Science.gov

Sample records for amp inducible early

  1. Inhibitory Role of Inducible cAMP Early Repressor (ICER) in Methamphetamine-Induced Locomotor Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wenhua; Takamatsu, Yukio; Yamamoto, Hideko; Kasai, Shinya; Endo, Shogo; Shirao, Tomoaki; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    Background The inducible cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) early repressor (ICER) is highly expressed in the central nervous system and functions as a repressor of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription. The present study sought to clarify the role of ICER in the effects of methamphetamine (METH). Methods and Findings We tested METH-induced locomotor sensitization in wildtype mice, ICER knockout mice, and ICER I-overexpressing mice. Both ICER wildtype mice and knockout mice displayed increased locomotor activity after continuous injections of METH. However, ICER knockout mice displayed a tendency toward higher locomotor activity compared with wildtype mice, although no significant difference was observed between the two genotypes. Moreover, compared with wildtype mice, ICER I-overexpressing mice displayed a significant decrease in METH-induced locomotor sensitization. Furthermore, Western blot analysis and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that ICER overexpression abolished the METH-induced increase in CREB expression and repressed cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and prodynorphin (Pdyn) expression in mice. The decreased CART and Pdyn mRNA expression levels in vivo may underlie the inhibitory role of ICER in METH-induced locomotor sensitization. Conclusions Our data suggest that ICER plays an inhibitory role in METH-induced locomotor sensitization. PMID:21738744

  2. Sequence and expression analysis of the gene encoding inducible cAMP early repressor in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Rui; Gan, Xi; Lei, Aiying; Li, Chao; Yu, Xiaoli; Huang, Jun; Huang, Ting; Liang, Wanwen

    2010-06-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization library was generated by comparison of cDNA populations isolated from peripheral leukocytes of pre- and post-immunized tilapia. One cDNA sequence encoding complete inducible cAMP early repressor was obtained from the library. The sequence was characterized by the presence of the basic structure of ICER IIgamma. Expression of ICER was in the tissues of four types of tilapia was decreased after infection with Streptococcus. After immunization, expression of ICER was initially decreased and then increased after 7 days. In addition, the order for the overall expression of ICER gene after infection and the increases of ICER expression later after immunization in these four types of tilapia was positively correlated to the disease resistance and productivity of these four species of tilapia. Our results provided molecular mechanisms for the different disease resistance capability in different species of tilapia. In addition, our results also provided reference molecular marker for breeding disease resistant tilapia, cAMP responsive element modulator.

  3. Cyclic AMP-inducible genes respond uniformly to seasonal lighting conditions in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Spessert, R; Gupta, B B P; Rohleder, N; Gerhold, S; Engel, L

    2006-12-01

    The encoding of photoperiodic information ensues in terms of the daily profile in the expression of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-inducible genes such as the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) gene that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin formation. In the present study, we compared the influence of the photoperiodic history on the cAMP-inducible genes AA-NAT, inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER), fos-related antigen-2 (FRA-2), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), nerve growth factor inducible gene-A (NGFI-A) and nerve growth factor inducible gene-B (NGFI-B) in the pineal gland of rats. For this purpose, we monitored the daily profiles of each gene in the same pineal gland under a long (light/dark 16:8) and a short (light/dark 8:16) photoperiod by measuring the respective mRNA amounts by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. We found that, for all genes under investigation, the duration of increased nocturnal expression is lengthened and, in relation to light onset, the nocturnal rise is earlier under the long photoperiod (light/dark 16:8). Furthermore, with the exception of ICER, all other cAMP-inducible genes tend to display higher maximum expression under light/dark 8:16 than under light/dark 16:8. Photoperiod-dependent changes persist for all of the cAMP-inducible genes when the rats are kept for two cycles under constant darkness. Therefore, all cAMP-inducible genes are also influenced by the photoperiod of prior entrained cycles. Our study indicates that, despite differences regarding the expressional control and the temporal phasing of the daily profile, cAMP-inducible genes are uniformly influenced by photoperiodic history in the rat pineal gland.

  4. cAMP initiates early phase neuron-like morphology changes and late phase neural differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linxia; Seitz, Linsey C.; Abramczyk, Amy M.; Liu, Li

    2010-01-01

    The intracellular second messenger cAMP is frequently used in induction media to induce mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neural lineage cells. To date, an understanding of the role cAMP exerts on MSCs and whether cAMP can induce MSCs into functional neurons is still lacking. We found cAMP initiated neuron-like morphology changes early and neural differentiation much later. The early phase changes in morphology were due to cell shrinkage, which subsequently rendered some cells apoptotic. While the morphology changes occurred prior to the expression of neural markers, it is not required for neural marker expression and the two processes are differentially regulated downstream of cAMP-activated protein kinase A. cAMP enabled MSCs to gain neural marker expressions with neuronal function, such as, calcium rise in response to neuronal activators, dopamine, glutamate, and potassium chloride. However, only some of the cells induced by cAMP responded to the three neuronal activators and further lack the neuronal morphology, suggesting that although cAMP is able to direct MSCs towards neural differentiation, they do not achieve terminal differentiation. PMID:20725762

  5. Novel role of C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) ubiquitin ligase on inhibiting cardiac apoptosis and dysfunction via regulating ERK5-mediated degradation of inducible cAMP early repressor

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Chang-Hoon; Le, Nhat-Tu; Shishido, Tetsuro; Chang, Eugene; Lee, Hakjoo; Heo, Kyung-Sun; Mickelsen, Deanne M.; Lu, Yan; McClain, Carolyn; Spangenberg, Thomas; Yan, Chen; Molina, Carlos A.; Yang, Jay; Patterson, Cam; Abe, Jun-ichi

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates a critical role of ubiquitin-proteosome system in apoptosis regulation. A cardioprotective effect of ubiquitin (Ub) ligase of the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) on myocytes has been reported. In the current study, we found that the cardioprotective effect of insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was mediated by ERK5-CHIP signal module via inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) destabilization. In vitro runoff assay and Ub assay showed ICER as a substrate of CHIP Ub ligase. Both disruption of ERK5-CHIP binding with inhibitory helical linker domain fragment (aa 101–200) of CHIP and the depletion of ERK5 by siRNA inhibited CHIP Ub ligase activity, which suggests an obligatory role of ERK5 on CHIP activation. Depletion of CHIP, using siRNA, inhibited IGF-1-mediated reduction of isoproterenol-mediated ICER induction and apoptosis. In diabetic mice subjected to myocardial infarction, the CHIP Ub ligase activity was decreased, with an increase in ICER expression. These changes were attenuated significantly in a cardiac-specific constitutively active form of MEK5α transgenic mice (CA-MEK5α-Tg) previously shown to have greater functional recovery. Furthermore, pressure overload-mediated ICER induction was enhanced in heterozygous CHIP+/− mice. We identified ICER as a novel CHIP substrate and that the ERK5-CHIP complex plays an obligatory role in inhibition of ICER expression, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and cardiac dysfunction.—Woo, C.-H., Le, N.-T., Shishido, T., Chang, E., Lee, H., Heo, K.-S., Mickelsen, D. M., Lu, Y., McClain, C., Spangenberg, T., Yan, C., Molina, C. A., Yang, J., Patterson, C., Abe, J.-I. Novel role of C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) ubiquitin ligase on inhibiting cardiac apoptosis and dysfunction via regulating ERK5-mediated degradation of inducible cAMP early repressor. PMID:20724525

  6. Different Roles of GNAS and cAMP Signaling During Early and Late Stages of Osteogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S.; Kaplan, F. S.; Shore, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) and fibrous dysplasia (FD) are genetic diseases of bone formation at opposite ends of the osteogenic spectrum: imperfect osteogenesis of the skeleton occurs in FD, while heterotopic ossification in skin, subcutaneous fat, and skeletal muscle forms in POH. POH is caused by heterozygous inactivating germline mutations in GNAS, which encodes G-protein subunits regulating the cAMP pathway, while FD is caused by GNAS somatic activating mutations. We used pluripotent mouse ES cells to examine the effects of Gnas dysregulation on osteoblast differentiation. At the earliest stages of osteogenesis, Gnas transcripts Gs α, XLαs and 1A are expressed at low levels and cAMP levels are also low. Inhibition of cAMP signaling (as in POH) by 2′,5′-dideoxyadenosine enhanced osteoblast differentiation while conversely, increased cAMP signaling (as in FD), induced by forskolin, inhibited osteoblast differentiation. Notably, increased cAMP was inhibitory for osteogenesis only at early stages after osteogenic induction. Expression of osteogenic and adipogenic markers showed that increased cAMP enhanced adipogenesis and impaired osteoblast differentiation even in the presence of osteogenic factors, supporting cAMP as a critical regulator of osteoblast and adipocyte lineage commitment. Furthermore, increased cAMP signaling decreased BMP pathway signaling, indicating that G protein-cAMP pathway activation (as in FD) inhibits osteoblast differentiation, at least in part by blocking the BMP-Smad pathway, and suggesting that GNAS inactivation as occurs in POH enhances osteoblast differentiation, at least in part by stimulating BMP signaling. These data support that differences in cAMP levels during early stages of cell differentiation regulate cell fate decisions. PMID:22903279

  7. cAMP inducibility of transcriptional repressor ICER in developing and mature human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bodor, J; Spetz, A L; Strominger, J L; Habener, J F

    1996-01-01

    Stimulation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathway exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation and effector functions of T cells. The ability of T cells to form high intracellular levels of cAMP is acquired during development in the human thymus and is retained by the majority of mature peripheral T lymphocytes. Here we show that elevated cAMP levels in T cells correlate with the expression of the potent transcriptional repressor ICER (inducible cAMP early repressor) previously described in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Further, in transcriptional assays in vivo, ICER inhibits calcineurin-mediated expression of the interleukin 2 promoter as well as Tax-mediated transactivation of the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) promoter. Thus, the induction of ICER in T cells may play an important role in the cAMP-induced quiescence and the persistent latency of HTLV-I. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8622971

  8. Modulation in the expression of SHP-1, SHP-2 and PTP1B due to the inhibition of MAPKs, cAMP and neutrophils early on in the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, Violeta; Sarmiento, Nancy; Sánchez-Bernal, Carmen; Matellán, Laura; Calvo, José J; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús

    2014-02-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) SHP-1, SHP-2 and PTP1B are overexpressed early on during the development of cerulein -induced acute pancreatitis (AP) in rats, and their levels can be modulated by some species of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), the intracellular levels of cAMP and by general leukocyte infiltration, the latter at least for SHP-2 and PTP1B. In this study we show that cerulein treatment activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) but not p38 MAPK during the early phase of cerulein-induced AP (2h after the first injection of cerulein). Therefore, by using the MAPK inhibitors SP600125 (a specific JNK inhibitor) and PD98059 (a specific ERK inhibitor), we have unmasked the particular MAPK that underlies the modulation of the expression levels of these PTPs. JNK would act by preventing SHP-1 protein expression from increasing beyond a certain level. ERK 1/2 was the main MAPK involved in the increase in SHP-2 protein expression due to cerulein. JNK negatively modulated the SH2-domain containing PTPs. Both MAPKs played a role in the increase in PTP1B protein expression due to cerulein. Finally, by using the white blood cell inhibitors vinblastine sulfate, gadolinium chloride and FK506 (tacrolimus), we show that the macrophage activity or T-lymphocytes does not modulate the expression of any of the PTPs, although neutrophil infiltration was found to be a regulator of SHP-2 and PTP1B protein expression due to cerulein.

  9. Novel role of C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) ubiquitin ligase on inhibiting cardiac apoptosis and dysfunction via regulating ERK5-mediated degradation of inducible cAMP early repressor.

    PubMed

    Woo, Chang-Hoon; Le, Nhat-Tu; Shishido, Tetsuro; Chang, Eugene; Lee, Hakjoo; Heo, Kyung-Sun; Mickelsen, Deanne M; Lu, Yan; McClain, Carolyn; Spangenberg, Thomas; Yan, Chen; Molina, Carlos A; Yang, Jay; Patterson, Cam; Abe, Jun-ichi

    2010-12-01

    Growing evidence indicates a critical role of ubiquitin-proteosome system in apoptosis regulation. A cardioprotective effect of ubiquitin (Ub) ligase of the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) on myocytes has been reported. In the current study, we found that the cardioprotective effect of insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was mediated by ERK5-CHIP signal module via inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) destabilization. In vitro runoff assay and Ub assay showed ICER as a substrate of CHIP Ub ligase. Both disruption of ERK5-CHIP binding with inhibitory helical linker domain fragment (aa 101-200) of CHIP and the depletion of ERK5 by siRNA inhibited CHIP Ub ligase activity, which suggests an obligatory role of ERK5 on CHIP activation. Depletion of CHIP, using siRNA, inhibited IGF-1-mediated reduction of isoproterenol-mediated ICER induction and apoptosis. In diabetic mice subjected to myocardial infarction, the CHIP Ub ligase activity was decreased, with an increase in ICER expression. These changes were attenuated significantly in a cardiac-specific constitutively active form of MEK5α transgenic mice (CA-MEK5α-Tg) previously shown to have greater functional recovery. Furthermore, pressure overload-mediated ICER induction was enhanced in heterozygous CHIP(+/-) mice. We identified ICER as a novel CHIP substrate and that the ERK5-CHIP complex plays an obligatory role in inhibition of ICER expression, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and cardiac dysfunction.

  10. Calcium-linked increase in coupled cAMP synthesis and hydrolysis is an early event in cholinergic and. beta. -adrenergic stimulation of parotid secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Deeg, M.A.; Graeff, R.M.; Walseth, T.F.; Goldberg, N.D. )

    1988-11-01

    The dynamics and compartmental characteristics of cAMP metabolism were examined by {sup 18}O labeling of cellular adenine nucleotide {alpha} phosphoryls in rat parotid gland stimulated to secrete with {beta}-adrenergic and cholinergic agents. The secretory response occurred in association with a rapidly increased rate of cAMP hydrolysis apparently coordinated with an equivalent increase in the rate of cAMP synthesis, since the cellular concentration of cAMP remained unchanged. The magnitude of this metabolic response was equivalent to the metabolism of 10-75 times the cellular content of cAMP within the first minute of stimulation. This increased metabolic rate occurred only during the early (1-3 min) period of stimulation, in what appeared to be an exclusive cellular compartment distinguished by a unique distribution of {sup 18}O among adenine nucleotide {alpha} phosphoryls. This {sup 18}O distribution contrasted with that produced by forskolin, which increased cellular cAMP concentration and elicited only a delayed response missing the early secretory component. The early acceleration of cAMP metabolism appeared linked to a stimulus-induced increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, since the Ca{sup 2+} ionophore ionomycin produced the same metabolic response in association with secretion. These observations suggest that cAMP metabolism is involved in stimulus-secretion coupling by a Ca{sup 2+}-linked mechanism different from that in which cAMP plays the role of a second messenger.

  11. Sustained antagonism of acute ethanol-induced ataxia following microinfusion of cyclic AMP and cpt-cAMP in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2011-05-01

    Ataxia is a conspicuous physical manifestation of alcohol consumption in humans and laboratory animals. Previously we reported possible involvement of cAMP in ethanol-induced ataxia. We now report a sustained antagonism of ataxia due to multiple ethanol injections following intracerebellar (ICB) cAMP or cpt-cAMP microinfusion. Adenylyl cyclase drugs cAMP, cpt-cAMP, Sp-cAMP, Rp-cAMP, adenosine A₁ agonist, N⁶-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) and GABA(A) agonist muscimol were directly microinfused into the cerebellum of CD-1 male mice to evaluate their effect on ethanol (2 g/kg; i.p.) ataxia. Drug microinfusions were made via stereotaxically implanted stainless steel guide cannulas. Rotorod was used to evaluate the ethanol's ataxic response. Intracerebellar cAMP (0.1, 1, 10 fmol) or cpt-cAMP (0.5, 1, 2 fmol) 60 min before ethanol treatment, dose-dependently attenuated ethanol-induced ataxia in general agreement with previous observations. Intracerebellar microinfusion of cAMP (100 fmol) or cpt-cAMP (2 fmol) produced a sustained attenuation of ataxia following ethanol administration at 1, 4, 7 and 25 h or 31 h post-cAMP/cpt-cAMP microinfusion. At 31 h post-cAMP, the ataxic response of ethanol reappeared. Additionally, marked antagonism to the accentuation of ethanol-induced ataxia by adenosine A₁ and GABA(A) agonists, CHA (34 pmol) and muscimol (88 pmol), respectively, was noted 24h after cAMP and cpt-cAMP treatment. This indicated possible participation of AC/cAMP/PKA signaling in the co-modulation of ethanol-induced ataxia by A₁ adenosinergic and GABAergic systems. No change in normal motor coordination was noted when cAMP or cpt-cAMP microinfusion was followed by saline. Finally, Rp-cAMP (PKA inhibitor, 22 pmol) accentuated ethanol-induced ataxia and antagonized its attenuation by cAMP whereas Sp-cAMP (PKA activator, 22 pmol) produced just the opposite effects, further indicating participation of cAMP-dependent PKA downstream. Overall, the results support a role of

  12. Rhythmic melatonin secretion does not correlate with the expression of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, inducible cyclic amp early repressor, period1 or cryptochrome1 mRNA in the sheep pineal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J D; Bashforth, R; Diack, A; Andersson, H; Lincoln, G A; Hazlerigg, D G

    2004-01-01

    The pineal gland, through nocturnal melatonin, acts as a neuroendocrine transducer of daily and seasonal time. Melatonin synthesis is driven by rhythmic activation of the rate-limiting enzyme, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT). In ungulates, AA-NAT mRNA is constitutively high throughout the 24-h cycle, and melatonin production is primarily controlled through effects on AA-NAT enzyme activity; this is in contrast to dominant transcriptional control in rodents. To determine whether there has been a selective loss of circadian control of AA-NAT mRNA expression in the sheep pineal, we measured the expression of other genes known to be rhythmic in rodents (inducible cAMP early repressor ICER, the circadian clock genes Period1 and Cryptochrome1, as well as AA-NAT). We first assayed gene expression in pineal glands collected from Soay sheep adapted to short days (Light: dark, 8-h: 16-h), and killed at 4-h intervals through 24-h. We found no evidence for rhythmic expression of ICER, AA-NAT or Cryptochrome1 under these conditions, whilst Period1 showed a low amplitude rhythm of expression, with higher values during the dark period. In a second group of animals, lights out was delayed by 8-h during the final 24-h sampling period, a manipulation that causes an immediate shortening of the period of melatonin secretion. This did not significantly affect the expression of ICER, AA-NAT or Cryptochrome1 in the pineal, whilst a slight suppressive effect on overall Per1 levels was observed. The attenuated response to photoperiod change appears to be specific to the ovine pineal, as the first long day induced rapid changes of Period1 and ICER expression in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei and pituitary pars tuberalis, respectively. Overall, our data suggest a general reduction of circadian control of transcript abundance in the ovine pineal gland, consistent with a marked evolutionary divergence in the mechanism regulating melatonin production between terrestrial

  13. Hepatic gene expression profiling of 5′-AMP-induced hypometabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Takao; Van Oort-Jansen, Anita; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Loose, David S.; Lee, Cheng Chi

    2011-01-01

    There is currently much interest in clinical applications of therapeutic hypothermia. Hypothermia can be a consequence of hypometabolism. We have recently established a procedure for the induction of a reversible deep hypometabolic state in mice using 5′-adenosine monophosphate (5′-AMP) in conjunction with moderate ambient temperature. The current study aims at investigating the impact of this technology at the gene expression level in a major metabolic organ, the liver. Our findings reveal that expression levels of the majority of genes in liver are not significantly altered by deep hypometabolism. However, among those affected by hypometabolism, more genes are differentially upregulated than downregulated both in a deep hypometabolic state and in the early arousal state. These altered gene expression levels during 5′-AMP induced hypometabolism are largely restored to normal levels within 2 days of the treatment. Our data also suggest that temporal control of circadian genes is largely stalled during deep hypometabolism. PMID:21224422

  14. Ethanol-induced loss of brain cyclic AMP binding proteins: correlation with growth suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, S.; Kalmus, G.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hypoplasia secondary to maternal ethanol consumption is a common fetal defect observed in all models of fetal alcohol syndrome. The molecular mechanism by which ethanol inhibits growth is unknown but has been hypothesized to involve ethanol-induced changes in the activity of cyclic-AMP stimulated protein kinase. Acute and chronic alcohol exposure elevate cyclic AMP level in many tissues, including brain. This increase in cyclic AMP should increase the phosphorylating activity of kinase by increasing the amount of dissociated (active) kinase catalytic subunit. In 7-day embryonic chick brains, ethanol-induced growth suppression was correlated with increased brain cyclic AMP content but neither basal nor cyclic AMP stimulated kinase catalytic activity was increased. However, the levels of cyclic AMP binding protein (kinase regulatory subunit) were significantly lowered by ethanol exposure. Measured as either /sup 3/H cyclic AMP binding or as 8-azido cyclic AM/sup 32/P labeling, ethanol-exposed brains had significantly less cyclic AMP binding activity (51 +/- 14 versus 29 +/- 10 units/..mu..g protein for 8-azido cyclic AMP binding). These findings suggest that ethanol's effect on kinase activity may involve more than ethanol-induced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  15. TSH-induced cyclic AMP production in an ovine thyroid cell line: OVNIS 5H.

    PubMed

    Fayet, G; Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S

    1986-01-06

    The TSH-induced cyclic AMP response was studied using a 3-year-old ovine thyroid cell line TSH-independent for growth: OVNIS 5H. The kinetics of cyclic AMP production was followed both in cell layers and in cell culture media, with or without phosphodiesterase inhibitor. It is noteworthy that following the first wave in cyclic AMP obtained within minutes, we observed later a sustained exponential increase in cyclic AMP during the 5 days following TSH stimulation. A bioassay of TSH was derived allowing measurement of 1 microU/ml TSH from a crude bTSH preparation.

  16. IP{sub 3}-dependent intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release is required for cAMP-induced c-fos expression in hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenting; Tingare, Asmita; Ng, David Chi-Heng; Johnson, Hong W.; Schell, Michael J.; Lord, Rebecca L.; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP-induced c-fos expression in hippocampal neurons requires a submembraneous Ca{sup 2+} pool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The submembraneous Ca{sup 2+} pool derives from intracellular ER stores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of IP{sub 3}-metabolizing enzymes inhibits cAMP-induced c-fos expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SRE-mediated and CRE-mediated gene expression is sensitive to IP{sub 3}-metabolizing enzymes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release is required for cAMP-induced nuclear translocation of TORC1. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP are widely used in concert by neurons to relay signals from the synapse to the nucleus, where synaptic activity modulates gene expression required for synaptic plasticity. Neurons utilize different transcriptional regulators to integrate information encoded in the spatiotemporal dynamics and magnitude of Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signals, including some that are Ca{sup 2+}-responsive, some that are cAMP-responsive and some that detect coincident Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signals. Because Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP can influence each other's amplitude and spatiotemporal characteristics, we investigated how cAMP acts to regulate gene expression when increases in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} are buffered. We show here that cAMP-mobilizing stimuli are unable to induce expression of the immediate early gene c-fos in hippocampal neurons in the presence of the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} buffer BAPTA-AM. Expression of enzymes that attenuate intracellular IP{sub 3} levels also inhibited cAMP-dependent c-fos induction. Synaptic activity induces c-fos transcription through two cis regulatory DNA elements - the CRE and the SRE. We show here that in response to cAMP both CRE-mediated and SRE-mediated induction of a luciferase reporter gene is attenuated by IP{sub 3} metabolizing enzymes. Furthermore, cAMP-induced nuclear translocation of the CREB coactivator TORC1 was inhibited by

  17. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  18. Mechanically induced c-fos expression is mediated by cAMP in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    In serum-deprived MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts, mechanical stimulation caused by mild (287 x g) centrifugation induced a 10-fold increase in mRNA levels of the proto-oncogene, c-fos. Induction of c-fos was abolished by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor H-89, suggesting that the transient c-fos mRNA increase is mediated by cAMP. Down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity by chronic TPA treatment failed to significantly reduce c-fos induction, suggesting that TPA-sensitive isoforms of PKC are not responsible for c-fos up-regulation. In addition, 287 x g centrifugation increased intracellular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels 2.8-fold (P<0. 005). Since we have previously shown that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can induce c-fos expression via a cAMP-mediated mechanism, we asked whether the increase in c-fos mRNA was due to centrifugation-induced PGE2 release. Pretreatment with the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and flurbiprofen did not hinder the early induction of c-fos by mechanical stimulation. We conclude that c-fos expression induced by mild mechanical loading is dependent primarily on cAMP, not PKC, and initial induction of c-fos is not necessarily dependent on the action of newly synthesized PGE2.

  19. Mechanically induced c-fos expression is mediated by cAMP in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    In serum-deprived MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts, mechanical stimulation caused by mild (287 x g) centrifugation induced a 10-fold increase in mRNA levels of the proto-oncogene, c-fos. Induction of c-fos was abolished by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor H-89, suggesting that the transient c-fos mRNA increase is mediated by cAMP. Down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity by chronic TPA treatment failed to significantly reduce c-fos induction, suggesting that TPA-sensitive isoforms of PKC are not responsible for c-fos up-regulation. In addition, 287 x g centrifugation increased intracellular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels 2.8-fold (P<0. 005). Since we have previously shown that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can induce c-fos expression via a cAMP-mediated mechanism, we asked whether the increase in c-fos mRNA was due to centrifugation-induced PGE2 release. Pretreatment with the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and flurbiprofen did not hinder the early induction of c-fos by mechanical stimulation. We conclude that c-fos expression induced by mild mechanical loading is dependent primarily on cAMP, not PKC, and initial induction of c-fos is not necessarily dependent on the action of newly synthesized PGE2.

  20. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying; Billiar, Timothy R

    2012-06-22

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation.

  1. Double electron–electron resonance reveals cAMP-induced conformational change in HCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Zagotta, William N.; Stoll, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Binding of 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels regulates their gating. cAMP binds to a conserved intracellular cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) in the channel, increasing the rate and extent of activation of the channel and shifting activation to less hyperpolarized voltages. The structural mechanism underlying this regulation, however, is unknown. We used double electron–electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy to directly map the conformational ensembles of the CNBD in the absence and presence of cAMP. Site-directed, double-cysteine mutants in a soluble CNBD fragment were spin-labeled, and interspin label distance distributions were determined using DEER. We found motions of up to 10 Å induced by the binding of cAMP. In addition, the distributions were narrower in the presence of cAMP. Continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance studies revealed changes in mobility associated with cAMP binding, indicating less conformational heterogeneity in the cAMP-bound state. From the measured DEER distributions, we constructed a coarse-grained elastic-network structural model of the cAMP-induced conformational transition. We find that binding of cAMP triggers a reorientation of several helices within the CNBD, including the C-helix closest to the cAMP-binding site. These results provide a basis for understanding how the binding of cAMP is coupled to channel opening in HCN and related channels. PMID:24958877

  2. Dibutyryl cAMP effects on thromboxane and leukotriene production in decompression-induced lung injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, T. M.; Butler, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    Decompression-induced venous bubble formation has been linked to increased neutrophil counts, endothelial cell injury, release of vasoactive eicosanoids, and increased vascular membrane permeability. These actions may account for inflammatory responses and edema formation. Increasing the intracellular cAMP has been shown to decrease eicosanoid production and edema formation in various models of lung injury. Reduction of decompression-induced inflammatory responses was evaluated in decompressed rats pretreated with saline (controls) or dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP, an analog of cAMP). After pretreatment, rats were exposed to either 616 kPa for 120 min or 683 kPa for 60 min. The observed increases in extravascular lung water ratios (pulmonary edema), bronchoalveolar lavage, and pleural protein in the saline control group (683 kPa) were not evident with DBcAMP treatment. DBcAMP pretreatment effects were also seen with the white blood cell counts and the percent of neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Urinary levels of thromboxane B2, 11-dehydrothromboxane B2, and leukotriene E4 were significantly increased with the 683 kPa saline control decompression exposure. DBcAMP reduced the decompression-induced leukotriene E4 production in the urine. Plasma levels of thromboxane B2, 11-dehydrothromboxane B2, and leukotriene E4 were increased with the 683-kPa exposure groups. DBcAMP treatment did not affect these changes. The 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 and leukotriene E4 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage were increased with the 683 kPa exposure and were reduced with the DBcAMP treatment. Our results indicate that DBcAMP has the capability to reduce eicosanoid production and limit membrane permeability and subsequent edema formation in rats experiencing decompression sickness.

  3. B cell differentiation factor-induced B cell maturation: regulation via reduction in cAMP.

    PubMed

    Huang, R; Cioffi, J; Berg, K; London, R; Cidon, M; Maayani, S; Mayer, L

    1995-04-15

    We have previously described a novel human B cell differentiation factor (BCDF), 446-BCDF, that is distinct biochemically and functionally from other cytokines. Since signal transduction pathways involved in human B cell differentiation have been incompletely studied and are poorly understood, we assessed the effects of 446-BCDF on various intracellular second messenger systems. After exposure of B cells to 446-BCDF, intracellular cAMP concentration started to decrease at 5 min and was significantly lower at 30 min and reached the lowest level at 4 hr. In most cases, cAMP concentrations returned toward baseline by 24 hr. A cAMP analog (dibutyryl cAMP), a stimulator of adenyl cyclase (forskolin), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (aminophylline and IBMX) which inhibited the 446-BCDF-induced decrease in intracellular cAMP, inhibited 446-BCDF-induced B cell differentiation, suggesting that the fall in intracellular cAMP was a critical event in this process. To understand the mechanism involved in the reduction of cAMP, B cells were treated with pertussis toxin (PTX), a Gi protein inhibitor. Pertussis toxin blocked 446-BCDF-induced B cell differentiation as well, suggesting that 446-BCDF may function by stimulation of a Gi-linked receptor resulting in the inhibition of adenylate cyclase with a consequent reduction in cAMP. Other cytokines known to promote Ig secretion (IL2 and IL6) also caused a reduction in cAMP, suggesting that this pathway may be generally important in B cell differentiation. Taken together, these data suggest that at least one pathway of terminal maturation in B cells may involve the reduction of intracellular cAMP.

  4. cAMP-Induced Histones H3 Dephosphorylation Is Independent of PKA and MAP Kinase Activations and Correlates With mTOR Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Pedro; Rojas, Juan

    2016-03-01

    cAMP is a second messenger well documented to be involved in the phosphorylation of PKA, MAP kinase, and histone H3 (H3). Early, we reported that cAMP also induced H3 dephosphorylation in a variety of proliferating cell lines. Herein, it is shown that cAMP elicits a biphasic H3 dephosphorylation independent of PKA activation in cycling cells. H89, a potent inhibitor of PKA catalytic sub-unite, could not abolish this effect. Additionally, H89 induces a rapid and biphasic H3 serine 10 dephosphorylation, while a decline in the basal phosphorylation of CREB/ATF-1 is observed. Rp-cAMPS, an analog of cAMP and specific inhibitor of PKA, is unable to suppress cAMP-mediated H3 dephosphorylation, whereas Rp-cAMPS effectively blocks CREB/ATF-1 hyper-phosphorylation by cAMP and its inducers. Interestingly, cAMP exerts a rapid and profound H3 dephosphorylation at much lower concentration (50-fold lower, 0.125 mM) than the concentration required for maximal CREB/ATF-1 phosphorylation (5 mM). Much higher cAMP concentration is required to fully induce CREB/ATF-1 gain in phosphate (5 mM), which correlates with the inhibition of H3 dephosphorylation. Also, the dephosphorylation of H3 does not overlap at onset of MAP kinase phosphorylation pathways, p38 and ERK. Surprisingly, rapamycin (an mTOR inhibitor), cAMP, and its natural inducer isoproterenol, elicit identical dephosphorylation kinetics on both S6K1 ribosomal kinase (a downstream mTOR target) and H3. Finally, cAMP-induced H3 dephosphorylation is PP1/2-dependent. The results suggest that a pathway, requiring much lower cAMP concentration to that required for CREB/ATF-1 hyper-phosphorylation, is responsible for histone H3 dephosphorylation and may be linked to mTOR down regulation.

  5. Cyclic AMP can promote APL progression and protect myeloid leukemia cells against anthracycline-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Gausdal, G; Wergeland, A; Skavland, J; Nguyen, E; Pendino, F; Rouhee, N; McCormack, E; Herfindal, L; Kleppe, R; Havemann, U; Schwede, F; Bruserud, Ø; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Døskeland, S O

    2013-01-01

    We show that cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevating agents protect blasts from patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) against death induced by first-line anti-leukemic anthracyclines like daunorubicin (DNR). The cAMP effect was reproduced in NB4 APL cells, and shown to depend on activation of the generally cytoplasmic cAMP-kinase type I (PKA-I) rather than the perinuclear PKA-II. The protection of both NB4 cells and APL blasts was associated with (inactivating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser118 of pro-apoptotic Bad and (activating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser133 of the AML oncogene CREB. Either event would be expected to protect broadly against cell death, and we found cAMP elevation to protect also against 2-deoxyglucose, rotenone, proteasome inhibitor and a BH3-only mimetic. The in vitro findings were mirrored by the findings in NSG mice with orthotopic NB4 cell leukemia. The mice showed more rapid disease progression when given cAMP-increasing agents (prostaglandin E2 analog and theophylline), both with and without DNR chemotherapy. The all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced terminal APL cell differentiation is a cornerstone in current APL treatment and is enhanced by cAMP. We show also that ATRA-resistant APL cells, believed to be responsible for treatment failure with current ATRA-based treatment protocols, were protected by cAMP against death. This suggests that the beneficial pro-differentiating and non-beneficial pro-survival APL cell effects of cAMP should be weighed against each other. The results suggest also general awareness toward drugs that can affect bone marrow cAMP levels in leukemia patients. PMID:23449452

  6. Cyclic AMP can promote APL progression and protect myeloid leukemia cells against anthracycline-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gausdal, G; Wergeland, A; Skavland, J; Nguyen, E; Pendino, F; Rouhee, N; McCormack, E; Herfindal, L; Kleppe, R; Havemann, U; Schwede, F; Bruserud, O; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Døskeland, S O

    2013-02-28

    We show that cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevating agents protect blasts from patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) against death induced by first-line anti-leukemic anthracyclines like daunorubicin (DNR). The cAMP effect was reproduced in NB4 APL cells, and shown to depend on activation of the generally cytoplasmic cAMP-kinase type I (PKA-I) rather than the perinuclear PKA-II. The protection of both NB4 cells and APL blasts was associated with (inactivating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser118 of pro-apoptotic Bad and (activating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser133 of the AML oncogene CREB. Either event would be expected to protect broadly against cell death, and we found cAMP elevation to protect also against 2-deoxyglucose, rotenone, proteasome inhibitor and a BH3-only mimetic. The in vitro findings were mirrored by the findings in NSG mice with orthotopic NB4 cell leukemia. The mice showed more rapid disease progression when given cAMP-increasing agents (prostaglandin E2 analog and theophylline), both with and without DNR chemotherapy. The all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced terminal APL cell differentiation is a cornerstone in current APL treatment and is enhanced by cAMP. We show also that ATRA-resistant APL cells, believed to be responsible for treatment failure with current ATRA-based treatment protocols, were protected by cAMP against death. This suggests that the beneficial pro-differentiating and non-beneficial pro-survival APL cell effects of cAMP should be weighed against each other. The results suggest also general awareness toward drugs that can affect bone marrow cAMP levels in leukemia patients.

  7. The resolution of acute inflammation induced by cyclic AMP is dependent on annexin A1.

    PubMed

    Lima, Kátia M; Vago, Juliana P; Caux, Thaís R; Negreiros-Lima, Graziele Letícia; Sugimoto, Michelle A; Tavares, Luciana P; Arribada, Raquel G; Carmo, Aline Alves F; Galvão, Izabela; Costa, Bruno Rocha C; Soriani, Frederico M; Pinho, Vanessa; Solito, Egle; Perretti, Mauro; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2017-08-18

    Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is a glucocorticoid-regulated protein known for its anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving effects. We have shown previously that the cAMP-enhancing compounds rolipram (ROL; a PDE4 inhibitor) and Bt2cAMP (a cAMP mimetic) drive caspase-dependent resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. In this follow-up study, we investigated whether AnxA1 could be involved in the pro-resolving properties of these compounds using a model of LPS-induced inflammation in BALB/c mice. The treatment with ROL or Bt2cAMP at the peak of inflammation shortened resolution intervals, improved resolution indices, and increased AnxA1 expression. In vitro studies showed that ROL and Bt2cAMP induced AnxA1 expression and phosphorylation, and this effect was prevented by PKA inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of PKA in ROL-induced AnxA1 expression. Akin to these in vitro findings, H89 prevented ROL- and Bt2cAMP-induced resolution of inflammation, and it was associated with decreased levels of intact AnxA1. Moreover, two different strategies to block the AnxA1 pathway (by using N-t-Boc-Met-Leu-Phe, a nonselective AnxA1 receptor antagonist, or by using an anti-AnxA1 neutralizing antiserum) prevented ROL- and Bt2cAMP-induced resolution and neutrophil apoptosis. Likewise, the ability of ROL or Bt2cAMP to induce neutrophil apoptosis was impaired in AnxA-knock-out mice. Finally, in in vitro settings, ROL and Bt2cAMP overrode the survival-inducing effect of LPS in human neutrophils in an AnxA1-dependent manner. Our results show that AnxA1 is at least one of the endogenous determinants mediating the pro-resolving properties of cAMP-elevating agents and cAMP-mimetic drugs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Forskolin increases cAMP and inhibits progesterone induced meiosis reinitiation in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Schorderet-Slatkine, S; Baulieu, E E

    1982-10-01

    The diterpene, forskolin, is a potent and reversible inhibitor of progesterone-induced meiosis in Xenopus laevis oocytes (ED50 of inhibition approximately 3 microM). Forskolin alone increases cAMP concentration in oocytes, but, unlike with cholera toxin treatment, there is no lag phase, and reversibility is obtained by washing the cells. Progesterone decreases the forskolin effect on cAMP accumulation, but cAMP concentration remains above the level observed in oocytes treated with progesterone alone. The data corroborate the previously-established antagonistic effect of cAMP on progesterone-induced meiosis. Preliminary experiments in the presence of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor suggest that, as in other biological systems, forskolin is an activator of adenylate cyclase in xenopus laevis oocytes. Contrary to what is observed when forskolin is present in the incubation medium, no effect of the diterpene is recorded after its injection into oocytes, evoking a site of action at the external side of the membrane.

  9. Cyclic di-AMP Released from Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Induces a Macrophage Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Gries, Casey M.; Bruger, Eric L.; Moormeier, Derek E.; Scherr, Tyler D.; Waters, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of community- and nosocomial-acquired infections, with a propensity for biofilm formation. S. aureus biofilms actively skew the host immune response toward an anti-inflammatory state; however, the biofilm effector molecules and the mechanism(s) of action responsible for this phenomenon remain to be fully defined. The essential bacterial second messenger cyclic diadenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an emerging pathogen-associated molecular pattern during intracellular bacterial infections, as c-di-AMP secretion into the infected host cytosol induces a robust type I interferon (IFN) response. Type I IFNs have the potential to exacerbate infectious outcomes by promoting anti-inflammatory effects; however, the type I IFN response to S. aureus biofilms is unknown. Additionally, while several intracellular proteins function as c-di-AMP receptors in S. aureus, it has yet to be determined if any extracellular role for c-di-AMP exists and its release during biofilm formation has not yet been demonstrated. This study examined the possibility that c-di-AMP released during S. aureus biofilm growth polarizes macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory phenotype via type I interferon signaling. DacA, the enzyme responsible for c-di-AMP synthesis in S. aureus, was highly expressed during biofilm growth, and 30 to 50% of total c-di-AMP produced from S. aureus biofilm was released extracellularly due to autolytic activity. S. aureus biofilm c-di-AMP release induced macrophage type I IFN expression via a STING-dependent pathway and promoted S. aureus intracellular survival in macrophages. These findings identify c-di-AMP as another mechanism for how S. aureus biofilms promote macrophage anti-inflammatory activity, which likely contributes to biofilm persistence. PMID:27736778

  10. Changes in the expression of LIMP-2 during cerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats: Effect of inhibition of leukocyte infiltration, cAMP and MAPKs early on in its development.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, Violeta; Sarmiento, Nancy; Sánchez-Bernal, Carmen; Coveñas, Rafael; Hernández-Hernández, Angel; Calvo, José J; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    Lysosomal integral membrane protein-2 (LIMP-2) is an important protein in lysosomal biogenesis and function and also plays a role in the tissue inflammatory response. It is known that lysosomes play a central role in acute pancreatitis, with inflammatory cell infiltration triggering the disease early on. In this study we report increases in pancreatic LIMP-2 protein and mRNA levels as early events that occur during the development of cerulein (Cer)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) in rats. GdCl3, a macrophage inhibitor, but not FK506, a T lymphocyte inhibitor, was able to reverse the increase in LIMP-2 expression after Cer treatment, although such reversion was abolished if the animals were depleted of neutrophils due to a vinblastine sulfate pre-treatment. Immunostaining revealed that the cellular source of LIMP-2 was mainly acinar cells. Additionally, pre-treatments with the MAPKs inhibitors SP600125 and PD98059, inhibitors of JNK and ERK½ activation, respectively, but not of rolipram, a type IV phosphodiesterase inhibitor, suppressed the increase in the expression of LIMP-2 after Cer administration. Together, these results indicate that neutrophils are able to drive a macrophage activation that would regulate the increase in LIMP-2 expression during the early phase of Cer-induced AP, with the stress kinases JNK and ERK½ also playing a coordinated role in the increase of LIMP-2 expression due to Cer.

  11. Regulation by intracellular Ca sup 2+ and cyclic AMP of the growth factor-induced ruffling membrane formation and stimulation of fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Yoshihiko Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Medical Science ); Nishida, Eisuke; Sakai, Hikoichi ); Koyasu, Shigeo; Yahara, Ichiro )

    1989-04-01

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) induce formation of ruffling membranes and stimulate the fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis in human epidermoid carcinoma KB cells. An increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration by treatment with A23187, a calcium ionophore, or an increase in intracellular cAMP level by treatment with dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin almost completely inhibited the insulin-, IGF-I-, or EGF-induced formation of ruffling membranes. Increases in Ca{sup 2+} or cAMP concentration also inhibited almost completely the stimulation of fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis elicited by these growth factors. These results suggest that the growth factor-induced ruffling membrane formation and the stimulation of fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis have a common regulatory mechanism involving intracellular concentrations of Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP. {sup 125}I-EGF binding assays and immunoprecipitation experiments with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody revealed that treatment of KB cells with A23187, dibutyryl cAMP, or forskolin did not inhibit the EGF binding to the cells nor subsequent tyrosine autophosphorylation of its receptors. These results indicate that Ca{sup 2+}- and/or cAMP-sensitive intracellular reactions exist downstream from the receptor kinase activation in the process of these early cellular responses.

  12. Vv-AMP1, a ripening induced peptide from Vitis vinifera shows strong antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Abré; Vivier, Melané A

    2008-01-01

    Background Latest research shows that small antimicrobial peptides play a role in the innate defense system of plants. These peptides typically contribute to preformed defense by developing protective barriers around germinating seeds or between different tissue layers within plant organs. The encoding genes could also be upregulated by abiotic and biotic stimuli during active defense processes. The peptides display a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities. Their potent anti-pathogenic characteristics have ensured that they are promising targets in the medical and agricultural biotechnology sectors. Results A berry specific cDNA sequence designated Vv-AMP1, Vitis vinifera antimicrobial peptide 1, was isolated from Vitis vinifera. Vv-AMP1 encodes for a 77 amino acid peptide that shows sequence homology to the family of plant defensins. Vv-AMP1 is expressed in a tissue specific, developmentally regulated manner, being only expressed in berry tissue at the onset of berry ripening and onwards. Treatment of leaf and berry tissue with biotic or abiotic factors did not lead to increased expression of Vv-AMP1 under the conditions tested. The predicted signal peptide of Vv-AMP1, fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP), showed that the signal peptide allowed accumulation of its product in the apoplast. Vv-AMP1 peptide, produced in Escherichia coli, had a molecular mass of 5.495 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry. Recombinant Vv-AMP1 was extremely heat-stable and showed strong antifungal activity against a broad spectrum of plant pathogenic fungi, with very high levels of activity against the wilting disease causing pathogens Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae. The Vv-AMP1 peptide did not induce morphological changes on the treated fungal hyphae, but instead strongly inhibited hyphal elongation. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of Vv-AMP1 might be associated with altering the membrane permeability of the fungal

  13. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Tang, Ming-Chi; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  14. [cAMP analogue 8-CPT-cAMP inducing differentiation in the M2b subtype of acute myeloid leukemia cell line Kasumi-1].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qi; Hu, Jun-Pei; Jia, Pei-Min; Wang, Zhen-Yi; Tong, Jian-Hua

    2008-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the possible effects of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) analogue 8-(4-chlorophenylthio) adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-CPT-cAMP) on the M(2b) subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M(2b)) cells. AML-M(2b) is characterized by the non-random chromosome translocation t (8; 21) (q22; q22), through which AML1 (acute myeloid leukemia 1) gene on chromosome 21 is fused with ETO (eight twenty-one) gene on chromosome 8, coding correspondent AML1-ETO fusion protein, which plays a crucial role in the leukemogenesis of AML-M(2b). The AML-M(2b) cell line Kasumi-1 cells were used as an in vitro model. The influences of 8-CPT-cAMP on the proliferation and differentiation of Kasumi-1 cells were evaluated according to cellular morphology, changes in cell surface antigen and cell cycle, as well as nitroblue-tetrazolium (NBT) assay. Meanwhile, semi-quantity RT-PCR and Western blot assay were used to detect the degradation of AML1-ETO fusion protein in Kasumi-1 cells before and after the treatment. The results showed that 8-CPT-cAMP (200 micromol/L) could significantly inhibit cell growth and induce differentiation of Kasumi-1 cells. However, it must be pointed out that 8-CPT-cAMP-induced differentiation in Kasumi-1 is not a typical terminal differentiation. Furthermore, 8-CPT-cAMP exerted little influence on the expression of AML1-ETO fusion gene and its product in Kasumi-1 cells. In conclusion, the 8-CPT-cAMP induced differentiation in Kasumi-1 cells. This results may provide experimental and theoretical basis for the breakthrough of differentiation-induced therapy extended to another leukemia.

  15. The role of ventral striatal cAMP signaling in stress-induced behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, Florian; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Hernandez, Adan; Benavides, David R.; Tassin, Tara C.; Tan, Chunfeng; Day, Jonathan; Fina, Maggy W.; Yuen, Eunice Y.; Yan, Zhen; Goldberg, Matthew S.; Nairn, Angus C.; Greengard, Paul; Nestler, Eric J.; Taussig, Ronald; Nishi, Akinori; Houslay, Miles D.; Bibb, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP/PKA signaling cascade is a ubiquitous pathway acting downstream of multiple neuromodulators. We found that the phosphorylation of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) by cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (Cdk5) facilitates cAMP degradation and homeostasis of cAMP/PKA signaling. In mice, loss of Cdk5 throughout the forebrain elevated cAMP levels and increased PKA activity in striatal neurons, and altered behavioral responses to acute or chronic stressors. Ventral striatum- or D1 dopamine receptor-specific conditional knockout of Cdk5, or ventral striatum infusion of a small interfering peptide that selectively targets the regulation of PDE4 by Cdk5, all produced analogical effects on stress-induced behavioral responses. Together, our results demonstrate that altering cAMP signaling in medium spiny neurons of the ventral striatum can effectively modulate stress-induced behavioral states. We propose that targeting the Cdk5 regulation of PDE4 could be a new therapeutic approach for clinical conditions associated with stress, such as depression. PMID:26192746

  16. Cyclic AMP induces IPC leukemia cell apoptosis via CRE-and CDK-dependent Bim transcription.

    PubMed

    Huseby, S; Gausdal, G; Keen, T J; Kjærland, E; Krakstad, C; Myhren, L; Brønstad, K; Kunick, C; Schwede, F; Genieser, H-G; Kleppe, R; Døskeland, S O

    2011-12-08

    The IPC-81 cell line is derived from the transplantable BNML model of acute myelogenic leukemia (AML), known to be a reliable predictor of the clinical efficiency of antileukemic agents, like the first-line AML anthracycline drug daunorubicin (DNR). We show here that cAMP acted synergistically with DNR to induce IPC cell death. The DNR-induced death differed from that induced by cAMP by (1) not involving Bim induction, (2) being abrogated by GSK3β inhibitors, (3) by being promoted by the HSP90/p23 antagonist geldanamycin and truncated p23 and (4) by being insensitive to the CRE binding protein (CREB) antagonist ICER and to cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK) inhibitors. In contrast, the apoptosis induced by cAMP correlated tightly with Bim protein expression. It was abrogated by Bim (BCL2L11) downregulation, whether achieved by the CREB antagonist ICER, by CDK inhibitors, by Bim-directed RNAi, or by protein synthesis inhibitor. The forced expression of BimL killed IPC-81(WT) cells rapidly, Bcl2-overexpressing cells being partially resistant. The pivotal role of CREB and CDK activity for Bim transcription is unprecedented. It is also noteworthy that newly developed cAMP analogs specifically activating PKA isozyme I (PKA-I) were able to induce IPC cell apoptosis. Our findings support the notion that AML cells may possess targetable death pathways not exploited by common anti-cancer agents.

  17. H2S induces vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries via cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Lei; Mi, Yan-Ni; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), traditionally known for its toxic effects, is now involved in regulating vascular tone. Here we investigated the vasoconstrictive effect of H2S on cerebral artery and the underlying mechanism. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, concentration-dependently induced vasoconstriction on basilar artery, which was enhanced in the presence of isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist or forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator. Administration of NaHS attenuated the vasorelaxant effects of isoprenaline or forskolin. Meanwhile, the NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was diminished in the presence of 8B-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, but was not affected by Bay K-8644, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist. These results could be explained by the revised effects of NaHS on isoprenaline-induced cAMP elevation and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Additionally, NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced by removing the endothelium or in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. L-NAME only partially attenuated the effect of NaHS which was given together with forskolin on the pre-contracted artery. In conclusion, H2S induces vasoconstriction of cerebral artery via, at least in part, cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intratracheal administration of DBcAMP attenuates edema formation in phosgene-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sciuto, A M; Strickland, P T; Kennedy, T P; Guo, Y L; Gurtner, G H

    1996-01-01

    Phosgene, a toxic gas widely used as an industrial chemical intermediate, is known to cause life-threatening latent noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Mechanisms related to its toxicity appear to involve lipoxygenase mediators of arachidonic acid (AA) and can be inhibited by pretreatment with drugs that increase adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). In the present study, we used the isolated buffer-perfused rabbit lung model to investigate the mechanisms by which cAMP protects against phosgene-induced lung injury. Posttreatment with dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) was given 60-85 min after exposure by an intravascular or intratracheal route. Lung weight gain (LWG) was measured continuously. AA metabolites leukotriene (LT) C4, LTD4, and LTE4 and 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha were measured in the perfusate at 70, 90, 110, 130, and 150 min after exposure. Tissue malondialdehyde and reduced and oxidized glutathione were analyzed 150 min postexposure. Compared with measurements in the lungs of rabbits exposed to phosgene alone, posttreatment with DBcAMP significantly reduced LWG, pulmonary arterial pressure, and inhibited the release of LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. Intratracheal administration of DBcAMP was more effective than intravascular administration in reducing LWG. Posttreatment also decreased MDA and protected against glutathione oxidation observed with phosgene exposure. We conclude that phosgene causes marked glutathione oxidation, lipid peroxidation, release of AA mediators, and increases LWG. Posttreatment with DBcAMP attenuates these effects, not only by previously described inhibition of pulmonary endothelial or epithelial cell contraction but also by inhibition of AA-mediator production and a novel antioxidant effect.

