consumer use (spray application). As the colloidal material used is similar to previously investigated SAS, the hazard profile was considered to be comparable. Overall, SAS has a low toxicity. Worker exposure was analysed to be well controlled. The particle size distribution indicated that the aerosol droplets were in a size range not expected to reach the alveoli. Predictive modelling was used to approximate external exposure concentrations. Consumer and environmental exposure were estimated conservatively and were not of concern. It was concluded based on the available weight-of-evidence that the production and application of the glass cleaner is safe for humans and the environment under intended use conditions.

  15. Titanium Dioxide in Pyroclastic Layers from Volcanoes in the Cascad Range.

    PubMed

    Czamanske, G K; Porter, S C

    1965-11-19

    Rapid determinations of titanium dioxide have been made by x-ray emission techniques to evaluate the potentiality of using the TiO(2) content of samples for checking field correlations and assisting in identification of pyroclastic units from Cascade volcanoes. Preliminary data suggest that the two most wide-spread units have characteristic ranges of TiO(2) content and that other, less extensive layers have ranges which, though characteristic, often overlap the ranges of the more widespread layers. Relative to fresh samples,. weathered samples from B and C soil horizons are enriched in TiO(2).

  16. Interdigitated electrode (IDE) based on titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films for biosensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, N.; Hashim, U.; Azizah, N.

    2016-07-01

    Sensor is the device that can detect and produce output or response that comes from any input from the physical environment. In this study, sensor is developed by simple photolithography process to create a small IDE device. The device is coated with Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) to give the positive result in detection. The result shows the device with coating stabilized at 2.46×10-10 compare to device without TiO2 which only at 2.24×10-10. IDE device is reusable and can use many times for different kind of detection.

  17. Electrical and mechanical properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticle filled epoxy resin composites

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; More, Karren Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution. They were dispersed into an epoxy polymer matrix (commercially available under the trade name Araldite 5808) using a planetary mixer. Nanocomposite materials were prepared with several weight loadings of nanoparticles. In this work we investigate the effects of the particle agglomeration on the mechanical and electrical properties of the composites. The structure of the composites was probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For investigating the mechanical properties, a dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) was employed. The dielectric breakdown strength and the impedance response were also measured in order to characterize the insulating properties of the nanocomposites and their potential use in high voltage applications.

  18. Titanium dioxide nanofiber-cotton targets for efficient multi-keV x-ray generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nagai, Keiji; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Mima, Kunioki; Gu, Zhong-Ze; Pan, Chao; Girard, Frederic; Primout, Michel; Villette, Bruno; Brebion, Didier; Fournier, Kevin B.; Fujishima, Akira

    2008-08-04

    Multi-keV x-ray generation from low-density (27{+-}7 mg/cm{sup 3}) nanofiber-cotton targets composed of titanium dioxide has been investigated. The cotton targets were heated volumetrically and supersonically to a peak electron temperature of 2.3 keV, which is optimal to yield Ti K-shell x rays. Considerable enhancement of conversion efficiency [(3.7{+-}0.5)%] from incident laser energy into Ti K-shell x rays (4-6 keV band) was attained in comparison with that [(1.4{+-}0.9)%] for a planar Ti-foil target.

  19. Investigation of the Effects of MIR-FELIrradiation on the Photoluminescence of Titanium Dioxides

    SciTech Connect

    Sonobe, T.; Hachiya, K.; Bakr, M.; Yoshida, K.; Higashimura, K.; Kinjo, R.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.

    2010-02-03

    A mid-infrared free electron laser (MIR-FEL: 5 {mu}m-20 {mu}m) facility (KU-FEL: Kyoto University Free Electron Laser) has been constructed in Institute of Advanced Energy Kyoto University, and first laser saturation at 13.2 {mu}m was achieved in May 2008. Currently, we have started to develop the application of MIR-FEL in the field of energy and material science. This study aimed at investigating the feasibility for the development of new evaluation technique of electron-phonon interaction in metal oxides by MIR-FEL. A preliminary result of electrical and optical properties of titanium dioxides was presented.

  20. Titanium dioxide in pyroclastic layers from volcanoes in the cascade range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Porter, S.C.

    1965-01-01

    Rapid determinations of titanium dioxide have been made by x-ray emission techniques to evaluate the potentiality of using the TiO2 content of samples for checking field correlations and assisting in identification of pyroclastic units from Cascade volcanoes. Preliminary data suggest that the two most wide-spread units have characteristic ranges of TiO2 content and that other, less extensive layers have ranges which, though characteristic, often overlap the ranges of the more widespread layers. Relative to fresh samples, weathered samples from B and C soil horizons are enriched in TiO 2.

  1. ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLE FILLED EPOXY RESIN COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Polizos, G.; Tuncer, E.; Sauers, I.; James, D. R.; Ellis, A. R.; More, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution. They were dispersed into an epoxy polymer matrix (commercially available under the trade name Araldite 5808) using a planetary mixer. Nanocomposite materials were prepared with several weight loadings of nanoparticles In this work we Investigate the effects of the particle agglomeration on the mechanical and electrical properties of the composites. The structure of the composites was probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For investigating the mechanical properties, a dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) was employed. The dielectric breakdown strength and the impedance response were also measured in order to characterize the insulating properties of the nanocomposites and their potential use in high voltage applications.

  2. Titanium dioxide nanofiber-cotton targets for efficient multi-keV x-ray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nagai, Keiji; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Gu, Zhong-Ze; Pan, Chao; Girard, Frederic; Primout, Michel; Villette, Bruno; Brebion, Didier; Fournier, Kevin B.; Fujishima, Akira; Mima, Kunioki

    2008-08-01

    Multi-keV x-ray generation from low-density (27±7mg/cm3) nanofiber-cotton targets composed of titanium dioxide has been investigated. The cotton targets were heated volumetrically and supersonically to a peak electron temperature of 2.3keV, which is optimal to yield Ti K-shell x rays. Considerable enhancement of conversion efficiency [(3.7±0.5)%] from incident laser energy into Ti K-shell x rays (4-6keV band) was attained in comparison with that [(1.4±0.9)%] for a planar Ti-foil target.

  3. Optical properties and radiation stability of submicro- and nanopowders titanium dioxide measured in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, M. M.; Neshchimenko, V. V.; Yuryev, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    This study carried out an in situ and external investigation on the reflective spectra of micro- and nanopowders titanium dioxide before and after irradiation by 30 keV electrons. The particle sizes range from 60-240 nm. It was established that the decrease in the particle size leads to an increase in intrinsic defects. The particles with intrinsic defects are then transformed into absorption centers during irradiation as a result of optical degradation of TiO2 powders. High radiation stability has particle sizes range from 80-160 nm.

  4. Fabrication of titanium dioxide nanotube arrays using organic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoriya, Sorachon

    to ~2 microm. In comparison to DMSO electrolyte, the electrochemical anodization rates are relatively slower in DEG electrolyte; as a result, the nanotube length is typically less than 10 microm. Pore size of nanotubes grown in DEG has been extended from 150 nm up to approximately 400 nm. The approach to pore widening could be achieved by using a specific condition of low HF concentration and prolonged anodization time. The study of evolution of nanotubes grown in DEG electrolytes showed that a fibrous layer was formed in the early growth stages and then was chemically and gradually removed after a long duration, leaving behind the nanotubes with large pore size. In DEG electrolyte, the closer spacing between Ti and Pt electrodes resulted in the larger nanotube morphological parameters due to the enhanced electrode kinetics facilitating the electrode reactions. Furthermore, this dissertation showed possibilities to crystallize the titania nanotube array films at room temperature via anodization in either DMSO or DEG electrolytes. The partially crystallized films could be achieved specifically in the optimum slow growth process conditions. Due to partial crystallization of the as-anodized samples, the high temperature annealing study revealed that the temperatures of phase transformation are 260 ºC and 430°C for respectively amorphous to anatase and anatase to rutile, which are accounted as the lowest phase transformation temperatures reported to date (2010). Finally, the photoelectrochemical properties of the DMSO fabricated nanotubes were investigated. The maximum photocurrent density of ~ 11 mA cm--2 was achieved by using the 46-microm long nanotube array sample with completely open pores, and photoconversion efficiencies of 5.425 % (+/- 0.087) (under UV light) and 0.197 % (+/- 0.001) (under solar spectrum AM 1.5) have been demonstrated. Biomedical applications of the DEG fabricated nanotube arrays films such as blood clotting, hemocompatibility, and drug

  5. Titanium dioxide nanotube films: Preparation, characterization and electrochemical biosensitivity towards alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Roman, Ioan; Trusca, Roxana Doina; Soare, Maria-Laura; Fratila, Corneliu; Krasicka-Cydzik, Elzbieta; Stan, Miruna-Silvia; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2014-04-01

    Titania nanotubes (TNTs) were prepared by anodization on different substrates (titanium, Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb alloys) in ethylene glycol and glycerol. The influence of the applied potential and processing time on the nanotube diameter and length is analyzed. The as-formed nanotube layers are amorphous but they become crystalline when subjected to subsequent thermal treatment in air at 550°C; TNT layers grown on titanium and Ti6Al4V alloy substrates consist of anatase and rutile, while those grown on Ti6Al7Nb alloy consist only of anatase. The nanotube layers grown on Ti6Al7Nb alloy are less homogeneous, with supplementary islands of smaller diameter nanotubes, spread across the surface. Better adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts was found for the nanotubes grown on all three substrates by comparison to an unprocessed titanium plate. The sensitivity towards bovine alkaline phosphatase was investigated mainly by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in relation to the crystallinity, the diameter and the nature of the anodization electrolyte of the TNT/Ti samples. The measuring capacity of the annealed nanotubes of 50nm diameter grown in glycerol was demonstrated and the corresponding calibration curve was built for the concentration range of 0.005-0.1mg/mL.

  6. The Infrared Spectra and Absorption Intensities of Amorphous Ices: Methane and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark J.

    2015-11-01

    Our research group is carrying out new IR measurements of icy solids relevant to the outer solar system and the interstellar medium, with an emphasis on amorphous and crystalline ices below ~70 K. Our goal is to add to the relatively meager literature on this subject and to provide electronic versions of state-of-the-art data, since the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate reference spectra and IR band strengths. In the past year, we have focused on two of the simplest and most abundant components of icy bodies in the solar system - methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Infrared spectra from ˜ 4500 to 500 cm-1 have been measured for each of these molecules in μm-thick films at temperatures from 10 to 70 K. All known amorphous and crystalline phases have been reproduced and, for some, presented for the first time. We also report measurements of the index of refraction at 670 nm and the mass densities for each ice phase. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible. Electronic versions of our new results are available at http://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/691/cosmicice/ constants.html.

  7. Ammonia sensing using lossy mode resonances in a tapered optical fibre coated with porphyrin-incorporated titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Divya; Mullaney, Kevin; Korposh, Serhiy; James, Stephen W.; Lee, Seung-Woo; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2016-05-01

    The development of an ammonia sensor, formed by the deposition of a functionalised titanium dioxide film onto a tapered optical fibre is presented. The titanium dioxide coating allows the coupling of light from the fundamental core mode to a lossy mode supported by the coating, thus creating lossy mode resonance (LMR) in the transmission spectrum. The porphyrin compound that was used to functionalise the coating was removed from the titanium dioxide coating upon exposure to ammonia, causing a change in the refractive index of the coating and a concomitant shift in the central wavelength of the lossy mode resonance. Concentrations of ammonia as small as 1ppm was detected with a response time of less than 1min.

  8. Kinetic analysis of photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase formaldehyde over titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongmin; Lian, Zhiwei; Ye, Xiaojiang; Shangguan, Wenfeng

    2005-07-01

    Degradation of formaldehyde with different initial concentration over titanium dioxide was carried out in a photocatalytic reactor. Photocatalytic rates were well described by the simplified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The kinetic analysis shows that the apparent first-order reaction coefficient is lower and half-life of photocatalysis is longer for low concentration than for high concentration formaldehyde. A network formation model of the photocatalytic products was established. Experimental results and analysis demonstrate that carbon dioxide concentration and carbon monoxide concentration in gas phase vary exponentially with the illumination time and may be even higher than gas-phase formaldehyde concentration if there is much pre-adsorbed formaldehyde in adsorption equilibrium on catalysts before illumination. Carbon monoxide is found to be one of the by-products during formaldehyde photooxidation.

  9. The effect of doping titanium dioxide nanoparticles on phase transformation, photocatalytic activity and anti-bacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzby, Scott Edward

    Nanosized titanium dioxide has a variety of important applications in everyday life including a photocatalyst for pollution remediation, photovoltaic devices, sunscreen, etc. This study focuses on the various properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles doped with various cation and anion species. Samples were produced by various methods including metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), plasma assisted metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (PA-MOCVD) and sol-gel. Numerous techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron microscopy both scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) were used for physical characterization. Photocatalytic properties were determined by the oxidation of methylene blue dye and 2-chlorophenol in water as well as gaseous formic acid with results analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and ultra violet - visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS). For the purpose of enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the effect of anion doping and the anatase-rutile phase ratio were studied. Although anatase, rutile and mixed crystallite phases all show some degree of activity in photocatalytic reactions, these results show that anatase is better suited for the degradation of organic compounds in an aqueous medium any advantage in photocatalytic activity gained through the enhancement in optical response from the smaller band gap by addition of rutile was overcome by the negatives associated with the rutile phase. Furthermore substitutional nitrogen doping showed significant improvement in UV photocatalysis as well as allowing for visible light activation of the catalyst. Further studies on the phase transitions in titanium dioxide nanoparticles were carried out by synthesizing various cation doped samples by sol-gel. Analysis of the phases by XRD showed an inverse relationship between dopant size and rutile percentage

  10. [Influence of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the expression of genes of biomarkers of inflammatory responses and apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Baranova, L A; Zhornik, E V; Volotovski, I D

    2015-01-01

    In order to evaluate the toxic effect of silver (AgNP) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles their influence on the expression of genes of biomarkers of inflammatory responses and apoptosis in human lymphocytes was studied. An increase in the IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and p53 genes expression in the concentration range of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles of 10-40 μk g/ml was found. Increased expression of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and p53 genes under the nanoparticles action indicates the stimulation of the immune system and of apoptosis, respectively.

  11. Effect of doping on the photocatalytic, electronic and mechanical properties of sol-gel titanium dioxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtoglu, Murat

    Heterogeneous photocatalysis has been an active research area over the last decade as a promising solution for energy generation and environmental problems which has led to promising applications from air and water purification systems, self-cleaning and self-sterilizing surfaces to solar cells and hydrogen production from water dissociation reaction. Titanium dioxide (TiO2), an abundant material with a high photocatalytic efficiency and chemical stability, is undoubtedly the most widely studied and used among all photocatalytic materials. Although titanium dioxide has been used in powder form, its immobilized form (film) is necessary from practical application standpoint. However, there are several shortcomings of titanium dioxide films that need to be addressed to realize a wide range of successful applications: lack of visible light activity, poisoning of the catalytic performance by the substrate and the low surface area compared to powder forms. In addition, mechanical properties of such films have not been investigated thoroughly, which may be critical when abrasion and weathering resistance are necessary. To address each of these issues, a systematic experimental and theoretical investigation of doping titanium dioxide films with a variety of elements were conducted. Utilizing theoretical calculations to filter elements for experimental studies as well as interpretation of the experimental results, several dopant or dopant combinations were found to remedy some of the issues of photocatalytic titanium dioxide films. Doping with 32 metals, nitrogen and 11 metal-nitrogen combinations are investigated theoretically and the results are used as guideline for the experimental studies. Particular attention is given to certain metal dopants such as Cr, V, Mo, Ta and Ga not just because of their relatively modest cost but also their non-toxicity and wide availability of their compatible compounds for sol-gel synthesis. While metal-dopants improved the overall

  12. Nanotubular Heterostructure of Tin Dioxide/Titanium Dioxide as a Binder-Free Anode in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungjun; Lee, Joobong; Lee, Seonhee; Seo, Seongrok; Bae, Changdeuck; Shin, Hyunjung

    2015-07-20

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2 ), tin dioxide (SnO2 ), and heterostructured TiO2 /SnO2 nanotube (NT) arrays have been fabricated by template-assisted atomic-layer deposition (ALD) for use as anodes in a lithium-ion battery (LIB). TiO2 NT arrays with 8 nm thick walls showed higher capacity (≈250 mA h g(-1) after the 50th cycle at a rate of C/10) than the typical theoretical capacity of bulk TiO2 and a radically improved capacity retention property upon cycling. SnO2 NT arrays with different wall thicknesses (8, 10, 13, and 20 nm) were also fabricated and their electrochemical performances were measured. All of the SnO2 NT arrays showed substantially higher initial irreversible capacity and higher reversible capacity than those of bulk TiO2 . Thinner walls of the SnO2 NTs result in better capacity retention. Heterotubular structures of TiO2 (5 nm)/SnO2 (10 nm)/TiO2 (5 nm) were successfully fabricated, and displayed a sufficiently high capacity (≈300 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles) with exceptionally improved cycling performance up to the 50th cycle.

  13. Enhanced photoactivity of graphene/titanium dioxide nanotubes for removal of Acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Hong; Liang, Xiao; Zhang, Qian; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is commonly used as an antipyretic or analgesics agent and poses threat to human health. In this research, TiO2 and graphite oxide were used as precursors of titanium dioxide nanotubes and graphene respectively. Titanium dioxide nanotube and graphene (GR-TNT) nanocomposites were synthesized through a hydrothermal method. FT-IR, UV-Vis, XRD, and TGA were used to characterize the catalysts. The acetaminophen degradation rate can reach up to 96% under UV light irradiation for 3 h and with the 5% GR-TNT dosage of 0.1 g L-1. Further experiments were done to probe the mechanism of the photocatalytic reaction catalyzed by the GR-TNT composite. EDTA (hole scavengers) and t-BuOH (radical scavengers) were used to detect the main active oxidative species in the system. The results showed that the holes are the main oxidation species in the photocatalytic process. This study provides a new prospect for acetaminophen degradation by using high efficiency catalysts.

  14. A reproducible number-based sizing method for pigment-grade titanium dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Kluwig, Manfred; Koch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary A strong demand for reliable characterization methods of particulate materials is triggered by the prospect of forthcoming national and international regulations concerning the classification of nanomaterials. Scientific efforts towards standardized number-based sizing methods have so far been concentrated on model systems, such as spherical gold or silica nanoparticles. However, for industrial particulate materials, which are typically targets of regulatory efforts, characterisation is in most cases complicated by irregular particle shapes, broad size distributions and a strong tendency to agglomeration. Reliable sizing methods that overcome these obstacles, and are practical for industrial use, are still lacking. By using the example of titanium dioxide, this paper shows that both necessities are well met by the sophisticated counting algorithm presented here, which is based on the imaging of polished sections of embedded particles and subsequent automated image analysis. The data presented demonstrate that the typical difficulties of sizing processes are overcome by the proposed method of sample preparation and image analysis. In other words, a robust, reproducible and statistically reliable method is presented, which leads to a number-based size distribution of pigment-grade titanium dioxide, for example, and therefore allows reliable classification of this material according to forthcoming regulations. PMID:25383293

  15. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Increase Sensitivity in the Next Generation of the Water Flea Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Seitz, Frank; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R.; Schulz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The nanoparticle industry is expected to become a trillion dollar business in the near future. Therefore, the unintentional introduction of nanoparticles into the environment is increasingly likely. However, currently applied risk-assessment practices require further adaptation to accommodate the intrinsic nature of engineered nanoparticles. Combining a chronic flow-through exposure system with subsequent acute toxicity tests for the standard test organism Daphnia magna, we found that juvenile offspring of adults that were previously exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit a significantly increased sensitivity to titanium dioxide nanoparticles compared with the offspring of unexposed adults, as displayed by lower 96 h-EC50 values. This observation is particularly remarkable because adults exhibited no differences among treatments in terms of typically assessed endpoints, such as sensitivity, number of offspring, or energy reserves. Hence, the present study suggests that ecotoxicological research requires further development to include the assessment of the environmental risks of nanoparticles for the next and hence not directly exposed generation, which is currently not included in standard test protocols. PMID:23145038

  16. Photo-decolorization and detoxification of toxic dyes using titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Farzana, M Hasmath; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2014-09-01

    The removal of three different dyes namely Reactive Red 2 (RR), Methylene Blue (MB) and Rhodamine B (RB) using titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads (TCB) by photocatalytic method has been studied. The TCB was characterized by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectral studies and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDAX). The photocatalytic activity of TCB for the decolorization of the three dyes is much higher than that of bare titanium dioxide, which can be attributed to the synergistic effect of TiO2 and chitosan. The chitosan adsorbs dye molecule which continuously supplies, dye molecule for degradation by TiO2 thereby preventing the electron-hole recombination. The photocatalytic experiment was carried out by varying different parameters such as irradiation time, dosage, pH, substrate concentration and co-ions. The kinetics of decolorization of dyes are explained on the basis of Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The mineralization of dyes has also been confirmed by COD measurements.

  17. Cytotoxicity Evaluation of pH-Controlled Antitumor Drug Release System of Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Yuan, Lulu; Yao, Chenjie; Fang, Jie; Wu, Minghong

    2015-06-01

    Application of nanotechnology and nanomaterials in cancer therapeutics has attracted much attention in recent years. Nano titanium dioxide is one of the most important inorganic functional materials. Cellular toxicity of pH-controlled antitumor drug release system of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TiO2-NTs) in pancreatic cancer cells (SW1990) was evaluated in this paper. The anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) was easily loaded on TiO2-NTs through adsorption forces because of its high specific surface area and perfect surface activity. The drug release from the nanotubes was pH dependent. The toxicological effects were studied after co-incubation of SW1990 with TiO2-NTs-DOX, TiO2-NTs and DOX, respectively. The cellular effect of DOX released from the TiO2-NTs-DOX was same as when DOX was used alone, indicating that the synthesized TiO2-NTs are well qualified as drug carriers in antitumor drug controlled-release system.

  18. Electrospray deposition of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Halimi, Siti Umairah Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu Ismail, Siti Norazian Hashib, Syafiza Abd; Naim, M. Nazli

    2014-02-24

    Deposition of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles was conducted by using eletrospray method. 0.05wt% of titanium dioxide suspension was prepared and characterized by using Malvern Zetasizer prior to the experiment. From Zetasizer results, stable suspension condition was obtained which is at pH 2 with zeta potential value of ±29.0 mV. In this electrospraying, the suspension was pumped at flowrate of 5 ml/hr by using syringe pump. The input voltage of 2.1 kV was applied at the nozzle tip and counter electrode. Electrosprayed particles were collected on the grounded aluminium plate substrate which was placed at 10–20 cm from counter electrode. Particles were then characterized using FESEM and average size of electrosprayed particles obtained. Initial droplet size was calculated by scaling law and compared with FE-SEM results in order to prove droplet fission occur during electrospray. Due to the results obtained, as the working distance increase from 10–20 cm the deposited TiO{sub 2} droplet size decrease from 247–116 nm to show droplet fission occur during the experiment.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of copper ions surface-doped titanium dioxide nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Li Haibin Duan Xuechen; Liu Guocong; Li Lili

    2008-08-04

    Copper ions surface-doped titanium dioxide nanotubes were prepared via an assembly process based on the reactions between Cu(NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2} and hydroxide radicals on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, followed by the heat treatment in air at 723 K. The as-prepared samples were characterized with infrared spectroscopy (IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy (FL). The photocatalytic activity of the copper ions surface-doped titanium dioxide nanotubes was investigated by photodegradation of Rhodamine B. The results showed that copper ions were successfully introduced onto the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. And two kinds of copper species of Cu(I) and Cu(II) were found on TiO{sub 2} surface. Copper ions act as electron trappers facilitating the separation of electrons and holes on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, which allows more efficiency for the photodegradation of Rhodamine B.

  20. Photo-decolorization and detoxification of toxic dyes using titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Farzana, M Hasmath; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2014-09-01

    The removal of three different dyes namely Reactive Red 2 (RR), Methylene Blue (MB) and Rhodamine B (RB) using titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads (TCB) by photocatalytic method has been studied. The TCB was characterized by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectral studies and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDAX). The photocatalytic activity of TCB for the decolorization of the three dyes is much higher than that of bare titanium dioxide, which can be attributed to the synergistic effect of TiO2 and chitosan. The chitosan adsorbs dye molecule which continuously supplies, dye molecule for degradation by TiO2 thereby preventing the electron-hole recombination. The photocatalytic experiment was carried out by varying different parameters such as irradiation time, dosage, pH, substrate concentration and co-ions. The kinetics of decolorization of dyes are explained on the basis of Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The mineralization of dyes has also been confirmed by COD measurements. PMID:25038261

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of titanium dioxide nanotubes as novel lithium adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Moazeni, Maryam; Hajipour, Hengameh; Askari, Masoud; Nusheh, Mohammad

    2015-01-15

    The ion exchange process is a promising method for lithium extraction from brine and seawater having low concentrations of this element. To achieve this goal, it is vital to use an effective adsorbent with maximum lithium adsorption potential together with a stable structure during extraction and insertion of the ions. In this study, titanium dioxide and then lithium titanate spinel with nanotube morphology was synthesized via a simple two-step hydrothermal process. The produced Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} spinel ternary oxide nanotube with about 70 nm diameter was then treated with dilute acidic solution in order to prepare an adsorbent suitable for lithium adsorption from local brine. Morphological and phase analysis of the obtained nanostructured samples were done by using transmission and scanning electron microscopes along with X-ray diffraction. Lithium ion exchange capacity of this adsorbent was finally evaluated by means of adsorption isotherm. The results showed titanium dioxide adsorbent could recover 39.43 mg/g of the lithium present in 120 mg/L of lithium solution.

  2. Surface character and membranolytic activity of rutile and anatase: two titanium dioxide polymorphs.

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, R P; Langer, A M; Weisman, I; Herson, G B

    1987-01-01

    Biological studies of two titanium dioxide polymorphs, rutile and anatase, have produced conflicting results. Generally, the in vivo and in vitro methods used to evaluate pneumoconiotic dusts have shown the polymorphs to be inert, but occasionally both minerals have been reported to produce effects consistent with biologically active minerals. Many of these reports failed to specify which polymorph was used experimentally. While this limited the value of the data, the problem was further compounded by the variation in the surface properties of each polymorph depending on whether the specimen was a naturally occurring mineral or was made synthetically. Five naturally occurring and 11 synthetically produced titanium dioxide specimens were studied. The physical characterisation of each specimen entailed the determination of the polymorph type(s) by continuous scan x ray diffraction and the size distribution by transmission electron microscopy. The ability of each specimen to lyse erythrocytes was determined and compared with quartz. Only two, both synthetic rutiles, were found to be active. The hydrogen bonding ability of the surfaces of these rutiles were compared with inert rutile and quartz. The binding properties of the active rutile have been found to be consistent with those properties associated with biologically active quartz. The surface properties of rutile are the determinants of its activity. Because natural and synthetic rutiles possess different surface properties, they display different activities. Images PMID:3676122

  3. Titanium dioxide antireflection coating for silicon solar cells by spray deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, W.; Tracy, E.

    1980-01-01

    A high-speed production process is described for depositing a single-layer, quarter-wavelength thick antireflection coating of titanium dioxide on metal-patterned single-crystal silicon solar cells for terrestrial applications. Controlled atomization spraying of an organotitanium solution was selected as the most cost-effective method of film deposition using commercial automated equipment. The optimal composition consists of titanium isopropoxide as the titanium source, n-butyl acetate as the diluent solvent, sec-butanol as the leveling agent, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol to render the material uniformly depositable. Application of the process to the coating of circular, large-diameter solar cells with either screen-printed silver metallization or with vacuum-evaporated Ti/Pd/Ag metallization showed increases of over 40% in the electrical conversion efficiency. Optical characteristics, corrosion resistance, and several other important properties of the spray-deposited film are reported. Experimental evidence indicates a wide tolerance in the coating thickness upon the overall efficiency of the cell. Considerations pertaining to the optimization of AR coatings in general are discussed, and a comprehensive critical survey of the literature is presented.

  4. Tissue distribution and elimination after oral and intravenous administration of different titanium dioxide nanoparticles in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to obtain kinetic data that can be used in human risk assessment of titanium dioxide nanomaterials. Methods Tissue distribution and blood kinetics of various titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NM-100, NM-101, NM-102, NM-103, and NM-104), which differ with respect to primary particle size, crystalline form and hydrophobicity, were investigated in rats up to 90 days post-exposure after oral and intravenous administration of a single or five repeated doses. Results For the oral study, liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were selected as target tissues for titanium (Ti) analysis. Ti-levels in liver and spleen were above the detection limit only in some rats. Titanium could be detected at low levels in mesenteric lymph nodes. These results indicate that some minor absorption occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, but to a very limited extent. Both after single and repeated intravenous (IV) exposure, titanium rapidly distributed from the systemic circulation to all tissues evaluated (i.e. liver, spleen, kidney, lung, heart, brain, thymus, reproductive organs). Liver was identified as the main target tissue, followed by spleen and lung. Total recovery (expressed as % of nominal dose) for all four tested nanomaterials measured 24 h after single or repeated exposure ranged from 64-95% or 59-108% for male or female animals, respectively. During the 90 days post-exposure period, some decrease in Ti-levels was observed (mainly for NM-100 and NM-102) with a maximum relative decrease of 26%. This was also confirmed by the results of the kinetic analysis which revealed that for each of the investigated tissues the half-lifes were considerable (range 28–650 days, depending on the TiO2-particle and tissue investigated). Minor differences in kinetic profile were observed between the various particles, though these could not be clearly related to differences in primary particle size or hydrophobicity. Some indications were observed for an

  5. Determination of trace impurities in titanium dioxide by direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dočekal, Bohumil; Vojtková, Blanka

    2007-03-01

    A true direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method with Zeeman-effect background correction (Analytik Jena ZEEnit 60 AAS) was developed for the determination of As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb and Zn in powdered titanium dioxide of pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics grade. The interaction of the titanium matrix and graphite surface of the sample carrier boat in a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer was investigated. Conversion of titanium dioxide to interfering TiO 2-TiC-liquid phase, running out the sampling boat, was observed at temperatures above 2000 °C. The temperature program was optimized accordingly for these volatile analytes in atomization and cleaning steps in order to prevent this interference and to prolong significantly the analytical lifetime of the boat to more than one thousand runs. For all elements, calibration by aqueous standard addition method, by wet-chemically analyzed samples with different content of analytes and/or by dosing one sample in different amounts, were proved as adequate quantification procedures. Linear dynamic calibration working ranges can be considerably expanded up to two orders of magnitude within one measurement run by applying three-field dynamic mode of the Zeeman background correction system. The results obtained by true direct solid sampling technique are compared with those of other independent, mostly wet-chemical methods. Very low limits of detection (3 σ criterion) of true solid sampling technique of 21, 0.27, 24, 3.9, 6.3 and 0.9 ng g - 1 were achieved for As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb and Zn, respectively.

  6. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crosera, Matteo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Larese Filon, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L) in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue® and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays) was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm2) while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm2). Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10−4 M (MTT assay), 3.8 × 10−5 M (AlamarBlue® assay), and 7.6 × 10−4 M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death). Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure. PMID:26262634

  7. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells.

    PubMed

    Crosera, Matteo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-08-07

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L) in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue(®) and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays) was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm(2)) while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm(2)). Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10(-4) M (MTT assay), 3.8 × 10(-5) M (AlamarBlue(®) assay), and 7.6 × 10(-4) M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death). Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure.

  8. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells.

    PubMed

    Crosera, Matteo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L) in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue(®) and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays) was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm(2)) while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm(2)). Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10(-4) M (MTT assay), 3.8 × 10(-5) M (AlamarBlue(®) assay), and 7.6 × 10(-4) M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death). Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure. PMID:26262634

  9. Tunable top-down fabrication and functional surface coating of single-crystal titanium dioxide nanostructures and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seungkyu; Janissen, Richard; Ussembayev, Yera Ye.; van Oene, Maarten M.; Solano, Belen; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2016-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a key component of diverse optical and electronic applications that exploit its exceptional material properties. In particular, the use of TiO2 in its single-crystalline phase can offer substantial advantages over its amorphous and polycrystalline phases for existing and yet-to-be-developed applications. However, the implementation of single-crystal TiO2 has been hampered by challenges in its fabrication and subsequent surface functionalization. Here, we introduce a novel top-down approach that allows for batch fabrication of uniform high-aspect-ratio single-crystal TiO2 nanostructures with targeted sidewall profiles. We complement our fabrication approach with a functionalization strategy that achieves dense, uniform, and area-selective coating with a variety of biomolecules. This allows us to fabricate single-crystal rutile TiO2 nanocylinders tethered with individual DNA molecules for use as force- and torque-transducers in an optical torque wrench. These developments provide the means for increased exploitation of the superior material properties of single-crystal TiO2 at the nanoscale.Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a key component of diverse optical and electronic applications that exploit its exceptional material properties. In particular, the use of TiO2 in its single-crystalline phase can offer substantial advantages over its amorphous and polycrystalline phases for existing and yet-to-be-developed applications. However, the implementation of single-crystal TiO2 has been hampered by challenges in its fabrication and subsequent surface functionalization. Here, we introduce a novel top-down approach that allows for batch fabrication of uniform high-aspect-ratio single-crystal TiO2 nanostructures with targeted sidewall profiles. We complement our fabrication approach with a functionalization strategy that achieves dense, uniform, and area-selective coating with a variety of biomolecules. This allows us to fabricate single-crystal rutile

  10. Mid-infrared optical properties of thin films of aluminum oxide, titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide, aluminum nitride, and silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Kischkat, Jan; Peters, Sven; Gruska, Bernd; Semtsiv, Mykhaylo; Chashnikova, Mikaela; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Fedosenko, Oliana; Machulik, Stephan; Aleksandrova, Anna; Monastyrskyi, Gregorii; Flores, Yuri; Masselink, W Ted

    2012-10-01

    The complex refractive index components, n and k, have been studied for thin films of several common dielectric materials with a low to medium refractive index as functions of wavelength and stoichiometry for mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths within the range 1.54-14.29 μm (700-6500 cm(-1)). The materials silicon oxide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and titanium oxide are prepared using room temperature reactive sputter deposition and are characterized using MIR variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. The investigation shows how sensitive the refractive index functions are to the O2 and N2 flow rates, and for which growth conditions the materials deposit homogeneously. It also allows conclusions to be drawn on the degree of amorphousness and roughness. To facilitate comparison of the materials deposited in this work with others, the index of refraction was also determined and provided for the near-IR and visible ranges of the spectrum. The results presented here should serve as a useful information base for designing optical coatings for the MIR part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The results are parameterized to allow them to be easily used for coating design.

  11. Effects of Material Properties on Sedimentation and Aggregation of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles of Anatase and Rutile in the Aqueous Phase

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated the sedimentation and aggregation kinetics of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles with varying material properties (i.e., crystallinity, morphology, and chemical compositions). Used in the study were various types of commercially available TiO2 nanoparti...

  12. Experimental studies in rats on the effects of asbestos inhalation coupled with the inhalation of titanium dioxide or quartz.

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Jones, A D; Miller, B G

    1991-10-01

    Rats were exposed for 1 year, with a 2-year follow-up, to dust clouds consisting of a mixture of amosite or chrysotile asbestos with either titanium dioxide or quartz. The addition of titanium dioxide to asbestos did not increase levels of pulmonary fibrosis above the amounts produced by chrysotile or amosite alone. Quartz, however, greatly increased fibrosis above that produced by the asbestos types alone. Both particulate dusts caused an increase in the numbers of pulmonary tumours and mesotheliomas compared to asbestos alone but while tumours in animals treated with asbestos and quartz tended to occur earlier than tumours with asbestos alone, in animals treated with dusts containing titanium dioxide, tumour production occurred later than with asbestos alone. In animals treated with mixtures of asbestos and quartz, there was evidence of increased transport of fibres across the visceral pleural surface and this may be associated with the finding of a higher proportion of pleural mesotheliomas than previously reported in experimental inhalation studies from any laboratory using the main asbestos varieties. The presence of particulate dusts made little difference to the amounts of amosite fibre retained in the lung tissue but, with chrysotile, titanium dioxide appeared to increase retention while quartz reduced it.

  13. Development of silver/titanium dioxide/chitosan adipate nanocomposite as an antibacterial coating for fruit storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel nanocomposite of silver/titanium dioxide/chitosan adipate (Ag/TiO2/CS) was developed through photochemical reduction using a chitosan adipate template. Chitosan served as a reducing agent for the metal ions, and anchored metal ions by forming Ag–N coordination bonds and electrostatic attract...

  14. [Application of aspartic acid as a non-specific binding inhibitor in the enrichment of phosphopeptides with titanium dioxide].

    PubMed

    Chi, Ming; Bi, Wei; Lu, Zhuang; Song, Lina; Jia, Wei; Zhang, Yangjun; Qian, Xiaohong; Cai, Yun

    2010-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of metal oxides widely used for phosphopeptide enrichment in phosphoproteomic research nowadays. However it can bind to some non-phosphorylated peptides containing one or more aspartic acid residues and/or glutamic acid residues. These non-phosphorylated peptides can be eluted along with phosphorylated peptides and cause the reduction of the selectivity. Conventional inhibitors for the non-specific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides can often contaminate the ion source of mass spectrometry and therefore their applications are limited in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In this study, aspartic acid was reported as a novel non-specific binding inhibitor for phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide. Firstly, the tryptic peptide mixtures of 3 and 9 standard proteins were used for the comparison of the enrichment efficiency of titanium dioxide. The effects with the presence of aspartic acid, glutamic acid and no-inhibitor in the enrichment systems were compared separately. The results showed that aspartic acid can greatly improve the selectivity of titanium dioxide for phosphopeptide enrichment. Then, aspartic acid was used for the enrichment of tryptic peptide mixture of C57BL/6J mouse liver lysate and good results were also obtained which demonstrated that aspartic acid was a promising non-specific binding inhibitor for complex biological samples. Besides, no contamination in the ion source occurred during the mass spectrometric analysis.

  15. Effect of Treatment Media on the Agglomeration of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles: Impact on Genotoxicity, Cellular Interaction, and Cell Cycle

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The widespread use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in consumer products increases the probability of exposure to humans and the environment. Although TiO2 nanoparticles have been shown to induce DNA damage (comet assay) and chromosome damage (micronucleus ass...

  16. Germination and early plant development of ten plant species exposed to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten agronomic plant species were exposed to different concentrations of nano titanium dioxide (nTiO2) or nano cerium oxide (nCeO2) (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/L) to examine potential effects on germination and early seedling development. We modified a standard test protocol develop...

  17. Atomic layer deposited titanium dioxide coatings on KD-II silicon carbide fibers and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shiyi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    To provide oxidation protection and/or to act as an interfacial coating, titanium oxide (TiO2) coatings were deposited on KD-II SiC fibers by employing atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique with tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) and water (H2O) as precursors. The average deposition rate was about 0.08 nm per cycle, and the prepared coatings were smooth, uniform and conformal, shielding the fibers entirely. The as-deposited coatings were amorphous regardless of the coating thickness, and changed to anatase and rutile crystal phase after annealing at 600 °C and 1000 °C, respectively. The oxidation measurement suggests that the TiO2 coating enhanced the oxidation resistance of SiC fibers obviously. SiC fibers coated with a 70-nm-thick TiO2 layer retained a relatively high tensile strength of 1.66 GPa even after exposition to air at 1400 °C for 1 h, and thick silica layer was not observed. In contrast, uncoated SiC fibers were oxidized dramatically through the same oxidation treatment, covered with a macro-cracked thick silica film, and the tensile strength was not measurable due to interfilament adhesion. The above results indicate that TiO2 films deposited by ALD are a promising oxidation resistance coating for SiC fibers.

  18. Copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide on catalytic photo reduction of carbon dioxide with water: Experimental and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dongmei; Bi, Ye; Kan, Wei; Zhang, Ning; Hong, Sanguo

    2011-05-01

    The catalytic activities of copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide were studied experimentally and theoretically in the synthesis of methanol by the photo reduction of carbon dioxide with water firstly. Photo catalysts copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide were prepared via the equivalent-volume incipient wetness impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, Raman, BET, and electrochemistry analyses. The catalytic properties were determined in the synthesis of methanol from CO 2 in the aqueous solution. The experimental results suggested that Cu/Ce-TiO 2 catalysts obviously enhanced the efficiency of the photocatalytic reduction of CO 2. The methanol yield could reach up to 180.3 μmol/g-cat rapidly. The different effects of copper and cerium on the surface of titanium dioxide have been calculated at the Becke's three-parameter hybrid exchange functional together with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional (B3LYP) level. Our results revealed that Ce atoms affect the reaction more profoundly than Cu atoms do. Ce atoms activated H 2O and CO 2 molecules, while Cu atoms act as the channel of photoelectrons in real time and prevent the recombination of electrons and holes.

  19. Behavior of Enterobacter pulveris in amorphous and crystalline powder matrices treated with supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Callanan, M; Paes, M; Iversen, C; Kleijn, R; Bravo Almeida, C; Peñaloza, W; Johnson, N; Vuataz, G; Michel, M

    2012-11-01

    The resistance of an Enterobacter pulveris strain to combined heat and supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) treatments in different powder matrices was examined. The strain proved resistant to scCO(2) treatment up to 50 MPa pressure at temperatures >73 °C for at least 20 min in a commercial infant formula. Water availability was shown to be important for the observed thermotolerance, because introduction of water in the scCO(2) gas flow during treatment resulted in a 1 log(10) cfu/g reduction of the initial inoculum. Interestingly, similar tolerance to heat and scCO(2) treatment was observed in a less complex matrix, a maltodextrin powder. In contrast, the bacterial strain proved sensitive to lower temperatures (55-65 °C) over shorter times (≤10 min) in a dextrose powder composed of crystalline particles. Therefore, the microorganism demonstrates heat sensitivity in the crystalline powder matrix closer to that of nonpowder liquid matrices. These data demonstrate the increased heat tolerance of the bacterium specifically in amorphous powders and indicate that this characteristic is not dependent on fat and other components commonly found in infant formula. The information is important in designing strategies to deal with contamination of powders with Enterobacteriacae, including pathogenic Cronobacter spp.