  19. Attenuation of epinephrine-induced increase in liver cyclic AMP by endogeneous insulin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shikama, H; Ui, M

    1976-09-24

    1. Epinephrine-induced increase in rat liver cyclic AMP in vivo was potentiated when the circulating insulin was suppressed by injection of anti-insulin serum or by induction of diabetes. Consequently, phosphorylase was activated, glycogen synthetase was inactivated and glycogen accumulation induced by glucose load was prevented by epinephrine in the insulin-deficient rats to a much larger extent than in normal rats. 2. Insulin lack was effective in potentiating epinephrine-induced increase in liver and muscule cyclic AMP even after the treatment of rats with theophylline; the potentiation could not be solely accounted for by the inhibition of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. Thus, it is likely that insulin lack enhaces epinephrine activation of adenylate cyclase. 3. Unlike epinephrine, glucagon increased liver cyclic AMP to essentially the same extent whether the rat was treated with anti-insulin serum or not. 4. Based on the difference in dose-response curves between normal and insulin-deficient rats, a possibility is discussed that there are two adenylate cylase in the liver with higher and lower affinities for epinephrine and that circulating insulin blocks the high affinity enzyme selectively.

  20. Involvement of cyclic AMP in the regulations of lymphokine induced glia cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fontana, A; Jost, R; Balsiger, S; Grob, P; Grieder, A

    1981-11-01

    T and B lymphocytes of human or murine origin were found to secrete a factor which increases the DNA and RNA synthesis of cultured glia cells. This factor, termed glia cell stimulating factor (GSF), is released upon stimulation of such immune cells by mitogen or antigen qualifying it as a lymphokine. In this communication we report on the role of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in regulating the effect of GSF on glia cells. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), isoproterenol and theophylline were effective in suppressing the GSF-induced increase of the glia cell proliferation. No inhibition of DNA synthesis and no decrease in cell number was observed when testing these substances on glia cells not being activated by GSF. The drugs were found to induce an increase in cAMP concentrations of glia cells. A partial desensitization of the glia cells to these drug induced elevations of cAMP was detected after pretreatment of the glia cell cultures with GSF. It is suggested that stimulated lymphocytes not only release GSF but also low molecular weight proteins such as PGE1 which regulate the effects of GSF on glia cells by activating their adenylate cyclase.

  1. The β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam (NXL104) does not induce ampC β-lactamase in Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Miossec, Christine; Claudon, Monique; Levasseur, Premavathy; Black, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Induction of ampC β-lactamase expression can often compromise antibiotic treatment and is triggered by several β-lactams (such as cefoxitin and imipenem) and by the β-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid. The novel β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam (NXL104) is a potent inhibitor of both class A and class C enzymes. The potential of avibactam for induction of ampC expression in Enterobacter cloacae was investigated by ampC messenger ribonucleic acid quantitation. Cefoxitin and clavulanic acid were confirmed as ampC inducers, whereas avibactam was found to exert no effect on ampC expression. Thus, avibactam is unlikely to diminish the activity of any partner β-lactam antibiotic against AmpC-producing organisms. PMID:24348054

  2. Dissecting the cAMP-inducible allosteric switch in protein kinase A RI alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoberg, T.J.; Kornev, A.P.; Taylor, S.S.; /SLAC

    2012-08-23

    The regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are the major receptors of cAMP in most eukaryotic cells. As the cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domains release cAMP and bind to the catalytic subunit of PKA, they undergo a major conformational change. The change is mediated by the B/C helix in CNB-A, which extends into one long helix that now separates the two CNB domains and docks onto the surface of the catalytic subunit. We explore here the role of three key residues on the B/C helix that dock onto the catalytic subunit, Arg226, Leu233, and Met 234. By replacing each residue with Ala, we show that each contributes significantly to creating the R:C interface. By also deleting the second CNB domain (CNB-B), we show furthermore that CNB-B is a critical part of the cAMP-induced conformational switch that dislodges the B/C helix from the surface of the catalytic subunit. Without CNB-B the K{sub a} for activation by cAMP increases from 80 to 1000 nM. Replacing any of the key interface residues with Ala reduces the K{sub a} to 25-40 nM. Leu233 and M234 contribute to a hydrophobic latch that binds the B/C helix onto the large lobe of the C-subunit, while Arg226 is part of an electrostatic switch that couples the B/C helix to the phosphate binding cassette where the cAMP docks.

  3. Evidence that glucocorticoid- and cyclic AMP-induced apoptotic pathways in lymphocytes share distal events.

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, D R; Miesfeld, R L

    1992-01-01

    WEHI7.2 murine lymphocytes undergo apoptotic death when exposed to glucocorticoids or elevated levels of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP), and these pathways are initiated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and protein kinase A, respectively. We report the isolation and characterization of a novel WEHI7.2 variant cell line, WR256, which was selected in a single step for growth in the presence of dexamethasone and arose at a frequency of approximately 10(-10). The defect was not GR-related, as WR256 expressed functional GR and underwent GR-dependent events associated with apoptosis, such as hormone-dependent gene transcription and inhibition of cell proliferation. Moreover, the glucocorticoid-resistant phenotype was stable in culture and did not revert after treatment with 5-azacytidine or upon stable expression of GR cDNA. In addition, WR256 did not exhibit the diminished mitochondrial activity commonly associated with apoptosis. Interestingly, WR256 was also found to be resistant to 8-bromo-cAMP and forskolin despite having normal levels of protein kinase A activity and the ability to induce cAMP-dependent transcription. We examined the steady-state transcript levels of bcl-2, a gene whose protein product acts dominantly to inhibit thymocyte apoptosis, to determine whether elevated bcl-2 expression could account for the resistant phenotype. Our data showed that bcl-2 RNA levels were similar in the two cell lines and not altered by either dexamethasone or 8-bromo-cAMP treatment. These results suggest that WR256 exhibits a "deathless" phenotype and has a unique defect in a step of the apoptotic cascade that may be common to the glucocorticoid- and cAMP-mediated cell death pathways. Images PMID:1378529

  4. Autocrine activation of neuronal NMDA receptors by aspartate mediates dopamine- and cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luis E. F.; Murray, Peter D.; Zielke, H. Ronald; Roby, Clinton D.; Kingsbury, Tami J.; Krueger, Bruce K.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic AMP can stimulate the transcription of many activity-dependent genes via activation of the transcription factor, CREB. However, in mouse cortical neuron cultures, prior to synaptogenesis, neither cAMP nor dopamine, which acts via cAMP, stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription when NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) were blocked. Stimulation of transcription by cAMP was potentiated by inhibitors of excitatory amino acid uptake, suggesting a role for extracellular glutamate or aspartate in cAMP-induced transcription. Aspartate was identified as the extracellular messenger: enzymatic scavenging of L-aspartate, but not glutamate, blocked stimulation of CREB-dependent gene transcription by cAMP; moreover, cAMP induced aspartate but not glutamate release. Taken together, these results suggest that cAMP acts via an autocrine or paracrine pathway to release aspartate, which activates NR2B-containing NMDARs, leading to Ca2+ entry and activation of transcription. This cAMP/aspartate/NMDAR signaling pathway may mediate the effects of transmitters such as dopamine on axon growth and synaptogenesis in developing neurons or on synaptic plasticity in mature neural networks. PMID:19812345

  5. Resveratrol attenuates vascular endothelial inflammation by inducing autophagy through the cAMP signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Liang; Yi, Long; Jin, Xin; Liang, Xin-Yu; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Ting; Xie, Qi; Zhou, Xi; Chang, Hui; Fu, Yu-Jie; Zhu, Jun-Dong; Zhang, Qian-Yong; Mi, Man-Tian

    2013-12-01

    Inflammation participates centrally in all stages of atherosclerosis (AS), which begins with inflammatory changes in the endothelium, characterized by expression of the adhesion molecules. Resveratrol (RSV) is a naturally occurring phytoalexin that can attenuate endothelial inflammation; however, the exact mechanisms have not been thoroughly elucidated. Autophagy refers to the normal process of cell degradation of proteins and organelles, and is protective against certain inflammatory injuries. Thus, we intended to determine the role of autophagy in the antiinflammatory effects of RSV in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We found that RSV pretreatment reduced tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF/TNF?)-induced inflammation and increased MAP1LC3B2 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 ? 2) expression and SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1) degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. A bafilomycin A 1 (BafA1) challenge resulted in further accumulation of MAP1LC3B2 in HUVECs. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA), chloroquine as well as ATG5 and BECN1 siRNA significantly attenuated RSV-induced autophagy, which, subsequently, suppressed the downregulation of RSV-induced inflammatory factors expression. RSV also increased cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) content, the expression of PRKA (protein kinase A) and SIRT1 (sirtuin 1), as well as the activity of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). RSV-induced autophagy in HUVECs was abolished in the presence of inhibitors of ADCY (adenylyl cyclase, KH7), PRKA (H-89), AMPK (compound C), or SIRT1 (nicotinamide and EX-527), as well as ADCY, PRKA, AMPK, and SIRT1 siRNA transfection, indicating that the effects of RSV on autophagy induction were dependent on cAMP, PRKA, AMPK and SIRT1. In conclusion, RSV attenuates endothelial inflammation by inducing autophagy, and the autophagy in part was mediated through the activation of the cAMP-PRKA-AMPK-SIRT1 signaling pathway.

  6. Dual Transcriptional Regulation of the Escherichia coli Phosphate-Starvation-Inducible psiE Gene of the Phosphate Regulon by PhoB and the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Ki; Kimura, Sigenobu; Shinagawa, Hideo; Nakata, Atsuo; Lee, Ki-Sung; Wanner, Barry L.; Makino, Kozo

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that the Escherichia coli phosphate-starvation-inducible psiE gene is regulated by both phosphate and the carbon source by using both lacZ and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) fusions. Yet, under all conditions tested, a single transcriptional start site lying 7 bp downstream of a predicted −10 region was revealed by primer extension analysis. DNase I footprinting showed that the PhoB transcriptional-activator protein protects two predicted pho boxes lying upstream of and near the −35 promoter region. Similar analysis showed that the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (cAMP-CRP) complex binds a region that overlaps with the downstream pho box. These results, together with measurements of the in vivo psiE promoter activity under various conditions, show that expression of the psiE gene is under direct positive and negative control by PhoB and cAMP-CRP, respectively. PMID:10986267

  7. Glucose- and Hormone-Induced cAMP Oscillations in α- and β-Cells Within Intact Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Sandler, Stellan; Gylfe, Erik; Tengholm, Anders

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE cAMP is a critical messenger for insulin and glucagon secretion from pancreatic β- and α-cells, respectively. Dispersed β-cells show cAMP oscillations, but the signaling kinetics in cells within intact islets of Langerhans is unknown. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The subplasma-membrane cAMP concentration ([cAMP]pm) was recorded in α- and β-cells in the mantle of intact mouse pancreatic islets using total internal reflection microscopy and a fluorescent translocation biosensor. Cell identification was based on the opposite effects of adrenaline on cAMP in α- and β-cells. RESULTS In islets exposed to 3 mmol/L glucose, [cAMP]pm was low and stable. Glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)-amide (GLP-1) induced dose-dependent elevation of [cAMP]pm, often with oscillations synchronized among β-cells. Whereas glucagon also induced [cAMP]pm oscillations in most α-cells, <20% of the α-cells responded to GLP-1. Elevation of the glucose concentration to 11–30 mmol/L in the absence of hormones induced slow [cAMP]pm oscillations in both α- and β-cells. These cAMP oscillations were coordinated with those of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the β-cells but not caused by the changes in [Ca2+]i. The transmembrane adenylyl cyclase (AC) inhibitor 2′5′-dideoxyadenosine suppressed the glucose- and hormone-induced [cAMP]pm elevations, whereas the preferential inhibitors of soluble AC, KH7, and 1,3,5(10)-estratrien-2,3,17-β-triol perturbed cell metabolism and lacked effect, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Oscillatory [cAMP]pm signaling in secretagogue-stimulated β-cells is maintained within intact islets and depends on transmembrane AC activity. The discovery of glucose- and glucagon-induced [cAMP]pm oscillations in α-cells indicates the involvement of cAMP in the regulation of pulsatile glucagon secretion. PMID:21444924

  8. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  9. Theophylline and cAMP inhibit lysophosphatidic acid-induced hyperresponsiveness of bovine tracheal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Jiro; Oike, Masahiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ito, Yushi

    2003-01-01

    We have established an in vitro model of airway hyperresponsiveness, using a bovine tracheal smooth muscle cell (BTSMC)-embedded collagen gel lattice. When the gel was pretreated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which activates the small G protein RhoA, ATP- and high K+ solution-induced gel contraction was significantly augmented. This was not due to the modulation of Ca2+ mobilizing properties, since ATP- and high K+-induced Ca2+ transients were not significantly different between control and LPA-treated BTSMC. Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho-kinase, suppressed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction, whereas it did not inhibit the contraction of control gels. Theophylline (> 1 μm) reversed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction, whereas it inhibited control gel contraction only with a very high concentration (100 μm). We confirmed that theophylline increased the intracellular concentration of cAMP ([cAMP]i) in BTSMC. Elevation of [cAMP]i with dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin also reversed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction. Furthermore, theophylline, as well as dibutyryl cAMP and forskolin, suppressed the LPA-induced membrane translocation of RhoA, indicating that they prevented airway hyperresponsiveness by inhibiting RhoA. We conclude from these results that theophylline inhibits LPA-induced, RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated hyperresponsiveness of tracheal smooth muscle cells due to the accumulation of cAMP. PMID:12679373

  10. Cellular mechanisms underlying prostaglandin-induced transient cAMP signals near the plasma membrane of HEK-293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Thomas; Xin, Wenkuan; Mehats, Céline; Hassell, Kathryn; Piggott, Leslie; Le, Xuan; Karpen, Jeffrey; Conti, Marco

    2007-01-01

    We have previously used cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels as sensors to measure cAMP signals in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells. We found that prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) triggered transient increases in cAMP concentration near the plasma membrane, whereas total cAMP levels rose to a steady plateau over the same time course. In addition, we presented evidence that the decline in the near-membrane cAMP levels was due primarily to a PGE1-induced stimulation of phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, and that the differences between near-membrane and total cAMP levels were largely due to diffusional barriers and differential PDE activity. Here, we examine the mechanisms regulating transient, near-membrane cAMP signals. We observed that 5-min stimulation of HEK-293 cells with prostaglandins triggered a two- to threefold increase in PDE4 activity. Extracellular application of H89 (a PKA inhibitor) inhibited stimulation of PDE4 activity. Similarly, when we used CNG channels to monitor cAMP signals we found that both extracellular and intracellular (via the whole-cell patch pipette) application of H89, or the highly selective PKA inhibitor, PKI, prevented the decline in prostaglandin-induced responses. Following pretreatment with rolipram (a PDE4 inhibitor), H89 had little or no effect on near-membrane or total cAMP levels. Furthermore, disrupting the subcellular localization of PKA with the A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) disruptor Ht31 prevented the decline in the transient response. Based on these data we developed a plausible kinetic model that describes prostaglandin-induced cAMP signals. This model has allowed us to quantitatively demonstrate the importance of PKA-mediated stimulation of PDE4 activity in shaping near-membrane cAMP signals. PMID:16899551

  11. Intracellular cAMP increases during the positive inotropism induced by androgens in isolated left atrium of rat.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Lucía; Sánchez, Manuel; Rubín, José Manuel; Hidalgo, Agustín; Bordallo, Carmen; Cantabrana, Begoña

    2002-03-01

    Molecular interactions of androgens with the plasma membrane may produce rapid cardiovascular effects that cannot be explained by the classic genomic mechanisms. In this sense, 5 alpha- and 5 beta-dihydrotestosterone-induced an acute positive inotropic effect in isolated left atrium of rat, an effect which may be due to cAMP-dependent mechanisms. To prove this, intracellular levels of cAMP, after exposure to androgens in the organ bath, and binding to beta(1)-adrenoceptors were evaluated. After a 4-min exposure, 5 alpha- and 5 beta-dihydrotestosterone increased cAMP levels from 3.83+/-0.61 to 6.15+/-1.1 and 11.18+/-2.4 pmol cAMP/mg of protein, respectively. These increases were inhibited by atenolol and not modified by treatment of the rats with reserpine. The androgen-induced cAMP increase seems to be produced via an extracellular interaction, because positive inotropism and raised levels of cAMP were produced by 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). In addition, it is independent of beta(1)-adrenoceptor activation, because neither androgen displaced [(3)H]dihydroalprenolol binding. Therefore, the androgens induced a positive inotropic effect via a postsynaptic effect that increases intracellular levels of cAMP. This effect is modulated by transcriptional mechanisms or by a protein with a short half-life.

  12. Dual chemotaxis signalling regulates Dictyostelium development: intercellular cyclic AMP pulses and intracellular F-actin disassembly waves induce each other.

    PubMed

    Vicker, Michael G; Grutsch, James F

    2008-10-01

    Aggregating Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae periodically emit and relay cAMP, which regulates their chemotaxis and morphogenesis into a multicellular, differentiated organism. Cyclic AMP also stimulates F-actin assembly and chemotactic pseudopodium extension. We used actin-GFP expression to visualise for the first time intracellular F-actin assembly as a spatio-temporal indicator of cell reactions to cAMP, and thus the kinematics of cell communication, in aggregating streams. Every natural cAMP signal pulse induces an autowave of F-actin disassembly, which propagates from each cell's leading end to its trailing end at a linear rate, much slower than the calculated and measured velocities of cAMP diffusion in aggregating Dictyostelium. A sequence of transient reactions follows behind the wave, including anterior F-actin assembly, chemotactic pseudopodium extension and cell advance at the cell front and, at the back, F-actin assembly, extension of a small retrograde pseudopodium (forcing a brief cell retreat) and chemotactic stimulation of the following cell, yielding a 20s cAMP relay delay. These dynamics indicate that stream cell behaviour is mediated by a dual signalling system: a short-range cAMP pulse directed from one cell tail to an immediately following cell front and a slower, long-range wave of intracellular F-actin disassembly, each inducing the other.

  13. Neuroprotective Effects of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase on Scopolamine Induced Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jun-Ho; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Song, Joo-Hyun; Ha, Joohun

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important regulator of energy metabolism, is activated in response to cellular stress when intracellular levels of AMP increase. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of AMPK against scopolamine-induced memory impairment in vivo and glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. An adenovirus expressing AMPK wild type alpha subunit (WT) or a dominant negative form (DN) was injected into the hippocampus of rats using a stereotaxic apparatus. The AMPK WT-injected rats showed significant reversal of the scopolamine induced cognitive deficit as evaluated by escape latency in the Morris water maze. In addition, they showed enhanced acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-reactive neurons in the hippocampus, implying increased cholinergic activity in response to AMPK. We also studied the cellular mechanism by which AMPK protects against glutamate-induced cell death in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We further demonstrated that AMPK WT-infected cells increased cell viability and reduced Annexin V positive hippocampal neurons. Western blot analysis indicated that AMPK WT-infected cells reduced the expression of Bax and had no effects on Bcl-2, which resulted in a decreased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. These data suggest that AMPK is a useful cognitive impairment treatment target, and that its beneficial effects are mediated via the protective capacity of hippocampal neurons. PMID:23946693

  14. AmpA protein functions by different mechanisms to influence early cell type specification and to modulate cell adhesion and actin polymerization in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Cost, Hoa N; Noratel, Elizabeth F; Blumberg, Daphne D

    2013-01-01

    The Dictyostelium discoideum ampA gene encodes a multifunctional regulator protein that modulates cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions and actin polymerization during growth and is necessary for correct cell type specification and patterning during development. Insertional inactivation of the ampA gene results in defects that define two distinct roles for the ampA gene during development. AmpA is necessary in a non-cell autonomous manner to prevent premature expression of a prespore gene marker. It is also necessary in a cell autonomous manner for the anterior like cells, which express the ampA gene, to migrate to the upper cup during culmination. It is also necessary to prevent excessive cell-cell agglutination when cells are developed in a submerged suspension culture. Here, we demonstrate that a supernatant source of AmpA protein, added extracellularly, can prevent the premature mis-expression of the prespore marker. Synthetic oligopeptides are used to identify the domain of the AmpA protein that is important for preventing cells from mis-expressing the prespore gene. We further demonstrate that a factor capable of inducing additional cells to express the prespore gene marker accumulates extracellularly in the absence of AmpA protein. While the secreted AmpA acts extracellularly to suppress prespore gene expression, the effects of AmpA on cell agglutination and on actin polymerization in growing cells are not due to an extracellular role of secreted AmpA protein. Rather, these effects appear to reflect a distinct cell autonomous role of the ampA gene. Finally, we show that secretion of AmpA protein is brought about by elevating the levels of expression of ampA so that the protein accumulates to an excessive level.

  15. AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP signalling via phosphorylation-induced activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B

    PubMed Central

    Johanns, M.; Lai, Y.-C.; Hsu, M.-F.; Jacobs, R.; Vertommen, D.; Van Sande, J.; Dumont, J. E.; Woods, A.; Carling, D.; Hue, L.; Viollet, B.; Foretz, M; Rider, M H

    2016-01-01

    Biguanides such as metformin have previously been shown to antagonize hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase by AMP. Here we show that incubation of hepatocytes with the small-molecule AMPK activator 991 decreases glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity and downstream PKA target phosphorylation. Moreover, incubation of hepatocytes with 991 increases the Vmax of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) without affecting intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations. The effects of 991 to decrease glucagon-stimulated cAMP concentrations and activate PDE4B are lost in hepatocytes deleted for both catalytic subunits of AMPK. PDE4B is phosphorylated by AMPK at three sites, and by site-directed mutagenesis, Ser304 phosphorylation is important for activation. In conclusion, we provide a new mechanism by which AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon signalling via phosphorylation-induced PDE4B activation. PMID:26952277

  16. Modulation by cyclic AMP and phorbol myristate acetate of cephaloridine-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Y; Gemba, M

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and protein kinase C (PKC) have been suggested to modulate the generation of free radicals. We investigated the effects of cAMP and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, on cephaloridine (CER)-induced renal cell injury, which has been reported to be due to the generation of free radicals. Incubation of rat renal cortical slices with CER resulted in increases in lipid peroxidation and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and in decreases in gluconeogenesis and p-aminohippurate (PAH) accumulation in rat renal cortical slices, suggesting free radical-induced injury in slices exposed to CER. A derivative of cAMP ameliorated not only the increase in lipid peroxidation but also the renal cell damage induced by CER. This amelioration by a cAMP derivative of lipid peroxidation and renal cell damage caused by CER was blocked by KT 5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Lipid peroxidation and the indices of cell injury were increased by PMA. PMA also enhanced CER-induced lipid peroxidation and cell damage in the slices. This enhancement by PMA of CER-induced injury was blocked by H-7, a PKC inhibitor. These results indicated that intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and PKC modulate free radical-mediated nephrotoxicity induced by CER.

  17. Secretin induces neurite outgrowth of PC12 through cAMP-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Soo; Yumkham, Sanatombi; Kim, Sun-Hee; Yea, Kyungmoo; Shin, You Chan; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2006-02-28

    The gastrointestinal functions of secretin have been fairly well established. However, its function and mode of action within the nervous system remain largely unclear. To gain insight into this area, we have attempted to determine the effects of secretin on neuronal differentiation. Here, we report that secretin induces the generation of neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. The expressions of Tau and beta-tubulin, neuronal differentiation markers, are increased upon secretin stimulation. In addition, secretin induces sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and also stimulates the cAMP secretion. Moreover, the neurite outgrowth elicited by secretin is suppressed to a marked degree in the presence of either PD98059, a specific MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor, or H89, a specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that secretin induces neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells through cAMP- MAPK pathway, and provide a novel insight into the manner in which secretin participates in neuritogenesis.

  18. Activation of AMP kinase alpha1 subunit induces aortic vasorelaxation in mice.

    PubMed

    Goirand, Françoise; Solar, Myriam; Athea, Yoni; Viollet, Benoit; Mateo, Philippe; Fortin, Dominique; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Garnier, Anne

    2007-06-15

    Vasodilatation is a vital mechanism of systemic blood flow regulation that occurs during periods of increased energy demand. The AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by conditions that increase the AMP-to-ATP ratio, such as exercise and metabolic stress. We hypothesized that AMPK could trigger vasodilatation and participate in blood flow regulation. Rings of thoracic aorta were isolated from C57Bl6 mice and mice deficient in the AMPK catalytic alpha1 (AMPKalpha1-/-) or alpha2 (AMPKalpha2-/-) subunit and their littermate controls, and mounted in an organ bath. Aortas were preconstricted with phenylephrine (1 microM) and activation of AMPK was induced by addition of increasing concentrations of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR). AICAR (0.1-3 mM) dose-dependently induced relaxation of precontracted C57BL6, AMPKalpha1+/+ and alpha2+/+ aorta (P<0.001, n=5-7 per group). This AICAR induced vasorelaxation was not inhibited by the addition of adenosine receptor antagonists. Moreover, when aortic rings were freed of endothelium by gentle rubbing, AICAR still induced aortic ring relaxation, suggesting a direct effect of AICAR on smooth muscle cells. When aortic rings were pretreated with L-NMMA (30 microM) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase activity, AICAR still induced relaxation. Western blot analysis of C57Bl6 mice denuded aorta showed that AMPK was phosphorylated after incubation with AICAR and that AMPKalpha1 was the main catalytic subunit expressed. Finally, AICAR-induced relaxation of aortic rings was completely abolished in AMPKalpha1-/- but not AMPKalpha2-/- mice. Taken together, the results show that activation of AMPKalpha1 but not AMPKalpha2 is able to induce aortic relaxation in mice, in an endothelium- and eNOS-independent manner.

  19. Activation of AMP kinase α1 subunit induces aortic vasorelaxation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Goirand, Françoise; Solar, Myriam; Athea, Yoni; Viollet, Benoit; Mateo, Philippe; Fortin, Dominique; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Garnier, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Vasodilatation is a vital mechanism of systemic blood flow regulation that occurs during periods of increased energy demand. The AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by conditions that increase the AMP-to-ATP ratio, such as exercise and metabolic stress. We hypothesized that AMPK could trigger vasodilatation and participate in blood flow regulation. Rings of thoracic aorta were isolated from C57Bl6 mice and mice deficient in the AMPK catalytic α1 (AMPKα1−/−) or α2 (AMPKα2−/−) subunit and their littermate controls, and mounted in an organ bath. Aortas were preconstricted with phenylephrine (1 μm) and activation of AMPK was induced by addition of increasing concentrations of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR). AICAR (0.1–3 mm) dose-dependently induced relaxation of precontracted C57BL6, AMPKα1+/+ and α2+/+ aorta (P < 0.001, n = 5–7 per group). This AICAR induced vasorelaxation was not inhibited by the addition of adenosine receptor antagonists. Moreover, when aortic rings were freed of endothelium by gentle rubbing, AICAR still induced aortic ring relaxation, suggesting a direct effect of AICAR on smooth muscle cells. When aortic rings were pretreated with l-NMMA (30 μm) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase activity, AICAR still induced relaxation. Western blot analysis of C57Bl6 mice denuded aorta showed that AMPK was phosphorylated after incubation with AICAR and that AMPKα1 was the main catalytic subunit expressed. Finally, AICAR-induced relaxation of aortic rings was completely abolished in AMPKα1−/− but not AMPKα2−/− mice. Taken together, the results show that activation of AMPKα1 but not AMPKα2 is able to induce aortic relaxation in mice, in an endothelium- and eNOS-independent manner. PMID:17446219

  20. Cyclic AMP in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L; Harman, J G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is found in a variety of prokaryotes including both eubacteria and archaebacteria. cAMP plays a role in regulating gene expression, not only for the classic inducible catabolic operons, but also for other categories. In the enteric coliforms, the effects of cAMP on gene expression are mediated through its interaction with and allosteric modification of a cAMP-binding protein (CRP). The CRP-cAMP complex subsequently binds specific DNA sequences and either activates or inhibits transcription depending upon the positioning of the complex relative to the promoter. Enteric coliforms have provided a model to explore the mechanisms involved in controlling adenylate cyclase activity, in regulating adenylate cyclase synthesis, and in performing detailed examinations of CRP-cAMP complex-regulated gene expression. This review summarizes recent work focused on elucidating the molecular mechanisms of CRP-cAMP complex-mediated processes. For other bacteria, less detail is known. cAMP has been implicated in regulating antibiotic production, phototrophic growth, and pathogenesis. A role for cAMP has been suggested in nitrogen fixation. Often the only data that support cAMP involvement in these processes includes cAMP measurement, detection of the enzymes involved in cAMP metabolism, or observed effects of high concentrations of the nucleotide on cell growth. PMID:1315922

  1. In Vivo Activation of cAMP Signaling Induces Growth Arrest and Differentiation in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Marie-Claude; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Vitoux, Dominique; Kogan, Scott; Soilihi, Hassane; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie; Zhu, Jun; Janin, Anne; Daniel, Marie-Thérèse; Gourmel, Bernard; Degos, Laurent; Dombret, Hervé; Lanotte, Michel; de Thé, Hugues

    2002-01-01

    Differentiation therapy for acute myeloid leukemia uses transcriptional modulators to reprogram cancer cells. The most relevant clinical example is acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), which responds dramatically to either retinoic acid (RA) or arsenic trioxide (As2O3). In many myeloid leukemia cell lines, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) triggers growth arrest, cell death, or differentiation, often in synergy with RA. Nevertheless, the toxicity of cAMP derivatives and lack of suitable models has hampered trials designed to assess the in vivo relevance of theses observations. We show that, in an APL cell line, cAMP analogs blocked cell growth and unraveled As2O3-triggered differentiation. Similarly, in RA-sensitive or RA-resistant mouse models of APL, continuous infusions of 8-chloro-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (8-Cl-cAMP) triggered major growth arrest, greatly enhanced both spontaneous and RA- or As2O3-induced differentiation and accelerated the restoration of normal hematopoiesis. Theophylline, a well-tolerated phosphodiesterase inhibitor which stabilizes endogenous cAMP, also impaired APL growth and enhanced spontaneous or As2O3-triggered cell differentiation in vivo. Accordingly, in an APL patient resistant to combined RA–As2O3 therapy, theophylline induced blast clearance and restored normal hematopoiesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in vivo activation of cAMP signaling contributes to APL clearance, independently of its RA-sensitivity, thus raising hopes that other myeloid leukemias may benefit from this therapeutic approach. PMID:12438428

  2. Ethanol-induced translocation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase to the nucleus. Mechanism and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, A; Diamond, I; Gordon, A S

    1999-09-17

    Ethanol induces translocation of the catalytic subunit (Calpha) of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) from the Golgi area to the nucleus in NG108-15 cells. Ethanol also induces translocation of the RIIbeta regulatory subunit of PKA to the nucleus; RI and Cbeta are not translocated. Nuclear PKA activity in ethanol-treated cells is no longer regulated by cAMP. Gel filtration and immunoprecipitation analysis confirm that ethanol blocks the reassociation of Calpha with RII but does not induce dissociation of these subunits. Ethanol also reduces inhibition of Calpha by the PKA inhibitor PKI. Pre-incubation of Calpha with ethanol decreases phosphorylation of Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly (Kemptide) and casein but has no effect on the phosphorylation of highly charged molecules such as histone H1 or protamine. cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation by Calpha is also increased in ethanol-treated cells. This increase in CREB phosphorylation is inhibited by the PKA antagonist (R(p))-cAMPS and by an adenosine receptor antagonist. These results suggest that ethanol affects a cascade of events allowing for sustained nuclear localization of Calpha and prolonged CREB phosphorylation. These events may account for ethanol-induced changes in cAMP-dependent gene expression.

  3. Inhibitory effects of cyclic AMP elevating agents on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microvascular permeability change in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Irie, K; Fujii, E; Ishida, H; Wada, K; Suganuma, T; Nishikori, T; Yoshioka, T; Muraki, T

    2001-05-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of cyclic AMP elevating agents were examined in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microvascular permeability change. Vascular permeability on the back skin was measured by the local accumulation of Pontamine sky blue (PSB) after subcutaneous injection of LPS (400 microg site-1) from Salmonella typhimurium. Dye leakage in the skin was significantly increased 2 h after injection of LPS. This LPS-induced dye leakage was suppressed by phosphodiesterase inhibitors, including pentoxifylline (160 mg kg-1), milrinone (5 - 10 mg kg-1), rolipram (0.5 - 10 mg kg-1) and zaprinast (5 - 10 mg kg-1). The dye leakage was also inhibited by beta-adrenoceptor agonists, including isoproterenol (0.5 - 5 mg kg-1) and salbutamol (0.05 - 5 mg kg-1), an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin (5 mg kg-1), and a cell permeable cyclic AMP analogue, 8-bromo-cyclic AMP (8-Br-cAMP, 10 mg kg-1). LPS caused a transient increase in serum TNF-alpha level peaking at 1 h after the injection. This increase in serum TNF-alpha was completely blocked by a pretreatment with pentoxifylline (160 mg kg-1), milrinone (5 mg kg-1), rolipram (1 mg kg-1), zaprinast (10 mg kg-1), salbutamol (0.5 mg kg-1), forskolin (1 mg kg-1) and 8-Br-cAMP (10 mg kg-1). LPS caused an increase in serum IL-1alpha level peaking at 3 h after injection. This increase in serum IL-1alpha was not significantly suppressed by the cyclic AMP elevating agents. Our study suggests that cyclic AMP elevating agents attenuate LPS-induced microvascular permeability change by suppressing TNF-alpha up regulation.

  4. Abnormal Mitochondrial cAMP/PKA Signaling Is Involved in Sepsis-Induced Mitochondrial and Myocardial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Neviere, Remi; Delguste, Florian; Durand, Arthur; Inamo, Jocelyn; Boulanger, Eric; Preau, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors couple to Gs-proteins leading to transmembrane adenylyl cyclase activation and cytosolic cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production. Cyclic AMP is also produced in the mitochondrial matrix, where it regulates respiration through protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of respiratory chain complexes. We hypothesized that a blunted mitochondrial cAMP-PKA pathway would participate in sepsis-induced heart dysfunction. Adult male mice were subjected to intra-abdominal sepsis. Mitochondrial respiration of cardiac fibers and myocardial contractile performance were evaluated in response to 8Br-cAMP, PKA inhibition (H89), soluble adenylyl cyclase inhibition (KH7), and phosphodiesterase inhibition (IBMX; BAY60-7550). Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-stimulated respiratory rates of cardiac fibers were reduced in septic mice. Compared with controls, stimulatory effects of 8Br-cAMP on respiration rates were enhanced in septic fibers, whereas inhibitory effects of H89 were reduced. Ser-58 phosphorylation of cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV-1 was reduced in septic hearts. In vitro, incubation of septic cardiac fibers with BAY60-7550 increased respiratory control ratio and improved cardiac MVO2 efficiency in isolated septic heart. In vivo, BAY60-7550 pre-treatment of septic mice have limited impact on myocardial function. Mitochondrial cAMP-PKA signaling is impaired in the septic myocardium. PDE2 phosphodiesterase inhibition by BAY60-7550 improves mitochondrial respiration and cardiac MVO2 efficiency in septic mice. PMID:27973394

  5. Strain-induced fetal type II epithelial cell differentiation is mediated via cAMP-PKA-dependent signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulian; Maciejewski, Benjamin S; Lee, Nicole; Silbert, Ophira; McKnight, Nathan L; Frangos, John A; Sanchez-Esteban, Juan

    2006-10-01

    The signaling pathways by which mechanical forces modulate fetal lung development remain largely unknown. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that strain-induced fetal type II cell differentiation is mediated via the cAMP signaling pathway. Freshly isolated E19 fetal type II epithelial cells were cultured on collagen-coated silastic membranes and exposed to mechanical strain for varying intervals, to simulate mechanical forces during lung development. Unstretched samples were used as controls. Mechanical strain activated heterotrimeric G-protein alpha(s) subunit, cAMP, and the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Incubation of E19 cells with the PKA inhibitor H-89 significantly decreased strain-induced CREB phosphorylation. Moreover, adenylate cyclase 5 and CREB genes were also mechanically induced. In contrast, components of the PKA-independent (Epac) pathway, including Rap-1 or B-Raf, were not phosphorylated by strain. The addition of forskolin or dibutyryl cAMP to unstretched E19 monolayers markedly upregulated expression of the type II cell differentiation marker surfactant protein C, whereas the Epac agonist 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP had no effect. Furthermore, incubation of E19 cells with the PKA inhibitor Rp-2'-O-monobutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate or transient transfection with plasmid DNA containing a PKA inhibitor expression vector significantly decreased strain-induced surfactant protein C mRNA expression. In conclusion, these studies indicate that the cAMP-PKA-dependent signaling pathway is activated by force in fetal type II cells and participates in strain-induced fetal type II cell differentiation.

  6. Berberine attenuates cAMP-induced lipolysis via reducing the inhibition of phosphodiesterase in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Libin; Wang, Xiao; Yang, Ying; Wu, Ling; Li, Fengying; Zhang, Rong; Yuan, Guoyue; Wang, Ning; Chen, Mingdao; Ning, Guang

    2011-04-01

    Berberine, a hypoglycemic agent, has been shown to decrease plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) level in insulin-resistant rats. In the present study, we explored the mechanism responsible for the antilipolytic effect of berberine in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. It was shown that berberine attenuated lipolysis induced by catecholamines, cAMP-raising agents, and a hydrolyzable cAMP analog, but not by tumor necrosis factor α and a nonhydrolyzable cAMP analog. Unlike insulin, the inhibitory effect of berberine on lipolysis in response to isoproterenol was not abrogated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but additive to that of PD98059, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase inhibitor. Prior exposure of adipocytes to berberine decreased the intracellular cAMP production induced by isoproterenol, forskolin, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), along with hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) Ser-563 and Ser-660 dephosphorylation, but had no effect on perilipin phosphorylation. Berberine stimulated HSL Ser-565 as well as adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. However, compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, did not reverse the regulatory effect of berberine on HSL Ser-563, Ser-660, and Ser-565 phosphorylation, nor the antilipolytic effect of berberine. Knockdown of AMPK using RNA interference also failed to restore berberine-suppressed lipolysis. cAMP-raising agents increased AMPK activity, which was not additive to that of berberine. Stimulation of adipocytes with berberine increased phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3B and PDE4 activity measured by hydrolysis of (3)[H]cAMP. These results suggest that berberine exerts an antilipolytic effect mainly by reducing the inhibition of PDE, leading to a decrease in cAMP and HSL phosphorylation independent of AMPK pathway.

  7. MyD88 and TRIF mediate the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) induced corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression in JEG3 choriocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Uh, Andy; Simmons, Charles F; Bresee, Catherine; Khoury, Nasif; Gombart, Adrian F; Nicholson, Richard C; Kocak, Hande; Equils, Ozlem

    2009-07-17

    Classically protein kinase A (PKA) and transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) mediate the cyclic AMP (cAMP) induced-corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) expression in the placenta. However enteric Gram (-) bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may also induce-CRH expression via Toll like receptor (TLR)4 and its adaptor molecule Myd88. Here we investigated the role of MyD88, TRIF and IRAK2 on cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells in the absence of LPS/TLR4 stimulation. JEG3 cells were transfected with CRH-luciferase and Beta-galactosidase expression vectors and either empty or dominant-negative (DN)-MyD88, DN-TRIF or DN-IRAK2 vectors using Fugene6 (Roche). cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation was examined by using a luminometer and luciferase assay. Calorimetric Beta-galactosidase assays were performed to correct for transfection efficiency. Luciferase expression vectors of cAMP-downstream molecules, CRE and AP-1, were used to further examine the signaling cascades. cAMP stimulation induced AP-1 and CRE promoter expression and led to dose-dependent CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells. Inhibition of MyD88 signaling blocked cAMP-induced CRE and CRH promoter activation. Inhibition of TRIF signaling blocked cAMP-induced CRH but not CRE expression, while inhibition of IRAK2 did not have an effect on cAMP-induced CRH expression. MyD88 and TRIF exert direct regulatory effect on cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells in the absence of infection. MyD88 most likely interacts with molecules upstream of IRAK2 to regulate cAMP-induced CRH expression.

  8. Positive inotropism induced by androgens in isolated left atrium of rat: evidence for a cAMP-dependent transcriptional mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rubín, J M; Hidalgo, A; Bordallo, C; Cantabrana, B; Sánchez, M

    1999-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert their biological actions via intracellular receptors modulation of transcription. In addition, a number of molecular interactions, and the existence of membrane receptors in several tissues, support the hypothesis of nongenomic action of steroids. The androgens, 5alpha- and 5beta-dihydrotestosterone (0.1 to 100 microM), induce a rapid positive inotropism in the isolated left atrium of male Wistar rats whose time course of response might suggest that it is a non-genomic effect. However, the fact that the facilitation of contractility was inhibited by actinomycin D (5 microg/ml) and cycloheximide (10 microg/ml) indicates that a transcriptional component might play a role. The existence of a rapid functional genomic role would be somewhat surprising. However, rapid transcriptional mechanisms were also observed in certain cAMP-dependent responses. In the left atrium of rat, Rp-cAMPS (10 microM), a cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor, antagonized 5alpha- but not 5beta-dihydrotestosterone-induced positive inotropism. The inhibition by Rp-cAMPS of isoproterenol- and forskolin-induced positive inotropism, and the fact that these cAMP-dependent effects were also inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, suggest that a cAMP-dependent transcriptional component may be partly involved in the positive inotropism induced by 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. In addition, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone might increase the basal adenylyl cyclase activity by acting on unoccupied beta-adrenoceptor-G-protein-adenylyl cyclase complexes, since the elicited inotropism was inhibited by a beta-blocker, atenolol (1 microM), a G-protein inhibitor, pertussis toxin (2 microg/ml, 3 h), and an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, dideoxy-adenosine (10 microM).

  9. Glucose starvation-induced dispersal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is cAMP and energy dependent.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tran T; McDougald, Diane; Klebensberger, Janosch; Al Qarni, Budoor; Barraud, Nicolas; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Schleheck, David

    2012-01-01

    Carbon starvation has been shown to induce a massive dispersal event in biofilms of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, the molecular pathways controlling this dispersal response remain unknown. We quantified changes in the proteome of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and planktonic cells during glucose starvation by differential peptide-fingerprint mass-spectrometry (iTRAQ). In addition, we monitored dispersal photometrically, as a decrease in turbidity/opacity of biofilms pre-grown and starved in continuous flow-cells, in order to evaluate treatments (e.g. inhibitors CCCP, arsenate, chloramphenicol, L-serine hydroxamate) and key mutants altered in biofilm development and dispersal (e.g. nirS, vfr, bdlA, rpoS, lasRrhlR, Pf4-bacteriophage and cyaA). In wild-type biofilms, dispersal started within five minutes of glucose starvation, was maximal after 2 h, and up to 60% of the original biomass had dispersed after 24 h of starvation. The changes in protein synthesis were generally not more than two fold and indicated that more than 100 proteins belonging to various classes, including carbon and energy metabolism, stress adaptation, and motility, were differentially expressed. For the different treatments, only the proton-ionophore CCCP or arsenate, an inhibitor of ATP synthesis, prevented dispersal of the biofilms. For the different mutants tested, only cyaA, the synthase of the intracellular second messenger cAMP, failed to disperse; complementation of the cyaA mutation restored the wild-type phenotype. Hence, the pathway for carbon starvation-induced biofilm dispersal in P. aeruginosa PAO1 involves ATP production via direct ATP synthesis and proton-motive force dependent step(s) and is mediated through cAMP, which is likely to control the activity of proteins involved in remodeling biofilm cells in preparation for planktonic survival.

  10. A pharmacological activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) induces astrocyte stellation

    PubMed Central

    Favero, Carlita B; Mandell, James W

    2007-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) represents a key energy-sensing molecule in many cell types. Because astrocytes are key mediators of metabolic signaling in the brain, we have initiated studies on the expression and activation of AMPK in these cells. Treatment of cultured rat cortical astrocytes with a pharmacological AMPK activator, AICA-riboside (AICAR) resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent increase in phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a direct substrate. AICAR treatment also induced a transition from epithelioid to stellate morphology in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. As stellation is indicative of actin cytoskeletal reorganization, the formation of stress fibers and focal adhesions in response to AICAR was assessed. AICAR-induced stellation correlated with F-actin disassembly and focal adhesion dispersal. Furthermore, transient transfection of an activated RhoA construct prevented AICAR-induced stellation, indicating a mechanism upstream of RhoA. Use of pharmacological inhibitor compound C prevented AICAR-induced stellation demonstrating necessity of AMPK activity for the response. Our findings suggest that AMPK mediates morphological alterations of astrocytes in response to energy depletion. PMID:17706943

  11. Dissociation of dorsal root ganglion neurons induces hyperexcitability that is maintained by increased responsiveness to cAMP and cGMP.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Hong; Walters, Edgar T; Song, Xue-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Injury or inflammation affecting sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) causes hyperexcitability of DRG neurons that can lead to spontaneous firing and neuropathic pain. Recent results indicate that after chronic compression of DRG (CCD treatment), both hyperexcitability of neurons in intact DRG and behaviorally expressed hyperalgesia are maintained by concurrent activity in cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) and cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathways. We report here that when tested under identical conditions, dissociation produces a pattern of hyperexcitability in small DRG neurons similar to that produced by CCD treatment, manifest as decreased action potential (AP) current threshold, increased AP duration, increased repetitive firing to depolarizing pulses, increased spontaneous firing and resting depolarization. A novel feature of this hyperexcitability is its early expression-as soon as testing can be conducted after dissociation (approximately 2 h). Both forms of injury increase the electrophysiological responsiveness of the neurons to activation of cAMP-PKA and cGMP-PKG pathways as indicated by enhancement of hyperexcitability by agonists of these pathways in dissociated or CCD-treated neurons but not in control neurons. Although inflammatory signals are known to activate cAMP-PKA pathways, dissociation-induced hyperexcitability is unlikely to be triggered by signals released from inflammatory cells recruited to the DRG because of insufficient time for recruitment during the dissociation procedure. Inhibition by specific antagonists indicates that continuing activation of cAMP-PKA and cGMP-PKG pathways is required to maintain hyperexcitability after dissociation. The reduction of hyperexcitability by blockers of adenylyl cyclase and soluble guanylyl cyclase after dissociation suggests a continuing release of autocrine and/or paracrine factors from dissociated neurons and/or satellite cells, which activate both cyclases and help to maintain acute

  12. Mathematical model of cAMP-dependent signaling pathway in constitutive and UV-induced melanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolnitz, Mikhail M.; Peshkova, Anna Y.

    2002-07-01

    Cascade of reactions of cAMP-dependent signaling pathway in melanocytes is investigated by mathematical modeling. Model takes into account (alpha) -melanocyte stimulating hormone binding to melanocortin-1 receptor, adenylate cyclase activation by G-protein, increase of the intracellular cAMP concentration, PKA activation by cAMP, CREB phosphorylation by PKA, microphthalmia gene expression, microphthalmia binding to tyrosinase gene promoter, increase of tyrosinase synthesis. Positive and negative feedback loops of this system are analyzed.

  13. Control of biodegradative threonine dehydratase inducibility by cyclic AMP in energy-restricted Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, A T; Egan, R M; Lewis, B

    1978-01-01

    To explain the requirement for anaerobic conditions in the induction of biodegradative L-threonine dehydratase in Escherichia coli, Crookes strain, measurements of cyclic AMP (cAMP) were made during aerobic and anaerobic growth and upon an aerobic-to-anaerobic transition. Internal cAMP levels were similar (5 to 10 muM) throughout exponential growth, whether aerobic or anaerobic, but only during anaerobiosis was threonine dehydratase synthesized. When an exponentially growing aerobic culture was made anaerobic, a sharp increase in internal cAMP was noted, reaching 300 muM within 10 min and declining thereafter to normal anaerobic levels. Threonine dehydratase synthesis was detected immediately after the attainment of peak cAMP levels and continued for several generations. A similar pattern but with less accumulation of cAMP and less threonine dehydratase production was also noted upon treatment of an aerobically growing culture with KCN. Pyruvate addition at the time of anaerobic shock severely affected both cAMP accumulation and threonine dehydratase synthesis; however, externally added cAMP could partially counter the pyruvate effect on enzyme synthesis. The conclusion was reached that conditions which resulted in a temporary energy deficit brought about the major accumulation of cAMP, and this elevated level served as a signal for initiation of threonine dehydratase synthesis to supply energy by the nonoxidative degradation of threonine. PMID:211115

  14. The role of quorum sensing system in antimicrobial induced ampC expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingming; Jiang, Handong; Cheng, Wei; Wu, Jinxiang; Zhao, Jiping; Wang, Junfei; Dong, Liang

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of quorum sensing (QS) systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) on the expression of ampC gene induced by antibiotics. An in vitro dynamic model of P. aeruginosa biofilms was established in a silicon tube in once-flowthrough system at 37 °C. Biofilm generation was identified by argentation. Biofilm morphology of standard P. aeruginosa strain (PAO-1) and QS systems deficient strains (PDO100, rhlI deficient strain; PAO-JP1, lasI deficient strain; and PAO-MW1, rhlI and lasI deficient strain) were observed by optical microscope. The expression of ampC in PAO1, PAO1 with QS inhibitor (furanone C-30) and the QS deficient strains before and after induced by antibiotics were quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. The biofilms of PAO-1 and PDO100 were much thicker and denser than that of PAO-JP1 and PAO-MW1. Being induced by antibiotics, the expression of ampC in PAO1 and PDO100 was significantly higher than that in PAO-MW1 and PAO-JP1. With the effect of furanone C-30, the expression of ampC in PAO1 induced by antibiotics was reduced in a dose-dependent manner. QS system, especially the las system, plays an important role in both biofilm formation and antimicrobials induced ampC expression and furanone C-30 is a potent inhibitor for P. aeruginosa QS system.

  15. A plant triterpenoid, avicin D, induces autophagy by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z-X; Liang, J; Haridas, V; Gaikwad, A; Connolly, F P; Mills, G B; Gutterman, J U

    2007-11-01

    Avicins, a family of plant triterpene electrophiles, can trigger apoptosis-associated tumor cell death, and suppress chemical-induced carcinogenesis by its anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, and antioxidant properties. Here, we show that tumor cells treated with benzyloxycarbonylvalyl-alanyl-aspartic acid (O-methyl)-fluoro-methylketone, an apoptosis inhibitor, and Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) apoptosis-resistant cells can still undergo cell death in response to avicin D treatment. We demonstrate that this non-apoptotic cell death is mediated by autophagy, which can be suppressed by chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, and by specific knockdown of autophagy-related gene-5 (Atg5) and Atg7. Avicin D decreases cellular ATP levels, stimulates the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S6 kinase activity. Suppression of AMPK by compound C and dominant-negative AMPK decreases avicin D-induced autophagic cell death. Furthermore, avicin D-induced autophagic cell death can be abrogated by knockdown of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2), a key mediator linking AMPK to mTOR inhibition, suggesting that AMPK activation is a crucial event targeted by avicin D. These findings indicate the therapeutic potential of avicins by triggering autophagic cell death.

  16. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by tributyltin induces neuronal cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsu, Yusuke; Kotake, Yaichiro Hino, Atsuko; Ohta, Shigeru

    2008-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a member of the metabolite-sensing protein kinase family, is activated by energy deficiency and is abundantly expressed in neurons. The environmental pollutant, tributyltin chloride (TBT), is a neurotoxin, and has been reported to decrease cellular ATP in some types of cells. Therefore, we investigated whether TBT activates AMPK, and whether its activation contributes to neuronal cell death, using primary cultures of cortical neurons. Cellular ATP levels were decreased 0.5 h after exposure to 500 nM TBT, and the reduction was time-dependent. It was confirmed that most neurons in our culture system express AMPK, and that TBT induced phosphorylation of AMPK. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, reduced the neurotoxicity of TBT, suggesting that AMPK is involved in TBT-induced cell death. Next, the downstream target of AMPK activation was investigated. Nitric oxide synthase, p38 phosphorylation and Akt dephosphorylation were not downstream of TBT-induced AMPK activation because these factors were not affected by compound C, but glutamate release was suggested to be controlled by AMPK. Our results suggest that activation of AMPK by TBT causes neuronal death through mediating glutamate release.

  17. cAMP-Inhibits Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Protects Neurons against Amyloid-β-Induced Synapse Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Williams, Alun

    2015-01-01

    A key event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides and the loss of synapses. In cultured neurons Aβ triggered synapse damage as measured by the loss of synaptic proteins. α-synuclein (αSN), aggregates of which accumulate in Parkinson’s disease, also caused synapse damage. Synapse damage was associated with activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an enzyme that regulates synapse function and structure, and the production of prostaglandin (PG) E2. In synaptosomes PGE2 increased concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) which suppressed the activation of cPLA2 demonstrating an inhibitory feedback system. Thus, Aβ/αSN-induced activated cPLA2 produces PGE2 which increases cAMP which in turn suppresses cPLA2 and, hence, its own production. Neurons pre-treated with pentoxifylline and caffeine (broad spectrum phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors) or the PDE4 specific inhibitor rolipram significantly increased the Aβ/αSN-induced increase in cAMP and consequently protected neurons against synapse damage. The addition of cAMP analogues also inhibited cPLA2 and protected neurons against synapse damage. These results suggest that drugs that inhibit Aβ-induced activation of cPLA2 and cross the blood–brain barrier may reduce synapse damage in AD. PMID:26389963

  18. Catechin-induced activation of the LKB1/AMP-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Murase, Takatoshi; Misawa, Koichi; Haramizu, Satoshi; Hase, Tadashi

    2009-07-01

    Catechins are abundant in green tea and induce a variety of biologic actions, including anti-cancer, anti-obesity, and anti-diabetes effects, and their clinical application has been widely investigated. To clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms of these actions, we examined the effect of catechins on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in cultured cells and in mice. In Hepa 1-6, L6, and 3T3-L1 cells, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) induced increases in AMPKalpha and the downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation, and AMPKalpha activity. Analysis of the molecular specificity of eight naturally occurring catechins revealed that catechins with a gallocatechin moiety or a galloyl residue act as AMPK activators. In addition, phosphorylation of LKB1, which is a tumor-suppressor protein and a major AMPK-kinase, was increased by catechin treatment. EGCG-induced phosphorylation of LKB1 and AMPKalpha was suppressed by treatment with catalase, suggesting that reactive oxygen species are involved in EGCG-induced activation of the LKB1/AMPK pathway. Oral administration of EGCG (200mg/kg body weight) to BALB/c mice induced an increase in AMPKalpha activity in the liver concomitant with a significant increase in AMPKalpha and ACC phosphorylation. EGCG administration also increased oxygen consumption and fat oxidation, as determined by indirect calorimetry. These findings suggest that multiple effects of catechins, including anti-obesity and anti-cancer effects, are mediated, at least in part, by the activation of LKB1/AMPK in various tissues, and that these effects vary according to the catechin structure.

  19. Uric acid-dependent inhibition of AMP kinase induces hepatic glucose production in diabetes and starvation: evolutionary implications of the uricase loss in hominids.

    PubMed

    Cicerchi, Christina; Li, Nanxing; Kratzer, James; Garcia, Gabriela; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Tanabe, Katsuyuki; Hunter, Brandi; Rivard, Christopher J; Sautin, Yuri Y; Gaucher, Eric A; Johnson, Richard J; Lanaspa, Miguel A

    2014-08-01

    Reduced AMP kinase (AMPK) activity has been shown to play a key deleterious role in increased hepatic gluconeogenesis in diabetes, but the mechanism whereby this occurs remains unclear. In this article, we document that another AMP-dependent enzyme, AMP deaminase (AMPD) is activated in the liver of diabetic mice, which parallels with a significant reduction in AMPK activity and a significant increase in intracellular glucose accumulation in human HepG2 cells. AMPD activation is induced by a reduction in intracellular phosphate levels, which is characteristic of insulin resistance and diabetic states. Increased gluconeogenesis is mediated by reduced TORC2 phosphorylation at Ser171 by AMPK in these cells, as well as by the up-regulation of the rate-limiting enzymes PEPCK and G6Pc. The mechanism whereby AMPD controls AMPK activation depends on the production of a specific AMP downstream metabolite through AMPD, uric acid. In this regard, humans have higher uric acid levels than most mammals due to a mutation in uricase, the enzyme involved in uric acid degradation in most mammals, that developed during a period of famine in Europe 1.5 × 10(7) yr ago. Here, working with resurrected ancestral uricases obtained from early hominids, we show that their expression on HepG2 cells is enough to blunt gluconeogenesis in parallel with an up-regulation of AMPK activity. These studies identify a key role AMPD and uric acid in mediating hepatic gluconeogenesis in the diabetic state, via a mechanism involving AMPK down-regulation and overexpression of PEPCK and G6Pc. The uricase mutation in the Miocene likely provided a survival advantage to help maintain glucose levels under conditions of near starvation, but today likely has a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. © FASEB.

  20. AMP-activated kinase α2 deficiency protects mice from denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuting; Meng, Jin; Tang, Yinglong; Wang, Ting; Wei, Bin; Feng, Run; Gong, Bing; Wang, Huiwen; Ji, Guangju; Lu, Zhongbing

    2016-06-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of skeletal muscle metabolic pathways. Recently, AMPK activation by AICAR has been shown to increase myofibrillar protein degradation in C2C12 myotubes via stimulating autophagy and ubiquitin proteasome system. However, the impact of AMPKα on denervation induced muscle atrophy has not been tested. In this study, we performed sciatic denervation on hind limb muscles in both wild type (WT) and AMPKα2(-/-) mice. We found that AMPKα was phosphorylated in atrophic muscles following denervation. In addition, deletion of AMPKα2 significantly attenuated denervation induced skeletal muscle wasting and protein degradation, as evidenced by preserved muscle mass and myofiber area, as well as lower levels of ubiquitinated protein, Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expression, and LC3-II/I ratio in tibial anterior (TA) muscles. Interestingly, the phosphorylated FoxO3a at Ser253 was significantly decreased in atrophic TA muscles, which was preserved in AMPKα2(-/-) mice. Collectively, our data support the notion that the activation of AMPKα2 contributes to the atrophic effects of denervation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity.

  2. AMP-activated protein kinase induces actin cytoskeleton reorganization in epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Lisa; Carpentier, Sarah; Platek, Anna; Hussain, Nusrat; Gueuning, Marie-Agnes; Vertommen, Didier; Ozkan, Yurda; Sid, Brice; Hue, Louis; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Rider, Mark H.; Horman, Sandrine

    2010-06-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a known regulator of cellular and systemic energy balance, is now recognized to control cell division, cell polarity and cell migration, all of which depend on the actin cytoskeleton. Here we report the effects of A769662, a pharmacological activator of AMPK, on cytoskeletal organization and signalling in epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. We show that AMPK activation induced shortening or radiation of stress fibers, uncoupling from paxillin and predominance of cortical F-actin. In parallel, Rho-kinase downstream targets, namely myosin regulatory light chain and cofilin, were phosphorylated. These effects resembled the morphological changes in MDCK cells exposed to hyperosmotic shock, which led to Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK activation via calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-{beta}(CaMKK{beta}), a known upstream kinase of AMPK. Indeed, hypertonicity-induced AMPK activation was markedly reduced by the STO-609 CaMKK{beta} inhibitor, as was the increase in MLC and cofilin phosphorylation. We suggest that AMPK links osmotic stress to the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  3. AMP-activated protein kinase induces actin cytoskeleton reorganization in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Lisa; Carpentier, Sarah; Platek, Anna; Hussain, Nusrat; Gueuning, Marie-Agnès; Vertommen, Didier; Ozkan, Yurda; Sid, Brice; Hue, Louis; Courtoy, Pierre J; Rider, Mark H; Horman, Sandrine

    2010-06-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a known regulator of cellular and systemic energy balance, is now recognized to control cell division, cell polarity and cell migration, all of which depend on the actin cytoskeleton. Here we report the effects of A769662, a pharmacological activator of AMPK, on cytoskeletal organization and signalling in epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. We show that AMPK activation induced shortening or radiation of stress fibers, uncoupling from paxillin and predominance of cortical F-actin. In parallel, Rho-kinase downstream targets, namely myosin regulatory light chain and cofilin, were phosphorylated. These effects resembled the morphological changes in MDCK cells exposed to hyperosmotic shock, which led to Ca(2+)-dependent AMPK activation via calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta(CaMKKbeta), a known upstream kinase of AMPK. Indeed, hypertonicity-induced AMPK activation was markedly reduced by the STO-609 CaMKKbeta inhibitor, as was the increase in MLC and cofilin phosphorylation. We suggest that AMPK links osmotic stress to the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  4. Experimental periodontitis induces a cAMP-dependent increase in amylase activity in parotid glands from male rats.

    PubMed

    Miozza, Valeria; Borda, Enri; Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Busch, Lucila

    2009-12-01

    It is known that subjects with periodontitis show enhanced amylase concentration in saliva. Our purpose was to analyze the release of amylase in parotid glands from rats with experimental periodontitis and controls. We present evidence that periodontitis induces an increase in resting amylase activity and release without changes in isoproterenol-induced amylase secretion. Changes in amylase were reverted by the inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase by SQ 22536, the cyclooxygenase type 1 by FR 122047 and by blocking the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor with VIP 6-28. Parotid glands from rats with periodontitis showed an increase in cAMP levels that was also reverted in the presence of SQ 22536, FR 122047 and VIP 6-28. We concluded that both PGE(2) and VIP are produced in parotid glands from rats with periodontitis and, by activating their own receptors in acinar cells, induce cAMP accumulation leading to an increase in amylase basal secretion.

  5. An AP-2 element acts synergistically with the cyclic AMP- and Phorbol ester-inducible enhancer of the human proenkephalin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, S.E.; Comb, M.; Pearlberg, J.; Goodman, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    An enhancer with two DNA elements, one containing the sequence CGTCA, is required for cyclic AMP-and phorbol ester-inducible transcription of the human proenkephalin gene. The authors report that an AP-2 element located adjacent to the enhancer acts synergistically with it to confer maximal response to cyclic AMP and phorbol esters.

  6. CANDLES, an assay for monitoring GPCR induced cAMP generation in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Trehan, Ashutosh; Rotgers, Emmi; Coffey, Eleanor T; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2014-11-04

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a physiologically and pharmacologically important family of receptors that upon coupling to GαS stimulate cAMP production catalyzed by adenylyl cyclase. Thus, developing assays to monitor cAMP production is crucial to screen for ligands in studies of GPCR signaling. Primary cell cultures represent a more robust model than cell lines to study GPCR signaling since they physiologically resemble the parent tissue. Current cAMP assays have two fundamental limitations: 1) absence of cAMP kinetics as competition-based assays require cell lysis and measure only a single time-point, and 2) high variation with separate samples needed to measure consecutive time points. The utility of real-time cAMP biosensors is also limited in primary cell cultures due to their poor transfection efficiency, variable expression levels and inability to select stable clones. We therefore, decided to develop an assay that can measure cAMP not only at a single time-point but the entire cAMP kinetics after GPCR activation in untransfected primary cells. CANDLES (Cyclic AMP iNdirect Detection by Light Emission from Sensor cells) assay for monitoring cAMP kinetics in cell cultures, particularly in primary cultures was developed. The assay requires co-culturing of primary cells with sensor cells that stably express a luminescent cAMP sensor. Upon GPCR activation in primary cells, cAMP is transferred to sensor cells via gap junction channels, thereby evoking a luminescent read-out. GPCR activation using primary cultures of rat cortical neurons and mouse granulosa cells was measured. Kinetic responses of different agonists to adrenergic receptors were also compared using rat cortical neurons. The assay optimization was done by varying sensor-test cell ratio, using phosphodiesterase inhibitors and testing cell-cell contact requirement. Here we present CANDLES assay based on co-culturing test cells with cAMP-detecting sensor cells. This co-culture setup

  7. Activation of the cyclic AMP pathway promotes serotonin-induced Ca2+ oscillations in salivary glands of the blowfly Calliphora vicina.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Lennart; Baumann, Otto; Walz, Bernd

    2013-02-01

    Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling pathways interact in a complex manner at multiple sites. This crosstalk fine-tunes the spatiotemporal patterns of Ca(2+) and cAMP signals. In salivary glands of the blowfly Calliphora vicina fluid secretion is stimulated by serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) via activation of two different 5-HT receptors coupled to the InsP(3)/Ca(2+) (Cv5-HT(2α)) or the cAMP pathway (Cv5-HT(7)), respectively. We have shown recently in permeabilized gland cells that cAMP sensitizes InsP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release to InsP(3). Here we study the effects of the cAMP signalling pathway on 5-HT-induced oscillations in transepithelial potential (TEP) and in intracellular [Ca(2+)]. We show: (1) Blocking the activation of the cAMP pathway by cinanserin suppresses the generation of TEP and Ca(2+) oscillations, (2) application of 8-CPT-cAMP in the presence of cinanserin restores 5-HT-induced TEP and Ca(2+) oscillations, (3) 8-CPT-cAMP sensitizes the InsP(3)/Ca(2+) signalling pathway to 5-HT and the Cv5-HT(2α) receptor agonist 5-MeOT, (4) 8-CPT-cAMP induces Ca(2+) oscillations in cells loaded with subthreshold concentrations of InsP(3), (5) inhibition of protein kinase A by H-89 abolishes 5-HT-induced TEP and Ca(2+) spiking and mimics the effect of cinanserin. These results suggest that activation of the cyclic AMP pathway promotes the generation of 5-HT-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in blowfly salivary glands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence study of plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae lacking inducible ampC from Saudi hospitals.

    PubMed

    Abdalhamid, Baha; Albunayan, Samar; Shaikh, Alaa; Elhadi, Nasreldin; Aljindan, Reem

    2017-09-01

    Enterobacteriaceae encoding plasmid-mediated AmpC (pAmpC) β-lactamases confer resistance to the third generation cephalosporins. pAmpC association with extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) and aminoglycoside modifying enzymes (AMEs) is well documented. There are limited data regarding the epidemiology and clinical significance of pAmpC in Saudi Arabia. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of pAmpC and its coexistence with ESBLs, PMQR and AMEs in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis isolates in Saudi hospitals from January to December 2015. The VITEK 2 system was used for organism identification and susceptibility testing. PCR and sequencing were used to detect pAmpC, ESBL, AME and PMQR genes. Out of 3625 isolates of E. coli, K. pneumoniae and P. mirabilis, 200 cefoxitin-resistant isolates were identified, making the prevalence of cefoxitin resistance 5.5 % (200/3625). CMY-2 and DHA were detected in 24 and 12 isolates, respectively. The prevalence of pAmpC was 1 % (36/3625). In several isolates, pAmpC β-lactamases were associated with PMQR genes including aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrB and/or with AMEs including aacA4, aacC2, aadA1, aphA6, armA and rmtB genes. No ESBLs were detected in pAmpC β-lactamase-harbouring isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first study determining the prevalence of pAmpC β-lactamases and their association with PMQR and/or AME genes in Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States. CMY-2 is the most prevalent pAmpC β-lactamase in this study. These data emphasize the importance of surveillance studies and implementation of antimicrobial stewardship programmes to reduce infections caused by such resistant organisms.

  9. cAMP signaling inhibits radiation-induced ATM phosphorylation leading to the augmentation of apoptosis in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Ah; Kim, Eui-Jun; Kwak, Sahng-June; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2014-02-24

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase plays a central role in coordinating the cellular response to radiation-induced DNA damage. cAMP signaling regulates various cellular responses including metabolism and gene expression. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism through which cAMP signaling regulates ATM activation and cellular responses to ionizing radiation in lung cancer cells. Lung cancer cells were transfected with constitutively active stimulatory G protein (GαsQL), and irradiated with γ-rays. The phosphorylation of ATM and protein phosphatase 2A was analyzed by western blotting, and apoptosis was assessed by western blotting, flow cytometry, and TUNNEL staining. The promoter activity of NF-κB was determined by dual luciferase reporter assay. BALB/c mice were treated with forskolin to assess the effect in the lung tissue. Transient expression of GαsQL significantly inhibited radiation-induced ATM phosphorylation in H1299 human lung cancer cells. Treatment with okadaic acid or knock down of PP2A B56δ subunit abolished the inhibitory effect of Gαs on radiation-induced ATM phosphorylation. Expression of GαsQL increased phosphorylation of the B56δ and PP2A activity, and inhibition of PKA blocked Gαs-induced PP2A activation. GαsQL enhanced radiation-induced cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP and increased the number of early apoptotic cells. The radiation-induced apoptosis was increased by inhibition of NF-κB using PDTC or inhibition of ATM using KU55933 or siRNA against ATM. Pretreatment of BALB/c mice with forskolin stimulated phosphorylation of PP2A B56δ, inhibited the activation of ATM and NF-κB, and augmented radiation-induced apoptosis in the lung tissue. GαsQL expression decreased the nuclear levels of the p50 and p65 subunits and NF-κB-dependent activity after γ-ray irradiation in H1299 cells. Pretreatment with prostaglandin E2 or isoproterenol increased B56δ phosphorylation, decreased radiation-induced ATM

  10. Early methyl donor deficiency alters cAMP signaling pathway and neurosteroidogenesis in the cerebellum of female rat pups

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj Chehadeh, Sarah; Dreumont, Natacha; Willekens, Jérèmy; Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia; Jeannesson, Elise; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Early deficiency of the methyl donors folate and vitamin B12 produces hyperhomocysteinemia and cognitive and motor disorders in 21-day-old rat pups from dams fed a diet deficient in methyl donors during gestation and lactation. These disorders are associated with impaired neurogenesis and altered synaptic plasticity in cerebellum. We aimed to investigate whether these disorders could be related to impaired expression of neurosteroidogenesis-associated proteins, key regulator receptors, and some steroid content in the cerebellum. The methyl donor deficiency produced a decreased concentration of folate and vitamin B12, along with accumulation of homocysteine in Purkinje cells in both sexes, whereas the S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio was reduced only in females. The transcription level and protein expression of StAR, aromatase, ERα, ERβ, and LH receptors were decreased only in females, with a marked effect in Purkinje cells, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Consistently, reduced levels of estradiol and pregnenolone were measured in cerebellar extracts of females only. The decreased expression levels of the transcriptional factors CREB, phospho-CREB, and SF-1, the lesser increase of cAMP concentration, and the lower level of phospho-PKC in the cerebellum of deficient females suggest that the activation of neurosteroidogenesis via cAMP-mediated signaling pathways associated with LHR activation would be altered. In conclusion, a gestational methyl donor deficiency impairs neurosteroidogenesis in cerebellum in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:25294213

  11. Early methyl donor deficiency alters cAMP signaling pathway and neurosteroidogenesis in the cerebellum of female rat pups.

    PubMed

    El Hajj Chehadeh, Sarah; Dreumont, Natacha; Willekens, Jérèmy; Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia; Jeannesson, Elise; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Leininger-Muller, Brigitte

    2014-12-01

    Early deficiency of the methyl donors folate and vitamin B12 produces hyperhomocysteinemia and cognitive and motor disorders in 21-day-old rat pups from dams fed a diet deficient in methyl donors during gestation and lactation. These disorders are associated with impaired neurogenesis and altered synaptic plasticity in cerebellum. We aimed to investigate whether these disorders could be related to impaired expression of neurosteroidogenesis-associated proteins, key regulator receptors, and some steroid content in the cerebellum. The methyl donor deficiency produced a decreased concentration of folate and vitamin B12, along with accumulation of homocysteine in Purkinje cells in both sexes, whereas the S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio was reduced only in females. The transcription level and protein expression of StAR, aromatase, ERα, ERβ, and LH receptors were decreased only in females, with a marked effect in Purkinje cells, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Consistently, reduced levels of estradiol and pregnenolone were measured in cerebellar extracts of females only. The decreased expression levels of the transcriptional factors CREB, phospho-CREB, and SF-1, the lesser increase of cAMP concentration, and the lower level of phospho-PKC in the cerebellum of deficient females suggest that the activation of neurosteroidogenesis via cAMP-mediated signaling pathways associated with LHR activation would be altered. In conclusion, a gestational methyl donor deficiency impairs neurosteroidogenesis in cerebellum in a sex-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Exposure to hydrogen peroxide induces oxidation and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W; Banerjee, Sami; Bae, Hongbeom; Friggeri, Arnaud; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Abraham, Edward

    2010-10-22

    Although metabolic conditions associated with an increased AMP/ATP ratio are primary factors in the activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a number of recent studies have shown that increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species can stimulate AMPK activity, even without a decrease in cellular levels of ATP. We found that exposure of recombinant AMPKαβγ complex or HEK 293 cells to H(2)O(2) was associated with increased kinase activity and also resulted in oxidative modification of AMPK, including S-glutathionylation of the AMPKα and AMPKβ subunits. In experiments using C-terminal truncation mutants of AMPKα (amino acids 1-312), we found that mutation of cysteine 299 to alanine diminished the ability of H(2)O(2) to induce kinase activation, and mutation of cysteine 304 to alanine totally abrogated the enhancing effect of H(2)O(2) on kinase activity. Similar to the results obtained with H(2)O(2)-treated HEK 293 cells, activation and S-glutathionylation of the AMPKα subunit were present in the lungs of acatalasemic mice or mice treated with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole, conditions in which intracellular steady state levels of H(2)O(2) are increased. These results demonstrate that physiologically relevant concentrations of H(2)O(2) can activate AMPK through oxidative modification of the AMPKα subunit. The present findings also imply that AMPK activation, in addition to being a response to alterations in intracellular metabolic pathways, is directly influenced by cellular redox status.

  13. Tetramethylpyrazine protects against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats by reversing the cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Yu, Xiao; Luo, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Dong

    2013-09-15

    Tetramethylpyrazine is used in the treatment of many neurological diseases because of its neuroprotective effect. Here, we demonstrate that administration of tetramethylpyrazine effectively reverses memory deficits induced by scopolamine. Moreover, tetramethylpyrazine preserves postsynaptic protein synthesis and restores cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway signaling deficits. Our study not only explores the actions of tetramethylpyrazine on synapses, but also provides novel evidence for the possible therapeutic use of tetramethylpyrazine in dementia.

  14. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb). We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  15. Gliadins induce TNFalpha production through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activation in intestinal cells (Caco-2).

    PubMed

    Laparra Llopis, José Moisés; Sanz Herranz, Yolanda

    2010-06-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to gliadins. In this study the effects of two gliadin-derived peptides (PA2, PQPQLPYPQPQLP and PA9, QLQPFPQPQLPY) on TNFalpha production by intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) and whether these effects were related to protein kinase A (PKA) and/or -C (PKC) activities have been evaluated. Caco-2 cell cultures were challenged with several sets of gliadin peptides solutions (0.25 mg/mL), with/without different activators of PKA or PKC, bradykinin (Brdkn) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). The gliadin-derived peptides assayed represent the two major immunodominant epitopes of the peptide 33-mer of alpha-gliadin (56-88) (LQLQPFPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQPF). Both peptides induced the TNFalpha production triggering the inflammatory cell responses, the PA2 being more effective. The addition of the peptides in the presence of dibutyril cyclic AMP (cAMP), Brdkn or PDTC, inhibited the TNFalpha production. The PKC-activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-diacetate additionally increased the PA2- and PA9-induced TNFalpha production. These results link the gliadin-derived peptides induced TNFalpha production through cAMP-dependent PKA activation, where ion channels controlling calcium influx into cells could play a protective role, and requires NF-kappaB activation.

  16. Panaxynol induces neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells via cAMP- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze-Jian; Nie, Bao-Ming; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Lu, Yang

    2006-01-05

    Panaxynol, a polyacetylene ((3R)-heptadeca-1,9-diene-4,6-diyn-3-ol; syn. falcarinol), was isolated from the lipophilic fractions of Panax notoginseng, a Chinese traditional medicinal plant. In the present study, we reported the neurotrophic effects of panaxynol on PC12D cells and mechanism involved in neurite outgrowth of the cells. Panaxynol could morphologically promote neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells, concentration-dependently reduce cell division and up-regulate molecular marker (MAP1B) expression in PC12D cells. Panaxynol induces the elevation of intracellular cAMP in PC12D cells. The neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells induced by panaxynol could be inhibited by the protein kinase A inhibitor RpcAMPS and by MAP kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor U0126. These observations reveal that panaxynol could induce the differentiation of PC12D cells in a process similar to but distinct from that of NGF and the panaxynol's effects were via cAMP- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanisms.

  17. 8-chloroadenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (8-Cl-cAMP) selectively eliminates protein kinase A type I to induce growth inhibition in c-ras-transformed fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, K; Murata, T; Cho-Chung, Y S

    1998-07-01

    8-Chloroadenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (8-Cl-cAMP), a site-selective cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) analogue, exhibits growth inhibition in a broad spectrum of cancer cell lines. We investigated the effect of 8-Cl-cAMP on c-ras-transformed mouse fibroblasts (MP3/3T3) which were established by transfection of Balb3T3 cells (Balb3T3) with the point-mutated c-ras gene [G12-->V12]. 8-Cl-cAMP (2-5 microM) exerted over 80% growth inhibition by day 4 on MP3/3T3, while inhibiting parental Balb3T3 cell growth less than 40%. In order to distinguish the effect of 8-Cl-cAMP from that of 8-chloroadenosine (8-Cl-adenosine), we examined the effect of 8-Cl-cAMP in serum-free medium. 8-Cl-cAMP demonstrated a potent growth inhibition of MP3/3T3 cells cultured in serum-free medium, suggesting that the growth inhibitory effect of 8-Cl-cAMP was not due to its hydrolysed product, 8-Cl-adenosine. In addition, both Balb3T3 and MP3/3T3 contained cAMP phosphodiesterases mainly composed of isozyme IV which has previously been reported to be insensitive towards the hydrolysis of 8-Cl-cAMP. Non-transformed Balb3T3 cells contained only type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), whereas transformed MP3/3T3 exhibited a marked increase in type I PKA. The growth inhibition of MP3/3T3 by 8-Cl-cAMP accompanied almost complete elimination of type I PKA without affecting type II PKA. Moreover, 8-Cl-cAMP induced an arrest in the G0/G1-phase of the cell cycle in MP3/3T3. 8-Cl-adenosine had little or no effect on the cell cycle kinetics of MP3/3T3 cells. These results show that 8-Cl-cAMP is a novel cAMP analogue which selectively eliminates type I PKA to induce growth inhibition in transformed fibroblasts.

  18. Exposure to Hydrogen Peroxide Induces Oxidation and Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W.; Banerjee, Sami; Bae, Hongbeom; Friggeri, Arnaud; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Abraham, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Although metabolic conditions associated with an increased AMP/ATP ratio are primary factors in the activation of 5′-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a number of recent studies have shown that increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species can stimulate AMPK activity, even without a decrease in cellular levels of ATP. We found that exposure of recombinant AMPKαβγ complex or HEK 293 cells to H2O2 was associated with increased kinase activity and also resulted in oxidative modification of AMPK, including S-glutathionylation of the AMPKα and AMPKβ subunits. In experiments using C-terminal truncation mutants of AMPKα (amino acids 1–312), we found that mutation of cysteine 299 to alanine diminished the ability of H2O2 to induce kinase activation, and mutation of cysteine 304 to alanine totally abrogated the enhancing effect of H2O2 on kinase activity. Similar to the results obtained with H2O2-treated HEK 293 cells, activation and S-glutathionylation of the AMPKα subunit were present in the lungs of acatalasemic mice or mice treated with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole, conditions in which intracellular steady state levels of H2O2 are increased. These results demonstrate that physiologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 can activate AMPK through oxidative modification of the AMPKα subunit. The present findings also imply that AMPK activation, in addition to being a response to alterations in intracellular metabolic pathways, is directly influenced by cellular redox status. PMID:20729205

  19. Modulation of PC12 cell viability by forskolin-induced cyclic AMP levels through ERK and JNK pathways: an implication for L-DOPA-induced cytotoxicity in nigrostriatal dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Park, Keun Hong; Park, Hyun Jin; Shin, Keon Sung; Choi, Hyun Sook; Kai, Masaaki; Lee, Myung Koo

    2012-07-01

    The intracellular levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP) increase in response to cytotoxic concentrations of L-DOPA in PC12 cells, and forskolin that induces intracellular cAMP levels either protects PC12 cells from L-DOPA-induced cytotoxicity or enhances cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. This study investigated the effects of cAMP induced by forskolin on cell viability of PC12 cells, relevant to L-DOPA-induced cytotoxicity in Parkinson's disease therapy. The low levels of forskolin (0.01 and 0.1 μM)-induced cAMP increased dopamine biosynthesis and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation, and induced transient phosphorylation of ERK1/2 within 1 h. However, at the high levels of forskolin (1.0 and 10 μM)-induced cAMP, dopamine biosynthesis and TH phosphorylation did not increase, but rapid differentiation in neurite-like formation was observed with a steady state. The high levels of forskolin-induced cAMP also induced sustained increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation within 0.25-6 h and then led to apoptosis, which was apparently mediated by JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation. Multiple treatment of PC12 cells with nontoxic L-DOPA (20 μM) for 4-6 days induced neurite-like formation and decreased intracellular dopamine levels by reducing TH phosphorylation. These results suggest that the low levels of forskolin-induced cAMP increased dopamine biosynthesis in cell survival via transient ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In contrast, the high levels of forskolin-induced cAMP induced differentiation via sustained ERK1/2 phosphorylation and then led to apoptosis. Taken together, the intracellular levels of cAMP play a dual role in cell survival and death through the ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 pathways in PC12 cells.

  20. Manassantin A inhibits cAMP-induced melanin production by down-regulating the gene expressions of MITF and tyrosinase in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwa Dong; Lee, Won-Hee; Roh, Eunmiri; Seo, Chang-Seob; Son, Jong-Keun; Lee, Seung Ho; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Jung, Sang-Hun; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2011-09-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is inducible in response to cAMP through the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and plays a pivotal role in the melanocyte-specific expression of tyrosinase or tyrosinase-related proteins (TRPs) for melanin biosynthesis. Manassantin A from Saururus chinensis inhibits cAMP-induced melanin production in B16 melanoma cells. Here, we focused on molecular basis of the antimelanogenic activity. Manassantin A consistently inhibited the cAMP elevator 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)- or dibutyryl cAMP-induced melanin production in B16 cells or in melan-a melanocytes by down-regulating the expression of tyrosinase or TRP1 gene. Moreover, manassantin A suppressed MITF induction through IBMX-activated CREB pathway, directly inhibiting the Ser-133 phosphorylation of CREB. However, manassantin A did not affect IBMX-increased cAMP levels in these cells but also other cAMP-dependent melanogenic pathways through post-translational modifications of MITF. This putative molecular mechanism of manassantin A in the inhibition of melanin production suggests its pharmacological potential in skin hyperpigmentation.

  1. Downstream molecular events in the altered profiles of lysophosphatidic acid-induced cAMP in senescent human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ik Soon; Rhim, Ji Heon; Park, Sang Chul; Yeo, Eui Ju

    2006-04-30

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a phospholipid growth factor that acts through G-protein-coupled receptors. Previously, we demonstrated an altered profile of LPA-dependent cAMP content during the aging process of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs). In attempts to define the molecular events associated with the age-dependent changes in cAMP profiles, we determined the protein kinase A (PKA) activity, phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), and the protein expression of CRE-regulatory genes, c-fos and COX-2 in young and senescent HDFs. We observed in senescent cells, an increase in mRNA levels of the catalytic subunit a of PKA and of the major regulatory subunit Ialpha. Senescence-associated increase of cAMP after LPA treatment correlated well with increased CREB phosphorylation accompanying activation of PKA in senescent cells. In senescent cells, after LPA treatment, the expression of c-fos and COX-2 decreased initially, followed by an increase. In young HDFs, CREB phosphorylation decreased following LPA treatment, and both c-fos and COX-2 protein levels increased rapidly. CRE-luciferase assay revealed higher basal CRE-dependent gene expression in young HDFs compared to senescent HDFs. However, LPA-dependent slope of luciferase increased more rapidly in senescent cells than in young cells, presumably due to an increase of LPA-induced CREB phosphorylation. CRE-dependent luciferase activation was abrogated in the presence of inhibitors of PKC, MEK1, p38MAPK, and PKA, in both young and senescent HDFs. We conclude that these kinase are coactivators of the expression of CRE-responsive genes in LPA-induced HDFs and that their changed activities during the aging process contribute to the final expression level of CRE-responsive genes.

  2. One-day treatment of small molecule 8-bromo-cyclic AMP analogue induces cell-based VEGF production for in vitro angiogenesis and osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kevin W-H; Kan, Ho Man; Gagnon, Keith A; Laurencin, Cato T

    2016-10-01

    Small molecule-based regenerative engineering is emerging as a promising strategy for regenerating bone tissue. Small molecule cAMP analogues have been proposed as novel biofactors for bone repair and regeneration and, while promising, the effect that these small molecules have on angiogenesis, a critical requirement for successful bone regeneration, is still unclear. Our previous research demonstrated that the small molecule cAMP analogue 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP) was able to promote initial osteoblast adhesion on a polymeric scaffold via cAMP signalling cascades. Here, we report that 8-Br-cAMP is capable of inducing in vitro cell-based VEGF production for angiogenesis promotion. We first demonstrated that treating osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells with 8-Br-cAMP for 1 day significantly increased VEGF production and secretion. We then demonstrated that 8-Br-cAMP-induced cell-secreted VEGF is biologically active and may promote angiogenesis, as evidenced by increased human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) migration and tubule formation. In addition, treatment of MC3T3-E1 cells with 8-Br-cAMP for as short as a single day resulted in enhanced ALP activity as well as matrix mineralization, demonstrating in vitro osteoblastic differentiation. A short-term 8-Br-cAMP treatment also addresses the concern of non-specific cytotoxicity, as our data indicate that a 1-day 8-Br-cAMP treatment scheme supports cellular proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells as well as HUVECs. While the major concern associated with small molecule drugs is the risk of non-specific cytotoxicity, the short exposure treatment outlined in this paper provides a very promising strategy to mitigate the risk associated with small molecules. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Cilostazol inhibits interleukin-1-induced ADAM17 expression through cAMP independent signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takaguri, Akira; Morimoto, Mayumi; Imai, Shin-Ichi; Satoh, Kumi

    2016-03-01

    Increased A disintegrin and metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is implicated in the development of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis and hypertension. Although cilostazol, type III phosphodiesterase (PDE III) inhibitor, has recently been found to inhibit VSMC proliferation, the mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, we hypothesized that cilostazol regulates the ADAM17 expression in VSMC. In cultured VSMC, interleukin (IL)-1α and IL-1β significantly increased ADAM17 expression. MEK inhibitor U0126, NF-κB inhibitor BAY-11-7085, and siRNA targeting p65/RelA significantly inhibited IL-1α or IL-β-induced ADAM17 expression. Cilostazol significantly inhibited IL-1α or IL-1β-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and ADAM17 expression. Unexpectedly, cilostamide, dibutryl cAMP, and forskolin did not affect IL-1-induced ADAM17 expression. Our results clearly demonstrated that IL-1 induces ADAM17 expression through ERK/NF-κB activation in VSMCs. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of cilostazol on IL-1-induced ADAM17 expression may be independent of the cAMP signaling pathway in VSMC. These novel findings may provide important clues to understanding the expression mechanisms of ADAM17 and the inhibitory mechanisms of cilostazol in VSMC proliferation. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  4. Cyclic AMP induces transforming growth factor beta 2 gene expression and growth arrest in the human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3.

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Y J; Kim, S J; Danielpour, D; O'Reilly, M A; Kim, K Y; Myers, C E; Trepel, J B

    1992-01-01

    The standard therapy for advanced prostate cancer is androgen ablation. Despite transitory responses, hormonally treated patients ultimately relapse with androgen-independent disease that is resistant to further hormonal manipulation and cytotoxic chemotherapy. To develop an additional approach to the treatment of advanced prostate cancer, we have been studying the signal transductions controlling the growth of human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell lines. We report here that elevation of intracellular cAMP markedly inhibits the growth of the hormone-refractory cell line PC-3. To examine the mechanism of cAMP action in PC-3 cells, we tested the effect of the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP (Bt2-cAMP) on the regulation of the potent negative growth factor transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). Bt2-cAMP selectively induced the secretion of TGF-beta 2 and not TGF-beta 1 by PC-3 cells. This TGF-beta 2 was shown to be bioactive by using the CCL-64 mink lung cell assay. TGF-beta 1 was not activated despite being present at 3-fold higher concentrations than TGF-beta 2. Northern analysis showed that Bt2-cAMP induced an increase in the five characteristic TGF-beta 2 transcripts and had no effect on the level of TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 3 transcripts. TGF-beta 2 induction was only weakly enhanced by cycloheximide and was completely inhibited by actinomycin D. These data show that Bt2-cAMP induces the expression of active TGF-beta 2 by PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells, suggesting a new approach to the treatment of prostate cancer and a new molecular mechanism of cAMP action. Images PMID:1373503

  5. 8-Cl-cAMP antagonizes mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and cell growth stimulation induced by epidermal growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Budillon, A; Gennaro, E Di; Caraglia, M; Barbarulo, D; Abbruzzese, A; Tagliaferri, P

    1999-01-01

    The growth factor-activated mitogenic pathways are often disregulated in tumour cells and, therefore, they can provide specific molecular targets for novel anti-tumour approaches. 8-Chloro-cAMP (8-Cl-cAMP), a synthetic cAMP analogue, is a novel anti-tumour agent that has recently undergone clinical evaluation. We investigated the effects of 8-CI-cAMP on the epidermal growth factor (EGF)/EGF receptor (EGF-R) signalling in human epidermoid cancer KB cells, which are responsive to the mitogenic stimulus of EGF. We found that the growth-promoting activity of EGF was completely abolished when EGF treatment was performed in combination with 8-CI-cAMP. The inhibition of the EGF-induced proliferation by 8-CI-cAMP was paralleled by the blockade of the EGF-stimulated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), ERK-1 and ERK-2. Conversely, we found an increase of EGF-R expression and EGF-R tyrosine phosphorylation when KB cells were growth inhibited by 8-Cl-cAMP. Moreover, the activity of Raf-1 and MEK-1 protein kinases, the activators upstream MAPK in the phosphorylation cascade induced by EGF, was not modified in 8-Cl-cAMP-treated cells. We concluded that the impairment of KB cell response to EGF, induced by 8-Cl-cAMP, resides in the specific inhibition of MAPK/ERKs activity while the function of the upstream elements in the EGF-R signalling is preserved. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10584873

  6. Efficient and robust differentiation of endothelial cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells via lineage control with VEGF and cyclic AMP

    PubMed Central

    Ikuno, Takeshi; Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Yamamizu, Kohei; Yoshioka, Miki; Minakata, Kenji; Ikeda, Tadashi; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood vessels are essential components for many tissues and organs. Thus, efficient induction of endothelial cells (ECs) from human pluripotent stem cells is a key method for generating higher tissue structures entirely from stem cells. We previously established an EC differentiation system with mouse pluripotent stem cells to show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is essential to induce ECs and that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synergistically enhances VEGF effects. Here we report an efficient and robust EC differentiation method from human pluripotent stem cell lines based on a 2D monolayer, serum-free culture. We controlled the direction of differentiation from mesoderm to ECs using stage-specific stimulation with VEGF and cAMP combined with the elimination of non-responder cells at early EC stage. This “stimulation-elimination” method robustly achieved very high efficiency (>99%) and yield (>10 ECs from 1 hiPSC input) of EC differentiation, with no purification of ECs after differentiation. We believe this method will be a valuable technological basis broadly for regenerative medicine and 3D tissue engineering. PMID:28288160

  7. Mechanism of cAMP-induced H(+)-efflux of Dictyostelium cells: a role for fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Flaadt, H; Schaloske, R; Malchow, D

    2000-09-01

    Aggregating Dictyostelium cells release protons when stimulated with cAMP. To find out whether the protons are generated by acidic vesicles or in the cytosol, we permeabilized the cells and found that this did not alter the cAMP-response. Proton efflux in intact cells was inhibited by preincubation with the V-type H(+) ATPase inhibitor concanamycin A and with the plasma membrane H(+) ATPase blocker miconazole. Surprisingly, miconazole also inhibited efflux in permeabilized cells, indicating that this type of H(+) ATPase is present on intracellular vesicles as well. Vesicular acidification was inhibited by miconazole and by concanamycin A, suggesting that the acidic vesicles contain both V-type and P-type H(+) ATPases. Moreover, concanamycin A and miconazole acted in concert, both in intact cells and in vesicles. The mechanism of cAMP-induced Ca2(+)-fluxes involves phospholipase A2 activity. Fatty acids circumvent the plasma membrane and stimulate vesicular Ca2(+)-efflux. Here we show that arachidonic acid elicited H(+)-efflux not only from intact cells but also from acidic vesicles. The target of regulation by arachidonic acid seemed to be the vesicular Ca2(+)-release channel.

  8. Activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cyclic AMP attenuates acute pyelonephritis in mice induced by uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yang; Li, Ke; Wang, Na; Cai, Gui-Dong; Zhang, Ting; Lin, Yan; Gui, Bao-Song; Liu, En-Qi; Li, Zong-Fang; Zhou, Wuding

    2015-02-01

    The pathogenesis of pyelonephritis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is not well understood. Here, we show that besides UPEC virulence, the severity of the host innate immune response and invasion of renal epithelial cells are important pathogenic factors. Activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cAMP significantly attenuated acute pyelonephritis in mice induced by UPEC. Administration of forskolin (a potent elevator of intracellular cAMP) reduced kidney infection (ie, bacterial load, tissue destruction); this was associated with attenuated local inflammation, as evidenced by the reduction of renal production of proinflammatory mediators, renal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and renal myeloperoxidase activity. In primary cell culture systems, forskolin not only down-regulated UPEC-stimulated production of proinflammatory mediators by renal tubular epithelial cells and inflammatory cells (eg, monocyte/macrophages) but also reduced bacterial internalization by renal tubular epithelial cells. Our findings clearly indicate that activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cAMP is beneficial for controlling UPEC-mediated acute pyelonephritis in mice. The beneficial effect can be explained at least in part by limiting excessive inflammatory responses through acting on both renal tubular epithelial cells and inflammatory cells and by inhibiting bacteria invasion of renal tubular epithelial cells. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Activation of Endogenous Anti-Inflammatory Mediator Cyclic AMP Attenuates Acute Pyelonephritis in Mice Induced by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yang; Li, Ke; Wang, Na; Cai, Gui-Dong; Zhang, Ting; Lin, Yan; Gui, Bao-Song; Liu, En-Qi; Li, Zong-Fang; Zhou, Wuding

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pyelonephritis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is not well understood. Here, we show that besides UPEC virulence, the severity of the host innate immune response and invasion of renal epithelial cells are important pathogenic factors. Activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cAMP significantly attenuated acute pyelonephritis in mice induced by UPEC. Administration of forskolin (a potent elevator of intracellular cAMP) reduced kidney infection (ie, bacterial load, tissue destruction); this was associated with attenuated local inflammation, as evidenced by the reduction of renal production of proinflammatory mediators, renal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and renal myeloperoxidase activity. In primary cell culture systems, forskolin not only down-regulated UPEC-stimulated production of proinflammatory mediators by renal tubular epithelial cells and inflammatory cells (eg, monocyte/macrophages) but also reduced bacterial internalization by renal tubular epithelial cells. Our findings clearly indicate that activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cAMP is beneficial for controlling UPEC-mediated acute pyelonephritis in mice. The beneficial effect can be explained at least in part by limiting excessive inflammatory responses through acting on both renal tubular epithelial cells and inflammatory cells and by inhibiting bacteria invasion of renal tubular epithelial cells. PMID:25478807

  10. Sesamin induces melanogenesis by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase up-regulation via cAMP signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zequn; Li, Shasha; Liu, Yunyi; Deng, Pengyi; Huang, Jianguo; He, Guangyuan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we confirmed that sesamin, an active lignan isolated from sesame seed and oil, is a novel skin-tanning compound. The melanin content and tyrosinase activity were increased by sesamin in a dose-dependent manner in B16 melanoma cells. The mRNA and protein levels of tyrosinase were also enhanced after the treatment with sesamin. Western blot analysis revealed that sesamin induced and sustained up-regulation of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). Sesamin could activate cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB), but it had no effect on the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or Akt. Moreover, sesamin activated protein kinase A (PKA) via a cAMP-dependent pathway. Consistent with these results, sesamin-mediated increase of melanin synthesis was reduced significantly by H-89, a PKA inhibitor, but not by SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor or by LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Sesamin-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and induction of MITF and tyrosinase expression were also inhibited by H-89. These findings indicated that sesamin could stimulate melanogenesis in B16 cells via the up-regulation of MITF and tyrosinase, which was, in turn, due to the activation of cAMP signaling.

  11. Mutant analysis suggests that cyclic GMP mediates the cyclic AMP-induced Ca2+ uptake in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Menz, S; Bumann, J; Jaworski, E; Malchow, D

    1991-05-01

    Previous work has shown that streamer F (stmF) mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum exhibit prolonged chemotactic elongation in aggregation fields. The mutants carry an altered structural gene for cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase resulting in low activities of this enzyme. Chemotactic stimulation by cyclic AMP causes a rapid transient increase in the cyclic GMP concentration followed by association of myosin heavy chains with the cytoskeleton. Both events persist several times longer in stmF mutants than in the parental strain, indicating that the change in association of myosin with the cytoskeleton is transmitted directly or indirectly by cyclic GMP. We measured the cyclic AMP-induced Ca2+ uptake with a Ca(2+)-sensitive electrode and found that Ca2+ uptake was prolonged in stmF mutants but not in the parental strain. The G alpha 2 mutant strain HC33 (fgdA), devoid of InsP3 release and receptor/guanylate cyclase coupling, lacked Ca2+ uptake. However, the latter response and cyclic GMP formation were normal in the signal-relay mutant strain agip 53 where cyclic AMP-stimulated cyclic AMP synthesis is absent. LiCl, which inhibits InsP3 formation in Dictyostelium, blocked Ca2+ uptake in a dose-dependent manner. The data indicate that the receptor-mediated Ca2+ uptake depends on the InsP3 pathway and is regulated by cyclic GMP. The rate of Ca2+ uptake was correlated in time with the association of myosin with the cytoskeleton, suggesting that Ca2+ uptake is involved in the motility response of the cells.

  12. Evidence for CB2 receptor involvement in LPS-induced reduction of cAMP intracellular levels in uterine explants from pregnant mice: pathophysiological implications.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Ana Inés; Carozzo, Alejandro; Correa, Fernando; Davio, Carlos; Franchi, Ana María

    2017-07-01

    What is the role of the endocannabinoid system (eCS) on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) effects on uterine explants from 7-day pregnant mice in a murine model of endotoxin-induced miscarriage? We found evidence for cannabinoid receptor type2 (CB2) involvement in LPS-induced increased prostaglandin-F2α (PGF2α) synthesis and diminished cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) intracellular content in uterine explants from early pregnant mice. Genital tract infections by Gram-negative bacteria are a common complication of human pregnancy that results in an increased risk of pregnancy loss. LPS, the main component of the Gram-negative bacterial wall, elicits a strong maternal inflammatory response that results in embryotoxicity and embryo resorption in a murine model endotoxin-induced early pregnancy loss. We have previously shown that the eCS mediates the embryotoxic effects of LPS, mainly via CB1 receptor activation. An in vitro study of mice uterine explants was performed to investigate the eCS in mediating the effects of LPS on PGF2α production and cAMP intracellular content. Eight to 12-week-old virgin female BALB/c or CD1 (wild-type [WT] or CB1-knockout [CB1-KO]) mice were paired with 8- to 12-week-old BALB/c or CD1 (WT or CB1-KO) males, respectively. On day 7 of pregnancy, BALB/c, CD1 WT or CD1 CB1-KO mice were euthanized, the uteri were excised, implantation sites were removed and the uterine tissues were separated from decidual and embryo tissues. Uterine explants were cultured and exposed for an appropriate amount of time to different pharmacological treatments. The tissues were then collected for cAMP assay and PGF2α content determination by radioimmunoassay. In vitro treatment of uteri explants from 7-day pregnant BALB/c or CD1 (WT or CB1-KO) mice with LPS induced an increased production of PGF2α (P < 0.05) and a reduction of the tissue content of cAMP (P < 0.05). These effects were mediated by CB2 receptors since exposure to AM630 (a specific CB2 receptor

  13. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  14. IGF-I–induced Differentiation of L6 Myogenic Cells Requires the Activity of cAMP-Phosphodiesterase

    PubMed Central

    De Arcangelis, Vania; Coletti, Dario; Conti, Marco; Lagarde, Michel; Molinaro, Mario; Adamo, Sergio; Nemoz, Georges; Naro, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    Inhibition of type 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE4) activity in L6-C5 and L6-E9 abolished myogenic differentiation induced by low-serum medium and IGF-I. L6-C5 cells cultured in low-serum medium displayed a PDE4 activity higher than cells cultured in serum-free medium, a condition not sufficient to induce differentiation. In the presence of serum, PDE4D3, the major isoform natively expressed in L6-C5 cells, translocated to a Triton-insoluble fraction, which increased the PDE specific activity of the fraction, and exhibited a Mr shift typical of phosphorylation of this isoform. Furthermore, serum promoted the localization of PDE4D3 to a vesicular subcellular compartment. In L6-C5 cells, IGF-I is a stronger inducer of myogenic differentiation in the presence than in absence of serum. Its ability to trigger differentiation in the absence of serum was restored by overexpressing wild-type PDE4D3, but not a phosphorylation-insensitive mutant. This finding was confirmed in single cells overexpressing a GFP-PDE4D3 fusion protein by assessing nuclear accumulation of myogenin in both L6-C5 and L6-E9. Overexpression of other PDE isoforms was less efficient, confirming that PDE4D3 is the physiologically relevant phosphodiesterase isoform in the control of myogenesis. These results show that downregulation of cAMP signaling through cAMP-phosphodiesterase stimulation is a prerequisite for induction of myogenesis. PMID:12686596

  15. IGF-I-induced differentiation of L6 myogenic cells requires the activity of cAMP-phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    De Arcangelis, Vania; Coletti, Dario; Conti, Marco; Lagarde, Michel; Molinaro, Mario; Adamo, Sergio; Nemoz, Georges; Naro, Fabio

    2003-04-01

    Inhibition of type 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE4) activity in L6-C5 and L6-E9 abolished myogenic differentiation induced by low-serum medium and IGF-I. L6-C5 cells cultured in low-serum medium displayed a PDE4 activity higher than cells cultured in serum-free medium, a condition not sufficient to induce differentiation. In the presence of serum, PDE4D3, the major isoform natively expressed in L6-C5 cells, translocated to a Triton-insoluble fraction, which increased the PDE specific activity of the fraction, and exhibited a Mr shift typical of phosphorylation of this isoform. Furthermore, serum promoted the localization of PDE4D3 to a vesicular subcellular compartment. In L6-C5 cells, IGF-I is a stronger inducer of myogenic differentiation in the presence than in absence of serum. Its ability to trigger differentiation in the absence of serum was restored by overexpressing wild-type PDE4D3, but not a phosphorylation-insensitive mutant. This finding was confirmed in single cells overexpressing a GFP-PDE4D3 fusion protein by assessing nuclear accumulation of myogenin in both L6-C5 and L6-E9. Overexpression of other PDE isoforms was less efficient, confirming that PDE4D3 is the physiologically relevant phosphodiesterase isoform in the control of myogenesis. These results show that downregulation of cAMP signaling through cAMP-phosphodiesterase stimulation is a prerequisite for induction of myogenesis.