  20. Behavior of Enterobacter pulveris in amorphous and crystalline powder matrices treated with supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Callanan, M; Paes, M; Iversen, C; Kleijn, R; Bravo Almeida, C; Peñaloza, W; Johnson, N; Vuataz, G; Michel, M

    2012-11-01

    The resistance of an Enterobacter pulveris strain to combined heat and supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) treatments in different powder matrices was examined. The strain proved resistant to scCO(2) treatment up to 50 MPa pressure at temperatures >73 °C for at least 20 min in a commercial infant formula. Water availability was shown to be important for the observed thermotolerance, because introduction of water in the scCO(2) gas flow during treatment resulted in a 1 log(10) cfu/g reduction of the initial inoculum. Interestingly, similar tolerance to heat and scCO(2) treatment was observed in a less complex matrix, a maltodextrin powder. In contrast, the bacterial strain proved sensitive to lower temperatures (55-65 °C) over shorter times (≤10 min) in a dextrose powder composed of crystalline particles. Therefore, the microorganism demonstrates heat sensitivity in the crystalline powder matrix closer to that of nonpowder liquid matrices. These data demonstrate the increased heat tolerance of the bacterium specifically in amorphous powders and indicate that this characteristic is not dependent on fat and other components commonly found in infant formula. The information is important in designing strategies to deal with contamination of powders with Enterobacteriacae, including pathogenic Cronobacter spp. PMID:22959935

  1. Nanostructured anatase-titanium dioxide based platform for application to microfluidics cholesterol biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azahar Ali, Md.; Srivastava, Saurabh; Solanki, Pratima R.; Varun Agrawal, Ved; John, Renu; Malhotra, Bansi D.

    2012-08-01

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a microfluidics cholesterol sensor based on nanocrystalline anatase-titanium dioxide (ant-TiO2) film deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO) glass. The results of response studies (optimized under the flow rate of 30 μl/min) conducted on cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) immobilized onto crystalline ant-TiO2 nanoparticles (˜27 nm)/ITO microfluidics electrode reveal linearity as 1.3 to 10.3 mM and improved sensitivity of 94.65 μA/mM/cm2. The observed low value of Km (0.14 mM) indicates high affinity of ChOx to cholesterol. No significant changes in current response of this microfluidics sensor are measured in the presence of different interferents.

  2. The state of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) may affect sunscreen performance.

    PubMed

    Tyner, K M; Wokovich, A M; Godar, D E; Doub, W H; Sadrieh, N

    2011-06-01

    In the past several years, there has been a trend in the sunscreen/cosmetics industry to replace micron-sized titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) particles with nanoscale materials. The increased use of nanoscale TiO(2) has resulted in questions about these and other nanoproducts. This study examines the effects of using nanoscale TiO(2) on ultraviolet (UV) attenuation in simple to complex sunscreen formulations. UV light attenuation, product stability, and potential damage to the skin barrier were examined with both nanoscale and microscale TiO(2) particles. Results indicate that none of the formulations decreased the barrier function of the skin and the best UV attenuation occurs when the TiO(2) particles are stabilized with a coating and evenly distributed such as with non-agglomerated coated nanoscale materials. This indicates that nanoscale TiO(2) may have better efficacy while lacking toxicity. PMID:21265867

  3. Self-cleaning superhydrophobic surface based on titanium dioxide nanowires combined with polydimethylsiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xia; Guo, Yonggang; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Pingyu

    2013-11-01

    The present work describes a simple dipping process for the preparation of superhydrophobic coatings based on titanium dioxide nanowires combined with polydimethylsiloxane. The coating surface morphology, composition and wettability were investigated by scanning electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and contact angle measurements, respectively. Interestingly, the superhydrophobic coatings turn into a hydrophilic one after UV irradiation. It is found that the superhydrophobic surface shows almost complete wet self-cleaning of dirt particles with water droplets. Furthermore, the coating surface shows the anti-fouling performance for organic solvents, which can self-remove the organic solvents layer and recovers its superhydrophobic behavior. The advantage of the present approach is that the damaged coating can be easily repaired.

  4. Surface morphology of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on aluminum interdigitated device electrodes (IDEs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizah, N.; Hashim, U.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Nadzirah, Sh.; Farehanim, M. A.; Fatin, M. F.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Ayub, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles based Interdigitated Device Electrodes (IDEs) Nanobiosensor device was developed for intracellular biochemical detection. Fabrication and characterization of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) using IDE nanocoated with TiO2 was studied in this paper. SEM analysis was carried out at 10 kV acceleration volatege and a 9.8 mA emission current to compare IDE with and without TiO2 on the surface area. The simple fabrication process, high sensitivity, and fast response of the TiO2 based IDEs facilitate their applications in a wide range of areas. The small size of semiconductor TiO2 based IDE for sensitive, label-free, real time detection of a wide range of biological species could be explored in vivo diagnostics and array-based screening.

  5. Extended Coverage of Singly and Multiply Phosphorylated Peptides from a Single Titanium Dioxide Microcolumn.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Masaki; Kyono, Yutaka; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2015-10-20

    We developed a novel approach to enlarge phosphoproteome coverage by selective elution depending on the number of phosphoryl group of peptides from a single titanium dioxide (TiO2) microcolumn using hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). In this approach, acidic methylphosphonate buffer including organic solvent is used for selective elution of singly phosphorylated peptides from an aliphatic hydroxy acid-modified metal oxide chromatography (HAMMOC) microcolumn and basic elution conditions with phosphate, ammonium hydroxide, and pyrrolidine are then employed for eluting multiply phosphorylated peptides retained by the HAMMOC microcolumn. Finally, we successfully identified 11 300 nonredundant phosphopeptides from triplicate analyses of 100 μg of HeLa cell lysates using this approach. This simple strategy made it possible to accomplish comprehensive and efficient phosphoproteome analysis from limited sample amounts loaded onto a single HAMMOC microcolumn without additional fractionation or enrichment approaches.

  6. Visible light inactivation of bacteria and fungi by modified titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Mitoraj, Dariusz; Jańczyk, Agnieszka; Strus, Magdalena; Kisch, Horst; Stochel, Grazyna; Heczko, Piotr B; Macyk, Wojciech

    2007-06-01

    Visible light induced photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis) and fungi (Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger) was tested. Carbon-doped titanium dioxide and TiO2 modified with platinum(IV) chloride complexes were used as suspension or immobilised at the surface of plastic plates. A biocidal effect was observed under visible light irradiation in the case of E. coli in the presence of both photocatalysts. The platinum(IV) modified titania exhibited a higher inactivation effect, also in the absence of light. The mechanism of visible light induced photoinactivation is briefly discussed. The observed detrimental effect of photocatalysts on various microorganism groups decreases in the order: E. coli > S. aureus approximately E. faecalis>C. albicans approximately A. niger. This sequence results most probably from differences in cell wall or cell membrane structures in these microorganisms and is not related to the ability of catalase production. PMID:17549266

  7. Sunscreens with Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) Nano-Particles: A Societal Experiment

    PubMed Central

    van de Poel, Ibo; Osseweijer, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    The risks of novel technologies, such as nano(bio)technology cannot be fully assessed due to the existing uncertainties surrounding their introduction into society. Consequently, the introduction of innovative technologies can be conceptualised as a societal experiment, which is a helpful approach to evaluate moral acceptability. This approach is illustrated with the marketing of sunscreens containing nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles. We argue that the marketing of this TiO2 nanomaterial in UV protective cosmetics is ethically undesirable, since it violates four reasonable moral conditions for societal experimentation (absence of alternatives, controllability, limited informed consent, and continuing evaluation). To remedy the current way nano-sized TiO2 containing sunscreens are utilised, we suggest five complementing actions (closing the gap, setup monitoring tools, continuing review, designing for safety, and regulative improvements) so that its marketing can become more acceptable. PMID:20835397

  8. Spectral broadening in anatase titanium dioxide waveguides at telecommunication and near-visible wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher C; Shtyrkova, Katia; Bradley, Jonathan D B; Reshef, Orad; Ippen, Erich; Mazur, Eric

    2013-07-29

    We observe spectral broadening of femtosecond pulses in single-mode anatase-titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) waveguides at telecommunication and near-visible wavelengths (1565 and 794 nm). By fitting our data to nonlinear pulse propagation simulations, we quantify nonlinear optical parameters around 1565 nm. Our fitting yields a nonlinear refractive index of 0.16 × 10(-18) m(2)/W, no two-photon absorption, and stimulated Raman scattering from the 144 cm(-1) Raman line of anatase with a gain coefficient of 6.6 × 10(-12) m/W. Additionally, we report on asymmetric spectral broadening around 794 nm. The wide wavelength applicability and negligible two-photon absorption of TiO(2) make it a promising material for integrated photonics.

  9. Photochemical synthesis of citric acid cycle intermediates based on titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Saladino, Raffaele; Brucato, John Robert; De Sio, Antonio; Botta, Giorgia; Pace, Emanuele; Gambicorti, Lisa

    2011-10-01

    The emergence of the citric acid cycle is one of the most remarkable occurrences with regard to understanding the origin and evolution of metabolic pathways. Although the chemical steps of the cycle are preserved intact throughout nature, diverse organisms make wide use of its chemistry, and in some cases organisms use only a selected portion of the cycle. However, the origins of this cycle would have arisen in the more primitive anaerobic organism or even back in the proto-metabolism, which likely arose spontaneously under favorable prebiotic chemical conditions. In this context, we report that UV irradiation of formamide in the presence of titanium dioxide afforded 6 of the 11 carboxylic acid intermediates of the reductive version of the citric acid cycle. Since this cycle is the central metabolic pathway of contemporary biology, this report highlights the role of photochemical processes in the origin of the metabolic apparatus.

  10. Template assisted synthesis of photocatalytic titanium dioxide nanotubes by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Mustafa; Sarıipek, Fatma; Köysüren, Özcan; Yıldız, H. Bekir

    2013-10-01

    Titanium dioxide thin films were deposited conformally over electrospun polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) fibers by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. Deposition rates were observed to be very high to allow for rapid coatings. Thermal annealing of as deposited materials leads the clean decomposition of the polymeric inner layer and formation of randomly distributed anatase TiO2 nanotubes. Nanotubular TiO2 structure was clearly identified by SEM and that structure is ideal for good photocatalytic activity because of its high surface area per unit volume ratio. FTIR and XPS results show the formation of stoichiometric TiO2, and the crystalline form of the final nanotubes was found to be anatase (1 0 1) after XRD analysis. High photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanotubes under UV irradiation was observed with an apparent rate constant of 0.74 h-1 for methyl orange decomposition.

  11. Characteristics of titanium dioxide nanostructures synthesized via electrochemical anodization at different applied voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Cheong, Y. L.; Yam, F. K.; Hassan, Z.

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents the study of the growth of nanostructure titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) via electrochemical anodization method. Both constant and alternating anodization voltage would be applied in this study. The effects of applied voltage on the morphological and structural properties were studied. Images of field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) revealed that morphology of nanostructure could be manipulated by changing the type and amount of applied voltage. Besides that, X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that crystalline structures (anatase and rutile) could be obtained after being annealed at 700°C for 60 minutes. By analysing the data in XRD measurements, crystallite size of the TiO{sub 2} could be calculated by using the Scherrer method. Besides that, the relationship between mean crystallites sizes and anodization voltage would also be further studied in this paper.

  12. Interdigitated electrode (IDE) for porcine detection based on titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, N.; Hashim, U.; Azizah, N.

    2016-07-01

    Interdigited Electrode (IDE) porcine detection can be accomplished to authenticate the halal issue that has been a concern to Muslim not only in Malaysia but all around the world. The method used is photolithography that used the p-type photoresist on the spin coater with 2500 rpm. Bare IDEs device is deposited with Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) to improve the performance of the device. The result indicates that current-voltage (I-V) measurement of porcine probe line slightly above porcine target due to negative charges repelled each other. The IDE device can detect the porcine presence in food as lowest as 1.0 µM. Better performance of the device can be achieved with the replacement of gold deposited to trigger more sensitivity of the device.

  13. Anemia and genotoxicity induced by sub-chronic intragastric treatment of rats with titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Grissa, Intissar; Elghoul, Jaber; Ezzi, Lobna; Chakroun, Sana; Kerkeni, Emna; Hassine, Mohsen; El Mir, Lassaad; Mehdi, Meriem; Ben Cheikh, Hassen; Haouas, Zohra

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used for their whiteness and opacity. We investigated the hematological effects and genotoxicity of anatase TiO2 NPs following sub-chronic oral gavage treatment. TiO2-NPs were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Wistar rats were treated with anatase TiO2 NPs by intragastric administration for 60 days. Hematological analysis showed a significant decrease in RBC and HCT and a significant increase in MCV, PLT, MPV and WBC at higher doses. Furthermore, abnormally shaped red cells, sometimes containing micronuclei, and hyper-segmented neutrophil nuclei were observed with TiO2 NPs treatment. The micronucleus test revealed damage to chromosomes in rat bone marrow at 100 and 200mg/kg bw; the comet assay showed significant DNA damage at the same doses.

  14. Modified nanoporous titanium dioxide as a novel carrier for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingtian; Wu, Shanshan; Xu, Zheng; Qiu, Yibin; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong

    2016-06-15

    ε-Poly-L-lysine (EPL)-modified mesoporous titanium dioxide (M-TiO2) was assembled through the electrostatic attraction between EPL and M-TiO2. Through modification, the M-TiO2 surface tends to form multilayered and complex architectures, which can be used as artificial matrices to change the microenvironment of carriers for enzyme immobilization. The modified M-TiO2 was characterized through scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. All of the immobilized enzymes with negative charges display strong storage stability, thermal stability, and good reusability. Results indicate that EPL can self-assemble onto the surface of M-TiO2 and form a considerable number of active coatings. Our results also demonstrate that this simple and novel method can be potentially used to immobilize negatively charged enzymes for biosensor applications.

  15. Examination of Ostwald ripening in the photocatalytic growth of silver nanoparticles on titanium dioxide coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwoński, Ireneusz; Spilarewicz-Stanek, Kaja; Kisielewska, Aneta; Kądzioła, Kinga; Cichomski, Michał; Ginter, Joanna

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were grown on the surface of titanium dioxide coating (TiO2) using a photochemical method. The size and number of AgNPs were monitored using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after 20, 30, 180 and 300 s of UV illumination. It was found that for short illumination times (20 s) a significant number of small nanoparticles were grown. However, after an additional 10 s of illumination, small nanoparticles were subject to decomposition and the released Ag+ ions were utilized for the growth of the existing larger nanoparticles, causing an increase in their dimensions. The observed results indicate that the nucleation and further growth of AgNPs proceed according to Ostwald ripening. For longer illumination times (180, 300 s) a coalescence of closely located particles was observed.

  16. Synthesis and dielectric studies of poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) / titanium dioxide nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Prathibha; Thomas, Sunil; V, Arunkumar K.; S, Karthika; V, Unnikrishnan N.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis of poly vinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) / titanium dioxide nanocomposites via sol- gel technique. The structural and dielectric properties of the samples were also analysed in this work. PVP doped with varying concentrations of TiO2 are prepared by the sol-gel route. The prepared composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and impedance spectroscopy. XRD and TEM confirm the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles in the composites. The dielectric response and the AC electrical conductivity of the samples are investigated for the frequency range 1 kHz-2MHz at room temperature. The dielectric studies show low values for dielectric constant and loss at high frequencies.

  17. Characterization of adsorption and electronic excited states of quercetin on titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdyb, Agata; Krawczyk, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of quercetin on colloidal titanium dioxide nanoparticles in ethanol and its excited-state electronic structure were investigated by means of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies. The changes in electronic charge redistribution as reflected by the dipole moment difference, ∆μ, between the ground and excited electronic states were measured with electroabsorption spectroscopy and analyzed using results of TD DFT computations. Adsorption of quercetin causes a red shift of its absorption spectrum. Raman spectra of quercetin analyzed with reference to analogous data for morin indicate binding of quercetin through the hydroxy groups of the catechol moiety. The difference dipole moment, which is 5.5 D in free quercetin, increases to 11.8 D in opposite direction in adsorbed quercetin, and is associated with charge-transfer to the Ti atom. The computed transition energy, intensity, vector Δμ and molecular orbitals involved in the electronic transition at different molecular configurations indicate a bidentate chelating mode of binding of quercetin.

  18. Effect of ingested titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the digestive gland cell membrane of terrestrial isopods.

    PubMed

    Valant, Janez; Drobne, Damjana; Novak, Sara

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to find out whether ingested titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO(2)) cause cell membrane damage by direct contact or by lipid peroxidation. We assessed lipid peroxidation and digestive gland cell membrane stability of animals fed on food dosed with nano-TiO(2). Conventional toxicity measures were completed to determine if cellular effects are propagated to higher levels of biological complexity. An invertebrate model organism (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea) was fed with food containing nanosized TiO(2) and the result confirmed that at higher exposure concentrations after 3 d exposure, nano-TiO(2) destabilized cell membranes but lipid peroxidation was not detected. Oxidative stress as evidenced by lipid peroxidation was observed at longer exposure durations and high exposure doses. These data suggest that cell membranes are destabilized by direct interactions between nanoparticles and cell membrane, not solely via oxidative stress.

  19. Imitation of phase I oxidative metabolism of anabolic steroids by titanium dioxide photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ruokolainen, Miina; Valkonen, Minna; Sikanen, Tiina; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2014-12-18

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysis for oxidation of anabolic steroids and for imitation of their phase I metabolism. The photocatalytic reaction products of five anabolic steroids were compared to their phase I in vitro metabolites produced by human liver microsomes (HLM). The same main reaction types - hydroxylation, dehydrogenation and combination of these two - were observed both in TiO2 photocatalysis and in microsomal incubations. Several isomers of each product type were formed in both systems. Based on the same mass, retention time and similarity of the product ion spectra, many of the products observed in HLM reactions were also formed in TiO2 photocatalytic reactions. However, products characteristic to only either one of the systems were also formed. In conclusion, TiO2 photocatalysis is a rapid, simple and inexpensive method for imitation of phase I metabolism of anabolic steroids and production of metabolite standards.

  20. Nanocomposites based on thermoplastic elastomers with functional basis of nano titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulovskaya, V. D.; Kuz'micheva, G. M.; Klechkovskaya, V. V.; Orekhov, A. S.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.; Domoroshchina, E. N.; Shegay, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Nanocomposites based on a thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) (low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and 1,2-polybutadiene in a ratio of 60/40) with functional titanium dioxide nanoparticles of different nature, TiO2/TPE, have been prepared and investigated by a complex of methods (X-ray diffraction analysis using X-ray and synchrotron radiation beams, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy). The morphology of the composites is found to be somewhat different, depending on the TiO2 characteristics. It is revealed that nanocomposites with cellular or porous structures containing nano-TiO2 aggregates with a large specific surface and large sizes of crystallites and nanoparticles exhibit the best deformation‒strength and fatigue properties and stability to the effect of active media under conditions of ozone and vapor‒air aging.

  1. Electrophoretic deposition of titanium dioxide films on copper in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Laamari, M; Ben Youssef, A; Bousselmi, L

    2016-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition was used to produce titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanostructured films on copper substrate in aqueous media for photocatalytic application. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) with a weight rate from 0 to 15% was added to TiO2 P25 suspension in order to enhance film adhesion. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, contact angle measurement, nanoindentation, scratch test and photoluminescence. The photocatalytic activity of the films was tested with amido black 10B under UV irradiation. The results indicated that the morphology and the mechanical properties of films depended on the added PVP amount. Scratch test showed that adhesion strength rose with increased PVP amount. The photocatalytic activity indicated that TiO2 film synthesized with 13% PVP had the highest efficiency. PMID:27438247

  2. Effect of nanostructured graphene oxide on electrochemical activity of its composite with polyaniline titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh Phan, Thi; Thanh Luong, Thi; Mai, Thi Xuan; Thanh Thuy Mai, Thi; Tot Pham, Thi

    2016-03-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) significantly affects the electrochemical activity of its composite with polyanline titanium dioxide (TiO2). In this work various composites with different GO contents have been successfully synthesized by chemical method to compare not only their material properties but also electrochemical characteristics with each other. The results of an electrochemical impedance study showed that their electrochemical property has been improved due to the presence of GO in a composite matrix. The galvanodynamic polarization explained that among them the composite with GO/Ani ratio in the range of 1-14 exhibits a better performance compared to the other due to yielding a higher current desity (280 μA cm-2). The TEM and SEM images which presented the fibres of a composite bundle with the presence of PANi and TiO2 were examined by IR-spectra and x-ray diffraction, respectively.

  3. Structural studies of amorphous titanium diboride thin films by extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure and extended electron-energy-loss fine-structure techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloyeros, Alain E.; Hoffman, Mark P.; Williams, Wendell S.; Greene, Alex E.; McMillan, Joyce A.

    1988-10-01

    The local atomic structure of amorphous titanium diboride thin films, prepared by electron-beam vaporization (EBV) of the crystalline compound onto liquid-nitrogen-cooled substrates, was studied using extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) and extended energy-loss fine-structure (EXELFS) techniques. From a comparison of the extended fine-structure spectra of the amorphous films with corresponding spectra of crystalline titanium diboride, accurate information was derived on the nature of the local structure, or short-range order, and on the coordination numbers, interatomic distances, and nanostructural atomic disorder in amorphous TiB2. A relaxation of the interatomic spacing and a reduction of coordination number for the nearest-neighbor atoms was inferred for the amorphous state. Local prismatic coordination with random 90° rotations about prismatic planes is proposed as a likely atomic structure consistent with the data for the amorphous form. Finally, EXAFS and EXELFS were employed to examine in detail the structural changes induced in amorphous TiB2 by variations in the EBV deposition parameters, and to determine a set of optimized parameters for the EBV deposition of a TiB2 stable amorphous phase.

  4. A novel approach for determining total titanium from titanium dioxide nanoparticles suspended in water and biosolids by digestion with ammonium persulfate.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Kambiz; Hoque, M Ehsanul; Dimock, Brian; Hintelmann, Holger; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2012-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (i.e. TiO(2)) in nano-form is a constituent of many nanomaterials that are used in sunscreens, cosmetics, industrial products and in biomedical applications. Quantification of TiO(2) nanoparticles in various matrixes is a topic of great interest for researchers studying the potential health and environmental impacts of nanoparticles. However, analysis of TiO(2) as Ti(4+) is difficult because current digestion techniques require use of strong acids that may be a health and safety risk in the laboratory. To overcome this problem, we developed a new method to digest TiO(2) nanoparticles using ammonium persulfate as a fusing reagent. The digestion technique requires short times to completion and optimally requires only 1 g of fusing reagent. The fusion method showed >95% recovery of Ti(4+) from 6 μg mL(-1) aqueous suspensions prepared from 10 μg mL(-1) suspension of different forms of TiO(2,) including anatase, rutile and mixed nanosized crystals, and amorphous particles. These recoveries were greater than open hot-plate digestion with a tri-acid solution and comparable to microwave digestion with a tri-acid solution. Cations and anions commonly found in natural waters showed no significant interferences when added to samples in amounts of 10 ng to 110 mg, which is a much broader range of these ions than expected in environmental samples. Using ICP-MS for analysis, the method detection limit (MDL) was determined to be 0.06 ng mL(-1), and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.20 ng mL(-1). Analysis of samples of untreated and treated wastewater and biosolids collected from wastewater treatment plants yielded concentrations of TiO(2) of 1.8 and 1.6 ng mL(-1) for the wastewater samples, respectively, and 317.4 ng mg(-1) dry weights for the biosolids. The reactions between persulfate ions and TiO(2) were evaluated using stoichiometric methods and FTIR and XRD analysis. A formula for the fusing reaction is proposed that involves the formation of sulfate

  5. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: some aspects of toxicity/focus on the development.

    PubMed

    Rollerova, E; Tulinska, J; Liskova, A; Kuricova, M; Kovriznych, J; Mlynarcikova, A; Kiss, A; Scsukova, S

    2015-04-01

    Nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles belong to the most widely manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) on a global scale because of their photocatalytic properties and the related surface effects. TiO2 NPs are in the top five NPs used in consumer products. Ultrafine TiO2 is widely used in the number of applications, including white pigment in paint, ceramics, food additive, food packaging material, sunscreens, cosmetic creams, and, component of surgical implants. Data evidencing rapid distribution, slow or ineffective elimination, and potential long-time tissue accumulation are especially important for the human risk assessment of ultrafine TiO2 and represent new challenges to more responsibly investigate potential adverse effects by the action of TiO2 NPs considering their ubiquitous exposure in various doses. Transport of ultrafine TiO2 particles in systemic circulation and further transition through barriers, especially the placental and blood-brain ones, are well documented. Therefore, from the developmental point of view, there is a raising concern in the exposure to TiO2 NPs during critical windows, in the pregnancy or the lactation period, and the fact that human mothers, women and men in fertile age and last but not least children may be exposed to high cumulative doses. In this review, toxicokinetics and particularly toxicity of TiO2 NPs in relation to the developing processes, oriented mainly on the development of the central nervous system, are discussed Keywords: nanoparticles, nanotoxicity, nanomaterials, titanium dioxide, reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity, blood brain barrier, placental barrier. PMID:25960011

  6. Silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticle toxicity in plants: A review of current research.

    PubMed

    Cox, Ashley; Venkatachalam, P; Sahi, Shivendra; Sharma, Nilesh

    2016-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have become widely used in recent years for many manufacturing and medical processes. Recent literature suggests that many metallic nanomaterials including those of silver (Ag) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) cause significant toxic effects in animal cell culture and animal models, however, toxicity studies using plant species are limited. This review examines current progress in the understanding of the effect of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on plant species. There are many facets to this ongoing environmental problem. This review addresses the effects of NPs on oxidative stress-related gene expression, genotoxicity, seed germination, and root elongation. It is largely accepted that NP exposure results in the cellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to both positive and negative effects on plant growth. However, factors such as NP size, shape, surface coating and concentration vary greatly among studies resulting in conflicting reports of the effect at times. In addition, plant species tend to differ in their reaction to NP exposure, with some showing positive effects of NP augmentation while many others showing detrimental effects. Seed germination studies have shown to be less effective in gauging phytotoxicity, while root elongation studies have shown more promise. Given the large increase in nanomaterial applications in consumer products, agriculture and energy sectors, it is critical to understand their role in the environment and their effects on plant life. A closer look at nanomaterial-driven ecotoxicity is needed. Ecosystem-level studies are required to indicate how these nanomaterials transfer at the critical trophic levels affecting human health and biota. PMID:27288991

  7. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: some aspects of toxicity/focus on the development.

    PubMed

    Rollerova, E; Tulinska, J; Liskova, A; Kuricova, M; Kovriznych, J; Mlynarcikova, A; Kiss, A; Scsukova, S

    2015-04-01

    Nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles belong to the most widely manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) on a global scale because of their photocatalytic properties and the related surface effects. TiO2 NPs are in the top five NPs used in consumer products. Ultrafine TiO2 is widely used in the number of applications, including white pigment in paint, ceramics, food additive, food packaging material, sunscreens, cosmetic creams, and, component of surgical implants. Data evidencing rapid distribution, slow or ineffective elimination, and potential long-time tissue accumulation are especially important for the human risk assessment of ultrafine TiO2 and represent new challenges to more responsibly investigate potential adverse effects by the action of TiO2 NPs considering their ubiquitous exposure in various doses. Transport of ultrafine TiO2 particles in systemic circulation and further transition through barriers, especially the placental and blood-brain ones, are well documented. Therefore, from the developmental point of view, there is a raising concern in the exposure to TiO2 NPs during critical windows, in the pregnancy or the lactation period, and the fact that human mothers, women and men in fertile age and last but not least children may be exposed to high cumulative doses. In this review, toxicokinetics and particularly toxicity of TiO2 NPs in relation to the developing processes, oriented mainly on the development of the central nervous system, are discussed Keywords: nanoparticles, nanotoxicity, nanomaterials, titanium dioxide, reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity, blood brain barrier, placental barrier.

  8. Silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticle toxicity in plants: A review of current research.

    PubMed

    Cox, Ashley; Venkatachalam, P; Sahi, Shivendra; Sharma, Nilesh

    2016-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have become widely used in recent years for many manufacturing and medical processes. Recent literature suggests that many metallic nanomaterials including those of silver (Ag) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) cause significant toxic effects in animal cell culture and animal models, however, toxicity studies using plant species are limited. This review examines current progress in the understanding of the effect of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on plant species. There are many facets to this ongoing environmental problem. This review addresses the effects of NPs on oxidative stress-related gene expression, genotoxicity, seed germination, and root elongation. It is largely accepted that NP exposure results in the cellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to both positive and negative effects on plant growth. However, factors such as NP size, shape, surface coating and concentration vary greatly among studies resulting in conflicting reports of the effect at times. In addition, plant species tend to differ in their reaction to NP exposure, with some showing positive effects of NP augmentation while many others showing detrimental effects. Seed germination studies have shown to be less effective in gauging phytotoxicity, while root elongation studies have shown more promise. Given the large increase in nanomaterial applications in consumer products, agriculture and energy sectors, it is critical to understand their role in the environment and their effects on plant life. A closer look at nanomaterial-driven ecotoxicity is needed. Ecosystem-level studies are required to indicate how these nanomaterials transfer at the critical trophic levels affecting human health and biota.

  9. Immunomodulatory effects in the spleen-injured mice following exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sang, Xuezi; Fei, Min; Sheng, Lei; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Yu, Xiaohong; Hong, Jie; Ze, Yuguan; Gui, Suxin; Sun, Qingqing; Ze, Xiao; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2014-10-01

    Immune injuries following the exposure of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO₂ NPs) have been greatly concerned along with the TiO₂ NPs are widely used in pharmacology and daily life. However, very little is known about the immunomodulatory mechanisms in the spleen-injured mice due to TiO₂ NPs exposure. In this study, mice were continuously exposed to 2.5, 5, or 10 TiO₂ NPs mg kg(-1) body weight for 90 days with intragastric administration to investigate the immunomodulatory mechanisms in the spleen. The findings showed that TiO₂ NPs exposure resulted in significant increases in spleen and thymus indices, and titanium accumulation, in turn led to histopathological changes and splenocyte apoptosis. Furthermore, the exposure of TiO₂ NPs could significantly increase the levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-2, Eotaxin, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interferon-γ, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-13, interferon-γ-inducible protein-10, migration inhibitory factor, CD69, major histocompatibility complex, protein tyrosine phosphatase, protein tyrosine kinase 1, basic fibroblast growth factor, Fasl, and GzmB expression, whereas markedly decrease the levels of NKG2D, NKp46, 2B4 expression involved in immune responses, lymphocyte healing and apoptosis. These findings would better understand toxicological effects induced by TiO₂ NPs exposure.

  10. TITANIUM DIOXIDE TRIADS FOR IMPROVED CHARGE-SEPARATION USING CONDUCTIVE POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, T.M.; Gaylor, T.N.; de la Garza, L.; Rajh, T.

    2009-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells are potentially one of the best solutions to solar energy conversion because of the low cost of required materials and production processes. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticulate fi lms are the basis for one of these types of cells, providing large surface area for dye-sensitizer adsorption. Because TiO2 nanoparticulate fi lms develop defects caused by oxygen defi ciency, deep reactive electron traps are formed. With the addition of an enediol ligand, these electron traps are deliberately removed, enhancing the conduction of electrons within the fi lm. In this project, TiO2 nanoparticulate fi lms made by a layer-by-layer dip coating method were modifi ed with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC). DOPAC binds to the titanium atoms on the surface of the nanoparticles, restoring their octahedral geometry. This restructuring of the surface shifts the spectral properties of the TiO2 to the visible spectrum and improves the separation of charges which is observed using photoelectrochemistry. Furthermore, DOPAC enables the electronic attachment of other molecules to the surface of TiO2 fi lms, such as the conductive polymer polyaniline base. This conductive polymer provides an extended separation of charges which increases photocurrent production by forming a triad with the TiO2 semiconductor through the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid linker. The photocurrent increases due to the donor properties of the conductive polymer thereby decreasing charge pair recombination.

  11. Effects of oral administration of titanium dioxide fine-sized particles on plasma glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ning; Hu, Hailong; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Wang, Changlin; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is an authorized additive used as a food colorant, is composed of nano-sized particles (NP) and fine-sized particles (FP). Previous study reported that oral administration of TiO2 NPs triggers an increase in plasma glucose of mice. However, no previous studies have focused on toxic effects of TiO2 FPs on plasma glucose homeostasis following oral administration. In the current study, mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs greater than 100 nm in size (64 mg/kg body weight per day), and effects on plasma glucose levels examined. Our results showed that titanium levels was not changed in mouse blood, livers and pancreases after mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose and ROS levels were not affected by TiO2 FPs. Histopathological results showed that TiO2 FPs did not induce pathology changes in organs, especially plasma glucose homeostasis regulation organs, such as pancreas and liver. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 FPs did not induce insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver. These results showed that, TiO2 FPs cannot be absorbed via oral administration and affect plasma glucose levels in mice. PMID:26472183

  12. Effects of oral administration of titanium dioxide fine-sized particles on plasma glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ning; Hu, Hailong; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Wang, Changlin; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is an authorized additive used as a food colorant, is composed of nano-sized particles (NP) and fine-sized particles (FP). Previous study reported that oral administration of TiO2 NPs triggers an increase in plasma glucose of mice. However, no previous studies have focused on toxic effects of TiO2 FPs on plasma glucose homeostasis following oral administration. In the current study, mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs greater than 100 nm in size (64 mg/kg body weight per day), and effects on plasma glucose levels examined. Our results showed that titanium levels was not changed in mouse blood, livers and pancreases after mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose and ROS levels were not affected by TiO2 FPs. Histopathological results showed that TiO2 FPs did not induce pathology changes in organs, especially plasma glucose homeostasis regulation organs, such as pancreas and liver. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 FPs did not induce insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver. These results showed that, TiO2 FPs cannot be absorbed via oral administration and affect plasma glucose levels in mice.

  13. Phenotypic and genomic responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis germinants.

    PubMed

    Tumburu, Laxminath; Andersen, Christian P; Rygiewicz, Paul T; Reichman, Jay R

    2015-01-01

    The effects of exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (nano-titanium) and cerium oxide (nano-cerium) on gene expression and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana germinants were studied by using microarrays and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and by evaluating germinant phenotypic plasticity. Exposure to 12 d of either nano-titania or nano-ceria altered the regulation of 204 and 142 genes, respectively. Genes induced by the nanoparticles mainly include ontology groups annotated as stimuli responsive, including both abiotic (oxidative stress, salt stress, water transport) and biotic (respiratory burst as a defense against pathogens) stimuli. Further analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicates that both nanoparticles affected a range of metabolic processes (deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] metabolism, hormone metabolism, tetrapyrrole synthesis, and photosynthesis). Individual exposures to the nanoparticles increased percentages of seeds with emergent radicles, early development of hypocotyls and cotyledons, and those with fully grown leaves. Although there were distinct differences between the nanoparticles in their affect on molecular mechanisms attributable to enhancing germinant growth, both particles altered similar suites of genes related to various pathways and processes related to enhanced growth.

  14. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles modulate the toxicological response to cadmium in the gills of Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Camilla; Balbi, Teresa; Grassi, Giacomo; Frenzilli, Giada; Bernardeschi, Margherita; Smerilli, Arianna; Guidi, Patrizia; Canesi, Laura; Nigro, Marco; Monaci, Fabrizio; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Rocco, Lucia; Focardi, Silvano; Monopoli, Marco; Corsi, Ilaria

    2015-10-30

    We investigated the influence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) on the response to cadmium in the gills of the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis in terms of accumulation and toxicity. Mussels were in vivo exposed to nano-TiO2, CdCl2, alone and in combination. Several cellular biomarkers were investigated in gills: ABC transport proteins and metallothioneins at gene/protein (abcb1, abcc-like and mt-20) and functional level, GST activity, NO production and DNA damage (Comet assay). Accumulation of total Cd and titanium in gills as in whole soft tissue was also investigated. Significant responses to Cd exposure were observed in mussel gills as up-regulation of abcb1 and mt-20 gene transcription, increases in total MT content, P-gp efflux and GST activity, DNA damage and NO production. Nano-TiO2 alone increased P-gp efflux activity and NO production. When combined with Cd, nano-TiO2 reduced the metal-induced effects by significantly lowering abcb1 gene transcription, GST activity, and DNA damage, whereas, additive effects were observed on NO production. A lower concentration of Cd was observed in the gills upon co-exposure, whereas, Ti levels were unaffected. A competitive effect in uptake/accumulation of nano-TiO2 and Cd seems to occur in gills. A confirmation is given by the observed absence of adsorption of Cd onto nano-TiO2 in sea water media.

  15. Fabrication of drug eluting implants: study of drug release mechanism from titanium dioxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlekhan, Azhang; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T.; Sukotjo, Cortino; Yarin, Alexander L.; Shokuhfar, Tolou

    2015-06-01

    Formation of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) on a titanium surface holds great potential for promoting desirable cellular response. However, prolongation of drug release from these nano-reservoirs remains to be a challenge. In our previous work TNTs were successfully loaded with a drug. In this study the effect of TNTs dimensions on prolongation of drug release is quantified aiming at the introduction of a simple novel technique which overcomes complications of previously introduced methods. Different groups of TNTs with different lengths and diameters are fabricated. Samples are loaded with a model drug and rate of drug release over time is monitored. The relation of the drug release rate to the TNT dimensions (diameter, length, aspect ratio and volume) is established. The results show that an increase in any of these parameters increases the duration of the release process. However, the strongest parameter affecting the drug release is the aspect ratio. In fact, TNTs with higher aspect ratios release drug slower. It is revealed that drug release from TNT is a diffusion-limited process. Assuming that diffusion of drug in (Phosphate-Buffered Saline) PBS follows one-dimensional Fick’s law, the theoretical predictions for drug release profile is compatible with our experimental data for release from a single TNT.

  16. Phenotypic and genomic responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis germinants.

    PubMed

    Tumburu, Laxminath; Andersen, Christian P; Rygiewicz, Paul T; Reichman, Jay R

    2015-01-01

    The effects of exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (nano-titanium) and cerium oxide (nano-cerium) on gene expression and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana germinants were studied by using microarrays and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and by evaluating germinant phenotypic plasticity. Exposure to 12 d of either nano-titania or nano-ceria altered the regulation of 204 and 142 genes, respectively. Genes induced by the nanoparticles mainly include ontology groups annotated as stimuli responsive, including both abiotic (oxidative stress, salt stress, water transport) and biotic (respiratory burst as a defense against pathogens) stimuli. Further analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicates that both nanoparticles affected a range of metabolic processes (deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] metabolism, hormone metabolism, tetrapyrrole synthesis, and photosynthesis). Individual exposures to the nanoparticles increased percentages of seeds with emergent radicles, early development of hypocotyls and cotyledons, and those with fully grown leaves. Although there were distinct differences between the nanoparticles in their affect on molecular mechanisms attributable to enhancing germinant growth, both particles altered similar suites of genes related to various pathways and processes related to enhanced growth. PMID:25242526

  17. Inhibition of uranium(VI) sorption on titanium dioxide by surface iron(III) species in ferric oxide/titanium dioxide systems.

    PubMed

    Comarmond, M Josick; Payne, Timothy E; Collins, Richard N; Palmer, Gabriel; Lumpkin, Gregory R; Angove, Michael J

    2012-10-16

    Uranium (U(VI)) sorption in systems containing titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and various Fe(III)-oxide phases was investigated in the acidic pH range (pH 2.5-6). Studies were conducted with physical mixtures of TiO(2) and ferrihydrite, TiO(2) with coprecipitated ferrihydrite, and with systems where Fe(III) was mostly present as crystalline Fe(III) oxides. The presence of ferrihydrite resulted in decreased U(VI) sorption relative to the pure TiO(2) systems, particularly below pH 4, an unexpected result given that the presence of another sorbent would be expected to increase U(VI) uptake. In mixtures of TiO(2) and crystalline Fe(III) oxide phases, U(VI) sorption was higher than for the analogous mixtures of TiO(2) with ferrihydrite, and was similar to U(VI) sorption on TiO(2) alone. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the TiO(2) system with freshly precipitated Fe(III) oxides indicated the presence of an Fe(III) surface phase that inhibits U(VI) sorption-a reaction whereby Fe(III) precipitates as lepidocrocite and/or ferrihydrite effectively blocking surface sorption sites on the underlying TiO(2). Competition between dissolved Fe(III) and U(VI) for sorption sites may also contribute to the observed decrease in U(VI) sorption. The present study demonstrates the complexity of sorption in mixed systems, where the oxide phases do not necessarily behave in an additive manner, and has implications for U(VI) mobility in natural and impacted environments where Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides are usually assumed to increase the retention of U(VI).

  18. Degradation of microcystin toxins in a falling film photocatalytic reactor with immobilized titanium dioxide catalyst.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Gordon S; Stockenström, Sonja; de Villiers, David; Engelbrecht, Willem J; Wessels, Gabriël F S

    2002-01-01

    The increasing incidence of algal blooms in fresh water supplies and the consequent possibility of cyanobacterial microcystin contamination of potable water is a cause of recent concern. Heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation forms part of a family of advanced water treatment technologies comprising the generation of reactive oxidizing species in water media and results in the complete oxidative degradation (mineralization) of organic pollutants to yield carbon dioxide, water and inorganic ions. A new experimental laboratory-scale 'falling film' reactor has been developed to study the photocatalytic degradation of microcystins in aqueous solution. The reactor consisted of a fiberglass sheet impregnated with immobilized titanium dioxide (TiO2) catalyst over which the microcystin solution was pumped (as a falling film) while being irradiated from UV-C germicidal lamps. The design of the system obviated the necessity to separate suspended catalyst from treated water as required in slurry reactors. The photocatalytic degradation was characterized by pseudo-first order reaction kinetics. Rapid degradation of microcystins LR, YR and RR was observed in natural lake water with half lives less than 10 min, while even faster rates were achieved in laboratory distilled water. Although low pH (pH 3) marginally improved reaction rates. the presence of radical scavengers such as sulfate ions was detrimental to the photocatalytic oxidation process. PMID:11767740

  19. Heteroaggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with model natural colloids under environmentally relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Praetorius, Antonia; Labille, Jérôme; Scheringer, Martin; Thill, Antoine; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Bottero, Jean-Yves

    2014-09-16

    The heteroaggregation of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) with natural colloids (NCs), which are ubiquitous in natural surface waters, is a crucial process affecting the environmental transport and fate of ENPs. Attachment efficiencies for heteroaggregation, α hetero, are required as input parameters in environmental fate models to predict ENP concentrations and contribute to ENP risk assessment. Here, we present a novel method for determining α hetero values by using a combination of laser diffraction measurements and aggregation modeling based on the Smoluchowski equation. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs, 15 nm) were used to demonstrate this new approach together with larger silicon dioxide particles (SiO2, 0.5 μm) representing NCs. Heteroaggregation experiments were performed at different environmentally relevant solution conditions. At pH 5 the TiO2 NPs and the SiO2 particles are of opposite charge, resulting in α hetero values close to 1. At pH 8, where all particles are negatively charged, α hetero was strongly affected by the solution conditions, with α hetero ranging from <0.001 at low ionic strength to 1 at conditions with high NaCl or CaCl2 concentrations. The presence of humic acid stabilized the system against heteroaggregation.