  16. NICER elements: a family of nerve growth factor-inducible cAMP-extinguishable retrovirus-like elements.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, K O; Minsk, B; Wagner, J A

    1990-01-01

    We have shown previously that the transcription of the gene designated d5 is induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) in rat adrenal pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells and that this NGF induction is repressed by cAMP. In this paper we demonstrate that d5 is a member of a gene family that contains several hundred members, which is closely related to retroviruses and retrotransposons, as demonstrated by the following observations: (i) the original d5 cDNA hybridized to numerous restriction fragments in genomic DNA; (ii) d5 cDNA hybridized to genomic clones with various intensities, and genomic clones can be isolated with a frequency suggesting that this family includes several hundred members; and (iii) there were minor sequence variations in four independently isolated cDNA clones that were homologous to d5 cDNA. Primer extension studies show that initiation of the 5.7-kilobase d5 mRNA(s) occurs at a unique site relative to a synthetic primer. The 5' end of the cDNA sequence was homologous to Rasheed rat sarcoma virus; and a genomic clone contained several elements that are typical of a long terminal repeat (LTR), including a CCAAT box, a TATA box, a primer binding site, a poly(A) addition signal, and a poly(A) addition site. Furthermore, there is a LTR at the 3' end of at least one of the genes in this family, and there appeared to be a four-base duplication at the probable site of integration into host DNA. Since several members of this family retain responses to NGF and cAMP, we conclude that the regulatory elements present in the LTR have been conserved in many members of this family. We have named this family of genes the NICER elements because they are a family of NGF-inducible cAMP-extinguishable retrovirus-like elements. Images PMID:2160077

  17. Low-threshold exocytosis induced by cAMP-recruited CaV3.2 (alpha1H) channels in rat chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Giancippoli, A; Novara, M; de Luca, A; Baldelli, P; Marcantoni, A; Carbone, E; Carabelli, V

    2006-03-01

    We have studied the functional role of CaV3 channels in triggering fast exocytosis in rat chromaffin cells (RCCs). CaV3 T-type channels were selectively recruited by chronic exposures to cAMP (3 days) via an exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac)-mediated pathway. Here we show that cAMP-treated cells had increased secretory responses, which could be evoked even at very low depolarizations (-50, -40 mV). Potentiation of exocytosis in cAMP-treated cells did not occur in the presence of 50 microM Ni2+, which selectively blocks T-type currents in RCCs. This suggests that the "low-threshold exocytosis" induced by cAMP is due to increased Ca2+ influx through cAMP-recruited T-type channels, rather than to an enhanced secretion downstream of Ca2+ entry, as previously reported for short-term cAMP treatments (20 min). Newly recruited T-type channels increase the fast secretory response at low voltages without altering the size of the immediately releasable pool. They also preserve the Ca2+ dependence of exocytosis, the initial speed of vesicle depletion, and the mean quantal size of single secretory events. All this indicates that cAMP-recruited CaV3 channels enhance the secretory activity of RCCs at low voltages by coupling to the secretory apparatus with a Ca2+ efficacy similar to that of already existing high-threshold Ca2+ channels. Finally, using RT-PCRs we found that the fast inactivating low-threshold Ca2+ current component recruited by cAMP is selectively associated to the alpha1H (CaV3.2) channel isoform.

  18. Low-Threshold Exocytosis Induced by cAMP-Recruited CaV3.2 (α1H) Channels in Rat Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giancippoli, A.; Novara, M.; de Luca, A.; Baldelli, P.; Marcantoni, A.; Carbone, E.; Carabelli, V.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the functional role of CaV3 channels in triggering fast exocytosis in rat chromaffin cells (RCCs). CaV3 T-type channels were selectively recruited by chronic exposures to cAMP (3 days) via an exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac)-mediated pathway. Here we show that cAMP-treated cells had increased secretory responses, which could be evoked even at very low depolarizations (−50, −40 mV). Potentiation of exocytosis in cAMP-treated cells did not occur in the presence of 50 μM Ni2+, which selectively blocks T-type currents in RCCs. This suggests that the “low-threshold exocytosis” induced by cAMP is due to increased Ca2+ influx through cAMP-recruited T-type channels, rather than to an enhanced secretion downstream of Ca2+ entry, as previously reported for short-term cAMP treatments (20 min). Newly recruited T-type channels increase the fast secretory response at low voltages without altering the size of the immediately releasable pool. They also preserve the Ca2+ dependence of exocytosis, the initial speed of vesicle depletion, and the mean quantal size of single secretory events. All this indicates that cAMP-recruited CaV3 channels enhance the secretory activity of RCCs at low voltages by coupling to the secretory apparatus with a Ca2+ efficacy similar to that of already existing high-threshold Ca2+ channels. Finally, using RT-PCRs we found that the fast inactivating low-threshold Ca2+ current component recruited by cAMP is selectively associated to the α1H (CaV3.2) channel isoform. PMID:16361341

  19. Phosphorylation of the protein kinase A catalytic subunit is induced by cyclic AMP deficiency and physiological stresses in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    McInnis, Brittney; Mitchell, Jessica; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} cAMP deficiency induces phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (Pka1) in S. pombe. {yields} Pka1 phosphorylation is further induced by physiological stresses. {yields} Pka1 phosphorylation is not induced in cells lacking the PKA regulatory subunit. {yields} Results suggest that cAMP-independent Pka1 phosphorylation is stimulatory in nature. -- Abstract: In the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is not essential for viability under normal culturing conditions, making this organism attractive for investigating mechanisms of PKA regulation. Here we show that S. pombe cells carrying a deletion in the adenylate cyclase gene, cyr1, express markedly higher levels of the PKA catalytic subunit, Pka1, than wild type cells. Significantly, in cyr1{Delta} cells, but not wild type cells, a substantial proportion of Pka1 protein is hyperphosphorylated. Pka1 hyperphosphorylation is strongly induced in cyr1{Delta} cells, and to varying degrees in wild type cells, by both glucose starvation and stationary phase stresses, which are associated with reduced cAMP-dependent PKA activity, and by KCl stress, the cellular adaptation to which is dependent on PKA activity. Interestingly, hyperphosphorylation of Pka1 was not detected in either cyr1{sup +} or cyr1{Delta} S. pombe strains carrying a deletion in the PKA regulatory subunit gene, cgs1, under any of the tested conditions. Our results demonstrate the existence of a cAMP-independent mechanism of PKA catalytic subunit phosphorylation, which we propose could serve as a mechanism for inducing or maintaining specific PKA functions under conditions in which its cAMP-dependent activity is downregulated.

  20. Ecklonia cava Polyphenol Has a Protective Effect against Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in a Cyclic AMP-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Haruka; Goto, Mayu; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that Ecklonia cava polyphenol (ECP) treatment suppressed ethanol-induced increases in hepatocyte death by scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and maintaining intracellular glutathione levels. Here, we examined the effects of ECP on the activities of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and their regulating mechanisms in ethanol-treated hepatocytes. Isolated hepatocytes were incubated with or without 100 mM ethanol. ECP was dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide. ECP was added to cultured cells that had been incubated with or without ethanol. The cells were incubated for 0–24 h. In cultured hepatocytes, the ECP treatment with ethanol inhibited cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) expression and activity, which is related to the production of ROS when large quantities of ethanol are oxidized. On the other hand, ECP treatment with ethanol increased the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase. These changes in activities of CYP2E1 and ADH were suppressed by treatment with H89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. ECP treatment with ethanol enhanced cyclic AMP concentrations compared with those of control cells. ECP may be a candidate for preventing ethanol-induced liver injury via regulating alcohol metabolic enzymes in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner. PMID:26096275

  1. p-Hydroxylcinnamaldehyde induces the differentiation of oesophageal carcinoma cells via the cAMP-RhoA-MAPK signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming; Zhao, Lian-mei; Yang, Xing-xiao; Shan, Ya-nan; Cui, Wen-xuan; Chen, Liang; Shan, Bao-en

    2016-01-01

    p-Hydroxylcinnamaldehyde (CMSP) has been identified as an inhibitor of the growth of various cancer cells. However, its function in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to characterize the differentiation effects of CMSP, as well as its mechanism in the differentiation of ESCC Kyse30 and TE-13 cells. The function of CMSP in the viability, colony formation, migration and invasion of Kyse30 and TE-13 cells was determined by MTS, colony-formation, wound healing and transwell assays. Western blotting and pull-down assays were used to investigate the effect of CMSP on the expression level of malignant markers of ESCC, as well as the activity of MAPKs, RhoA and GTP-RhoA in Kyse30 and TE-13 cells. We found that CMSP could inhibit proliferation and migration and induce Kyse30 and TE-13 cell differentiation, characterized by dendrite-like outgrowth, decreased expression of tumour-associated antigens, as well as the decreased expression of malignant markers. Furthermore, increased cAMP, p-P38 and decreased activities of ERK, JNK and GTP-RhoA, were detected after treatment with CMSP. These results indicated that CMSP induced the differentiation of Kyse30 and TE-13 cells through mediating the cAMP-RhoA-MAPK axis, which might provide new potential strategies for ESCC treatment. PMID:27501997

  2. Ecklonia cava Polyphenol Has a Protective Effect against Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in a Cyclic AMP-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Haruka; Goto, Mayu; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2015-06-18

    Previously, we showed that Ecklonia cava polyphenol (ECP) treatment suppressed ethanol-induced increases in hepatocyte death by scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and maintaining intracellular glutathione levels. Here, we examined the effects of ECP on the activities of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and their regulating mechanisms in ethanol-treated hepatocytes. Isolated hepatocytes were incubated with or without 100 mM ethanol. ECP was dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide. ECP was added to cultured cells that had been incubated with or without ethanol. The cells were incubated for 0-24 h. In cultured hepatocytes, the ECP treatment with ethanol inhibited cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) expression and activity, which is related to the production of ROS when large quantities of ethanol are oxidized. On the other hand, ECP treatment with ethanol increased the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase. These changes in activities of CYP2E1 and ADH were suppressed by treatment with H89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. ECP treatment with ethanol enhanced cyclic AMP concentrations compared with those of control cells. ECP may be a candidate for preventing ethanol-induced liver injury via regulating alcohol metabolic enzymes in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner.

  3. AMP-activated protein kinase supports the NGF-induced viability of human HeLa cells to glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Ting, Luo; Bo, Wan; Li, Ruwei; Chen, Xinya; Wang, Yingli; Jun, Zhou; Yu, Long

    2010-07-01

    As an important cellular energy regulation kinase, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been demonstrated as a key molecule in the development of tolerance to nutrient starvation. Activation of AMPK includes the phosphorylation of Thr172 of the alpha-subunit. Nerve growth factor (NGF) was originally isolated for its ability to stimulate both survival and differentiation in peripheral neurons, but many investigations have shown that the NGF also plays an important role in survival, growth and invasion of many human cancers. In this study, we used CCK-8 cell viability assay to find that NGF could facilitate the viability of HeLa cells following glucose deprivation while not in glucose-normal control groups. This effect of NGF-induced viability promotion to glucose starvation can be suppressed by Compound C, a specific inhibitor of AMPK. Meanwhile, western blot analysis showed that AMPKalpha1/alpha2 Thr172 phosphorylation level in HeLa cells was up-regulated after NGF treatment under glucose starvation, and Compound C was able to reduce the AMPKalpha1/alpha2 Thr172 phosphorylation level which was up-regulated by NGF in HeLa cells. Taken together, these results indicate that AMP-activated protein kinase supports the NGF-induced viability of human HeLa cells to glucose starvation.

  4. Effects of forskolin analogs, phosphodiesterase inhibitors and 8-bromo cyclic AMP on plasma exudations induced with bradykinin and prostaglandin E/sub 1/ in rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Sugio, K.; Daly, J.W.

    1984-01-09

    The effects of forskolin analogs, phosphodiesterase inhibitors and 8-bromo cyclic AMP on plasma exudations induced with bradykinin and prostaglandin E/sub 1/ in rat skin were investigated using (/sup 125/I) bovine serum albumin (/sup 125/I-BSA). Forskolin, forskolin 7-ethyl carbonate and 7-desacetylforskolin, which are potent activators of adenylate cyclase, greatly potentiated the bradykinin-induced plasma exudation and inhibited the prostaglandin E/sub 1/-induced response. The phosphodiesterase inhibitors, ZK 627ll, dipyridamole, HL 725, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine potentiated the bradykinin-induced plasma exudation and inhibited and prostaglandin E/sub 1/-induced response. 8-Bromo cyclic AMP in the doses of 0.01 to 1 ..mu..g potentiated the bradykinin-induced plasma exudation, but had no effect at doses of 10 and 100 ..mu..g. 8-bromo cyclic AMP at all doses significantly inhibited the prostaglandin E/sub 1/-induced response. The results suggest that the effects of forskolin and its analogs on plasma exudations induced with bradykinin and prostaglandin E/sub 1/ in rat skin derive from activation of cyclic AMP-generating systems.

  5. Hypothermia induced by adenosine 5'-monophosphate attenuates early stage injury in an acute gouty arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhimin; Guo, Weiting; Lu, Shulai; Lv, Wenshan; Li, Changgui; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Shihua; Yan, Shengli; Tao, Zhenyin; Wang, Yunlong

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether the hypothermia induced by Adenosine 5'-Monophosphate (5'-AMP) could attenuate early stage injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model. Ankle joint injection with monosodium urate monohydrate crystals (MSU crystals) in hypothermia rat model which was induced by 5'-AMP and then observe whether hypothermia induced by 5'-AMP could be effectively inhibit the inflammation on acute gouty arthritis in rats. AMP-induced hypothermia has protective effects on our acute gouty arthritis, which was demonstrated by the following criteria: (1) a significant reduction in the ankle swelling (p < 0.001); (2) a significant decrease in the occurrence of leukocyte infiltration and mild hemorrhage; (3) a significant reduction in the presence of serum Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, p < 0.001); and (4) a significant inhibition in the Nuclear Factor -κappaB (NF-κB) activity (p < 0.001). AMP-induced hypothermia could inhibit acute inflammation reaction and protect the synovial tissue against acute injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model.

  6. Reversine induces autophagic cell death through the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in urothelial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chiung-Yao; Chen, Jeng-Sheng; Chang, Shun-Kai; Shen, Cheng-Huang

    2017-10-03

    Urothelial carcinoma is one of the most common malignancies of the urinary tract. Effective treatment of advanced urothelial carcinoma remains a clinical challenge with poor outcomes in these patients. Previous reports have shown that the expression of aurora kinase is associated with clinical stage and prognosis; hence, aurora kinases are potential targets in urothelial carcinoma therapy. Reversine, an aurora kinase inhibitor, was analyzed for its cytotoxicity in this study. Cell proliferation, flow cytometry, western blotting, and immunofluorescent assay were used to determine the effect of reversine on urothelial carcinoma cells. The results showed that reversine significantly inhibits the growth of urothelial carcinoma cell lines. Reversine induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, leading to autophagic cell death by activating the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. Reversine induced significant cell death in urothelial carcinoma cells. Our results suggest that reversine may be a suitably small molecule for treating urothelial carcinoma in the future.

  7. microRNA-208a in an early stage myocardial infarction rat model and the effect on cAMP-PKA signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Gao; Yan, Zhang; Li, Chuanchuan; Hou, Yuemei

    2016-08-01

    The expression level of microRNA-208a (miR-208a) in a rat model with myocardial infarction and the effect of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in early stage of myocardial infarction in rats were investigated. The early myocardial infarction model was established in 12 male Sprague-Dawley rats by ligation of the anterior descending coronary artery, and 12 rats were selected as the control group (sham operation group). Reverse-transcription quantitative PCR was conducted to detect the expression levels of miR-208a in the myocardium of and the expression levels of miR‑208a in the serum of rats in the two groups. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of cAMP-PKA protein in the rat tissues in the two groups. After stimulating high levels of miR‑208a expression in human myocardial cells (HCM), western blot analysis was used to detect the cAMP-PKA protein levels. The expression levels of miR‑208a in myocardial tissues in rats with myocardial infarction were significantly higher than those in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The expression levels of miR‑208a in the early stage of myocardial infarction rats were also significantly higher than those in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The level of cAMP-PKA protein in myocardial tissue in rats with chronic myocardial infarction was also significantly higher. Transfection of human myocardial cells with miR‑208a analogue significantly increased the cAMP-PKA protein levels in human myocardial cells. In conclusion, the over-expression of miR-208a in myocardial infarction tissue and the high levels of this miRNA in the serum, may be involved in the process of myocardial infarction by influencing the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in myocardial cells.

  8. RGS17, an Overexpressed Gene in Human Lung and Prostate Cancer, Induces Tumor Cell Proliferation Through the Cyclic AMP-PKA-CREB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    James, Michael A.; Lu, Yan; Liu, Yan; Vikis, Haris G.; You, Ming

    2009-01-01

    We have identified RGS17 as a commonly induced gene in lung and prostate tumors. Through microarray and gene expression analysis, we show that expression of RGS17 is up-regulated in 80% of lung tumors, and also up-regulated in prostate tumors. Through knockdown and overexpression of RGS17 in tumor cells, we show that RGS17 confers a proliferative phenotype and is required for the maintenance of the proliferative potential of tumor cells. We show through exon microarray, transcript analysis, and functional assays that RGS17 promotes cyclic AMP (cAMP)-responsive element binding protein (CREB)-responsive gene expression, increases cAMP levels, and enhances forskolin-mediated cAMP production. Furthermore, inhibition of cAMP-dependent kinase prevents tumor cell proliferation, and proliferation is partially rescued by RGS17 overexpression. In the present study, we show a role for RGS17 in the maintenance of tumor cell proliferation through induction of cAMP signaling and CREB phosphorylation. The prevalence of the induction of RGS17 in tumor tissues of various types further implicates its importance in the maintenance of tumor growth. PMID:19244110

  9. Effects of the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 on iloprost-induced vasorelaxation and cyclic AMP elevation in isolated guinea-pig aorta

    PubMed Central

    Turcato, Sally; Clapp, Lucie H

    1999-01-01

    The stable prostacyclin analogue, iloprost relaxes a variety of blood vessels and increases cyclic AMP, although the relationship between adenosine 3′ : 5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and vasorelaxation remains unclear. We therefore investigated the effect of the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, 9-(tetrahydro-2-furanyl)-9H-purin-6-amine (SQ22536) on iloprost-mediated relaxation and cyclic AMP elevation in endothelium-denuded aortic strips. Iloprost (1–1000 nM) caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of phenylephrine (1–6 μM) contractions, the responses being unaffected by pre-incubation with SQ22536 (100 μM) for 30 min. In other experiments 60 nM iloprost caused a 64% inhibition of phenylephrine contractions concomitant with a 3 fold rise in cyclic AMP. SQ22536 completely abolished the iloprost-induced elevation in cyclic AMP while having no significant effect on relaxation. Our results therefore strongly suggest that cyclic AMP-independent pathways are responsible for the vasorelaxant effects of iloprost in guinea-pig aorta. PMID:10193763

  10. DNA-induced conformational changes in cyclic AMP receptor protein: detection and mapping by a protein footprinting technique using multiple chemical proteases.

    PubMed

    Baichoo, N; Heyduk, T

    1999-07-02

    Cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) is a regulator of transcription in Escherichia coli which mediates its activity by binding specific DNA sequences in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner. The interaction of CRP with specific DNA was probed by a protein footprinting technique using chemical proteases of different charge, size, and hydrophobicity. The experimental data were compared with known crystal structures of cAMP-CRP and cAMP-CRP-DNA complexes to determine a correlation between the structure of the complexes, the nature of the chemical protease and protein cleavage patterns. In addition, such comparison allowed us to determine if DNA binding in solution induced conformational changes in the protein not apparent in the crystal structure. In the cAMP-CRP-DNA complex, both the protections and the enhancements of proteolytic cleavage were observed outside of the known CRP-DNA interface, suggesting that CRP undergoes a conformational change upon binding DNA. Among the observed changes, the most interesting were those around the B alpha-helix and beta-strand 8, since this region overlaps with the activation region 2 which CRP uses for protein-protein interactions with RNA polymerase. DNA-induced changes were observed also in the region involved in CRP-CytR interaction and in CRP intersubunit contact regions. These data suggest that binding of DNA in solution induces conformational changes in CRP which can be transmitted via intersubunit contacts to regions of the protein involved in interactions with other members of transcriptional machinery.

  11. Sp1 Upregulates cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein Expression During Retinoic Acid-Induced Mucous Differentiation of Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeong Soo; Kim, Seung-Wook; Koo, Ja Seok

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response-element (CRE) binding protein (CREB) is an important transcription factor that is differentially regulated in cells of various types. We recently reported that RA rapidly activates CREB without using retinoic acid (RA) receptors RAR and RXR in normal human tracheobronchial epithelial (NHTBE) cells. However, little is known about RA’s role in the physiologic regulation of CREB expression in the early mucous differentiation of NHTBE cells. Here, we report that RA upregulated CREB gene expression and that using 5′-serial deletion promoter analysis and mutagenesis analyses, two Sp1-binding sites located at nucleotides −217 and −150, which flank the transcription initiation site, were essential for RA induction of CREB gene transcription. Furthermore, we found that CREs located at nucleotides −119 and −98 contributed to basal promoter activity. Interestingly, RA also upregulated Sp1 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of endogenous Sp1 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased RA-induced CREB gene expression. However, the converse was not true: knockdown of CREB using CREB siRNA did not affect RA-induced Sp1 gene expression. We conclude that RA upregulates CREB gene expression during the early stage of NHTBE cell differentiation and that RA-inducible Sp1 plays a major role in upregulating human CREB gene expression. This result implies that cooperation of these two transcription factors play a crucial role in mediating early events of normal mucous cell differentiation of bronchial epithelial cells. PMID:17937658

  12. Unpredictable chronic mild stress induces anxiety and depression-like behaviors and inactivates AMP-activated protein kinase in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shenghua; Wang, Junhui; Zhang, Yanbo; Li, Victor; Kong, Jiming; He, Jue; Li, Xin-Min

    2014-08-12

    The unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) model was developed based upon the stress-diathesis hypothesis of depression. Most effects of UCMS can be reversed by antidepressants, demonstrating a strong predictive validity of this model for depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the effects induced by UCMS remain incompletely understood. Increasing evidence has shown that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates intracellular energy metabolism and is especially important for neurons because neurons are known to have small energy reserves. Abnormalities in the AMPK pathway disturb normal brain functions and synaptic integrity. In the present study, we first investigated the effects of UCMS on a battery of different tests measuring anxiety and depression-like behaviors in female C57BL/6N mice after 4 weeks of UCMS exposure. Stressed mice showed suppressed body weight gain, heightened anxiety, and increased immobility in the forced swim and tail suspension tests. These results are representative of some of the core symptoms of depression. Simultaneously, we observed decrease of synaptic proteins in the cortex of mice subjected to UCMS, which is associated with decreased levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase). Our findings suggest that AMPKα inactivation might be a mechanism by which UCMS causes anxiety/depression-like behaviors in mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Complementation of growth defect in an ampC deletion mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bishop, R E; Weiner, J H

    1993-12-15

    beta-Lactamase genes of class-A (Rtem) and class-C (ampC) were placed under control of an inducible tac-promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. Expression of RTEM had no observable effect on the growth properties of E. coli strains HB101 (ampC+) or MI1443 (delta ampC). E. coli MI1443 exhibited a decline in growth rate at mid-exponential phase which could be delayed by expression of AmpC at early-exponential phase. AmpC expression otherwise inhibited growth, particularly during the transition into exponential phase where growth was prevented altogether. We suggest that the AmpC beta-lactamase, but not RTEM, may have an additional cellular function as a peptidoglycan hydrolase.

  14. Forskolin-inducible cAMP pathway negatively regulates T-cell proliferation by uncoupling the interleukin-2 receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Georgialina; Ross, Jeremy A; Nagy, Zsuzsanna S; Kirken, Robert A

    2013-03-08

    Cytokine-mediated regulation of T-cell activity involves a complex interplay between key signal transduction pathways. Determining how these signaling pathways cross-talk is essential to understanding T-cell function and dysfunction. In this work, we provide evidence that cross-talk exists between at least two signaling pathways: the Jak3/Stat5 and cAMP-mediated cascades. The adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (Fsk) significantly increased intracellular cAMP levels and reduced proliferation of the human T-cells via inhibition of cell cycle regulatory genes but did not induce apoptosis. To determine this inhibitory mechanism, effects of Fsk on IL-2 signaling was investigated. Fsk treatment of MT-2 and Kit 225 T-cells inhibited IL-2-induced Stat5a/b tyrosine and serine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding activity. Fsk treatment also uncoupled IL-2 induced association of the IL-2Rβ and γc chain, consequently blocking Jak3 activation. Interestingly, phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that Fsk-treated cells resulted in elevated serine phosphorylation of Jak3 but not Stat5, suggesting that Fsk can negatively regulate Jak3 activity possibly mediated through PKA. Indeed, in vitro kinase assays and small molecule inhibition studies indicated that PKA can directly serine phosphorylate and functionally inactivate Jak3. Taken together, these findings suggest that Fsk activation of adenylate cyclase and PKA can negatively regulate IL-2 signaling at multiple levels that include IL-2R complex formation and Jak3/Stat5 activation.

  15. cAMP-dependent protein kinase type I regulates ethanol-induced cAMP response element-mediated gene expression via activation of CREB-binding protein and inhibition of MAPK.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Anastasia; Wu, Meiye; Asher, Orna; Diamond, Ivan

    2004-10-08

    We have shown that the two types of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in NG108-15 cells differentially mediate forskolin- and ethanol-induced cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and CRE-mediated gene transcription. Activated type II PKA is translocated into the nucleus where it phosphorylates CREB. By contrast, activated type I PKA does not translocate to the nucleus but is required for CRE-mediated gene transcription by inducing the activation of other transcription cofactors such as CREB-binding protein (CBP). We show here that CBP is required for forskolin- and ethanol-induced CRE-mediated gene expression. Forskolin- and ethanol-induced CBP phosphorylation, demonstrable at 10 min, persists up to 24 h. CBP phosphorylation requires type I PKA but not type II PKA. In NG108-15 cells, ethanol and forskolin activation of type I PKA also inhibits several components of the MAPK pathway including B-Raf kinase, ERK1/2, and p90RSK phosphorylation. As a result, unphosphorylated p90RSK no longer binds to nor inhibits CBP. Moreover, MEK inhibition by PD98059 induces a significant increase of CRE-mediated gene activation. Taken together, our findings suggest that inhibition of the MAPK pathway enhances cAMP-dependent gene activation during exposure of NG108-15 cells to ethanol. This mechanism appears to involve type I PKA-dependent phosphorylation of CBP and inhibition of MEK-dependent phosphorylation of p90RSK. Under these conditions p90RSK is no longer bound to CBP, thereby promoting CBP-dependent CREB-mediated gene expression.

  16. Song-induced phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein in the songbird brain.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, H; Wada, K; Maekawa, M; Watsuji, T; Hagiwara, M

    1999-05-15

    We have investigated the participation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the response of the songbird brain to a natural auditory stimulus, a conspecific song. The cells in the two song control nuclei, the higher vocal center (HVC) and area X of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), were intensely stained with an anti-CREB monoclonal antibody. Double-labeling studies showed that CREB immunoreactivity was detected only in area X-projecting neurons in the HVC. The cloned CREB cDNA from zebra finches (zCREB) is highly homologous to mammalian delta CREB. Phosphorylation of zCREB at Ser119 in area X-projecting HVC neurons was induced by hearing tape-recorded conspecific songs of zebra finches, but not by birdsongs of another species or white noise. These results raise the possibility that zCREB plays a crucial role in the sensory process of song learning.

  17. AMP-activated protein kinase deficiency rescues paraquat-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction through an autophagy-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiurong; Yang, Lifang; Hua, Yinan; Nair, Sreejayan; Xu, Xihui; Ren, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Paraquat, a quaternary nitrogen herbicide, is a highly toxic prooxidant resulting in multi-organ failure including the heart although the underlying mechanism still remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the role of the cellular fuel sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and mitochondrial injury. Wild-type and transgenic mice with overexpression of a mutant AMPK α2 subunit (kinase dead, KD), with reduced activity in both α1 and α2 subunits, were administered with paraquat (45 mg/kg) for 48 h. Paraquat elicited cardiac mechanical anomalies including compromised echocardiographic parameters (elevated left ventricular end-systolic diameter and reduced factional shortening), suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) handling, reduced cell survival, and overt mitochondrial damage (loss in mitochondrial membrane potential). In addition, paraquat treatment promoted phosphorylation of AMPK and autophagy. Interestingly, deficiency in AMPK attenuated paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) derangement. The beneficial effect of AMPK inhibition was associated with inhibition of the AMPK-TSC-mTOR-ULK1 signaling cascade. In vitro study revealed that inhibitors for AMPK and autophagy attenuated paraquat-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction. Taken together, our findings revealed that AMPK may mediate paraquat-induced myocardial anomalies possibly by regulating the AMPK/mTOR-dependent autophagy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Deficiency Rescues Paraquat-Induced Cardiac Contractile Dysfunction Through an Autophagy-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiurong; Yang, Lifang; Hua, Yinan; Nair, Sreejayan; Xu, Xihui; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Paraquat, a quaternary nitrogen herbicide, is a highly toxic prooxidant resulting in multi-organ failure including the heart although the underlying mechanism still remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the role of the cellular fuel sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and mitochondrial injury. Results: Wild-type and transgenic mice with overexpression of a mutant AMPK α2 subunit (kinase dead, KD), with reduced activity in both α1 and α2 subunits, were administered with paraquat (45 mg/kg) for 48 h. Paraquat elicited cardiac mechanical anomalies including compromised echocardiographic parameters (elevated left ventricular end-systolic diameter and reduced factional shortening), suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca2+ handling, reduced cell survival, and overt mitochondrial damage (loss in mitochondrial membrane potential). In addition, paraquat treatment promoted phosphorylation of AMPK and autophagy. Interestingly, deficiency in AMPK attenuated paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca2+ derangement. The beneficial effect of AMPK inhibition was associated with inhibition of the AMPK-TSC-mTOR-ULK1 signaling cascade. In vitro study revealed that inhibitors for AMPK and autophagy attenuated paraquat-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction. Conclusion: Taken together, our findings revealed that AMPK may mediate paraquat-induced myocardial anomalies possibly by regulating the AMPK/mTOR-dependent autophagy. PMID:25092649

  19. Viola mandshurica ethanolic extract prevents high-fat-diet-induced obesity in mice by activating AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Kim, Dong-Seon; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2014-07-01

    Viola mandshurica W. Becker has been used as an expectorant, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory agent. We evaluated the effects of V. mandshurica ethanol extract (VME) on high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice. HPLC analysis showed that the VME contained 11.95 ± 0.37 mg/g esculetin and 0.13 ± 0.01 mg/g scopoletin. Orally administered VME decreased the body weight, adipose tissue mass, adipocyte size, and triglyceride and leptin serum concentrations. In contrast, VME increased serum adiponectin concentrations and adiponectin expression levels in epididymal adipose tissues. VME also significantly reversed the HFD-induced elevation of the mRNA and protein levels of lipogenic genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, fatty-acid synthase, and adipocyte protein 2. Moreover, VME reversed the HFD-induced inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-coA carboxylase phosphorylation in epididymal adipose tissues. Furthermore, treatment of VME and esculetin in 3T3-L1 cells inhibited adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation. These results suggest that VME exerts anti-obesity effects in HFD-induced obese mice by activating AMPK and suppressing PPARγ expression in adipose tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. ATP-Induced Inflammasome Activation and Pyroptosis Is Regulated by AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Qing-Bing; Wei, Hong-Xia; Li, Chen-Guang; Liang, Yi-Dan; Xu, Li-Hui; Bai, Wen-Jing; Pan, Hao; He, Xian-Hui; Ouyang, Dong-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is released by bacteria and host cells during bacterial infection as well as sterile tissue injury, acting as an inducer of inflammasome activation. Previous studies have shown that ATP treatment leads to AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. However, it is unclear whether AMPK signaling has been involved in the regulation of ATP-induced inflammasome activation and subsequent pyroptosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate this issue in lipopolysaccharide-activated murine macrophages. Our results showed that AMPK signaling was activated in murine macrophages upon ATP treatment, which was accompanied by inflammasome activation and pyroptosis as evidenced by rapid cell membrane rupture as well as mature interleukin (IL)-1β and active caspase-1p10 release. The ATP-induced inflammasome activation and pyroptosis were markedly suppressed by an AMPK inhibitor compound C or small-interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of AMPKα, but could be greatly enhanced by metformin (a well-known AMPK agonist). Importantly, metformin administration increased the mortality of mice with bacterial sepsis, which was likely because metformin treatment enhanced the systemic inflammasome activation as indicated by elevated serum and hepatic IL-1β levels. Collectively, these data indicated that the AMPK signaling positively regulated ATP-induced inflammasome activation and pyroptosis in macrophages, highlighting the possibility of AMPK-targeting therapies for inflammatory diseases involving inflammasome activation. PMID:28018360

  1. Redox regulation of cAMP levels by ascorbate in 1,25-dihydroxy- vitamin D3-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    López-Lluch, G; Burón, M I; Alcaín, F J; Quesada, J M; Navas, P

    1998-01-01

    1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] induces differentiation to monocyte-macrophage lineage of several leukaemic cell lines such as HL-60, U937, M1 and Mono Mac 6. Ascorbate also modulates growth and differentiation of different animal cells in culture. We have previously reported the stimulating effect of ascorbate on 1, 25-(OH)2D3-induced HL-60 cell differentiation. We show here that 1, 25-(OH)2D3 induces a transient increase in cAMP levels in these cells, and ascorbate significantly increases these cAMP levels. Ascorbate alone does not have any effect. Other cAMP-increasing agents such as isobutylmethylxanthine, forskolin and prostaglandin E2 maintain high levels of cAMP at 48 h of incubation and also enhance differentiation along the monocytic pathway induced by 1, 25-(OH)2D3, as revealed by specific differentiation markers, demonstrating the importance of cAMP in the differentiation process. It is also shown that the presence of ascorbate and its free radical (AFR) during 1,25-(OH)2D3-induced differentiation significantly decreases cytoplasmic NADH levels compared with those induced by 1,25-(OH)2D3 in HL-60 cells. The results indicate that NADH is an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase in these cells. AFR is an electron acceptor of the trans-plasma-membrane electron-transport system, and NADH is the electron donor. Through this system, ascorbate and AFR keep levels of NADH low, thereby decreasing its inhibitory effect on adenylate cyclase activity and so increasing cAMP synthesis. We also demonstrate that other ascorbate derivatives, such as ascorbate 2-phosphate and dehydroascorbate, both of which are unable to produce AFR, do not alter intracellular NADH levels during 1, 25-(OH)2D3-induced differentiation. Also, ascorbate and AFR increase specific differentiation markers (CD14 and NitroBlue Tetrazolium reduction) but neither ascorbate 2-phosphate nor dehydroascorbate show this enhancing activity. In summary, we propose that the effect of ascorbate on 1

  2. Piperine, a component of black pepper, decreases eugenol-induced cAMP and calcium levels in non-chemosensory 3T3-L1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeo Cho; Kim, Sung-Hee; Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Hye Jeong; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Park, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of an ethanol extract of black pepper and its constituent, piperine, on odorant-induced signal transduction in non-chemosensory cells. An ethanol extract of black pepper decreased eugenol-induced cAMP and calcium levels in preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells with no toxicity. Phosphorylation of CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) was down-regulated by the black pepper extract. The concentration (133.8 mg/g) and retention time (5.5 min) of piperine in the ethanol extract were quantified using UPLC–MS/MS. Pretreatment with piperine decreased eugenol-induced cAMP and calcium levels in 3T3-L1 cells. Piperine also decreased the phosphorylation of CREB, which is up-regulated by eugenol. These results suggest that piperine inhibits the eugenol-induced signal transduction pathway through modulation of cAMP and calcium levels and phosphorylation of CREB in non-chemosensory cells. PMID:25685661

  3. A cAMP and Ca2+ coincidence detector in support of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in mouse pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Guoxin; Chepurny, Oleg G; Rindler, Michael J; Collis, Leon; Chepurny, Zina; Li, Wen-hong; Harbeck, Mark; Roe, Michael W; Holz, George G

    2005-01-01

    The blood glucose-lowering hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) stimulates cAMP production, promotes Ca2+ influx, and mobilizes an intracellular source of Ca2+ in pancreatic β cells. Here we provide evidence that these actions of GLP-1 are functionally related: they reflect a process of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) that requires activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and the Epac family of cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factors (cAMPGEFs). In rat insulin-secreting INS-1 cells or mouse β cells loaded with caged Ca2+ (NP-EGTA), a GLP-1 receptor agonist (exendin-4) is demonstrated to sensitize intracellular Ca2+ release channels to stimulatory effects of cytosolic Ca2+, thereby allowing CICR to be generated by the uncaging of Ca2+ (UV flash photolysis). This sensitizing action of exendin-4 is diminished by an inhibitor of PKA (H-89) or by overexpression of dominant negative Epac. It is reproduced by cell-permeant cAMP analogues that activate PKA (6-Bnz-cAMP) or Epac (8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP) selectively. Depletion of Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin abolishes CICR, while inhibitors of Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine and heparin) attenuate CICR in an additive manner. Because the uncaging of Ca2+ fails to stimulate CICR in the absence of cAMP-elevating agents, it is concluded that there exists in β cells a process of second messenger coincidence detection, whereby intracellular Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors) monitor a simultaneous increase of cAMP and Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that second messenger coincidence detection of this type may explain how GLP-1 interacts with β cell glucose metabolism to stimulate insulin secretion. PMID:15860526

  4. Differential regulation of glucose transport activity in yeast by specific cAMP signatures.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Clara; Haerizadeh, Farzad; Sadoine, Mayuri S C; Chermak, Diane; Frommer, Wolf B

    2013-06-15

    Successful colonization and survival in variable environments require a competitive advantage during the initial growth phase after experiencing nutrient changes. Starved yeast cells anticipate exposure to glucose by activating the Hxt5p (hexose transporter 5) glucose transporter, which provides an advantage during early phases after glucose resupply. cAMP and glucose FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) sensors were used to identify three signalling pathways that co-operate in the anticipatory Hxt5p activity in glucose-starved cells: as expected the Snf1 (sucrose nonfermenting 1) AMP kinase pathway, but, surprisingly, the sugar-dependent G-protein-coupled Gpr1 (G-protein-coupled receptor 1)/cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) pathway and the Pho85 (phosphate metabolism 85)/Plc (phospholipase C) 6/7 pathway. Gpr1/cAMP/PKA are key elements of a G-protein-coupled sugar response pathway that produces a transient cAMP peak to induce growth-related genes. A novel function of the Gpr1/cAMP/PKA pathway was identified in glucose-starved cells: during starvation the Gpr1/cAMP/PKA pathway is required to maintain Hxt5p activity in the absence of glucose-induced cAMP spiking. During starvation, cAMP levels remain low triggering expression of HXT5, whereas cAMP spiking leads to a shift to the high capacity Hxt isoforms.

  5. Regulation of cAMP-induced arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, Period1, and MKP-1 gene expression by mitogen-activated protein kinases in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Chansard, Mathieu; Iwahana, Eiko; Liang, Jian; Fukuhara, Chiaki

    2005-10-03

    In rodent pineal glands, sympathetic innervation, which leads to norepinephrine release, is a key process in the circadian regulation of physiology and certain gene expressions. It has been shown that gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the melatonin synthesis arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aa-Nat), circadian clock gene Period1, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphtase-1 (MKP-1), is controlled mainly by a norepinephrine-beta-adrenergic receptor-cAMP signaling cascade in the rat pineal gland. To further dissect the signaling cascades that regulate those gene expressions, we examined whether MAPKs are involved in cAMP-induced gene expression. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses showed that one of the three MAPKs, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), was expressed in the pineal, and was phosphorylated by cAMP analogue stimulation with a peak 20 min after start of the stimulation, in vitro. A specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 (Anthra[1,9-cd]pyrazol-6(2H)-one1,9-pyrazoloanthrone), but not its negative control (N1-Methyl-1,9-pyrazoloanthrone), significantly reduced cAMP-stimulated Aa-Nat, Period1, and MKP-1 mRNA levels. Although another MAPK, p38(MAPK), has also been shown to be activated by cAMP stimulation, a p38(MAPK) inhibitor, SB203580 (4-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole, HCl), showed no effect on cAMP-induced Aa-Nat and Period1 mRNA levels; whereas SB203580, but not its negative analogue SB202474 (4-Ethyl-2(p-methoxyphenyl)-5-(4'-pyridyl)-IH-imidazole, DiHCl), significantly reduced cAMP-induced MKP-1 mRNA levels. Taken together, our data suggest that cAMP-induced Aa-Nat and Period1 are likely to be mediated by activation of JNK, whereas MKP-1 may be mediated by both p38(MAPK) and JNK activations.

  6. Transcriptional regulation induced by cAMP elevation in mouse Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Daniela; Zeis, Thomas; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, Schwann cell development is regulated by a variety of signals. Some of the aspects of Schwann cell differentiation can be reproduced in vitro in response to forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator elevating intracellular cAMP levels. Herein, the effect of forskolin treatment was investigated by a comprehensive genome-wide expression study on primary mouse Schwann cell cultures. Additional to myelin-related genes, many so far unconsidered genes were ascertained to be modulated by forskolin. One of the strongest differentially regulated gene transcripts was the transcription factor Olig1 (oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1), whose mRNA expression levels were reduced in treated Schwann cells. Olig1 protein was localized in myelinating and nonmyelinating Schwann cells within the sciatic nerve as well as in primary Schwann cells, proposing it as a novel transcription factor of the Schwann cell lineage. Data analysis further revealed that a number of differentially expressed genes in forskolin-treated Schwann cells were associated with the ECM (extracellular matrix), underlining its importance during Schwann cell differentiation in vitro. Comparison of samples derived from postnatal sciatic nerves and from both treated and untreated Schwann cell cultures showed considerable differences in gene expression between in vivo and in vitro, allowing us to separate Schwann cell autonomous from tissue-related changes. The whole data set of the cell culture microarray study is provided to offer an interactive search tool for genes of interest. PMID:24641305

  7. Stimulation of deep somatic tissue with capsaicin produces long-lasting mechanical allodynia and heat hypoalgesia that depends on early activation of the cAMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Sluka, K A

    2002-07-01

    Pain and hyperalgesia from deep somatic tissue (i.e., muscle and joint) are processed differently from that from skin. This study examined differences between deep and cutaneous tissue allodynia and the role of cAMP in associated behavioral changes. Capsaicin was injected into the plantar aspect of the skin, plantar muscles of the paw, or ankle joint, and responses to mechanical and heat stimuli were assessed until allodynia resolved. Capsaicin injected into skin resulted in a secondary mechanical allodynia and heat hypoalgesia lasting approximately 3 hr. In contrast, capsaicin injection into muscle or joint resulted in a long-lasting bilateral (1-4 weeks) mechanical allodynia with a simultaneous unilateral heat hypoalgesia. The pattern and degree of inflammation were similar when capsaicin was injected into skin, muscle, or joint, with peak increases 24 hr after injection. Heat hypoalgesia that occurs after injection into deep tissue was reversed by spinal blockade of adenylate cyclase or protein kinase A (PKA). Interestingly, mechanical allodynia was reversed if adenylate cyclase or PKA inhibitors were administered spinally 24 hr, but not 1 week, after injection of capsaicin. Spinally administered 8-bromo-cAMP resulted in a similar pattern, with heat hypoalgesia and mechanical allodynia occurring simultaneously. Thus, injection of capsaicin into deep tissues results in a longer-lasting mechanical allodynia and heat hypoalgesia compared with injection of capsaicin into skin. The mechanical allodynia depends on early activation of the cAMP pathway during the first 24 hr but is independent of the cAMP pathway by 1 week after injection of capsaicin.

  8. Intraocular elevation of cyclic AMP potentiates ciliary neurotrophic factor-induced regeneration of adult rat retinal ganglion cell axons.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qi; Yip, Henry K; Zhao, Robert C H; So, Kwok-Fai; Harvey, Alan R

    2003-01-01

    In vitro, cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevation alters neuronal responsiveness to diffusible growth factors and myelin-associated inhibitory molecules. Here we used an established in vivo model of adult central nervous system injury to investigate the effects of elevated cAMP on neuronal survival and axonal regeneration. We studied the effects of intraocular injections of neurotrophic factors and/or a cAMP analogue (CPT-cAMP) on the regeneration of axotomized rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons into peripheral nerve autografts. Elevation of cAMP alone did not significantly increase RGC survival or the number of regenerating RGCs. Ciliary neurotrophic factor increased RGC viability and axonal regrowth, the latter effect substantially enhanced by coapplication with CPT-cAMP. Under these conditions over 60% of surviving RGCs regenerated their axons. Neurotrophin-4/5 injections also increased RGC viability, but there was reduced long-distance axonal regrowth into grafts, an effect partially ameliorated by cAMP elevation. Thus, cAMP can act cooperatively with appropriate neurotrophic factors to promote axonal regeneration in the injured adult mammalian central nervous system.

  9. Reversible cAMP-induced translocation of cytoskeleton-associated 300- to 350-kDa proteins from nucleus to cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Tokiko; Nishizawa, Kimiko; Sato, Chicako )

    1988-08-01

    The authors previously reported that treatment of SV-3Y1 cells in an exponential growth state with db-cAMP plus theophylline induced reversible disappearance of nuclear dots stained by monoclonal anti-microtubule-associated protein (MAP)-1 antibody. In the present study, the authors examined the relation between the intracellular localization and phosphorylation of 300- to 350-kDa proteins that are intracellular antigens for our anti-Map-1 and -2 antibodies. Treatment with db-cAMP plus theophylline was found to result in a reversible decrease in immunofluorescent staining of the nucleus with polyclonal MAP-1 or -2 antibody, and a reversible increase in that of the cytoplasm. Simultaneous treatment with colchicine, colcemid, putrescine, or {alpha}-naphthyl phosphate in the presence of db-cAMP plus theophylline almost prevented this effect of db-cAMP plus theophylline. They examined the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions by immunoperoxidase staining, immunoprecipitation, and {sup 125}I-protein A with anti-MAP-1 and -2 antibodies. The present research indicated that treatment with db-cAMP plus theophylline resulted in the reversible translocation of 300- to 350-kDa proteins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm accompanied by the dephosphorylation of these proteins.

  10. Rebamipide induces the gastric mucosal protective factor, cyclooxygenase-2, via activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunyoung; Jeong, Seongkeun; Kim, Wooseong; Kim, Dohoon; Yang, Yejin; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Byung Joo; Min, Do Sik; Jung, Yunjin

    2017-01-29

    Rebamipide, an amino acid derivative of 2(1H)-quinolinone, has been used for mucosal protection, healing of gastroduodenal ulcers, and treatment of gastritis. Induction of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, a gastric mucosal protective factor, by rebamipide has been suggested as the major mechanism of the drug action. However, how rebamipide induces COX-2 at the molecular level needs further investigation. In this study, the molecular mechanism underlying the induction of COX-2 by rebamipide was investigated. In gastric carcinoma cells and macrophage cells, rebamipide induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a substrate of AMPK. The induction of COX-2 by rebamipide was dependent on AMPK activation because compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, abolished COX-2 induction by rebamipide. In a mouse ulcer model, rebamipide protected against hydrochloric acid/ethanol-induced gastric ulcer, and these protective effects were deterred by co-administration of compound C. In parallel, in the gastric tissues, rebamipide increased the phosphorylation AMPK, whereas compound C reduced the levels of COX-2 and phosphorylated ACC, which were increased by rebamipide. Taken together, the activation of AMPK by rebamipide may be a molecular mechanism that contributes to induction of COX-2, probably resulting in protection against gastric ulcers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. AMP Kinase Activation Alters Oxidant-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Modulating Cell Signaling and Microtubule Organization.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Hicham; Koromilas, Antonis E; Stochaj, Ursula

    2016-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells assemble stress granules (SGs) when translation initiation is inhibited. Different cell signaling pathways regulate SG production. Particularly relevant to this process is 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which functions as a stress sensor and is transiently activated by adverse physiologic conditions. Here, we dissected the role of AMPK for oxidant-induced SG formation. Our studies identified multiple steps of de novo SG assembly that are controlled by the kinase. Single-cell analyses demonstrated that pharmacological AMPK activation prior to stress exposure changed SG properties, because the granules became more abundant and smaller in size. These altered SG characteristics correlated with specific changes in cell survival, cell signaling, cytoskeletal organization, and the abundance of translation initiation factors. Specifically, AMPK activation increased stress-induced eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α phosphorylation and reduced the concentration of eIF4F complex subunits eIF4G and eIF4E. At the same time, the abundance of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) was diminished. This loss of HDAC6 was accompanied by increased acetylation of α-tubulin on Lys40. Pharmacological studies further confirmed this novel AMPK-HDAC6 interplay and its importance for SG biology. Taken together, we provide mechanistic insights into the regulation of SG formation. We propose that AMPK activation stimulates oxidant-induced SG formation but limits their fusion into larger granules. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. The Extract of Herbal Medicines Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Diet-Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hye-Yeon; Chung, SaeYeon; Kim, Soon Re; Lee, Ji-Hye; Seo, Hye-Sook; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    Our study investigated whether the extract of six herbal medicines (OB-1) has an inhibitory effect on obesity. High-fat diet-(HFD-) induced rats and controls were treated with 40 mg/100 g body weight of OB-1 or saline once a day for 5 weeks. After significant changes in body weight were induced, OB-1 and saline were administered to each subgroup of HFD and control groups for additional 5 weeks. No statistically significant decrease of body weight in OB-1-treated rats was found compared to controls. However, OB-1-treated rats were found to be more active in an open-field test and have a reduction in the size of adipocytes compared to controls. We observed no changes in the mRNA expressions of leptin and adiponectin from adipocytes between OB-1- and saline-treated rats with HFD-induced obesity group. However, OB-1 treatments were shown to be inversely correlated with accumulation of lipid droplets in liver tissue, suggesting that OB-1 could inhibit a lipid accumulation by blocking the pathway related to lipid metabolism. Moreover, the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was significantly increased in OB-1-treated rats with HFD compared to controls. These results suggest that OB-1 has no direct antiobesity effect and, however, could be a regulator of cellular metabolism. PMID:23533517

  13. Metformin-induced AMP-activated protein kinase activation regulates phenylephrine-mediated contraction of rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jin Young; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2012-05-11

    The aim of the present study is to determine the effects and molecular mechanisms by which activation of LKB1-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by metformin regulates vascular smooth muscle contraction. The essential ability of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to contract and relax in response to an elevation and reduction in intravascular pressure is necessary for appropriate blood flow regulation. Thus, vessel contraction is a critical mechanism for systemic blood flow regulation. In cultured rat VSMCs, AMPK activation through LKB1 by metformin-inhibited phenylephrine-mediated myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin light chain phosphorylation (p-MLC). Conversely, inhibition of AMPK and LKB1 reversed phenylephrine-induced MLCK and p-MLC phosphorylation. Measurement of the tension trace in rat aortic rings also showed that the effect of AMPK activation by metformin decreased phenylephrine-induced contraction. Metformin inhibited PE-induced p-MLC and α-smooth muscle actin co-localization. Our results suggest that activation of AMPK by LKB1 decreases VSMC contraction by inhibiting MLCK and p-MLC, indicating that induction by the AMPK-LKB1 pathway may be a new therapeutic target to lower high blood pressure.

  14. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Roth, Jack A; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Swisher, Stephen G; Pataer, Apar

    2015-05-10

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expression of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinase(T172) [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation.

  15. AMP-activated protein kinase deficiency reduces ozone-induced lung injury and oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute ozone exposure causes lung oxidative stress and inflammation leading to lung injury. At least one mechanism underlying the lung toxicity of ozone involves excessive production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates such as peroxynitrite. In addition and beyond its major prooxidant properties, peroxynitrite may nitrate tyrosine residues altering phosphorylation of many protein kinases involved in cell signalling. It was recently proposed that peroxynitrite activates 5'-AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), which regulates metabolic pathways and the response to cell stress. AMPK activation as a consequence of ozone exposure has not been previously evaluated. First, we tested whether acute ozone exposure in mice would impair alveolar fluid clearance, increase lung tissue peroxynitrite production and activate AMPK. Second, we tested whether loss of AMP-activated protein kinase alpha1 subunit in mouse would prevent enhanced oxidative stress and lung injury induced by ozone exposure. Methods Control and AMPKα1 deficient mice were exposed to ozone at a concentration of 2.0 ppm for 3 h in glass cages. Evaluation was performed 24 h after ozone exposure. Alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) was evaluated using fluorescein isothiocyanate tagged albumin. Differential cell counts, total protein levels, cytokine concentrations, myeloperoxidase activity and markers of oxidative stress, i.e. malondialdehyde and peroxynitrite, were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung homogenates (LH). Levels of AMPK-Thr172 phosphorylation and basolateral membrane Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase abundance were determined by Western blot. Results In control mice, ozone exposure induced lung inflammation as evidence by increased leukocyte count, protein concentration in BAL and myeloperoxidase activity, pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in LH. Increases in peroxynitrite levels (3 vs 4.4 nM, p = 0.02) and malondialdehyde concentrations (110 vs 230 μmole/g wet tissue) were detected in LH

  16. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae induce alterations in the intracellular pH, membrane permeability and culturability of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii cells.

    PubMed

    Branco, Patrícia; Viana, Tiago; Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-07-16

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) during alcoholic fermentation that are active against several wine-related yeasts (e.g. Hanseniaspora guilliermondii) and bacteria (e.g. Oenococcus oeni). In the present study, the physiological changes induced by those AMPs on sensitive H. guilliermondii cells were evaluated in terms of intracellular pH (pHi), membrane permeability and culturability. Membrane permeability was evaluated by staining cells with propidium iodide (PI), pHi was determined by a fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy (FRIM) technique and culturability by a classical plating method. Results showed that the average pHi of H. guilliermondii cells dropped from 6.5 (healthy cells) to 5.4 (damaged cells) after 20 min of exposure to inhibitory concentrations of AMPs, and after 24 h 77.0% of the cells completely lost their pH gradient (∆pH=pHi-pHext). After 24h of exposure to AMPs, PI-stained (dead) cells increased from 0% to 77.7% and the number of viable cells fell from 1×10(5) to 10 CFU/ml. This means that virtually all cells (99.99%) became unculturable but that a sub-population of 22.3% of the cells remained viable (as determined by PI staining). Besides, pHi results showed that after 24h, 23% of the AMP-treated cells were sub-lethally injured (with 0<∆pH<3). Taken together, these results indicated that this subpopulation was under a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state, which was further confirmed by recuperation assays. In summary, our study reveals that these AMPs compromise the plasma membrane integrity (and possibly also the vacuole membrane) of H. guilliermondii cells, disturbing the pHi homeostasis and inducing a loss of culturability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The light-induced increase of carbohydrate metabolism in glial cells of the honeybee retina is not mediated by K+ movement nor by cAMP

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is a nervous tissue in which glial cells and photoreceptor neurons constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. The phosphorylation of glucose and its subsequent incorporation into glycogen occur essentially in glia, whereas O2 consumption occurs in the photoreceptors. After [3H] glucose loading of superfused retinal slices, light stimulation induced a significant rise in [3H] glycogen turnover in the glia. This occurs without a concomitant covalent modification of glycogen enzymes. Probably only an increase or a decrease of the availability of [3H] glycosyls that are incorporated into glycogen is necessary. As only photoreceptors are directly excitable by light, we searched for a signal that stimulates glycogen metabolism in the glia. Although K+ in extracellular space and glia increases after repetitive light stimulation, increasing bath K+ in the dark did not mimic the metabolic effects of light, despite an equivalent increase of K+ in the extracellular space and glia. We subsequently explored the role of cAMP, a universal intracellular second messenger. Exposure of retinal slices to the adenylate-cyclase activator forskolin induced an expected increase in the rate of formation of cAMP, but only partially mimicked the metabolic effects of light. Furthermore, light stimulation failed to induce a rise in the rate of formation of cAMP. We conclude that in this nervous system, without synapses, neither K+ nor cAMP mediates the effect of light stimulation on intraglial glucose metabolism. PMID:1662260

  18. AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy mediated the protective effect of sonic hedgehog pathway on oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury of cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qing; Yang, Ya; Qin, Yuan; He, Yan-Hua; Chen, Kui-Xiang; Zhu, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Gui-Ping; Luo, Jian-Dong

    2015-02-13

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway has been reported to protect cardiomyocytes in myocardial infarction (MI), but the underlying mechanism is not clear. Here, we provide evidence that Shh pathway induces cardiomyocytes survival through AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy. Shh pathway agonist SAG increased the expression of LC3-II, and induced the formation of autophagosomes in cultured H9c2 cardiomyocytes under oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) 1 h and 4 h. Moreover, SAG induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, and then directly phosphorylated and activated the downstream autophagy initiator Ulk1, independent of the autophagy suppressor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1. Taken together, our results have shown that Shh activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in cardiomyocytes under OGD, suggesting a role of autophagy in Shh-induced cellular protection.

  19. Functions for the cAMP/Epac/Rap1 Signaling Pathway in Low-Dose Endothelial Monocyte-Activating Polypeptide-II-Induced Opening of Blood-Tumor Barrier.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiao-Bai; Liu, Yun-Hui; Xue, Yi-Xue; Wang, Ping; Liu, Li-Bo; Yao, Yi-Long; Ma, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that low-dose endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) induces blood-tumor barrier (BTB) hyperpermeability via both paracellular and transcellular pathways. In a recent study, we revealed that cAMP/PKA-dependent and cAMP/PKA-independent signaling pathways are both involved in EMAP-II-induced BTB hyperpermeability. The present study further investigated the exact mechanisms through which the cAMP/PKA-independent signaling pathway affects EMAP-II-induced BTB hyperpermeability. In an in vitro BTB model, low-dose EMAP-II (0.05 nM) induced a significant decrease in Rap1 activity in RBMECs. Pretreatment with forskolin to elevate intracellular cAMP concentration completely blocked EMAP-II-induced Rap1 inactivation. Epac/Rap1 activation by 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP significantly prevented EMAP-II-induced activation of RhoA/ROCK. Furthermore, 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP pretreatment significantly inhibited EMAP-II-induced decreases in TEER and increases in HRP flux. Pretreatment also significantly prevented EMAP-II-induced changes in MLC phosphorylation, actin cytoskeleton arrangement, and expression and distribution of ZO-1 in RBMECs. This study demonstrates that the cAMP/Epac/Rap1 signaling cascade is a crucial pathway in EMAP-II-induced BTB hyperpermeability.

  20. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  1. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B.; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  2. AKAP-dependent sensitization of Ca(v) 3.2 channels via the EP(4) receptor/cAMP pathway mediates PGE(2) -induced mechanical hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Aoki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Maiko; Kanaoka, Daiki; Nishimoto, Yuta; Tsubota-Matsunami, Maho; Yamanaka, Rumi; Yoshida, Shigeru; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2013-02-01

    The Ca(v) 3.2 isoform of T-type Ca(2+) channels (T channels) is sensitized by hydrogen sulfide, a pro-nociceptive gasotransmitter, and also by PKA that mediates PGE(2) -induced hyperalgesia. Here we examined and analysed Ca(v) 3.2 sensitization via the PGE(2) /cAMP pathway in NG108-15 cells that express Ca(v) 3.2 and produce cAMP in response to PGE(2) , and its impact on mechanical nociceptive processing in rats. In NG108-15 cells and rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, T-channel-dependent currents (T currents) were measured with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The molecular interaction of Ca(v) 3.2 with A-kinase anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150) and its phosphorylation were analysed by immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting in NG108-15 cells. Mechanical nociceptive threshold was determined by the paw pressure test in rats. In NG108-15 cells and/or rat DRG neurons, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP) or PGE(2) increased T currents, an effect blocked by AKAP St-Ht31 inhibitor peptide (AKAPI) or KT5720, a PKA inhibitor. The effect of PGE(2) was abolished by RQ-00015986-00, an EP(4) receptor antagonist. AKAP150 was co-immunoprecipitated with Ca(v) 3.2, regardless of stimulation with db-cAMP, and Ca(v) 3.2 was phosphorylated by db-cAMP or PGE(2) . In rats, intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of db-cAMP or PGE(2) caused mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect suppressed by AKAPI, two distinct T-channel blockers, NNC 55-0396 and ethosuximide, or ZnCl(2) , known to inhibit Ca(v) 3.2 among T channels. Oral administration of RQ-00015986-00 suppressed the PGE(2) -induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Our findings suggest that PGE(2) causes AKAP-dependent phosphorylation and sensitization of Ca(v) 3.2 through the EP(4) receptor/cAMP/PKA pathway, leading to mechanical hyperalgesia in rats. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Bavachalcone-induced manganese superoxide dismutase expression through the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yanqi; Ling, Shuang; Duan, Ju; Ma, Jing; Ni, Rongzhen; Xu, Jin-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress has been suggested as a major etiological factor in cardiovascular diseases. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is an essential antioxidant mitochondrial enzyme. Although polyphenols can induce MnSOD expression, their mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the effect of bavachalcone, a bioactive compound isolated from Psoralea corylifolia, on MnSOD protein expression and explored whether this effect is mediated through the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. Our data showed that bavachalcone enhanced the luciferase activity of the MnSOD promoter and increased MnSOD mRNA and protein expressions. Moreover, bavachalcone suppressed the mitochondrial superoxide production in endothelial cells. Conversely, bavachalcone stimulated liver kinase B1 and AMPKα phosphorylation. mRNA interference by using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) of AMPK inhibited bavachalcone-induced MnSOD expression. A-769662, an AMPK activator, also stimulated AMPK activity and increased MnSOD expression. Furthermore, AMPK knockdown by shRNA-AMPK reversed the inhibitory effects of bavachalcone on mitochondrial superoxide production in endothelial cells. These findings indicate that bavachalcone can protect the endothelial function by increasing AMPK activity and MnSOD expression and reducing mitochondrial oxidative stress. .

  4. MicroRNA-181a-mediated downregulation of AC9 protein decreases intracellular cAMP level and inhibits ATRA-induced APL cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, L K; Xu, G P; Pan, X R; Lou, Y J; Zou, Q P; Xia, D; Yan, W W; Zhang, Y T; Jia, P M; Tong, J H

    2014-04-10

    AC9 is one of the adenylate cyclase (AC) isoforms, which catalyze the conversion of ATP to cAMP, an important second messenger. We previously found that the integration of cAMP/PKA pathway with nuclear receptor-mediated signaling was required during all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced maturation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. Here we showed that AC9 could affect intracellular cAMP level and enhance the trans-activity of retinoic acid receptor. Knockdown of AC9 in APL cell line NB4 could obviously inhibit ATRA-induced differentiation. We also demonstrated that miR-181a could decrease AC9 expression by targeting 3'UTR of AC9 mRNA, finally controlling the production of intracellular cAMP. The expression of miR-181a itself could be inhibited by CEBPα, probably accounting for the differential expression of miR-181a in NB4 and ATRA-resistant NB4-R1 cells. Moreover, we found that AC9 expression was relatively lower in newly diagnosed or relapsed APL patients than in both complete remission and non-leukemia cases, closely correlating with the leukemogenesis of APL. Taken together, our studies revealed for the first time the importance of miR-181a-mediated AC9 downregulation in APL. We also suggested the potential value of AC9 as a biomarker in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of leukemia.

  5. Activation of Autophagic Flux against Xenoestrogen Bisphenol-A-induced Hippocampal Neurodegeneration via AMP kinase (AMPK)/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Swati; Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Seth, Brashket; Yadav, Anuradha; Singh, Anshuman; Mudawal, Anubha; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Gupta, Shailendra Kumar; Choubey, Vinay; Tripathi, Anurag; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Ratan Singh; Shukla, Shubha; Parmar, Devendra; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The human health hazards related to persisting use of bisphenol-A (BPA) are well documented. BPA-induced neurotoxicity occurs with the generation of oxidative stress, neurodegeneration, and cognitive dysfunctions. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) of the effects of BPA on autophagy and association with oxidative stress and apoptosis are still elusive. We observed that BPA exposure during the early postnatal period enhanced the expression and the levels of autophagy genes/proteins. BPA treatment in the presence of bafilomycin A1 increased the levels of LC3-II and SQSTM1 and also potentiated GFP-LC3 puncta index in GFP-LC3-transfected hippocampal neural stem cell-derived neurons. BPA-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis were mitigated by a pharmacological activator of autophagy (rapamycin). Pharmacological (wortmannin and bafilomycin A1) and genetic (beclin siRNA) inhibition of autophagy aggravated BPA neurotoxicity. Activation of autophagy against BPA resulted in intracellular energy sensor AMP kinase (AMPK) activation, increased phosphorylation of raptor and acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and decreased phosphorylation of ULK1 (Ser-757), and silencing of AMPK exacerbated BPA neurotoxicity. Conversely, BPA exposure down-regulated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway by phosphorylation of raptor as a transient cell's compensatory mechanism to preserve cellular energy pool. Moreover, silencing of mTOR enhanced autophagy, which further alleviated BPA-induced reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis. BPA-mediated neurotoxicity also resulted in mitochondrial loss, bioenergetic deficits, and increased PARKIN mitochondrial translocation, suggesting enhanced mitophagy. These results suggest implication of autophagy against BPA-mediated neurodegeneration through involvement of AMPK and mTOR pathways. Hence, autophagy, which arbitrates cell survival and demise during stress conditions, requires further assessment to be

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates the insulin-induced activation of the nitric oxide synthase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Schulz, Christian; Fichtlscherer, Birgit; Kemp, Bruce E; Fisslthaler, Beate; Busse, Rudi

    2003-11-01

    Little is known about the signaling cascades that eventually regulate the activity of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in platelets. Here, we investigated the effects of insulin on the phosphorylation and activation of eNOS in washed human platelets and in endothelial cells. Insulin activated the protein kinase Akt in cultured endothelial cells and increased the phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser(1177) but failed to increase endothelial cyclic GMP levels or to elicit the relaxation of endothelium-intact porcine coronary arteries. In platelets, insulin also elicited the activation of Akt as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS and initiated NO production which was associated with increased cyclic GMP levels and the inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation. The insulin-induced inhibition of aggregation was accompanied by a decreased Ca(2+) response to thrombin and was also prevented by N(omega) nitro-L-arginine. In platelets, but not in endothelial cells, insulin induced the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic stress-sensing kinase which was sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor wortmannin and the AMPK inhibitor iodotubercidin. Moreover, the insulin-mediated inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation was prevented by iodotubercidin. Insulin-independent activation of the AMPK using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, increased platelet eNOS phosphorylation, increased cyclic GMP levels and attenuated platelet aggregation. These results highlight the differences in the signal transduction cascade activated by insulin in endothelial cells and platelets, and demonstrate that insulin stimulates the formation of NO in human platelets, in the absence of an increase in Ca(2+), by acti-vating PI3-K and AMPK which phosphorylates eNOS on Ser(1177).

  7. Prevention of estradiol 17β-d-glucuronide–induced canalicular transporter internalization by hormonal modulation of cAMP in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zucchetti, Andrés E.; Barosso, Ismael R.; Boaglio, Andrea; Pellegrino, José M.; Ochoa, Elena J.; Roma, Marcelo G.; Crocenzi, Fernando A.; Sánchez Pozzi, Enrique J.

    2011-01-01

    In estradiol 17β-d-glucuronide (E17G)–induced cholestasis, the canalicular hepatocellular transporters bile salt export pump (Abcb11) and multidrug-resistance associated protein 2 (Abcc2) undergo endocytic internalization. cAMP stimulates the trafficking of transporter-containing vesicles to the apical membrane and is able to prevent internalization of these transporters in estrogen-induced cholestasis. Hepatocyte levels of cAMP are regulated by hormones such as glucagon and adrenaline (via the β2 receptor). We analyzed the effects of glucagon and salbutamol (a β2 adrenergic agonist) on function and localization of Abcb11 and Abcc2 in isolated rat hepatocyte couplets exposed to E17G and compared the mechanistic bases of their effects. Glucagon and salbutamol partially prevented the impairment in Abcb11 and Abcc2 transport capacity. E17G also induced endocytic internalization of Abcb11 and Abcc2, which partially colocalized with the endosomal marker Rab11a. This effect was completely prevented by salbutamol, whereas some transporter-containing vesicles remained internalized and mainly colocalizing with Rab11a in the perinuclear region after incubation with glucagon. Glucagon prevention was dependent on cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and independent of exchange proteins activated directly by cAMP (Epac) and microtubules. In contrast, salbutamol prevention was PKA independent and Epac/MEK and microtubule dependent. Anticholestatic effects of glucagon and salbutamol were additive in nature. Our results show that increases in cAMP could activate different anticholestatic signaling pathways, depending on the hormonal mediator involved. PMID:21865596

  8. 14-Deoxyandrographolide alleviates ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis through stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Samir; Mukhopadhyay, Sibabrata; Bandhopadhyay, Sukdeb; Sen, Gargi; Biswas, Tuli

    2014-03-01

    Andrographis paniculata (AP) is a traditional medicinal plant of Ayurveda. It grows widely in Asia and is prescribed in the treatment of liver diseases. Here we have investigated the beneficial role of 14-deoxyandrographolide (14-DAG), a bioactive diterpenoid from AP, against alcoholic steatosis in rats. 14-DAG was extracted from aerial parts (leaves and stems) of AP. Rats were fed with ethanol for 8 weeks. Animals were treated with 14-DAG during the last 4 weeks of ethanol treatment. In vitro studies were undertaken in a human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line culture. Hepatosteatosis was assessed from histopathological studies of liver sections. Acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and triglyceride contents were determined using commercially available kits. Fatty acid synthesis was evaluated from incorporation of 1-(14)C acetate. Regulation of fatty acid oxidation and lipogenesis were monitored with immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation studies. Ethanol exposure led to hepatotoxicity, as evident from the marked enhancement in the levels of AST and ALT. The values decreased almost to control levels in response to 14-DAG treatment. Results showed that ethanol feeding induced deactivation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) that led to enhanced lipid synthesis and decreased fatty acid oxidation, culminating in hepatic fat accumulation. Treatment with 14-DAG activated AMPK through induction of cyclic AMP-protein kinase A pathway. Activation of AMPK was followed by down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase, leading to suppression of lipogenesis. This was associated with up-regulation of sirtuin 1 and depletion of malonyl-CoA, in favor of increased fatty acid oxidation. 14-DAG controlled ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis by interfering with dysregulation of lipid metabolism. In conclusion, our results indicated that 14-DAG was capable of preventing the development of fatty liver through AMPK

  9. Elevation of cAMP Levels Inhibits Doxorubicin-Induced Apoptosis in Pre- B ALL NALM- 6 Cells Through Induction of BAD Phosphorylation and Inhibition of P53 Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Ahmad; Kazemi, Ahmad; Kashiri, Meysam; Safa, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of the molecular mechanisms of cAMP action against DNA damage-induced apoptosis can be useful to improve the efficacy of DNA damaging therapeutic agents. Considering the critical role of bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD) and p53 proteins in DNA damage -induced apoptosis, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of cAMP-elevating agents on these proteins in doxorubicin-treated pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) NALM-6 cells.The pre-B ALL cell line NALM-6 was cultured and treated with doxorubicin in combination with or without cAMP-elevating agents forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Cell viability was measured by trypan blue staining and MTT assay. For evaluation of apoptosis, annexin-V staining by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay were used. Protein expression of p53, BAD and phoshorylated BAD was detected by western blotting analysis.cAMP-increasing agents diminished the doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxicity in NALM-6 cells as indicated by the viability assays. Annexin-V apoptosis assay showed that the cAMP-elevating agents decreased doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, doxorubicin-induced caspase-3 activity was attenuated in the presence of cAMP-increasing agents. Western blot results revealed the reduced expression of p53 protein in cells treated with combination of cAMP-elevating agents and doxorubicin in contrast to cells treated with doxorubicin alone. Expression of total BAD protein was not affected by doxorubicin and cAMP-elevating agents. However, phosphorylation of BAD protein was induced in the presence of cAMP-elevating agents. Our study suggests that elevated cAMP levels inhibit doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in pre-B ALL cells through induction of BAD phosphorylation and abrogation of p53 accumulation.

  10. Prostaglandin E₂-induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression is mediated by cAMP/Epac signalling modules in bEnd.3 brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Yeop; Baik, Eun Joo; Lee, Soo Hwan

    2013-06-01

    Prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion molecules, leukocyte adhesion and infiltration into inflamed site. However, the underlying mechanism therein involved remains ill-defined. In this study, we explored its cellular mechanism of action in the regulation of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression in the brain endothelial cells. bEnd.3 cells, the murine cerebrovascular endothelial cell line and primary mouse brain endothelial cells were treated with PGE₂ with or without agonists/antagonists of PGE₂ receptors and associated signalling molecules. ICAM-1 expression, Akt phosphorylation and activity of NF-κB were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoblot analysis, luciferase assay and immunocytochemistry. PGE₂ significantly up-regulated the expression of ICAM-1, which was blocked by EP4 antagonist (ONO-AE2-227) and knock-down of EP4. PGE₂ effects were mimicked by forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) and an exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) activator (8-Cpt-cAMP) but not a protein kinase A activator (N⁶-Bnz-cAMP). PGE₂-induced ICAM-1 expression was reduced by knock-down of Epac1. A PI3K specific inhibitor (LY294002), Akt inhibitor VIII (Akti) and NF-κB inhibitors (Bay-11-7082 and MG-132) attenuated the induction of ICAM-1 by PGE₂. PGE₂, dbcAMP and 8-Cpt-cAMP induced the phosphorylation of Akt, IκB kinase and IκBα and the translocation of p65 to the nucleus and increased NF-κB dependent reporter gene activity, which was diminished by Akti. Our findings suggest that PGE₂ induces ICAM-1 expression via EP4 receptor and Epac/Akt/NF-κB signalling pathway in bEnd.3 brain endothelial cells, supporting its pathophysiological role in brain inflammation. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Prostaglandin E2-induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression is mediated by cAMP/Epac signalling modules in bEnd.3 brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Yeop; Baik, Eun Joo; Lee, Soo Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion molecules, leukocyte adhesion and infiltration into inflamed site. However, the underlying mechanism therein involved remains ill-defined. In this study, we explored its cellular mechanism of action in the regulation of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression in the brain endothelial cells. Experimental Approach bEnd.3 cells, the murine cerebrovascular endothelial cell line and primary mouse brain endothelial cells were treated with PGE2 with or without agonists/antagonists of PGE2 receptors and associated signalling molecules. ICAM-1 expression, Akt phosphorylation and activity of NF-κB were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoblot analysis, luciferase assay and immunocytochemistry. Key Results PGE2 significantly up-regulated the expression of ICAM-1, which was blocked by EP4 antagonist (ONO-AE2-227) and knock-down of EP4. PGE2 effects were mimicked by forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) and an exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) activator (8-Cpt-cAMP) but not a protein kinase A activator (N6-Bnz-cAMP). PGE2-induced ICAM-1 expression was reduced by knock-down of Epac1. A PI3K specific inhibitor (LY294002), Akt inhibitor VIII (Akti) and NF-κB inhibitors (Bay-11–7082 and MG-132) attenuated the induction of ICAM-1 by PGE2. PGE2, dbcAMP and 8-Cpt-cAMP induced the phosphorylation of Akt, IκB kinase and IκBα and the translocation of p65 to the nucleus and increased NF-κB dependent reporter gene activity, which was diminished by Akti. Conclusion and Implications Our findings suggest that PGE2 induces ICAM-1 expression via EP4 receptor and Epac/Akt/NF-κB signalling pathway in bEnd.3 brain endothelial cells, supporting its pathophysiological role in brain inflammation. PMID:23317035

  12. The AMP-Related Kinase (AMPK) Induces Ca(2+)-Independent Dilation of Resistance Arteries by Interfering With Actin Filament Formation.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Kai Michael; Qiu, Jiehua; Blodow, Stephanie; Wiedenmann, Margarethe; Lubomirov, Lubomir T; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Pohl, Ulrich; Schneider, Holger

    2017-07-07

    Decreasing Ca(2+) sensitivity of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) allows for vasodilation without lowering of cytosolic Ca(2+). This may be particularly important in states requiring maintained dilation, such as hypoxia. AMP-related kinase (AMPK) is an important cellular energy sensor in VSM. Regulation of Ca(2+) sensitivity usually is attributed to myosin light chain phosphatase activity, but findings in non-VSM identified changes in the actin cytoskeleton. The potential role of AMPK in this setting is widely unknown. To assess the influence of AMPK on the actin cytoskeleton in VSM of resistance arteries with regard to potential Ca(2+) desensitization of VSM contractile apparatus. AMPK induced a slowly developing dilation at unchanged cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in potassium chloride-constricted intact arteries isolated from mouse mesenteric tissue. This dilation was not associated with changes in phosphorylation of myosin light chain or of myosin light chain phosphatase regulatory subunit. Using ultracentrifugation and confocal microscopy, we found that AMPK induced depolymerization of F-actin (filamentous actin). Imaging of arteries from LifeAct mice showed F-actin rarefaction in the midcellular portion of VSM. Immunoblotting revealed that this was associated with activation of the actin severing factor cofilin. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that AMPK leads to the liberation of cofilin from 14-3-3 protein. AMPK induces actin depolymerization, which reduces vascular tone and the response to vasoconstrictors. Our findings demonstrate a new role of AMPK in the control of actin cytoskeletal dynamics, potentially allowing for long-term dilation of microvessels without substantial changes in cytosolic Ca(2+). © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Coenzyme Q10 Attenuates High Glucose-Induced Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsiao-Ya; Lin, Chih-Pei; Huang, Po-Hsun; Li, Szu-Yuan; Chen, Jia-Shiong; Lin, Feng-Yen; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antiapoptosis enzyme, is stored in the mitochondria of cells. We investigated whether CoQ10 can attenuate high glucose-induced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) apoptosis and clarified its mechanism. EPCs were incubated with normal glucose (5 mM) or high glucose (25 mM) enviroment for 3 days, followed by treatment with CoQ10 (10 μM) for 24 hr. Cell proliferation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and JC-1 assay were examined. The specific signal pathways of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), eNOS/Akt, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were also assessed. High glucose reduced EPC functional activities, including proliferation and migration. Additionally, Akt/eNOS activity and NO production were downregulated in high glucose-stimulated EPCs. Administration of CoQ10 ameliorated high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis, including downregulation of caspase 3, upregulation of Bcl-2, and increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, treatment with CoQ10 reduced reactive oxygen species, enhanced eNOS/Akt activity, and increased HO-1 expression in high glucose-treated EPCs. These effects were negated by administration of AMPK inhibitor. Transplantation of CoQ10-treated EPCs under high glucose conditions into ischemic hindlimbs improved blood flow recovery. CoQ10 reduced high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis and dysfunction through upregulation of eNOS, HO-1 through the AMPK pathway. Our findings provide a potential treatment strategy targeting dysfunctional EPC in diabetic patients. PMID:26682233

  14. Glabridin induces glucose uptake via the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Keisuke; Yamashita, Yoko; Zhang, Tianshun; Nakagawa, Kaku; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2014-08-05

    The present study demonstrates that glabridin, a prenylated isoflavone in licorice, stimulates glucose uptake through the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway in L6 myotubes. Treatment with glabridin for 4h induced glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner accompanied by the translocation of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane. Glabridin needed at least 4h to increase glucose uptake, while it significantly decreased glycogen and increased lactic acid within 15 min. Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK by Compound C suppressed the glabridin-induced glucose uptake, whereas phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt inhibition by LY294002 and Akt1/2 inhibitor, respectively, did not. Furthermore, glabridin induced AMPK phosphorylation, and siRNA for AMPK completely abolished glabridin-induced glucose uptake. We confirmed that glabridin-rich licorice extract prevent glucose intolerance accompanied by the AMPK-dependent GLUT4 translocation in the plasma membrane of mice skeletal muscle. These results indicate that glabridin may possess a therapeutic effect on metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and hyperglycemia, by modulating glucose metabolism through AMPK in skeletal muscle cells.

  15. 5'AMP-activated protein kinase activity is increased in adipose tissue of northern elephant seal pups during prolonged fasting-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Viscarra, Jose A; Champagne, Cory D; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2011-06-01

    Northern elephant seals endure a 2- to 3-month fast characterized by sustained hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and increased plasma cortisol and free fatty acids, conditions often seen in insulin-resistant humans. We had previously shown that adipose Glut4 expression and 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity increase and plasma glucose decreases in fasting seals suggesting that AMPK activity contributes to glucose regulation during insulin-resistant conditions. To address the hypothesis that AMPK activity increases during fasting-induced insulin resistance, we performed glucose tolerance tests (GTT) on early (n=5) and late (n=8)-fasted seal pups and compared adipose tissue expression of insulin signaling proteins, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), and AMPK, in addition to plasma adiponectin, leptin, cortisol, insulin, and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels. Fasting was associated with decreased glucose clearance, plasma insulin and adiponectin, and intracellular insulin signaling, as well as increased plasma cortisol and NEFAs, supporting the suggestion that seals develop insulin resistance late in the fast. The expression of Glut4 and VAMP2 increased (52 and 63% respectively) with fasting but did not change significantly during the GTT. PPARγ and phosphorylated AMPK did not change in the early fasted seals, but increased significantly (73 and 50% respectively) in the late-fasted seals during the GTT. Increased AMPK activity along with the reduction in the activity of insulin-signaling proteins supports our hypothesis that AMPK activity is increased following the onset of insulin resistance. The association between increased AMPK activity and Glut4 expression suggests that AMPK plays a greater role in regulating glucose metabolism in mammals adapted to prolonged fasting than in non-fasting mammals.

  16. cAMP-induced Epac-Rap activation inhibits epithelial cell migration by modulating focal adhesion and leading edge dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lyle, Karen S; Raaijmakers, Judith H; Bruinsma, Wytse; Bos, Johannes L; de Rooij, Johan

    2008-06-01

    Epithelial cell migration is a complex process crucial for embryonic development, wound healing and tumor metastasis. It depends on alterations in cell-cell adhesion and integrin-extracellular matrix interactions and on actomyosin-driven, polarized leading edge protrusion. The small GTPase Rap is a known regulator of integrins and cadherins that has also been implicated in the regulation of actin and myosin, but a direct role in cell migration has not been investigated. Here, we report that activation of endogenous Rap by cAMP results in an inhibition of HGF- and TGFbeta-induced epithelial cell migration in several model systems, irrespective of the presence of E-cadherin adhesion. We show that Rap activation slows the dynamics of focal adhesions and inhibits polarized membrane protrusion. Importantly, forced integrin activation by antibodies does not mimic these effects of Rap on cell motility, even though it does mimic Rap effects in short-term cell adhesion assays. From these results, we conclude that Rap inhibits epithelial cell migration, by modulating focal adhesion dynamics and leading edge activity. This extends beyond the effect of integrin affinity modulation and argues for an additional function of Rap in controlling the migration machinery of epithelial cells.

  17. Adiponectin protects the rats liver against chronic intermittent hypoxia induced injury through AMP-activated protein kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wenxiao; Zhang, Qiang; Dong, Yanbin; Ding, Ning; Huang, Hanpeng; Zhu, Xianji; Hutchinson, Sean; Gao, Xingya; Zhang, Xilong

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the effect of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on the liver, the associated mechanisms and the potential therapeutic roles of adiponectin (Ad). Sixty rats were randomly assigned to four groups: the normal control (NC), NC and Ad supplement (NC + Ad), CIH, and CIH and Ad supplement (CIH + Ad) groups. The rats in the CIH and CIH + Ad groups were exposed to a hypoxic environment for 4 months. Rats in the NC + Ad and CIH + Ad groups were also treated with an intravenous injection of Ad (10 ug), twice a week. The plasma levels of hepatic enzymes, serum triglyceride, liver triglyceride, fasting blood glucose and hepatic cell apoptosis in hepatic tissue, were higher in the CIH group than in the NC and NC + Ad groups. However, the Ad supplementation in the CIH + Ad group rescued the hepatic tissue insult by activating the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway. In conclusion, Ad could protect against CIH-induced hepatic injury partly through the AMPK pathway. PMID:27678302

  18. 17beta-estradiol potently suppresses cAMP-induced insulin-like growth factor-I gene activation in primary rat osteoblast cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Ji, C.; Shu, H.; Casinghino, S.; Crothers, K.; Rotwein, P.; Centrella, M.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a key factor in bone remodeling. In osteoblasts, IGF-I synthesis is enhanced by parathyroid hormone and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) through cAMP-activated protein kinase. In rats, estrogen loss after ovariectomy leads to a rise in serum IGF-I and an increase in bone remodeling, both of which are reversed by estrogen treatment. To examine estrogen-dependent regulation of IGF-I expression at the molecular level, primary fetal rat osteoblasts were co-transfected with the estrogen receptor (hER, to ensure active ER expression), and luciferase reporter plasmids controlled by promoter 1 of the rat IGF-I gene (IGF-I P1), used exclusively in these cells. As reported, 1 microM PGE2 increased IGF-I P1 activity by 5-fold. 17beta-Estradiol alone had no effect, but dose-dependently suppressed the stimulatory effect of PGE2 by up to 90% (ED50 approximately 0.1 nM). This occurred within 3 h, persisted for at least 16 h, required ER, and appeared specific, since 17alpha-estradiol was 100-300-fold less effective. By contrast, 17beta-estradiol stimulated estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent reporter expression by up to 10-fold. 17beta-Estradiol also suppressed an IGF-I P1 construct retaining only minimal promoter sequence required for cAMP-dependent gene activation, but did not affect the 60-fold increase in cAMP induced by PGE2. There is no consensus ERE in rat IGF-I P1, suggesting novel downstream interactions in the cAMP pathway that normally enhances IGF-I expression in skeletal cells. To explore this, nuclear extract from osteoblasts expressing hER were examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay using the atypical cAMP response element in IGF-I P1. Estrogen alone did not cause DNA-protein binding, while PGE2 induced a characteristic gel shift complex. Co-treatment with both hormones caused a gel shift greatly diminished in intensity, consistent with their combined effects on IGF-I promoter activity. Nonetheless, hER did not bind

  19. PGE2 potentiates tonicity-induced COX-2 expression in renal medullary cells in a positive feedback loop involving EP2-cAMP-PKA signaling.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Daniela; Küper, Christoph; Bartels, Helmut; Beck, Franz-X; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Cyooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived PGE2 is critical for the integrity and function of renal medullary cells during antidiuresis. The present study extended our previous finding that tonicity-induced COX-2 expression is further stimulated by the major COX-2 product PGE2 and investigated the underlying signaling pathways and the functional relevance of this phenomenon. Hyperosmolality stimulated COX-2 expression and activity in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, a response that was further increased by PGE2-cAMP signaling, suggesting the existence of a positive feedback loop. This effect was diminished by AH-6809, an EP2 antagonist, and by the PKA inhibitor H-89, but not by AH-23848, an EP4 antagonist. The effect of PGE2 was mimicked by forskolin and dibutyryl-cAMP, suggesting that the stimulatory effect of PGE2 on COX-2 is mediated by a cAMP-PKA-dependent mechanism. Accordingly, cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-driven reporter activity paralleled the effects of PGE2, AH-6809, AH-23848, H-89, forskolin, and dibutyryl-cAMP on COX-2 expression. In addition, the stimulatory effect of PGE2 on tonicity-induced COX-2 expression was blunted in cells transfected with dominant-negative CRE binding (CREB) protein, as was the case in a COX-2 promoter reporter construct in which a putative CRE was deleted. Furthermore, PGE2 resulted in PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad at Ser155, a mechanism that is known to inactivate Bad, which coincided with reduced caspase-3 activity during osmotic stress. Conversely, pharmacological interruption of the PGE2-EP2-cAMP-PKA pathway abolished Ser155 phosphorylation of Bad and blunted the protective effect of PGE2 on cell survival during osmotic stress. These observations indicate the existence of a positive feedback loop of PGE2 on COX-2 expression during osmotic stress, an effect that apparently is mediated by EP2-cAMP-PKA signaling, and that contributes to cell survival under hypertonic conditions.

  20. cAMP-induced actin cytoskeleton remodelling inhibits MKL1-dependent expression of the chemotactic and pro-proliferative factor, CCN1

    PubMed Central

    Duggirala, Aparna; Kimura, Tomomi E.; Sala-Newby, Graciela B.; Johnson, Jason L.; Wu, Yih-Jer; Newby, Andrew C.; Bond, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Elevation of intracellular cAMP concentration has numerous vascular protective effects that are in part mediated via actin cytoskeleton-remodelling and subsequent regulation of gene expression. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here we investigated whether cAMP-induced actin-cytoskeleton remodelling modulates VSMC behaviour by inhibiting expression of CCN1. In cultured rat VSMC, CCN1-silencing significantly inhibited BrdU incorporation and migration in a wound healing assay. Recombinant CCN1 enhanced chemotaxis in a Boyden chamber. Adding db-cAMP, or elevating cAMP using forskolin, significantly inhibited CCN1 mRNA and protein expression in vitro; transcriptional regulation was demonstrated by measuring pre-spliced CCN1 mRNA and CCN1-promoter activity. Forskolin also inhibited CCN1 expression in balloon injured rat carotid arteries in vivo. Inhibiting RhoA activity, which regulates actin-polymerisation, by cAMP-elevation or pharmacologically with C3-transferase, or inhibiting its downstream kinase, ROCK, with Y27632, significantly inhibited CCN1 expression. Conversely, expression of constitutively active RhoA reversed the inhibitory effects of forskolin on CCN1 mRNA. Furthermore, CCN1 mRNA levels were significantly decreased by inhibiting actin-polymerisation with latrunculin B or increased by stimulating actin-polymerisation with Jasplakinolide. We next tested the role of the actin-dependent SRF co-factor, MKL1, in CCN1 expression. Forskolin inhibited nuclear translocation of MKL1 and binding of MKL1 to the CCN1 promoter. Constitutively-active MKL1 enhanced basal promoter activity of wild-type but not SRE-mutated CCN1; and prevented forskolin inhibition. Furthermore, pharmacological MKL-inhibition with CCG-1423 significantly inhibited CCN1 promoter activity as well as mRNA and protein expression. Our data demonstrates that cAMP-induced actin-cytoskeleton remodelling regulates expression of CCN1 through MKL1: it highlights a novel cAMP

  1. cAMP-induced actin cytoskeleton remodelling inhibits MKL1-dependent expression of the chemotactic and pro-proliferative factor, CCN1.

    PubMed

    Duggirala, Aparna; Kimura, Tomomi E; Sala-Newby, Graciela B; Johnson, Jason L; Wu, Yih-Jer; Newby, Andrew C; Bond, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Elevation of intracellular cAMP concentration has numerous vascular protective effects that are in part mediated via actin cytoskeleton-remodelling and subsequent regulation of gene expression. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here we investigated whether cAMP-induced actin-cytoskeleton remodelling modulates VSMC behaviour by inhibiting expression of CCN1. In cultured rat VSMC, CCN1-silencing significantly inhibited BrdU incorporation and migration in a wound healing assay. Recombinant CCN1 enhanced chemotaxis in a Boyden chamber. Adding db-cAMP, or elevating cAMP using forskolin, significantly inhibited CCN1 mRNA and protein expression in vitro; transcriptional regulation was demonstrated by measuring pre-spliced CCN1 mRNA and CCN1-promoter activity. Forskolin also inhibited CCN1 expression in balloon injured rat carotid arteries in vivo. Inhibiting RhoA activity, which regulates actin-polymerisation, by cAMP-elevation or pharmacologically with C3-transferase, or inhibiting its downstream kinase, ROCK, with Y27632, significantly inhibited CCN1 expression. Conversely, expression of constitutively active RhoA reversed the inhibitory effects of forskolin on CCN1 mRNA. Furthermore, CCN1 mRNA levels were significantly decreased by inhibiting actin-polymerisation with latrunculin B or increased by stimulating actin-polymerisation with Jasplakinolide. We next tested the role of the actin-dependent SRF co-factor, MKL1, in CCN1 expression. Forskolin inhibited nuclear translocation of MKL1 and binding of MKL1 to the CCN1 promoter. Constitutively-active MKL1 enhanced basal promoter activity of wild-type but not SRE-mutated CCN1; and prevented forskolin inhibition. Furthermore, pharmacological MKL-inhibition with CCG-1423 significantly inhibited CCN1 promoter activity as well as mRNA and protein expression. Our data demonstrates that cAMP-induced actin-cytoskeleton remodelling regulates expression of CCN1 through MKL1: it highlights a novel cAMP

  2. 17beta-estradiol potently suppresses cAMP-induced insulin-like growth factor-I gene activation in primary rat osteoblast cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Ji, C.; Shu, H.; Casinghino, S.; Crothers, K.; Rotwein, P.; Centrella, M.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a key factor in bone remodeling. In osteoblasts, IGF-I synthesis is enhanced by parathyroid hormone and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) through cAMP-activated protein kinase. In rats, estrogen loss after ovariectomy leads to a rise in serum IGF-I and an increase in bone remodeling, both of which are reversed by estrogen treatment. To examine estrogen-dependent regulation of IGF-I expression at the molecular level, primary fetal rat osteoblasts were co-transfected with the estrogen receptor (hER, to ensure active ER expression), and luciferase reporter plasmids controlled by promoter 1 of the rat IGF-I gene (IGF-I P1), used exclusively in these cells. As reported, 1 microM PGE2 increased IGF-I P1 activity by 5-fold. 17beta-Estradiol alone had no effect, but dose-dependently suppressed the stimulatory effect of PGE2 by up to 90% (ED50 approximately 0.1 nM). This occurred within 3 h, persisted for at least 16 h, required ER, and appeared specific, since 17alpha-estradiol was 100-300-fold less effective. By contrast, 17beta-estradiol stimulated estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent reporter expression by up to 10-fold. 17beta-Estradiol also suppressed an IGF-I P1 construct retaining only minimal promoter sequence required for cAMP-dependent gene activation, but did not affect the 60-fold increase in cAMP induced by PGE2. There is no consensus ERE in rat IGF-I P1, suggesting novel downstream interactions in the cAMP pathway that normally enhances IGF-I expression in skeletal cells. To explore this, nuclear extract from osteoblasts expressing hER were examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay using the atypical cAMP response element in IGF-I P1. Estrogen alone did not cause DNA-protein binding, while PGE2 induced a characteristic gel shift complex. Co-treatment with both hormones caused a gel shift greatly diminished in intensity, consistent with their combined effects on IGF-I promoter activity. Nonetheless, hER did not bind

  3. Hypertonicity-induced transmitter release at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions is partly mediated by integrins and cAMP/protein kinase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Grinnell, Alan D.; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of quantal transmitter release increases upon application of hypertonic solutions. This effect bypasses the Ca(2+) triggering step, but requires the presence of key molecules involved in vesicle fusion, and hence could be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular process of vesicle fusion. We have examined the hypertonicity response at neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos in Ca(2+)-free saline. Relative to wild-type, the response induced by puff application of hypertonic solution was enhanced in a mutant, dunce, in which the cAMP level is elevated, or in wild-type embryos treated with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, while protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors decreased it. The response was also smaller in a mutant, DC0, which lacks the major subunit of PKA. Thus the cAMP/PKA cascade is involved in the hypertonicity response. Peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), which inhibit binding of integrins to natural ligands, reduced the response, whereas a peptide containing the non-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) did not. A reduced response persisted in a mutant, myospheroid, which expresses no integrins, and the response in DC0 was unaffected by RGD peptides. These data indicate that there are at lease two components in the hypertonicity response: one that is integrin mediated and involves the cAMP/PKA cascade, and another that is not integrin mediated and does not involve the cAMP/PKA cascade.

  4. Mapping cyclic nucleotide-induced conformational changes in cyclicAMP receptor protein by a protein footprinting technique using different chemical proteases.

    PubMed

    Baichoo, N; Heyduk, T

    1999-03-01

    CyclicAMP receptor protein (CRP) regulates transcription of numerous genes in Escherichia coli. Both cAMP and cGMP bind CRP, but only cAMP induces conformational changes that dramatically increase the specific DNA binding activity of the protein. We have shown previously that our protein footprinting technique is sensitive enough to detect conformational changes in CRP by cAMP [Baichoo N, Heyduk T. 1997. Biochemistry 36:10830-10836]. In this work, conformational changes in CRP induced by cAMP and cGMP binding were mapped and quantitatively analyzed by protein footprinting using iron complexed to diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid ([Fe-DTPA]2-), iron complexed to ethylenediaminediacetic acid ([Fe-EDDA]), iron complexed to desferrioxamine mesylate ([Fe-HDFO]+), and copper complexed to o-phenanthroline ([(OP)2Cu]+) as proteases. These chemical proteases differ in size, charge, and hydrophobicity. Binding of cAMP to CRP resulted in changes in susceptibility to cleavage by all four proteases. Cleavage by [Fe-EDDA] and [Fe-DTPA]2- of CRP-cAMP detected hypersensitivities in the DNA-binding F alpha-helix, the interdomain hinge, and the ends of the C alpha-helix, which is involved in intersubunit interactions. [Fe-EDDA] and [Fe-DTPA]2- also detected reductions in cleavage in the D and E alpha-helices, which are involved in DNA recognition. Cleavage by [Fe-HDFO]+ of CRP-cAMP detected hypersensitivities in beta-strand 8, the B alpha-helix, as well as in parts of the F and C alpha-helices. [Fe-HDFO]+ also detected protections from cleavage in beta-strands 4 to 5 and their intervening loop, beta-strand 7, which is part of the nucleotide binding pocket, as well as in the D and E alpha-helices. Cleavage by [(OP)2Cu]+ of CRP-cAMP detected hypersensitivities in beta-strands 9 and 11 as well as in the D and E alpha-helices. [(OP)2Cu]+ also detected protections in the C alpha-helix , the interdomain hinge, and beta-strands 2-7. Binding of cGMP to CRP resulted in changes in

  5. Intermittent hypoxic exposure during light phase induces changes in cAMP response element binding protein activity in the rat CA1 hippocampal region: water maze performance correlates.

    PubMed

    Goldbart, A; Row, B W; Kheirandish, L; Schurr, A; Gozal, E; Guo, S Z; Payne, R S; Cheng, Z; Brittian, K R; Gozal, D

    2003-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, a characteristic feature of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is associated with time-dependent apoptosis and spatial learning deficits in the adult rat. The mechanisms underlying such neurocognitive deficits remain unclear. Activation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) transcription factor mediates critical components of neuronal survival and memory consolidation in mammals. CREB phosphorylation and DNA binding, as well as the presence of apoptosis in the CA1 region of the hippocampus were examined in Sprague-Dawley male rats exposed to IH. Spatial reference task learning was assessed with the Morris water maze. IH induced significant decreases in Ser-133 phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) without changes in total CREB, starting as early as 1 h IH, peaking at 6 h-3 days, and returning toward normoxic levels by 14-30 days. Double-labeling immunohistochemistry for pCREB and Neu-N (a neuronal marker) confirmed these findings. The expression of cleaved caspase 3 (cC3) in the CA1, a marker of apoptosis, peaked at 3 days and returned to normoxic values at 14 days. Initial IH-induced impairments in spatial learning were followed by partial functional recovery starting at 14 days of IH exposure. We postulate that IH elicits time-dependent changes in CREB phosphorylation and nuclear binding that may account for decreased neuronal survival and spatial learning deficits in the adult rat. We suggest that CREB changes play an important role in the neurocognitive morbidity of SDB patients.

  6. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase in quercetin-induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jie; Niu, Guomin; Yin, Songmei; Xie, Shuangfeng; Li, Yiqing; Nie, Danian; Ma, Liping; Wang, Xiuju; Wu, Yudan

    2014-05-01

    Our previous studies have shown that quercetin inhibits Cox-2 and Bcl-2 expressions, and induces human leukemia HL-60 cell apoptosis. In order to investigate the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) on quercetin-induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells, we used flow cytometry to detect cell apoptosis. The expressions of LKB1, phosphorylated AMPK (p-AMPK), and Cox-2 protein were detected in HL-60 cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by western blot. The expressions of LKB1, p-AMPK, and Cox-2 were detected in HL-60 cells after culture with quercetin. The expressions of p-AMPK were detected in HL-60 cells after culture with AMPK inhibitor Compound C. Then, the expressions of LKB1, p-AMPK, and Cox-2 were detected in HL-60 cells after culture with quercetin alone or quercetin + Compound C. It was found that there was no significant difference in LKB1 between PBMCs and HL-60. p-AMPK in PBMCs was higher than that in HL-60, while Cox-2 was lower. After culture of HL-60 with quercetin, p-AMPK was increased, Cox-2 was decreased, but LKB1 remained unchanged. After culture of HL-60 with Compound C, p-AMPK was decreased. There was no significant difference in LKB1 between the quercetin-alone and the quercetin + Compound C groups. p-AMPK decreased more significantly, while Cox-2 increased more significantly in the quercetin + Compound C groups than those in the quercetin-alone groups. Taken together, these findings suggested that quercetin activates AMPK expression in HL-60 cells independent of LKB1 activation, inhibits Cox-2 expression by activating AMPK, and further regulates the Bcl-2-dependent pathways of apoptosis to exert its anti-leukemia effect.

  7. Chrysophanic Acid Suppresses Adipogenesis and Induces Thermogenesis by Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Alpha In vivo and In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hara; Park, Jinbong; Kim, Hye-Lin; Kang, JongWook; Jeong, Mi-Young; Youn, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Yunu; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kim, Su-Jin; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Hong, Seung-Heon; Um, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Chrysophanic acid (CA) is a member of the anthraquinone family abundant in rhubarb, a widely used herb for obesity treatment in Traditional Korean Medicine. Though several studies have indicated numerous features of CA, no study has yet reported the effect of CA on obesity. In this study, we tried to identify the anti-obesity effects of CA. By using 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary cultured brown adipocytes as in vitro models, high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice, and zebrafish as in vivo models, we determined the anti-obesity effects of CA. CA reduced weight gain in HFD-induced obese mice. They also decreased lipid accumulation and the expressions of adipogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In addition, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α), the brown fat specific thermogenic genes, were up-regulated in brown adipocytes by CA treatment. Furthermore, when co-treated with Compound C, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, the action of CA on AMPKα was nullified in both types of adipocytes, indicating the multi-controlling effect of CA was partially via the AMPKα pathway. Given all together, these results indicate that CA can ameliorate obesity by controlling the adipogenic and thermogenic pathway at the same time. On these bases, we suggest the new potential of CA as an anti-obese pharmacotherapy. PMID:28008317

  8. Chrysophanic Acid Suppresses Adipogenesis and Induces Thermogenesis by Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Alpha In vivo and In vitro.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hara; Park, Jinbong; Kim, Hye-Lin; Kang, JongWook; Jeong, Mi-Young; Youn, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Yunu; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kim, Su-Jin; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Hong, Seung-Heon; Um, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Chrysophanic acid (CA) is a member of the anthraquinone family abundant in rhubarb, a widely used herb for obesity treatment in Traditional Korean Medicine. Though several studies have indicated numerous features of CA, no study has yet reported the effect of CA on obesity. In this study, we tried to identify the anti-obesity effects of CA. By using 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary cultured brown adipocytes as in vitro models, high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice, and zebrafish as in vivo models, we determined the anti-obesity effects of CA. CA reduced weight gain in HFD-induced obese mice. They also decreased lipid accumulation and the expressions of adipogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In addition, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α), the brown fat specific thermogenic genes, were up-regulated in brown adipocytes by CA treatment. Furthermore, when co-treated with Compound C, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, the action of CA on AMPKα was nullified in both types of adipocytes, indicating the multi-controlling effect of CA was partially via the AMPKα pathway. Given all together, these results indicate that CA can ameliorate obesity by controlling the adipogenic and thermogenic pathway at the same time. On these bases, we suggest the new potential of CA as an anti-obese pharmacotherapy.