  20. Antimicrobial properties of poly (methyl methacrylate) acrylic resins incorporated with silicon dioxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on cariogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sodagar, Ahmad; Khalil, Soufia; Kassaee, Mohammad Zaman; Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar; Pourakbari, Babak; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess the effects of adding nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) and nano-silicon dioxide (nano-SiO2) and their mixture to poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to induce antimicrobial activity in acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: Acrylic specimens in size of 20 mm × 20 mm × 1 mm of 0.5% and 1% of nano-TiO2 (21 nm) and nano-SiO2 (20 nm) and their mixture (TiO2/SiO2 nanoparticles) (1:1 w/w) were prepared from the mixture of acrylic liquid containing nanoparticles and acrylic powder. To obtain 0.5% and 1% concentration, 0.02 g and 0.04 g of the nanoparticles was added to each milliliter of the acrylic monomer, respectively. Antimicrobial properties of six specimens of these preparations, as prepared, were assessed against planktonic Lactobacillus acidophilus and Streptococcus mutans at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 min follow-up by broth dilution assay. The specimens of each group were divided into three subgroups: Dark, daylight, or ultraviolet A (UVA). The percent of bacterial reduction is found out from the counts taken at each time point. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc analysis. Results: Exposure to PMMA containing the nanoparticles reduced the bacterial count by 3.2–99%, depending on the nanoparticles, bacterial types, and light conditions. Planktonic cultures of S. mutans and L. acidophilus exposed to PMMA containing 1% of TiO2/SiO2 nanoparticles showed a significant decrease (P < 0.001) (98% and 99%, respectively) in a time-dependent manner under UVA. The S. mutans and L. acidophilus counts did not significantly decrease in PMMA containing 0.5% nano-TiO2 and PMMA containing 0.5% nano-SiO2 in the dark. No statistically significant reduction (P > 0.05) was observed in the counts of S. mutans and L. acidophilus in PMMA without the nanoparticles exposed to UVA. Conclusions: PMMA resins incorporated with TiO2/SiO2 nanoparticles showed strong antimicrobial activity against the cariogenic

  1. Design and development of a new generation of UV-visible-light-driven nanosized codoped titanium dioxide photocatalysts and biocides/sporocides, and environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamal, Dambar B.

    For solar environmental remediation, a new generation of nanosized (< 10 nm) titanium dioxide photocatalysts codoped with metals and nonmetals, or metals only were prepared by the xero-gel and aero-gel methods. For silver or cobalt-based xero-gel titanium dioxide photocatalysts, photoactivities tests revealed that codoping of titanium dioxide with a metal (1% Ag or 2% Co) and nonmetals (carbon and sulfur) is necessary to achieve high-activities for acetaldehyde degradation under visible light (wavelength > 420 nm). It was concluded that high visible-light-activities for acetaldehyde degradation over codoped titanium dioxide were attributed to an interplay of anatase crystallinity, high-surface area, reduced band-gap (< 3.0 eV), uniform dispersion of doped metal ions, and suppressed recombination rate of photogenerated electronhole pairs. Moreover, the nature and amount of codoped metals play a significant role in visible-light-induced photocatalysis. Metals (Al, Ga, and In) doped/codoped titanium dioxide photocatalysts were prepared by the aero-gel method. The photocatalytic studies showed that activities of metal doped/codoped photocatalysts under UV light (wavelength < 400 nm) were found to be dependent on pollutants. Indium demonstrated beneficial effects in both textural and photocatalytic properties. Gallium and indium codoped titanium dioxide photocatalysts displayed even better performance in the CO oxidation reaction under UV light. Notably, titanium dioxide codoped with Ga, In, and Pt, exhibited unique photoactivities for the CO oxidation under both UV and visible light irradiation, indicating that this system could have promise for the water-gas shift reaction for hydrogen production. Silver-based nanostructured titanium dioxide samples were developed for killing human pathogens (Escherichia coli cells and Bacillus subtilis spores). Biocidal tests revealed that silver, carbon, and sulfur codoped titanium dioxide nanoparticles (< 10 nm) possess very strong

  2. Titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth’s crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  3. Efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation by silica supported and platinum promoted titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Meenal M.; Labhsetwar, Nitin K.; Parwate, D.V.; Rayalu, Sadhana S.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: Titanium dioxide was supported on mesoporous silica and promoted with Pt and Ru. The supported photocatalysts show high surface area and better photocatalytic activity in visible light as compared to the benchmark Degussa P25. These photocatalysts were characterized using XRD, BET-SA, and UV-DRS techniques. The surface area of supported photocatalyst was 140.6 m{sup 2}/g which is higher than Degussa P-25. Supported photocatalyst was evaluated for hydrogen evolution via water splitting reaction using ethanol as a sacrificial donor. Hydrogen yield observed is 4791.43 μmol/h/g of TiO{sub 2} and that for P-25 is 161 μmol/h/g of TiO{sub 2} under visible light irradiation. The value is 30 times higher than benchmark material Degussa P-25. This photocatalyst is also found stable up to 24 h without replenishing with sacrificial donor ethanol. - Highlights: • Semiconductor titanium dioxide has been supported on silica gel and promoted with Pt by simple wet impregnation route. • This synthesized photocatalyst is showing high surface area of 140.6 m{sup 2}/g with crystallite size in the range of 15.44 Å. • This photocatalyst is showing enhanced hydrogen yield of about 4791.43 μmol/h/g of TiO{sub 2}. • This photocatalyst is also found stable up to 24 h without replenishing with sacrificial donor ethanol. • The effect of various operating parameters on supported photocatalyst also has been studied. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide was supported on mesoporous silica and promoted with Pt and Ru. The supported photocatalysts show high surface area and better photocatalytic activity in visible light as compared to the benchmark Degussa P25. These photocatalysts were characterized using XRD, BET-SA, and UV-DRS techniques. The surface area of supported photocatalyst was 140.6 m{sup 2}/g which is higher than Degussa P-25. Supported photocatalyst was evaluated for hydrogen evolution via water splitting reaction using ethanol as a sacrificial donor

  4. Toxic Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles and Titanium Dioxide Bulk Salt in the Liver and Blood of Male Sprague-Dawley Rats Assessed by Different Assays.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farhat; Qureshi, Naureen Aziz; Fakhr-E-Alam, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the toxic effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) bulk salt as well as its nanoparticles (NPs) in anatase phase with mean crystallite size of 36.15 nm in male Sprague-Dawley rats by subcutaneous injections at four different dose levels of either control (0), 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg of body weight (BW) of rat for 28 days on alternate days. Animal mortality, haematology, micronucleus assay, liver histology and activities of liver tissue damage markers like, alkaline phosphate (ALP), alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), as well as oxidative stress indicators like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were investigated. The study revealed significant differences (P < 0.05) among control and experimental groups in all the haematological parameters at the end of experiment. Significantly elevated levels (P < 0.05) of ALT, AST and ALP were found for the group treated with TiO2 NPs at the dose of 150 mg/kg of body weight as compared to control. TiO2 and TiO2 NPs caused dose-dependent genotoxicity in the blood cells of the treated rat as revealed by micronuclei test. The highest frequency of micronuclei was observed in rats treated with NPs at the dose of 150 mg/kg BW which was significantly different (P < 0.001) from all other experimental groups after 28 days of exposure. Similarly, all the treatments showed dose-dependent oxidative stress in the treated rats. However, the significantly high decline in the activities of CAT, SOD, and GST as well as elevation in malondialdehyde and GSH was observed in the group receiving NPs at the rate of 150 mg/kg BW. TiO2 also caused histological alterations in the liver. The study revealed that higher dose of TiO2 NPs exerted significantly harmful effects on liver and blood as compared to its lower doses as well as from all other doses of their bulk counterparts.

  5. Adsorption of Rhodococcus Strain GIN-1 (NCIMB 40340) on Titanium Dioxide and Coal Fly Ash Particles

    PubMed Central

    Shabtai, Y.; Fleminger, G.

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococcus strain GIN-1 (NCIMB 40340) can be used to enrich and isolate a titanium-rich fraction from coal fly ash. The gram-positive bacterium was isolated by its ability to adhere strongly and rapidly to suspended particles of pure titanium dioxide or coal fly ash. Adsorption depends on the salt concentration and occurs in seawater. Lowering of the salt concentration or washing of particles with pure water did not, however, cause desorption of the bacteria from TiO2 particles; this was achieved by strong alkaline treatment or combined treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate and urea but not with dilute acids, alcohols, or cationic or nonionic detergents. The bacterium exhibits higher affinity towards oxides of Ti and Zn than to other oxides with similar distribution of particle size. Moreover, it adheres much faster to TiO2 than to magnetite (Fe3O4) or Al2O3. After about 1 min, more than 85% of the cells were adsorbed on TiO2, compared with adsorption of only 10 and 8% to magnetite and Al2O3, respectively. Adsorption of the bacteria on TiO2 occurs over a pH range of 1.0 to 9.0 and at temperatures from 4 to over 80°C. Scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray analysis revealed preferential adherence of the bacterium to coal ash particles richer in Ti. Stronger adhesion to TiO2 was also demonstrated in the translocation of bacteria, preadsorbed on magnetite, to TiO2 particles. The temporary co-adhesion to magnetite and TiO2 was exploited for the design of a prototype biomagnetic separation process in which bacterial cells serve as an adhesive mediator between magnetite and TiO2 particles in a mixture of Al, Si, and Ti oxides that simulates their proportion in the ash. Images PMID:16349369

  6. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase plasma glucose via reactive oxygen species-induced insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hailong; Guo, Qian; Wang, Changlin; Ma, Xiao; He, Hongjuan; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong; Gu, Ning

    2015-10-01

    There have been few reports about the possible toxic effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) nanoparticles on the endocrine system. We explored the endocrine effects of oral administration to mice of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles (0, 64 and 320 mg kg(-1) body weight per day to control, low-dose and high-dose groups, respectively, 7 days per week for 14 weeks). TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), and their physiological distribution was investigated by inductively coupled plasma. Biochemical analyzes included plasma glucose, insulin, heart blood triglycerides (TG), free fatty acid (FFA), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related markers (total SOD, GSH and MDA). Phosphorylation of IRS1, Akt, JNK1, and p38 MAPK were analyzed by western blotting. Increased titanium levels were found in the liver, spleen, small intestine, kidney and pancreas. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose significantly increased whereas there was no difference in plasma insulin secretion. Increased ROS levels were found in serum and the liver, as evidenced by reduced total SOD activity and GSH level and increased MDA content. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 nanoparticles induced insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver, shown by increased phosphorylation of IRS1 (Ser307) and reduced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473). The pathway by which TiO2 nanoparticles increase ROS-induced IR were included in the inflammatory response and phosphokinase, as shown by increased serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and increased phosphorylation of JNK1 and p38 MAPK in liver. These results show that oral administration of TiO2 nanoparticles increases ROS, resulting in IR and increasing plasma glucose in mice.

  7. Cellular responses of eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brian D; Gilbert, Samantha L; Khan, Bushra; Carroll, David L; Ringwood, Amy H

    2015-10-01

    Because of the continued development and production of a variety of nanomaterials and nanoparticles, their uptake and effects on the biota of marine ecosystems must be investigated. Filter feeding bivalve molluscs are highly adapted for capturing particles from the external environment and readily internalize nano- and micro-sized particles through endocytosis, so they are commonly used as valuable indicator species for nanoparticle studies. In these studies, adult eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, were exposed to a range of titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2-NP) concentrations (5, 50, 500, and 5000 μg/L) in conjunction with natural sunlight. Isolated hepatopancreas tissues were also exposed to the same TiO2-NP concentrations using particles exposed to similar light and dark conditions. Dose-dependent decreases in lysosomal stability were observed in the adult oyster studies as well as in the isolated tissues, at exposures as low as 50 μg/L. Titanium accumulation in isolated hepatopancreas tissue studies was directly correlated to lysosomal destabilization. Based on measurements of lipid peroxidation as an indicator of oxidative stress, TiO2-NPs toxicity was not related to increased ROS production over the short-term course of these exposures. Analysis of particle size using dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicated that concentration had a significant impact on agglomeration rates, and the small agglomerates as well as individual particles are readily processed by oysters. Overall, this study illustrates that low concentrations of TiO2-NPs may cause sublethal toxicity on oysters, which might be enhanced under natural sunlight conditions. In estuarine environments, where these nanomaterials are likely to accumulate, agglomeration rates, interaction with organics, and responses to sunlight are critical in determining the extent of their bioreactivity and biological impacts.

  8. Femtosecond laser induced periodic nanostructures on titanium dioxide film for improving biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinonaga, T.; Horiguchi, N.; Tsukamoto, M.; Nagai, A.; Yamashita, K.; Hanawa, T.; Matsushita, N.; Guoqiang, X.; Abe, N.

    2013-03-01

    Periodic nanostructures formation on Titanium dioxide (TiO2) film by scanning of femtosecond laser beam spot at fundamental and second harmonic wave is reported. Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used for biomaterials, because of its excellent anti-corrosion and high mechanical properties. However, Ti implant is typically artificial materials and has no biofunction. Hence, it is necessary for improving the bioactivity of Ti. Recently, coating of TiO2 film on Ti plate surface is useful methods to improve biocompatibility of Ti plate. Then, if periodic nanostructures were formed on the film surface, cell spreading might be controlled at one direction. We propose periodic nanostructures formation on TiO2 film by femtosecond laser irradiation. Cell spread could be controlled along the grooves of periodic nanostructures. In the experiments, the film was formed on Ti plate with an aerosol beam. A commercial femtosecond Ti : sapphire laser system was employed in our experiments. Periodic nanostructures, lying perpendicular to the laser electric field polarization vector, were formed on the film at fundamental and second harmonic wave. Periodic nanostructures were also produced on Ti plate with femtosecond laser. The period of periodic nanostructures on the film was much shorter than that on Ti plate. By cell test, there was a region of cell spreading along the grooves of periodic nanostructures on the film formed with femtosecond laser at fundamental wave. On bare film surface, cell spreading was observed at all direction. These results suggest that direction of cell spread could be controlled by periodic nanostructures formation on the film.

  9. Carbon nanotubes supported by titanium dioxide nanoparticles as recyclable and green catalyst for mild synthesis of dihydropyrimidinones/thiones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, Javad; Gandomi-Ravandi, Soheila

    2014-05-01

    The catalytic activity of titanium dioxide supported on carbon nanotubes has been investigated in a one-pot three components condensation reaction (Biginelli reaction). The TiO2-CNT nanocomposites as catalyst are highly stable and completely heterogeneous and they can be recycled several times. Compared to the classical Biginelli reaction conditions, the present methodology offers several advantages such as excellent yields, simplicity, fast and clean reactions and short reaction times.

  10. Bleaching effect of a 405-nm diode laser irradiation used with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, K.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Hirai, Y.

    2007-09-01

    A 405-nm diode laser has recently been developed for soft tissue problems in dentistry. A new in-office bleaching agent consisting of a titanium dioxide photocatalyst and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide has proven to react well with light irradiated at a wavelength of around 400 nm. In this study, we evaluated the bleaching efficacy of a newly developed 405-nm diode laser on bovine teeth treated with a bleaching agent composed of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide. Sixteen bovine incisors were randomly divided into two groups: Group A, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 200 mW; Group B, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 400 mW. The bleaching agent with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide was applied to bovine enamel and irradiated for 1 min. The specimens were then washed and dried, and the same procedure was repeated nine more times. After irradiation, we assessed the effects of bleaching on the enamel by measuring the color of the specimens with a spectrophotometer and examining the enamel surfaces with a scanning electron microscope. L* rose to a high score, reaching a significantly higher post-treatment level in comparison to pretreatment. In a comparison of the color difference (Δ E) between Group A and Group B, the specimens in Group B showed significantly higher values after 10 min of irradiation for the post-treatment. No remarkable differences in the enamel surface morphology were found between the unbleached and bleached enamel. The use of a 405-nm diode laser in combination with a bleaching agent of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide may be an effective method for bleaching teeth without the risk of tooth damage.

  11. Titanium Dioxide Photocatalytic Polymerization of Acrylamide for Gel Electrophoresis (TIPPAGE) of Proteins and Structural Identification by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenyang; Yuan, Zhiwei; Huang, Lulu; Kang, Jie; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) coupled with mass spectrometry has been well established for separating, identifying and quantifying protein mixtures from cell lines, tissues or other biological samples. The copolymerization process of acrylamide and bis-acrylamide is the key to mastering this powerful technique. In general, this is a vinyl addition reaction initiated by free radical-generating reagents such as ammonium persulfate (APS) and tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) under basic pH and degassing experimental condition. We report herein a photocatalytic polymerization approach that is based on photo-generated hydroxyl radicals with nanoparticles of titanium dioxide. It was shown that the polymerization process is greatly accelerated in acidic condition when ultraviolet light shots on the gel solution containing TiO2 nanoparticles without degassing. This feature makes it very useful in preparing Triton X-100 acid urea (TAU) gel that has been developed for separating basic proteins such as histones and variants in acidic experimental condition. Additionally, the presence of titanium dioxide in the gel not only improves mechanistic property of gels but also changes the migration pattern of different proteins that have different affinities to titanium dioxide. PMID:26865351

  12. Antimicrobial activity of zinc and titanium dioxide nanoparticles against biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesline, A.; John, Neetu P.; Narayanan, P. M.; Vani, C.; Murugan, Sevanan

    2015-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the major nosocomial pathogens responsible for a wide spectrum of infections and the emergence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has lead to treatment drawbacks towards large number of drugs. Formation of biofilms is the main contributing factor to antibiotic resistance. The development of reliable processes for the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles is an important aspect of nanotechnology today. Zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles comprise well-known inhibitory and bactericidal effects. Emergence of antimicrobial resistance by pathogenic bacteria is a major health problem in recent years. This study was designed to determine the efficacy of zinc and titanium dioxide nanoparticles against biofilm producing methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Biofilm production was detected by tissue culture plate method. Out of 30 MRSA isolates, 22 isolates showed strong biofilm production and 2 showed weak and moderate biofilm formation. Two strong and weak biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates were subjected to antimicrobial activity using commercially available zinc and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Thus, the nanoparticles showed considerably good activity against the isolates, and it can be concluded that they may act as promising, antibacterial agents in the coming years.

  13. Titanium Dioxide Photocatalytic Polymerization of Acrylamide for Gel Electrophoresis (TIPPAGE) of Proteins and Structural Identification by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyang; Yuan, Zhiwei; Huang, Lulu; Kang, Jie; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-02-11

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) coupled with mass spectrometry has been well established for separating, identifying and quantifying protein mixtures from cell lines, tissues or other biological samples. The copolymerization process of acrylamide and bis-acrylamide is the key to mastering this powerful technique. In general, this is a vinyl addition reaction initiated by free radical-generating reagents such as ammonium persulfate (APS) and tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) under basic pH and degassing experimental condition. We report herein a photocatalytic polymerization approach that is based on photo-generated hydroxyl radicals with nanoparticles of titanium dioxide. It was shown that the polymerization process is greatly accelerated in acidic condition when ultraviolet light shots on the gel solution containing TiO2 nanoparticles without degassing. This feature makes it very useful in preparing Triton X-100 acid urea (TAU) gel that has been developed for separating basic proteins such as histones and variants in acidic experimental condition. Additionally, the presence of titanium dioxide in the gel not only improves mechanistic property of gels but also changes the migration pattern of different proteins that have different affinities to titanium dioxide.

  14. Titanium Dioxide Photocatalytic Polymerization of Acrylamide for Gel Electrophoresis (TIPPAGE) of Proteins and Structural Identification by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyang; Yuan, Zhiwei; Huang, Lulu; Kang, Jie; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) coupled with mass spectrometry has been well established for separating, identifying and quantifying protein mixtures from cell lines, tissues or other biological samples. The copolymerization process of acrylamide and bis-acrylamide is the key to mastering this powerful technique. In general, this is a vinyl addition reaction initiated by free radical-generating reagents such as ammonium persulfate (APS) and tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) under basic pH and degassing experimental condition. We report herein a photocatalytic polymerization approach that is based on photo-generated hydroxyl radicals with nanoparticles of titanium dioxide. It was shown that the polymerization process is greatly accelerated in acidic condition when ultraviolet light shots on the gel solution containing TiO2 nanoparticles without degassing. This feature makes it very useful in preparing Triton X-100 acid urea (TAU) gel that has been developed for separating basic proteins such as histones and variants in acidic experimental condition. Additionally, the presence of titanium dioxide in the gel not only improves mechanistic property of gels but also changes the migration pattern of different proteins that have different affinities to titanium dioxide. PMID:26865351

  15. Titanium Dioxide Photocatalytic Polymerization of Acrylamide for Gel Electrophoresis (TIPPAGE) of Proteins and Structural Identification by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenyang; Yuan, Zhiwei; Huang, Lulu; Kang, Jie; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-02-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) coupled with mass spectrometry has been well established for separating, identifying and quantifying protein mixtures from cell lines, tissues or other biological samples. The copolymerization process of acrylamide and bis-acrylamide is the key to mastering this powerful technique. In general, this is a vinyl addition reaction initiated by free radical-generating reagents such as ammonium persulfate (APS) and tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) under basic pH and degassing experimental condition. We report herein a photocatalytic polymerization approach that is based on photo-generated hydroxyl radicals with nanoparticles of titanium dioxide. It was shown that the polymerization process is greatly accelerated in acidic condition when ultraviolet light shots on the gel solution containing TiO2 nanoparticles without degassing. This feature makes it very useful in preparing Triton X-100 acid urea (TAU) gel that has been developed for separating basic proteins such as histones and variants in acidic experimental condition. Additionally, the presence of titanium dioxide in the gel not only improves mechanistic property of gels but also changes the migration pattern of different proteins that have different affinities to titanium dioxide.

  16. Loading amorphous Asarone in mesoporous silica SBA-15 through supercritical carbon dioxide technology to enhance dissolution and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengzan; Quan, Guilan; Wu, Qiaoli; Zhou, Chan; Li, Feng; Bai, Xuequn; Li, Ge; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to load amorphous hydrophobic drug into ordered mesoporous silica (SBA-15) by supercritical carbon dioxide technology in order to improve the dissolution and bioavailability of the drug. Asarone was selected as a model drug due to its lipophilic character and poor bioavailability. In vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability of the obtained Asarone-SBA-15 were significantly improved as compared to the micronized crystalline drug. This study offers an effective, safe, and environmentally benign means of solving the problems relating to the solubility and bioavailability of hydrophobic molecules.

  17. Alteration of metabolomic profiles by titanium dioxide nanoparticles in human gingivitis model.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Contreras, Rene; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Umemura, Naoki; Kaneko, Miku; Hatakeyama, Yoko; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalia; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Although nanoparticles (NPs) has afforded considerable benefits in various fields of sciences, several reports have shown their harmful effects, suggesting the necessity of adequate risk assessment. To clarify the mechanism of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs)-enhanced gingival inflammation, we conducted the full-scale metabolomic analyses of human gingival fibroblast cells treated with IL-1β alone or in combination with TiO2 NPs. Observation with transmission electron microscope demonstrated the incorporation of TiO2 NPs into vacuoles of the cells. TiO2 NPs significantly enhanced the IL-1β-induced prostaglandin E2 production and COX-1 and COX-2 protein expression. IL-1β reduced the intracellular concentrations of overall primary metabolites especially those of amino acid, urea cycle, polyamine, S-adenosylmethione and glutathione synthetic pathways. The addition of TiO2 NPs further augmented these IL-1β-induced metabolic changes, recommending careful use of dental materials containing TiO2 NPs towards patients with gingivitis or periodontitis. The impact of the present study is to identify the molecular targets of TiO2 NPs for the future establishment of new metabolic markers and therapeutic strategy of gingival inflammation.

  18. Critical review of public health regulations of titanium dioxide, a human food additive.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Boris

    2015-01-01

    From 1916 to 2011, an estimated total of 165050000 metric tons of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) pigment were produced worldwide. Current safety regulations on the usage of the TiO2 pigment as an inactive ingredient additive in human food are based on legislation from 1969 and are arguably outdated. This article compiles new research results to provide fresh data for potential risk reassessment. However, even after 45 years, few scientific research reports have provided truly reliable data. For example, administration of very high doses of TiO2 is not relevant to daily human uptake. Nevertheless, because dose makes the poison, the literature provides a valuable source for understanding potential TiO2 toxicity after oral ingestion. Numerous scientific articles have observed that TiO2 can pass and be absorbed by the mammalian gastrointestinal tract; can bioconcentrate, bioaccumulate, and biomagnify in the tissues of mammals and other vertebrates; has a very limited elimination rate; and can cause histopathological and physiological changes in various organs of animals. Such action is contrary to the 1969 decision to approve the use of TiO2 as an inactive ingredient in human food without an established acceptable daily intake, stating that neither significant absorption nor tissue storage following ingestion of TiO2 was possible. Thus, relevant governmental agencies should reassess the safety of TiO2 as an additive in human food and consider establishing an acceptable maximum daily intake as a precautionary measure.

  19. Genotoxicity Studies of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) in the Brain of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hanan R. H.

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) are excessively used and represent one of the top five most commonly used nanoparticles worldwide. Recently, various studies referred to their toxic potential on various organs using different treatment route. Male Swiss Webster mice were orally administrated TiO2NPs (500 mg/kg b.w.) daily for five consecutive days and then animals were sacrificed at 24 h, 7 days, or 14 days after the last treatment. The present results report that exposure to TiO2NPs produces mild to moderate changes in the cytoarchitecture of brain tissue in a time dependent manner. Moreover, Comet assay revealed the apoptotic DNA fragmentation, while PCR-SSCP pattern and direct sequencing showed point mutation of Presenilin 1 gene at exon 5, gene linked to inherited forms of the Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, from these findings, the present study concluded that TiO2NPs is genotoxic and mutagenic to brain tissue which in turn might lead to Alzheimer's disease incidence. PMID:27034902

  20. Bioavailability of Silica, Titanium Dioxide, and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Jeong-A; Jo, Mi-Rae; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2016-06-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have been widely applied to various industrial fields and biological applications. However, the question as to whether nanoparticles are more efficiently absorbed into the systemic circulation than bulk-sized materials remains to be unclear. In the present study, the physico-chemical and dissolution properties of the most extensively developed inorganic nanoparticles, such as silica (SiO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), and zinc oxide (ZnO), were analyzed, as compared with bulk-sized particles. Furthermore, the bioavailability of nanoparticles versus their bulk counterparts was evaluated in rats after a single oral administration and intravenous injection, respectively. The results demonstrated that all bulk materials had slightly higher crystallinity than nanoparticles, however, their dissolution properties were not affected by particle size. No significant difference in oral absorption and bioavailability of both SiO2 and TiO2 was found between nano- and bulk-sized materials, while bulk ZnO particles were more bioavailable in the body than ZnO nanoparticles. These finding will provide critical information to apply nanoparticles with high efficiency as well as to predict their toxicity potential. PMID:27427756

  1. Unraveling the neurotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: focusing on molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bin; Zhang, Yanli; Liu, Jia; Feng, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Summary Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) possess unique characteristics and are widely used in many fields. Numerous in vivo studies, exposing experimental animals to these NPs through systematic administration, have suggested that TiO2 NPs can accumulate in the brain and induce brain dysfunction. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs remain unclear. However, we have concluded from previous studies that these mechanisms mainly consist of oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, inflammatory response, genotoxicity, and direct impairment of cell components. Meanwhile, other factors such as disturbed distributions of trace elements, disrupted signaling pathways, dysregulated neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity have also been shown to contribute to neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs. Recently, studies on autophagy and DNA methylation have shed some light on possible mechanisms of nanotoxicity. Therefore, we offer a new perspective that autophagy and DNA methylation could contribute to neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs. Undoubtedly, more studies are needed to test this idea in the future. In short, to fully understand the health threats posed by TiO2 NPs and to improve the bio-safety of TiO2 NPs-based products, the neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs must be investigated comprehensively through studying every possible molecular mechanism. PMID:27335754

  2. Elaborately prepared hierarchical structure titanium dioxide for remarkable performance in lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghua; Luo, Dong; Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhengxi; Yang, Li; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    2016-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been considered to be a promisingly alternative anode material for lithium-ion batteries and thus attracted wide research interest. But, its practical application in lithium-ion batteries is seriously impeded by low capacity and poor rate capability. In the present work, the electrochemical performance of TiO2 is significantly improved by elaborately fabricating hierarchical structures. These as-prepared four hierarchical structure TiO2 assembled by different building blocks (TO2-2 h, TO2-6 h, TO2-18 h and TO2-24 h) all exhibit impressed performance. More importantly, the TO2-6 h constructed by curved nanosheets exhibits the best performance, delivering a capacity of 231.6 mAh g-1 at 0.2C after 200 cycles, and capacities of 187.1 and 129.3 mAh g-1 at 1 and 10C after even 1200 cycles, respectively. The results indicated that design and fabrication of hierarchical structure is an effective strategy for significantly improving the electrochemical performance of TiO2 electrodes, and the electrochemical performance of hierarchical structure TiO2 is heavily dependent on its building blocks. It is suggested that thus excellent electrochemical performance may make TiO2-6 h a promising anode material for advanced lithium-ion batteries with high capacity, good rate capability and long life.

  3. Genotoxic responses to titanium dioxide nanoparticles and fullerene in gpt delta transgenic MEF cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, An; Chai, Yunfei; Nohmi, Takehiko; Hei, Tom K

    2009-01-01

    Background Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles and fullerene (C60) are two attractive manufactured nanoparticles with great promise in industrial and medical applications. However, little is known about the genotoxic response of TiO2 nanoparticles and C60 in mammalian cells. In the present study, we determined the mutation fractions induced by either TiO2 nanoparticles or C60 in gpt delta transgenic mouse primary embryo fibroblasts (MEF) and identified peroxynitrite anions (ONOO-) as an essential mediator involved in such process. Results Both TiO2 nanoparticles and C60 dramatically increased the mutation yield, which could be abrogated by concurrent treatment with the endocytosis inhibitor, Nystatin. Under confocal scanning microscopy together with the radical probe dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR 123), we found that there was a dose-dependent formation of ONOO- in live MEF cells exposed to either TiO2 nanoparticles or C60, and the protective effects of antioxidants were demonstrated by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, NG-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Furthermore, suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity by using the chemical inhibitor NS-398 significantly reduced mutation frequency of both TiO2 nanoparticles and C60. Conclusion Our results provided novel information that both TiO2 nanoparticles and C60 were taken up by cells and induced kilo-base pair deletion mutations in a transgenic mouse mutation system. The induction of ONOO- may be a critical signaling event for nanoparticle genotoxicity. PMID:19154577

  4. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Increase Superoxide Anion Production by Acting on NADPH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Trepout, Sylvain; Wien, Frank; Marco, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) anatase nanoparticles (NPs) are metal oxide NPs commercialized for several uses of everyday life. However their toxicity has been poorly investigated. Cellular internalization of NPs has been shown to activate macrophages and neutrophils that contribute to superoxide anion production by the NADPH oxidase complex. Transmission electron micrososcopy images showed that the membrane fractions were close to the NPs while fluorescence indicated an interaction between NPs and cytosolic proteins. Using a cell-free system, we have investigated the influence of TiO2 NPs on the behavior of the NADPH oxidase. In the absence of the classical activator molecules of the enzyme (arachidonic acid) but in the presence of TiO2 NPs, no production of superoxide ions could be detected indicating that TiO2 NPs were unable to activate by themselves the complex. However once the NADPH oxidase was activated (i.e., by arachidonic acid), the rate of superoxide anion production went up to 140% of its value without NPs, this effect being dependent on their concentration. In the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles, the NADPH oxidase produces more superoxide ions, hence induces higher oxidative stress. This hyper-activation and the subsequent increase in ROS production by TiO2 NPs could participate to the oxidative stress development. PMID:26714308

  5. Synthesization of Nanostructured Titanium Dioxide at Low Molarity of Sol-Gel Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarof, S. K. M.; Abdullah, S.; Rusop, M.

    2013-06-01

    Titanium dioxide, TiO2 is one of the semiconductor materials. The aim of this paper is to determine the production of TiO2 by sol-gel method. The sol-gel method used because this method is quite simple compare to other methods such as dip-coated and refractive sputtering. The parameter will be used in this paper is the concentration. The sol-gel TiO2 solution then spin coated on the glass substrate to form homogenous and transparent thin film. The thin film was coated at 8 layers to adjust the refractive index characteristics and to get the clear images during characterize by spin coating technique. Other than that, this work also to get the band gap energy similar to the standard bandgap for TiO2. The optical properties such as absorption and transmittance of TiO2 can be done by Ultraviolet-visible Spectroscopy (UV-Vis). The changes on the surface morphology were observed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). Based on the result, higher the molarity of TiO2, the uniformity of the surface morphology, and the energy bandgap is much better. Higher the molarity, the bandgap will be lower with 0.1M (3.78 eV) and its too large compare to the standard value (3.2 eV).

  6. Enhanced biohydrogen and subsequent biomethane production from sugarcane bagasse using nano-titanium dioxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Omid; Zilouei, Hamid

    2016-08-01

    Nano-titanium dioxide (nanoTiO2) under ultraviolet irradiation (UV) followed by dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse was used to enhance the production of biohydrogen and biomethane in a consecutive dark fermentation and anaerobic digestion. Different concentrations of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1g nanoTiO2/L under different UV times of 30, 60, 90 and 120min were used. Sulfuric acid (2%v/v) at 121°C was used for 15, 30 and 60min to hydrolyze the pretreated bagasse. For acidic hydrolysis times of 15, 30 and 60min, the highest total free sugar values were enhanced by 260%, 107%, and 189%, respectively, compared to samples without nanoTiO2 pretreatment. The highest hydrogen production samples for the same acidic hydrolysis times showed 88%, 127%, and 25% enhancement. The maximum hydrogen production of 101.5ml/g VS (volatile solids) was obtained at 1g nanoTiO2/L and 120min UV irradiation followed by 30min acid hydrolysis. PMID:27208737

  7. Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Red Clover and Its Rhizobial Symbiont.

    PubMed

    Moll, Janine; Okupnik, Annette; Gogos, Alexander; Knauer, Katja; Bucheli, Thomas D; van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Widmer, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are in consideration to be used in plant protection products. Before these products can be placed on the market, ecotoxicological tests have to be performed. In this study, the nitrogen fixing bacterium Rhizobium trifolii and red clover were exposed to two TiO2 NPs, i.e., P25, E171 and a non-nanomaterial TiO2. Growth of both organisms individually and their symbiotic root nodulation were investigated in liquid and hydroponic systems. While 23 and 18 mg l-1 of E171 and non-nanomaterial TiO2 decreased the growth rate of R. trifolii by 43 and 23% respectively, P25 did not cause effects. Shoot length of red clover decreased between 41 and 62% for all tested TiO2 NPs. In 21% of the TiO2 NP treated plants, no nodules were found. At high concentrations certain TiO2 NPs impaired R. trifolii as well as red clover growth and their symbiosis in the hydroponic systems. PMID:27171465

  8. Photocytotoxicity in human dermal fibroblasts elicited by permanent makeup inks containing titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wamer, Wayne G; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a pigment widely used in decorative tattoo and permanent makeup inks. However, little is known about the risks associated with its presence in these products. We have developed an in vitro assay to identify inks containing TiO2 that are cytotoxic and/or photocytotoxic. The presence of TiO2 in ten permanent makeup inks was established by X-ray fluorescence. Using X-ray diffraction, we found that seven inks contained predominately TiO2 (anatase), the more photocatalytically active crystalline form of TiO2. The remaining inks contained predominately TiO2 (rutile). To identify cytotoxic and/or photocytotoxic inks, human dermal fibroblasts were incubated for 18 h in media containing inks or pigments isolated from inks. Fibroblasts were then irradiated with 10 J/cm2 UVA radiation combined with 45 J/cm2 visible light for determining photocytotoxicity, or kept in the dark for determining cytotoxicity. Toxicity was assessed as inhibition of colony formation. No inks were cytotoxic. However eight inks, and the pigments isolated from these inks, were photocytotoxic. Using ESR, we found that most pigments from photocytotoxic inks generated hydroxyl radicals when photoexcited with UV radiation. Therefore, the possibility of photocytotoxicity should be considered when evaluating the safety of permanent makeup inks containing TiO2.

  9. The Use of Titanium Dioxide for Selective Enrichment of Phosphorylated Peptides.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has very high affinity for phosphopeptides and in recent years it has become one of the most popular methods for phosphopeptide enrichment from complex biological samples. Peptide loading onto TiO2 resin in a highly acidic environment in the presence of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), phthalic acid, lactic acid, or glycolic acid has been shown to improve selectivity significantly by reducing unspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. The phosphopeptides bound to the TiO2 are subsequently eluted from the chromatographic material using an alkaline buffer. TiO2 chromatography is extremely tolerant towards most buffers used in biological experiments, highly robust and as such it has become the method of choice in large-scale phosphoproteomics. Here we describe a batch mode protocol for phosphopeptide enrichment using TiO2 chromatographic material followed by desalting and concentration of the sample by reversed phase micro-columns prior to downstream MS and LC-MS/MS analysis. PMID:26584923

  10. Highly selective capture of phosphopeptides using a nano titanium dioxide-multiwalled carbon nanotube nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guozhen; Gao, Wei; Deng, Qiliang; Qian, Kun; Han, Haitao; Wang, Shuo

    2012-04-15

    In this study, a titanium dioxide-multiwalled carbon nanotube (TiO2-MWNT) nanocomposite was first used to enrich phosphopeptides as a binding agent. The TiO2-MWNT nanocomposite was synthesized by the hydrothermal reaction process and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results demonstrated that the anatase phase TiO2 nanoparticles had been successfully linked by MWNTs. The TiO2-MWNT nanocomposite was applied as a sorbent to enrich phosphopeptides, and the results showed that the performance of the TiO2-MWNT nanocomposite was better than 5 μm TiO2, as confirmed by the analysis of phosphopeptides from a tryptic digest of a standard protein (β-casein and bovine serum albumin) using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS). The use of lactic acid in the loading buffer significantly enhances the selectivity of the TiO2-MWNT nanocomposite. This nanocomposite material was further applied to enrich the phosphopeptides in a protein digest obtained from nonfat milk successfully. PMID:22369891

  11. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Increase Superoxide Anion Production by Acting on NADPH Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Rawand; Bizouarn, Tania; Trepout, Sylvain; Wien, Frank; Baciou, Laura; Marco, Sergio; Houée Levin, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) anatase nanoparticles (NPs) are metal oxide NPs commercialized for several uses of everyday life. However their toxicity has been poorly investigated. Cellular internalization of NPs has been shown to activate macrophages and neutrophils that contribute to superoxide anion production by the NADPH oxidase complex. Transmission electron micrososcopy images showed that the membrane fractions were close to the NPs while fluorescence indicated an interaction between NPs and cytosolic proteins. Using a cell-free system, we have investigated the influence of TiO2 NPs on the behavior of the NADPH oxidase. In the absence of the classical activator molecules of the enzyme (arachidonic acid) but in the presence of TiO2 NPs, no production of superoxide ions could be detected indicating that TiO2 NPs were unable to activate by themselves the complex. However once the NADPH oxidase was activated (i.e., by arachidonic acid), the rate of superoxide anion production went up to 140% of its value without NPs, this effect being dependent on their concentration. In the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles, the NADPH oxidase produces more superoxide ions, hence induces higher oxidative stress. This hyper-activation and the subsequent increase in ROS production by TiO2 NPs could participate to the oxidative stress development. PMID:26714308

  12. A mechanistic study to increase understanding of titanium dioxide nanoparticles-increased plasma glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hailong; Li, Li; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Zhou, Ying; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong; Gu, Ning

    2016-09-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2 NP) is an authorized food additive. Previous studies determined oral administration of TiO2 NPs increases plasma glucose in mice via inducing insulin resistance. An increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been considered the possible mechanism of increasing plasma glucose. However, persistently high plasma glucose is also a mechanism of increasing ROS. This study aims to explore whether TiO2 NPs increase plasma glucose via ROS. We found after oral administration of TiO2 NPs, an increase in ROS preceded an increase in plasma glucose. Subsequently, mice were treated with two antioxidants (resveratrol and vitamin E) at the same time as oral administration of TiO2 NPs. Results showed resveratrol and vitamin E reduced TiO2 NPs-increased ROS. An increase in plasma glucose was also inhibited. Further research showed resveratrol and vitamin E inhibited the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6, and the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK, resulting in improved insulin resistance. These results suggest TiO2 NPs increased ROS levels, and then ROS activated inflammatory cytokines and phosphokinases, and thus induced insulin resistance, resulting in an increase in plasma glucose. Resveratrol and vitamin E can reduce TiO2 NPs-increased ROS and thereby inhibit an increase in plasma glucose in mice. PMID:27430421

  13. Workplace Exposure to Titanium Dioxide Nanopowder Released from a Bag Filter System.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jun Ho; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Gwangjae; Noh, Jung-Hun; Yook, Se-Jin; Cho, So-Hye; Bae, Gwi-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers who use laboratory-scale synthesis systems to manufacture nanomaterials could be easily exposed to airborne nanomaterials during the research and development stage. This study used various real-time aerosol detectors to investigate the presence of nanoaerosols in a laboratory used to manufacture titanium dioxide (TiO2). The TiO2 nanopowders were produced via flame synthesis and collected by a bag filter system for subsequent harvesting. Highly concentrated nanopowders were released from the outlet of the bag filter system into the laboratory. The fractional particle collection efficiency of the bag filter system was only 20% at particle diameter of 100 nm, which is much lower than the performance of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Furthermore, the laboratory hood system was inadequate to fully exhaust the air discharged from the bag filter system. Unbalanced air flow rates between bag filter and laboratory hood systems could result in high exposure to nanopowder in laboratory settings. Finally, we simulated behavior of nanopowders released in the laboratory using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). PMID:26125024

  14. Interaction of hydrogen chloride and water with oxide surfaces. III - Titanium dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siriwardane, R. V.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen chloride and water vapors on five TiO2 powders in both the anatase and rutile crystalline forms was studied as a function of temperature, pressure, and outgas conditions. The adsorbents were characterized utilizing X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, surface area analysis, indicator method, microelectrophoresis, XPS, and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that both outgas temperature and adsorption temperature influenced the adsorption of water vapor on TiO2, while water vapor adsorption on TiO2 was completely reversible. It is argued that the number of hydroxyl groups present on the surface determines the adsorption capacity of water on the different titanium dioxides. It was found that heats of immersion in water were affected significantly by outgas temperature. Hydrogen chloride adsorption isotherms at 30 C measured on TiO2 after outgassing at 100-400 C showed that a part of the total HCl adsorbed was irreversibly adsorbed. The highest HCl adsorption capacity per unit area was exhibited by anatase, while pure rutile exhibited the lowest adsorption capacity.