  9. The Med1 Subunit of the Mediator Complex Induces Liver Cell Proliferation and Is Phosphorylated by AMP Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Viswakarma, Navin; Jia, Yuzhi; Bai, Liang; Gao, Qian; Lin, Bingliang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Misra, Parimal; Rana, Ajay; Jain, Sanjay; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Zhu, Yi-Jun; Thimmapaya, Bayar; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2013-01-01

    Mediator, a large multisubunit protein complex, plays a pivotal role in gene transcription by linking gene-specific transcription factors with the preinitiation complex and RNA polymerase II. In the liver, the key subunit of the Mediator complex, Med1, interacts with several nuclear receptors and transcription factors to direct gene-specific transcription. Conditional knock-out of Med1 in the liver showed that hepatocytes lacking Med1 did not regenerate following either partial hepatectomy or treatment with certain nuclear receptor activators and failed to give rise to tumors when challenged with carcinogens. We now report that the adenovirally driven overexpression of Med1 in mouse liver stimulates hepatocyte DNA synthesis with enhanced expression of DNA replication, cell cycle control, and liver-specific genes, indicating that Med1 alone is necessary and sufficient for liver cell proliferation. Importantly, we demonstrate that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important cellular energy sensor, interacts with, and directly phosphorylates, Med1 in vitro at serine 656, serine 756, and serine 796. AMPK also phosphorylates Med1 in vivo in mouse liver and in cultured primary hepatocytes and HEK293 and HeLa cells. In addition, we demonstrate that PPARα activators increase AMPK-mediated Med1 phosphorylation in vivo. Inhibition of AMPK by compound C decreased hepatocyte proliferation induced by Med1 and also by the PPARα activators fenofibrate and Wy-14,643. Co-treatment with compound C attenuated PPARα activator-inducible fatty acid β-oxidation in liver. Our results suggest that Med1 phosphorylation by its association with AMPK regulates liver cell proliferation and fatty acid oxidation, most likely as a downstream effector of PPARα and AMPK. PMID:23943624

  10. The effects of forskolin and rolipram on cAMP, cGMP and free fatty acid levels in diet induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Doseyici, S; Mehmetoglu, I; Toker, A; Yerlikaya, F H; Erbay, E

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is a major health problem. We investigated the effects of forskolin and rolipram in the diet of animals in which obesity had been induced. We used 50 female albino Wistar rats that were assigned randomly into five groups as follows: group 1, control; group 2, high fat diet; group 3, high fat diet + forskolin; group 4, high fat diet + rolipram; and group 5, high fat diet + rolipram + forskolin. The rats were fed for 10 weeks and rolipram and forskolin were administered during last two weeks. The animals were sacrificed and blood samples were obtained. Serum cAMP, cGMP and free fatty acids (FFA) levels were measured using ELISA assays. We also measured weight gain during the 10 week period. cAMP and FFA levels of groups 3, 4 and 5 were significantly higher than those of groups 1 and 2. We found no significant differences in serum cGMP levels among the groups. The weight gain in groups 3, 4 and 5 was significantly less than for group 2. We also found that the weight gain in group 5 was significantly less than in groups 3 and 4. We found that both forskolin and rolipram stimulated lipolysis and inhibited body weight increase by increasing cAMP levels. Also, combination therapy using the two agents may be more effective in preventing diet induced obesity than either agent alone. We found also that these agents did not effect cellular cGMP levels in diet induced obesity.

  11. Role of LRP1 and ERK and cAMP Signaling Pathways in Lactoferrin-Induced Lipolysis in Mature Rat Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ikoma-Seki, Keiko; Nakamura, Kanae; Morishita, Satoru; Ono, Tomoji; Sugiyama, Keikichi; Nishino, Hoyoku; Hirano, Hisashi; Murakoshi, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a multifunctional glycoprotein present in milk. A clinical study showed that enteric-coated bovine LF tablets decrease visceral fat accumulation. Furthermore, animal studies revealed that ingested LF is partially delivered to mesenteric fat, and in vitro studies showed that LF promotes lipolysis in mature adipocytes. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism underlying the induction of lipolysis in mature adipocytes that is induced by LF. To address this question, we used proteomics techniques to analyze protein expression profiles. Mature adipocytes from primary cultures of rat mesenteric fat were collected at various times after exposure to LF. Proteomic analysis revealed that the expression levels of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis, were upregulated and that HSL was activated by protein kinase A within 15 min after the cells were treated with LF. We previously reported that LF increases the intracellular concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), suggesting that LF activates the cAMP signaling pathway. In this study, we show that the expression level and the activity of the components of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway were upregulated. Moreover, LF increased the activity of the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), which acts downstream in the cAMP and ERK signaling pathways and regulates the expression levels of adenylyl cyclase and HSL. Moreover, silencing of the putative LF receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) attenuated lipolysis in LF-treated adipocytes. These results suggest that LF promoted lipolysis in mature adipocytes by regulating the expression levels of proteins involved in lipolysis through controlling the activity of cAMP/ERK signaling pathways via LRP1. PMID:26506094

  12. Role of LRP1 and ERK and cAMP Signaling Pathways in Lactoferrin-Induced Lipolysis in Mature Rat Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ikoma-Seki, Keiko; Nakamura, Kanae; Morishita, Satoru; Ono, Tomoji; Sugiyama, Keikichi; Nishino, Hoyoku; Hirano, Hisashi; Murakoshi, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a multifunctional glycoprotein present in milk. A clinical study showed that enteric-coated bovine LF tablets decrease visceral fat accumulation. Furthermore, animal studies revealed that ingested LF is partially delivered to mesenteric fat, and in vitro studies showed that LF promotes lipolysis in mature adipocytes. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism underlying the induction of lipolysis in mature adipocytes that is induced by LF. To address this question, we used proteomics techniques to analyze protein expression profiles. Mature adipocytes from primary cultures of rat mesenteric fat were collected at various times after exposure to LF. Proteomic analysis revealed that the expression levels of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis, were upregulated and that HSL was activated by protein kinase A within 15 min after the cells were treated with LF. We previously reported that LF increases the intracellular concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), suggesting that LF activates the cAMP signaling pathway. In this study, we show that the expression level and the activity of the components of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway were upregulated. Moreover, LF increased the activity of the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), which acts downstream in the cAMP and ERK signaling pathways and regulates the expression levels of adenylyl cyclase and HSL. Moreover, silencing of the putative LF receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) attenuated lipolysis in LF-treated adipocytes. These results suggest that LF promoted lipolysis in mature adipocytes by regulating the expression levels of proteins involved in lipolysis through controlling the activity of cAMP/ERK signaling pathways via LRP1.

  13. Vasopressin induces dopamine release and cyclic AMP efflux from the brain of water-deprived rats: inhibitory effect of vasopressin V2 receptor-mediated phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, M G; Handa, R K; Stephen, P M; Bapna, J S

    1998-01-01

    The neurohypophyseal hormone vasopressin (AVP) is widely distributed throughout the central nervous system. It acts as an excitatory transmitter in the CNS and plays an important physiological role in water and electrolyte homeostasis. However, water deprivation has been shown to induce changes in the levels of monoamines, but there is little knowledge about the influence of AVP on monoamine levels after water deprivation. In this study, we investigated the effect of AVP and its receptor antagonists on alterations in dopamine (DA) release and cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP) efflux from rat brain slices following water deprivation. Striatal brain slices (500 microm thick) were incubated in a medium with or without AVP (0. 1-1.0 microM) for 30 min. After 2 h of washout in normal medium, high KCl (40 mM)-evoked DA release and cAMP efflux from the rat brain slices were examined. In the brain slices of euhydrated animals, treatment with AVP slightly altered DA release and cAMP efflux from the brain. This increase in DA release and cAMP efflux was not significantly affected by the addition of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, calcineurin (20 microM), to the incubation medium or either by a V1 or V2 AVP receptor antagonist. In contrast, AVP significantly increased the DA release and enhanced the cAMP efflux from the brain slices of water-deprived animals. The AVP-induced increase of brain response in the water-deprived animals was significantly attenuated by a V2 receptor antagonist, partially by calcineurin, but not by a V1 receptor antagonist. The present results suggest that AVP may play a role in water-deprivation-induced DA release and cAMP efflux, which is possibly mediated through the activation of the V2 receptor. The V2 receptor action is attenuated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent dephosphorlyation of some cellular proteins critical for signal transduction.

  14. The progestin levonorgestrel induces endothelium-independent relaxation of rabbit jugular vein via inhibition of calcium entry and protein kinase C: role of cyclic AMP

    PubMed Central

    Herkert, Olaf; Kuhl, Herbert; Busse, Rudi; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2000-01-01

    The progestin and oestrogen component of oral contraceptives have been involved in the development of venous thromboembolic events in women. In the present study we determined the vasoactive effects of sex steroids used in oral contraceptives in isolated preconstricted rabbit jugular veins in the presence of diclofenac and examined the underlying mechanisms.The natural hormone progesterone, the synthetic progestins levonorgestrel, 3-keto-desogestrel, gestodene and chlormadinone acetate, and the synthetic estrogen 17 α-ethinyloestradiol induced concentration-dependent relaxations of endothelium-intact veins constricted with U46619. Levonorgestrel also inhibited constrictions evoked by either a high potassium (K+) solution or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in the absence and presence of extracellular calcium (Ca2+). In addition, levonorgestrel depressed contractions evoked by Ca2+ and reduced 45Ca2+ influx in depolarized veins.Relaxations to levonorgestrel in U46619-constricted veins were neither affected by the presence of the endothelium nor by the inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, NS2028, but were significantly improved either by the selective cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram or in the absence of diclofenac, and decreased by the protein kinase A inhibitor, Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. Rolipram also potentiated relaxations to levonorgestrel in PMA-constricted veins in the presence, but not in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Levonorgestrel increased levels of cyclic AMP and inhibited PMA-induced activation of protein kinase C in veins.These findings indicate that levonorgestrel caused endothelium-independent relaxations of jugular veins via inhibition of Ca2+ entry and of protein kinase C activation. In addition, the cyclic AMP effector pathway contributes to the levonorgestrel-induced relaxation possibly by depressing Ca2+ entry. PMID:10952682

  15. AMP-activated protein kinase controls exercise training- and AICAR-induced increases in SIRT3 and MnSOD

    PubMed Central

    Brandauer, Josef; Andersen, Marianne A.; Kellezi, Holti; Risis, Steve; Frøsig, Christian; Vienberg, Sara G.; Treebak, Jonas T.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial protein deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT) 3 may mediate exercise training-induced increases in mitochondrial biogenesis and improvements in reactive oxygen species (ROS) handling. We determined the requirement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) for exercise training-induced increases in skeletal muscle abundance of SIRT3 and other mitochondrial proteins. Exercise training for 6.5 weeks increased SIRT3 (p < 0.01) and superoxide dismutase 2 (MnSOD; p < 0.05) protein abundance in quadriceps muscle of wild-type (WT; n = 13–15), but not AMPK α2 kinase dead (KD; n = 12–13) mice. We also observed a strong trend for increased MnSOD abundance in exercise-trained skeletal muscle of healthy humans (p = 0.051; n = 6). To further elucidate a role for AMPK in mediating these effects, we treated WT (n = 7–8) and AMPK α2 KD (n = 7–9) mice with 5-amino-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR). Four weeks of daily AICAR injections (500 mg/kg) resulted in AMPK-dependent increases in SIRT3 (p < 0.05) and MnSOD (p < 0.01) in WT, but not AMPK α2 KD mice. We also tested the effect of repeated AICAR treatment on mitochondrial protein levels in mice lacking the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α KO; n = 9–10). Skeletal muscle SIRT3 and MnSOD protein abundance was reduced in sedentary PGC-1α KO mice (p < 0.01) and AICAR-induced increases in SIRT3 and MnSOD protein abundance was only observed in WT mice (p < 0.05). Finally, the acetylation status of SIRT3 target lysine residues on MnSOD (K122) or oligomycin-sensitivity conferring protein (OSCP; K139) was not altered in either mouse or human skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise. We propose an important role for AMPK in regulating mitochondrial function and ROS handling in skeletal muscle in response to exercise training. PMID:25852572

  16. Characterization of a DNA-damage-recognition protein from F9 teratocarcinoma cells, which is inducible by retinoic acid and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Chao, C C; Sun, N K; Lin-Chao, S

    1993-02-15

    A nuclear protein that recognizes u.v.-damaged DNA was detected in extracts from murine F9 embryonic stem cells using a DNA-binding assay. The nuclear-protein-binding activity was increased in cells after treatment with retinoic acid/dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP), with optimum induction at 6 days. In vitro treatment of nuclear extracts with agents that affect protein conformation (such as urea, Nonidet P40 and Ca2+) slightly modulated the damage-recognition activity. Furthermore, treatment of nuclear extracts with phosphatase dramatically inhibited the binding activity. In addition, damaged-DNA recognition of the nuclear extracts was effectively inhibited by damaged double- and single-stranded DNA. The expression of the nuclear protein with similar characteristics was abundant in HeLa cells and was increased in drug- or u.v.-resistant cells. The findings suggest that the recognition of a u.v.-DNA adduct is modulated, at least in part, by an activity that is induced during retinoic acid/dbcAMP-induced differentiation. These results also imply that the identified damage-recognition protein may be important for the sensitivity or resistance of mammalian cells to DNA damage.

  17. Expression of orphan G-protein coupled receptor GPR174 in CHO cells induced morphological changes and proliferation delay via increasing intracellular cAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Sugita, Kazuya; Yamamura, Chiaki; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Fujita, Norihisa

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of GPR174 in CHO cells induces morphological changes and proliferation delay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These are due to increase in intracellular cAMP concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lysophosphatidylserine was identified to stimulate GPR174 leading to activate ACase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potencies of fatty acid moiety on LysoPS were oleoyl Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To stearoyl > palmitoyl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose that GPR174 is a lysophosphatidylserine receptor. -- Abstract: We established cell lines that stably express orphan GPCR GPR174 using CHO cells, and studied physiological and pharmacological features of the receptor. GPR174-expressing cells showed cell-cell adhesion with localization of actin filaments to cell membrane, and revealed significant delay of cell proliferation. Since the morphological changes of GPR174-cells were very similar to mock CHO cells treated with cholera toxin, we measured the concentration of intracellular cAMP. The results showed the concentration was significantly elevated in GPR174-cells. By measuring intracellular cAMP concentration in GPR174-cells, we screened lipids and nucleotides to identify ligands for GPR174. We found that lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) stimulated increase in intracellular cAMP in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, phosphorylation of Erk was elevated by LysoPS in GPR174 cells. These LysoPS responses were inhibited by NF449, an inhibitor of G{alpha}{sub s} protein. These results suggested that GPR174 was a putative LysoPS receptor conjugating with G{alpha}{sub s}, and its expression induced morphological changes in CHO cells by constitutively activating adenylyl cycles accompanied with cell conjunctions and delay of proliferation.

  18. S-Adenosylmethionine Decreases Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Phosphodiesterase 4B2 and Attenuates Tumor Necrosis Factor Expression via cAMP/Protein Kinase A PathwayS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gobejishvili, Leila; Avila, Diana V.; Barker, David F.; Ghare, Smita; Henderson, David; Brock, Guy N.; Kirpich, Irina A.; Joshi-Barve, Swati; Mokshagundam, Sri Prakash L.; McClain, Craig J.

    2011-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) treatment has anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective effects against endotoxin-induced organ injury. An important component of the anti-inflammatory action of SAM involves down-regulation of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcriptional induction of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) expression by monocytes/macrophages. We examined the effect of SAM on expression and activity of LPS-induced up-regulation of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4), which regulates cellular cAMP levels and TNF expression. LPS treatment of RAW 264.7, a mouse macrophage cell line, led to the induction of Pde4b2 mRNA expression with no effect on Pde4a or Pde4d. SAM pretreatment led to a significant decrease in LPS-induced up-regulation of Pde4b2 expression in both RAW 264.7 cells and primary human CD14+ monocytes. Of note, the decreased Pde4b2 mRNA expression correlated with the SAM-dependent increase in the transcriptionally repressive histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation on the Pde4b2 intronic promoter region. The SAM-mediated decrease in LPS-inducible Pde4b2 up-regulation resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels and activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), which plays an inhibitory role in LPS-induced TNF production. In addition, SAM did not affect LPS-inducible inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB degradation or nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-p65 translocation into the nucleus but rather inhibited NF-κB transcriptional activity. These results demonstrate for the first time that inhibition of LPS-induced PDE4B2 up-regulation and increased cAMP-dependent PKA activation are significant mechanisms contributing to the anti-TNF effect of SAM. Moreover, these data also suggest that SAM may be used as an effective PDE4B inhibitor in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders in which TNF expression plays a significant pathogenic role. PMID:21266552

  19. The cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting Epac1-mediated proteasomal degradation of XRCC1 protein in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eun-Ah; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits DNA damage repair by decreasing XRCC1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system decreases XRCC1 expression by promoting its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The promotion of XRCC1 degradation by cAMP signaling system is mediated by Epac1. -- Abstract: Cyclic AMP is involved in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cellular growth and proliferation. Recently, the cAMP signaling system was found to modulate DNA-damaging agent-induced apoptosis by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibitors of apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the cAMP signaling may modulate DNA repair activity, and we investigated the effects of the cAMP signaling system on {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage repair in lung cancer cells. Transient expression of a constitutively active mutant of stimulatory G protein (G{alpha}sQL) or treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, augmented radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibited repair of the damage in H1299 lung cancer cells. Expression of G{alpha}sQL or treatment with forskolin or isoproterenol inhibited the radiation-induced expression of the XRCC1 protein, and exogenous expression of XRCC1 abolished the DNA repair-inhibiting effect of forskolin. Forskolin treatment promoted the ubiquitin and proteasome-dependent degradation of the XRCC1 protein, resulting in a significant decrease in the half-life of the protein after {gamma}-ray irradiation. The effect of forskolin on XRCC1 expression was not inhibited by PKA inhibitor, but 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analog, increased ubiquitination of XRCC1 protein and decreased XRCC1 expression. Knockdown of Epac1 abolished the effect of 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP and restored XRCC1 protein level following {gamma}-ray irradiation. From

  20. Signaling transcript profile of the asexual intraerythrocytic development cycle of Plasmodium falciparum induced by melatonin and cAMP

    PubMed Central

    Rozanski, Andrei; Parreira, Kleber S.; Moraes, Miriam S.; Martins, David C.; Hashimoto, Ronaldo F.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Garcia, Célia R.S.

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Plasmodium falciparum is the deadliest parasite among all species. This parasite possesses the ability to sense molecules, including melatonin (MEL) and cAMP, and modulate its cell cycle accordingly. MEL synchronizes the development of this malaria parasite by activating several cascades, including the generation of the second messenger cAMP. Therefore, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis in P. falciparum erythrocytic stages (ring, trophozoite and schizont) treated with MEL and cAMP. To investigate the expression profile of P. falciparum genes regulated by MEL and cAMP, we performed RNA-Seq analysis in three P. falciparum strains (control, 3D7; protein kinase 7 knockout, PfPK7-; and PfPK7 complement, PfPK7C). In the 3D7 strain, 38 genes were differentially expressed upon MEL treatment; however, none of the genes in the trophozoite (T) stage PfPK7- knockout parasites were differentially expressed upon MEL treatment for 5 hours compared to untreated controls, suggesting that PfPK7 may be involved in the signaling leading to differential gene expression. Moreover, we found that MEL modified the mRNA expression of genes encoding membrane proteins, zinc ion-binding proteins and nucleic acid-binding proteins, which might influence numerous functions in the parasite. The RNA-Seq data following treatment with cAMP show that this molecule modulates different genes throughout the intraerythrocytic cycle, namely, 75, 101 and 141 genes, respectively, in the ring (R), T and schizont (S) stages. Our results highlight P. falciparum's perception of the external milieu through the signaling molecules MEL and cAMP, which are able to drive to changes in gene expression in the parasite. PMID:28050233

  1. Ferulic acid prevents LPS-induced up-regulation of PDE4B and stimulates the cAMP/CREB signaling pathway in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Hong, Qian; Tan, Hong-ling; Xiao, Cheng-rong; Gao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) isozymes are involved in different functions, depending on their patterns of distribution in the brain. The PDE4 subtypes are distributed in different inflammatory cells, and appear to be important regulators of inflammatory processes. In this study we examined the effects of ferulic acid (FA), a plant component with strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced up-regulation of phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) in PC12 cells, which in turn regulated cellular cAMP levels and the cAMP/cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) pathway in the cells. Methods: PC12 cells were treated with LPS (1 μg/mL) for 8 h, and the changes of F-actin were detected using laser scanning confocal microscopy. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured suing ELISA kits, and PDE4B-specific enzymatic activity was assessed with a PDE4B assay kit. The mRNA levels of PDE4B were analyzed with Q-PCR, and the protein levels of CREB and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were determined using immunoblotting. Furthermore, molecular docking was used to identify the interaction between PDE4B2 and FA. Results: Treatment of PC12 cells with LPS induced thick bundles of actin filaments appearing in the F-actin cytoskeleton, which were ameliorated by pretreatment with FA (10–40 μmol/L) or with a PDE4B inhibitor rolipram (30 μmol/L). Pretreatment with FA dose-dependently inhibited the LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β in PC12 cells. Furthermore, pretreatment with FA dose-dependently attenuated the LPS-induced up-regulation of PDE4 activity in PC12 cells. Moreover, pretreatment with FA decreased LPS-induced up-regulation of the PDE4B mRNA, and reversed LPS-induced down-regulation of CREB and pCREB in PC12 cells. The molecular docking results revealed electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between FA and PDE4B2. Conclusion: The beneficial effects of FA in PC12 cells might be conferred through inhibition of LPS-induced

  2. Activation of the cAMP transduction cascade contributes to the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Sluka, K A

    1997-11-01

    1. The spinal role of the cAMP transduction cascade in nociceptive processing was investigated in awake behaving rats (male, Sprague-Dawley) by activating or inhibiting this pathway spinally. Microdialysis fibres were implanted into the dorsal horn to infuse drugs directly to the spinal cord. 2. Animals, without peripheral tissue injury, were tested for responses to repeated applications (10 trials) of von Frey filaments and threshold to mechanical stimulation before and after infusion of 8-bromo-cAMP. In this group of animals treated spinally with 8-br-cAMP (1-10 mM) a dose-dependent hyperalgesia and allodynia were produced. This was manifested as an increased number of responses to 10 trials of von Frey filaments (10, 50, 150, 250 mN) and a decrease in mechanical threshold. 3. A second series of experiments studied the manipulation of the cAMP pathway spinally in a model of tissue injury induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin. Animals were either pre- or post-treated spinally with the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, tetrahydrofuryl adenine (THFA) or the protein kinase A inhibitor, myrosilated protein kinase (14-22) amide (PKI). Injection of capsaicin resulted in an increased number of responses to repeated applications of von Frey filaments and a decrease in threshold to mechanical stimuli outside the site of injection, secondary mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia. 4. Pre-treatment with either THFA (1 mM) or PKI (5 mM) had no effect on the capsaicin-evoked secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia. 5. In contrast, post-treatment spinally with THFA (0.01-1 mM) or PKI (0.05-50 mM) dose-dependently reduced the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia produced by capsaicin injection. Furthermore, the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia blocked by the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, THFA (1 mM), was reversed by infusion of 8-bromo-cAMP (0.01-10 mM) in a dose-dependent manner. 6. Thus, this study demonstrates that activation of the cAMP transduction cascade at the spinal

  3. Role of Calmodulin-Calmodulin Kinase II, cAMP/Protein Kinase A and ERK 1/2 on Aeromonas hydrophila-Induced Apoptosis of Head Kidney Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Chaitali; Khatri, Preeti; Raman, Rajagopal; Bhatia, Himanshi; Datta, Malabika; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2014-01-01

    The role of calcium (Ca2+) and its dependent protease calpain in Aeromonas hydrophila-induced head kidney macrophage (HKM) apoptosis has been reported. Here, we report the pro-apoptotic involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin kinase II gamma (CaMKIIg) in the process. We observed significant increase in CaM levels in A. hydrophila-infected HKM and the inhibitory role of BAPTA/AM, EGTA, nifedipine and verapamil suggested CaM elevation to be Ca2+-dependent. Our studies with CaM-specific siRNA and the CaM inhibitor calmidazolium chloride demonstrated CaM to be pro-apoptotic that initiated the downstream expression of CaMKIIg. Using the CaMKIIg-targeted siRNA, specific inhibitor KN-93 and its inactive structural analogue KN-92 we report CaM-CaMKIIg signalling to be critical for apoptosis of A. hydrophila-infected HKM. Inhibitor studies further suggested the role of calpain-2 in CaMKIIg expression. CaMK Kinase (CaMKK), the other CaM dependent kinase exhibited no role in A. hydrophila-induced HKM apoptosis. We report increased production of intracellular cAMP in infected HKM and our results with KN-93 or KN-92 implicate the role of CaMKIIg in cAMP production. Using siRNA to PKACA, the catalytic subunit of PKA, anti-PKACA antibody and H-89, the specific inhibitor for PKA we prove the pro-apoptotic involvement of cAMP/PKA pathway in the pathogenicity of A. hydrophila. Our inhibitor studies coupled with siRNA approach further implicated the role of cAMP/PKA in activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK 1/2). We conclude that the alteration in intracellular Ca2+ levels initiated by A. hydrophila activates CaM and calpain-2; both pathways converge on CaMKIIg which in turn induces cAMP/PKA mediated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation leading to caspase-3 mediated apoptosis of infected HKM. PMID:24763432

  4. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) induces vascular relaxation by activating Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels in rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Owain Llŷr; Kamishima, Tomoko; Barrett-Jolley, Richard; Quayle, John M; Dart, Caroline

    2013-10-15

    Vasodilator-induced elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a central mechanism governing arterial relaxation but is incompletely understood due to the diversity of cAMP effectors. Here we investigate the role of the novel cAMP effector exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) in mediating vasorelaxation in rat mesenteric arteries. In myography experiments, the Epac-selective cAMP analogue 8-pCPT-2-O-Me-cAMP-AM (5 μM, subsequently referred to as 8-pCPT-AM) elicited a 77.6 ± 7.1% relaxation of phenylephrine-contracted arteries over a 5 min period (mean ± SEM; n = 6). 8-pCPT-AM induced only a 16.7 ± 2.4% relaxation in arteries pre-contracted with high extracellular K(+) over the same time period (n = 10), suggesting that some of Epac's relaxant effect relies upon vascular cell hyperpolarization. This involves Ca(2+)-sensitive, large-conductance K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel opening as iberiotoxin (100 nM) significantly reduced the ability of 8-pCPT-AM to reverse phenylephrine-induced contraction (arteries relaxed by only 35.0 ± 8.5% over a 5 min exposure to 8-pCPT-AM, n = 5; P < 0.05). 8-pCPT-AM increased Ca(2+) spark frequency in Fluo-4-AM-loaded mesenteric myocytes from 0.045 ± 0.008 to 0.103 ± 0.022 sparks s(-1) μm(-1) (P < 0.05) and reversibly increased both the frequency (0.94 ± 0.25 to 2.30 ± 0.72 s(-1)) and amplitude (23.9 ± 3.3 to 35.8 ± 7.7 pA) of spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) recorded in isolated mesenteric myocytes (n = 7; P < 0.05). 8-pCPT-AM-activated STOCs were sensitive to iberiotoxin (100 nM) and to ryanodine (30 μM). Current clamp recordings of isolated myocytes showed a 7.9 ± 1.0 mV (n = 10) hyperpolarization in response to 8-pCPT-AM that was sensitive to iberiotoxin (n = 5). Endothelial disruption suppressed 8-pCPT-AM-mediated relaxation in phenylephrine-contracted arteries (24.8 ± 4.9% relaxation after 5 min of exposure, n = 5; P < 0.05), as did apamin and TRAM-34, blockers of Ca(2+)-sensitive, small- and

  5. The V-ATPase is expressed in the choroid plexus and mediates cAMP-induced intracellular pH alterations.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Henriette L; Păunescu, Teodor G; Matchkov, Vladimir; Barbuskaite, Dagne; Brown, Dennis; Damkier, Helle H; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2017-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pH influences brain interstitial pH and, therefore, brain function. We hypothesized that the choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) expresses the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) as an acid extrusion mechanism in the luminal membrane to counteract detrimental elevations in CSF pH. The expression of mRNA corresponding to several V-ATPase subunits was demonstrated by RT-PCR analysis of CPE cells (CPECs) isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy localized the V-ATPase primarily in intracellular vesicles with only a minor fraction in the luminal microvillus area. The vesicles did not translocate to the luminal membrane in two in vivo models of hypocapnia-induced alkalosis. The Na(+)-independent intracellular pH (pHi) recovery from acidification was studied in freshly isolated clusters of CPECs. At extracellular pH (pHo) 7.4, the cells failed to display significant concanamycin A-sensitive pHi recovery (i.e., V-ATPase activity). The recovery rate in the absence of Na(+) amounted to <10% of the pHi recovery rate observed in the presence of Na(+) Recovery of pHi was faster at pHo 7.8 and was abolished at pHo 7.0. The concanamycin A-sensitive pHi recovery was stimulated by cAMP at pH 7.4 in vitro, but intraventricular infusion of the membrane-permeant cAMP analog 8-CPT-cAMP did not result in trafficking of the V-ATPase. In conclusion, we find evidence for the expression of a minor fraction of V-ATPase in the luminal membrane of CPECs. This fraction does not contribute to enhanced acid extrusion at high extracellular pH, but seems to be activated by cAMP in a trafficking-independent manner.

  6. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase by Adenine Alleviates TNF-Alpha-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Jang, Hyun-Hwa; Chen, Chin-Chen; Nong, Jing-Yi; Chen, Po-Ku; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Kao, Shao-Hsuan; Liang, Yao-Jen; Chen, Han-Min

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling system plays a key role in cellular stress by repressing the inflammatory responses induced by the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) system. Previous studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory role of AMPK involves activation by adenine, but the mechanism that allows adenine to produce these effects has not yet been elucidated. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adenine was observed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK in both a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as its downstream target acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC). Adenine also attenuated NF-κB targeting of gene expression in a dose-dependent manner and decreased monocyte adhesion to HUVECs following tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) treatment. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AMPK α1 in HUVECs attenuated the adenine-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α, thereby suggesting that the anti-inflammatory role of adenine is mediated by AMPK. Following the knockdown of adenosyl phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) in HUVECs, adenine supplementation failed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Similarly, the expression of a shRNA against APRT nullified the anti-inflammatory effects of adenine in HUVECs. These results suggested that the role of adenine as an AMPK activator is related to catabolism by APRT, which increases the cellular AMP levels to activate AMPK. PMID:26544976

  7. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase by Adenine Alleviates TNF-Alpha-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Fang; Young, Guang-Huar; Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Jang, Hyun-Hwa; Chen, Chin-Chen; Nong, Jing-Yi; Chen, Po-Ku; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Kao, Shao-Hsuan; Liang, Yao-Jen; Chen, Han-Min

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling system plays a key role in cellular stress by repressing the inflammatory responses induced by the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) system. Previous studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory role of AMPK involves activation by adenine, but the mechanism that allows adenine to produce these effects has not yet been elucidated. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adenine was observed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK in both a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as its downstream target acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC). Adenine also attenuated NF-κB targeting of gene expression in a dose-dependent manner and decreased monocyte adhesion to HUVECs following tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) treatment. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AMPK α1 in HUVECs attenuated the adenine-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α, thereby suggesting that the anti-inflammatory role of adenine is mediated by AMPK. Following the knockdown of adenosyl phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) in HUVECs, adenine supplementation failed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Similarly, the expression of a shRNA against APRT nullified the anti-inflammatory effects of adenine in HUVECs. These results suggested that the role of adenine as an AMPK activator is related to catabolism by APRT, which increases the cellular AMP levels to activate AMPK.

  8. cAMP and in vivo hypoxia induce tob, ifr1, and fos expression in erythroid cells of the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stefanie; Offenhäuser, Nina; Baumann, Rosemarie

    2002-04-01

    During avian embryonic development, terminal erythroid differentiation occurs in the circulation. Some of the key events, such as the induction of erythroid 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG), carbonic anhydrase (CAII), and pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase (P5N) synthesis are oxygen dependent (Baumann R, Haller EA, Schöning U, and Weber M, Dev Biol 116: 548-551, 1986; Dragon S and Baumann R, Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 280: R870-R878, 2001; Dragon S, Carey C, Martin K, and Baumann R, J Exp Biol 202: 2787-2795, 1999; Dragon S, Glombitza S, Götz R, and Baumann R, Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 271: R982-R989, 1996; Dragon S, Hille R, Götz R, and Baumann R, Blood 91: 3052-3058, 1998; Million D, Zillner P, and Baumann R, Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 261: R1188-R1196, 1991) in an indirect way: hypoxia stimulates the release of norepinephrine (NE)/adenosine into the circulation (Dragon et al., J Exp Biol 202: 2787-2795, 1999; Dragon et al., Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 271: R982-R989, 1996). This leads via erythroid beta-adrenergic/adenosine A(2) receptor activation to a cAMP signal inducing several proteins in a transcription-dependent manner (Dragon et al., Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 271: R982-R989, 1996; Dragon et al., Blood 91: 3052-3058, 1998; Glombitza S, Dragon S, Berghammer M, Pannermayr M, and Baumann R, Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 271: R973-R981, 1996). To understand how the cAMP-dependent processes are initiated, we screened an erythroid cDNA library for cAMP-regulated genes. We detected three genes that were strongly upregulated (>5-fold) by cAMP in definitive and primitive red blood cells. They are homologous to the mammalian Tob, Ifr1, and Fos proteins. In addition, the genes are induced in the intact embryo during short-term hypoxia. Because the genes are regulators of proliferation and differentiation in other cell types, we suggest that cAMP

  9. Spinal Glia Division Contributes to Conditioning Lesion-Induced Axon Regeneration Into the Injured Spinal Cord: Potential Role of Cyclic AMP-Induced Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaqing; Angert, Mila; Nishihara, Tasuku; Shubayev, Igor; Dolkas, Jennifer; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2015-06-01

    Regeneration of sensory neurons after spinal cord injury depends on the function of dividing neuronal-glial antigen 2 (NG2)-expressing cells. We have shown that increases in the number of dividing NG2-positive cells through short-term pharmacologic inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases contributes to recovery after spinal cord injury. A conditioning sciatic nerve crush (SNC) preceding spinal cord injury stimulates central sensory axon regeneration via the intraganglionic action of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Here, using bromodeoxyuridine, mitomycin (mitosis inhibitor), and cholera toxin B tracer, we demonstrate that SNC-induced division of spinal glia is related to the spinal induction of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and contributes to central sensory axon growth into the damaged spinal cord. Dividing cells were mainly NG2-positive and Iba1-positive and included myeloid NG2-positive populations. The cells dividing in response to SNC mainly matured into oligodendrocytes and microglia within the injured spinal cord. Some postmitotic cells remained NG2-reactive and were associated with regenerating fibers. Moreover, intraganglionic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 expression was induced after administration of SNC or cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog (dbcAMP) to dorsal root ganglia in vivo and in primary adult dorsal root ganglia cultures. Collectively, these findings support a novel model whereby a cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated regeneration program induced in sensory neurons by a conditioning peripheral nerve lesion uses tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 to protect against short-term proteolysis, enabling glial cell division and promoting axon growth into the damaged CNS.

  10. Involvement of cAMP-PKA pathway in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor-mediated regulation of acetaldehyde-induced activation of HSCs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaru; Wang, He; Lv, Xiongwen; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Yang, Yan; Li, Jun

    2015-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism by which adenosine receptors (ARs)-mediated the cAMP/PKA/CREB signal pathway regulates the activation of acetaldehyde-induced hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Primary HSCs were isolated from SD rats, cultured in vitro, and activated with different concentrations of acetaldehyde at different time points. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to quantify both protein and mRNA levels of the four AR (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R) in rat HSCs. Selective inhibitors of PDEs and the Gi/o protein pathway, general AR agonists, and AR subtype specific agents were used to study the AR signaling. The level of cAMP was measured by radio-immunoassay, and the expression of α-SMA, collagen type I and III, PKA and p-CREB were also detected by Western blotting. Acetaldehyde could significantly promote HSC proliferation, with a maximum stimulatory effect observed at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. All four AR subtypes could be present in rat HSCs, and the mRNA and protein expression levels for A2AR and A1R in much greater abundance than those for A2BR and A3R. The expression of A2AR and A1R was significantly increased in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs as compared with that of control group, whereas the expression of A2BR and A3R remained unaffected by the addition of acetaldehyde. Curiously, there is coupling of A2AR to the Gs-AC signaling, as well as coupling of A1R to the Gi/o-AC signaling pathway in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Both the A2AR and A1R antagonists could suppress the activation of HSC, although they have opposing effects on cAMP signal transduction. These results suggested that a combination of cAMP/PKA/CREB signals via A2AR and A1R likely mediate the activation of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs, and A1R coupled to the Gi/o-AC signaling pathway may be masked by the more predominant A2AR that coupled to the Gs-AC signaling pathway.

  11. Metformin induces up-regulation of blood-brain barrier functions by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takata, Fuyuko; Dohgu, Shinya; Matsumoto, Junichi; Machida, Takashi; Kaneshima, Shuji; Matsuo, Mai; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Takeshige, Yuki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2013-04-19

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurs frequently in CNS diseases and injuries. Few drugs have been developed as therapeutic candidates for facilitating BBB functions. Here, we examined whether metformin up-regulates BBB functions using rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBECs). Metformin, concentration- and time-dependently increased transendothelial electrical resistance of RBEC monolayers, and decreased RBEC permeability to sodium fluorescein and Evans blue albumin. These effects of metformin were blocked by compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK stimulation with an AMPK activator, AICAR, enhanced BBB functions. These findings indicate that metformin induces up-regulation of BBB functions via AMPK activation.

  12. Phosphodiesterase-3B-cAMP pathway of leptin signalling in the hypothalamus is impaired during the development of diet-induced obesity in FVB/N mice.

    PubMed

    Sahu, M; Anamthathmakula, P; Sahu, A

    2015-04-01

    The phosphodiesterase-3B (PDE3B)-cAMP pathway plays an important role in transducing the action of leptin in the hypothalamus. Obesity is usually associated with hyperleptinaemia and resistance to anorectic and body weight-reducing effects of leptin. To determine whether the hypothalamic PDE3B-cAMP pathway of leptin signalling is impaired during the development of diet-induced obesity (DIO), we fed male FVB/N mice a high-fat diet (HFD: 58% kcal as fat) or low-fat diet (LFD: 6% kcal as fat) for 4 weeks. HFD fed mice developed DIO in association with hyperphagia, hyperleptinaemia and hyperinsulinaemia. Leptin (i.p.) significantly increased hypothalamic PDE3B activity and phosphorylated (p)-Akt levels in LFD-fed but not in HFD-fed mice. However, basal p-Akt levels in hypothalamus were increased in DIO mice. Additionally, amongst six-microdissected brain nuclei examined, leptin selectively decreased cAMP levels in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of LFD-fed mice but failed to do so in HFD-fed mice. We next tested whether both the PBE3B and Akt pathways of leptin signalling remained impaired in DIO mice on the HFD for 12 weeks (long-term). DIO mice were hyperinsulinaemic and hyperleptinaemic in association with impaired glucose and insulin tolerance. Although, in LFD-fed mice, leptin significantly increased PDE3B activity and p-Akt levels in the hypothalamus, it failed to do so in HFD-fed mice. Also, basal p-Akt levels in the hypothalamus were increased in DIO mice and leptin had no further effect. Similarly, immunocytochemistry showed that leptin increased the number of p-Akt-positive cells in the ARC of LFD-fed but not in HFD-fed mice, and there was an increased basal number of p-Akt positive cells in the ARC of DIO mice. These results suggest that the PDE3B-cAMP- and Akt-pathways of leptin signalling in the hypothalamus are impaired during the development of DIO. Thus, a defect in the regulation by leptin of the hypothalamic PDE3B-cAMP pathway and Akt signalling may be one

  13. Phosphorylation of CREB affects its binding to high and low affinity sites: implications for cAMP induced gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, M; Weih, F; Schmid, W; DeVack, C; Kowenz-Leutz, E; Luckow, B; Boshart, M; Schütz, G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP treatment of hepatoma cells leads to increased protein binding at the cyclic AMP response element (CRE) of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in vivo, as revealed by genomic footprinting, whereas no increase is observed at the CRE of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene. Several criteria establish that the 43 kDa CREB protein is interacting with both of these sites. Two classes of CRE with different affinity for CREB are described. One class, including the TATCRE, is characterized by asymmetric and weak binding sites (CGTCA), whereas the second class containing symmetrical TGACGTCA sites shows a much higher binding affinity for CREB. Both classes show an increase in binding after phosphorylation of CREB by protein kinase A (PKA). An in vivo phosphorylation-dependent change in binding of CREB increases the occupancy of weak binding sites used for transactivation, such as the TATCRE, while high affinity sites may have constitutive binding of transcriptionally active and inactive CREB dimers, as demonstrated by in vivo footprinting at the PEPCK CRE. Thus, lower basal level and higher relative stimulation of transcription by cyclic AMP through low affinity CREs should result, allowing finely tuned control of gene activation. Images PMID:1354612

  14. Acute Exposure to Low Glucose Rapidly Induces Endothelial Dysfunction and Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress: Role for AMP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingli; Alexanian, Anna; Ying, Rong; Kizhakekuttu, Tinoy J.; Dharmashankar, Kodlipet; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeanette; Gutterman, David D.; Widlansky, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality. The reasons for this remain unclear and the effects of low glucose exposure on vascular endothelial function remain largely unknown. We endeavored to determine the effects of low glucose on endothelial cells and intact human arterioles. Methods and Results We exposed human umbilical vein endothelial cells to low glucose conditions in a clinically relevant range (40–70 mg/dL) and found rapid and marked reductions in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability (P<0.001). This was associated with concomitantly increased mitochondrial superoxide production (P<0.001) and NO-dependent mitochondrial hyperpolarization (P<0.001). Reduced NO bioavailability was rapid and attributable to reduced eNOS activity and destruction of NO. Low glucose rapidly activated AMP Kinase but physiological activation failed to restore NO bioavailability. Pharmacological AMP Kinase activation led to phosphorylation of eNOS’s Ser633 activation site, reversing the adverse effects of low glucose, and this protective effect was prevented by L-NAME. Intact human arterioles exposed to low glucose demonstrated marked endothelial dysfunction which was prevented by either metformin or TEMPOL. Conclusions Our data suggest that moderate low glucose exposure rapidly impairs NO bioavailability and endothelial function in the human endothelium, and that pharmacological AMP Kinase activation can inhibit this effect in an NO-dependent manner. PMID:22207730

  15. Hypotonicity-induced Reduction of Aquaporin-2 Transcription in mpkCCD Cells Is Independent of the Tonicity Responsive Element, Vasopressin, and cAMP*

    PubMed Central

    Kortenoeven, Marleen L. A.; van den Brand, Michiel; Wetzels, Jack F. M.; Deen, Peter M. T.

    2011-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is characterized by excessive water uptake and hyponatremia. The extent of hyponatremia, however, is less than anticipated, which is ascribed to a defense mechanism, the vasopressin-escape, and is suggested to involve a tonicity-determined down-regulation of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). The underlying mechanism, however, is poorly understood. To study this, we used the mouse cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD) cell line. MpkCCD cells, transfected with an AQP2-promoter luciferase construct showed a reduced and increased AQP2 abundance and transcription following culture in hypotonic and hypertonic medium, respectively. This depended on tonicity rather than osmolality and occurred independently of the vasopressin analog dDAVP, cAMP levels, or protein kinase A activity. Although prostaglandins and nitric oxide reduced AQP2 abundance, inhibition of their synthesis did not influence tonicity-induced AQP2 transcription. Also, cells in which the cAMP or tonicity-responsive element (CRE/TonE) in the AQP2-promoter were mutated showed a similar response to hypotonicity. Instead, the tonicity-responsive elements were pin-pointed to nucleotides −283 to −252 and −157 to −126 bp. In conclusion, our data indicate that hypotonicity reduces AQP2 abundance and transcription, which occurs independently of vasopressin, cAMP, and the known TonE and CRE in the AQP2-promoter. Increased prostaglandin and nitric oxide, as found in vivo, may contribute to reduced AQP2 in vasopressin-escape, but do not mediate the effect of hypotonicity on AQP2 transcription. Our data suggest that two novel segments (−283 to −252 and −157 to −126 bp) in the AQP2-promoter mediate the hypotonicity-induced AQP2 down-regulation during vasopressin-escape. PMID:21324903

  16. Hypotonicity-induced reduction of aquaporin-2 transcription in mpkCCD cells is independent of the tonicity responsive element, vasopressin, and cAMP.

    PubMed

    Kortenoeven, Marleen L A; van den Brand, Michiel; Wetzels, Jack F M; Deen, Peter M T

    2011-04-15

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is characterized by excessive water uptake and hyponatremia. The extent of hyponatremia, however, is less than anticipated, which is ascribed to a defense mechanism, the vasopressin-escape, and is suggested to involve a tonicity-determined down-regulation of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). The underlying mechanism, however, is poorly understood. To study this, we used the mouse cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD) cell line. MpkCCD cells, transfected with an AQP2-promoter luciferase construct showed a reduced and increased AQP2 abundance and transcription following culture in hypotonic and hypertonic medium, respectively. This depended on tonicity rather than osmolality and occurred independently of the vasopressin analog dDAVP, cAMP levels, or protein kinase A activity. Although prostaglandins and nitric oxide reduced AQP2 abundance, inhibition of their synthesis did not influence tonicity-induced AQP2 transcription. Also, cells in which the cAMP or tonicity-responsive element (CRE/TonE) in the AQP2-promoter were mutated showed a similar response to hypotonicity. Instead, the tonicity-responsive elements were pin-pointed to nucleotides -283 to -252 and -157 to -126 bp. In conclusion, our data indicate that hypotonicity reduces AQP2 abundance and transcription, which occurs independently of vasopressin, cAMP, and the known TonE and CRE in the AQP2-promoter. Increased prostaglandin and nitric oxide, as found in vivo, may contribute to reduced AQP2 in vasopressin-escape, but do not mediate the effect of hypotonicity on AQP2 transcription. Our data suggest that two novel segments (-283 to -252 and -157 to -126 bp) in the AQP2-promoter mediate the hypotonicity-induced AQP2 down-regulation during vasopressin-escape.

  17. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias are associated with transient down-regulation of cAMP and cGMP in the caudate-putamen of hemiparkinsonian rats: reduced synthesis or increased catabolism?

    PubMed

    Sancesario, Giuseppe; Morrone, Luigi Antonio; D'Angelo, Vincenza; Castelli, Valentina; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Sica, Francesco; Martorana, Alessandro; Sorge, Roberto; Cavaliere, Federica; Bernardi, Giorgio; Giorgi, Mauro

    2014-12-01

    Second messenger cAMP and cGMP represent a key step in the action of dopamine that modulates directly or indirectly their synthesis. We aimed to verify whether levodopa-induced dyskinesias are associated with changes of the time course of levodopa/dopamine stimulated cAMP and cGMP levels, and/or with changes of their catabolism by phosphodiesterase activity in rats with experimental hemiparkinsonism. Microdialysis and tissue homogenates of the striatal tissues demonstrated that extracellular and intracellular cAMP/cGMP levels were lower in dyskinetic animals during the increasing phase of dyskinesias compared to eukinetic animals, but cAMP/cGMP levels increased in dyskinetic animals during the phase of decreasing and extinction of dyskinesias. Dyskinesias and the abnormal lowering of striatal cGMP and cAMP after levodopa were prevented by pretreatment with the multipotent drug amantadine, outlining the inverse relationship of cAMP/cGMP to dyskinesias. Moreover, dyskinetic animals showed higher striatal hydrolyzing cGMP-phosphodiesterase but not hydrolyzing cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity, suggesting that low cGMP but not cAMP levels could be due to increased catabolism. However, expressions of isozyme phosphodiesterase-1B and -10A highly and specifically located in the basal ganglia were not changed after levodopa in dyskinetic and eukinetic animals: accordingly, selective inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-1B and -10A were ineffective on levodopa dyskinesias. Therefore, the isozyme(s) expressing higher cGMP-phosphodiesterase activity in the striatum of dyskinetic animal should be determined. These observations suggest that dopamine-mediated processes of synthesis and/or degradation of cAMP/cGMP could be acutely impaired in levodopa dyskinesias, opening new ways to understanding physiopathology and treatment.

  18. Phosphorylation of CREB, a cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein, contributes partially to lysophosphatidic acid-induced fibroblast cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Yong-Jun; Sun, Yuanjie; Kim, Nam-Ho; Huh, Sung-Oh

    2009-03-13

    Lysophospholipids regulate a wide array of biological processes including cell survival and proliferation. In our previous studies, we found that in addition to SRE, CRE is required for maximal c-fos promoter activation triggered by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). c-fos is an early indicator of various cells into the cell cycle after mitogenic stimulation. However, role of CREB activation in LPA-stimulated proliferation has not been elucidated yet. Here, we investigate how LPA induces proliferation in Rat-2 fibroblast cell via CREB activation. We found that total cell number and BrdU-positive cells were increased by LPA. Moreover, levels of c-fos mRNA and cyclin D1 protein were increased via LPA-induced CREB phosphorylation. Furthermore, LPA-induced Rat-2 cell proliferation was decreased markedly by ERK inhibitor (U0126) and partially by MSK inhibitor (H89). Taken together, these results suggest that CREB activation could partially up-regulate accumulation of cyclin D1 protein level and proliferation of LPA-stimulated Rat-2 fibroblast cells.

  19. Interrogating cyclic AMP signaling using optical approaches.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jason Y; Falcone, Jeffrey L; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M

    2017-03-01

    Optical reporters for cAMP represent a fundamental advancement in our ability to investigate the dynamics of cAMP signaling. These fluorescent sensors can measure changes in cAMP in single cells or in microdomains within cells as opposed to whole populations of cells required for other methods of measuring cAMP. The first optical cAMP reporters were FRET-based sensors utilizing dissociation of purified regulatory and catalytic subunits of PKA, introduced by Roger Tsien in the early 1990s. The utility of these sensors was vastly improved by creating genetically encoded versions that could be introduced into cells with transfection, the first of which was published in the year 2000. Subsequently, improved sensors have been developed using different cAMP binding platforms, optimized fluorescent proteins, and targeting motifs that localize to specific microdomains. The most common sensors in use today are FRET-based sensors designed around an Epac backbone. These rely on the significant conformational changes in Epac when it binds cAMP, altering the signal between FRET pairs flanking Epac. Several other strategies for optically interrogating cAMP have been developed, including fluorescent translocation reporters, dimerization-dependent FP based biosensors, BRET (bioluminescence resonance energy transfer)-based sensors, non-FRET single wavelength reporters, and sensors based on bacterial cAMP-binding domains. Other newly described mammalian cAMP-binding proteins such as Popdc and CRIS may someday be exploited in sensor design. With the proliferation of engineered fluorescent proteins and the abundance of cAMP binding targets in nature, the field of optical reporters for cAMP should continue to see rapid refinement in the coming years.

  20. Increasing cAMP levels of preadipocytes by cyanidin-3-glucoside treatment induces the formation of beige phenotypes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Toshiya; Villareal, Myra O; Motojima, Hideko; Isoda, Hiroko

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is a serious health problem and a major risk factor for the onset of several diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke and cancer. The conversion of white adipocytes to brown-like adipocytes, also called beige or brite adipocytes, by pharmacological and dietary compounds has gained attention as an effective treatment for obesity. Cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy3G), a polyphenolic compound contained in black soybean, blueberry and grape, has several antiobesity effects. However, there are no reports on the role of Cy3G in the induction of differentiation of preadipocytes to beige adipocytes and corresponding phenotypes. Here, the formation of beige adipocyte phenotypes following treatment with Cy3G was evaluated using 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Cy3G induced phenotypic changes to white adipocytes, such as increased multilocular lipid droplets and mitochondrial content. Additionally, the expression of mitochondrial genes (TFAM, SOD2, UCP-1 and UCP-2), UCP-1 protein and beige adipocyte markers (CITED1 and TBX1) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes was increased by Cy3G. Furthermore, Cy3G promoted preadipocyte differentiation by up-regulating of C/EBPβ through the elevation of the intracellular cAMP levels. These results indicated that Cy3G elevates the intracellular cAMP levels, which induces beige adipocyte phenotypes. This is the first report on the effect of Cy3G on induction of differentiation of preadipocytes into beige adipocyte phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) on cell viability and differentiation in the human BeWo choriocarcinoma cell line: a potential syncytialisation inducer distinct from cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP).

    PubMed

    Chen, YuXia; Allars, Megan; Pan, Xin; Maiti, Kaushik; Angeli, Giavanna; Smith, Roger; Nicholson, Richard C

    2013-04-15

    Placental production of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) rises exponentially as pregnancy progresses, and has been linked with the onset of normal and preterm labour. CRH is produced in syncytiotrophoblast cells and production is increased by glucocorticoids and cAMP. It remains unclear whether cAMP acts by inducing differentiation of cytotrophoblasts and/or through induction of syncytialisation. As CRH can stimulate cAMP pathways we have tested whether a feed-forward system may exist in placental cells during syncytialisation. The choriocarcinoma BeWo cell line was treated with cAMP, CRH or vehicle. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay, while apoptosis was analysed by DAPI staining and by FACS. Differentiation was measured by assaying message for hCG and ERVW-1 (syncytin1) by qRT-PCR, as well as the respective protein by ELISA. Fusion of BeWo cells was assessed by co-staining cell membrane and nuclei with CellMask and Hoechst 33342. CRHR1 and CRHR2 mRNA levels were measured by qRT-PCR. We show that cAMP has an inductive effect on syncytialisation, as evidenced by induction of hCG secretion, by ERVW-1 mRNA expression and by formation of multinuclear cells. CRH mRNA expression was found to increase prior to the changes in the other syncytialisation markers. cAMP had an inhibitory effect on BeWo cell viability, but exogenous CRH did not. However, CRH did mimic the differentiation inducing effect of cAMP, suggesting a link between CRH and cAMP signalling in syncytialisation. We also found that treatment of BeWo cells with exogenous CRH resulted in elevated cellular CRHR1 levels. This study suggests a positive feed-forward role exists for CRH in trophoblast cell differentiation, which may underlie the exponential rise in CRH observed as gestation advances.