  15. Freshwater ecotoxicity characterisation factor for metal oxide nanoparticles: a case study on titanium dioxide nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Salieri, Beatrice; Righi, Serena; Pasteris, Andrea; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2015-02-01

    The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology is widely applied in several industrial sectors to evaluate the environmental performance of processes, products and services. Recently, several reports and studies have emphasized the importance of LCA in the field of engineered nanomaterials. However, to date only a few LCA studies on nanotechnology have been carried out, and fewer still have assessed aspects relating to ecotoxicity. This is mainly due to the lack of knowledge in relation on human and environmental exposure and effect of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). This bottleneck is continued when performing Life Cycle Impact Assessment, where characterization models and consequently characterization factors (CFs) for ENPs are missing. This paper aims to provide the freshwater ecotoxicity CF for titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO₂). The USEtox model has been selected as a characterisation model. An adjusted multimedia fate model has been developed which accounts for nano-specific fate process descriptors (i.e. sedimentation, aggregation with suspended particle matter, etc.) to estimate the fate of nano-TiO₂ in freshwater. A literature survey of toxicity tests performed on freshwater organism representative of multiple trophic levels was conducted, including algae, crustaceans and fish in order to collect relevant EC₅₀ values. Then, the toxic effect of nano-TiO₂ was computed on the basis of the HC₅₀ value. Thus, following the principle of USEtox model and accounting for nano-specific descriptors a CF for the toxic impact of freshwater ecotoxicity of 0.28 PAFdaym(3)kg(-1) is proposed.

  16. Imitation of phase I oxidative metabolism of anabolic steroids by titanium dioxide photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ruokolainen, Miina; Valkonen, Minna; Sikanen, Tiina; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2014-12-18

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysis for oxidation of anabolic steroids and for imitation of their phase I metabolism. The photocatalytic reaction products of five anabolic steroids were compared to their phase I in vitro metabolites produced by human liver microsomes (HLM). The same main reaction types - hydroxylation, dehydrogenation and combination of these two - were observed both in TiO2 photocatalysis and in microsomal incubations. Several isomers of each product type were formed in both systems. Based on the same mass, retention time and similarity of the product ion spectra, many of the products observed in HLM reactions were also formed in TiO2 photocatalytic reactions. However, products characteristic to only either one of the systems were also formed. In conclusion, TiO2 photocatalysis is a rapid, simple and inexpensive method for imitation of phase I metabolism of anabolic steroids and production of metabolite standards. PMID:25220585

  17. Chances and limitations of nanosized titanium dioxide practical application in view of its physicochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Janusz; Jackowska-Tracz, Agnieszka; Zarzyńska, Joanna; Pławińska-Czarnak, Joanna

    2015-02-01

    Nanotechnology is a field of science that is nowadays developing in a dynamic way. It seems to offer almost endless opportunities of contribution to many areas of economy and human activity, in general. Thanks to nanotechnology, the so-called nanomaterials can be designed. They present structurally altered materials, with their physical, chemical and biological properties entirely differing from properties of the same materials manufactured in microtechnology. Nanotechnology creates a unique opportunity to modify the matter at the level of atoms and particles. Therefore, it has become possible to obtain items displaying new, useful properties, i.e. self-disinfecting and self-cleaning surfaces. Those surfaces are usually covered by a thin layer of a photocatalyst. The role of the photocatalyst is most of the time performed by the nanosized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2). Excitation of nano-TiO2 by ultraviolet radiation initiates advanced oxidation processes and reactions leading to the creation of oxygen vacancies that bind water particles. As a result, photocatalytic surfaces are given new properties. Those properties can then be applied in a variety of disciplines, such as medicine, food hygiene, environmental protection or building industry. Practically, the applications include inactivation of microorganisms, degradation of toxins, removing pollutants from buildings and manufacturing of fog-free windows or mirrors.

  18. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles as carrier facilitate bioaccumulation of phenanthrene in marine bivalve, ark shell (Scapharca subcrenata).

    PubMed

    Tian, Shengyan; Zhang, Yaodan; Song, Chunzheng; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) on the uptake of hydrophobic organic chemicals by marine bivalves, we conducted a comparative bioaccumulation study by exposing clam, Scapharca subcrenata, to phenanthrene (Phe) in the presence and absence of nTiO2. The large surface area of nTiO2 resulted in adsorption of co-existing Phe in aqueous solution to form nTiO2-Phe complexes. Accumulation of nTiO2 was not observed in clams at exposed concentration (500 μg/L) in this study. However, enhanced uptake of Phe by clams was observed in the presence of nTiO2, with ku and BAFs values being 2 and 1.7 times higher than that of Phe alone, respectively. The enhanced uptake can be explained by ingestion of nTiO2-Phe complexes into the gut and subsequent desorption of Phe there. Therefore, nTiO2 as a carrier facilitated the uptake of Phe by marine bivalves.

  19. Potassium iodate assisted synthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with superior water-dispersibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yawen; Duo, Fangfang; Peng, Shiqi; Jia, Falong; Fan, Caimei

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we report a novel polyol process to synthesize highly water-dispersible anatase titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (∼5 nm) by the introduction of inorganic oxidizing agent--KIO3. The obtained TiO2 nanoparticles are well dispersible in water at pH≥5.0 and the resulting aqueous dispersion remains stable over months. The superior water-dispersibility of as-formed TiO2 is ascribed to the electrostatic repulsion from carboxylic acid group modified on TiO2 nanoparticles, which is the oxidation product of solvent diethylene glycol (DEG) by KIO3. Based on the characterization results, the formation processes of water-dispersibility TiO2 nanoparticles are proposed. Meanwhile, the synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles are found to be doped by iodine and exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity on degradation of rhodamine-B (RhB) under visible-light irradiation. The further tests demonstrate that the O(2-) is the main active species during photodegradation of RhB.

  20. The toxicity of titanium dioxide nanopowder to early life stages of the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Paterson, Gordon; Ataria, Jamie M; Hoque, M Ehsanul; Burns, Darcy C; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2011-02-01

    In this study, fertilized Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos were exposed from fertilization to 5 d post-hatch using static non-renewal assays to aqueous suspensions of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO₂) ranging in nominal concentrations between 0 and 14 μg mL⁻¹. The average size of the nTiO₂ in the stock solution before addition to the test treatments was 87 nm (±14 nm). TiO₂ materials accumulated in a concentration dependent manner on the chorionic filaments of developing medaka embryos with evidence of pericardial edema occurring during embryo development. However, no significant (p > 0.05) increases in mortality relative to control treatments were observed for the nTiO₂ exposed embryos. A concentration dependent increase in cumulative percent hatch was observed at 11 d, indicating that exposure to increasing concentrations of nTiO₂ resulted in the premature hatch of medaka embryos. Post-hatch, a significant proportion of sac fry from the nTiO₂ exposure groups exhibited moribund swimming behavior and these individuals also experienced greater mortality at 15 d post-hatch. Combined, these results demonstrate that exposure to nTiO₂ can impact the development of early life stages of fish. PMID:21074241

  1. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified concrete materials - influence of utilizing recycled glass cullets as aggregates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Combining the use of photocatalysts with cementitious materials is an important development in the field of photocatalytic air pollution mitigation. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on assessing the effectiveness of pollutant degradation by concrete surface layers that incorporate a photocatalytic material - Titanium Dioxide. The photocatalytic activity of the concrete samples was determined by photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) in the laboratory. Recycled glass cullets, derived from crushed waste beverage bottles, were used to replace sand in preparing the concrete surface layers. Factors, which may affect the pollutant removal performance of the concrete layers including glass color, aggregate size and curing age, were investigated. The results show a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity due to the use of glass cullets as aggregates in the concrete layers. The samples fabricated with clear glass cullets exhibited threefold NO removal efficiency compared to the samples fabricated with river sand. The light transmittance property of glass was postulated to account for the efficiency improvement, which was confirmed by a separate simulation study. But the influence of the size of glass cullets was not evident. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of concrete surface layers decreased with curing age, showing a loss of 20% photocatalytic activity after 56-day curing. PMID:19540649

  2. Toxicological effects of nanometer titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lanzhou; Zhou, Lina; Liu, Yongding; Deng, Songqiang; Wu, Hao; Wang, Gaohong

    2012-10-01

    The toxicological effects of nanometer titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) on a unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were assessed by investigating the changes of the physiology and cyto-ultrastructure of this species under treatment. We found that nano-TiO2 inhibited photosynthetic efficiency and cell growth, but the content of chlorophyll a content in algae did not change, while carotenoid and chlorophyll b contents increased. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content reached maximum values after 8h exposure and then decreased to a moderately low level at 72 h. Electron microscopy images indicated that as concentrations of nano-TiO2 increased, a large number of C. reinhardtii cells were noted to be damaged: the number of chloroplasts declined, various other organelles were degraded, plasmolysis occurred, and TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be located inside cell wall and membrane. It was also noted that cell surface was surrounded by TiO2 particles, which could present an obstacle to the exchange of substances between the cell and its surrounding environment. To sum up, the effect of nano-TiO2 on C. reinhardtii included cell surface aggregation, photosynthesis inhibition, lipid peroxidation and new protein synthesis, while the response of C. reinhardtii to nano-TiO2 was a rapid process which occurs during 24 h after exposing and may relate to physiological stress system to mitigate damage. PMID:22883605

  3. Effect of light units on tooth bleaching with visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Ayaka; Otsuki, Masayuki; Sadr, Alireza; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different light sources on the efficiency of an office bleaching agent containing visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst (VL-TiO(2)) using an artificial discoloration tooth model. Extracted bovine teeth were stained by black tea. The CIE L*a*b* values were measured before and after nine consecutive treatments by the VL-TiO(2)-containing bleaching agent (TiON in Office, GC, Tokyo, Japan). A halogen light unit (CB; CoBee, GC) or an LED unit (G-light, GC) with two modes (blue and violet: GL-BV, blue: GL-B) were used to activate the bleaching agent in three groups (n=8). Brightness (ΔL) and color difference (ΔE) increased as bleaching repeated in all groups. Two-way ANOVA showed that both number of treatments and light sources significantly affected ΔE (p<0.05). GL-BV showed better bleaching effect than GL-B. In measurement of irradiation spectra, CB showed a wide spectrum (380-530 nm), GL-B had a sharp peak at 470 nm and GL-BV showed an additional peak at 405 nm. It was concluded that the light source influenced the efficiency of the tooth bleaching with VL-TiO(2). PMID:21946494

  4. Effects of impurity doping and finite temperature in titanium dioxide: A First-principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yuta; Saito, Susumu

    2012-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most important materials for application to photocatalysts while it is a highly polymorphic material. Therefore, understanding of its fundamental physical properties is essential for improvements of its photocatalytic properties. From this point of view, we study the effects of nitrogen doping and the thermodynamic stability of various TiO2 phases in the framework of the density-functional theory. We use the supercells with various dopant concentrations to reveal the nitrogen-doping effects on the energetics and the electronic properties [1]. It is found that the nitrogen doping into both rutile and anatase phases significantly reduces the minimum photo-excitation energies. On the other hand, it is suggested that the dopants tend to cluster in the TiO2 lattice. This clustering might cancel the above-mentioned doping effects on the photo-excitation energies. Next, we consider the finite-temperature effects by introducing phonons to investigate the thermodynamic phase stability. We compare the free energies of rutile, anatase, brookite, and TiO2-II phases. We will also discuss the importance of treatment of semicore states in generating Ti pseudopotentials.[4pt] [1] Y. Aoki and S. Saito, J. Phys: Conf. Ser. 302, 012034 (2011) .

  5. Improvement of photocatalytic activity of brookite titanium dioxide nanorods by surface modification using chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linjie; Menendez-Flores, Victor M.; Murakami, Naoya; Ohno, Teruhisa

    2012-05-01

    Surface morphology of brookite titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanorods was modified by chemical etching with aqueous hydrogen (H2O2)-ammonia (NH3) or sulfuric acid (H2SO4) solution. The brookite nanorods after chemical etching were characterized by TEM, SAED, FE-SEM, XRD and specific surface area measurements. Brookite nanorods after chemical etching with H2O2-NH3 solution exposed new crystal faces in the tips, and nanorods with sharper tips were observed. On the other hand, etching with H2SO4 at 200 °C induced morphological changes in the tip faces and broadened the angle between tip faces as a result of dissolution along the [0 0 1] direction, though brookite nanorods were only slightly etched after etching with H2SO4 at room temperature. Photocatalytic activity of brookite nanorods was tested by toluene decomposition in gas phase under ultraviolet irradiation. Brookite nanorods etched with H2O2-NH3 solution showed higher photocatalytic activity than that of brookite nanorods before etching. In the case of H2SO4 etching at 200 °C, brookite nanorods after etching exhibited lower photocatalytic activity. One reason for this may be that the formation of newly exposed crystal faces by H2O2-NH3 etching improved separation of redox sites due to their strong oxidation ability.

  6. Stoichiometric titanium dioxide ion implantation in AISI 304 stainless steel for corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, A.; Decker, M.; Klein, O.; Karl, H.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of highly chemically inert titanium dioxide synthesized by ion beam implantation for corrosion protection of AISI 304 stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. More specifically, the prevention of galvanic corrosion between carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and AISI 304 was investigated. Corrosion performance of TiO2 implanted AISI 304 - examined for different implantation and annealing parameters - is strongly influenced by implantation fluence. Experimental results show that a fluence of 5 × 1016 cm-2 (Ti+) and 1 × 1017 cm-2 (O+) is sufficient to prevent pitting corrosion significantly, while galvanic corrosion with CFRP can already be noticeably reduced by an implantation fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 (Ti+) and 1 × 1016 cm-2 (O+). Surface roughness, implantation energy and annealing at 200 °C and 400 °C show only little influence on the corrosion behavior. TEM analysis indicates the existence of stoichiometric TiO2 inside the steel matrix for medium fluences and the formation of a separated metal oxide layer for high fluences.

  7. Chitosan/titanium dioxide nanocomposite coatings: Rheological behavior and surface application to cellulosic paper.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanjun; Hu, Xiulan; Zhang, Xinqi; Guo, Daliang; Zhang, Junhua; Kong, Fangong

    2016-10-20

    Incorporation of nanofillers into a polymeric matrix has received much attention as a route to reinforced polymer nanocomposites. In the present work, an environmentally friendly chitosan (CTS)/titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocomposite coating was designed/prepared and subsequently employed for imparting antibacterium and improved mechanical properties to cellulosic paper via surface coating. Effect of TiO2 nanoparticle loadings on the rheological behavior of nanocomposite coatings was investigated. Surface application of CTS/TiO2 nanocomposite coatings to cellulosic paper was performed, and the antibacterial activity and mechanical properties of surface-coated cellulosic paper were examined. Results showed that the increased TiO2 nanoparticle loadings decreased the viscosity and dynamic viscoelasticity of the as-prepared coatings, and improved the antibacterial activity and mechanical properties of surface-coated cellulosic paper. The optimum loading of TiO2 nanoparticles was identified at 10%. This work suggested that CTS/TiO2 nanocomposite coatings may have the potential to be used as a promising antibacterial protective coating for paper packaging.

  8. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified concrete materials - influence of utilizing recycled glass cullets as aggregates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Combining the use of photocatalysts with cementitious materials is an important development in the field of photocatalytic air pollution mitigation. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on assessing the effectiveness of pollutant degradation by concrete surface layers that incorporate a photocatalytic material - Titanium Dioxide. The photocatalytic activity of the concrete samples was determined by photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) in the laboratory. Recycled glass cullets, derived from crushed waste beverage bottles, were used to replace sand in preparing the concrete surface layers. Factors, which may affect the pollutant removal performance of the concrete layers including glass color, aggregate size and curing age, were investigated. The results show a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity due to the use of glass cullets as aggregates in the concrete layers. The samples fabricated with clear glass cullets exhibited threefold NO removal efficiency compared to the samples fabricated with river sand. The light transmittance property of glass was postulated to account for the efficiency improvement, which was confirmed by a separate simulation study. But the influence of the size of glass cullets was not evident. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of concrete surface layers decreased with curing age, showing a loss of 20% photocatalytic activity after 56-day curing.

  9. Genotoxicity Studies of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) in the Brain of Mice.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hanan R H; Hussien, Nahed A

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) are excessively used and represent one of the top five most commonly used nanoparticles worldwide. Recently, various studies referred to their toxic potential on various organs using different treatment route. Male Swiss Webster mice were orally administrated TiO2NPs (500 mg/kg b.w.) daily for five consecutive days and then animals were sacrificed at 24 h, 7 days, or 14 days after the last treatment. The present results report that exposure to TiO2NPs produces mild to moderate changes in the cytoarchitecture of brain tissue in a time dependent manner. Moreover, Comet assay revealed the apoptotic DNA fragmentation, while PCR-SSCP pattern and direct sequencing showed point mutation of Presenilin 1 gene at exon 5, gene linked to inherited forms of the Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, from these findings, the present study concluded that TiO2NPs is genotoxic and mutagenic to brain tissue which in turn might lead to Alzheimer's disease incidence. PMID:27034902

  10. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles strongly impact soil microbial function by affecting archaeal nitrifiers

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Marie; Richaume, Agnès; Guyonnet, Julien P.; Dubost, Audrey; Martins, Jean M. F.; Pommier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soils are facing new environmental stressors, such as titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs). While these emerging pollutants are increasingly released into most ecosystems, including agricultural fields, their potential impacts on soil and its function remain to be investigated. Here we report the response of the microbial community of an agricultural soil exposed over 90 days to TiO2-NPs (1 and 500 mg kg−1 dry soil). To assess their impact on soil function, we focused on the nitrogen cycle and measured nitrification and denitrification enzymatic activities and by quantifying specific representative genes (amoA for ammonia-oxidizers, nirK and nirS for denitrifiers). Additionally, diversity shifts were examined in bacteria, archaea, and the ammonia-oxidizing clades of each domain. With strong negative impacts on nitrification enzyme activities and the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing microorganism, TiO2-NPs triggered cascading negative effects on denitrification enzyme activity and a deep modification of the bacterial community structure after just 90 days of exposure to even the lowest, realistic concentration of NPs. These results appeal further research to assess how these emerging pollutants modify the soil health and broader ecosystem function. PMID:27659196

  11. Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Red Clover and Its Rhizobial Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Janine; Okupnik, Annette; Gogos, Alexander; Knauer, Katja; Bucheli, Thomas D.; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.; Widmer, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are in consideration to be used in plant protection products. Before these products can be placed on the market, ecotoxicological tests have to be performed. In this study, the nitrogen fixing bacterium Rhizobium trifolii and red clover were exposed to two TiO2 NPs, i.e., P25, E171 and a non-nanomaterial TiO2. Growth of both organisms individually and their symbiotic root nodulation were investigated in liquid and hydroponic systems. While 23 and 18 mg l-1 of E171 and non-nanomaterial TiO2 decreased the growth rate of R. trifolii by 43 and 23% respectively, P25 did not cause effects. Shoot length of red clover decreased between 41 and 62% for all tested TiO2 NPs. In 21% of the TiO2 NP treated plants, no nodules were found. At high concentrations certain TiO2 NPs impaired R. trifolii as well as red clover growth and their symbiosis in the hydroponic systems. PMID:27171465

  12. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles (TiO2) Quenching Based Aptasensing Platform: Application to Ochratoxin A Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Atul; Hayat, Akhtar; Mishra, Rupesh K.; Catanante, Gaëlle; Bhand, Sunil; Marty, Jean Louis

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time, the development of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2) quenching based aptasensing platform for detection of target molecules. TiO2 quench the fluorescence of FAM-labeled aptamer (fluorescein labeled aptamer) upon the non-covalent adsorption of fluorescent labeled aptamer on TiO2 surface. When OTA interacts with the aptamer, it induced aptamer G-quadruplex complex formation, weakens the interaction between FAM-labeled aptamer and TiO2, resulting in fluorescence recovery. As a proof of concept, an assay was employed for detection of Ochratoxin A (OTA). At optimized experimental condition, the obtained limit of detection (LOD) was 1.5 nM with a good linearity in the range 1.5 nM to 1.0 µM for OTA. The obtained results showed the high selectivity of assay towards OTA without interference to structurally similar analogue Ochratoxin B (OTB). The developed aptamer assay was evaluated for detection of OTA in beer sample and recoveries were recorded in the range from 94.30%–99.20%. Analytical figures of the merits of the developed aptasensing platform confirmed its applicability to real samples analysis. However, this is a generic aptasensing platform and can be extended for detection of other toxins or target analyte. PMID:26402704

  13. Surface modification of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride and titanium oxynitride for lactate dehydrogenase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Saengdee, Pawasuth; Chaisriratanakul, Woraphan; Bunjongpru, Win; Sripumkhai, Witsaroot; Srisuwan, Awirut; Jeamsaksiri, Wutthinan; Hruanun, Charndet; Poyai, Amporn; Promptmas, Chamras

    2015-05-15

    Three different types of surface, silicon dioxide (SiO2), silicon nitride (Si3N4), and titanium oxynitride (TiON) were modified for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) immobilization using (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) to obtain an amino layer on each surface. The APTES modified surfaces can directly react with LDH via physical attachment. LDH can be chemically immobilized on those surfaces after incorporation with glutaraldehyde (GA) to obtain aldehyde layers of APTES-GA modified surfaces. The wetting properties, chemical bonding composition, and morphology of the modified surface were determined by contact angle (CA) measurement, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. In this experiment, the immobilized protein content and LDH activity on each modified surface was used as an indicator of surface modification achievement. The results revealed that both the APTES and APTES-GA treatments successfully link the LDH molecule to those surfaces while retaining its activity. All types of tested surfaces modified with APTES-GA gave better LDH immobilizing efficiency than APTES, especially the SiO2 surface. In addition, the SiO2 surface offered the highest LDH immobilization among tested surfaces, with both APTES and APTES-GA modification. However, TiON and Si3N4 surfaces could be used as alternative candidate materials in the preparation of ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) based biosensors, including lactate sensors using immobilized LDH on the ISFET surface.

  14. Listeria monocytogenes Behaviour in Presence of Non-UV-Irradiated Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; De Berardis, Barbara; Guccione, Giuliana; Superti, Fabiana; Conte, Maria Pia; Longhi, Catia

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the agent of listeriosis, a food-borne disease. It represents a serious problem for the food industry because of its environmental persistence mainly due to its ability to form biofilm on a variety of surfaces. Microrganisms attached on the surfaces are a potential source of contamination for environment and animals and humans. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are used in food industry in a variety of products and it was reported that daily exposure to these nanomaterials is very high. Anti-listerial activity of TiO2 NPs was investigated only with UV-irradiated nanomaterials, based on generation of reactive oxigen species (ROS) with antibacterial effect after UV exposure. Since both Listeria monocytogenes and TiO2 NPs are veicolated with foods, this study explores the interaction between Listeria monocytogenes and non UV-irradiated TiO2 NPs, with special focus on biofilm formation and intestinal cell interaction. Scanning electron microscopy and quantitative measurements of biofilm mass indicate that NPs influence both production and structural architecture of listerial biofilm. Moreover, TiO2 NPs show to interfere with bacterial interaction to intestinal cells. Increased biofilm production due to TiO2 NPs exposure may favour bacterial survival in environment and its transmission to animal and human hosts. PMID:24416327

  15. Chitosan/titanium dioxide nanocomposite coatings: Rheological behavior and surface application to cellulosic paper.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanjun; Hu, Xiulan; Zhang, Xinqi; Guo, Daliang; Zhang, Junhua; Kong, Fangong

    2016-10-20

    Incorporation of nanofillers into a polymeric matrix has received much attention as a route to reinforced polymer nanocomposites. In the present work, an environmentally friendly chitosan (CTS)/titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocomposite coating was designed/prepared and subsequently employed for imparting antibacterium and improved mechanical properties to cellulosic paper via surface coating. Effect of TiO2 nanoparticle loadings on the rheological behavior of nanocomposite coatings was investigated. Surface application of CTS/TiO2 nanocomposite coatings to cellulosic paper was performed, and the antibacterial activity and mechanical properties of surface-coated cellulosic paper were examined. Results showed that the increased TiO2 nanoparticle loadings decreased the viscosity and dynamic viscoelasticity of the as-prepared coatings, and improved the antibacterial activity and mechanical properties of surface-coated cellulosic paper. The optimum loading of TiO2 nanoparticles was identified at 10%. This work suggested that CTS/TiO2 nanocomposite coatings may have the potential to be used as a promising antibacterial protective coating for paper packaging. PMID:27474622

  16. Nanoporous anodic titanium dioxide layers as potential drug delivery systems: Drug release kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Magdalena; Pawlik, Anna; Szuwarzyński, Michał; Jaskuła, Marian; Sulka, Grzegorz D

    2016-07-01

    Nanoporous anodic titanium dioxide (ATO) layers on Ti foil were prepared via a three step anodization process in an electrolyte based on an ethylene glycol solution with fluoride ions. Some of the ATO samples were heat-treated in order to achieve two different crystallographic structures - anatase (400°C) and a mixture of anatase and rutile (600°C). The structural and morphological characterizations of ATO layers were performed using a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hydrophilicity of ATO layers was determined with contact angle measurements using distilled water. Ibuprofen and gentamicin were loaded effectively inside the ATO nanopores. Afterwards, an in vitro drug release was conducted for 24h under a static and dynamic flow conditions in a phosphate buffer solution at 37°C. The drug concentrations were determined using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The absorbance of ibuprofen was measured directly at 222nm, whether gentamicin was determined as a complex with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) at 394nm. Both compounds exhibited long term release profiles, despite the ATO structure. A new release model, based on the desorption of the drug from the ATO top surface followed by the desorption and diffusion of the drug from the nanopores, was derived. The proposed release model was fitted to the experimental drug release profiles, and kinetic parameters were calculated. PMID:27037782

  17. The combined toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and bisphenol A on zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Lin, Bencheng; Hu, Chuanlu; Zhang, Huashan; Lin, Zhiqing; Xi, Zhuge

    2014-08-01

    Environmental pollutants co-exist and exhibit interaction effects that are different from those associated with a single pollutant. As one of the more commonly manufactured nanomaterials, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are most likely to bind to other contaminants in water. In this paper, we aimed to study the combined toxicological effects of TiO2-NPs and bisphenol A (BPA) on organism. First, in vitro adsorption experiments were conducted to determine the adsorptive interaction between TiO2-NPs and BPA. Second, zebrafish embryo toxicity tests were performed to monitor for changes in the toxicological effects associated with the two chemicals. The study results demonstrated that adsorptive interactions exist between the two chemicals and increased toxicity effects which included an advanced toxicological effect time, decreased survival, increased morphological abnormalities, and delayed embryo hatching. Also, we suggest that the mode of combined action has a synergistic effect. Based on this, we postulate that concomitant exposure to TiO2-NPs and BPA increased BPA bioavailability and uptake into cells and organisms. Further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of interactions of this mixture.

  18. Systemic Immune Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles after Repeated Intratracheal Instillation in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yanyun; Zhang, Yanqiu; Chang, Xuhong; Zhang, Yingjian; Ma, Shumei; Sui, Jing; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liang, Geyu

    2014-01-01

    The potential immune effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) are raising concern. Our previous study verified that nano-TiO2 induce local immune response in lung tissue followed by intratracheal instillation administration. In this study, we aim to evaluate the systemic immune effects of nano-TiO2. Sprague Dawley rats were treated by intratracheal instillation with nano-TiO2 at doses of 0.5, 4, and 32 mg/kg body weight, micro-TiO2 with 32 mg/kg body weight and 0.9% NaCl, respectively. The exposure was conducted twice a week, for four consecutive weeks. Histopathological immune organs from exposed animals showed slight congestion in spleen, generally brown particulate deposition in cervical and axillary lymph node. Furthermore, immune function response was characterized by increased proliferation of T cells and B cells following mitogen stimulation and enhanced natural killer (NK) cell killing activity in spleen, accompanying by increased number of B cells in blood. No significant changes of Th1-type cytokines (IL-2 and INF-γ) and Th2-type cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) were observed. Intratracheal exposure to nano-TiO2 may be one of triggers to be responsible for the systemic immune response. Further study is needed to confirm long-lasting lymphocyte responses and the potential mechanisms. PMID:24758935

  19. Food-grade titanium dioxide exposure exacerbates tumor formation in colitis associated cancer model.

    PubMed

    Urrutia-Ortega, Ismael M; Garduño-Balderas, Luis G; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Flores-Flores, José O; González-Robles, Arturo; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Terrazas, Luis I; van Loveren, Henk; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2016-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the fourth worldwide cause of death and even if some dietary habits are consider risk factors, the contribution of food additives including foodgrade titanium dioxide (TiO2), designated as E171, has been poorly investigated. We hypothesized that oral E171 intake could have impact on the enhancement of colorectal tumor formation and we aimed to investigate if E171 administration could enhance tumor formation in a colitis associated cancer (CAC) model. BALB/c male mice were grouped as follows: a) control, b) E171, c) CAC and d) CAC + E171 group (n = 6). E171 used in this study formed agglomerates of 300 nm in water. E171 intragastric administration (5 mg/kg body weight/5 days/10 weeks) was unable to induce tumor formation but dysplastic alterations were observed in the distal colon but enhanced the tumor formation in distal colon (CAC + E171 group) measured by tumor progression markers. Some E171 particles were internalized in colonic cells of the E171 and CAC + E171 groups and both groups showed a decrease in goblet cells in the distal colon. However the CAC + E171 group showed a higher decrease of these cells that act as protection barrier in colon. These results suggest that E171 could worsen pre-existent intestinal diseases.

  20. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles (TiO₂) Quenching Based Aptasensing Platform: Application to Ochratoxin A Detection.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Atul; Hayat, Akhtar; Mishra, Rupesh K; Catanante, Gaëlle; Bhand, Sunil; Marty, Jean Louis

    2015-09-22

    We demonstrate for the first time, the development of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO₂) quenching based aptasensing platform for detection of target molecules. TiO₂ quench the fluorescence of FAM-labeled aptamer (fluorescein labeled aptamer) upon the non-covalent adsorption of fluorescent labeled aptamer on TiO₂ surface. When OTA interacts with the aptamer, it induced aptamer G-quadruplex complex formation, weakens the interaction between FAM-labeled aptamer and TiO₂, resulting in fluorescence recovery. As a proof of concept, an assay was employed for detection of Ochratoxin A (OTA). At optimized experimental condition, the obtained limit of detection (LOD) was 1.5 nM with a good linearity in the range 1.5 nM to 1.0 µM for OTA. The obtained results showed the high selectivity of assay towards OTA without interference to structurally similar analogue Ochratoxin B (OTB). The developed aptamer assay was evaluated for detection of OTA in beer sample and recoveries were recorded in the range from 94.30%-99.20%. Analytical figures of the merits of the developed aptasensing platform confirmed its applicability to real samples analysis. However, this is a generic aptasensing platform and can be extended for detection of other toxins or target analyte.

  1. Inhalation of titanium dioxide induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated autophagy and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Somin; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Sanghwa; Cho, Won-Young; Lee, Ah Young; Park, Soo Jin; Lim, Joohyun; Park, Changhoon; Chae, Chanhee; Lee, Jin Kyu; Lee, Jinkyu; Kim, Jun-Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are widely used in cosmetics, sunscreen, electronics, drug delivery systems, and diverse bio-application fields. In the workplace, the primary exposure route for TiO2 nanoparticles is inhalation through the respiratory system. Because TiO2 nanoparticles have different physiological properties, in terms of size and bioactivity, their toxic effects in the respiratory system must be determined. In this study, to determine the toxic effect of inhaled TiO2 nanoparticles in the lung and the underlying mechanism, we used a whole-body chamber inhalation system to expose A/J mice to TiO2 nanoparticles for 28 days. During the experiments, the inhaled TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized using a cascade impactor and transmission electron microscopy. After inhalation of the TiO2 nanoparticles, hyperplasia and inflammation were observed in a TiO2 dose-dependent manner. To determine the biological mechanism of the toxic response in the lung, we examined endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in lung. The ER and mitochondria were disrupted and dysfunctional in the TiO2-exposed lung leading to abnormal autophagy. In summary, we assessed the potential risk of TiO2 nanoparticles in the respiratory system, which contributed to our understanding of the mechanism underlining TiO2 nanoparticle toxicity in the lung.

  2. The Use of Titanium Dioxide for Selective Enrichment of Phosphorylated Peptides.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has very high affinity for phosphopeptides and in recent years it has become one of the most popular methods for phosphopeptide enrichment from complex biological samples. Peptide loading onto TiO2 resin in a highly acidic environment in the presence of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), phthalic acid, lactic acid, or glycolic acid has been shown to improve selectivity significantly by reducing unspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. The phosphopeptides bound to the TiO2 are subsequently eluted from the chromatographic material using an alkaline buffer. TiO2 chromatography is extremely tolerant towards most buffers used in biological experiments, highly robust and as such it has become the method of choice in large-scale phosphoproteomics. Here we describe a batch mode protocol for phosphopeptide enrichment using TiO2 chromatographic material followed by desalting and concentration of the sample by reversed phase micro-columns prior to downstream MS and LC-MS/MS analysis.

  3. Leaching potential of nano-scale titanium dioxide in fresh municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Dulger, M; Sakallioglu, T; Temizel, I; Demirel, B; Copty, N K; Onay, T T; Uyguner-Demirel, C S; Karanfil, T

    2016-02-01

    With the rapid development in nanotechnology in recent years, the number of commercially available products containing engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has increased significantly. It is expected that large fractions of these ENMs will end up in landfills for final disposal. Despite the wide use of ENMs, little data is available on their fate within landfills. This study examined the leaching behavior of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2), one of the mostly used ENMs, in fresh municipal solid wastes (MSWs). Batch reactors containing municipal waste samples were spiked with a range of nano-TiO2 concentrations at different pH and ionic strength conditions. The Ti concentrations in leachate decreased rapidly and reached steady state after about 12-24 h. Results suggest that, for the environmental conditions considered, approximately 3-19% of the added nano-TiO2 remained in leachate. Batch tests conducted with individual synthetically-prepared solid waste components also showed low leaching potential (5.2% for organic waste, 3.3% for glass, 1.7% for both textile and paper and 0.6% for metal), indicating that all components of MSW contributed to the retention of the nano-TiO2 mass within the solid matrix.

  4. Microwave-irradiation-assisted hybrid chemical approach for titanium dioxide nanoparticle synthesis: microbial and cytotoxicological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Shivendu; Dasgupta, Nandita; Rajendran, Bhavapriya; Avadhani, Ganesh S; Ramalingam, Chidambaram; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-06-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs) are widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. It is used for protection against UV exposure due to its light-scattering properties and high refractive index. Though TNPs are increasingly used, the synthesis of TNPs is tedious and time consuming; therefore, in the present study, microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach was used for TNP synthesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNPs can be synthesized only in 2.5 h; however, the commonly used chemical approach using muffle furnace takes 5 h. The activity of TNP depends on the synthetic protocol; therefore, the present study also determined the effect of microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach synthetic protocol on microbial and cytotoxicity. The results showed that TNP has the best antibacterial activity in decreasing order from Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The IC50 values of TNP for HCT116 and A549 were found to be 6.43 and 6.04 ppm, respectively. Cell death was also confirmed from trypan blue exclusion assay and membrane integrity loss was observed. Therefore, the study determines that the microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach is time-saving; hence, this technique can be upgraded from lab scale to industrial scale via pilot plant scale. Moreover, it is necessary to find the mechanism of action at the molecular level to establish the reason for greater bacterial and cytotoxicological toxicity. Graphical abstract A graphical representation of TNP synthesis.

  5. Nanoporous anodic titanium dioxide layers as potential drug delivery systems: Drug release kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Magdalena; Pawlik, Anna; Szuwarzyński, Michał; Jaskuła, Marian; Sulka, Grzegorz D

    2016-07-01

    Nanoporous anodic titanium dioxide (ATO) layers on Ti foil were prepared via a three step anodization process in an electrolyte based on an ethylene glycol solution with fluoride ions. Some of the ATO samples were heat-treated in order to achieve two different crystallographic structures - anatase (400°C) and a mixture of anatase and rutile (600°C). The structural and morphological characterizations of ATO layers were performed using a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hydrophilicity of ATO layers was determined with contact angle measurements using distilled water. Ibuprofen and gentamicin were loaded effectively inside the ATO nanopores. Afterwards, an in vitro drug release was conducted for 24h under a static and dynamic flow conditions in a phosphate buffer solution at 37°C. The drug concentrations were determined using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The absorbance of ibuprofen was measured directly at 222nm, whether gentamicin was determined as a complex with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) at 394nm. Both compounds exhibited long term release profiles, despite the ATO structure. A new release model, based on the desorption of the drug from the ATO top surface followed by the desorption and diffusion of the drug from the nanopores, was derived. The proposed release model was fitted to the experimental drug release profiles, and kinetic parameters were calculated.

  6. Role of Point Defects on the Reactivity of Reconstructed Anatase Titanium Dioxide (001) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yang; Sun, Huijuan; Tan, Shijing; Feng, Hao; Cheng, Zhengwang; Zhao, Jin; Zhao, Aidi; Wang, Bing; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jinlong; Hou, J. G.

    2013-07-30

    The chemical reactivity of different surfaces of titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been the subject of extensive studies in recent decades. The anatase TiO2(001) and its (1x4) reconstructed surfaces were theoretically considered to be the most reactive and have been heavily pursued by synthetic chemists. However, the lack of direct experimental verification or determination of the active sites on these surfaces has caused controversy and debate. Here we report a systematic study on an anatase TiO2(001)-(1x4) surface by means of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques in combination with first-principles calculations. Two types of intrinsic point defects are identified, among which only the Ti3+ defect site on the reduced surface demonstrates considerable chemical activity. The perfect surface itself can be fully oxidized, but shows no obvious activity. Our findings suggest that the reactivity of the anatase TiO2(001) surface should depend on its reduction status, similar to that of rutile TiO2 surfaces.

  7. Acute effects of sono-activated photocatalytic titanium dioxide nanoparticles on oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moosavi Nejad, S; Takahashi, Hiromasa; Hosseini, Hamid; Watanabe, Akiko; Endo, Hitomi; Narihira, Kyoichi; Kikuta, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Katsuro

    2016-09-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is a new treatment modality using ultrasound to activate certain chemical sensitizers for cancer therapy. In this study, effects of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with photocatalytic titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on human oral squamous cell line HSC-2 were investigated. Viability of HSC-2 cells after 0, 0.1, 1, or 3s of HIFU irradiation with 20, 32, 55 and 73Wcm(-2) intensities in the presence or absence of TiO2 was measured immediately after the exposures in vitro. Immediate effects of HIFU (3s, 73Wcm(-2)) combined with TiO2 on solid tumors were also examined by histological study. Cytotoxic effect of HIFU+TiO2in vitro was significantly higher than that of TiO2 or HIFU alone with the tendency to increase for higher HIFU intensity, duration, and TiO2 concentration in the suspension. In vivo results showed significant necrosis and tissue damage in HIFU and HIFU+TiO2 treated samples. However, penetration of TiO2 nanoparticles into the cell cytoplasm was only observed in HIFU+TiO2 treated tissues. In this study, our findings provide a rational basis for the development of an effective HIFU based sonodynamic activation method. This approach offers an attractive non-invasive therapy technique for oral cancer in future.

  8. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Impact of increasing ionic strength during synthesis, reflux, and hydrothermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Isley, Sara L.; Jordan, David S.; Penn, R. Lee

    2009-01-08

    This work investigates the role of ionic strength during synthesis, reflux, and hydrothermal aging of sol-gel synthesized titanium dioxide. Research presented here uses X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements to quantify anatase, brookite, and rutile phases as functions of synthetic and aging variables. In addition, the Scherrer equation is used to obtain average crystallite sizes for each phase quantified. Results presented in this work demonstrate that the most control over the sol-gel products can be obtained by modifying the pH during hydrolysis. In addition, while varying the ionic strength during reflux and hydrothermal aging can result in enhanced control over the crystalline phase and crystallite size, the most control can be achieved by varying the ionic strength during synthesis. Finally, sol-gel synthesis at low pH (-0.6) and high-chloride concentration (3 M NaCl) produced a heterogeneous sample composed of nanocrystalline anatase (3.8 nm) and rutile (2.9 nm)

  9. A mechanistic study to increase understanding of titanium dioxide nanoparticles-increased plasma glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hailong; Li, Li; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Zhou, Ying; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong; Gu, Ning

    2016-09-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2 NP) is an authorized food additive. Previous studies determined oral administration of TiO2 NPs increases plasma glucose in mice via inducing insulin resistance. An increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been considered the possible mechanism of increasing plasma glucose. However, persistently high plasma glucose is also a mechanism of increasing ROS. This study aims to explore whether TiO2 NPs increase plasma glucose via ROS. We found after oral administration of TiO2 NPs, an increase in ROS preceded an increase in plasma glucose. Subsequently, mice were treated with two antioxidants (resveratrol and vitamin E) at the same time as oral administration of TiO2 NPs. Results showed resveratrol and vitamin E reduced TiO2 NPs-increased ROS. An increase in plasma glucose was also inhibited. Further research showed resveratrol and vitamin E inhibited the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6, and the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK, resulting in improved insulin resistance. These results suggest TiO2 NPs increased ROS levels, and then ROS activated inflammatory cytokines and phosphokinases, and thus induced insulin resistance, resulting in an increase in plasma glucose. Resveratrol and vitamin E can reduce TiO2 NPs-increased ROS and thereby inhibit an increase in plasma glucose in mice.

  10. Biosynthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using a probiotic from coal fly ash effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Babitha, S; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metal resistant probiotic species was isolated from coal fly ash effluent site. • Uniform sized anatase form of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized using Propionibacterium jensenii. • Diffraction patterns confirmed the anatase – TiO{sub 2} NPs with average size <80 nm. • TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle incorporated wound dressing exhibits better wound healing. - Abstract: The synthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO{sub 2} NP) has gained importance in the recent years owing to its wide range of potential biological applications. The present study demonstrates the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} NPs by a metal resistant bacterium isolated from the coal fly ash effluent. This bacterial strain was identified on the basis of morphology and 16s rDNA gene sequence [KC545833]. The physico-chemical characterization of the synthesized nanoparticles is completely elucidated by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM). The crystalline nature of the nanoparticles was confirmed by X-RD pattern. Further, cell viability and haemolytic assays confirmed the biocompatible and non toxic nature of the NPs. The TiO{sub 2} NPs was found to enhance the collagen stabilization and thereby enabling the preparation of collagen based biological wound dressing. The paper essentially provides scope for an easy bioprocess for the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} NPs from the metal oxide enriched effluent sample for future biological applications.

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Early Response Lymph Node Proteins in Mice Treated with Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Gopee, Neera V.; Howard, Paul C.; Yu, Li-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Human exposure to nanoparticles is inevitable from natural and anthropogenic sources. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are increasingly being used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. Previous studies revealed that TiO2 levels were significantly increased in tissues (e.g., lymph nodes) after mice were injected with nanosized TiO2. To identify early response lymph node proteins to TiO2 nanoparticles, groups of mice were intradermally injected with a low dose of DeGussa P25 TiO2 nanoparticles or vehicle alone. The proteomes of lymph nodes at 24 h were quantitatively analyzed using trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling in conjunction with two-dimensional liquid chromatography separation and tandem mass spectrometry (2DLC-MS/MS). A total of 33 proteins were significantly changed (over 1.3-fold, p<0.05) in the mice treated with TiO2 nanoparticles, which accounted for approximately 1% of the total proteins identified. The differentially expressed proteins mainly involve the immune response (e.g., inflammation), lipid and fatty acid metabolism, mRNA processing, and nucleosome assembly. Regulation of functionally distinct classes of proteins could be mediated by estrogen receptor (ESR1), PPARγ, and c-Myc signalings, etc. The differentially expressed proteins identified in this experiment could represent early response proteins to TiO2 nanoparticle treatment in mouse lymph nodes. PMID:21884834

  12. Leaching potential of nano-scale titanium dioxide in fresh municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Dulger, M; Sakallioglu, T; Temizel, I; Demirel, B; Copty, N K; Onay, T T; Uyguner-Demirel, C S; Karanfil, T

    2016-02-01

    With the rapid development in nanotechnology in recent years, the number of commercially available products containing engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has increased significantly. It is expected that large fractions of these ENMs will end up in landfills for final disposal. Despite the wide use of ENMs, little data is available on their fate within landfills. This study examined the leaching behavior of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2), one of the mostly used ENMs, in fresh municipal solid wastes (MSWs). Batch reactors containing municipal waste samples were spiked with a range of nano-TiO2 concentrations at different pH and ionic strength conditions. The Ti concentrations in leachate decreased rapidly and reached steady state after about 12-24 h. Results suggest that, for the environmental conditions considered, approximately 3-19% of the added nano-TiO2 remained in leachate. Batch tests conducted with individual synthetically-prepared solid waste components also showed low leaching potential (5.2% for organic waste, 3.3% for glass, 1.7% for both textile and paper and 0.6% for metal), indicating that all components of MSW contributed to the retention of the nano-TiO2 mass within the solid matrix. PMID:26517383

  13. Biodegradable starch/poly (vinyl alcohol) film reinforced with titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejri, Zahra; Seifkordi, Ali Akbar; Ahmadpour, Ali; Zebarjad, Seyed Mojtaba; Maskooki, Abdolmajid

    2013-10-01

    Biodegradable starch/poly (vinyl alcohol)/nano-titanium dioxide (ST/PVA/nano-TiO2) nanocomposite films were prepared via a solution casting method. Their biodegradability, mechanical properties, and thermal properties were also studied in this paper. A general full factorial experimental approach was used to determine effective parameters on the mechanical properties of the prepared films. ST/PVA/TiO2 nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results of mechanical analysis show that ST/PVA films with higher contents of PVA have much better mechanical properties. In thermal analysis, it is found that the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles improves the thermal stability of the films. SEM micrographs, taken from the fracture surface of samples, illustrate that the addition of PVA makes the film softer and more flexible. The results of soil burial biodegradation indicate that the biodegradability of ST/PVA/TiO2 films strongly depends on the starch proportion in the film matrix. The degradation rate is increased by the addition of starch in the films.

  14. Facile fabrication of titanium dioxide/fullerene nanocomposite and its enhanced visible photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Qi; Zou, Lan-Hua; You, Jia-Wen

    2016-03-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2)/fullerene hybrid nanocomposite was facilely fabricated by mixing TiO2 and poly-carboxylic acid functionalized fullerene under an ultrasonication-evaporation method. It was found that the TiO2/fullerene composite could serve as an efficient and reusable photocatalyst for degradation of rhodamine B dye under visible light (λ>400 nm). The as-prepared photocatalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS). The degradation experiments revealed that the photocatalytic activity strongly depends on the contents of fullerene from 0.5% to 3% mass ratio. The incorporation of fullerene into TiO2 efficiently extended the absorption spectrum of photocatalyst to visible light region, enhanced the adsorption capacity and degradation efficiency, resulting from a synergistic effect of fullerene and TiO2. The trapping experiments demonstrated that both the photo-generated hole (h(+)) and the reactive oxygen species such as superoxide anion radical (˙O2(-)) were involved in the photocatalytic reaction.

  15. Characteristics of titanium dioxide microdispersions with different photo-activity suitable for sunscreen formulations.

    PubMed

    Kubáč, L; Akrman, J; Kejlová, K; Bendová, H; Klánová, K; Hladíková, Z; Pikal, P; Kovaříková, L; Kašparová, L; Jírová, D

    2015-03-15

    The aim of the study was the comparison of photo-activity of three types of titanium dioxide (TiO2) micro-dispersions intended for use as UV filters for cosmetic sunscreen products. The dispersions were also investigated with regard to their influence on the stability of photo-protective systems in cosmetic emulsions, their skin penetration/absorption and their photo-toxicity for humans and skin bacterial flora. All the tested micro-dispersions of rutile TiO2 type (agglomerates with diameter 120-150 nm), with primary particle size lower than 100 nm, demonstrated no phototoxic effect and insignificant antimicrobial behaviour. On the other hand, TiO2 with insufficient deactivation of photo-activity had significant negative impact on the stability of other organic UV filters and therefore on the stability of declared UV protective factors (SPF, UVA-PF). The study demonstrated that the level of deactivation of TiO2 is one of the highly important factors for evaluation of UV filters used as sunscreens.

  16. Photocatalytic activity of Ho-doped anatase titanium dioxide coated magnetite.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhongliang; Xiang, Yongfang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yao, Shuhua

    2011-01-01

    A composite photocatalyst (Ho/TiO(2)/Fe(3)O(4)) with Ho-doped anatase titanium dioxide (Ho/TiO(2)) shell and a magnetite core was prepared by coating photoactive Ho/TiO(2) onto a magnetic Fe(3)O(4) core through the hydrolysis of tetrabutyltitanate (Ti(OBu)(4), TBT) in water/oil (w/o) microemulsion with precursors of Ho(NO(3))(3) and TBT in the presence of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. The morphological, structural and optical properties of the prepared samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-Vis diffusive reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS). The effect of Ho ion content on the photocatalytic activity was studied. The photodegradation behavior of the prepared photocatalyst under UV and visible light was investigated in aqueous solution using methyl orange (MO) as target pollutant. The results showed that the prepared photocatalyst was activated by visible light and used as effective catalyst in photo-oxidation reactions. In addition, the possibility of cyclic usage of the prepared photocatalyst was also confirmed. Moreover, Ho/TiO(2) was tightly bound to Fe(3)O(4) and could be easily recovered from the medium by a simple magnetic process. It can therefore be potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by organic pollutants. PMID:21208216

  17. Workplace Exposure to Titanium Dioxide Nanopowder Released from a Bag Filter System

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jun Ho; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Gwangjae; Noh, Jung-Hun; Yook, Se-Jin; Cho, So-Hye; Bae, Gwi-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers who use laboratory-scale synthesis systems to manufacture nanomaterials could be easily exposed to airborne nanomaterials during the research and development stage. This study used various real-time aerosol detectors to investigate the presence of nanoaerosols in a laboratory used to manufacture titanium dioxide (TiO2). The TiO2 nanopowders were produced via flame synthesis and collected by a bag filter system for subsequent harvesting. Highly concentrated nanopowders were released from the outlet of the bag filter system into the laboratory. The fractional particle collection efficiency of the bag filter system was only 20% at particle diameter of 100 nm, which is much lower than the performance of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Furthermore, the laboratory hood system was inadequate to fully exhaust the air discharged from the bag filter system. Unbalanced air flow rates between bag filter and laboratory hood systems could result in high exposure to nanopowder in laboratory settings. Finally, we simulated behavior of nanopowders released in the laboratory using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). PMID:26125024

  18. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of nonmetal Co-doped titanium dioxide photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaogang; Xing, Jun; Qiu, Jingping

    2016-06-01

    A series of boron and sulfur co-doped titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysts were prepared by a sol-gel method using boric acid, thiourea and tetrabutyl titanate [Ti(OC4H9)4] as precursors. The photoabsorbance of as-prepared photocatalysts was measured by UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), and its microstructure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and N2 adsorption-desorption measurements. The prepared photocatalysts consisted of the anatase phase mainly in the form of spherical particles. The photocatalytic performance was studied by photodegradation of methyl blue (MB) in water under UV and visible light irradiation. The calcination temperature and the codoping content influenced the photoactivity. The synergistic effect of boron and sulfur co-doping played an important role in improving the photocatalytic activity. In addition, the possibility of cyclic usage of codoped TiO2 was also confirmed, the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 remained above 91% of that of the fresh sample after being used four times. It was shown that the co-doped TiO2 could be activated by visible light and could thus be potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by organic pollutants.

  19. Removal of dyes using immobilized titanium dioxide illuminated by fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hui, Lee Kong; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Abdullah, Abdul Halim; Ramli, Irmawati

    2005-10-17

    The photodegradation of various dyes in aqueous solution was studied. Experiments were carried out using glass coated titanium dioxide thin film as photocatalyst. Photodegradation processes of methylene blue (MB), methyl orange (MO), indigo carmine (IC), chicago sky blue 6B (CSB), and mixed dye (MD, mixture of the four mentioned single dye) were reported. As each photodegradation system is pH dependent, the photodegradation experiment was carried out in each dye photodegradation reactive pH range at approximately 28 degrees C. The dyes removal efficiency was studied and compared using UV-vis spectrophotometer analysis. The total removal of each dye was: methylene blue (90.3%), methyl orange (98.5%), indigo carmine (92.4%), chicago sky blue 6B (60.3%), and mixed dyes (70.1%), respectively. The characteristic of the photocatalyst was investigated using X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The amount of each dye intermediate produced in the photodegradation process was also determined with the help of total organic carbon (TOC) analysis.

  20. Photoinitated charge separation in a hybrid titanium dioxide metalloporphyrin peptide material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, H. Christopher; Liu, Yuzi; Dimitrijevic, Nada M.; Rajh, Tijana

    2014-08-01

    In natural systems, electron flow is mediated by proteins that spatially organize donor and acceptor molecules with great precision. Achieving this guided, directional flow of information is a desirable feature in photovoltaic media. Here, we design self-assembled peptide materials that organize multiple electronic components capable of performing photoinduced charge separation. Two peptides, c16-AHL3K3-CO2H and c16-AHL3K9-CO2H, self-assemble into fibres and provide a scaffold capable of binding a metalloporphyrin via histidine axial ligation and mineralize titanium dioxide (TiO2) on the lysine-rich surface of the resulting fibrous structures. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of this self-assembled material under continuous light excitation demonstrate charge separation induced by excitation of the metalloporphyrin and mediated by the peptide assembly structure. This approach to dye-sensitized semiconducting materials offers a means to spatially control the dye molecule with respect to the semiconducting material through careful, strategic peptide design.

  1. Role of point defects on the reactivity of reconstructed anatase titanium dioxide (001) surface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Sun, Huijuan; Tan, Shijing; Feng, Hao; Cheng, Zhengwang; Zhao, Jin; Zhao, Aidi; Wang, Bing; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jinlong; Hou, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical reactivity of different surfaces of titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been the subject of extensive studies in recent decades. The anatase TiO2(001) and its (1 × 4) reconstructed surfaces were theoretically considered to be the most reactive and have been heavily pursued by synthetic chemists. However, the lack of direct experimental verification or determination of the active sites on these surfaces has caused controversy and debate. Here we report a systematic study on an anatase TiO2(001)-(1 × 4) surface by means of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques in combination with first-principles calculations. Two types of intrinsic point defects are identified, among which only the Ti3+ defect site on the reduced surface demonstrates considerable chemical activity. The perfect surface itself can be fully oxidized, but shows no obvious activity. Our findings suggest that the reactivity of the anatase TiO2(001) surface should depend on its reduction status, similar to that of rutile TiO2 surfaces. PMID:23896829

  2. Enhanced biohydrogen and subsequent biomethane production from sugarcane bagasse using nano-titanium dioxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Omid; Zilouei, Hamid

    2016-08-01

    Nano-titanium dioxide (nanoTiO2) under ultraviolet irradiation (UV) followed by dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse was used to enhance the production of biohydrogen and biomethane in a consecutive dark fermentation and anaerobic digestion. Different concentrations of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1g nanoTiO2/L under different UV times of 30, 60, 90 and 120min were used. Sulfuric acid (2%v/v) at 121°C was used for 15, 30 and 60min to hydrolyze the pretreated bagasse. For acidic hydrolysis times of 15, 30 and 60min, the highest total free sugar values were enhanced by 260%, 107%, and 189%, respectively, compared to samples without nanoTiO2 pretreatment. The highest hydrogen production samples for the same acidic hydrolysis times showed 88%, 127%, and 25% enhancement. The maximum hydrogen production of 101.5ml/g VS (volatile solids) was obtained at 1g nanoTiO2/L and 120min UV irradiation followed by 30min acid hydrolysis.

  3. In vivo genotoxicity study of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using comet assay following intratracheal instillation in rats.

    PubMed

    Naya, Masato; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Ema, Makoto; Kasamoto, Sawako; Fukumuro, Masahito; Takami, Shigeaki; Nakajima, Madoka; Hayashi, Makoto; Nakanishi, Junko

    2012-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) is widely used as a white pigment in paints, plastics, inks, paper, creams, cosmetics, drugs and foods. In the present study, the genotoxicity of anatase TiO₂ nanoparticles was evaluated in vivo using the comet assay after a single or repeated intratracheal instillation in rats. The nanoparticles were instilled intratracheally at a dosage of 1.0 or 5.0 mg/kg body weight (single instillation group) and 0.2 or 1.0 mg/kg body weight once a week for 5 weeks (repeated instillation group) into male Sprague-Dawley rats. A positive control, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) at 500 mg/kg, was administered orally 3 h prior to dissection. Histopathologically, macrophages and neutrophils were detected in the alveolus of the lung in the 1.0 and 5.0 mg/kg TiO₂ groups. In the comet assay, there was no increase in % tail DNA in any of the TiO₂ groups. In the EMS group, there was a significant increase in % tail DNA compared with the negative control group. TiO₂ nanoparticles in the anatase crystal phase are not genotoxic following intratracheal instillation in rats. PMID:22198002

  4. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles strongly impact soil microbial function by affecting archaeal nitrifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonin, Marie; Richaume, Agnès; Guyonnet, Julien P.; Dubost, Audrey; Martins, Jean M. F.; Pommier, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Soils are facing new environmental stressors, such as titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs). While these emerging pollutants are increasingly released into most ecosystems, including agricultural fields, their potential impacts on soil and its function remain to be investigated. Here we report the response of the microbial community of an agricultural soil exposed over 90 days to TiO2-NPs (1 and 500 mg kg‑1 dry soil). To assess their impact on soil function, we focused on the nitrogen cycle and measured nitrification and denitrification enzymatic activities and by quantifying specific representative genes (amoA for ammonia-oxidizers, nirK and nirS for denitrifiers). Additionally, diversity shifts were examined in bacteria, archaea, and the ammonia-oxidizing clades of each domain. With strong negative impacts on nitrification enzyme activities and the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing microorganism, TiO2-NPs triggered cascading negative effects on denitrification enzyme activity and a deep modification of the bacterial community structure after just 90 days of exposure to even the lowest, realistic concentration of NPs. These results appeal further research to assess how these emerging pollutants modify the soil health and broader ecosystem function.

  5. Visible-Light-Induced Bactericidal Activity of Titanium Dioxide Co-doped with Nitrogen and Silver

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pinggui; Xie, Rongcai; Imlay, Kari; Shang, Jian-Ku

    2011-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles co-doped with nitrogen and silver (Ag2O/TiON) were synthesized by the sol-gel process and found to be an effective visible light driven photocatalyst. The catalyst showed strong bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) under visible light irradiation (λ> 400 nm). In x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction characterization of the samples, the as-added Ag species mainly exist as Ag2O. Spin trapping EPR study showed Ag addition greatly enhanced the production of hydroxyl radicals (•OH) under visible light irradiation. The results indicate that the Ag2O species trapped eCB− in the process of Ag2O/TiON photocatalytic reaction, thus inhibiting the recombination of eCB− and hVB+ in agreement with the stronger photocatalytic bactericidal activity of Ag2O/TiON. The killing mechanism of Ag2O/TiON under visible light irradiation is shown to be related to oxidative damages in the forms of cell wall thinning and cell disconfiguration. PMID:20726520

  6. Removal of dinitrotoluenes and trinitrotoluene from industrial wastewater by ultrasound enhanced with titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Shing; Huang, Yan-Liang

    2011-09-01

    Oxidative degradation of dinitrotoluenes (DNTs) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in wastewater was conducted using ultrasonic irradiation combined with titanium dioxide (TiO(2)). The batch-wise experiments were carried out to elucidate the influence of various operating parameters on the sonolytic behavior, including power intensity, TiO(2) dosage, acidity of wastewater, reaction temperature and oxygen dosage. It is worthy to note that the nitrotoluene contaminants could be almost completely eliminated by sonochemical oxidation enhanced significantly with the addition of TiO(2) due to the supply of adsorbent and/or excess nuclei. High destruction rate of nitrotoluenes could be achieved by increasing the acidity of wastewater and decreasing the reaction temperature. According to the result given by pyrolysis/gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (Pyrolysis/GC-MS), it is postulated that DNTs adsorbed on TiO(2) preliminarily undergo denitration pathway to o-mononitrotoluene (MNT) or oxidation pathway to 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB), respectively. Further, based on the spectra obtained from GC-MS, it is proposed that DNTs dissolved in wastewater proceed with similar reaction pathways as those adsorbed on TiO(2). Besides, oxidative degradation of 2,4,6-TNT results in the formation of 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB). Apparently, the sonolytic technique established is promising for direct treatment of wastewater from TNT manufacturing process.

  7. Effects of suspended titanium dioxide nanoparticles on cake layer formation in submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lijie; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Jiang, Wei; Ye, Biao; Xu, Xiaoyin; Gu, Zaoli; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu-Hao; Meng, Xiangzhou; Fan, Jinhong; Zhao, Jianfu

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the suspended titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs, 50 mg/L) on the cake layer formation in a submerged MBR were systematically investigated. With nanometer sizes, TiO2 NPs were found to aggravate membrane pore blocking but postpone cake layer fouling. TiO2 NPs showed obvious effects on the structure and the distribution of the organic and the inorganic compounds in cake layer. Concentrations of fatty acids and cholesterol in the cake layer increased due to the acute response of bacteria to the toxicity of TiO2 NPs. Line-analysis and dot map of energy-dispersive X-ray were also carried out. Since TiO2 NPs inhibited the interactions between the inorganic and the organic compounds, the inorganic compounds (especially SiO2) were prevented from depositing onto the membrane surface. Thus, the postponed cake layer fouling was due to the changing features of the complexes on the membrane surface caused by TiO2 NPs.

  8. Photocatalytic oxidation and removal of arsenite by titanium dioxide supported on granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shu Hua; Jia, Yong Feng; Zhao, Shan Lin

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is a worldwide concern. Photocatalysis can rapidly oxidize arsenite, i.e. As(III), to less labile arsenate, i.e. As(V), which then can be removed by adsorption on to various adsorbents. This study investigated the photocatalytic oxidation of arsenite in aqueous solution by granular activated carbon supporting a titanium dioxide photocatalyst (GAC-TiO2). The effects of photocatalyst dosage, solution pH values, initial concentration of As(III) and co-anions (SO4(2-), PO4(3-), SiO3(2-) and Cl-) on the oxidation of As(III) were studied. The photocatalytic oxidation of As(III) took place in minutes and followed first-order kinetics. The presence of phosphate and silicate significantly decreased As(III) oxidation, while the effect of sulphate, chloride was insignificant. The oxidation efficiency of As(III) was observed to increase with increasing pH. The results suggest that the supported photocatalyst developed in this study is an ideal candidate for pre-oxidation treatment of arsenic-contaminated water.

  9. Prenatal exposure to nanoparticulate titanium dioxide enhances depressive-like behaviors in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yonghua; Chen, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Zhu; Lei, Yu; Ma, Mengnan; Cao, Renjing; Sun, Tianjin; Xu, Jialei; Huo, Mingyue; Cao, Renjing; Wen, Chenghong; Che, Yi

    2014-02-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have the potential to produce reactive oxygen species and can be transferred from the mother to the fetal brain. The central nervous system exhibits remarkable plasticity in early life and can be altered significantly by environmental stressors encountered during fetal period. Additionally, prenatal stressors are involved with emotional problems in adulthood. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate whether prenatal exposure to TiO2 NPs could induce oxidative damage in the offspring brain and eventually affect the emotional behaviors in adulthood. The results showed that prenatal exposure to TiO2 NPs impaired the antioxidant status, caused a significant oxidative damage to nucleic acids and lipids in the brain of newborn pups, and enhanced the depressive-like behaviors during adulthood in the force swimming test and the sucrose preference test. These results suggest that the stress during fetal life induced by prenatal exposure to TiO2 NPs could be implicated in depressive-like behaviors in adulthood. PMID:23972732

  10. Unraveling the neurotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: focusing on molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Song, Bin; Zhang, Yanli; Liu, Jia; Feng, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ting; Shao, Longquan

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) possess unique characteristics and are widely used in many fields. Numerous in vivo studies, exposing experimental animals to these NPs through systematic administration, have suggested that TiO2 NPs can accumulate in the brain and induce brain dysfunction. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs remain unclear. However, we have concluded from previous studies that these mechanisms mainly consist of oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, inflammatory response, genotoxicity, and direct impairment of cell components. Meanwhile, other factors such as disturbed distributions of trace elements, disrupted signaling pathways, dysregulated neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity have also been shown to contribute to neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs. Recently, studies on autophagy and DNA methylation have shed some light on possible mechanisms of nanotoxicity. Therefore, we offer a new perspective that autophagy and DNA methylation could contribute to neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs. Undoubtedly, more studies are needed to test this idea in the future. In short, to fully understand the health threats posed by TiO2 NPs and to improve the bio-safety of TiO2 NPs-based products, the neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs must be investigated comprehensively through studying every possible molecular mechanism. PMID:27335754

  11. Cancer Therapeutic Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Are Associated with Oxidative Stress and Cytokine Induction.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Rina; Luo, Yi; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Fujii, Kiyomu; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered to influence the inflammatory process; however, the precise mechanism and the significance in tumors are still not clear. In this study, when CT26 and LL2 mouse cancer cells were treated with 6-nm anatase titanium dioxide NPs (TDNPs) without ultraviolet irradiation, oxidative stress and induction of inflammatory cytokines were observed. Oxidative stress was further increased by disease-associated conditions such as high glucose concentrations and hypoxia. Inhaled or orally administered TDNPs generated granulomatous lesions in the lungs and colon of the rodent models tested, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were also found in cancer cells treated with gold or carbon black NPs. Treatment of CT26 cells with 10- to 70-nm rutile TDNPs showed that smaller NPs produced more oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines than larger ones did. To avoid diffusion of TDNPs and to minimize toxicity, 10-nm TDNPs were suspended in a collagen gel inserted into a subcutaneous tumor in a CT26 mouse. A single TDNP treatment via this method inhibited tumor growth in a size- and dose-dependent manner, and resulted in lower levels of urinary 8-OHdG when compared to systemically administered TDNPs. These findings suggest that TDNPs might be useful for the local treatment of tumors. PMID:26485713

  12. Rheology and UV protection properties of suspensions of fine titanium dioxides in a silicone oil.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Akio; Otsubo, Yasufumi

    2006-04-15

    Ultrafine particles of titanium dioxide (TiO2) are very attractive as a UV protection ingredient in cosmetic products. The UV-scattering behavior of TiO2 suspensions in a silicone oil are studied in relation to rheological properties. To control the dispersion stability of suspensions, two types of polyether-modified silicones are used as dispersants. When the suspensions are prepared with branch-type dispersants in which the polyether groups are incorporated as side chains along the backbone, the flow is shear-thinning even at low shear rates. The appearance of plateaus in the frequency-dependence curves of storage modulus implies the solidlike responses. On the other hand, the suspensions prepared with linear conformation dispersants, in which the silicone group and polyether group are alternately repeated in one long chain, are Newtonian at low shear rates. The suspensions are regarded as liquids, because the storage modulus decreases rapidly in the low-frequency region. The suspension rheology is strongly associated with flocculated structures that are primarily controlled by the interparticle attractions. The differences in rheological behavior can be explained by the differences in the adsorbed conformation of dispersant silicones. From optical measurements, it is confirmed that UV scattering increases with decreasing flocculation degree. Therefore, good agreement is established between rheological properties and UV protection ability.

  13. A novel titanium dioxide-polydimethylsiloxane plate for phosphopeptide enrichment and mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Jung; Lai, Chien-Chen; Tseng, Mei-Chun; Liu, Yu-Ching; Liu, Yu-Huei; Chiou, Liang-Wei; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2014-02-17

    The phosphorylation of proteins is a major post-translational modification that is required for the regulation of many cellular processes and activities. Mass spectrometry signals of low-abundance phosphorylated peptides are commonly suppressed by the presence of abundant non-phosphorylated peptides. Therefore, one of the major challenges in the detection of low-abundance phosphopeptides is their enrichment from complex peptide mixtures. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been proven to be a highly efficient approach for phosphopeptide enrichment and is widely applied. In this study, a novel TiO2 plate was developed by coating TiO2 particles onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated MALDI plates, glass, or plastic substrates. The TiO2-PDMS plate (TP plate) could be used for on-target MALDI-TOF analysis, or as a purification plate on which phosphopeptides were eluted out and subjected to MALDI-TOF or nanoLC-MS/MS analysis. The detection limit of the TP plate was ∼10-folds lower than that of a TiO2-packed tip approach. The capacity of the ∼2.5 mm diameter TiO2 spots was estimated to be ∼10 μg of β-casein. Following TiO2 plate enrichment of SCC4 cell lysate digests and nanoLC-MS/MS analysis, ∼82% of the detected proteins were phosphorylated, illustrating the sensitivity and effectiveness of the TP plate for phosphoproteomic study.

  14. Bioavailability of Silica, Titanium Dioxide, and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Jeong-A; Jo, Mi-Rae; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2016-06-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have been widely applied to various industrial fields and biological applications. However, the question as to whether nanoparticles are more efficiently absorbed into the systemic circulation than bulk-sized materials remains to be unclear. In the present study, the physico-chemical and dissolution properties of the most extensively developed inorganic nanoparticles, such as silica (SiO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), and zinc oxide (ZnO), were analyzed, as compared with bulk-sized particles. Furthermore, the bioavailability of nanoparticles versus their bulk counterparts was evaluated in rats after a single oral administration and intravenous injection, respectively. The results demonstrated that all bulk materials had slightly higher crystallinity than nanoparticles, however, their dissolution properties were not affected by particle size. No significant difference in oral absorption and bioavailability of both SiO2 and TiO2 was found between nano- and bulk-sized materials, while bulk ZnO particles were more bioavailable in the body than ZnO nanoparticles. These finding will provide critical information to apply nanoparticles with high efficiency as well as to predict their toxicity potential.

  15. Effects of ingested nano-sized titanium dioxide on terrestrial isopods (Porcellio scaber).

    PubMed

    Jemec, Anita; Drobne, Damjana; Remskar, Maja; Sepcić, Kristina; Tisler, Tatjana

    2008-09-01

    The effects of ingested nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2; anatase, 15 nm) on the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea) after short-term (3-d) dietary exposure were studied. Activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), in digestive glands were affected in a dose-independent manner, but higher-level isopod endpoints, including weight change, feeding rate, food assimilation efficiency, and survival, were not affected up to the highest tested concentration of TiO2 in food (3,000 microg/g). Exposure concentrations of 0.5, 2,000, and 3,000 microg nonsonicated TiO2/g food decreased CAT and GST activities, but intermediate concentrations (1, 10, 100, and 1,000 microg/g food) did not result in significant changes of enzyme activities. When the dispersion of TiO2 was sonicated, no effects on enzyme activities or higher-level biomarkers were observed. The experimental setup with terrestrial isopods designed for dissolved chemicals also is suitable for testing the effects of ingested nanoparticles, but the presentation of toxicity data needs to be adapted according to the mode of action of the nanoparticles and their specific characteristics.

  16. In situ effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on community structure of freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Boris; Milošević, Djuradj; Piperac, Milica Stojković; Savić, Ana

    2016-06-01

    For the first time in the current literature, the effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on the community structure of macroinvertebrates has been investigated in situ. Macroinvertebrates were exposed for 100 days to an environmentally relevant concentration of TiO2 nanoparticles, 25 mg kg(-1) in sediment. Czekanowski's index was 0.61, meaning 39% of the macroinvertebrate community structure was affected by the TiO2 treatment. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) visualized the qualitative and quantitative variability of macroinvertebrates at the community level among all samples. A distance-based permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) revealed the significant effect of TiO2 on the macroinvertebrate community structure. The indicator value analysis showed that the relative frequency and abundance of Planorbarius corneus and Radix labiata were significantly lower in the TiO2 treatment than in the control. Meanwhile, Ceratopogonidae, showed a significantly higher relative frequency and abundance in the TiO2 treatment than in the control.

  17. Sedimentation and reuse of titanium dioxide: Application to suspended-photocatalyst reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.J.; Kong, S.; Lee, W.

    1995-10-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) sedimentation, enhanced through charge neutralization and coagulation/flocculation with metal salts and polymers, was investigated to evaluate the potential for its recovery from the effluents of suspended photocatalyst reactors. The application emphasizes reuse of the TiO{sub 2} after separation from the reactor effluent. Zeta-potential analysis showed that the zero point of charge (ZPC) of TiO{sub 2} suspensions was at pH 2.5, and settling rates for the photocatalyst were greatest at {+-} 0.5 pH unit of the ZPC. Aluminum sulfate, ferric chloride, and ferrous sulfate were effective in enhancing TiO{sub 2} sedimentation through coagulating and flocculating the dispersed TiO{sub 2} catalyst at neutral pH. However, two cationic polymers and one anionic polymer were effective in enhancing TiO{sub 2} sedimentation only at pH 3. Using 1,2-bis(2-chloro-ethoxy)ethane as a photocatalytic substrate, ferrous sulfate-coagulated TiO{sub 2} and acid-precipitated TiO{sub 2} had the highest rates of photocatalytic activity after sedimentation.

  18. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles are not Cytotoxic or Clastogenic in Human Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Cynthia L; The, Therry; Mason, Michael D; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    The application of nanoparticle technology is rapidly expanding. The reduced dimensionality of nanoparticles can give rise to changes in chemical and physical properties, often resulting in altered toxicity. People are exposed dermally to titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in industrial and residential settings. The general public is increasingly exposed to these nanoparticles as their use in cosmetics, sunscreens and lotions expands. The toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles towards human skin cells is unclear and understudied. We used a human skin fibroblast cell line to investigate the cytotoxicity and clastogenicity of TiO2 nanoparticles after 24 h exposure. In a clonogenic survival assay, treatments of 10, 50 and 100 μg/cm2 induced 97.8, 88.8 and 84.7% relative survival, respectively. Clastogenicity was assessed using a chromosomal aberration assay in order to determine whether TiO2 nanoparticles induced serious forms of DNA damage such as chromatid breaks, isochromatid lesions or chromatid exchanges. Treatments of 0, 10, 50 and 100 μg/cm2 induced 3.3, 3.0, 3.0 and 2.7% metaphases with damage, respectively. No isochromatid lesions or chromatid exchanges were detected. These data show that TiO2 nanoparticles are not cytotoxic or clastogenic to human skin cells. PMID:26568896

  19. In situ effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on community structure of freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Boris; Milošević, Djuradj; Piperac, Milica Stojković; Savić, Ana

    2016-06-01

    For the first time in the current literature, the effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on the community structure of macroinvertebrates has been investigated in situ. Macroinvertebrates were exposed for 100 days to an environmentally relevant concentration of TiO2 nanoparticles, 25 mg kg(-1) in sediment. Czekanowski's index was 0.61, meaning 39% of the macroinvertebrate community structure was affected by the TiO2 treatment. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) visualized the qualitative and quantitative variability of macroinvertebrates at the community level among all samples. A distance-based permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) revealed the significant effect of TiO2 on the macroinvertebrate community structure. The indicator value analysis showed that the relative frequency and abundance of Planorbarius corneus and Radix labiata were significantly lower in the TiO2 treatment than in the control. Meanwhile, Ceratopogonidae, showed a significantly higher relative frequency and abundance in the TiO2 treatment than in the control. PMID:26924756

  20. Microwave-irradiation-assisted hybrid chemical approach for titanium dioxide nanoparticle synthesis: microbial and cytotoxicological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Shivendu; Dasgupta, Nandita; Rajendran, Bhavapriya; Avadhani, Ganesh S; Ramalingam, Chidambaram; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-06-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs) are widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. It is used for protection against UV exposure due to its light-scattering properties and high refractive index. Though TNPs are increasingly used, the synthesis of TNPs is tedious and time consuming; therefore, in the present study, microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach was used for TNP synthesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNPs can be synthesized only in 2.5 h; however, the commonly used chemical approach using muffle furnace takes 5 h. The activity of TNP depends on the synthetic protocol; therefore, the present study also determined the effect of microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach synthetic protocol on microbial and cytotoxicity. The results showed that TNP has the best antibacterial activity in decreasing order from Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The IC50 values of TNP for HCT116 and A549 were found to be 6.43 and 6.04 ppm, respectively. Cell death was also confirmed from trypan blue exclusion assay and membrane integrity loss was observed. Therefore, the study determines that the microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach is time-saving; hence, this technique can be upgraded from lab scale to industrial scale via pilot plant scale. Moreover, it is necessary to find the mechanism of action at the molecular level to establish the reason for greater bacterial and cytotoxicological toxicity. Graphical abstract A graphical representation of TNP synthesis. PMID:26976013

  1. Highly Transparent Dual-Sensitized Titanium Dioxide Nanotube Arrays for Spontaneous Solar Water Splitting Tandem Configuration.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kahee; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2015-08-26

    Vertically aligned one-dimensional (1D) titanium dioxide (TiO2) arrays on transparent conducting oxide (TCO) substrates, which can act as host electron transport materials for low bandgap materials, were synthesized via a hydrothermal reaction combined with a controlled chemical etching process. By controlling the chemical etching conditions, we can maximize the light transmission properties of the 1D TiO2 arrays, which is beneficial for the front electrode in photoelectrochemical (PEC) tandem configurations. As a result, dual sensitization to form 1D TiO2@CdS@CdSe (CdS and CdSe coated 1D TiO2) results in excellent photocurrent density, as well as transparency, and the resulting material is able to pass unabsorbed photons through the front electrode into the rear bias solar cell. Owing to the improved light transmission in combination with the increased specific surface area of the obtained 1D TiO2 arrays from the controlled etching process, a high-efficiency PEC tandem device with ∼2.1% was successfully fabricated for unassisted hydrogen evolution. Efficient PEC tandem device was fabricated for unassisted solar hydrogen generation using highly transparent composite electrode composed of dual sensitization to form 1D TiO2@CdS@CdSe.

  2. [Values of the micronucleus test on animal epithelial cells exposed to titanium dioxide].

    PubMed

    Iurchenko, V V; Krivtsova, E K; Iuretseva, N A; Tul'skaia, E A; Mamonov, R A; Zholdakova, Z I; Sinitsyna, O O; Mal'tseva, M M; Pankratova, G P; Sycheva, L P

    2011-01-01

    The genetic safety of titanium dioxide (TD)-containing foods and cosmetic products has been little investigated. The study evaluated the mutagenic activity of TD in the micronucleus test with animal visceral mucosal epithelial cells. Two simethicone-coated anatase samples (mean size 160 and 33.2 nm) were inserted into the mouse stomach in doses of 40-200-1000 mg/kg seven times and applied as an ingredient of 10 and 25% cream (doses 250 and 625 mg/kg, respectively) to the hair-sheared rat skin once for 4 hours. Analysis of cytogenetic disorders (micronuclei, protrusions, and the atypical form of the nucleus) revealed no mutagenic properties of TD on the mucosal epithelium of the mouse and rat intestine, mouse prostomach, and rat uterine bladder. Enhanced mitotic activity was observed in all the study tissues after exposure of both samples to TD given in some or in all (in the rat urinary bladder mucosal epithelium) doses. PMID:22185006

  3. Nano-titanium dioxide induced cardiac injury in rat under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sha, BaoYong; Gao, Wei; Wang, ShuQi; Li, Wei; Liang, Xuan; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2013-08-01

    Heart diseases, which are related to oxidative stress (OS), negatively affect millions of people from kids to the elderly. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has widespread applications in our daily life, especially nanoscale TiO2. Compared to the high risk of particulate matter (≤2.5μm) in air to heart disease patients, related research of TiO2 on diseased body is still unknown, which suggest us to explore the potential effects of nanoscale and microscale TiO2 to heart under OS conditions. Here, we used alloxan to induce OS conditions in rat, and investigated the response of heart tissue to TiO2 in healthy and alloxan treated rats. Compared with NMs treatment only, the synergistic interaction between OS conditions and nano-TiO2 significantly reduced the heart-related function indexes, inducing pathological changes of myocardium with significantly increased levels of cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase-MB. In contrast with the void response of micro-TiO2 to heart functions in alloxan treated rats, aggravation of OS conditions might play an important role in cardiac injury after alloxan and nano-TiO2 dual exposure. Our results demonstrated that OS conditions enhanced the adverse effects of nano-TiO2 to heart, suggesting that the use of NMs in stressed conditions (e.g., drug delivery) needs to be carefully monitored. PMID:23665316

  4. Photoluminescence and hydrogen gas-sensing properties of titanium dioxide nanostructures synthesized by hydrothermal treatments.

    PubMed

    Sikhwivhilu, Lucky M; Mpelane, Siyasanga; Mwakikunga, Bonex W; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2012-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanostructures were synthesized by microwave-assisted and conventionally heated hydrothermal treatment of TiO(2) powder. The tubular structures were converted to a rodlike shape by sintering the samples at various temperatures in air for 3 h. This was accompanied by phase transformation largely influenced by the method of synthesis and the mode of heating. The X-ray diffraction results are in agreement with the structural transformation indicating the gradual changes in the phase and crystallinity of the as prepared samples. The tubular structure is found to collapse at high temperature. UV-vis-IR spectroscopic results suggest that nanorods tend to absorb photons of higher energy (λ = 280 nm) than nanotubes (λ = 300 nm) but emit photons with lower energy than nanotubes. It was found that the nanotubes have a sharper photoluminance emission line at 340 nm that is absent in the nanorods. We also found that nanotubes have higher efficiency, lower threshold sensing temperature, longer response time, and shorter recovery time for hydrogen gas sensing than nanorods. PMID:22352872

  5. Relationship between wheat characteristics and nutrient digestibility in broilers: comparison between total collection and marker (titanium dioxide) technique.

    PubMed

    Smeets, N; Nuyens, F; Van Campenhout, L; Delezie, E; Pannecoucque, J; Niewold, T

    2015-07-01

    Three wheat cultivars (Orpheus, Rustic, and Viscount) were used to formulate 3 test feeds (62.4% wheat) in a broiler digestibility trial. The diets were fed to male Ross 308 broiler chickens. The wheat cultivars mainly differed in their amount of non-starch polysaccharides ( NSP: ). The cultivar Orpheus was chosen to represent a high amount of NSP (102 g/kg DM), whereas the cultivars Rustic and Viscount represented low amounts of NSP (83.4 g/kg DM and 73.9 g/kg DM, respectively). Furthermore, the cultivars Orpheus and Viscount were feed quality wheat, whereas Rustic was a milling quality wheat. Nutrient digestibilities and AMEn contents of the diets were measured from 18 to 22-days-old by total excreta collection, or with the use of the indigestible marker titanium dioxide. In addition, the ileal viscosity was measured when the broilers were 25-days-old. Wheat cultivar affected N retention, DM digestibility, and AMEn. In general, the feed formulated with the high NSP wheat cultivar Orpheus resulted in the least favorable nutrient digestibilities and AMEn, whereas the results were better when the feed was formulated with the low NSP cultivars Viscount and Rustic. Feeding the Rustic cultivar caused the highest intestinal viscosity, although this was not reflected in the animal responses. Nutrient digestibilities and AMEn content of the diets were lower when calculated with the titanium dioxide marker than with the total excreta collection procedure. Moreover, the P-values of the effect of wheat cultivar on DM digestibility, N retention, crude fat digestibility and AMEn were lower with the use of the titanium dioxide marker. It can be concluded that wheat cultivar affected nutrient digestibility and AMEn, and that the observed differences were related to the amount of NSP. Furthermore, both the titanium dioxide marker and the total excreta collection methods showed the same trends despite the different values obtained. The titanium dioxide marker method was the

  6. Relationship between wheat characteristics and nutrient digestibility in broilers: comparison between total collection and marker (titanium dioxide) technique.