  2. cAMP/PKA Pathways and S56 Phosphorylation Are Involved in AA/PGE2-Induced Increases in rNaV1.4 Current.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hua; Fang, Yan-Jia; Liu, Dong-Dong; Chen, Ping; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites are important second messengers for ion channel modulation. The effects of extracellular application of AA and its non-metabolized analogue on muscle rNaV1.4 Na+ current has been studied, but little is known about the effects of intracellular application of AA on this channel isoform. Here, we report that intracellular application of AA significantly augmented the rNaV1.4 current peak without modulating the steady-state activation and inactivation properties of the rNaV1.4 channel. These results differed from the effects of extracellular application of AA on rNaV1.4 current. The effects of intracellular AA were mimicked by prostaglandin E2 but not eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), the non-metabolized analogue of AA, and were eliminated by treatment with cyclooxygenase inhibitors, flufenamic acid, or indomethacin. AA/PGE2-induced activation of rNaV1.4 channels was mimicked by a cAMP analogue (db-cAMP) and eliminated by a PKA inhibitor, PKAi. Furthermore, inhibition of EP2 and EP4 (PGE2 receptors) with AH6809 and AH23848 reduced the intracellular AA/PGE2-induced increase of rNaV1.4 current. Two mutated channels, rNaV1.4S56A and rNaV1.4T21A, were designed to investigate the role of predicted phosphorylation sites in the AA/PGE2-mediated regulation of rNaV1.4 currents. In rNaV1.4S56A, the effects of intracellular db-cAMP, AA, and PGE2 were significantly reduced. The results of the present study suggest that intracellular AA augments rNaV1.4 current by PGE2/EP receptor-mediated activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway, and that the S56 residue on the channel protein is important for this process.

  3. cAMP/PKA Pathways and S56 Phosphorylation Are Involved in AA/PGE2-Induced Increases in rNaV1.4 Current

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hua; Fang, Yan-Jia; Liu, Dong-Dong; Chen, Ping; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites are important second messengers for ion channel modulation. The effects of extracellular application of AA and its non-metabolized analogue on muscle rNaV1.4 Na+ current has been studied, but little is known about the effects of intracellular application of AA on this channel isoform. Here, we report that intracellular application of AA significantly augmented the rNaV1.4 current peak without modulating the steady-state activation and inactivation properties of the rNaV1.4 channel. These results differed from the effects of extracellular application of AA on rNaV1.4 current. The effects of intracellular AA were mimicked by prostaglandin E2 but not eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), the non-metabolized analogue of AA, and were eliminated by treatment with cyclooxygenase inhibitors, flufenamic acid, or indomethacin. AA/PGE2-induced activation of rNaV1.4 channels was mimicked by a cAMP analogue (db-cAMP) and eliminated by a PKA inhibitor, PKAi. Furthermore, inhibition of EP2 and EP4 (PGE2 receptors) with AH6809 and AH23848 reduced the intracellular AA/PGE2-induced increase of rNaV1.4 current. Two mutated channels, rNaV1.4S56A and rNaV1.4T21A, were designed to investigate the role of predicted phosphorylation sites in the AA/PGE2–mediated regulation of rNaV1.4 currents. In rNaV1.4S56A, the effects of intracellular db-cAMP, AA, and PGE2 were significantly reduced. The results of the present study suggest that intracellular AA augments rNaV1.4 current by PGE2/EP receptor-mediated activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway, and that the S56 residue on the channel protein is important for this process. PMID:26485043

  4. Enhancement by lithium of cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed gene transcription conferred by TORC on the CREB basic leucine zipper domain

    PubMed Central

    Böer, Ulrike; Eglins, Julia; Krause, Doris; Schnell, Susanne; Schöfl, Christof; Knepel, Willhart

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the action of lithium salts in the treatment of bipolar disorder is not well understood. As their therapeutic action requires chronic treatment, adaptive neuronal processes are suggested to be involved. The molecular basis of this are changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors such as CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein). CREB contains a transactivation domain, in which Ser119 is phosphorylated upon activation, and a bZip (basic leucine zipper domain). The bZip is involved in CREB dimerization and DNA-binding, but also contributes to CREB transactivation by recruiting the coactivator TORC (transducer of regulated CREB). In the present study, the effect of lithium on CRE (cAMP response element)/CREB-directed gene transcription was investigated. Electrically excitable cells were transfected with CRE/CREB-driven luciferase reporter genes. LiCl (6 mM or higher) induced an up to 4.7-fold increase in 8-bromo-cAMP-stimulated CRE/CREB-directed transcription. This increase was not due to enhanced Ser119 phosphorylation or DNA-binding of CREB. Also, the known targets inositol monophosphatase and GSK3β (glycogen-synthase-kinase 3β) were not involved as specific GSK3β inhibitors and inositol replenishment did not mimic and abolish respectively the effect of lithium. However, lithium no longer enhanced CREB activity when the CREB-bZip was deleted or the TORC-binding site inside the CREB-bZip was specifically mutated (CREB-R300A). Otherwise, TORC overexpression conferred lithium responsiveness on CREB-bZip or the CRE-containing truncated rat somatostatin promoter. This indicates that lithium enhances cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed transcription, conferred by TORC on the CREB-bZip. We thus support the hypothesis that lithium salts modulate CRE/CREB-dependent gene transcription and suggest the CREB coactivator TORC as a new molecular target of lithium. PMID:17696880

  5. Helicobacter pylori Induces miR-155 in T Cells in a cAMP-Foxp3-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Fassi Fehri, Lina; Koch, Manuel; Belogolova, Elena; Khalil, Hany; Bolz, Christian; Kalali, Behnam; Mollenkopf, Hans J.; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Karlas, Alexander; Schneider, Thomas; Churin, Yuri; Gerhard, Markus; Meyer, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Amongst the most severe clinical outcomes of life-long infections with Helicobacter pylori is the development of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma - diseases often associated with an increase of regulatory T cells. Understanding H. pylori-driven regulation of T cells is therefore of crucial clinical importance. Several studies have defined mammalian microRNAs as key regulators of the immune system and of carcinogenic processes. Hence, we aimed here to identify H. pylori-regulated miRNAs, mainly in human T cells. MicroRNA profiling of non-infected and infected human T cells revealed H. pylori infection triggers miR-155 expression in vitro and in vivo. By using single and double H. pylori mutants and the corresponding purified enzymes, the bacterial vacuolating toxin A (VacA) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) tested positive for their ability to regulate miR-155 and Foxp3 expression in human lymphocytes; the latter being considered as the master regulator and marker of regulatory T cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown (KD) of the Foxp3 transcription factor in T cells abolished miR-155 expression. Using adenylate cyclase inhibitors, the miR-155 induction cascade was shown to be dependent on the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Furthermore, we found that miR-155 directly targets the protein kinase A inhibitor α (PKIα) mRNA in its 3′UTR, indicative of a positive feedback mechanism on the cAMP pathway. Taken together, our study describes, in the context of an H. pylori infection, a direct link between Foxp3 and miR-155 in human T cells and highlights the significance of cAMP in this miR-155 induction cascade. PMID:20209161

  6. DREAM mediates cAMP-dependent, Ca2+-induced stimulation of GFAP gene expression and regulates cortical astrogliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cebolla, Beatriz; Fernández-Pérez, Antonio; Perea, Gertrudis; Araque, Alfonso; Vallejo, Mario

    2008-06-25

    In the developing mouse brain, once the generation of neurons is mostly completed during the prenatal period, precisely coordinated signals act on competent neural precursors to direct their differentiation into astrocytes, which occurs mostly after birth. Among these signals, those provided by neurotrophic cytokines and bone morphogenetic proteins appear to have a key role in triggering the neurogenic to gliogenic switch and in regulating astrocyte numbers. In addition, we have reported previously that the neurotrophic peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is able to promote astrocyte differentiation of cortical precursors via activation of a cAMP-dependent pathway. Signals acting on progenitor cells of the developing cortex to generate astrocytes activate glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene expression, but the transcriptional mechanisms that regulate this activation are unclear. Here, we identify the previously known transcriptional repressor downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) as an activator of GFAP gene expression. We found that DREAM occupies specific sites on the GFAP promoter before and after differentiation is initiated by exposure of cortical progenitor cells to PACAP. PACAP raises intracellular calcium concentration via a mechanism that requires cAMP, and DREAM-mediated transactivation of the GFAP gene requires the integrity of calcium-binding domains. Cortical progenitor cells from dream(-/-) mice fail to express GFAP in response to PACAP. Moreover, the neonatal cortex of dream(-/-) mice exhibits a reduced number of astrocytes and increased number of neurons. These results identify the PACAP-cAMP-Ca(2+)-DREAM cascade as a new pathway to activate GFAP gene expression during astrocyte differentiation.

  7. The melatonin agonist ramelteon induces duration-dependent clock gene expression through cAMP signaling in pancreatic INS-1 β-cells.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Keiji; Hirai, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to melatonin improves glycemic control in animals. Although glucose metabolism is controlled by circadian clock genes, little is known about the role of melatonin signaling and its duration in the regulation of clock gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Activation of MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors inhibits cAMP signaling, which mediates clock gene expression. Therefore, this study investigated exposure duration-dependent alterations in cAMP element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and clock gene expression that occur during and after exposure to ramelteon, a selective melatonin agonist used to treat insomnia. In rat INS-1 cells, a pancreatic β-cell line endogenously expressing melatonin receptors, ramelteon persistently decreased CREB phosphorylation during the treatment period (2-14 h), whereas the subsequent washout induced an enhancement of forskolin-stimulated CREB phosphorylation in a duration- and concentration-dependent manner. This augmentation was blocked by forskolin or the melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole. Similarly, gene expression analyses of 7 clock genes revealed the duration dependency of the effects of ramelteon on Rev-erbα and Bmal1 expression through melatonin receptor-mediated cAMP signaling; longer exposure times (14 h) resulted in greater increases in the expression and signaling of Rev-erbα, which is related to β-cell functions. Interestingly, this led to amplified oscillatory Rev-erbα and Bmal1 expression after agonist washout and forskolin stimulation. These results provide new insights into the duration-dependent effects of ramelteon on clock gene expression in INS-1 cells and may improve the understanding of its effect in vivo. The applicability of these results to pancreatic islets awaits further investigation.

  8. Compartmentalized accumulation of cAMP near complexes of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes to drug-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Woodrooffe, Koryse; Schuetz, John D; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; de Jonge, Hugo R; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M; Buddington, Randal K; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common adverse side effects observed in ∼7% of individuals consuming Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. The mechanism of how these drugs alter fluid secretion in the gut and induce diarrhea is not clearly understood. Several drugs are either substrates or inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), such as the anti-colon cancer drug irinotecan and an anti-retroviral used to treat HIV infection, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). These drugs activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated fluid secretion by inhibiting MRP4-mediated cAMP efflux. Binding of drugs to MRP4 augments the formation of MRP4-CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes that is mediated via scaffolding protein PDZK1. Importantly, HIV patients on AZT treatment demonstrate augmented MRP4-CFTR complex formation in the colon, which defines a novel paradigm of drug-induced diarrhea.

  9. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase induce expression of FoxO1, FoxO3a, and myostatin after exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kihyuk; Ochi, Eisuke; Song, Hongsun; Nakazato, Koichi

    2015-10-23

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been shown to regulate protein metabolism in skeletal muscle. We previously found that levels of Forkhead box proteins, FoxO1 and FoxO3a, and myostatin in rat gastrocnemius increased after exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). Eccentric muscle contractions (ECs), defined as elongation of muscle under tension, were used for inducing EIMD. The objective of this study was to clarify whether AMPK participates in activation and expression of FoxO proteins and myostatin in rat gastrocnemius muscle after EIMD. Wistar rats were randomly assigned into the following three groups; CON (n = 6), 180ECs group (ankle angular velocity, 180°/s; n = 6), and 30ECs group (ankle angular velocity, 30°/s; n = 6). 20 ECs were conducted with percutaneous electrical stimulation of gastrocnemius and simultaneous forced dorsiflexion of ankle joint (from 0° to 45°). To evaluate activation of AMPK, we measured the phosphorylated states of AMPK and acetyl CoA carboxylase. For evaluation of the direct relationships of AMPK and other proteins, we also examined contents of FoxOs and myostatin with stimulation of L6 myotube with AMPK agonist, 5 -aminoimidazole -4 -carboxamide -1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) (0.1, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mM). Western blotting was employed for protein analysis. Significant torque deficit was only observed in the 180ECs, suggesting EIMD. We also observed that phosphorylated AMPKα was induced in response to 180ECs (p < 0.01 vs. CON). Additionally, the level of phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase was significantly higher in response to 180ECs and 30ECs. The phosphorylated states of FoxO1, FoxO3a, and myostatin expression were increased significantly in response to 180ECs. Furthermore, treatment of L6 myotubes with AICAR showed similar tendencies to that observed in in vivo gastrocnemius muscle treated with 180ECs. Therefore, we conclude that activation of AMPK plays a key role in increasing the level of FoxO1, FoxO3a

  10. A bimodal modulation of the cAMP pathway is involved in the control of myogenic differentiation in l6 cells.

    PubMed

    Naro, Fabio; De Arcangelis, Vania; Sette, Claudio; Ambrosio, Caterina; Komati, Hiba; Molinaro, Mario; Adamo, Sergio; Nemoz, Georges

    2003-12-05

    We have previously shown that myogenesis induction by Arg8-vasopressin (AVP) in L6 rat myoblasts involves a sustained stimulation of type 4 cAMP-phosphodiesterase. In this model, we observed that a transient cAMP generation occurs in the minutes following AVP addition. Evidence suggests that cAMP generation is due to the prostaglandins produced in response to AVP binding to V1a receptors and subsequent activation of phospholipase A2. The early cAMP increase was effective in activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and increasing phosphorylation of CREB transcription factor. Inhibition of PKA by compound H89 prior to AVP addition led to a significant reduction of expression of the differentiation marker creatine kinase, whereas H89 added 1-5 h after AVP had no significant effect. Furthermore, PKA inhibition 24 h after the beginning of AVP treatment potentiated differentiation. This shows that both an early activation and a later down-regulation of the cAMP pathway are required for AVP induction of myogenesis. Because phosphodiesterase PDE4D3 overexpressed in L6 cells lost its ability to potentiate AVP-induced differentiation when mutated and rendered insensitive to PKA phosphorylation and activation, we hypothesize that the early cAMP increase is required to trigger the down-regulation of cAMP pathway through stimulation of phosphodiesterase.

  11. Escherichia coli exports cyclic AMP via TolC.

    PubMed

    Hantke, Klaus; Winkler, Karin; Schultz, Joachim E

    2011-03-01

    In Escherichia coli more than 180 genes are regulated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. However, more than 90% of cAMP that is made by intracellular adenylyl cyclases is found in the culture medium. How is cAMP exported from E. coli? In a tolC mutant, 0.03 mM IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) was sufficient to induce β-galactosidase compared to 0.1 mM IPTG in the parent strain. In a cya mutant unable to produce cAMP about 1 mM extracellular cAMP was required to induce β-galactosidase, whereas in a cya tolC mutant 0.1 mM cAMP was sufficient. When cAMP in E. coli cya was generated intracellularly by a recombinant, weakly active adenylyl cyclase from Corynebacterium glutamicum, the critical level of cAMP necessary for induction of maltose degradation was only achieved in a tolC mutant and not in the parent strain. Deletion of a putative cAMP phosphodiesterase of E. coli, CpdA, resulted in a slightly similar, yet more diffuse phenotype. The data demonstrate that export of cAMP via TolC is a most efficient way of E. coli to lower high concentrations of cAMP in the cell and maintain its sensitivity in changing metabolic environments.

  12. The β-blocker propranolol affects cAMP-dependent signaling and induces the stress response in Mediterranean mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Franzellitti, Silvia; Buratti, Sara; Valbonesi, Paola; Capuzzo, Antonio; Fabbri, Elena

    2011-01-25

    Widespread occurrence of pharmaceuticals is reported in aquatic systems, posing concerns for the health of aquatic wildlife and a theoretical risk to humans. A recent concept was developed for the identification of highly active compounds amongst the environmental pharmaceuticals, based on their mode of action, the homology between human targets and possible targets in the environment, and the importance of the affected pathway for the target species. In line with this approach, this study investigated whether propranolol (PROP) affects the cAMP-dependent pathway in Mediterranean mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis. PROP is a prototypical β-adrenoceptor antagonist, and these receptors exist in bivalves and show gross pharmacological properties similar to their mammalian counterparts. PROP also acts as a 5-HT1 receptor antagonist, which is the sole 5-HT receptor reported in bivalves to date. Importantly, β-adrenoceptor and 5HT-1 receptor subtypes are positively and negatively coupled to cAMP-mediated signaling, respectively. PROP was administered as either l-PROP or dl-PROP. A wide range of concentrations was tested including low (0.3, 3 and 30ng/L) and high (300ng/L) environmental ranges, and a concentration 5-fold above the maximum reported environmental level (30,000ng/L). After a 7-day exposure, mussel cAMP levels and PKA activities were significantly reduced in digestive gland, increased in mantle/gonads and unaffected in gills. Similar patterns were observed for the mRNA expression of the ABCB1 gene encoding the membrane transporter P-glycoprotein, hypothesised to be under PKA modulation. The effects on the digestive gland are consistent with PROP blocking β-adrenoceptors. The observed increased cAMP levels in the mantle/gonad tissue support PROP blocking 5-HT1 receptors. Catalase and glutathione-S tranferase were differently affected by PROP in the two tissues. Mussel haemocyte lysosome membrane stability, a sensitive biomarker of animal health status, was

  13. Modulation of a human lymphoblastoid B cell line by cyclic AMP. Ig secretion and phosphatidylcholine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, W.T.; Patke, C.L.; Gilliam, E.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Barron, K.S.; Orson, F.M.

    1988-09-01

    A transformed human B cell line, LA350, was found to be sensitive to cAMP-elevating agents by responding with rapid (0 to 2 h) severalfold elevations of intracellular cAMP to treatment with cholera toxin, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), forskolin, and dibutyryl cAMP (all p less than 0.001). These cAMP-elevating agents also produced significant inhibitions of subsequent (48 to 72 h) Ig secretion by the same B cells as measured by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay and an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay for IgM (both p less than 0.001). PMA- and IBMX-treated cells were particularly responsive to the effects of cholera toxin, showing a doubling of cAMP content and profound decrease in Ig production (p less than 0.001). Because our previous studies had correlated activation of the metabolic turnover of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) fraction of membrane phospholipids with enhanced Ig secretion, we examined the sensitivity of PC metabolism to cAMP in control and PMA-stimulated cells. Formation of PC was found to be inhibited by forskolin and IBMX (both p less than 0.002) but breakdown of PC was stimulated (p less than 0.001). These findings imply that as the enzymatic products of PC, choline phosphate and diacylglycerol, are depleted due to the combined effects of cAMP upon synthesis and turnover of PC, there is a decrease in Ig secretion. Since diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C, it appears reasonable that Ig secretion is at least partially regulated by cAMP-responsive alterations in PC metabolism produced by protein kinase C-induced phosphorylation. We conclude that the early cAMP-sensitive changes in PC metabolism in this activated B cell line may signal for subsequent alterations in Ig secretion.

  14. Role of cyclic AMP sensor Epac1 in masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition induced by β2-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2014-12-15

    The predominant isoform of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) in skeletal muscle is β2-AR and that in the cardiac muscle is β1-AR. We have reported that Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1), a new protein kinase A-independent cAMP sensor, does not affect cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload or chronic isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion. However, the role of Epac1 in skeletal muscle hypertrophy remains poorly understood. We thus examined the effect of disruption of Epac1, the major Epac isoform in skeletal muscle, on masseter muscle hypertrophy induced by chronic β2-AR stimulation with clenbuterol (CB) in Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The masseter muscle weight/tibial length ratio was similar in wild-type (WT) and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased in WT after CB infusion, but this increase was suppressed in Epac1KO. CB treatment significantly increased the proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb at the expense of that of MHC IId/x in both WT and Epac1KO, indicating that Epac1 did not mediate the CB-induced MHC isoform transition towards the faster isoform. The mechanism of suppression of CB-mediated hypertrophy in Epac1KO is considered to involve decreased activation of Akt signalling. In addition, CB-induced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation on serine 246 mediated by calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), which plays a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, was suppressed in Epac1KO. Our findings suggest that Epac1 plays a role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy, probably through activation of both Akt signalling and CaMKII/HDAC4 signalling. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  15. cAMP signaling by anthrax edema toxin induces transendothelial cell tunnels, which are resealed by MIM via Arp2/3-driven actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Maddugoda, Madhavi P; Stefani, Caroline; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Saarikangas, Juha; Torrino, Stéphanie; Janel, Sebastien; Munro, Patrick; Doye, Anne; Prodon, François; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Goossens, Pierre L; Lafont, Frank; Bassereau, Patricia; Lappalainen, Pekka; Brochard, Françoise; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2011-11-17

    RhoA-inhibitory bacterial toxins, such as Staphylococcus aureus EDIN toxin, induce large transendothelial cell macroaperture (TEM) tunnels that rupture the host endothelium barrier and promote bacterial dissemination. Host cells repair these tunnels by extending actin-rich membrane waves from the TEM edges. We reveal that cyclic-AMP signaling produced by Bacillus anthracis edema toxin (ET) also induces TEM formation, which correlates with increased vascular permeability. We show that ET-induced TEM formation resembles liquid dewetting, a physical process of nucleation and growth of holes within a thin liquid film. We also identify the cellular mechanisms of tunnel closure and reveal that the I-BAR domain protein Missing in Metastasis (MIM) senses de novo membrane curvature generated by the TEM, accumulates at the TEM edge, and triggers Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization, which induces actin-rich membrane waves that close the TEM. Thus, the balance between ET-induced TEM formation and resealing likely determines the integrity of the host endothelium barrier.

  16. Prophylactic Melatonin Attenuates Isoflurane-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Aged Rats through Hippocampal Melatonin Receptor 2 - cAMP Response Element Binding Signalling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yajie; Ni, Cheng; Li, Zhengqian; Yang, Ning; Zhou, Yang; Rong, Xiaoying; Qian, Min; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2017-03-01

    Melatonin exerts many physiological effects via melatonin receptors, among which the melatonin-2 receptor (MT2 ) plays a critical role in circadian rhythm disorders, Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders. A melatonin replacement strategy has been tested previously, and MT2 was a critical target during the process. cAMP response element binding (CREB) is an essential transcription factor for memory formation and could be involved in MT2 signalling. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effects of prophylactic melatonin on inhaled anaesthetic isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment, and to determine whether the protective effects of melatonin are dependent on MT2 and downstream CREB signalling in the hippocampus of aged rats. The results showed that prophylactic melatonin attenuated isoflurane-induced decreases in plasma/hippocampal melatonin levels and cognitive impairment in aged rats. Furthermore, 4P-PDOT, a selective MT2 antagonist, blocked the protective effects of melatonin on isoflurane-induced decreases in both hippocampal MT2 expression and downstream CREB phosphorylation. And 4P-PDOT blocked the attenuation of melatonin on isoflurane-induced memory impairment. Collectively, the results suggest that the protective effects of prophylactic melatonin are dependent on hippocampal MT2 -CREB signalling, which could be a potential therapeutic target for anaesthetic-induced cognitive impairment.

  17. Involvement of the cAMP Response Element Binding Protein, CREB, and Cyclin D1 in LPA-Induced Proliferation of P19 Embryonic Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jung; Sun, Yuanjie; Yang, Haijie; Kim, Nam-Ho; Jeon, Sung Ho; Huh, Sung-Oh

    2012-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid growth factor that induces proliferation of fibroblasts by activating the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Here, we further investigated whether LPA induces proliferation of P19 cells, a line of pluripotent embryonic carcinoma cells. 5′-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation and cell viability as-says showed that LPA stimulated proliferation of P19 cells. Immunoblot experiments with P19 cells revealed that the mitogen activated protein kinases, including p-ERK, p38, pAKT, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, and CREB were phosphorylated by treatment with 10 μM LPA. LPA-induced phosphorylation of CREB was efficiently blocked by U0126 and H89, inhibitors of the MAP kinases ERK1/2 and mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1, respectively. Involvement of cyclin D1 in LPA-induced P19 cell proliferation was verified by immunoblot analysis in combination with pharmacological inhibitor treatment. Furthermore, LPA up-regulated CRE-harboring cyclin D1 promoter activity, suggesting that CREB and cyclin D1 play significant roles in LPA-induced proliferation of P19 embryonic carcinoma cells. PMID:22847216

  18. Transcriptional regulation of the miR-212/miR-132 cluster in insulin-secreting β-cells by cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator 1 and salt-inducible kinases.

    PubMed

    Malm, Helena Anna; Mollet, Inês G; Berggreen, Christine; Orho-Melander, Marju; Esguerra, Jonathan Lou S; Göransson, Olga; Eliasson, Lena

    2016-03-15

    MicroRNAs are central players in the control of insulin secretion, but their transcriptional regulation is poorly understood. Our aim was to investigate cAMP-mediated transcriptional regulation of the miR-212/miR-132 cluster and involvement of further upstream proteins in insulin secreting β-cells. cAMP induced by forskolin+IBMX or GLP-1 caused increased expression of miR-212/miR-132, and elevated phosphorylation of cAMP-response-element-binding-protein (CREB)/Activating-transcription-factor-1 (ATF1) and Salt-Inducible-Kinases (SIKs). CyclicAMP-Regulated Transcriptional Co-activator-1 (CRTC1) was concomitantly dephosphorylated and translocated to the nucleus. Silencing of miR-212/miR-132 reduced, and overexpression of miR-212 increased, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Silencing of CRTC1 expression resulted in decreased insulin secretion and miR-212/miR-132 expression, while silencing or inhibition of SIKs was associated with increased expression of the microRNAs and dephosphorylation of CRTC1. CRTC1 protein levels were reduced after silencing of miR-132, suggesting feed-back regulation. Our data propose cAMP-dependent co-regulation of miR-212/miR-132, in part mediated through SIK-regulated CRTC1, as an important factor for fine-tuned regulation of insulin secretion.

  19. 6-OHDA-induced hemiparkinsonism and chronic L-DOPA treatment increase dopamine D1-stimulated [(3)H]-GABA release and [(3)H]-cAMP production in substantia nigra pars reticulata of the rat.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Silva, Isaac; García-Ramírez, Martha; Sánchez-Lemus, Enrique; Floran, Leonor; Aceves, Jorge; Erlij, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2008-10-01

    It has been proposed that striatonigral GABAergic transmission in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr) is enhanced during Parkinson's disease and subsequent L-DOPA treatment. To evaluate this proposal we determined the effects of activating dopamine D1 receptors on depolarization induced [(3)H]-GABA release and on [(3)H]-cAMP accumulation in slices of SNr of rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesions with and without l-DOPA treatment. Denervation increased depolarization induced D1-stimulated [(3)H]-GABA release, while repeated L-DOPA treatment further enhanced this response. Both also enhanced the effects of forskolin on [(3)H]-cAMP production and [(3)H]-GABA release, while neither modified the stimulating effects of 8-Br-cAMP on the release. These results shown that, after 6-OHDA lesions and l-DOPA treatment, cAMP signaling is enhanced. Furthermore, the results suggest that activation of sites in the signaling cascade downstream of cAMP synthesis is not required to increase release.

  20. High glucose-induced barrier impairment of human retinal pigment epithelium is ameliorated by treatment with Goji berry extracts through modulation of cAMP levels.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Barbara; Capuzzo, Antonio; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Human retinal pigment epithelium cells were used to investigate the mechanisms underlying blood-retinal barrier disruption under conditions of chronic hyperglycemia. The treatment with 25 mM glucose caused a rapid drop in the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), which was reversed by the addition of either a methanolic extract from Goji (Lycium barbarum L.) berries or its main component, taurine. Intracellular cAMP levels increased concurrently with the high glucose-induced TEER decrease, and were correlated to an increased activity of the cytosolic isoform of the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. The treatment with plant extract or taurine restored control levels. Data are discussed in view of a possible prevention approach for diabetic retinopathy.

  1. Prostaglandin E2 induces chloride secretion through crosstalk between cAMP and calcium signaling in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Thomas, Sheela V; Kathpalia, Paru P; Chen, Yu; Pao, Alan C

    2014-02-01

    Under conditions of high dietary salt intake, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production is increased in the collecting duct and promotes urinary sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion; however, the molecular mechanisms by which PGE2 increases NaCl excretion in this context have not been clearly defined. We used the mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD)-K2 cell line to characterize mechanisms underlying PGE2-regulated NaCl transport. When epithelial Na(+) channels were inhibited, PGE2 exclusively stimulated basolateral EP4 receptors to increase short-circuit current (Isc(PGE2)). We found that Isc(PGE2) was sensitive to inhibition by H-89 and CFTR-172, indicating that EP4 receptors signal through protein kinase A to induce Cl(-) secretion via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Unexpectedly, we also found that Isc(PGE2) was sensitive to inhibition by BAPTA-AM (Ca(2+) chelator), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) (inositol triphosphate receptor blocker), and flufenamic acid (FFA) [Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel (CACC) inhibitor], suggesting that EP4 receptors also signal through Ca(2+) to induce Cl(-) secretion via CACC. Additionally, we observed that PGE2 stimulated an increase in Isc through crosstalk between cAMP and Ca(2+) signaling; BAPTA-AM or 2-APB inhibited a component of Isc(PGE2) that was sensitive to CFTR-172 inhibition; H-89 inhibited a component of Isc(PGE2) that was sensitive to FFA inhibition. Together, our findings indicate that PGE2 activates basolateral EP4 receptors and signals through both cAMP and Ca(2+) to stimulate Cl(-) secretion in IMCD-K2 cells. We propose that these signaling pathways, and the crosstalk between them, may provide a concerted mechanism for enhancing urinary NaCl excretion under conditions of high dietary NaCl intake.

  2. Prostaglandin E2 induces chloride secretion through crosstalk between cAMP and calcium signaling in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Thomas, Sheela V.; Kathpalia, Paru P.; Chen, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Under conditions of high dietary salt intake, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production is increased in the collecting duct and promotes urinary sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion; however, the molecular mechanisms by which PGE2 increases NaCl excretion in this context have not been clearly defined. We used the mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD)-K2 cell line to characterize mechanisms underlying PGE2-regulated NaCl transport. When epithelial Na+ channels were inhibited, PGE2 exclusively stimulated basolateral EP4 receptors to increase short-circuit current (IscPGE2). We found that IscPGE2 was sensitive to inhibition by H-89 and CFTR-172, indicating that EP4 receptors signal through protein kinase A to induce Cl− secretion via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Unexpectedly, we also found that IscPGE2 was sensitive to inhibition by BAPTA-AM (Ca2+ chelator), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) (inositol triphosphate receptor blocker), and flufenamic acid (FFA) [Ca2+-activated Cl− channel (CACC) inhibitor], suggesting that EP4 receptors also signal through Ca2+ to induce Cl− secretion via CACC. Additionally, we observed that PGE2 stimulated an increase in Isc through crosstalk between cAMP and Ca2+ signaling; BAPTA-AM or 2-APB inhibited a component of IscPGE2 that was sensitive to CFTR-172 inhibition; H-89 inhibited a component of IscPGE2 that was sensitive to FFA inhibition. Together, our findings indicate that PGE2 activates basolateral EP4 receptors and signals through both cAMP and Ca2+ to stimulate Cl− secretion in IMCD-K2 cells. We propose that these signaling pathways, and the crosstalk between them, may provide a concerted mechanism for enhancing urinary NaCl excretion under conditions of high dietary NaCl intake. PMID:24284792

  3. Immunization with Tc52 or its amino terminal domain adjuvanted with c-di-AMP induces Th17+Th1 specific immune responses and confers protection against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Marina N.; Cazorla, Silvia I.; Schulze, Kai; Ebensen, Thomas; Guzmán, Carlos A.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.

    2017-01-01

    The development of new adjuvants enables fine modulation of the elicited immune responses. Ideally, the use of one or more adjuvants should result in the induction of a protective immune response against the specific pathogen. We have evaluated the immune response and protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice vaccinated with recombinant Tc52 or its N- and C-terminal domains (NTc52 and CTc52) adjuvanted either with the STING (Stimulator of Interferon Genes) agonist cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP), a pegylated derivative of α-galactosylceramide (αGC-PEG), or oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated CpG motifs (ODN-CpG). All groups immunized with the recombinant proteins plus adjuvant: Tc52+c-di-AMP, NTc52+c-di-AMP, CTc52+c-di-AMP, NTc52+c-di-AMP+αGC-PEG, NTc52+CpG, developed significantly higher anti-Tc52 IgG titers than controls. Groups immunized with c-di-AMP and Tc52, NTc52 or CTc52 showed the highest Tc52-specific IgA titers in nasal lavages. All groups immunized with the recombinant proteins plus adjuvant developed a strong specific cellular immune response in splenocytes and lymph node cells with significant differences for groups immunized with c-di-AMP and Tc52, NTc52 or CTc52. These groups also showed high levels of Tc52-specific IL-17 and IFN-γ producing cells, while NTc52+CpG group only showed significant difference with control in IFN-γ producing cells. Groups immunized with c-di-AMP and Tc52, NTc52 or CTc52 developed predominantly a Th17 and Th1immune response, whereas for NTc52+CpG it was a dominant Th1 response. It was previously described that αGC-PEG inhibits Th17 differentiation by activating NKT cells. Thus, in this work we have also included a group immunized with both adjuvants (NTc52+c-di-AMP+αGC-PEG) with the aim to modulate the Th17 response induced by c-di-AMP. This group showed a significant reduction in the number of Tc52-specific IL-17 producing splenocytes, as compared to the group NTc52+c-di-AMP, which has in turn

  4. Immunization with Tc52 or its amino terminal domain adjuvanted with c-di-AMP induces Th17+Th1 specific immune responses and confers protection against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marina N; Cazorla, Silvia I; Schulze, Kai; Ebensen, Thomas; Guzmán, Carlos A; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2017-02-01

    The development of new adjuvants enables fine modulation of the elicited immune responses. Ideally, the use of one or more adjuvants should result in the induction of a protective immune response against the specific pathogen. We have evaluated the immune response and protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice vaccinated with recombinant Tc52 or its N- and C-terminal domains (NTc52 and CTc52) adjuvanted either with the STING (Stimulator of Interferon Genes) agonist cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP), a pegylated derivative of α-galactosylceramide (αGC-PEG), or oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated CpG motifs (ODN-CpG). All groups immunized with the recombinant proteins plus adjuvant: Tc52+c-di-AMP, NTc52+c-di-AMP, CTc52+c-di-AMP, NTc52+c-di-AMP+αGC-PEG, NTc52+CpG, developed significantly higher anti-Tc52 IgG titers than controls. Groups immunized with c-di-AMP and Tc52, NTc52 or CTc52 showed the highest Tc52-specific IgA titers in nasal lavages. All groups immunized with the recombinant proteins plus adjuvant developed a strong specific cellular immune response in splenocytes and lymph node cells with significant differences for groups immunized with c-di-AMP and Tc52, NTc52 or CTc52. These groups also showed high levels of Tc52-specific IL-17 and IFN-γ producing cells, while NTc52+CpG group only showed significant difference with control in IFN-γ producing cells. Groups immunized with c-di-AMP and Tc52, NTc52 or CTc52 developed predominantly a Th17 and Th1immune response, whereas for NTc52+CpG it was a dominant Th1 response. It was previously described that αGC-PEG inhibits Th17 differentiation by activating NKT cells. Thus, in this work we have also included a group immunized with both adjuvants (NTc52+c-di-AMP+αGC-PEG) with the aim to modulate the Th17 response induced by c-di-AMP. This group showed a significant reduction in the number of Tc52-specific IL-17 producing splenocytes, as compared to the group NTc52+c-di-AMP, which has in turn

  5. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 attenuates PDGF-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway.

    PubMed

    Mottola, Giorgio; Chatterjee, Anuran; Wu, Bian; Chen, Mian; Conte, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Resolvin D1 (RvD1) is a specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator that has been previously shown to attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key process in the development of intimal hyperplasia. We sought to investigate the role of the cAMP/PKA pathway in mediating the effects of the aspirin-triggered epimer 17R-RvD1 (AT-RvD1) on VSMC migration. VSMCs were harvested from human saphenous veins. VSMCs were analyzed for intracellular cAMP levels and PKA activity after exposure to AT-RvD1. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced migration and cytoskeletal changes in VSMCs were observed through scratch, Transwell, and cell shape assays in the presence or absence of a PKA inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cAMP). Further investigation of the pathways involved in AT-RvD1 signaling was performed by measuring Rac1 activity, vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and paxillin translocation. Finally, we examined the role of RvD1 receptors (GPR32 and ALX/FPR2) in AT-RvD1 induced effects on VSMC migration and PKA activity. Treatment with AT-RvD1 induced a significant increase in cAMP levels and PKA activity in VSMCs at 5 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. AT-RvD1 attenuated PDGF-induced VSMC migration and cytoskeletal rearrangements. These effects were attenuated by the PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMP, suggesting cAMP/PKA involvement. Treatment of VSMC with AT-RvD1 inhibited PDGF-stimulated Rac1 activity, increased VASP phosphorylation, and attenuated paxillin localization to focal adhesions; these effects were negated by the addition of Rp-8-Br-cAMP. The effects of AT-RvD1 on VSMC migration and PKA activity were attenuated by blocking ALX/FPR2, suggesting an important role of this G-protein coupled receptor. Our results suggest that AT-RvD1 attenuates PDGF-induced VSMC migration via ALX/FPR2 and cAMP/PKA. Interference with Rac1, VASP and paxillin function appear to mediate the downstream effects of AT-RvD1 on VSMC migration.

  6. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 attenuates PDGF-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anuran; Wu, Bian; Chen, Mian; Conte, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Resolvin D1 (RvD1) is a specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator that has been previously shown to attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key process in the development of intimal hyperplasia. We sought to investigate the role of the cAMP/PKA pathway in mediating the effects of the aspirin-triggered epimer 17R-RvD1 (AT-RvD1) on VSMC migration. Methods VSMCs were harvested from human saphenous veins. VSMCs were analyzed for intracellular cAMP levels and PKA activity after exposure to AT-RvD1. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced migration and cytoskeletal changes in VSMCs were observed through scratch, Transwell, and cell shape assays in the presence or absence of a PKA inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cAMP). Further investigation of the pathways involved in AT-RvD1 signaling was performed by measuring Rac1 activity, vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and paxillin translocation. Finally, we examined the role of RvD1 receptors (GPR32 and ALX/FPR2) in AT-RvD1 induced effects on VSMC migration and PKA activity. Results Treatment with AT-RvD1 induced a significant increase in cAMP levels and PKA activity in VSMCs at 5 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. AT-RvD1 attenuated PDGF-induced VSMC migration and cytoskeletal rearrangements. These effects were attenuated by the PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMP, suggesting cAMP/PKA involvement. Treatment of VSMC with AT-RvD1 inhibited PDGF-stimulated Rac1 activity, increased VASP phosphorylation, and attenuated paxillin localization to focal adhesions; these effects were negated by the addition of Rp-8-Br-cAMP. The effects of AT-RvD1 on VSMC migration and PKA activity were attenuated by blocking ALX/FPR2, suggesting an important role of this G-protein coupled receptor. Conclusions Our results suggest that AT-RvD1 attenuates PDGF-induced VSMC migration via ALX/FPR2 and cAMP/PKA. Interference with Rac1, VASP and paxillin function appear to mediate the downstream effects

  7. Activating AMP-activated protein kinase by an α1 selective activator compound 13 attenuates dexamethasone-induced osteoblast cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shiguang; Mao, Li; Ji, Feng; Wang, Shouguo; Xie, Yue; Fei, Haodong; Wang, Xiao-dong

    2016-03-18

    Excessive glucocorticoid (GC) usage may lead to non-traumatic femoral head osteonecrosis. Dexamethasone (Dex) exerts cytotoxic effect to cultured osteoblasts. Here, we investigated the potential activity of Compound 13 (C13), a novel α1 selective AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, against the process. Our data revealed that C13 pretreatment significantly attenuated Dex-induced apoptosis and necrosis in both osteoblastic-like MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts. AMPK activation mediated C13′ cytoprotective effect in osteoblasts. The AMPK inhibitor Compound C, shRNA-mediated knockdown of AMPKα1, or dominant negative mutation of AMPKα1 (T172A) almost abolished C13-induced AMPK activation and its pro-survival effect in osteoblasts. On the other hand, forced AMPK activation by adding AMPK activator A-769662 or exogenous expression a constitutively-active (ca) AMPKα1 (T172D) mimicked C13's actions and inhibited Dex-induced osteoblast cell death. Meanwhile, A-769662 or ca-AMPKα1 almost nullified C13's activity in osteoblast. Further studies showed that C13 activated AMPK-dependent nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) pathway to inhibit Dex-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts. Such effects by C13 were almost reversed by Compound C or AMPKα1 depletion/mutation. Together, these results suggest that C13 alleviates Dex-induced osteoblast cell death via activating AMPK signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Compound 13 (C13) attenuates dexamethasone (Dex)-induced osteoblast cell death. • C13-induced cytoprotective effect against Dex in osteoblasts requires AMPK activation. • Forced AMPK activation protects osteoblasts from Dex, nullifying C13's activities. • C13 increases NADPH activity and inhibits Dex-induced oxidative stress in osteoblasts.

  8. Dictyostelium discoideum lipids modulate cell-cell cohesion and cyclic AMP signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, D R; Luo, C S; Phillips, J C

    1991-01-01

    During Dictyostelium discoideum development, cell-cell communication is mediated through cyclic AMP (cAMP)-induced cAMP synthesis and secretion (cAMP signaling) and cell-cell contact. Cell-cell contact elicits cAMP secretion and modulates the magnitude of a subsequent cAMP signaling response (D. R. Fontana and P. L. Price, Differentiation 41:184-192, 1989), demonstrating that cell-cell contact and cAMP signaling are not independent events. To identify components involved in the contact-mediated modulation of cAMP signaling, amoebal membranes were added to aggregation-competent amoebae in suspension. The membranes from aggregation-competent amoebae inhibited cAMP signaling at all concentrations tested, while the membranes from vegetative amoebae exhibited a concentration-dependent enhancement or inhibition of cAMP signaling. Membrane lipids inhibited cAMP signaling at all concentrations tested. The lipids abolished cAMP signaling by blocking cAMP-induced adenylyl cyclase activation. The membrane lipids also inhibited amoeba-amoeba cohesion at concentrations comparable to those which inhibited cAMP signaling. The phospholipids and neutral lipids decreased cohesion and inhibited the cAMP signaling response. The glycolipid/sulfolipid fraction enhanced cohesion and cAMP signaling. Caffeine, a known inhibitor of cAMP-induced adenylyl cyclase activation, inhibited amoeba-amoeba cohesion. These studies demonstrate that endogenous lipids are capable of modulating amoeba-amoeba cohesion and cAMP-induced activation of the adenylyl cyclase. These results suggest that cohesion may modulate cAMP-induced adenylyl cyclase activation. Because the complete elimination of cohesion is accompanied by the complete elimination of cAMP signaling, these results further suggest that cohesion may be necessary for cAMP-induced adenylyl cyclase activation in D. discoideum. PMID:1846024

  9. Regulatory effect of AMP-activated protein kinase on pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia in rats: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoying; Fan, Rong; Lu, Yuanyuan; Yu, Chang; Xu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Xie; Liu, Panpan; Yan, Shuangquan; Chen, Chun; Wang, Liangxing

    2014-06-01

    Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays an important role in cardiovascular protection. It can inhibit arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation and cardiac fibroblast collagen synthesis induced by anoxia. However, the role of AMPK-dependent signalling cascades in the pulmonary vascular system is currently unknown. This study aims to determine the effects of AMPK on pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vessel remodelling induced by hypoxia in rats using in vivo and in vitro studies. In vivo study: pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular remodelling were found in hypoxic rats. Meanwhile, AMPKα1 and phosphorylated AMPKα1 were increased markedly in pulmonary arterioles and lung tissues. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure, index of right ventricular hypertrophy and parameters of pulmonary vascular remodelling, including vessel wall area/total area, density of nuclei in medial smooth muscle cells, and thickness of the medial smooth muscle cell layer were markedly suppressed by AICAR, an AMPK agonist. In vitro study: the expression of AMPKα1 and phosphorylated AMPKα1 was increased in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) under hypoxic conditions. The effects of PASMC proliferation stimulated by hypoxia were reinforced by treatment with Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. AICAR inhibited the proliferation of PASMCs stimulated by hypoxia. These findings suggest that AMPK is involved in the formation of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vessel remodelling. Up-regulating AMPK can contribute to decreasing pulmonary vessel remodelling and pulmonary hypertension induced by hypoxia.

  10. Cinnamon Extract Enhances Glucose Uptake in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes and C2C12 Myocytes by Inducing LKB1-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; Honma, Natsumi; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Jia, Liu Nan; Hosono, Takashi; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Ariga, Toyohiko; Seki, Taiichiro

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cinnamon extract (CE) ameliorates type 1 diabetes induced by streptozotocin in rats through the up-regulation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation in both muscle and adipose tissues. This present study was aimed at clarifying the detailed mechanism(s) with which CE increases the glucose uptake in vivo and in cell culture systems using 3T3-L1 adipocytes and C2C12 myotubes in vitro. Specific inhibitors of key enzymes in insulin signaling and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathways, as well as small interference RNA, were used to examine the role of these kinases in the CE-induced glucose uptake. The results showed that CE stimulated the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. An AMPK inhibitor and LKB1 siRNA blocked the CE-induced glucose uptake. We also found for the first time that insulin suppressed AMPK activation in the adipocyte. To investigate the effect of CE on type 2 diabetes in vivo, we further performed oral glucose tolerance tests and insulin tolerance tests in type 2 diabetes model rats administered with CE. The CE improved glucose tolerance in oral glucose tolerance tests, but not insulin sensitivity in insulin tolerance test. In summary, these results indicate that CE ameliorates type 2 diabetes by inducing GLUT4 translocation via the AMPK signaling pathway. We also found insulin antagonistically regulates the activation of AMPK. PMID:24551069

  11. Insulin antagonizes ischemia-induced Thr172 phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase alpha-subunits in heart via hierarchical phosphorylation of Ser485/491.

    PubMed

    Horman, Sandrine; Vertommen, Didier; Heath, Richard; Neumann, Dietbert; Mouton, Véronique; Woods, Angela; Schlattner, Uwe; Wallimann, Theo; Carling, David; Hue, Louis; Rider, Mark H

    2006-03-03

    Previous studies showed that insulin antagonizes AMP-activated protein kinase activation by ischemia and that protein kinase B might be implicated. Here we investigated whether the direct phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase by protein kinase B might participate in this effect. Protein kinase B phosphorylated recombinant bacterially expressed AMP-activated protein kinase heterotrimers at Ser(485) of the alpha1-subunits. In perfused rat hearts, phosphorylation of the alpha1/alpha2 AMP-activated protein kinase subunits on Ser(485)/Ser(491) was increased by insulin and insulin pretreatment decreased the phosphorylation of the alpha-subunits at Thr(172) in a subsequent ischemic episode. It is proposed that the effect of insulin to antagonize AMP-activated protein kinase activation involves a hierarchical mechanism whereby Ser(485)/Ser(491) phosphorylation by protein kinase B reduces subsequent phosphorylation of Thr(172) by LKB1 and the resulting activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

  12. Ca/sup + +/- and cyclic AMP-induced changes in intact cell phosphorylation of ileal microvillus membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, G.W.G.; Hannah, C.M.; Cohen, M.; Donowitz, M.

    1986-03-05

    Pieces of rabbit distal ileal mucosa, with the muscularis propria and serosa removed, were incubated for 90 minutes in Krebs-Ringer bicarborate buffer (KRB) with /sup 32/PO/sub 4/ to label the intracellular nucleotide pools. After rinsing, the mucosal pieces were transferred to KRB in the absence and presence of 10 ..mu..M A23187 or 10 mM theophylline. After a further 10 minutes the cells were scraped off and microvillus membranes prepared. The membranes were solubilized, subjected to two dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography, and analyzed by densitometry. A23187 increased the phosphorylation of four microvillus membrane proteins with M/sub r/ of 32, 52, 110 and 116K. Increased phosphorylation of the 52 and 116K proteins has also been detected in microvillus membranes subjected to Ca/sup + +/ and calmodulin in the presence of ..gamma..-/sup 32/P-ATP. Theophylline increased the phosphorylation of the same 32 and 52K proteins and, additionally, of a second 32K peptide. While any of these proteins could be involved in the control of electrolyte transport, it is noteworthy that increased Ca/sup + +/, and increased cyclic AMP levels exert similar effects upon intestinal electrolyte transport. That A23187 and theophylline both increase the phosphorylation of the 32 and 52K proteins increases the possibility that these are involved in ion transport.

  13. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits TGF-β-, angiotensin II-, aldosterone-, high glucose-, and albumin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Han; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Ja Seon; Chang, Jai Won; Kim, Soon Bae; Park, Jung Sik; Lee, Sang Koo

    2013-03-15

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a novel mechanism that promotes renal fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), angiotensin II, aldosterone, high glucose, and urinary albumin are well-known causes of EMT and renal fibrosis. We examined whether and how activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) suppressed EMT induced by the above agents in tubular epithelial cells. All experiments were performed using HK-2 cells. Protein expression was measured by Western blot analysis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Exposure of tubular cells to TGF-β (10 ng/ml), angiotensin II (1 μM), aldosterone (100 nM), high glucose (30 mM), and albumin (5 mg/ml) for 5 days induced EMT, as shown by upregulation of α-smooth muscle actin and downregulation of E-cadherin. ROS and NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression were increased, and antioxidants such as tiron and N-acetylcysteine inhibited EMT induction. Metformin (the best known clinical activator of AMPK) suppressed EMT induction through inhibition of ROS via induction of heme oxygenase-1 and endogenous antioxidant thioredoxin. An AMPK inhibitor (compound C) and AMPK small interfering RNA blocked the effect of metformin, and another AMPK activator [5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1β riboside (AICAR)] exerted the same effects as metformin. In conclusion, AMPK activation might be beneficial in attenuating the tubulointerstitial fibrosis induced by TGF-β, angiotensin II, aldosterone, high glucose, and urinary albumin.

  14. 24-hydroxyursolic acid from the leaves of the Diospyros kaki (Persimmon) induces apoptosis by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Prem; Oh, Won-Keun; Thuong, Phuong Thien; Cho, Sung Dae; Choi, Hong Seok

    2010-05-01

    There are multiple lines of evidence that persimmon extract and its constituents have potent antitumor activity against human cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of 24-hydroxyursolic acid, a triterpenoid found in persimmon, on antitumor activities are not yet understood. Here, we demonstrate that 24-hydroxyursolic acid inhibited cell proliferation, strongly activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mediated critical anticancer effects by inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) expression in HT-29 cells. In addition, 24-hydroxyursolic acid induced cellular apoptosis by activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), caspase-3, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15. It also strongly induced DNA fragmentation in HT-29 cells and thereby significantly inhibited colony formation of HT-29 cells in soft agar. In addition, 24-hydroxyursolic acid blocked the EGF-induced ERKs phosphorylation and led to the inhibition of AP-1 activity and cell transformation in JB6 CL41 cells. Collectively, these findings are the first to reveal a molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of 24-hydroxyursolic acid and might account for the reported chemopreventive and chemotherapic effects of persimmon extracts. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart. New York.