    PubMed

    Smeets, N; Nuyens, F; Van Campenhout, L; Delezie, E; Pannecoucque, J; Niewold, T

    2015-07-01

    Three wheat cultivars (Orpheus, Rustic, and Viscount) were used to formulate 3 test feeds (62.4% wheat) in a broiler digestibility trial. The diets were fed to male Ross 308 broiler chickens. The wheat cultivars mainly differed in their amount of non-starch polysaccharides ( NSP: ). The cultivar Orpheus was chosen to represent a high amount of NSP (102 g/kg DM), whereas the cultivars Rustic and Viscount represented low amounts of NSP (83.4 g/kg DM and 73.9 g/kg DM, respectively). Furthermore, the cultivars Orpheus and Viscount were feed quality wheat, whereas Rustic was a milling quality wheat. Nutrient digestibilities and AMEn contents of the diets were measured from 18 to 22-days-old by total excreta collection, or with the use of the indigestible marker titanium dioxide. In addition, the ileal viscosity was measured when the broilers were 25-days-old. Wheat cultivar affected N retention, DM digestibility, and AMEn. In general, the feed formulated with the high NSP wheat cultivar Orpheus resulted in the least favorable nutrient digestibilities and AMEn, whereas the results were better when the feed was formulated with the low NSP cultivars Viscount and Rustic. Feeding the Rustic cultivar caused the highest intestinal viscosity, although this was not reflected in the animal responses. Nutrient digestibilities and AMEn content of the diets were lower when calculated with the titanium dioxide marker than with the total excreta collection procedure. Moreover, the P-values of the effect of wheat cultivar on DM digestibility, N retention, crude fat digestibility and AMEn were lower with the use of the titanium dioxide marker. It can be concluded that wheat cultivar affected nutrient digestibility and AMEn, and that the observed differences were related to the amount of NSP. Furthermore, both the titanium dioxide marker and the total excreta collection methods showed the same trends despite the different values obtained. The titanium dioxide marker method was the

  7. How to measure hazards/risks following exposures to nanoscale or pigment-grade titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Warheit, David B

    2013-07-01

    Due to its multifunctional applications, titanium dioxide particles have widespread use in commerce. The particle-types function as sources of pigment color, in food products, anti-bacterial components, ultraviolet radiation scavengers, catalysts, as well as in cosmetics. Because of its inherent properties in a diverse number of products, exposures may occur via any of the major point-of-entry routes, i.e., inhalation, oral or dermal. Although the majority of TiO2 applications are known to exist in the pigment-grade form, nanoscale forms of TiO2 are also common components in several products. This brief review is designed to identify relevant toxicology and risk-related issues which inform health effects assessments on the various forms of titanium dioxide particles. While there has been an abundance of hazard data generated on titanium dioxide particulates, many of the published reports have limited informational value for assessing health effects due, in large part, to shortcomings in experimental design issues, such as: (1) inadequate material characterization of test samples; (2) questionable relevance of experimental systems employed to simulate human exposures; (3) applications of generally high doses, exclusive focus on acute toxicity endpoints, and a lack of reference benchmark control materials, to afford interpretation of measured results; and/or (4) failure to recognize fundamental differences between hazard and risk concepts. Accordingly, a number of important toxicology issues are identified and integrated herein to provide a more comprehensive assessment of the health risks of different forms of pigment-grade and nanoscale titanium dioxide particles. It is important to note that particle-types of different TiO2 compositions may have variable toxicity potencies, depending upon crystal structure, particle size, particle surface characteristics and surface coatings. In order to develop a more robust health risk evaluation of TiO2 particle exposures, this

  8. A hybrid of titanium nitride and nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon supported on SiC as a noble metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yingdan; Wang, Yanhui; Dong, Liang; Huang, Junjie; Zhang, Yan; Su, Jing; Zang, Jianbing

    2015-02-14

    A novel noble metal-free catalyst, with nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon and titanium nitride particles supported on SiC (NC-TiN/SiC), was synthesized. The NC-TiN/SiC catalyst exhibited excellent oxygen reduction reaction activities as well as superior stability and methanol tolerance. The catalytic activities were attributed to the synergistic effect of TiN and NC. PMID:25574526

  9. Electronic structure modification and Fermi level shifting in niobium-doped anatase titanium dioxide thin films: a comparative study of NEXAFS, work function and stiffening of phonons.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Subodh K; Das, Arkaprava; Ojha, S; Shukla, D K; Phase, D M; Singh, Fouran

    2016-02-01

    The electronic structure and tuning of work function (WF) by electronic excitations (EEs) induced by swift heavy ions (SHIs) in anatase niobium-doped titanium dioxide (NTO) thin films is reported. The densities of EEs were varied using 80 MeV O, 130 MeV Ni and 120 MeV Ag ions for irradiation. The EE-induced modifications in electronic structure were studied by O K-edge and Ti L3,2 edge absorption spectra using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The reduction of hybridized O 2p and Ti 3d unoccupied states in the conduction band with a decrease in energy of the crystal field strength of ∼ 480 meV and the correlated effect on the decrease in the WF value of ∼ 520 meV upon increasing the total energy deposition in the lattice are evident from the study of NEXAFS and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM), respectively. The observed stiffening in the low frequency Raman mode (LFRM) of ∼ 9 cm(-1) further validates the electronic structure modification under the influence of EE-induced strain in TiO6 octahedra. The reduction of hybridized valence states, stiffening behavior of LFRM and decrease in WF by nano-crystallization followed by amorphization and defects in NTO lattice are explained in terms of continuous, discontinuous amorphous ion tracks containing intestinally created defects and non-stoichiometry in the lattice. These studies are very appropriate for better insights of electronic structure modification during phase transformation and controlled Fermi level shifting, which plays a crucial role in controlling the charge carrier injection efficiency in opto-electronic applications and also provides a deeper understanding of the involved physical processes. PMID:26752253

  10. Arsenate Accumulation, Distribution, and Toxicity Associated with Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengting; Luo, Zhuanxi; Yan, Yameng; Wang, Zhenhong; Chi, Qiaoqiao; Yan, Changzhou; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-09-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) are widely used in consumer products. Nano-TiO2 dispersion could, however, interact with metals and modify their behavior and bioavailability in aquatic environments. In this study, we characterized and examined arsenate (As(V)) accumulation, distribution, and toxicity in Daphnia magna in the presence of nano-TiO2. Nano-TiO2 acts as a positive carrier, significantly facilitating D. magna's ability to uptake As(V). As nano-TiO2 concentrations increased from 2 to 20 mg-Ti/L, total As increased by a factor of 2.3 to 9.8 compared to the uptake from the dissolved phase. This is also supported by significant correlations between arsenic (As) and titanium (Ti) signal intensities at concentrations of 2.0 mg-Ti/L nano-TiO2 (R = 0.676, P < 0.01) and 20.0 mg-Ti/L nano-TiO2 (R = 0.776, P < 0.01), as determined by LA-ICP-MS. Even though As accumulation increased with increasing nano-TiO2 concentrations in D. magna, As(V) toxicity associated with nano-TiO2 exhibited a dual effect. Compared to the control, the increased As was mainly distributed in BDM (biologically detoxified metal), but Ti was mainly distributed in MSF (metal-sensitive fractions) with increasing nano-TiO2 levels. Differences in subcellular distribution demonstrated that adsorbed As(V) carried by nano-TiO2 could dissociate itself and be transported separately, which results in increased toxicity at higher nano-TiO2 concentrations. Decreased As(V) toxicity associated with lower nano-TiO2 concentrations results from unaffected As levels in MSFs (when compared to the control), where several As components continued to be adsorbed by nano-TiO2. Therefore, more attention should be paid to the potential influence of nano-TiO2 on bioavailability and toxicity of cocontaminants. PMID:27485179

  11. Effect of Liquid Feed-Stock Composition on the Morphology of Titanium Dioxide Films Deposited by Thermal Plasma Spray.

    PubMed

    Adán, C; Marugán, J; van Grieken, R; Chien, K; Pershin, L; Coyle, T; Mostaghimi, J

    2015-09-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were deposited on the surface of titanium foils by Thermal Plasma Spray (TPS) process. Three different TiO2 coatings were prepared using the commercial TiO2-P25 nanopowder and titanium isopropoxide precursor solution as feed-stocks. Structure and morphology of the TiO2-P25 powder and the plasma sprayed coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, UV-visible spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRD and Raman results indicate that the TiO2 coatings were composed of an anatase/rutile mixture that is conditioned by the suspension composition used to be sprayed. Coatings prepared from TiO2-P25 nanoparticles in water suspension (NW-P25) and titanium isopropoxide solution suspension (NSP-P25) are incorporated into the coatings without phase transformation and their anatase/rutile ratio percentage remains very similar to the starting TiO2-P25 powder. On the contrary, when titanium isopropoxide solution is used for spraying (SP), the amount of rutile increases in the final TiO2 coating. SEM analysis also reveals different microstructure morphology, coating thickness, density and porosity of the three TiO2 films that depend significantly on the type of feed-stock employed. Interestingly, we have observed the role of titanium isopropoxide in the formation of more porous and cohesive layers of TiO2. The NSP-P25 coating, prepared with a mix of titanium isopropoxide solution based on TiO2 nanoparticles, presents higher deposition efficiencies and higher coating thickness than the film prepared with nanoparticles suspended in water (NW-P25) or with titanium isopropoxide solutions (SP). This is due to the precursor solution is acting as the cement between TiO2 nanoparticles, improving the cohesive strength of the coating. In sum, NSP-P25 and NW-P25 coatings display a good photocatalytic potential, based on their light absorption properties and mechanical stability. Band gap of

  12. Effect of Liquid Feed-Stock Composition on the Morphology of Titanium Dioxide Films Deposited by Thermal Plasma Spray.

    PubMed

    Adán, C; Marugán, J; van Grieken, R; Chien, K; Pershin, L; Coyle, T; Mostaghimi, J

    2015-09-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were deposited on the surface of titanium foils by Thermal Plasma Spray (TPS) process. Three different TiO2 coatings were prepared using the commercial TiO2-P25 nanopowder and titanium isopropoxide precursor solution as feed-stocks. Structure and morphology of the TiO2-P25 powder and the plasma sprayed coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, UV-visible spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRD and Raman results indicate that the TiO2 coatings were composed of an anatase/rutile mixture that is conditioned by the suspension composition used to be sprayed. Coatings prepared from TiO2-P25 nanoparticles in water suspension (NW-P25) and titanium isopropoxide solution suspension (NSP-P25) are incorporated into the coatings without phase transformation and their anatase/rutile ratio percentage remains very similar to the starting TiO2-P25 powder. On the contrary, when titanium isopropoxide solution is used for spraying (SP), the amount of rutile increases in the final TiO2 coating. SEM analysis also reveals different microstructure morphology, coating thickness, density and porosity of the three TiO2 films that depend significantly on the type of feed-stock employed. Interestingly, we have observed the role of titanium isopropoxide in the formation of more porous and cohesive layers of TiO2. The NSP-P25 coating, prepared with a mix of titanium isopropoxide solution based on TiO2 nanoparticles, presents higher deposition efficiencies and higher coating thickness than the film prepared with nanoparticles suspended in water (NW-P25) or with titanium isopropoxide solutions (SP). This is due to the precursor solution is acting as the cement between TiO2 nanoparticles, improving the cohesive strength of the coating. In sum, NSP-P25 and NW-P25 coatings display a good photocatalytic potential, based on their light absorption properties and mechanical stability. Band gap of

  13. Microstructure and physical properties of laser Zn modified amorphous-nanocrystalline coating on a titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia-Ning; Gong, Shui-Li; Shi, Yi-Ning; Suo, Hong-Bo; Wang, Xi-Chang; Deng, Yun-Hua; Shan, Fei-Hu; Li, Jian-Quan

    2014-02-01

    A Zn modified amorphous-nanocrystalline coating was fabricated on a Ti-6Al-4V alloy by laser cladding of the Co-Ti-B4C-Zn-Y2O3 mixed powders. Such coating was researched by means of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), etc. Experimental results indicated that the Co5Zn21 and TiB2 nanocrystalline phases were produced through in situ metallurgical reactions, which blocked the motion of dislocation, and TiB2 grew along (010), (111) and (024). The Co5Zn21 nanocrystals were produced attached to the ceramics, which mainly consisted of the Co nanoparticles embedded in a heterogeneous zinc, and had varied crystalline orientations.

  14. Electrical effect of titanium diffusion on amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seung-Ha; Jung, Woo-Shik; Park, Jin-Hong

    2012-11-19

    In this work, thermal diffusion phenomenon of Ti into amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide ({alpha}-IGZO) was carefully investigated with secondary ion mass spectroscopy, I-V, and R{sub s} measurement systems and HSC chemistry simulation tool. According to the experimental and simulated results, the diffused Ti atoms were easily oxidized due to its lowest oxidation free energy. Since oxygen atoms were decomposed from the {alpha}-IGZO during the oxidation of Ti, the number of oxygen vacancies working as electron-donating sites in {alpha}-IGZO was dramatically increased, contributing to the decrease of resistivity ({rho}) from 1.96 {Omega} cm (as-deposited {alpha}-IGZO) to 1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}{Omega} cm (350 Degree-Sign C annealed {alpha}-IGZO).

  15. Crystallization of amorphous titanium oxide thin films by pulsed UV-laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Yo; Adachi, Hideaki; Setsune, Kentaro; Kawashima, Syunichiro; Kugimiya, Koichi

    1996-12-31

    Oxide ceramic materials are applied to many electric devices using dielectric, ferroelectric, piezoelectric and elastic properties. Effects of ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation on the local crystal structure have been investigated for amorphous Ti-O thin films sputtered on ST-cut quartz substrates. The irradiation was conducted with a pulsed KrF excimer laser of 248 nm in wavelength. There were few changes in the optical transmission spectra of the films before and after the irradiation. The crystal structure of the films was characterized by electron diffraction, XPS and EXAFS analyses. The results obtained from these analyses suggest the films gradually crystallize to a TiO{sub 2} crystal with the rutile type structure by the increasing of the laser pulses.

  16. Synthesis and electromagnetic properties of BaFe{sub 11.92}(LaNd){sub 0.04}O{sub 19}/titanium dioxide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yu; Hong, Xiaowei; Liu, Jinmei; Le, Zhanggao; Huang, Feihui; Qin, Yuancheng; Zhong, Rong; Gao, Yunhua; Pan, Jianfei; Ling, Yun

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: Due to combining different functions and characteristics of individual materials, hybrid nanocomposite materials can strengthen their applications. Magnetic-conductive nanocomposites are the promising materials with electromagnetic loss, which have synergetic behavior between magnetic and conductive materials. It is the first time to report the synthesis of BaFe{sub 11.92}(LaNd){sub 0.04}O{sub 19}/titanium dioxide (BF/TD) composites by the gel-precursor self-propagating combustion process. The influence of mass ratio of BF and TD on the electromagnetic properties of BaFe{sub 11.92}(LaNd){sub 0.04}O{sub 19}/titanium dioxide composites was studied. The tgδ{sub μ} and tgδ{sub ε} of BF–TD composites. - Highlights: • It is the first time to report BaFe{sub 11.92}(LaNd){sub 0.04}O{sub 19}/titanium dioxide composites. • The composites are prepared by the gel-precursor self-propagating combustion. • The electromagnetic properties could be adjusted by the mass ratio of BF and TD. • The introduction of TD enhances the dielectric loss and widens the frequency bands. • BF/TD composites will be microwave absorption materials with wide frequency band. - Abstract: Doped BaFe{sub 11.92}(LaNd){sub 0.04}O{sub 19}/titanium dioxide composites have been prepared by the gel-precursor self-propagating combustion process. The characterization of the composites are performed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential thermal analysis-thermo gravimetry (DTA–TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and network analyzer. Both XRD and FT-IR indicate that the doped BaFe{sub 11.92}(LaNd){sub 0.04}O{sub 19}/titanium dioxide composites are successfully synthesized and there are some interactions between BaFe{sub 11.92}(LaNd){sub 0.04}O{sub 19} and titanium dioxide. DTA–TG analysis of BaFe{sub 11.92}(LaNd){sub 0.04}O{sub 19}/titanium dioxide composites shows that the composite gel

  17. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles alter cellular morphology via disturbing the microtubule dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhilei; Xu, Bo; Ji, Xiaoli; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Xuemei; Chen, Minjian; Han, Xiumei; Tang, Qiusha; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2015-04-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in our daily lives, for example, in the areas of sunscreens, cosmetics, toothpastes, food products, and nanomedical reagents. Recently, increasing concern has been raised about their neurotoxicity, but the mechanisms underlying such toxic effects are still unknown. In this work, we employed a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to study the effects of TiO2 NPs on neurological systems. Our results showed that TiO2 NPs did not affect cell viability but induced noticeable morphological changes until 100 μg ml-1. Immunofluorescence detection showed disorder, disruption, retraction, and decreased intensity of the microtubules after TiO2 NPs treatment. Both α and β tubule expressions did not change in the TiO2 NP-treated group, but the percentage of soluble tubules was increased. A microtubule dynamic study in living cells indicated that TiO2 NPs caused a lower growth rate and a higher shortening rate of microtubules as well as shortened lifetimes of de novo microtubules. TiO2 NPs did not cause changes in the expression and phosphorylation state of tau proteins, but a tau-TiO2 NP interaction was observed. TiO2 NPs could interact with tubule heterodimers, microtubules and tau proteins, which led to the instability of microtubules, thus contributing to the neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs.Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in our daily lives, for example, in the areas of sunscreens, cosmetics, toothpastes, food products, and nanomedical reagents. Recently, increasing concern has been raised about their neurotoxicity, but the mechanisms underlying such toxic effects are still unknown. In this work, we employed a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to study the effects of TiO2 NPs on neurological systems. Our results showed that TiO2 NPs did not affect cell viability but induced noticeable morphological changes until 100 μg ml-1. Immunofluorescence detection showed disorder

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christina L.; Natarajan, Vaishaali; Hayward, Stephen L.; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are currently the second most produced engineered nanomaterial in the world with vast usage in consumer products leading to recurrent human exposure. Animal studies indicate significant nanoparticle accumulation in the brain while cellular toxicity studies demonstrate negative effects on neuronal cell viability and function. However, the toxicological effects of nanoparticles on astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, we determined the sub-toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (rutile, anatase and commercially available P25 TiO2 nanoparticles) on primary rat cortical astrocytes. We evaluated some events related to astrocyte functions and mitochondrial dysregulation: (1) glutamate uptake; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring ROS production; (3) the expression patterns of dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) and mitofusins 1 and 2, whose expression is central to mitochondrial dynamics; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker® Red CMXRos staining. Anatase, rutile and P25 were found to have LC50 values of 88.22 +/- 10.56 ppm, 136.0 +/- 31.73 ppm and 62.37 +/- 9.06 ppm respectively indicating nanoparticle specific toxicity. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss in glutamate uptake indicative of a loss in vital astrocyte function. TiO2 nanoparticles also induced an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting mitochondrial damage. TiO2 nanoparticle exposure altered expression patterns of DRPs at low concentrations (25 ppm) and apoptotic fission at high concentrations (100 ppm). TiO2 nanoparticle exposure also resulted in changes to mitochondrial morphology confirmed by mitochondrial staining. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence that TiO2 nanoparticle exposure has potential implications in astrocyte-mediated neurological dysfunction.Titanium dioxide (Ti

  19. Role of fatty acid composites in the toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles used in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Chang, JuOae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Alsulimani, Helal Hussain; Choi, Jee Eun; Lee, Joo-Kyung; Kim, AhYoung; Park, Bae Ho; Kim, Jonghan; Lee, HeaYeon

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in the cosmetic industry results in products with better efficacy and functionality. However, recent advances in molecular toxicology have revealed that NP exposure can promote cytotoxicity and oxidative damage, which has raised health concerns in the use of NPs in personal care products. Nevertheless, the mechanistic basis for the toxicity and safety of cosmetic NPs is poorly understood. The goal of the study was to determine the cytotoxicity and intracellular distribution of titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs containing fatty acid composites (palmitoleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid and oleic acid) commonly used in cosmetic products. Two types of cells, human fibroblast skin cells and adenocarcinoma lung cells, were exposed to either bare TiO2 NPs or TiO2 NPs mixed with fatty acids for up to 48 hr. NMR analysis confirmed that the fatty acid composites remained in the NPs after wash. The cytotoxicity of TiO2 NPs was determined by cell viability measurement using quantitative confocal microscopy, and the localization of two different forms of TiO2 NPs were assessed using electron spectroscopic imaging with transmission electron microscopy. TiO2 NPs containing fatty acids posed significantly reduced cytotoxicity (80-88% decreases) than bare NPs in both cell types. Furthermore, there was less intracellular penetration of the NPs containing fatty acid composites compared with bare NPs. These results provide important insights into the role of fatty acids in protecting the cells from possible toxicity caused by NPs used in the production of cosmetic products.

  20. Mechanism of enhanced Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus-resistance by titanium dioxide nanoparticles in silkworm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kaizun; Li, Fanchi; Ma, Lie; Wang, Binbin; Zhang, Hua; Ni, Min; Hong, Fashui; Shen, Weide; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The infection of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) in silkworms is often lethal. It is difficult to prevent, and its lethality is correlated with both viral particle characteristics and silkworm strains. Low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) can promote silkworm growth and improve its resistance to organophosphate pesticides. In this study, TiO2 NPs' effect on BmNPV resistance was investigated by analyzing the characteristics of BmNPV proliferation and transcriptional differences in silkworm midgut and the transcriptional changes of immunity related genes after feeding with TiO2 NPs. We found that low doses of TiO2 NPs improved the resistance of silkworm against BmNPV by 14.88-fold, with the mortalities of the experimental group and control group being 0.56% and 8.33% at 144 h, respectively. The proliferation of BmNPV in the midgut was significantly increased 72 h after infection in both experimental and control groups; the control group reached the peak at 120 h, while the experimental group took 24 more hours to reach the maximal value that was 12.63 times lower than the control, indicating that TiO2 NPs can inhibit BmNPV proliferation in the midgut. Consistently, the expression of the BmNPV-resistant gene Bmlipase-1 had the same increase pattern as the proliferation changes. Immune signaling pathway analysis revealed that TiO2 NPs inhibited the proliferation of silkworm BmNPV to reduce the activation levels of janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway, while promoting the expression of Bmakt to improve the immunity. Overall, our results demonstrate that TiO2 NPs increase silkworm resistance against BmNPV by inhibiting virus proliferation and improving immunity in silkworms.

  1. Titanium Dioxide Particle Type and Concentration Influence the Inflammatory Response in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Fukatsu, Hitomi; Shimanuki, Yuka; Tanaka, Natsuki; Watanabe, Eri; Suzuki, Yuka; Murakami, Masahiko; Izuoka, Kiyora; Chang, Jie; Wu, Wenting; Yamada, Yoshiji; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are widely used in cosmetics, sunscreens, biomedicine, and food products. When used as a food additive, TiO2 nanoparticles are used in significant amounts as white food-coloring agents. However, the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on the gastrointestinal tract remain unclear. The present study was designed to determine the effects of five TiO2 particles of different crystal structures and sizes in human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Twenty-four-hour exposure to anatase (primary particle size: 50 and 100 nm) and rutile (50 nm) TiO2 particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner in THP-1 macrophages, but in not Caco-2 cells. However, 72-h exposure of Caco-2 cells to anatase (50 nm) TiO2 particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner. The highest dose (50 µg/mL) of anatase (100 nm), rutile (50 nm), and P25 TiO2 particles also reduced cellular viability in Caco-2 cells. The production of reactive oxygen species tended to increase in both types of cells, irrespective of the type of TiO2 particle. Exposure of THP-1 macrophages to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO2 particles increased interleukin (IL)-1β expression level, and exposure of Caco-2 cells to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO2 particles also increased IL-8 expression. The results indicated that anatase TiO2 nanoparticles induced inflammatory responses compared with other TiO2 particles. Further studies are required to determine the in vivo relevance of these findings to avoid the hazards of ingested particles. PMID:27092499

  2. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Trigger Loss of Function and Perturbation of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Primary Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Vaishaali; Wilson, Christina L; Hayward, Stephen L; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are one of the most highly manufactured and employed nanomaterials in the world with applications in copious industrial and consumer products. The liver is a major accumulation site for many nanoparticles, including TiO2, directly through intentional exposure or indirectly through unintentional ingestion via water, food or animals and increased environmental contamination. Growing concerns over the current usage of TiO2 coupled with the lack of mechanistic understanding of its potential health risk is the motivation for this study. Here we determined the toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (commercially available rutile, anatase and P25) on primary rat hepatocytes. Specifically, we evaluated events related to hepatocyte functions and mitochondrial dynamics: (1) urea and albumin synthesis using colorimetric and ELISA assays, respectively; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP); (3) OPA1 and Mfn-1 expression that mediates the mitochondrial dynamics by PCR; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker Green FM staining. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss (p < 0.05) in hepatocyte functions even at concentrations as low as 50 ppm with commercially used P25 causing maximum damage. TiO2 nanoparticles induced a strong oxidative stress in primary hepatocytes. TiO2 nanoparticles exposure also resulted in morphological changes in mitochondria and substantial loss in the fusion process, thus impairing the mitochondrial dynamics. Although this study demonstrated that TiO2 nanoparticles exposure resulted in substantial damage to primary hepatocytes, more in vitro and in vivo studies are required to determine the complete toxicological mechanism in primary hepatocytes and subsequently liver function. PMID:26247363

  3. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca; Stecca, Laura

    2015-06-23

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO{sub 2} NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO{sub 2} NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO{sub 2} NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm{sup 2} levels of TiO{sub 2} NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO{sub 2} NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  4. Effect of titanium dioxide nanomaterials and ultraviolet light coexposure on African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junling; Wages, Mike; Cox, Stephen B; Maul, Jonathan D; Li, Yujia; Barnes, Melanie; Hope-Weeks, Louisa; Cobb, George P

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanomaterials (nano-TiO(2) ) exhibit stronger photochemical oxidation/reduction capacity compared with their bulk counterparts, but the effectiveness of nano-TiO(2) interaction with ultraviolet (UV) light strongly depends on particle size. In this study, the dependence of nano-TiO(2) toxicity on particle size and interaction with UV light were investigated. Toxicity tests with Xenopus laevis included eight concentrations of nano-TiO(2) in the presence of either white light or UVA (315-400 nm). We quantified viability and growth of Xenopus laevis. Results showed that, regardless of UV light exposure, increasing TiO(2) concentration decreased X. laevis survival (p < 0.05). Coexposure to 5-nm TiO(2) and UVA caused near-significant decreases in X. laevis survival (p = 0.08). Coexposure to 10-nm TiO(2) and UVA significantly decreased X. laevis survival (p = 0.005). However, coexposure to 32-nm TiO(2) and UVA had no statistical effect on X. laevis survival (p = 0.8). For all three particle sizes, whether alone or with UV light, the nano-TiO(2) concentrations significantly affected growth of tadpoles as determined by total body length, snout-vent length, and developmental stage. High-concentration TiO(2) solutions suppressed tadpole body length and delayed developmental stages. Further research to explore reasons for the growth and mortality in tadpoles is still underway in our laboratory. Given the widespread application of nano-TiO(2) , our results may be useful in the management of nano-TiO(2) released from industrial, municipal, and nonpoint sources. PMID:22012895

  5. Murine liver damage caused by exposure to nano-titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jie; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2016-03-18

    Due to its unique physiochemical properties, nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) is widely used in all aspects of people's daily lives, bringing it into increasing contact with humans. Thus, this material's security issues for humans have become a heavily researched subject. Nano-TiO2 can enter the body through the mouth, skin, respiratory tract or in other ways, after which it enters the blood circulation and is deposited in the liver, changing biochemical indicators and causing liver inflammation. Meanwhile, the light sensitivity of these nanoparticles allows them to become media-generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing an imbalance between oxidation and anti-oxidation that leads to oxidative stress and liver damage. Nano-TiO2 can be transported into cells via phagocytosis, where the nanoparticles bind to the mitochondrial membrane, resulting in the disintegration of the membrane and the electron transport chain within the mitochondria. Thus, more ROS are produced. Nano-TiO2 can also enter the nucleus, where it can directly embed into or indirectly affect DNA, thereby causing DNA breakage or affecting gene expression. These effects include increased mRNA and protein expression levels of inflammation-related factors and decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of IκB and IL-2, resulting in inflammation. Long-term inflammation of the liver causes HSC cell activation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition is promoted by multiple signalling pathways, resulting in liver fibrosis. In this paper, the latest progress on murine liver injury induced by environmental TiO2 is systematically described. The toxicity of nano-TiO2 also depends on size, exposure time, surface properties, dosage, administration route, and its surface modification. Therefore, its toxic effects in humans should be studied in greater depth. This paper also provides useful reference information regarding the safe use of nano-TiO2 in the future. PMID:26871200

  6. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles detoxify pirimicarb under UV irradiation at ambient intensities.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Frank; Bundschuh, Mirco; Dabrunz, André; Bandow, Nicole; Schaumann, Gabriele E; Schulz, Ralf

    2012-03-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO₂) form reactive oxygen species (ROS) under irradiation by ultraviolet light (UV). This known photocatalytic activity may finally affect the presence and toxicity of organic environmental chemicals, which have not yet been studied at ambient UV intensity. The authors used a three-factorial design to evaluate the interaction of the carbamate insecticide pirimicarb (initial nominal concentration, 20 µg/L), ambient UV irradiation (40 W/m² for 15 min), and nTiO₂(~100 nm; 2.0 mg/L). Pirimicarb, pirimicarb × UV, and pirimicarb × nTiO₂ treatments revealed a median immobilization of Daphnia magna after 72 h ranging between 70 and 80%. This effect seemed to be caused by the initial nominal pirimicarb concentration. However, UV irradiation before an exposure of daphnids in the presence of 2.0 mg nTiO₂/L reduced pirimicarb concentrations to values below the limit of quantification, likely because of the formation of ROS. This reduction was associated with an almost complete removal of toxicity for D. magna. Furthermore, during a second experiment, 0.2 mg nTiO₂/L in combination with 15 min UV irradiation reduced pirimicarb concentrations by approximately 30%. These results indicate a detoxification and therefore remediation potential of the combined application of nTiO₂ and UV irradiation at ambient levels. This potential has not been documented to date in surface waters, where nTiO₂ concentrations in the low to medium µg/L range may occur.

  7. Effect of glycyrrhizic acid on titanium dioxide nanoparticles-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Orazizadeh, Mahmoud; Fakhredini, Fereshtesadat; Mansouri, Esrafil; Khorsandi, Layasadat

    2014-09-01

    Many recent studies demonstrate that most nanoparticles (NPs) have an adverse or toxic action on liver. The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) against hepatic injury induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NTiO2) in rats. Thirty-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups. NTiO2-intoxicated rats received 300 mg/kg of NTiO2 for 14 days by gavage method. Protection group pretreated with GA for 7 days before NTiO2 administration. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were detected as biomarkers in the blood to indicate hepatic injury. Product of lipid peroxidation (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were evaluated for oxidative stress in hepatic injury. Light microscopy for histopathological studies and TUNEL assay was also done. Administration of NTiO2 induced a significant elevation in plasma AST, ALT and ALP. In the liver, NTiO2 increased oxidative stress through the increase in lipid peroxidation and decrease in SOD and GPx enzymes. Histopathological studies showed that treatment with NTiO2 caused liver damage including centrilobular necrosis, which was accompanied by congestion and accumulation of inflammatory cells. Apoptotic index was also significantly increased in this group. Pretreatment of GA significantly decreased ALT, AST and ALP, attenuated the histopathology of hepatic injury, decreased apoptotic index, ameliorated oxidative stress in hepatic tissue, and increased the activities of SOD and GPx. These findings indicate that GA effectively protects against NTiO2-induced hepatotoxicity. GA has a potent protective effect against the NPs induced hepatotoxicity and might be clinically useful.

  8. Carbon Black and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Distinct Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Sonja; Hussain, Salik; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence link nanomaterials with adverse biological outcomes and due to the variety of applications and potential human exposures to nanoparticles it is thus important to evaluate their toxicity for the risk assessment of workers and consumers. It is crucial to understand the underlying mechanisms of their toxicity as observation of similar effects after different nanomaterial exposures does not reflect similar intracellular processing and organelle interactions. A thorough understanding of mechanisms is not only needed for accurate prediction of potential toxicological impacts but also for the development of safer nanoapplications by modulating the physico-chemical characteristics. Furthermore biomedical applications may also take advantage of an in depth knowledge about the mode of action of nanotoxicity to design new nanoparticle-derived drugs. In the present manuscript we discuss the similarities and differences in molecular pathways of toxicity after carbon black and TiO2 nanoparticle exposures and identify the main toxicity mechanisms induced by these two nanoparticles which may also be indicative for the mode of action of other insoluble nanomaterials. We address the translocation, cell death induction, genotoxicity and inflammation induced by titanium dioxide and carbon black nanoparticles which depend on their internalisation, ROS production capacities and/or protein interactions. We summarise their distinct cellular mechanisms of toxicity and the crucial steps which may be targeted to avoid adverse effects or to induce them for nanomedical purposes. Several physico-chemical characteristics could influence these general toxicity pathways depicted here and the identification of common toxicity pathways could support the grouping of nanomaterials in terms of toxicity. PMID:25266826

  9. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Trigger Loss of Function and Perturbation of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Primary Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Vaishaali; Wilson, Christina L; Hayward, Stephen L; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are one of the most highly manufactured and employed nanomaterials in the world with applications in copious industrial and consumer products. The liver is a major accumulation site for many nanoparticles, including TiO2, directly through intentional exposure or indirectly through unintentional ingestion via water, food or animals and increased environmental contamination. Growing concerns over the current usage of TiO2 coupled with the lack of mechanistic understanding of its potential health risk is the motivation for this study. Here we determined the toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (commercially available rutile, anatase and P25) on primary rat hepatocytes. Specifically, we evaluated events related to hepatocyte functions and mitochondrial dynamics: (1) urea and albumin synthesis using colorimetric and ELISA assays, respectively; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP); (3) OPA1 and Mfn-1 expression that mediates the mitochondrial dynamics by PCR; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker Green FM staining. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss (p < 0.05) in hepatocyte functions even at concentrations as low as 50 ppm with commercially used P25 causing maximum damage. TiO2 nanoparticles induced a strong oxidative stress in primary hepatocytes. TiO2 nanoparticles exposure also resulted in morphological changes in mitochondria and substantial loss in the fusion process, thus impairing the mitochondrial dynamics. Although this study demonstrated that TiO2 nanoparticles exposure resulted in substantial damage to primary hepatocytes, more in vitro and in vivo studies are required to determine the complete toxicological mechanism in primary hepatocytes and subsequently liver function.

  10. Differential Mouse Pulmonary Dose and Time Course Responses to Titanium Dioxide Nanospheres and Nanobelts

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Dale W.

    2013-01-01

    Three anatase titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared; nanospheres (NSs), short nanobelts (NB1), and long nanobelts (NB2). These NPs were used to investigate the effect of NP shape and length on lung toxicity. Mice were exposed (0–30 µg per mouse) by pharyngeal aspiration and pulmonary toxicity was assessed over a 112-day time course. Whole lung lavage data indicated that NB1- and NB2-exposed mice, but not NS-exposed mice, had significant dose- and time-dependent pulmonary inflammation and damage. Histopathological analyses at 112 days postexposure determined no interstitial fibrosis in any NS-exposed mice, an increased incidence in 30 µg NB1-exposed mice, and significant interstitial fibrosis in 30 µg NB2-exposed mice. At 112 days postexposure, lung burden of NS was decreased by 96.4% and NB2 by 80.5% from initial deposition levels. At 112 days postexposure, enhanced dark field microscopy determined that alveolar macro- phages were the dominant deposition site, but a fraction of NB1 and NB2 was observed in the alveolar interstitial spaces. For the 30 µg exposure groups at 112 days postexposure, confocal micro- scopy and immunofluorescent staining demonstrated that retained NB2 but not NS were present in the interstitium subjacent to the terminal bronchiole near the normal location of the smallest lymphatic capillaries in the lung. These lymphatic capillaries play a critical role in particle clearance, and the accumulation of NB2, but not NS, suggests possible impaired lymphatic clearance by the high aspect ratio particles. In summary, our data indicate that TiO2 NP shape alters pulmonary responses, with severity of responses being ranked as NS < NB1 < NB2. PMID:22956629

  11. Genotoxicity assessment of intravenously injected titanium dioxide nanoparticles in gpt delta transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Miura, Nobuhiko; Hojo, Rieko; Yanagiba, Yukie; Suda, Megumi; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Miyagawa, Muneyuki; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are increasingly manufactured in large amounts for use in industrial applications such as cosmetics, pigments, foods, and as photo-catalysts. Many in vitro studies have examined the genotoxicity of TiO2 nanomaterials; some of these studies suggest that TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are genotoxic. Several in vivo studies have also been reported recently, but the results are inconsistent. In this study, we investigated, using several genotoxicity endpoints, the effects of dispersed TiO2 suspensions following multiple intravenous injections in mice. Male gpt Delta C57BL/6J mice were administered TiO2 NPs at doses of 2, 10 or 50mg/kg body weight per week for 4 consecutive weeks. Genotoxic effects were then analyzed by the Pig-a gene mutation assay and the micronucleus assay on peripheral blood, and by the alkaline comet, gpt mutation, and Spi(-) mutation assays on the liver. We also assessed the localization of TiO2 NPs in the liver, by transmission electron microscopy. Administration of TiO2 NPs did not significantly increase any of the following endpoints: frequency of Pig-a mutants (erythrocytes); frequency of micronuclei (reticulocytes); level of DNA damage (liver); frequencies of gpt and Spi(-) mutants (liver). Most TiO2 NPs in the liver were found in the sinuses and inside Kupffer cells, although some were occasionally observed in liver parenchymal cells. These results indicate that TiO2 NPs do not have genotoxic effects on mouse liver or bone marrow. PMID:27169374

  12. Titanium Dioxide Particle Type and Concentration Influence the Inflammatory Response in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Fukatsu, Hitomi; Shimanuki, Yuka; Tanaka, Natsuki; Watanabe, Eri; Suzuki, Yuka; Murakami, Masahiko; Izuoka, Kiyora; Chang, Jie; Wu, Wenting; Yamada, Yoshiji; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanoparticles are widely used in cosmetics, sunscreens, biomedicine, and food products. When used as a food additive, TiO₂ nanoparticles are used in significant amounts as white food-coloring agents. However, the effects of TiO₂ nanoparticles on the gastrointestinal tract remain unclear. The present study was designed to determine the effects of five TiO₂ particles of different crystal structures and sizes in human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Twenty-four-hour exposure to anatase (primary particle size: 50 and 100 nm) and rutile (50 nm) TiO₂ particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner in THP-1 macrophages, but in not Caco-2 cells. However, 72-h exposure of Caco-2 cells to anatase (50 nm) TiO₂ particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner. The highest dose (50 µg/mL) of anatase (100 nm), rutile (50 nm), and P25 TiO₂ particles also reduced cellular viability in Caco-2 cells. The production of reactive oxygen species tended to increase in both types of cells, irrespective of the type of TiO₂ particle. Exposure of THP-1 macrophages to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO₂ particles increased interleukin (IL)-1β expression level, and exposure of Caco-2 cells to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO₂ particles also increased IL-8 expression. The results indicated that anatase TiO₂ nanoparticles induced inflammatory responses compared with other TiO₂ particles. Further studies are required to determine the in vivo relevance of these findings to avoid the hazards of ingested particles. PMID:27092499

  13. Investigation of polypyrrole/polyvinyl alcohol-titanium dioxide composite films for photo-catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shaoqiang; Zhang, Hongyang; Song, Yuanqing; Zhang, Jianling; Yang, Haigang; Jiang, Long; Dan, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Polypyrrole/polyvinyl alcohol-titanium dioxide (PPy/PVA-TiO2) composite films used as photo-catalysts were fabricated by combining TiO2 sol with PPy/PVA solution in which PPy was synthesized by in situ polymerization of pyrrole (Py) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix and loaded on glass. The prepared photo-catalysts were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflection spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and photoluminescence (PL). The results indicate that the composites have same crystal structure as the TiO2 and extend the optic absorption from UV region to visible light region. By detecting the variation ratio, detected by ultraviolet-vis spectroscopy, of model pollutant rhodamine B (RhB) solution in the presence of the composite films under both UV and visible light irradiation, the photo-catalytic performance of the composite films was investigated. The results show that the PPy/PVA-TiO2 composite films show better photo-catalytic properties than TiO2 film both under UV and visible light irradiation, and the photo-catalytic degradation of RhB follows the first-order kinetics. The effects of the composition of composite films and the concentration of RhB on the photo-catalytic performance, as well as the possible photo-catalytic mechanism, were also discussed. By photo-catalytic recycle experiments, the structure stability of the PPy/PVA-TiO2 composite film was investigated and the results show that the photo-catalytic activity under both UV and visible light irradiation have no significant decrease after four times of recycle experiments, suggesting that the photo-catalyst film is stable during the photo-catalytic process, which was also confirmed by the XRD pattern and FT-IR spectra of the composite film before and after photo-catalytic.

  14. Influence of clay particles on the transport and retention of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Cai, Li; Tong, Meiping; Wang, Xueting; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of two representative suspended clay particles, bentonite and kaolinite, on the transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) in saturated quartz sand in both NaCl (1 and 10 mM ionic strength) and CaCl2 solutions (0.1 and 1 mM ionic strength) at pH 7. The breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite or kaolinite were higher than those without the presence of clay particles in NaCl solutions, indicating that both types of clay particles increased nTiO2 transport in NaCl solutions. Moreover, the enhancement of nTiO2 transport was more significant when bentonite was present in nTiO2 suspensions relative to kaolinite. Similar to NaCl solutions, in CaCl2 solutions, the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite were also higher than those without clay particles, while the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with kaolinite were lower than those without clay particles. Clearly, in CaCl2 solutions, the presence of bentonite in suspensions increased nTiO2 transport, whereas, kaolinite decreased nTiO2 transport in quartz sand. The attachment of nTiO2 onto clay particles (both bentonite and kaolinite) were observed under all experimental conditions. The increased transport of nTiO2 in most experimental conditions (except for kaolinite in CaCl2 solutions) was attributed mainly to the clay-facilitated nTiO2 transport. The straining of larger nTiO2-kaolinite clusters yet contributed to the decreased transport (enhanced retention) of nTiO2 in divalent CaCl2 solutions when kaolinite particles were copresent in suspensions.

  15. Photocatalytic removal of phenol over titanium dioxide- reduced graphene oxide photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuhada Alim, Nor; Lintang, Hendrik O.; Yuliati, Leny

    2016-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been one of the most investigated semiconductors due to its high activity for the removal of organic pollutants. In order to improve the efficiency of the TiO2, series of TiO2-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composites with various loading amounts of graphene oxide (GO), which were 0.5, 1, 3 and 5 wt% were prepared by UV- assisted photocatalytic reduction method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra confirmed that all the TiO2-rGO composites samples were successfully synthesized without disrupting the structure of the TiO2. Fluorescence spectroscopy revealed the role of the rGO to reduce the electron-hole recombination on the TiO2, while the transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X- ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDS) confirmed the morphology and the presence of both TiO2 and rGO. In the photocatalytic removal of phenol, all the TiO2-rGO composites showed better photocatalytic activities than the TiO2 under UV light irradiation. The activity of the TiO2 was enhanced by more than two times with the addition of the GO with the optimum amount (3 wt%). It was proposed that the good photocatalytic performance obtained on the composites were caused by the successful suppression of electron-hole recombination by the rGO on the TiO2.

  16. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Stecca, Laura; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO2) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO2 NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO2 NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO2 NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm2 levels of TiO2 NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO2 NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  17. Immunotoxicology of titanium dioxide and hydroxylated fullerenes engineered nanoparticles in fish models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Boris

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles have the potential to cause adverse effects on the fish health, but the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is limited. Major task of this dissertation was to connect gaps in current knowledge with a comprehensive sequence of molecular, cellular and organismal responses toward environmentally relevant concentrations of engineered nanoparticles (titanium dioxide -- TiO2 and hydroxylated fullerenes), outlining the interaction with the innate immune system of fish. The research was divided into following steps: 1) create cDNA libraries for the species of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas); 2) evaluate whether, and how can nanoparticles modulate neutrophil function in P. promelas; 3) determine the changes in expression of standard biomarker genes as a result of nanoparticle treatment; 4) expose the P. promelas to nanoparticles and appraise their survival rate in a bacterial challenge study; 5) assess the impact of nanoparticles on neuro-immunological interface during the early embryogenesis of zebrafish (Danio rerio). It was hypothesized that engineered nanoparticles can cause measurable changes in fish transcriptome, immune response, and disease resistance. The results of this dissertation are: 1) application of environmentally relevant concentration of nanoparticles changed function of fish neutrophils; 2) fish exposed to nano-TiO2 had significantly increased expression of interleukin 11, macrophage stimulating factor 1, and neutrophil cytosolic factor 2, while expression of interleukin 11 and myeloperoxidase was significantly increased and expression of elastase 2 was significantly decreased in fish exposed to hydroxylated fullerenes; 3) exposure to environmental estimated concentration of nano-TiO2 significantly increased fish mortality during Aeromonas hydrophila challenge. Analysis of nano-TiO 2 distribution in fish organism outlined that the nano-TiO2 is concentrating in the fish kidney and spleen; 4) during the early embryogenesis of D

  18. Field enhanced photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli using immobilized titanium dioxide nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Jeffrey M.

    A batch reactor device utilizing photocatalysis and a flow reactor combining photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis were developed for bacterial disinfection in lab-synthesized and natural waters. The batch reactor provided a 90% decrease in initial concentration (~1 x 103 CFU/mL) after 60 minutes when subjected to incident light at 100 mW/cm2 and continuous mixing via aeration. A combination of photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis in the flow reactor provided complete inactivation of contaminated waters with flow rates of 50 mL/min. Both devices consisted of immobilized titanium dioxide nanotube arrays as the catalyzing medium. The flow reactor used an applied bias of up to 6 V without noticeable water splitting. Light intensity, applied voltage, and background electrolytes and concentration were all found to impact the device performance. Complete inactivation of E. coli W3110 (800 CFU/mL) occurred in 15 seconds in the flow reactor irradiated at 25 mW/cm2 with an applied voltage of 4 V in a 100 ppm NaCl solution. Disinfection in natural water was inhibited by the presence of inorganic ions and other constituents that are commonly found in natural water. To simulate natural scenarios in which a point-of-use device might be employed, testing was conducted in a natural environment using source water from Emigration Creek in Salt Lake City, Utah. A higher voltage of 6 V was required to reach 100% inactivation in natural surface water. The nanotube flow through disinfection chamber shows promise as a personal point-of use device for E. coli inactivation.

  19. Toxicity of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticle suspensions to the aquatic invertebrate, Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Das, Pranab; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the 48 h acute toxicity of capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), and capped and uncapped titanium dioxide (nTiO₂) to Daphnia magna neonates. In addition, a 24 days chronic toxicity study was performed for D. magna exposed to uncapped nTiO₂ to evaluate effects on growth, reproduction and survival. The 48 h median lethal concentrations (LC₅₀) for carboxy-functionalized capped AgNPs and uncapped nTiO₂ were 2.75 μg/L and 7.75 mg/L, respectively. In contrast, no mortalities were observed for Daphnia exposed to carboxy-functionalized capped nTiO₂ at concentrations up to 30 mg/L. In the chronic toxicity experiment with uncapped nTiO₂, the growth, reproduction and survival of D. magna were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced at concentrations ranging from 4.5 to 7.5 mg/L. Growth and reproduction were reduced by 35 % and 93 %, respectively in the treatments at the highest uncapped nTiO₂ concentration (7.5 mg/L). Time to first reproduction was delayed by 2-3 days in D. magna and the test organisms produced only 1-2 broods over 24 days exposure to the highest concentration of uncapped nTiO₂. Overall, the results from the present study indicate that exposures of aquatic invertebrates to nanoparticles could have important ecological effects on lower trophic levels in aquatic ecosystems.

  20. The Ginkgo biloba Extract Reverses the Renal Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Adult Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Escárcega-González, Carlos Enrique; Reynoso-Andeola, Irma Guadalupe; Jaramillo-Juárez, Fernando; Martínez-Ruvalcaba, Haydée; Posadas Del Rio, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    The Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) is a commercial product used as a nutraceutic herbal remedy in Europe and US. It contains 27% of the polyphenols isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin, as antioxidants. We used male adult Wistar rats (200-300 g), divided into four groups: control group (treated with 5.0 mg/kg of sodium chloride, intravenous), titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) group (5.0 mg/kg, intravenous), GbE group (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), and GbE + TiO2-NPs group (treated 24 h before with 10 mg/kg of GbE, intraperitoneal), followed, 24 h later, by 5.0 mg/kg of TiO2-NPs intravenously. The statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test for grouped data with ANOVA posttest. The GbE protected renal cells against the effects of TiO2-NPs because it reversed the increased activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase and the enzymatic activity of dipeptidylaminopeptidase IV at all times tested (0-5, 5-24, 24-48, and 48-72 h). Also it reversed the glucosuria, hypernatriuria, and urine osmolarity at three times tested (5-24, 24-48, and 48-72). Thus, we conclude that GbE has a beneficial activity in the cytoplasmic membranes of brush border cells on the renal tubules, against the adverse effects that can be produced by some xenobiotics in this case the TiO2-NPs, in experimental rats. PMID:27042354

  1. Evaluation of coexposure to inorganic arsenic and titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Lucas; Müller, Larissa; Gelesky, Marcos A; Wasielesky, Wilson; Fattorini, Daniele; Regoli, Francesco; Monserrat, José Marìa; Ventura-Lima, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    The acute toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) that occur concomitantly in the aquatic environment with other contaminants such as arsenic (As) is little known in crustaceans. The objective of the present study is to evaluate whether coexposure to nTiO2 can influence the accumulation, metabolism, and oxidative stress parameters induced by arsenic exposure in the gills and hepatopancreas of the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. Organisms were exposed by dissolving chemicals in seawater (salinity = 30) at nominal concentrations of 10 μg/L nTiO2 or As(III), dosed alone and in combination. Results showed that there was not a significant accumulation of As in either tissue type, but the coexposure altered the pattern of the metabolism. In the hepatopancreas, no changes were observed in the biochemical response, while in the gills, an increase in the glutamate-cysteine-ligase (GCL) activity was observed upon exposure to As or nTiO2 alone, an increase in the reduced glutathione (GSH) levels was observed upon exposure to As alone, and an increase in the total antioxidant capacity was observed upon exposure to nTiO2 or nTiO2 + As. However, these modulations were not sufficient enough to prevent the lipid damage induced by nTiO2 exposure. Our results suggest that coexposure to nTiO2 and As does not alter the toxicity of this metalloid in the gills and hepatopancreas of L. vannamei but does alter its metabolism, favoring its accumulation of organic As species considered moderately toxic.

  2. Effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangjian; Wang, Yun; Zhuo, Lin; Chen, Shi; Zhao, Lin; Luan, Xianguo; Wang, Haifang; Jia, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have been widely used in various consumer products, especially food and personal care products. Compared to the well-characterized adverse cardiovascular effect of inhaled ambient ultrafine particles, research on the health response to orally administrated TiO2 NPs is still limited. In our study, we performed an in vivo study in Sprague-Dawley rats to understand the cardiovascular effect of TiO2 NPs after oral intake. After daily gastrointestinal administration of TiO2 NPs at 0, 2, 10, 50 mg/kg for 30 and 90 days, heart rate (HR), blood pressure, blood biochemical parameters and histopathology of cardiac tissues was assessed to quantify cardiovascular damage. Mild and temporary reduction of HR and systolic blood pressure as well as an increase of diastolic blood pressure was observed after daily oral administration of TiO2 NPs for 30 days. Injury of cardiac function was observed after daily oral administration of TiO2 NPs for 90 days as reflected in decreased activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBDH) and creatine kinase (CK). Increased white blood cells count (WBC) and granulocytes (GRN) in blood as well as increased concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in the serum indicated inflammatory response initiated by TiO2 NPs exposure. It was hypothesize that cardiac damage and inflammatory response are the possible mechanisms of the adverse cardiovascular effects induced by orally administrated TiO2 NPs. Data from our study suggested that even at low dose of TiO2 NPs can induce adverse cardiovascular effects after 30 days or 90 days of oral exposure, thus warranting concern for the dietary intake of TiO2 NPs for consumers.

  3. Enhancement of bioactivity on medical polymer surface using high power impulse magnetron sputtered titanium dioxide film.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Ju; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Chen, Ying-Hung; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-12-01

    This study utilizes a novel technique, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), which provides a higher ionization rate and ion bombardment energy than direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS), to deposit high osteoblast compatible titanium dioxide (TiO2) coatings with anatase (A-TiO2) and rutile (R-TiO2) phases onto the biomedical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) polymer substrates at low temperature. The adhesions of TiO2 coatings that were fabricated using HIPIMS and DCMS were compared. The in vitro biocompatibility of these coatings was confirmed. The results reveal that HIPIMS can be used to prepare crystallinic columnar A-TiO2 and R-TiO2 coatings on PEEK substrate if the ratio of oxygen to argon is properly controlled. According to a tape adhesion test, the HIPIMS-TiO2 coatings had an adhesion grade of 5B even after they were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) environments for 28days. Scratch tests proved that HIPIMS-TiO2 coatings undergo cohesive failure. These results demonstrate that the adhesive force between HIPIMS-TiO2 coating/PEEK is stronger than that between DCMS-TiO2 coating/PEEK. After a long period (28days) of immersion in SBF, a bone-like crystallinic hydroxyapatite layer with a corresponding Ca/P stoichiometry was formed on both HIPIMS-TiO2. The osteoblast compatibility of HIPIMS-TiO2 exceeded that of the bare PEEK substrate. It is also noticeable that the R-TiO2 performed better in vitro than the A-TiO2 due to the formation of many negatively charged hydroxyl groups (-OH(-)) groups on R-TiO2 (110) surface. In summary, the HIPIMS-TiO2 coatings satisfied the requirements for osseointegration, suggesting the possibility of using HIPIMS to modify the PEEK surface with TiO2 for spinal implants.

  4. Biological effect of food additive titanium dioxide nanoparticles on intestine: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Song, Zheng-Mei; Chen, Ni; Liu, Jia-Hui; Tang, Huan; Deng, Xiaoyong; Xi, Wen-Song; Han, Kai; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang; Wang, Haifang

    2015-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely found in food-related consumer products. Understanding the effect of TiO2 NPs on the intestinal barrier and absorption is essential and vital for the safety assessment of orally administrated TiO2 NPs. In this study, the cytotoxicity and translocation of two native TiO2 NPs, and these two TiO2 NPs pretreated with the digestion simulation fluid or bovine serum albumin were investigated in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells, differentiated Caco-2 cells and Caco-2 monolayer. TiO2 NPs with a concentration less than 200 µg ml(-1) did not induce any toxicity in differentiated cells and Caco-2 monolayer after 24 h exposure. However, TiO2 NPs pretreated with digestion simulation fluids at 200 µg ml(-1) inhibited the growth of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Undifferentiated Caco-2 cells swallowed native TiO2 NPs easily, but not pretreated NPs, implying the protein coating on NPs impeded the cellular uptake. Compared with undifferentiated cells, differentiated ones possessed much lower uptake ability of these TiO2 NPs. Similarly, the traverse of TiO2 NPs through the Caco-2 monolayer was also negligible. Therefore, we infer the possibility of TiO2 NPs traversing through the intestine of animal or human after oral intake is quite low. This study provides valuable information for the risk assessment of TiO2 NPs in food.

  5. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce genotoxicity but not mutagenicity in golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei.

    PubMed

    Girardello, Francine; Custódio Leite, Camila; Vianna Villela, Izabel; da Silva Machado, Miriana; Luiz Mendes Juchem, André; Roesch-Ely, Mariana; Neves Fernandes, Andreia; Salvador, Mirian; Antonio Pêgas Henriques, João

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) in consumer products is the cause of its appearance in wastewater and effluents, reaching the aquatic environment. The evaluation of the biological impact of TiO2-NP and the need to understand its ecotoxicological impact to the aquatic ecosystem are of major concern. Bivalve mollusks may represent a target group for nanoparticle toxicity. Limnoperna fortunei (golden mussel), a freshwater bivalve organism that has been employed in biomonitoring environmental conditions. Comet assay, micronucleus test and oxidative damage to lipids and proteins were performed after the golden mussel was exposed to TiO2-NP (1, 5, 10 and 50μgmL(-1)). The results demonstrate that TiO2-NP can damage the DNA of haemocytes after 2h of exposure and the genotoxic activity significantly increased after 4h exposure to TiO2-NP, at all the TiO2-NP concentrations. TiO2-NP was ineffective in causing mutagenicity in the haemolymph cells of golden mussel. The increase in the lipid peroxidation levels and carbonyl proteins after the exposure to TiO2-NP indicates the induction of oxidative stress at 2h exposure with similar results to all TiO2-NP concentrations, but these effects did not occur at 4h exposure. These results demonstrated that, although TiO2-NP is not mutagenic to golden mussel, it does induce DNA damage and oxidative stress in these organisms.

  6. Amelioration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles-induced liver injury in mice: possible role of some antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Azim, Samy A Abdel; Darwish, Hebatallah A; Rizk, Maha Z; Ali, Sanaa A; Kadry, Mai O

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of idebenone, carnosine and vitamin E in ameliorating some of the biochemical indices induced in the liver of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) intoxicated mice. Nano-anatase TiO2 (21 nm) was administered (150 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks followed by the aforementioned antioxidants either alone or in combination for 1 month. TiO2 NPs significantly increased serum liver function enzyme activities, liver coefficient and malondialdehyde levels in hepatic tissue. They also suppressed hepatic glutathione level and triggered an inflammatory response via the activation of macrophages and the enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 levels. Moreover, the mRNA expression of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2, nuclear factor kappa B and Bax was up-regulated whereas that of Bcl-2 was down-regulated following TiO2 NPs. Additionally, these NPs effectively activated caspase-3 and caused liver DNA damage. Oral administration of idebenone (200mg/kg), carnosine (200mg/kg) and vitamin E (100mg/kg) alleviated the hazards of TiO2 NPs with the combination regimen showing a relatively higher effect. The histopathological examination reinforced these findings. In conclusion, oxidative stress could be regarded as a key player in TiO2 NPs-induced liver injury. The study also highlights the anti-inflammatory and the anti-apoptotic potentials of these antioxidants against the detrimental effects of TiO2 NPs.

  7. Comparative toxicities of bismuth oxybromide and titanium dioxide exposure on human skin keratinocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoya; Wang, Yawen; Peng, Shiqi; Yue, Bin; Fan, Caimei; Chen, Weiyi; Li, Xiaona

    2015-09-01

    Nano-sized bismuth oxybromide (BiOBr) particles are being considered for applications within the semiconductor industry. However, little is known about their potential impact on human health. In this study, we comparatively investigated the cytotoxicity of BiOBr and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) using human skin keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) as a research model. Results indicate that lamellar-shaped BiOBr (length: 200 nm, width: 150 nm, and an average thickness: around 15 nm) has less toxic effects on cell viability and intracellular organelles than TiO2 (P25) NPs. BiOBr mainly induced late cell apoptosis, while for TiO2, both early apoptosis and late apoptosis were involved. Cell cycle arrest was found in cells on both NPs exposure, and more prominent in TiO2-treated cells. More cellular uptake was achieved after TiO2 exposure, particularly at 10 μg mL(-1), presence of TiO2 resulted in more than 2-fold increase in cellular granularity compared with BiOBr. Furthermore, TiO2 had a high potential to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells, where a 2.7-fold increase in TiO2 group and 2.0-fold increase in BiOBr group at the same concentration of 25 μg mL(-1). Higher cellular uptake and ROS stimulation should contribute to the more hazards of TiO2 than BiOBr NPs. This knowledge is a crucial component in the environmental and human hazard assessment of BiOBr and TiO2 NPs.

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christina L; Natarajan, Vaishaali; Hayward, Stephen L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-11-28

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are currently the second most produced engineered nanomaterial in the world with vast usage in consumer products leading to recurrent human exposure. Animal studies indicate significant nanoparticle accumulation in the brain while cellular toxicity studies demonstrate negative effects on neuronal cell viability and function. However, the toxicological effects of nanoparticles on astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, we determined the sub-toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (rutile, anatase and commercially available P25 TiO2 nanoparticles) on primary rat cortical astrocytes. We evaluated some events related to astrocyte functions and mitochondrial dysregulation: (1) glutamate uptake; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring ROS production; (3) the expression patterns of dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) and mitofusins 1 and 2, whose expression is central to mitochondrial dynamics; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker® Red CMXRos staining. Anatase, rutile and P25 were found to have LC50 values of 88.22 ± 10.56 ppm, 136.0 ± 31.73 ppm and 62.37 ± 9.06 ppm respectively indicating nanoparticle specific toxicity. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss in glutamate uptake indicative of a loss in vital astrocyte function. TiO2 nanoparticles also induced an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting mitochondrial damage. TiO2 nanoparticle exposure altered expression patterns of DRPs at low concentrations (25 ppm) and apoptotic fission at high concentrations (100 ppm). TiO2 nanoparticle exposure also resulted in changes to mitochondrial morphology confirmed by mitochondrial staining. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence that TiO2 nanoparticle exposure has potential implications in astrocyte-mediated neurological dysfunction.

  9. Genotoxicity assessment of intravenously injected titanium dioxide nanoparticles in gpt delta transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Miura, Nobuhiko; Hojo, Rieko; Yanagiba, Yukie; Suda, Megumi; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Miyagawa, Muneyuki; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are increasingly manufactured in large amounts for use in industrial applications such as cosmetics, pigments, foods, and as photo-catalysts. Many in vitro studies have examined the genotoxicity of TiO2 nanomaterials; some of these studies suggest that TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are genotoxic. Several in vivo studies have also been reported recently, but the results are inconsistent. In this study, we investigated, using several genotoxicity endpoints, the effects of dispersed TiO2 suspensions following multiple intravenous injections in mice. Male gpt Delta C57BL/6J mice were administered TiO2 NPs at doses of 2, 10 or 50mg/kg body weight per week for 4 consecutive weeks. Genotoxic effects were then analyzed by the Pig-a gene mutation assay and the micronucleus assay on peripheral blood, and by the alkaline comet, gpt mutation, and Spi(-) mutation assays on the liver. We also assessed the localization of TiO2 NPs in the liver, by transmission electron microscopy. Administration of TiO2 NPs did not significantly increase any of the following endpoints: frequency of Pig-a mutants (erythrocytes); frequency of micronuclei (reticulocytes); level of DNA damage (liver); frequencies of gpt and Spi(-) mutants (liver). Most TiO2 NPs in the liver were found in the sinuses and inside Kupffer cells, although some were occasionally observed in liver parenchymal cells. These results indicate that TiO2 NPs do not have genotoxic effects on mouse liver or bone marrow.

  10. Photocatalytic reduction of nitrate using titanium dioxide for regeneration of ion exchange brine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Doudrick, Kyle; Westerhoff, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Nitrate is often removed from groundwater by ion exchange (IX) before its use as drinking water. Accumulation of nitrate in IX brine reduces the efficiency of IX regeneration and the useful life of the regeneration brine. For the first time, we present a strategy to photocatalytically reduce nitrate in IX brine, thereby extending the use of the brine. Titanium dioxide (Evonik P90), acting as photocatalyst, reduced nitrate effectively in both synthetic brines and sulfate-removed IX brine when formic acid (FA) was used as the hole scavenger (i.e., electron donor) and the initial FA to nitrate molar ratio (IFNR) was 5.6. Increasing the NaCl level in the synthetic brine slowed the nitrate reduction rate without affecting by-product selectivity of ammonium and gaseous N species (e.g., N(2), N(2)O). In a non-modified IX brine, nitrate removal was greatly inhibited owing to the presence of sulfate, which competed with nitrate for active surface sites on P90 and induced aggregation of P90 nanoparticles. After removing sulfate through barium sulfate precipitation, nitrate was effectively reduced; approximately 3.6 × 10(24) photons were required to reduce each mole of nitrate to 83% N Gases and 17% NH(4)(+). To make optimum use of FA and control the residual FA level in treated brine, the IFNR was varied. High IFNRs (e.g., 4, 5.6) were found to be more efficient for nitrate reduction but left higher residual FA in brine. IX column tests were performed to investigate the impact of residual FA for brine reuse. The residual FA in the brine did not significantly affect the nitrate removal capacity of IX resins, and formate contamination of treated water could be eliminated by rinsing with one bed volume of fresh brine.

  11. Photo-induced toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles to Daphnia magna under natural sunlight.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, C M; Alloy, M M; Hamilton, J; Verbeck, G F; Newton, K; Klaine, S J; Roberts, A P

    2015-02-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NP) are one of the most abundantly utilized nanoparticles in the world. Studies have demonstrated the ability of the anatase crystal of TiO2 NP to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a co-exposure likely to occur in aquatic ecosystems. The goal of this study was to examine the photo-induced toxicity of anatase TiO2 NP under natural sunlight to Daphnia magna. D. magna were exposed to a range of UVR intensities and anatase TiO2 concentrations in an outdoor exposure system using the sun as the source of UVR. Different UVR intensities were achieved using UVR opaque and transparent plastics. AnataseTiO2-NP demonstrated the reciprocal relationship seen in other phototoxic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at higher UVR treatments. The calculated 8h LC50 of anatase TiO2 NP was 139 ppb under full intensity ambient natural sunlight, 778 ppb under 50% natural sunlight, and >500 ppm under 10% natural sunlight. Mortality was also compared between animals allowed to accumulate a body burden of anatase TiO2 for 1h and organisms whose first exposure to anatase TiO2 aqueous suspensions occurred under UVR. A significantly greater toxic effect was observed in aqueous, low body burden suspensions than that of TiO2 1h body burdens, which is dissimilar from the model presented in PAHs. Anatase TiO2 presents a unique photo-induced toxic model that is different than that of established phototoxic compounds.

  12. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce genotoxicity but not mutagenicity in golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei.

    PubMed

    Girardello, Francine; Custódio Leite, Camila; Vianna Villela, Izabel; da Silva Machado, Miriana; Luiz Mendes Juchem, André; Roesch-Ely, Mariana; Neves Fernandes, Andreia; Salvador, Mirian; Antonio Pêgas Henriques, João

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) in consumer products is the cause of its appearance in wastewater and effluents, reaching the aquatic environment. The evaluation of the biological impact of TiO2-NP and the need to understand its ecotoxicological impact to the aquatic ecosystem are of major concern. Bivalve mollusks may represent a target group for nanoparticle toxicity. Limnoperna fortunei (golden mussel), a freshwater bivalve organism that has been employed in biomonitoring environmental conditions. Comet assay, micronucleus test and oxidative damage to lipids and proteins were performed after the golden mussel was exposed to TiO2-NP (1, 5, 10 and 50μgmL(-1)). The results demonstrate that TiO2-NP can damage the DNA of haemocytes after 2h of exposure and the genotoxic activity significantly increased after 4h exposure to TiO2-NP, at all the TiO2-NP concentrations. TiO2-NP was ineffective in causing mutagenicity in the haemolymph cells of golden mussel. The increase in the lipid peroxidation levels and carbonyl proteins after the exposure to TiO2-NP indicates the induction of oxidative stress at 2h exposure with similar results to all TiO2-NP concentrations, but these effects did not occur at 4h exposure. These results demonstrated that, although TiO2-NP is not mutagenic to golden mussel, it does induce DNA damage and oxidative stress in these organisms. PMID:26675368

  13. Murine liver damage caused by exposure to nano-titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jie; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2016-03-01

    Due to its unique physiochemical properties, nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) is widely used in all aspects of people’s daily lives, bringing it into increasing contact with humans. Thus, this material’s security issues for humans have become a heavily researched subject. Nano-TiO2 can enter the body through the mouth, skin, respiratory tract or in other ways, after which it enters the blood circulation and is deposited in the liver, changing biochemical indicators and causing liver inflammation. Meanwhile, the light sensitivity of these nanoparticles allows them to become media-generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing an imbalance between oxidation and anti-oxidation that leads to oxidative stress and liver damage. Nano-TiO2 can be transported into cells via phagocytosis, where the nanoparticles bind to the mitochondrial membrane, resulting in the disintegration of the membrane and the electron transport chain within the mitochondria. Thus, more ROS are produced. Nano-TiO2 can also enter the nucleus, where it can directly embed into or indirectly affect DNA, thereby causing DNA breakage or affecting gene expression. These effects include increased mRNA and protein expression levels of inflammation-related factors and decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of IκB and IL-2, resulting in inflammation. Long-term inflammation of the liver causes HSC cell activation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition is promoted by multiple signalling pathways, resulting in liver fibrosis. In this paper, the latest progress on murine liver injury induced by environmental TiO2 is systematically described. The toxicity of nano-TiO2 also depends on size, exposure time, surface properties, dosage, administration route, and its surface modification. Therefore, its toxic effects in humans should be studied in greater depth. This paper also provides useful reference information regarding the safe use of nano-TiO2 in the future.

  14. Enrichment specificity of micro and nano-sized titanium and zirconium dioxides particles in phosphopeptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Vilasi, Annalisa; Fiume, Immacolata; Pace, Paolo; Rossi, Mosè; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella

    2013-11-01

    Owning to their anion-exchange properties, titanium and zirconium dioxides are widely used in phosphopeptide enrichment and purification protocols. The physical and chemical characteristics of the particles can significantly influence the loading capacity, the capture efficiency and phosphopeptide specificity and thus the outcome of the analyses. Although there are a number of protocols and commercial kits available for phosphopeptide purification, little data are found in the literature on the choice of the enrichment media. Here, we studied the influence of particle size on the affinity capture of phosphopeptides by TiO2 and ZrO2. Bovine milk casein derived phosphopeptides were enriched by micro and nanoparticles using a single-tube in-solution protocol at different peptide-to-beads ratio ranging from 1 : 1 to 1 : 200. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis based on the whole set of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of the phosphopeptide enriched samples revealed 62 clustered peptide peaks and shows that nanoparticles have considerably higher enrichment capacity than bulk microparticles. Moreover, ZrO2 particles have higher enrichment capacity than TiO2. The selectivity and specificity of the enrichment was studied by monitoring the ion abundances of monophosphorylated, multiphosphorylated and non-phosphorylated casein-derived peptide peaks at different peptide-to-beads ratios. Comparison of the resulting plots enabled the determination of the optimal peptide-to-beads ratios for the different beads studied and showed that nano-TiO2 have higher selectivity for phosphopeptides than nano-ZrO2 particles.

  15. Photocatalytic reduction of nitrate using titanium dioxide for regeneration of ion exchange brine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Doudrick, Kyle; Westerhoff, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate is often removed from groundwater by ion exchange (IX) before its use as drinking water. Accumulation of nitrate in IX brine reduces the efficiency of IX regeneration and the useful life of the regeneration brine. For the first time, we present a strategy to photocatalytically reduce nitrate in IX brine, thereby extending the use of the brine. Titanium dioxide (Evonik P90), acting as photocatalyst, reduced nitrate effectively in both synthetic brines and sulfate-removed IX brine when formic acid (FA) was used as the hole scavenger (i.e., electron donor) and the initial FA to nitrate molar ratio (IFNR) was 5.6. Increasing the NaCl level in the synthetic brine slowed the nitrate reduction rate without affecting byproduct selectivity of ammonium and gaseous N species (e.g., N2, N2O). In a non-modified IX brine, nitrate removal was greatly inhibited owing to the presence of sulfate, which competed with nitrate for active surface sites on P90 and induced aggregation of P90 nanoparticles. After removing sulfate through barium sulfate precipitation, nitrate was effectively reduced; approximately 3.6 × 1024 photons were required to reduce each mole of nitrate to 83% N Gases and 17% NH4+. To make optimum use of FA and control the residual FA level in treated brine, the IFNR was varied. High IFNRs (e.g., 4, 5.6) were found to be more efficient for nitrate reduction but left higher residual FA in brine. IX column tests were performed to investigate the impact of residual FA for brine reuse. The residual FA in the brine did not significantly affect the nitrate removal capacity of IX resins, and formate contamination of treated water could be eliminated by rinsing with one bed volume of fresh brine. PMID:23276425

  16. Murine liver damage caused by exposure to nano-titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jie; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2016-03-18

    Due to its unique physiochemical properties, nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) is widely used in all aspects of people's daily lives, bringing it into increasing contact with humans. Thus, this material's security issues for humans have become a heavily researched subject. Nano-TiO2 can enter the body through the mouth, skin, respiratory tract or in other ways, after which it enters the blood circulation and is deposited in the liver, changing biochemical indicators and causing liver inflammation. Meanwhile, the light sensitivity of these nanoparticles allows them to become media-generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing an imbalance between oxidation and anti-oxidation that leads to oxidative stress and liver damage. Nano-TiO2 can be transported into cells via phagocytosis, where the nanoparticles bind to the mitochondrial membrane, resulting in the disintegration of the membrane and the electron transport chain within the mitochondria. Thus, more ROS are produced. Nano-TiO2 can also enter the nucleus, where it can directly embed into or indirectly affect DNA, thereby causing DNA breakage or affecting gene expression. These effects include increased mRNA and protein expression levels of inflammation-related factors and decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of IκB and IL-2, resulting in inflammation. Long-term inflammation of the liver causes HSC cell activation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition is promoted by multiple signalling pathways, resulting in liver fibrosis. In this paper, the latest progress on murine liver injury induced by environmental TiO2 is systematically described. The toxicity of nano-TiO2 also depends on size, exposure time, surface properties, dosage, administration route, and its surface modification. Therefore, its toxic effects in humans should be studied in greater depth. This paper also provides useful reference information regarding the safe use of nano-TiO2 in the future.

  17. Influence of clay particles on the transport and retention of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Cai, Li; Tong, Meiping; Wang, Xueting; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of two representative suspended clay particles, bentonite and kaolinite, on the transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) in saturated quartz sand in both NaCl (1 and 10 mM ionic strength) and CaCl2 solutions (0.1 and 1 mM ionic strength) at pH 7. The breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite or kaolinite were higher than those without the presence of clay particles in NaCl solutions, indicating that both types of clay particles increased nTiO2 transport in NaCl solutions. Moreover, the enhancement of nTiO2 transport was more significant when bentonite was present in nTiO2 suspensions relative to kaolinite. Similar to NaCl solutions, in CaCl2 solutions, the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite were also higher than those without clay particles, while the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with kaolinite were lower than those without clay particles. Clearly, in CaCl2 solutions, the presence of bentonite in suspensions increased nTiO2 transport, whereas, kaolinite decreased nTiO2 transport in quartz sand. The attachment of nTiO2 onto clay particles (both bentonite and kaolinite) were observed under all experimental conditions. The increased transport of nTiO2 in most experimental conditions (except for kaolinite in CaCl2 solutions) was attributed mainly to the clay-facilitated nTiO2 transport. The straining of larger nTiO2-kaolinite clusters yet contributed to the decreased transport (enhanced retention) of nTiO2 in divalent CaCl2 solutions when kaolinite particles were copresent in suspensions. PMID:24911544

  18. Nano-Scaled Particles of Titanium Dioxide Convert Benign Mouse Fibrosarcoma Cells into Aggressive Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Kunishige; Sato, Yu; Ogawara, Satomi; Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Yoshitake, Jun; Yoshimura, Tetsuhiko; Iigo, Masaaki; Fujii, Junichi; Okada, Futoshi

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles are prevalent in both commercial and medicinal products; however, the contribution of nanomaterials to carcinogenesis remains unclear. We therefore examined the effects of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) on poorly tumorigenic and nonmetastatic QR-32 fibrosarcoma cells. We found that mice that were cotransplanted subcutaneously with QR-32 cells and nano-sized TiO2, either uncoated (TiO2−1, hydrophilic) or coated with stearic acid (TiO2−2, hydrophobic), did not form tumors. However, QR-32 cells became tumorigenic after injection into sites previously implanted with TiO2−1, but not TiO2−2, and these developing tumors acquired metastatic phenotypes. No differences were observed either histologically or in inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression between TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 treatments. However, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, generated high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell-free conditions. Although both TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 resulted in intracellular ROS formation, TiO2−2 elicited a stronger response, resulting in cytotoxicity to the QR-32 cells. Moreover, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, led to the development of nuclear interstices and multinucleate cells. Cells that survived the TiO2 toxicity acquired a tumorigenic phenotype. TiO2-induced ROS formation and its related cell injury were inhibited by the addition of antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine. These results indicate that nano-sized TiO2 has the potential to convert benign tumor cells into malignant ones through the generation of ROS in the target cells. PMID:19815711

  19. The Ginkgo biloba Extract Reverses the Renal Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Reynoso-Andeola, Irma Guadalupe; Jaramillo-Juárez, Fernando; Martínez-Ruvalcaba, Haydée; Posadas del Rio, Francisco A.

    2016-01-01

    The Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) is a commercial product used as a nutraceutic herbal remedy in Europe and US. It contains 27% of the polyphenols isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin, as antioxidants. We used male adult Wistar rats (200–300 g), divided into four groups: control group (treated with 5.0 mg/kg of sodium chloride, intravenous), titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) group (5.0 mg/kg, intravenous), GbE group (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), and GbE + TiO2-NPs group (treated 24 h before with 10 mg/kg of GbE, intraperitoneal), followed, 24 h later, by 5.0 mg/kg of TiO2-NPs intravenously. The statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test for grouped data with ANOVA posttest. The GbE protected renal cells against the effects of TiO2-NPs because it reversed the increased activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase and the enzymatic activity of dipeptidylaminopeptidase IV at all times tested (0–5, 5–24, 24–48, and 48–72 h). Also it reversed the glucosuria, hypernatriuria, and urine osmolarity at three times tested (5–24, 24–48, and 48–72). Thus, we conclude that GbE has a beneficial activity in the cytoplasmic membranes of brush border cells on the renal tubules, against the adverse effects that can be produced by some xenobiotics in this case the TiO2-NPs, in experimental rats. PMID:27042354

  20. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles disturb the fibronectin-mediated adhesion and spreading of pre-osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Marie-Charlotte; Besse, Marie; Vayssade, Muriel; Morandat, Sandrine; El Kirat, Karim

    2012-09-25

    In the context of rapid development of nanoparticles (NPs) for industrial applications, the question of their toxicity and biological effects must be considered. In this work, we have assessed the influence of titanium dioxide NPs on the adhesion and spreading of MC-3T3 pre-osteoblasts by using a cell subclone that does not produce its own extracellular matrix. Petri dishes were coated with the important adhesion protein fibronectin (Fn). By incubating these Fn-coated surfaces with different amounts of TiO(2) NPs, we have shown that the adhesion of pre-osteoblasts is disturbed, with an important decrease in the number of adherent cells (from 40 to 75% depending upon the concentration and type of NPs). Petri-dish surfaces were analyzed with environmental scanning electron microscropy (ESEM), with images showing that TiO(2) NP aggregates are bound to the layer of adsorbed Fn molecules. The cells cultured on these Fn/NP surfaces adopted an irregular shape and an aberrant organization of actin cytoskeleton, as revealed by fluorescence microscopy. Most importantly, these results, taken together, have revealed that the actin cytoskeleton forms abnormal aggregates, even on top of the nucleus, that coincide with the presence of large aggregates of NPs on top of cells. On the basis of these observations, we propose that some Fn molecules are able to desorb from the Petri dish surface to coat TiO(2) NPs. Fn/NP complexes are not attached firmly enough on the surface to allow for normal cell adhesion/spreading and the development of tense actin fibers. These results stress the paramount need for the assessment of the toxicology of NPs, with special attention to their interactions with biomolecules. PMID:22934655

  1. Genotoxicity evaluation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using the Ames test and Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Robert S; Li, Yan; Yan, Jian; Bishop, Michelle; Jones, M Yvonne; Watanabe, Fumiya; Biris, Alexandru S; Rice, Penelope; Zhou, Tong; Chen, Tao

    2012-11-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are being used increasingly for various industrial and consumer products, including cosmetics and sunscreens because of their photoactive properties. Therefore, the toxicity of TiO2-NPs needs to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of 10nm uncoated sphere TiO2-NPs with an anatase crystalline structure, which has been well characterized in a previous study, was assessed using the Salmonella reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and the single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. For the Ames test, Salmonella strains TA102, TA100, TA1537, TA98 and TA1535 were preincubated with eight different concentrations of the TiO2-NPs for 4 h at 37 °C, ranging from 0 to 4915.2 µg per plate. No mutation induction was found. Analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the TiO2-NPs were not able to enter the bacterial cell. For the Comet assay, TK6 cells were treated with 0-200 µg ml(-1) TiO2-NPs for 24 h at 37 °C to detect DNA damage. Although the TK6 cells did take up TiO2-NPs, no significant induction of DNA breakage or oxidative DNA damage was observed in the treated cells using the standard alkaline Comet assay and the endonuclease III (EndoIII) and human 8-hydroxyguanine DNA-glycosylase (hOGG1)-modified Comet assay, respectively. These results suggest that TiO2-NPs are not genotoxic under the conditions of the Ames test and Comet assay.

  2. Critical Review of Public Health Regulations of Titanium Dioxide, a Human Food Additive

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Boris

    2015-01-01

    From 1916 to 2011, an estimated total of 165 050 000 metric tons of titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment were produced worldwide. Current safety regulations on the usage of the TiO2 pigment as an inactive ingredient additive in human food are based on legislation from 1969 and are arguably outdated. This article compiles new research results to provide fresh data for potential risk reassessment. However, even after 45 years, few scientific research reports have provided truly reliable data. For example, administration of very high doses of TiO2 is not relevant to daily human uptake. Nevertheless, because dose makes the poison, the literature provides a valuable source for understanding potential TiO2 toxicity after oral ingestion. Numerous scientific articles have observed that TiO2 can pass and be absorbed by the mammalian gastrointestinal tract; can bioconcentrate, bioaccumulate, and biomagnify in the tissues of mammals and other vertebrates; has a very limited elimination rate; and can cause histopathological and physiological changes in various organs of animals. Such action is contrary to the 1969 decision to approve the use of TiO2 as an inactive ingredient in human food without an established acceptable daily intake, stating that neither significant absorption nor tissue storage following ingestion of TiO2 was possible. Thus, relevant governmental agencies should reassess the safety of TiO2 as an additive in human food and consider establishing an acceptable maximum daily intake as a precautionary measure. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2015;11:10–20. © 2014 The Author. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:25091211

  3. Role of fatty acid composites in the toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles used in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Chang, JuOae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Alsulimani, Helal Hussain; Choi, Jee Eun; Lee, Joo-Kyung; Kim, AhYoung; Park, Bae Ho; Kim, Jonghan; Lee, HeaYeon

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in the cosmetic industry results in products with better efficacy and functionality. However, recent advances in molecular toxicology have revealed that NP exposure can promote cytotoxicity and oxidative damage, which has raised health concerns in the use of NPs in personal care products. Nevertheless, the mechanistic basis for the toxicity and safety of cosmetic NPs is poorly understood. The goal of the study was to determine the cytotoxicity and intracellular distribution of titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs containing fatty acid composites (palmitoleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid and oleic acid) commonly used in cosmetic products. Two types of cells, human fibroblast skin cells and adenocarcinoma lung cells, were exposed to either bare TiO2 NPs or TiO2 NPs mixed with fatty acids for up to 48 hr. NMR analysis confirmed that the fatty acid composites remained in the NPs after wash. The cytotoxicity of TiO2 NPs was determined by cell viability measurement using quantitative confocal microscopy, and the localization of two different forms of TiO2 NPs were assessed using electron spectroscopic imaging with transmission electron microscopy. TiO2 NPs containing fatty acids posed significantly reduced cytotoxicity (80-88% decreases) than bare NPs in both cell types. Furthermore, there was less intracellular penetration of the NPs containing fatty acid composites compared with bare NPs. These results provide important insights into the role of fatty acids in protecting the cells from possible toxicity caused by NPs used in the production of cosmetic products. PMID:27432239

  4. High bioconcentration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in Daphnia magna determined by kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenhong; Liu, Lingling; Peng, Ruishuang; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-11-01

    The environmental risk assessments of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have drawn wide attention and one of the required critical information is the bioconcentration potentials of these nanoparticles in aquatic organisms. In the present study, the bioconcentration of six commercially available TiO2 NPs with different sizes and surface properties were quantified in a freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna using kinetic modeling approach. We first calculated the uptake rate constant (ku) and depuration rate constant (ke) of TiO2 NPs and then employed a first-order kinetic model to predict the bioconcentration factors (BCF) at different TiO2 NPs concentrations. Both the ku and ke of TiO2 NPs were significantly affected by the exposure concentration and the nanoparticle property. The predicted BCF values in D. magna of six TiO2 NPs ranged from 2.40×10(5)L/kg to 1.52×10(6)L/kg, and had no clear correlation with the exposure concentration. Large nominal size resulted in a lower BCF of TiO2 NPs at lower exposure concentration. Higher hydrophobicity and Al(OH)3 coating also resulted in a higher BCF. All the six TiO2 NPs in this study were therefore considered very bioaccumulative. More attention should be paid to bioconcentration in the environmental risk assessments of TiO2 NPs, and the physicochemical properties of TiO2 NPs should be taken into account. PMID:27392581

  5. Genotoxicity and gene expression modulation of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Asare, Nana; Duale, Nur; Slagsvold, Hege H; Lindeman, Birgitte; Olsen, Ann Karin; Gromadzka-Ostrowska, Joanna; Meczynska-Wielgosz, Sylwia; Kruszewski, Marcin; Brunborg, Gunnar; Instanes, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we showed that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) caused apoptosis, necrosis and DNA strand breaks in different cell models in vitro. These findings warranted analyses of their relevance in vivo. We investigated the genotoxic potential and gene expression profiles of silver particles of nano- (Ag20, 20 nm) and submicron- (Ag200, 200 nm) size and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs, 21 nm) in selected tissues from exposed male mice including the gonades. A single dose of 5 mg/kg bw nanoparticles was administered intravenously to male mice derived from C57BL6 (WT) and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase knock-out (Ogg1(-/-) KO). Testis, lung and liver were harvested one and seven days post-exposure and analyzed for DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines employing the Comet assay with Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) treatment, and sperm DNA fragmentation by the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Based on an initial screening of a panel of 21 genes, seven genes were selected and their expression levels were analyzed in all lung and testis tissues sampled from all animals (n = 6 mice/treatment group) using qPCR. AgNPs, in particular Ag200, caused significantly increased levels of DNA strand breaks and alkali labile sites in lung, seven days post-exposure. Fpg-sensitive lesions were significantly induced in both testis and lung. The transcript level of some key genes; Atm, Rad51, Sod1, Fos and Mmp3, were significantly induced compared to controls, particularly in lung samples from Ag200-exposed KO mice. We conclude that the Ag200 causes genotoxicity and distinct gene expression patterns in selected DNA damage response and repair related genes. PMID:26923343

  6. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles As Guardian against Environmental Carcinogen Benzo[alpha]Pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Dhasmana, Anupam; Sajid Jamal, Qazi Mohd.; Mir, Snober Shabnam; Bhatt, Madan Lal Bramha; Rahman, Qamar; Gupta, Richa; Siddiqui, Mohd. Haris; Lohani, Mohtashim

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), like Benzo[alpha]Pyrene (BaP) are known to cause a number of toxic manifestations including lung cancer. As Titanium dioxide Nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have recently been shown to adsorb a number of PAHs from soil and water, we investigated whether TiO2 NPs could provide protection against the BaP induced toxicity in biological system. A549 cells when co-exposed with BaP (25 µM, 50 µM and 75 µM) along with 0.1 µg/ml,0.5 µg/ml and 1 µg/ml of TiO2 NPs, showed significant reduction in the toxic effects of BaP, as measured by Micronucleus Assay, MTT Assay and ROS Assay. In order to explore the mechanism of protection by TiO2 NP against BaP, we performed in silico studies. BaP and other PAHs are known to enter the cell via aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). TiO2 NP showed a much higher docking score with AHR (12074) as compared to the docking score of BaP with AHR (4600). This indicates a preferential binding of TiO2 NP with the AHR, in case if both the TiO2 NP and BaP are present. Further, we have done the docking of BaP with the TiO2 NP bound AHR-complex (score 4710), and observed that BaP showed strong adsorption on TiO2 NP itself, and not at its original binding site (at AHR). TiO2 NPs thereby prevent the entry of BaP in to the cell via AHR and hence protect cells against the deleterious effects induced by BaP. PMID:25215666

  7. Nanosized titanium dioxide influences copper-induced toxicity during aging as a function of environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, Ricki R; Seitz, Frank; Haigis, Ann-Cathrin; Höger, Johanna; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2016-07-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 -NPs) adsorb co-occurring heavy metals in surface waters, modulating their toxicity for freshwater invertebrates. The processes triggering this interaction may be influenced by several environmental parameters; however, their relative importance remains unclear. The present study assessed the implications of aging on the joint acute toxicity of copper (Cu) and TiO2 -NPs for Daphnia magna over a duration of up to 72 h. The influences of aging duration as well as ionic strength, pH, and presence of different qualities of organic matter during aging were assessed. The results indicated that the presence of TiO2 -NPs often reduced the Cu-induced toxicity for daphnids after aging (albeit with varying extent), which was displayed by up to 3-fold higher EC50 (50% effective concentration) values compared to the absence of TiO2 -NPs. Moreover, the Cu speciation, influenced by the ionic composition and the pH as well as the presence of organic additives in the medium, strongly modulated the processes during aging, with partly limited implications of the aging duration on the ecotoxicological response of D. magna. Nonetheless, the present study underpins the potential of TiO2 -NPs to modify toxicity induced by heavy metals in freshwater ecosystems under various environmental conditions. This pattern, however, needs further verification using heavy metal ions with differing properties in combination with further environmental factors, such as ultraviolet irradiation. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1766-1774. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26640248

  8. Periodic nanostructures on titanium dioxide film produced using femtosecond laser with wavelengths of 388 nm and 775 nm.

    PubMed

    Shinonaga, Togo; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Miyaji, Godai

    2014-06-16

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) film is an important biomaterial used to improve the biocompatibility of titanium (Ti). We have used a film coating method with an aerosol beam and femtosecond laser irradiation to form periodic structures on biomaterials for control of the cell spreading. The control of cell spreading on biomaterials is important for the development of advanced biomaterials. In this study, nanostructures with periods of 130 and 230 nm were formed on a film using a femtosecond laser with wavelengths of 388 and 775 nm, respectively. The nanostructure period on the film was 30% of the laser wavelengths. Periods produced with wavelengths of 388 and 775 nm were calculated using a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) model and the experimental results for both wavelengths were in the range of the calculated periods, which suggests that the mechanism for the formation of the periodic nanostructures on the film with a femtosecond laser was due to the excitation of SPPs.

  9. The antibacterial effects of silver, titanium dioxide and silica dioxide nanoparticles compared to the dental disinfectant chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans using a suite of bioassays.

    PubMed

    Besinis, Alexandros; De Peralta, Tracy; Handy, Richard D

    2014-02-01

    Metal-containing nanomaterials have the potential to be used in dentistry for infection control, but little is known about their antibacterial properties. This study investigated the toxicity of silver (Ag), titanium dioxide and silica nanoparticles (NPs) against the oral pathogenic species of Streptococcus mutans, compared to the routine disinfectant, chlorhexidine. The bacteria were assessed using the minimum inhibitory concentration assay for growth, fluorescent staining for live/dead cells, and measurements of lactate. All the assays showed that Ag NPs had the strongest antibacterial activity of the NPs tested, with bacterial growth also being 25-fold lower than that in chlorhexidine. The survival rate of bacteria under the effect of 100 mg l(-1) Ag NPs in the media was 2% compared to 60% with chlorhexidine, while the lactate concentration was 0.6 and 4.0 mM, respectively. Silica and titanium dioxide NPs had limited effects. Dialysis experiments showed negligible silver dissolution. Overall, Ag NPs were the best disinfectant and performed better than chlorhexidine. Improvements to the MIC assay are suggested.

  10. Titanium-Dioxide Nano-Fiber-Cotton Targets for Efficient Multi-keV X-Ray Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, M; Nishimura, H; Fujioka, S; Nagai, K; Yamamoto, N; Gu, Z; Pan, C; Girard, F; Primout, M; Villette, B; Brebion, D; Fournier, K B; Fujishima, A; Mima, K

    2008-06-12

    Multi-keV x-ray generation from low-density (27 {+-} 7 mg/cc) nano-fiber-cotton targets composed of titanium-dioxide has been investigated. The cotton targets were heated volumetrically and supersonically to a peak electron temperature of 2.3 keV, which is optimal to yield Ti K-shell x rays. Considerable enhancement of conversion efficiency (3.7 {+-} 0.5%) from incident laser energy into Ti K-shell x rays (4-6 keV band) was attained in comparison with that (1.4 {+-} 0.9%) for a planar Ti-foil target.

  11. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, R.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1995-05-23

    A process is disclosed for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  12. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, Rasit; Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  13. Processing-property relationships in epoxy resin/titanium dioxide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; More, Karren Leslie

    2010-01-01

    In situ precipitated titanium dioxide nanoparticles improve the physical properties of polymer composites. Since the pioneering work at Toyota Research Center on exfoliated montmorillonite nanoparticles in a nylon matrix, extensive studies have been performed on polymer nanocomposites in an effort to better integrate organic and inorganic phases. Inorganic fillers, such as silicon and titanium oxides, are widely used because of their remarkable enhancement of the mechanical, electrical, barrier, and flame-retardancy properties of organic polymers. The dispersion and size of the fillers determine the performance of nanocomposites and, despite numerous methods and processing conditions reported in the literature, a universally simple method to scale up the distribution of nanofillers remains a challenge. A significant part of our research involves formulation of novel nanodielectrics that can withstand high electric fields and exhibit superior mechanical performance. Focusing on nanocomposites operating at cryogenic temperatures, our group developed an in situ method for nucleating titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol. We also applied this method to a variety of polymer matrices. Here, we present our recent work on a cryogenic resin filled with TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Using a particle-precursor solution from which TiO{sub 2} precipitates, we nucleated nanoparticles within the cryogenic epoxy resin Araldite 5808 (Huntsman Advanced Materials Inc., USA). We fabricated nanocomposite films at low weight percentages ({approx}2.5%) to avoid formation of large aggregates and interfaces. The morphology and dispersion of the in situ synthesized nanoparticles are shown by low- and high-magnification transmission-electron-microscopy (TEM) images. The TiO{sub 2} particles ({le}5nm in diameter) are uniformly nucleated and form evenly distributed nanometer-sized clusters in the polymer matrix. This morphology differs significantly from nanocomposites

  14. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Molecular Responses of Mouse Macrophages to Titanium Dioxide and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Unravels Some Toxic Mechanisms for Copper Oxide Nanoparticles in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Gerdil, Adèle; Proamer, Fabienne; Strub, Jean-Marc; Habert, Aurélie; Herlin, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carrière, Marie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide) or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide), increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K) are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions. PMID:25902355

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis of the molecular responses of mouse macrophages to titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles unravels some toxic mechanisms for copper oxide nanoparticles in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Gerdil, Adèle; Proamer, Fabienne; Strub, Jean-Marc; Habert, Aurélie; Herlin, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carrière, Marie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide) or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide), increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K) are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions.

  16. Electron Cloud in Steel Beam Pipe vs Titanium Nitride Coated and Amorphous Carbon Coated Beam Pipes in Fermilab's Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Backfish, Michael

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents the use of four retarding field analyzers (RFAs) to measure electron cloud signals created in Fermilab’s Main Injector during 120 GeV operations. The first data set was taken from September 11, 2009 to July 4, 2010. This data set is used to compare two different types of beam pipe that were installed in the accelerator. Two RFAs were installed in a normal steel beam pipe like the rest of the Main Injector while another two were installed in a one meter section of beam pipe that was coated on the inside with titanium nitride (TiN). A second data run started on August 23, 2010 and ended on January 10, 2011 when Main Injector beam intensities were reduced thus eliminating the electron cloud. This second run uses the same RFA setup but the TiN coated beam pipe was replaced by a one meter section coated with amorphous carbon (aC). This section of beam pipe was provided by CERN in an effort to better understand how an aC coating will perform over time in an accelerator. The research consists of three basic parts: (a) continuously monitoring the conditioning of the three different types of beam pipe over both time and absorbed electrons (b) measurement of the characteristics of the surrounding magnetic fields in the Main Injector in order to better relate actual data observed in the Main Injector with that of simulations (c) measurement of the energy spectrum of the electron cloud signals using retarding field analyzers in all three types of beam pipe.

  17. Nano-titanium dioxide modulates the dermal sensitization potency of DNCB

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We determined the ability of a model nanoparticle (NP) (titanium dioxide, TiO2) to modulate sensitization induced by a known potent dermal sensitizer (dinitrochlorobenzene) using a variant of the local lymph node assay called lymph node proliferation assay. BALB/c mice received sub-cutaneous injections of vehicle (2.5 mM sodium citrate), TiO2 NPs (0.004, 0.04 or 0.4 mg/ml) or pigment particles (0.04 mg/ml) both stabilized in sodium citrate buffer at the base of each ear (2x50μl), before receiving dermal applications (on both ears) of 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) (2x25μl of 0.1%) or its vehicle (acetone olive oil – AOO (4:1)) on days 0, 1 and 2. On day 5, the stimulation index (SI) was calculated as a ratio of 3HTdR incorporation in lymphocytes from DNBC-treated mice and AOO-treated controls. In a second experiment the EC3-value for DNCB (0 to 0.1%) was assessed in the absence or presence of 0.04 mg/ml TiO2. In a third experiment, the lymphocyte subpopulations and the cytokine secretion profile were analyzed after TiO2 (0.04 mg/ml) and DNCB (0.1%) treatment. Injection of NPs in AOO-treated control mice did not have any effect on lymph node (LN) proliferation. DNCB sensitization resulted in LN proliferation, which was further increased by injection of TiO2 NPs before DNCB sensitization. The EC3 of DNCB, with prior injection of vehicle control was 0.041%, while injection with TiO2 decreased the EC3 of DNCB to 0.015%. TiO2 NPs pre-treatment did not alter the lymphocyte subpopulations, but significantly increased the level of IL-4 and decreased IL-10 production in DNCB treated animals. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that administration of nano-TiO2 increases the dermal sensitization potency of DNCB, by augmenting a Th2 response, showing the immunomodulatory abilities of NPs. PMID:22621278

  18. Titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles in sunscreens: focus on their safety and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Smijs, Threes G; Pavel, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Sunscreens are used to provide protection against adverse effects of ultraviolet (UV)B (290–320 nm) and UVA (320–400 nm) radiation. According to the United States Food and Drug Administration, the protection factor against UVA should be at least one-third of the overall sun protection factor. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) minerals are frequently employed in sunscreens as inorganic physical sun blockers. As TiO2 is more effective in UVB and ZnO in the UVA range, the combination of these particles assures a broad-band UV protection. However, to solve the cosmetic drawback of these opaque sunscreens, microsized TiO2 and ZnO have been increasingly replaced by TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) (<100 nm). This review focuses on significant effects on the UV attenuation of sunscreens when microsized TiO2 and ZnO particles are replaced by NPs and evaluates physicochemical aspects that affect effectiveness and safety of NP sunscreens. With the use of TiO2 and ZnO NPs, the undesired opaqueness disappears but the required balance between UVA and UVB protection can be altered. Utilization of mixtures of micro- and nanosized ZnO dispersions and nanosized TiO2 particles may improve this situation. Skin exposure to NP-containing sunscreens leads to incorporation of TiO2 and ZnO NPs in the stratum corneum, which can alter specific NP attenuation properties due to particle–particle, particle–skin, and skin–particle–light physicochemical interactions. Both sunscreen NPs induce (photo)cyto- and genotoxicity and have been sporadically observed in viable skin layers especially in case of long-term exposures and ZnO. Photocatalytic effects, the highest for anatase TiO2, cannot be completely prevented by coating of the particles, but silica-based coatings are most effective. Caution should still be exercised when new sunscreens are developed and research that includes sunscreen NP stabilization, chronic exposures, and reduction of NPs’ free-radical production

  19. Coexistence of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles: enhancing or reducing environmental risks?

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoyan; Shi, Junpeng; Zhang, Hongwu

    2014-09-01

    Due to their bactericidal and photocatalytic characteristics, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used in the fields of environment and physiology. Once these untreated nanoparticles are released into an aquatic environment and encounter one another, there is more uncertainty about their fate and ecotoxicological risks compared with the single nanoparticles. To expand our knowledge of the health and environmental impacts of nanoparticles, we investigated the possible risk of the co-existence of TiO2 NPs and Ag NPs in an aquatic environment using ciliated protozoa (Tetrahymena pyriformis) as an aquatic animal model. In this study, silver ion (Ag(+)) release and physicochemical properties, as well as their effect on oxidative stress biomarkers, were monitored. Continuous illumination (12,000 lx) led to the 20.0% decrease in Ag(+) release in comparison with dark conditions, while TiO2 NPs and continuous illumination resulted in decreasing the Ag(+) concentration to 64.3% in contrast with Ag NPs-only suspensions. Toxicity tests indicated that different illumination modes exerted distinct effects of TiO2 NPs on the toxicity of Ag NPs: no effects, antagonism and synergism in dark, natural light and continuous light, respectively. In the presence of 1.5mg/L (18.8 μM) TiO2 NPs, the toxicity of 1.5 mg/L (13.9 μM) Ag NPs was reduced by 28.7% and increased by 6.93% in natural light and 12,000 lx of continuous light, respectively. After culturing in 12,000 lx continuous light for 24h, SOD activity of the light control surged to 1.96 times compared to the dark control (P<0.001). TiO2 NPs induced a reduction of CAT activity by an average of (36.1±1.7) % in the light. In the natural light reductions in the toxicity of Ag, NPs decrease Ag(+) concentrations via adsorption of Ag(+) onto TiO2 NPs surfaces. The enhancement of Ag NPs toxicity can contribute to the formation of activated TiO2-Ag NPs complexes in continuous light. The

  20. Mechanical and moisture barrier properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and halloysite nanotubes reinforced polylactic acid (PLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberton, J.; Martelli, S. M.; Fakhouri, F. M.; Soldi, V.

    2014-08-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) has been larger used in biomedical field due to its low toxicity and biodegradability. The aim of this study was to produce PLLA nanocomposites, by melt extrusion, containing Halloysite nanotubes (HNT) and/or titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. Immediately after drying, PLLA was mechanically homogenized with the nanofillers and then melt blended using a single screw extruder (L/D = 30) at a speed of 110 rpm, with three heating zones in which the following temperatures were maintained: 150, 150 and 160°C (AX Plasticos model AX14 LD30). The film samples were obtained by compression molding in a press with a temperature profile of 235 ± 5°C for 2.5 min, after pressing, films were cooled up to room temperature. The mechanical tests were performed according to ASTM D882-09 and the water vapor permeability (WVP) was measured according to ASTM E-96, in triplicate. The tensile properties indicated that the modulus was improved with increased TiO2 content up to 1g/100g PLLA. The Young's modulus (YM) of the PLA was increased from 3047 MPa to 3222 MPa with the addition of 1g TiO2/100g PLLA. The tensile strength (TS) of films increases with the TiO2 content. In both cases, the YM and TS are achieved at the 1% content of TiO2 and is due to the reinforcing effect of nanoparticles. Pristine PLA showed a strain at break (SB) of 3.56%, while the SB of nanocomposites were significant lower, for instance the SB of composite containing 7.5 g HNT/100g PLLA was around 1.90 %. The WVP of samples was increased by increasing the nano filler content. It should be expected that an increase of nanofiller content would decrease the mass transfer of water molecules throughout the samples due to the increase in the way water molecules will have to cross to permeate the material. However, this was not observed. Therefore, this result can be explained considering the molecular structure of both fillers, which contain several hydroxyl groups in the surface, making the

  1. Impact of natural organic matter on particle behavior and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Shibin; Ma, Hongbo; Wallis, Lindsay K; Etterson, Matthew A; Riley, Benjamin; Hoff, Dale J; Diamond, Stephen A

    2016-01-15

    Due to their inherent phototoxicity and inevitable environmental release, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) are increasingly studied in the field of aquatic toxicology. One of the particular interests is the interactions between nano-TiO2 and natural organic matter (NOM). In this study, a series of experiments was conducted to study the impacts of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) on phototoxicity and particle behaviors of nano-TiO2. For Daphnia magna, after the addition of 5mg/L SRNOM, LC50 value decreased significantly from 1.03 (0.89-1.20) mg/L to 0.26 (0.22-0.31) mg/L. For zebrafish larvae, phototoxic LC50 values were 39.9 (95% CI, 25.9-61.2) mg/L and 26.3 (95% CI, 18.3-37.8) mg/L, with or without the presence of 5mg/L SRNOM, respectively. There was no statistically significant change of these LC50 values. The impact of SRNOM on phototoxicity of nano-TiO2 was highly dependent on test species, with D. magna being the more sensitive species. The impact on particle behavior was both qualitatively and quantitatively examined. A global predictive model for particle behavior was developed with a three-way interaction of SRNOM, TiO2 concentration, and time and an additive effect of ionic strength. Based on power analyses, 96-h exposure in bioassays was recommended for nanoparticle-NOM interaction studies. The importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) quenching of SRNOM was also systematically studied using a novel exposure system that isolates the effects of environmental factors. These experiments were conducted with minimal impacts of other important interaction mechanisms (NOM particle stabilization, NOM UV attenuation, and NOM photosensitization). This study highlighted both the particle stabilization and ROS quenching effects of NOM on nano-TiO2 in an aquatic system. There is an urgent need for representative test materials, together with key environmental factors, for future risk assessment and regulations of nanomaterials.

  2. In Vitro Phototoxicity and Hazard Identification of Nano-scale Titanium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Kristen; Degn, Laura L.; Mundy, William R.; Zucker, Robert M.; Dreher, Kevin; Zhao, Baozhong; Roberts, Joan E.; and others

    2012-01-15

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO{sub 2}) catalyze reactions under UV radiation and are hypothesized to cause phototoxicity. A human-derived line of retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) was treated with six samples of nano-TiO{sub 2} and exposed to UVA radiation. The TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were independently characterized to have mean primary particle sizes and crystal structures of 22 nm anatase/rutile, 25 nm anatase, 31 nm anatase/rutile, 59 nm anatase/rutile, 142 nm anatase, and 214 nm rutile. Particles were suspended in cell culture media, sonicated, and assessed for stability and aggregation by dynamic light scattering. Cells were treated with 0, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30, or 100 μg/ml nano-TiO{sub 2} in media for 24 hrs and then exposed to UVA (2 hrs, 7.53 J/cm{sup 2}) or kept in the dark. Viability was assessed 24 hrs after the end of UVA exposure by microscopy with a live/dead assay (calcein-AM/propidium iodide). Exposure to higher concentrations of nano-TiO{sub 2} with UVA lowered cell viability. The 25 nm anatase and 31 nm anatase/rutile were the most phototoxic (LC{sub 50} with UVA < 5 μg/ml), while the 142 nm anatase and 214 nm rutile were the least phototoxic. An acellular assay ranked TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles for their UVA photocatalytic reactivities. The particles were found to be capable of generating thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) under UVA. Flow cytometry showed that nano-TiO{sub 2} combined with UVA decreased cell viability and increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, measured by Mitosox). LC{sub 50} values under UVA were correlated with TBARS reactivity, particle size, and surface area. -- Highlights: ► Nano-TiO{sub 2} enters cells within 24 hours ► Nano-TiO{sub 2} causes dose-dependent cytotoxicity greatly enhanced by UVA radiation ► Treatment with nano-TiO{sub 2} and UVA produces reactive oxygen species ► Phototoxicity is correlated with particle size, surface area, and TBARS reactivity.

  3. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles affect the growth and microRNA expression of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Frazier, Taylor P; Burklew, Caitlin E; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) is one of the most widely used pigments in the world. Due to its heavy use in industry and daily life, such as food additives, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and paints, many residues are released into the environment and currently TiO(2) nanoparticles are considered an emerging environmental contaminant. Although several studies have shown the effect of TiO(2) nanoparticles on a wide range of organisms including bacteria, algae, plankton, fish, mice, and rats, little research has been performed on land plants. In this study, we investigated the effect of TiO(2) nanoparticles on the growth, development, and gene expression of tobacco, an important economic and agricultural crop in the southeastern USA as well as around the world. We found that TiO(2) nanoparticles significantly inhibited the germination rates, root lengths, and biomasses of tobacco seedlings after 3 weeks of exposure to 0.1, 1, 2.5, and 5 % TiO(2) nanoparticles and that overall growth and development of the tobacco seedlings significantly decreased as TiO(2) nanoparticle concentrations increased. Overall, tobacco roots were the most sensitive to TiO(2) nanoparticle exposure. Nano-TiO(2) also significantly influenced the expression profiles of microRNAs (miRNAs), a recently discovered class of small endogenous noncoding RNAs (∼20-22 nt) that are considered important gene regulators and have been shown to play an important role in plant development as well as plant tolerance to abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, cold, and heavy metal. Low concentrations (0.1 and 1 %) of TiO(2) nanoparticles dramatically induced miRNA expression in tobacco seedlings with miR395 and miR399 exhibiting the greatest fold changes of 285-fold and 143-fold, respectively. The results of this study show that TiO(2) nanoparticles have a negative impact on tobacco growth and development and that miRNAs may play an important role in tobacco response to heavy metals/nanoparticles by regulating

  4. Impact of natural organic matter on particle behavior and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Shibin; Ma, Hongbo; Wallis, Lindsay K; Etterson, Matthew A; Riley, Benjamin; Hoff, Dale J; Diamond, Stephen A

    2016-01-15

    Due to their inherent phototoxicity and inevitable environmental release, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) are increasingly studied in the field of aquatic toxicology. One of the particular interests is the interactions between nano-TiO2 and natural organic matter (NOM). In this study, a series of experiments was conducted to study the impacts of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) on phototoxicity and particle behaviors of nano-TiO2. For Daphnia magna, after the addition of 5mg/L SRNOM, LC50 value decreased significantly from 1.03 (0.89-1.20) mg/L to 0.26 (0.22-0.31) mg/L. For zebrafish larvae, phototoxic LC50 values were 39.9 (95% CI, 25.9-61.2) mg/L and 26.3 (95% CI, 18.3-37.8) mg/L, with or without the presence of 5mg/L SRNOM, respectively. There was no statistically significant change of these LC50 values. The impact of SRNOM on phototoxicity of nano-TiO2 was highly dependent on test species, with D. magna being the more sensitive species. The impact on particle behavior was both qualitatively and quantitatively examined. A global predictive model for particle behavior was developed with a three-way interaction of SRNOM, TiO2 concentration, and time and an additive effect of ionic strength. Based on power analyses, 96-h exposure in bioassays was recommended for nanoparticle-NOM interaction studies. The importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) quenching of SRNOM was also systematically studied using a novel exposure system that isolates the effects of environmental factors. These experiments were conducted with minimal impacts of other important interaction mechanisms (NOM particle stabilization, NOM UV attenuation, and NOM photosensitization). This study highlighted both the particle stabilization and ROS quenching effects of NOM on nano-TiO2 in an aquatic system. There is an urgent need for representative test materials, together with key environmental factors, for future risk assessment and regulations of nanomaterials. PMID:26519592

  5. Reproductive and behavioral responses of earthworms exposed to nano-sized titanium dioxide in soil.

    PubMed

    McShane, Heather; Sarrazin, Manon; Whalen, Joann K; Hendershot, William H; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2012-01-01

    Nanometer-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO(2) ) is found in a number of commercial products; however, its effects on soil biota are largely unknown. In the present study, earthworms (Eisenia andrei and Eisenia fetida) were exposed to three types of commercially available, uncoated TiO(2) nanomaterials with nominal diameters of 5, 10, and 21 nm. Nanomaterials were characterized for particle size, agglomeration, surface charge, chemical composition, and purity. Standard lethality, reproduction, and avoidance tests, as well as a juvenile growth test, were conducted in artificial soil or field soil amended with nano-TiO(2) by two methods, liquid dispersion and dry powder mixing. All studies included a micrometer-sized TiO(2) control. Exposure to field and artificial soil containing between 200 and 10,000 mg nano-TiO(2) per kilogram of dry soil (mg/kg) had no significant effect (p > 0.05) on juvenile survival and growth, adult earthworm survival, cocoon production, cocoon viability, or total number of juveniles hatched from these cocoons. However, earthworms avoided artificial soils amended with nano-TiO(2) . The lowest concentration at which avoidance was observed was between 1,000 and 5,000 mg nano-TiO(2) per kilogram of soil, depending on the TiO(2) nanomaterial applied. Furthermore, earthworms differentiated between soils amended with 10,000 mg/kg nano-TiO(2) and micrometer-sized TiO(2) . A positive relationship between earthworm avoidance and TiO(2) specific surface area was observed, but the relationship between avoidance and primary particle size was not determined because of the agglomeration and aggregation of nano-TiO(2) materials. Biological mechanisms that may explain earthworm avoidance of nano-TiO(2) are discussed. Results of the present study indicate that earthworms can detect nano-TiO(2) in soil, although exposure has no apparent effect on survival or standard reproductive parameters.

  6. Integrated titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on interdigitated device electrodes (IDEs) for pH analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizah, N.; Hashim, U.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Nadzirah, Sh.; Farehanim, M. A.; Fatin, M. F.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Ayub, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles based Interdigitated Device Electrodes (IDEs) Nanobiosensor device was developed for intracellular biochemical detection. Fabrication and characterization of pH sensors using IDE nanocoated with TiO2 was studied in this paper. In this paper, a preliminary assessment of this intracellular sensor with electrical measurement under different pH levels. 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) was used to enhance the sensitivity of titanium dioxide layer as well as able to provide surface modification by undergoing protonation and deprotonation process. Different types of pH solution provide different resistivity and conductivity towards the surface. Base solution has the higher current compared to an acid solution. Amine and oxide functionalized TiO2 based IDE exhibit pH-dependent could be understood in terms of the change in surface charge during protonation and deprotonation. The simple fabrication process, high sensitivity, and fast response of the TiO2 based IDEs facilitate their applications in a wide range of areas. The small size of semiconductor TiO2 based IDE for sensitive, label-free, real time detection of a wide range of biological species could be explored in vivo diagnostics and array-based screening.

  7. The potential use of nanosilver-decorated titanium dioxide nanofibers for toxin decomposition with antimicrobial and self-cleaning properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srisitthiratkul, Chutima; Pongsorrarith, Voraluck; Intasanta, Narupol

    2011-08-01

    While chemical and biological attacks pose risk to human health, clean air is of scientific, environmental and physiological concerns. In the present contribution, the potential use of nanosilver-decorated titanium dioxide (TiO 2) nanofibers for toxin decomposition with antimicrobial activity and self-cleaning properties was investigated. Titanium dioxide nanofibers were prepared through sol-gel reaction followed by an electrospinning process. Following the Japan Industrial Standard (JIS) protocol, decompositions of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and volatile organic compound (VOC) by the TiO 2 nanofibers suggested that these materials were capable of air treatment. To further enhance their anti-microbial activity, silver nanoparticles were decorated onto the TiO 2 nanofibers' surfaces via photoreduction of silver ion in the presence of the nanofibers suspension. Furthermore, tests of photocatalytic activity of the samples were performed by photodegrading methylene blue in water. The nanofibrous membranes prepared from these nanofibers showed superhydrophilicity under UV. Finally, the possibility of using these hybrid nanofibers in environmental and hygienic nanofiltration was proposed, where the self-cleaning characteristics was expected to be valuable in maintenance processes.

  8. Comparative study of respiratory tract immune toxicity induced by three sterilisation nanoparticles: silver, zinc oxide and titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanliang; Yang, Danfeng; Yang, Honglian; Zhang, Huashan; Zhang, Wei; Fang, Yanjun; Lin, Zhiqing; Tian, Lei; Lin, Bencheng; Yan, Jun; Xi, Zhuge

    2013-03-15

    Silver, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles are used as sterilisation materials to enhance the performance of disinfectants. We investigated the respiratory tract immune toxicity ("immunotoxicity") of these nanoparticles in vivo and in vitro, and we explored the relationships between particle size, particle shape, chemical composition, chemical stability and the toxicological effects of these typical nanoparticles in rats. In vivo, the rats were exposed to nanoparticles by intratracheal instillation. Exposure to nanoparticles caused an increase in oxidative injury to the lungs and disorders in regulating the cytokine network, which were detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, suggesting that oxidative stress might be important for inducing the respiratory immunotoxicity of nanoparticles. In vitro, the phagocytic function of alveolar macrophages (AMs) was dose-dependently reduced by nanoparticles, and ZnO nanoparticles induced greater cytotoxicity than the silver and titanium-dioxide nanoparticles, which were coincident with the results of multiple measurements, such as a cell viability assay by WST-8 and LDH measurements. Comparative analyses demonstrated that particle composition and chemical stability most likely had a primary role in the biological effects of different nanoparticles.

  9. Effects of light irradiation on bleaching by a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemori, T.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Akashi, G.; Igarashi, A.; Hirai, Y.; Kumagai, Y.; Kurata, H.

    2008-05-01

    A low-concentration hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst has attracted attention as a safe office bleaching agent. In this study, the influence of different kinds of light on the bleaching effect of this agent was examined. The bleaching agent was applied to hematoporphyrin-stained paper strips that were then irradiated with a 405-nm diode laser (800 mW/cm2), a halogen lamp (720 mW/cm2), or an LED (835 mW/cm2) for 5 minutes. The color was measured spectrophotometrically before treatment and every 30 seconds thereafter, and the effects of bleaching on the strip were assessed using the CIE 1976 L* a* b* color coordinate system. Of the three different irradiation conditions, 405-nm laser irradiation gave the strongest bleaching effect with 3.5% hydrogen peroxide containing titanium dioxide. The laser provides strong irradiance at 405 nm, which corresponds to the absorption range of the bleaching agent, and consequently the largest effect was obtained.

  10. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo; Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao; Li, Jun

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  11. Toxicity profiling of water contextual zinc oxide, silver, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles in human oral and gastrointestinal cell systems.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, Marcella; Tay, Chor Yong; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Xie, Jianping; Ong, Choon Nam; Fan, Rongli; Yue, Junqi; Zhang, Lifeng; Leong, David Tai

    2015-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are increasingly detected in water supply due to environmental release of ENPs as the by-products contained within the effluent of domestic and industrial run-off. The partial recycling of water laden with ENPs, albeit at ultra-low concentrations, may pose an uncharacterized threat to human health. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of three prevalent ENPs: zinc oxide, silver, and titanium dioxide over a wide range of concentrations that encompasses drinking water-relevant concentrations, to cellular systems representing oral and gastrointestinal tissues. Based on published in silico-predicted water-relevant ENPs concentration range from 100 pg/L to 100 µg/L, we detected no cytotoxicity to all the cellular systems. Significant cytotoxicity due to the NPs set in around 100 mg/L with decreasing extent of toxicity from zinc oxide to silver to titanium dioxide NPs. We also found that noncytotoxic zinc oxide NPs level of 10 mg/L could elevate the intracellular oxidative stress. The threshold concentrations of NPs that induced cytotoxic effect are at least two to five orders of magnitude higher than the permissible concentrations of the respective metals and metal oxides in drinking water. Based on these findings, the current estimated levels of NPs in potable water pose little cytotoxic threat to the human oral and gastrointestinal systems within our experimental boundaries.

  12. Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed as photo sensitizer for titanium dioxide based dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananth, S.; Vivek, P.; Arumanayagam, T.; Murugakoothan, P.

    2014-07-01

    Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed were used as photo sensitizer to fabricate titanium dioxide nanoparticles based dye sensitized solar cells. Pure titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in anatase phase were synthesized by sol-gel technique and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using modified sol-gel technique by mixing lawsone pigment rich natural dye during the synthesis itself. This pre dye treatment with natural dye has yielded colored TiO2 nanoparticles with uniform adsorption of natural dye, reduced agglomeration, less dye aggregation and improved morphology. The pure and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were subjected to structural, optical, spectral and morphological studies. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) fabricated using the pre dye treated and pure TiO2 nanoparticles sensitized by natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed showed a promising solar light to electron conversion efficiency of 1.47% and 1% respectively. The pre dye treated TiO2 based DSSC showed an improved efficiency of 47% when compared to that of conventional DSSC.

  13. Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed as photo sensitizer for titanium dioxide based dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ananth, S; Vivek, P; Arumanayagam, T; Murugakoothan, P

    2014-07-15

    Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed were used as photo sensitizer to fabricate titanium dioxide nanoparticles based dye sensitized solar cells. Pure titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in anatase phase were synthesized by sol-gel technique and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using modified sol-gel technique by mixing lawsone pigment rich natural dye during the synthesis itself. This pre dye treatment with natural dye has yielded colored TiO2 nanoparticles with uniform adsorption of natural dye, reduced agglomeration, less dye aggregation and improved morphology. The pure and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were subjected to structural, optical, spectral and morphological studies. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) fabricated using the pre dye treated and pure TiO2 nanoparticles sensitized by natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed showed a promising solar light to electron conversion efficiency of 1.47% and 1% respectively. The pre dye treated TiO2 based DSSC showed an improved efficiency of 47% when compared to that of conventional DSSC.

  14. Electrical and Magneto-Resistivity Measurements on Amorphous Copper-Titanium Alloys at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Renyong

    1992-01-01

    The anomalous transport properties of highly disordered metallic glasses, which require corrections to the classical Boltzmann theory, are due to quantum interference effects of the scattered electron waves. These corrections provide new contributions to the resistivity: "weak localization" and "electron-electron interaction". To study these quantum interference effects, we have made the highest-precision measurements, so far, of the resistances of the amorphous rm Cu_{50}Ti_{50 } and rm Cu_{60}Ti _{40} ribbons at much lower temperatures than before (15mK < T < 6K) and in small magnetic fields (0T < B < 0.2T). To measure the resistance and temperature accurately, we developed a novel method: measuring the resistance perpendicular to the ribbons with potassium as the non-superconducting glue between the CuTi ribbons and two Cu electrodes in order to make excellent electrical and thermal contact. With this method, we were able to measure the resistances with a relative precision of Deltarho/rho = 10^{-7}-10 ^{-8} and temperatures reliably down to 15mK with an error of less than 1mK. The zero field resistances and magnetoresistances were analyzed using weak localization theories that include the Zeeman splitting and electron-electron interaction theories. Possible background contributions from the K layers, the Cu electrodes, and their boundaries are quantified in the analysis. In zero field, these background contributions were negligible for T<3K. At zero magnetic field and T<0.15K, we found that electron -electron interaction dominates the resistance, while weak localization makes a nontrivial contribution to the resistance for T>0.15K. In contrast, at the lowest temperatures, the magnetoresistances were dominated by weak localization with Zeeman splitting and Maki-Thompson superconducting fluctuations. For higher magnetic fields and lowest temperatures (B/T > 1 T/K), we find discrepancies between our data and the theoretical calculations. We found that most of the

  15. The role of ascorbic acid on titanium dioxide-induced genetic damage assessed by the comet assay and cytogenetic tests.

    PubMed

    Turkez, Hasan

    2011-07-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) is used in several commercial products such as cosmetics, sunscreen, toothpaste and pharmaceuticals. However, some recent investigations have revealed that titanium particles generate potential harmful effects on the environment and humans. Because of its strong antioxidant activity, ascorbic acid (AA) is admitted to act as an anti-mutagenic agent. The present study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of AA against TiO(2)-induced genotoxicity. Sister chromatid exchange (SCE), micronucleus (MN) and the comet assays were used to assess TiO(2)-induced genotoxicity and to establish the protective effects of AA. There were significant increases (P<0.05) in both SCE and MN frequencies of cultures treated with TiO(2) as compared to controls. However, co-application of AA (4.87 and 9.73 μM) and TiO(2) resulted in decreases of SCE and MN rates as compared to the group treated with titanium alone. Besides, significant reductions of primary DNA damage (comet assay) were determined when the AA was added to the cell culture medium simultaneously with TiO(2). In conclusion, the preventive role of AA in alleviating TiO(2)-induced DNA damage was indicated for the first time in the present study.

  16. Novel supercritical carbon dioxide impregnation technique for the production of amorphous solid drug dispersions: a comparison to hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Potter, Catherine; Tian, Yiwei; Walker, Gavin; McCoy, Colin; Hornsby, Peter; Donnelly, Conor; Jones, David S; Andrews, Gavin P

    2015-05-01

    The formulation of BCS Class II drugs as amorphous solid dispersions has been shown to provide advantages with respect to improving the aqueous solubility of these compounds. While hot melt extrusion (HME) and spray drying (SD) are among the most common methods for the production of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs), the high temperatures often required for HME can restrict the processing of thermally labile drugs, while the use of toxic organic solvents during SD can impact on end-product toxicity. In this study, we investigated the potential of supercritical fluid impregnation (SFI) using carbon dioxide as an alternative process for ASD production of a model poorly water-soluble drug, indomethacin (INM). In doing so, we produced ASDs without the use of organic solvents and at temperatures considerably lower than those required for HME. Previous studies have concentrated on the characterization of ASDs produced using HME or SFI but have not considered both processes together. Dispersions were manufactured using two different polymers, Soluplus and polyvinylpyrrolidone K15 using both SFI and HME and characterized for drug morphology, homogeneity, presence of drug-polymer interactions, glass transition temperature, amorphous stability of the drug within the formulation, and nonsink drug release to measure the ability of each formulation to create a supersaturated drug solution. Fully amorphous dispersions were successfully produced at 50% w/w drug loading using HME and 30% w/w drug loading using SFI. For both polymers, formulations containing 50% w/w INM, manufactured via SFI, contained the drug in the γ-crystalline form. Interestingly, there were lower levels of crystallinity in PVP dispersions relative to SOL. FTIR was used to probe for the presence of drug-polymer interactions within both polymer systems. For PVP systems, the nature of these interactions depended upon processing method; however, for Soluplus formulations this was not the case. The area under

  17. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of anatase titanium dioxide on Si: Modifying the interface by pre-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandell, A.; Andersson, M. P.; Johansson, M. K.-J.; Karlsson, P. G.; Alfredsson, Y.; Schnadt, J.; Siegbahn, H.; Uvdal, P.

    2003-04-01

    The formation of TiO 2 films on clean and pre-oxidized Si(1 1 1) through chemical vapor deposition of titanium(IV) isopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum has been examined by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and scanning tunneling microscopy. In both cases, TTIP deposition at 500 °C eventually results in an anatase TiO 2 film with a carbon-free surface and the surface morphology of the anatase films is very similar. By using a novel way of combining photoemission and XAS data, it is demonstrated that the two situations have substantially different interfacial properties. Pre-oxidation of the surface at 500 °C passivates the surface so that the thickness of the amorphous TiSi xO y interface layer decreases from 30-35 to 15-25 Å and eliminates the formation of interfacial carbon completely.

  18. Biosynthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using Bacillus amyloliquefaciens culture and enhancement of its photocatalytic activity for the degradation of a sulfonated textile dye Reactive Red 31.

    PubMed

    Khan, Razia; Fulekar, M H

    2016-08-01

    The present study aims at exploiting Bacillus amyloliquefaciens for the biosynthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and also investigates role of bacterial enzymes in the biosynthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Bacterial synthesized as well as metal doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). Amylase activity (43.37IU) in culture supernatant evinced a potential involvement of extracellular enzyme in TiO2 nanoparticle biosynthesis. Crystallite size of bio-synthesized nanoparticles was found to be in the range of 15.23-87.6nm. FTIR spectroscopy and native-PAGE (Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis) clearly indicated involvement of alpha amylase in biosynthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles and in their stabilization. TEM micrographs of the synthesized titanium dioxide nanoparticles revealed the formation of spherical nanoparticles with a size range of 22.11-97.28nm. Photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Red 31 (RR31) dye was carried out using bio-synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles under UV radiation. Photocatalytic activity of synthesized nanoparticles was enhanced by Ag, La, Zn and Pt doping. Platinum doped TiO2 showed highest potential (90.98%) in RR31 degradation as compared to undoped (75.83%). PMID:27175828

  19. Cellular Interactions and Biological Responses to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in HepG2 and BEAS-2B Cells: Role of Cell Culture Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that the composition of the biological medium used in vitro can affect the cellular interaction and biological response of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in human lung epithelial cells. However, it is unclear if these effects are co...

  20. Selective photocatalytic oxidation of benzene for the synthesis of phenol using engineered Au-Pd alloy nanoparticles supported on titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Su, Ren; Kesavan, Lokesh; Jensen, Mads M; Tiruvalam, Ramchandra; He, Qian; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Wendt, Stefan; Glasius, Marianne; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2014-10-28

    The selectivity of photocatalytic phenol production from the direct oxidation of benzene can be enhanced by fine adjustment of the morphology and composition of Au-Pd metal nanoparticles supported on titanium dioxide thereby suppressing the decomposition of benzene and evolution of phenolic compounds.