  15. Extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathways in the mouse kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jin; Cheng, Dongmei; Mi, Zaichuan

    2011-01-01

    The renal extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine and 3′,5′-cAMP-adenosine pathways (extracellular cAMPs→AMPs→adenosine) may contribute to renal adenosine production. Because mouse kidneys provide opportunities to investigate renal adenosine production in genetically modified kidneys, it is important to determine whether mouse kidneys express these cAMP-adenosine pathways. We administered (renal artery) 2′,3′-cAMP and 3′,5′-cAMP to isolated, perfused mouse kidneys and measured renal venous secretion rates of 2′,3′-cAMP, 3′,5′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, 5′-AMP, adenosine, and inosine. Arterial infusions of 2′,3′-cAMP increased (P < 0.0001) the mean venous secretion of 2′-AMP (390-fold), 3′-AMP (497-fold), adenosine (18-fold), and inosine (adenosine metabolite; 7-fold), but they did not alter 5′-AMP secretion. Infusions of 3′,5′-cAMP did not affect venous secretion of 2′-AMP or 3′-AMP, but they increased (P < 0.0001) secretion of 5′-AMP (5-fold), adenosine (17-fold), and inosine (6-fold). Energy depletion (metabolic inhibitors) increased the secretion of 2′,3′-cAMP (8-fold, P = 0.0081), 2′-AMP (4-fold, P = 0.0028), 3′-AMP (4-fold, P = 0.0270), 5′-AMP (3-fold, P = 0.0662), adenosine (2-fold, P = 0.0317), and inosine (7-fold, P = 0.0071), but it did not increase 3′,5′-cAMP secretion. The 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway was quantitatively similar in CD73 −/− vs. +/+ kidneys. However, 3′,5′-cAMP induced a 6.7-fold greater increase in 5′-AMP, an attenuated increase (61% reduction) in inosine and a similar increase in adenosine in CD73 −/− vs. CD73 +/+ kidneys. In mouse kidneys, 1) 2′,3′-cAMP and 3′,5′-cAMP are metabolized to their corresponding AMPs, which are subsequently metabolized to adenosine; 2) energy depletion activates the 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine, but not the 3′,5′-cAMP-adenosine, pathway; and 3) although CD73 is involved in the 3′,5′-AMP-adenosine pathway, alternative

  16. Role of Deleted in Breast Cancer 1 (DBC1) Protein in SIRT1 Deacetylase Activation Induced by Protein Kinase A and AMP-activated Protein Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Veronica; Escande, Carlos; Chini, Claudia C.; Giri, Shailendra; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Matalonga, Jonathan; Lou, Zhenkun; Chini, Eduardo N.

    2012-01-01

    The NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 is a key regulator of several aspects of metabolism and aging. SIRT1 activation is beneficial for several human diseases, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, liver steatosis, and Alzheimer disease. We have recently shown that the protein deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) is a key regulator of SIRT1 activity in vivo. Furthermore, SIRT1 and DBC1 form a dynamic complex that is regulated by the energetic state of the organism. Understanding how the interaction between SIRT1 and DBC1 is regulated is therefore essential to design strategies aimed to activate SIRT1. Here, we investigated which pathways can lead to the dissociation of SIRT1 and DBC1 and consequently to SIRT1 activation. We observed that PKA activation leads to a fast and transient activation of SIRT1 that is DBC1-dependent. In fact, an increase in cAMP/PKA activity resulted in the dissociation of SIRT1 and DBC1 in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner. Pharmacological AMPK activation led to SIRT1 activation by a DBC1-dependent mechanism. Indeed, we found that AMPK activators promote SIRT1-DBC1 dissociation in cells, resulting in an increase in SIRT1 activity. In addition, we observed that the SIRT1 activation promoted by PKA and AMPK occurs without changes in the intracellular levels of NAD+. We propose that PKA and AMPK can acutely activate SIRT1 by inducing dissociation of SIRT1 from its endogenous inhibitor DBC1. Our experiments provide new insight on the in vivo mechanism of SIRT1 regulation and a new avenue for the development of pharmacological SIRT1 activators targeted at the dissociation of the SIRT1-DBC1 complex. PMID:22553202

  17. cAMP-independent role of PKA in tonicity-induced transactivation of tonicity-responsive enhancer/ osmotic response element-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Joan D; Persaud, Prita; Williams, Chester K; Chen, Ye; Burg, Maurice B

    2002-12-24

    Hypertonicity-induced increase in activity of the transcription factor tonicity-responsive enhancer/osmotic response element-binding protein (TonEBP/OREBP) protects renal cells by increasing transcription of genes, including those involved in increased accumulation of organic osmolytes. We previously showed that hypertonicity increases transactivating activity of TonEBP/OREBP. Assay with a binary GAL4 transactivation system showed that the 984 C-terminal amino acids of TonEBP/OREBP (amino acids 548-1531) contain a tonicity-dependent transactivation domain (TAD). Also, amino acids 548-1531 undergo tonicity-dependent phosphorylation, and some inhibitors of protein kinases reduce the tonicity-dependent transactivation. In the present studies we examined the role of protein kinase A (PKA). (i) An inhibitor of PKA (H89) reduces tonicity-dependent increases in transactivation, ORE/TonE reporter activity, and induction of aldose reductase and betaine transporter mRNAs. (ii) Overexpression of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc) increases transactivation activity of amino acids 548-1531 and activity of an ORE/TonE reporter. The increases are much greater under isotonic than under hypertonic conditions. (iii) A dominant-negative PKAc reduces activity of an ORE/TonE reporter. (iv) PKAc activity increases with tonicity but cAMP does not. (v) TonEBP/OREBP and PKAc coimmunoprecipitate. (vi) amino acids 872-1271, including N- and C-terminal polyglutamine stretches, demonstrate tonicity-dependent transactivation, albeit less than amino acids 548-1531, and a similar role for PKA. (i) PKA plays an important role in TonEBP/OREBP activation of tonicity-dependent gene expression; (ii) PKA activation of TonEBP/OREBP appears to be cAMP-independent; and (iii) amino acids 872-1271 are sufficient for tonicity-dependent transactivation of TonEBP/OREBP.

  18. cAMP-independent role of PKA in tonicity-induced transactivation of tonicity-responsive enhancer/ osmotic response element-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Joan D.; Persaud, Prita; Williams, Chester K.; Chen, Ye; Burg, Maurice B.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertonicity-induced increase in activity of the transcription factor tonicity-responsive enhancer/osmotic response element-binding protein (TonEBP/OREBP) protects renal cells by increasing transcription of genes, including those involved in increased accumulation of organic osmolytes. We previously showed that hypertonicity increases transactivating activity of TonEBP/OREBP. Assay with a binary GAL4 transactivation system showed that the 984 C-terminal amino acids of TonEBP/OREBP (amino acids 548–1531) contain a tonicity-dependent transactivation domain (TAD). Also, amino acids 548–1531 undergo tonicity-dependent phosphorylation, and some inhibitors of protein kinases reduce the tonicity-dependent transactivation. In the present studies we examined the role of protein kinase A (PKA). Results: (i) An inhibitor of PKA (H89) reduces tonicity-dependent increases in transactivation, ORE/TonE reporter activity, and induction of aldose reductase and betaine transporter mRNAs. (ii) Overexpression of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc) increases transactivation activity of amino acids 548–1531 and activity of an ORE/TonE reporter. The increases are much greater under isotonic than under hypertonic conditions. (iii) A dominant-negative PKAc reduces activity of an ORE/TonE reporter. (iv) PKAc activity increases with tonicity but cAMP does not. (v) TonEBP/OREBP and PKAc coimmunoprecipitate. (vi) amino acids 872–1271, including N– and C-terminal polyglutamine stretches, demonstrate tonicity-dependent transactivation, albeit less than amino acids 548–1531, and a similar role for PKA. Conclusions: (i) PKA plays an important role in TonEBP/OREBP activation of tonicity-dependent gene expression; (ii) PKA activation of TonEBP/OREBP appears to be cAMP-independent; and (iii) amino acids 872–1271 are sufficient for tonicity-dependent transactivation of TonEBP/OREBP. PMID:12482947

  19. Steroid-mediated inhibition of cAMP induced de novo synthesis of cytochrome P-450/sub 17 / in Leydig cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.B.; Sha, L.; Payne, A.H.

    1987-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which testosterone (T), produced during cAMP induction of P-450/sub 17 /, modulates the rate of its de novo synthesis. Purified Leydig cells (LC) were maintained in culture for 7 days prior to the initiation of treatment. De novo synthesis was determined by TVS-methionine incorporation, immunoprecipitation with specific antibody, separation by SDS-gel electrophoresis and quantitation by laser densitometry. Treatment of LC with 0.05 mM 8-Br-cAMP (cA) results in a time-dependent increase in the rate of de novo synthesis of P-450/sub 17 / which is increased 2 fold when T production is inhibited by aminoglutethimide (AG). The addition of increasing concentrations of the androgen receptor antagonist, hydroxyflutamide (1-10 M), to cA treated LC enhances the rate of synthesis similar to that seen in cA-treated LC in which T production was inhibited by AG. The addition of increasing concentrations of T (0.05-5 M) or the androgen agonist, mibolerone (1-5 M), to cA + AG treated LC causes a dose-dependent reversal of the AG-enhanced increase in the rate of cA-induced de novo synthesis of P-450/sub 17 /. Addition of estradiol (1 M) or dexamethasone (1 M) was without effect. These data indicate that T produced during cA induction of P-450/sub 17 / negatively regulates the rate of synthesis of this cytochrome P-450 enzyme by an androgen receptor mediated mechanism.

  20. Betulin binds to melanocortin receptors and antagonizes alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone induced cAMP generation in mouse melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Muceniece, Ruta; Saleniece, Kristine; Riekstina, Una; Krigere, Liga; Tirzitis, Gunars; Ancans, Janis

    2007-01-01

    Betulin is a principal component of birch bark and is known to possess a broad range of biological activities, including antiinflammatory, antiviral and anticancer actions. The present study was carried out in vitro to clarify the influence of betulin on melanocortin (MC) receptor-ergic signalling by using COS-7 cells transfected with corresponding human MC receptor DNA. The results showed that betulin binds to the human melanocortin MC1, three to five receptors with selectivity to the MC1 subtype (K(i) value 1.022 +/- 0.115 microM). Betulin binds to the MC receptors with the following potency order-MC > MC3 > MC5 > MC4. Betulin itself does not stimulate cAMP generation, however, it slightly antagonizes alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH)-induced cAMP accumulation in the mouse melanoma cell line B16-F1. As a water-insoluble substance, betulin was dissolved in DMSO therefore DMSO competition with the labelled ligand NDP-MSH for the binding to the MC receptors was tested in the identical experimental set-up. We found that DMSO competes for binding to all the MC receptor subtypes, at 20% concentration and above. Selectivity for one or another receptor subtype was not observed. We have demonstrated for the first time, the ability of the plant compound betulin to bind to the MC receptors. One may suggest MC receptor MC1 subtype as the essential target for the antimelanoma action of betulin and its structurally close molecules such as betulinic acid. Moreover, we have found a new non-peptide small molecule MC mimetic, that is betulin. Thus, we report a new chemical motif for the binding to the MC receptors that could be used as a template for the search of more selective MC mimetics.

  1. Short-chain fatty acids activate AMP-activated protein kinase and ameliorate ethanol-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Elamin, Elhaseen E; Masclee, Ad A; Dekker, Jan; Pieters, Harm-Jan; Jonkers, Daisy M

    2013-12-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have been shown to promote intestinal barrier function, but their protective effects against ethanol-induced intestinal injury and underlying mechanisms remain essentially unknown. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of SCFAs on ethanol-induced barrier dysfunction and to examine the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as a possible mechanism using Caco-2 monolayers. The monolayers were treated apically with butyrate (2, 10, or 20 mmol/L), propionate (4, 20, or 40 mmol/L), or acetate (8, 40, or 80 mmol/L) for 1 h before ethanol (40 mmol/L) for 3 h. Barrier function was analyzed by measurement of transepithelial resistance and permeation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran. Distribution of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zona occludens-1, occludin, and filamentous-actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence. Metabolic stress was determined by measuring oxidative stress, mitochondrial function, and ATP using dichlorofluorescein diacetate, dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, and bioluminescence assay, respectively. AMPK was knocked down by small interfering RNA (siRNA), and its activity was assessed by a cell-based ELISA. Exposure to ethanol significantly impaired barrier function compared with controls (P < 0.0001), disrupted TJ and F-actin cytoskeleton integrity, and induced metabolic stress. However, pretreatment with 2 mmol/L butyrate, 4 mmol/L propionate, and 8 mmol/L acetate significantly alleviated the ethanol-induced barrier dysfunction, TJ and F-actin disruption, and metabolic stress compared with ethanol-exposed monolayers (P < 0.0001). The promoting effects on barrier function were abolished by inhibiting AMPK using either compound C or siRNA. These observations indicate that SCFAs exhibit protective effects against ethanol-induced barrier disruption via AMPK activation, suggesting a potential for SCFAs as prophylactic and/or therapeutic factors against ethanol-induced

  2. Adiponectin Inhibits LPS-Induced HMGB1 Release through an AMP Kinase and Heme Oxygenase-1-Dependent Pathway in RAW 264 Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaede, Ryuji; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) is a late inflammatory mediator that exaggerates septic symptoms. Adiponectin, an adipokine, has potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible effects of adiponectin on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced HMGB1 release are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of full length adiponectin on HMGB1 release in LPS-stimulated RAW 264 macrophage cells. Treatment of the cells with LPS alone significantly induced HMGB1 release associated with HMGB1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytosol. However, prior treatment with adiponectin suppressed LPS-induced HMGB1 release and translocation. The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin- (IL-) 10 similarly suppressed LPS-induced HMGB1 release. Adiponectin treatment decreased toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mRNA expression and increased heme oxygenase- (HO-) 1 mRNA expression without inducing IL-10 mRNA, while IL-10 treatment decreased TLR2 and HMGB1 mRNA expression and increased the expression of IL-10 and HO-1 mRNA. Treatment with the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP completely prevented the suppression of HMGB1 release by adiponectin but only partially inhibited that induced by IL-10. Treatment with compound C, an AMP kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, abolished the increase in HO-1 expression and the suppression of HMGB1 release mediated by adiponectin. In conclusion, our results indicate that adiponectin suppresses HMGB1 release by LPS through an AMPK-mediated and HO-1-dependent IL-10-independent pathway. PMID:27313399

  3. Regulation of mitochondrial poly(ADP-Ribose) polymerase activation by the β-adrenoceptor/cAMP/protein kinase A axis during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Brunyanszki, Attila; Olah, Gabor; Coletta, Ciro; Szczesny, Bartosz; Szabo, Csaba

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the regulation of mitochondrial poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) system during oxidative stress in U937 monocytes. Oxidative stress induced an early (10 minutes) mitochondrial DNA damage, and concomitant activation of PARP1 in the mitochondria. These early events were followed by a progressive mitochondrial oxidant production and nuclear PARP1 activation (by 6 hours). These processes led to a functional impairment of mitochondria, culminating in cell death of mixed (necrotic/apoptotic) type. β-Adrenoceptor blockade with propranolol or inhibition of its downstream cAMP/PKA signaling attenuated, while β-adrenoceptor agonists and cAMP/PKA activators enhanced, the oxidant-mediated PARP1 activation. In the presence of cAMP, recombinant PKA directly phosphorylated recombinant PARP1 on serines 465 (in the automodification domain) and 782 and 785 (both in the catalytic domain). Inhibition of the β-adrenergic receptor/cAMP/PKA axis protected against the oxidant-mediated cell injury. Propranolol also suppressed PARP1 activation in peripheral blood leukocytes during bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation in mice. We conclude that the activation of mitochondrial PARP1 is an early, active participant in oxidant-induced cell death, which is under the control of β-adrenoceptor/cAMP/PKA axis through the regulation of PARP1 activity by PARP1 phosphorylation.

  4. The stellate vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype is induced by IL-1β via the secretion of PGE2 and subsequent cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activation.

    PubMed

    Blirando, Karl; Blaise, Régis; Gorodnaya, Natalia; Rouxel, Clotilde; Meilhac, Olivier; Vincent, Pierre; Limon, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Atherosclerosis development is associated with morphological changes to intimal cells, leading to a stellate cell phenotype. In this study, we aimed to determine whether and how key pro-atherogenic cytokines present in atherosclerotic plaques (IL-1β, TNFα and IFNγ) could induce this phenotype, as these molecules are known to trigger the transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). We found that, IL-1β was the only major inflammatory mediator tested capable of inducing a stellate morphology in VSMCs. This finding was confirmed by staining for F-actin and vinculin at focal adhesions, as these two markers were disrupted only by IL-1β. We then investigated the possible association of this IL-1β-dependent change in morphology with an increase in intracellular cAMP concentration ([cAMP]), using the FRET-based biosensor for cAMP (T)Epac(VV). Experiments in the presence of IL-1β or medium conditioned by IL-1β-treated VSMCs and pharmacological tools demonstrated that the long-term increase in intracellular cAMP concentration was induced by the secretion of an autocrine/paracrine mediator, prostaglandin E₂(PGE₂), acting through the EP4 receptor. Finally, by knocking down the expression of the regulatory subunit PKAR1α, thereby reproducing the effects of IL-1β and PGE₂ on VSMCs, we demonstrated the contribution of PKA activity to the observed behavior of VSMCs.

  5. C1q/TNF-related protein-9 inhibits cytokine-induced vascular inflammation and leukocyte adhesiveness via AMP-activated protein kinase activation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Hee; Lee, Min Jung; Kang, Yu Mi; Lee, Yoo La; Seol, So Mi; Yoon, Hae Kyeong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Lee, Woo Je; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2016-01-05

    Although recent studies have reported cardioprotective effects of C1q/TNF-related protein 9 (CTRP9), the closet adiponectin paralog, its role on cytokine-induced endothelial inflammation is unknown. We investigated whether CTRP9 prevented inflammatory cytokine-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and inhibited the expression of adhesion molecules and a chemokine in the vascular endothelial cell. We used human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) to examine the effects of CTRP9 on NF-κB activation and the expression of NF-κB-mediated genes, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was used as a representative proinflammatory cytokine. In an adhesion assay using THP-1 cells, CTRP9 reduced TNFα-induced adhesion of monocytes to HAECs. Treatment with CTRP9 significantly decreased TNFα-induced activation of NF-κB, as well as the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MCP-1. In addition, treatment with CTRP9 significantly increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the downstream target of AMPK. The inhibitory effect of CTRP9 on the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MCP-1 and monocyte adhesion to HAECs was abolished after transfection with an AMPKα1-specific siRNA. Our study is the first to demonstrate that CTRP9 attenuates cytokine-induced vascular inflammation in endothelial cells mediated by AMPK activation.

  6. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei-Wan; Li, Xin-Yuan; Liu, Hui-Bin; Wang, Zi-Rui; Hu, Qing-Qing; Li, Yu-Xia; Song, Bin-Lin; Lou, Jie; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Ma, He-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (P O ). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and P O . Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells.

  7. α-Terpineol induces fatty liver in mice mediated by the AMP-activated kinase and sterol response element binding protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, You-Jin; Sim, Woo-Cheol; Choi, Hyun Kyu; Lee, Seung-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2013-05-01

    The use of herbal medicines in disease prevention and treatment is growing rapidly worldwide, without careful consideration of safety issues. α-Terpineol is a monoterpene alcoholic component of Melaleuca alternifolia, Salvia officinalis and Carthamus tinctorius that is used widely as a flavor and essential oil in food. The present study showed that α-terpineol induces fatty liver via the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mTOR-sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) pathway. α-Terpineol-treated hepatocytes had significantly increased neutral lipid accumulation. α-Terpineol suppressed AMPK phosphorylation, and increased p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) phosphorylation and SREBP-1 activation. It also increased luciferase activity in cells transfected with LXRE-tk-Luc and SRE-tk-Luc. Inhibition of mTOR signaling by co-treatment with rapamycin or co-transfection with dominant negative p70S6K blocked completely the effects of α-terpineol. α-Terpineol oral administration to mice for 2weeks led to decreased AMPK phosphorylation and increased SREBP-1 activation in the liver, followed by hepatic lipid accumulation. Conversely, rapamycin co-treatment reversed α-terpineol-induced SREBP-1 activation and fatty liver in mice. These data provide evidence that α-terpineol causes fatty liver, an effect mediated by the AMPK/mTOR/SREBP-1 pathway.

  8. Adrenoreceptors are involved in the stimulation of neutrophils by exercise-induced circulating concentrations of Hsp72: cAMP as a potential "intracellular danger signal".

    PubMed

    Hinchado, María D; Giraldo, Esther; Ortega, Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    Recently, the terms "stress mediators" or "danger signals" have come to be used to describe endogenous molecules that can be released in stress situations and activate the innate immune system even in the absence of antigenic stimuli. There is evidence suggesting that extracellular heat shock proteins of 72  kDa (eHsp72), together with noradrenaline (NA), are candidates as danger signals during exercise-induced stress, interacting in the activation of neutrophils. Previous studies have shown that the post-exercise circulating concentration of eHsp72 activates the phagocytic process of neutrophils with the participation of toll-like receptor 2, but that other receptors must also be involved. The present investigation evaluates the role of adrenoreceptors in the activation of the chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and fungicidal capacity of neutrophils by the post-exercise circulating concentration of eHsp72. The results showed that intact α- and β-adrenoreceptors are necessary for the stimulation of all stages of the phagocytic process by eHsp72. Also, eHsp72 increased the intracellular levels of cAMP, suggesting that it is an "intracellular danger signal" during stress-induced activation of neutrophils mediated by extracellular heat shock proteins. These results can contribute to better understanding the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the innate immune response mediated by "danger signals" during exercise, and probably during other stress situations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Is Required for Berberine-Induced Reduction of Atherosclerosis in Mice: The Role of Uncoupling Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilong; Zhang, Miao; Liang, Bin; Shirwany, Najeeb; Zhu, Yi; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Aims Berberine, a botanical alkaloid purified from Coptidis rhizoma, is reported to activate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Whether AMPK is required for the protective effects of berberine in cardiovascular diseases remains unknown. This study was designed to determine whether AMPK is required for berberine-induced reduction of oxidative stress and atherosclerosis in vivo. Methods ApoE (ApoE-/-) mice and ApoE-/-/AMPK alpha 2-/- mice that were fed Western diets were treated with berberine for 8 weeks. Atherosclerotic aortic lesions, expression of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), and markers of oxidative stress were evaluated in isolated aortas. Results In ApoE-/- mice, chronic administration of berberine significantly reduced aortic lesions, markedly reduced oxidative stress and expression of adhesion molecules in aorta, and significantly increased UCP2 levels. In contrast, in ApoE-/-/AMPK alpha 2-/- mice, berberine had little effect on those endpoints. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), berberine significantly increased UCP2 mRNA and protein expression in an AMPK-dependent manner. Transfection of HUVECs with nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1)-specific siRNA attenuated berberine-induced expression of UCP2, whereas transfection with control siRNA did not. Finally, berberine promoted mitochondrial biogenesis that contributed to up-regulation of UCP2 expression. Conclusion We conclude that berberine reduces oxidative stress and vascular inflammation, and suppresses atherogenesis via a mechanism that includes stimulation of AMPK-dependent UCP2 expression. PMID:21980456

  10. Prostaglandin D2 induces nuclear import of the sex-determining factor SOX9 via its cAMP-PKA phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Malki, Safia; Nef, Serge; Notarnicola, Cécile; Thevenet, Laurie; Gasca, Stéphan; Méjean, Catherine; Berta, Philippe; Poulat, Francis; Boizet-Bonhoure, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    During mammalian gonadal development, nuclear import/export of the transcription factor SOX9 is a critical step of the Sry-initiated testis-determining cascade. In this study, we identify a molecular mechanism contributing to the SOX9 nuclear translocation in NT2/D1 cells, which is mediated by the prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) signalling pathway via stimulation of its adenylcyclase-coupled DP1 receptor. We find that activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) induces phosphorylation of SOX9 on its two S64 and S181 PKA sites, and its nuclear localization by enhancing SOX9 binding to the nucleocytoplasmic transport protein importin β. Moreover, in embryonic gonads, we detect a male-specific prostaglandin D synthase expression and an active PGD2 signal at the time and place of SOX9 expression. We thus propose a new step in the sex-determining cascade where PGD2 acts as an autocrine factor inducing SOX9 nuclear translocation and subsequent Sertoli cell differentiation. PMID:15889150

  11. Prostaglandin D2 induces nuclear import of the sex-determining factor SOX9 via its cAMP-PKA phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Malki, Safia; Nef, Serge; Notarnicola, Cécile; Thevenet, Laurie; Gasca, Stéphan; Méjean, Catherine; Berta, Philippe; Poulat, Francis; Boizet-Bonhoure, Brigitte

    2005-05-18

    During mammalian gonadal development, nuclear import/export of the transcription factor SOX9 is a critical step of the Sry-initiated testis-determining cascade. In this study, we identify a molecular mechanism contributing to the SOX9 nuclear translocation in NT2/D1 cells, which is mediated by the prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) signalling pathway via stimulation of its adenylcyclase-coupled DP1 receptor. We find that activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) induces phosphorylation of SOX9 on its two S64 and S181 PKA sites, and its nuclear localization by enhancing SOX9 binding to the nucleocytoplasmic transport protein importin beta. Moreover, in embryonic gonads, we detect a male-specific prostaglandin D synthase expression and an active PGD2 signal at the time and place of SOX9 expression. We thus propose a new step in the sex-determining cascade where PGD2 acts as an autocrine factor inducing SOX9 nuclear translocation and subsequent Sertoli cell differentiation.

  12. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Yuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells. PMID:27635187

  13. Aspirin-induced AMP-activated protein kinase activation regulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Jin Young; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation was greater in VSMC from SHR than WKY. {yields} Aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation inhibited proliferation of VSMC from SHR. {yields} Low basal AMPK phosphorylation in SHR elicits increased VSMC proliferation. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK restored decreased VSMC proliferation by aspirin in SHR. {yields} Aspirin exerts anti-proliferative effect through AMPK activation in VSMC from SHR. -- Abstract: Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), used to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, plays an important role in the regulation of cellular proliferation. However, mechanisms responsible for aspirin-induced growth inhibition are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether aspirin may exert therapeutic effects via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from wistar kyoto rats (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Aspirin increased AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner in VSMCs from WKY and SHR, but with greater efficacy in SHR. In SHR, a low basal phosphorylation status of AMPK resulted in increased VSMC proliferation and aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation inhibited proliferation of VSMCs. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and AMPK siRNA reduced the aspirin-mediated inhibition of VSMC proliferation, this effect was more pronounced in SHR than in WKY. In VSMCs from SHR, aspirin increased p53 and p21 expression and inhibited the expression of cell cycle associated proteins, such as p-Rb, cyclin D, and cyclin E. These results indicate that in SHR VSMCs aspirin exerts anti-proliferative effects through the induction of AMPK phosphorylation.

  14. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase α2 in Neutrophils Regulates Vascular Repair via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α and a Network of Proteins Affecting Metabolism and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Malik, Randa; Zippel, Nina; Frömel, Timo; Heidler, Juliana; Zukunft, Sven; Walzog, Barbara; Ansari, Nariman; Pampaloni, Francesco; Wingert, Susanne; Rieger, Michael A.; Wittig, Ilka; Fisslthaler, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is stimulated by hypoxia, and although the AMPKα1 catalytic subunit has been implicated in angiogenesis, little is known about the role played by the AMPKα2 subunit in vascular repair. Objective: To determine the role of the AMPKα2 subunit in vascular repair. Methods and Results: Recovery of blood flow after femoral artery ligation was impaired (>80%) in AMPKα2−/− versus wild-type mice, a phenotype reproduced in mice lacking AMPKα2 in myeloid cells (AMPKα2ΔMC). Three days after ligation, neutrophil infiltration into ischemic limbs of AMPKα2ΔMC mice was lower than that in wild-type mice despite being higher after 24 hours. Neutrophil survival in ischemic tissue is required to attract monocytes that contribute to the angiogenic response. Indeed, apoptosis was increased in hypoxic neutrophils from AMPKα2ΔMC mice, fewer monocytes were recruited, and gene array analysis revealed attenuated expression of proangiogenic proteins in ischemic AMPKα2ΔMC hindlimbs. Many angiogenic growth factors are regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induction was attenuated in AMPKα2-deficient cells and accompanied by its enhanced hydroxylation. Also, fewer proteins were regulated by hypoxia in neutrophils from AMPKα2ΔMC mice. Mechanistically, isocitrate dehydrogenase expression and the production of α-ketoglutarate, which negatively regulate hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stability, were attenuated in neutrophils from wild-type mice but remained elevated in cells from AMPKα2ΔMC mice. Conclusions: AMPKα2 regulates α-ketoglutarate generation, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stability, and neutrophil survival, which in turn determine further myeloid cell recruitment and repair potential. The activation of AMPKα2 in neutrophils is a decisive event in the initiation of vascular repair after ischemia. PMID:27777247

  15. The Role of Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase and AMP-Activated Kinase in the Rapid Estrogenic Attenuation of Cannabinoid-Induced Changes in Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Garrett S.; Peng, Kelly C.; Wagner, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    We sought to determine the involvement of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the estrogenic antagonism of the cannabinoid regulation of energy homeostasis. Food intake and body weight were evaluated in ovariectomized female guinea pigs treated s.c. with estradiol benzoate (EB) or its sesame oil vehicle, or the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 or its cremephor/ethanol/0.9% saline vehicle. AMPK catalytic subunit, PI3K p85α regulatory subunit and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene expression was assessed via quantitative RT-PCR in microdissected hypothalamic tissue. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed in hypothalamic slices. Both EB and AM251 decreased food intake and weight gain, and increased AMPKα1, AMPKα2 and PI3K p85α gene expression in the mediobasal hypothalamus. 17β-Estradiol rapidly and markedly attenuated the decreases in glutamatergic miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequency caused by the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in POMC neurons. This rapid estrogenic diminution of cannabinoid-induced decreases in mEPSC frequency was blocked by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780 and the PI3K inhibitor PI 828, the latter of which also prevented the AM251-induced increase in mEPSC frequency. In addition, the AMPK activator metformin reversed the EB-induced decreases in food intake and weight gain and restored the ability of WIN 55,212-2 to reduce mEPSC frequency. These data reveal that estrogens physiologically antagonize cannabinoid-induced changes in appetite and POMC neuronal activity by activating PI3K and inhibiting AMPK. As such, they provide insight into the neuroanatomical substrates and signal transduction mechanisms upon which these counter-regulatory factors converge in the control of energy homeostasis.

  16. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by metformin ablates angiotensin II-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and hypertension in mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Duan, Quanlu; Song, Ping; Ding, Ye; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2017-07-01

    Metformin, one of the most frequently prescribed medications for type 2 diabetes, reportedly exerts BP-lowering effects in patients with diabetes. However, the effects and underlying mechanisms of metformin on BP in non-diabetic conditions remain to be determined. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of metformin on angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion-induced hypertension in vivo. The effects of metformin on BP were investigated in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice and in mice lacking AMP-activated protein kinase α2 (AMPKα2) mice with or without Ang II infusion. Also, the effect of metformin on Ang II-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was explored in cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Metformin markedly reduced BP in Ang II-infused WT mice but not in AMPKα2-deficient mice. In cultured hVSMCs, Ang II treatment resulted in inactivation of AMPK, as well as the subsequent induction of spliced X-box binding protein-1, phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α and expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa, representing three well-characterized ER stress biomarkers. Moreover, AMPK activation by metformin ablated Ang II-induced ER stress in hVSMCs. Mechanistically, metformin-activated AMPKα2 suppressed ER stress by increasing phospholamban phosphorylation. Metformin alleviates Ang II-triggered hypertension in mice by activating AMPKα2, which mediates phospholamban phosphorylation and inhibits Ang II-induced ER stress in vascular smooth muscle cells. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase and phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase3 β mediate ursolic acid induced apoptosis in HepG2 liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyun-Soo; Kwon, Hee Young; Sohn, Eun Jung; Lee, Jang-Hoon; Woo, Hong-Jung; Yun, Miyong; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Chul

    2013-11-01

    Despite the antitumour effect of ursolic acid observed in several cancers, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Thus, in the present study, the roles of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) were examined in ursolic acid induced apoptosis in HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Ursolic acid significantly exerted cytotoxicity, increased the sub-G1 population and the number of ethidium homodimer and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase(TdT) mediated dUTP nick end labeling positive cells in HepG2 cells. Also, ursolic acid enhanced the cleavages of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase3, attenuated the expression of astrocyte elevated gene (AEG1) and survivin in HepG2 cells. Interestingly, ursolic acid increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and coenzyme A carboxylase and also enhanced phosphorylation of GSK3β at inactive form serine 9, whereas ursolic acid attenuated the phosphorylation of AKT and mTOR in HepG2 cells. Conversely, AMPK inhibitor compound C or GSK3β inhibitor SB216763 blocked the cleavages of PARP and caspase 3 induced by ursolic acid in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, proteosomal inhibitor MG132 suppressed AMPK activation, GSK3β phosphorylation, cleaved PARP and deceased AEG-1 induced by ursolic acid in HepG2 cells. Overall, our findings suggest that ursolic acid induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells via AMPK activation and GSK3β phosphorylation as a potent chemopreventive agent. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Cordycepin-Enriched WIB801C from Cordyceps militaris Inhibits Collagen-Induced [Ca2+]i Mobilization via cAMP-Dependent Phosphorylation of Inositol 1, 4, 5-Trisphosphate Receptor in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Ha; Kim, Hyun-Hong; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Yu, Young-Bin; Kang, Hyo-Chan; Kim, Jong-Lae; Lee, Jong-Jin; Park, Hwa-Jin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we prepared cordycepin-enriched (CE)-WIB801C, a n-butanol extract of Cordyceps militaris-hypha, and investigated the effect of CE-WIB801C on collagen-induced human platelet aggregation. CE-WIB801C dose-dependently inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation, and its IC50 value was 175 μg/ml. CE-WIB801C increased cAMP level more than cGMP level, but inhibited collagen-elevated [Ca2+]i mobilization and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) production. cAMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase) inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS increased the CE-WIB801C-downregulated [Ca2+]i level in a dose dependent manner, and strongly inhibited CE-WIB801C-induced inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) phosphorylation. These results suggest that the inhibition of [Ca2+]i mobilization by CE-WIB801C is resulted from the cAMP/A-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of IP3R. CE-WIB801C suppressed TXA2 production, but did not inhibit the activities of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and TXA2 synthase (TXAS). These results suggest that the inhibition of TXA2 production by WIB801C is not resulted from the direct inhibition of COX-1 and TXAS. In this study, we demonstrate that CE-WIB801C with cAMP-dependent Ca2+-antagonistic antiplatelet effects may have preventive or therapeutic potential for platelet aggregation-mediated diseases, such as thrombosis, myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis, and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:25009703

  19. Hypercontractility of intestinal longitudinal smooth muscle induced by cytokines is mediated by the nuclear factor-κB/AMP-activated kinase/myosin light chain kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Nalli, Ancy D; Kumar, Divya P; Mahavadi, Sunila; Al-Shboul, Othman; Alkahtani, Reem; Kuemmerle, John F; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have identified AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) as a target of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKKβ) and a negative regulator of myosin light-chain (MLC) kinase (MLCK). The present study examined whether a change in expression or activity of AMPK is responsible for hypercontractility of intestinal longitudinal muscle during inflammation or in response to proinflammatory cytokines. In mouse colonic longitudinal muscle cells, acetylcholine (ACh) stimulated AMPK and MLCK phosphorylation and activity and induced MLC20 phosphorylation and muscle contraction. Blockade of CaMKKβ with STO609 (7-oxo-7H-benzimidazo[2,1-a]benz[de]isoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid acetate) inhibited AMPK and MLCK phosphorylation and augmented MLCK activity, MLC20 phosphorylation, and smooth muscle cell contraction. In muscle cells isolated from the colon of TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid)-treated mice or from strips treated with interleukin-1β or tumor necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor κB was activated as indicated by an increase in p65 phosphorylation and IκBα degradation, and AMPK was phosphorylated at a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-specific site (Ser(485)) that is distinct from the stimulatory CaMKKβ site (Thr(172)), resulting in attenuation of ACh-stimulated AMPK activity and augmentation of MLCK activity and muscle cell contraction. Inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activity with MG-132 (carbobenzoxy-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-leucinal Z-LLL-CHO) or PKA activity with myristoylated PKA inhibitor 14-22 amide blocked phosphorylation of AMPK at Ser(485) and restored MLCK activity and muscle cell contraction to control levels. The results imply that PKA released from IκBα complex phosphorylated AMPK at a PKA-specific site and inhibited its activity, thereby relieving the inhibitory effect of AMPK on MLCK and increasing MLCK activity and muscle cell contraction. We conclude that hypercontractility of intestinal longitudinal muscle induced by inflammation

  20. AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK) Activation by AICAR in Human White Adipocytes Derived from Pericardial White Adipose Tissue Stem Cells Induces a Partial Beige-Like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Rahman, Omar; Kristóf, Endre; Doan-Xuan, Quang-Minh; Vida, András; Nagy, Lilla; Horváth, Ambrus; Simon, József; Maros, Tamás; Szentkirályi, István; Palotás, Lehel; Debreceni, Tamás; Csizmadia, Péter; Szerafin, Tamás; Fodor, Tamás; Szántó, Magdolna; Tóth, Attila; Kiss, Borbála; Bacsó, Zsolt; Bai, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Beige adipocytes are special cells situated in the white adipose tissue. Beige adipocytes, lacking thermogenic cues, morphologically look quite similar to regular white adipocytes, but with a markedly different response to adrenalin. White adipocytes respond to adrenergic stimuli by enhancing lipolysis, while in beige adipocytes adrenalin induces mitochondrial biogenesis too. A key step in the differentiation and function of beige adipocytes is the deacetylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) by SIRT1 and the consequent mitochondrial biogenesis. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an upstream activator of SIRT1, therefore we set out to investigate the role of AMPK in beige adipocyte differentiation using human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) from pericardial adipose tissue. hADMSCs were differentiated to white and beige adipocytes and the differentiation medium of the white adipocytes was supplemented with 100 μM [(2R,3S,4R,5R)-5-(4-Carbamoyl-5-aminoimidazol-1-yl)-3,4-dihydroxyoxolan-2-yl]methyl dihydrogen phosphate (AICAR), a known activator of AMPK. The activation of AMPK with AICAR led to the appearance of beige-like morphological properties in differentiated white adipocytes. Namely, smaller lipid droplets appeared in AICAR-treated white adipocytes in a similar fashion as in beige cells. Moreover, in AICAR-treated white adipocytes the mitochondrial network was more fused than in white adipocytes; a fused mitochondrial system was characteristic to beige adipocytes. Despite the morphological similarities between AICAR-treated white adipocytes and beige cells, functionally AICAR-treated white adipocytes were similar to white adipocytes. We were unable to detect increases in basal or cAMP-induced oxygen consumption rate (a marker of mitochondrial biogenesis) when comparing control and AICAR-treated white adipocytes. Similarly, markers of beige adipocytes such as TBX1, UCP1, CIDEA, PRDM16 and TMEM26 remained the same when

  1. Raloxifene induces autophagy-dependent cell death in breast cancer cells via the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Eun; Kim, Yunha; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Kim, Sung-Bae; Suh, Nayoung; Lee, Jung Shin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Koh, Jae-Young; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that binds to the estrogen receptor (ER), and exhibits potent anti-tumor and autophagy-inducing effects in breast cancer cells. However, the mechanism of raloxifene-induced cell death and autophagy is not well-established. So, we analyzed mechanism underlying death and autophagy induced by raloxifene in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment with raloxifene significantly induced death in MCF-7 cells. Raloxifene accumulated GFP-LC3 puncta and increased the level of autophagic marker proteins, such as LC3-II, BECN1, and ATG12-ATG5 conjugates, indicating activated autophagy. Raloxifene also increased autophagic flux indicators, the cleavage of GFP from GFP-LC3 and only red fluorescence-positive puncta in mRFP-GFP-LC3-expressing cells. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), suppressed the level of LC3-II and blocked the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Moreover, siRNA targeting BECN1 markedly reversed cell death and the level of LC3-II increased by raloxifene. Besides, raloxifene-induced cell death was not related to cleavage of caspases-7, -9, and PARP. These results indicate that raloxifene activates autophagy-dependent cell death but not apoptosis. Interestingly, raloxifene decreased the level of intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and activated the AMPK/ULK1 pathway. However it was not suppressed the AKT/mTOR pathway. Addition of ATP decreased the phosphorylation of AMPK as well as the accumulation of LC3-II, finally attenuating raloxifene-induced cell death. Our current study demonstrates that raloxifene induces autophagy via the activation of AMPK by sensing decreases in ATP, and that the overactivation of autophagy promotes cell death and thereby mediates the anti-cancer effects of raloxifene in breast cancer cells.

  2. Intracellular mechanisms involved in copper-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Cu-GnRH) complex-induced cAMP/PKA signaling in female rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Alina; Zielinska-Gorska, Marlena; Wolinska-Witort, Ewa; Siawrys, Gabriela; Baran, Marta; Kotarba, Grzegorz; Biernacka, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The copper-gonadotropin-releasing hormone molecule (Cu-GnRH) is a GnRH analog, which preserves its amino acid sequence, but which contains a Cu(2+) ion stably bound to the nitrogen atoms including that of the imidazole ring of Histidine(2). A previous report indicated that Cu-GnRH was able to activate cAMP/PKA signaling in anterior pituitary cells in vitro, but raised the question of which intracellular mechanism(s) mediated the Cu-GnRH-induced cAMP synthesis in gonadotropes. To investigate this mechanism, in the present study, female rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro were pretreated with 0.1 μM antide, a GnRH antagonist; 0.1 μM cetrorelix, a GnRH receptor antagonist; 0.1 μM PACAP6-38, a PAC-1 receptor antagonist; 2 μM GF109203X, a protein kinase C inhibitor; 50 mM PMA, a protein kinase C activator; the protein kinase A inhibitors H89 (30 μM) and KT5720 (60 nM); factors affecting intracellular calcium activity: 2.5 mM EGTA; 2 μM thapsigargin; 5 μM A23187, a Ca(2+) ionophore; or 10 μg/ml cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor. After one of the above pretreatments, cells were incubated in the presence of 0.1 μM Cu-GnRH for 0.5, 1, and 3 h. Radioimmunoassay analysis of cAMP confirmed the functional link between Cu-GnRH stimulation and cAMP/PKA signal transduction in rat anterior pituitary cells, demonstrating increased intracellular cAMP, which was reduced in the presence of specific PKA inhibitors. The stimulatory effect of Cu-GnRH on cAMP production was partly dependent on GnRH receptor activation. In addition, an indirect and Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism might be involved in intracellular adenylate cyclase stimulation. Neither activation of protein kinase C nor new protein synthesis was involved in the Cu-GnRH-induced increase of cAMP in the rat anterior pituitary primary cultures. Presented data indicate that conformational changes of GnRH molecule resulting from cooper ion coordination affect specific pharmacological properties of Cu

  3. Adrenomedullin 2 Improves Early Obesity-Induced Adipose Insulin Resistance by Inhibiting the Class II MHC in Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Yang; Lv, Ying; Zhang, Heng; Gao, Song; Wang, Ting; Feng, Juan; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Wang, Xian; Jiang, Changtao

    2016-08-01

    MHC class II (MHCII) antigen presentation in adipocytes was reported to trigger early adipose inflammation and insulin resistance. However, the benefits of MHCII inhibition in adipocytes remain largely unknown. Here, we showed that human plasma polypeptide adrenomedullin 2 (ADM2) levels were negatively correlated with HOMA of insulin resistance in obese human. Adipose-specific human ADM2 transgenic (aADM2-tg) mice were generated. The aADM2-tg mice displayed improvements in high-fat diet-induced early adipose insulin resistance. This was associated with increased insulin signaling and decreased systemic inflammation. ADM2 dose-dependently inhibited CIITA-induced MHCII expression by increasing Blimp1 expression in a CRLR/RAMP1-cAMP-dependent manner in cultured adipocytes. Furthermore, ADM2 treatment restored the high-fat diet-induced early insulin resistance in adipose tissue, mainly via inhibition of adipocyte MHCII antigen presentation and CD4(+) T-cell activation. This study demonstrates that ADM2 is a promising candidate for the treatment of early obesity-induced insulin resistance. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. AMPED Program Overview

    ScienceCinema

    Gur, Ilan

    2016-07-12

    An overview presentation about ARPA-E's AMPED program. AMPED projects seek to develop advanced sensing, control, and power management technologies that redefine the way we think about battery management. Energy storage can significantly improve U.S. energy independence, efficiency, and security by enabling a new generation of electric vehicles. While rapid progress is being made in new battery materials and storage technologies, few innovations have emerged in the management of advanced battery systems. AMPED aims to unlock enormous untapped potential in the performance, safety, and lifetime of today's commercial battery systems exclusively through system-level innovations, and is thus distinct from existing efforts to enhance underlying battery materials and architectures.

  5. AMPED Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Ilan

    2014-03-04

    An overview presentation about ARPA-E's AMPED program. AMPED projects seek to develop advanced sensing, control, and power management technologies that redefine the way we think about battery management. Energy storage can significantly improve U.S. energy independence, efficiency, and security by enabling a new generation of electric vehicles. While rapid progress is being made in new battery materials and storage technologies, few innovations have emerged in the management of advanced battery systems. AMPED aims to unlock enormous untapped potential in the performance, safety, and lifetime of today's commercial battery systems exclusively through system-level innovations, and is thus distinct from existing efforts to enhance underlying battery materials and architectures.

  6. Directed evolution of the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein at the cAMP pocket.

    PubMed

    Gunasekara, Sanjiva M; Hicks, Matt N; Park, Jin; Brooks, Cory L; Serate, Jose; Saunders, Cameron V; Grover, Simranjeet K; Goto, Joy J; Lee, Jin-Won; Youn, Hwan

    2015-10-30

    The Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) requires cAMP binding to undergo a conformational change for DNA binding and transcriptional regulation. Two CRP residues, Thr(127) and Ser(128), are known to play important roles in cAMP binding through hydrogen bonding and in the cAMP-induced conformational change, but the connection between the two is not completely clear. Here, we simultaneously randomized the codons for these two residues and selected CRP mutants displaying high CRP activity in a cAMP-producing E. coli. Many different CRP mutants satisfied the screening condition for high CRP activity, including those that cannot form any hydrogen bonds with the incoming cAMP at the two positions. In vitro DNA-binding analysis confirmed that these selected CRP mutants indeed display high CRP activity in response to cAMP. These results indicate that the hydrogen bonding ability of the Thr(127) and Ser(128) residues is not critical for the cAMP-induced CRP activation. However, the hydrogen bonding ability of Thr(127) and Ser(128) was found to be important in attaining high cAMP affinity. Computational analysis revealed that most natural cAMP-sensing CRP homologs have Thr/Ser, Thr/Thr, or Thr/Asn at positions 127 and 128. All of these pairs are excellent hydrogen bonding partners and they do not elevate CRP activity in the absence of cAMP. Taken together, our analyses suggest that CRP evolved to have hydrogen bonding residues at the cAMP pocket residues 127 and 128 for performing dual functions: preserving high cAMP affinity and keeping CRP inactive in the absence of cAMP.

  7. Cordycepin inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production via activating amp-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Li; Xu, Ying; Shen, Jie

    2014-07-08

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is elevated during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease (KD), which damages vascular endothelial cells to cause systemic vasculitis. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of cordycepin on TNFα expression in both lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and ex vivo cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of KD patients. We found that cordycepin significantly suppressed LPS-induced TNFα expression and production in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs)). Meanwhile, cordycepin alleviated TNFα production in KD patients' PBMCs. PBMCs from healthy controls had a much lower level of basal TNF-α content than that of KD patients. LPS-induced TNF-α production in healthy controls' PBMCs was also inhibited by cordycepin. For the mechanism study, we discovered that cordycepin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in both KD patients' PBMCs and LPS-stimulated macrophages, which mediated cordycepin-induced inhibition against TNFα production. AMPK inhibition by its inhibitor (compound C) or by siRNA depletion alleviated cordycepin's effect on TNFα production. Further, we found that cordycepin inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation in LPS-stimulate RAW 264.7 cells or healthy controls' PBMCs. PBMCs of KD patients showed higher basal level of ROS and NF-κB activation, which was also inhibited by cordycepin co-treatment. In conclusion, our data showed that cordycepin inhibited TNFα production, which was associated with AMPK activation as well as ROS and NF-κB inhibition. The results of this study should have significant translational relevance in managing this devastating disease.

  8. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid protects against high-fat diet-induced fatty liver by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in obese mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Su; Kim, Daeyoung; Jo, Keunae; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} NDGA decreases high-fat diet-induced body weight gain and adiposity. {yields} NDGA reduces high-fat diet-induced triglyceride accumulation in liver. {yields} NDGA improves lipid storage in vitro through altering lipid regulatory proteins. {yields} Inhibition of lipid storage in vivo and in vitro is mediated by AMPK activation. -- Abstract: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease, is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) has been reported to inhibit lipoprotein lipase; however, the effect of NDGA on hepatic lipid metabolism remains unclear. We evaluated body weight, adiposity, liver histology, and hepatic triglyceride content in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed C57BL/6J mice treated with NDGA. In addition, we characterized the underlying mechanism of NDGA's effects in HepG2 hepatocytes by Western blot and RT-PCR analysis. NDGA (100 or 200 mg/kg/day) reduced weight gain, fat pad mass, and hepatic triglyceride accumulation, and improved serum lipid parameters in mice fed a HFD for 8 weeks. NDGA significantly increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in the liver and in HepG2 hepatocytes. NDGA downregulated the level of mature SREBP-1 and its target genes (acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase), but, it upregulated expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){alpha}, PPAR{gamma} coactivator-1, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, and uncoupling protein-2. The specific AMPK inhibitor compound C attenuated the effects of NDGA on expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins in HepG2 hepatocytes. The beneficial effects of NDGA on HFD-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation are mediated through AMPK signaling pathways, suggesting a potential target for preventing NAFLD.

  9. Coordination between proteasome impairment and caspase activation leading to TAU pathology: neuroprotection by cAMP

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, M J; Huang, Q; Figueiredo-Pereira, M E

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The main component of NFTs is TAU, a highly soluble microtubule-associated protein. However, when TAU is cleaved at Asp421 by caspases it becomes prone to aggregation leading to NFTs. What triggers caspase activation resulting in TAU cleavage remains unclear. We investigated in rat cortical neurons a potential coordination between proteasome impairment and caspase activation. We demonstrate that upon proteasome inhibition, the early accumulation of detergent-soluble ubiquitinated (SUb) proteins paves the way to caspase activation and TAU pathology. This occurs with two drugs that inhibit the proteasome by different means: the product of inflammation prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2) and epoxomicin. Our results pinpoint a critical early event, that is, the buildup of SUb proteins that contributes to caspase activation, TAU cleavage, TAU/Ub-protein aggregation and neuronal death. Furthermore, to our knowledge, we are the first to demonstrate that elevating cAMP in neurons with dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) or the lipophilic peptide PACAP27 prevents/diminishes caspase activation, TAU cleavage and neuronal death induced by PGJ2, as long as these PGJ2-induced changes are moderate. db-cAMP also stimulated proteasomes, and mitigated proteasome inhibition induced by PGJ2. We propose that targeting cAMP/PKA to boost proteasome activity in a sustainable manner could offer an effective approach to avoid early accumulation of SUb proteins and later caspase activation, and TAU cleavage, possibly preventing/delaying AD neurodegeneration. PMID:22717581

  10. Cyclic AMP regulation of the human glycoprotein hormone. cap alpha. -subunit gene is mediated by an 18-base-pair element

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, B.J.; Bokar, J.A.; Virgin, J.B.; Vallen, E.A.; Milsted, A.; Nilson, J.H.

    1987-04-01

    cAMP regulates transcription of the gene encoding the ..cap alpha..-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the choriocarcinoma cells (BeWo). To define the sequences required for regulation by cAMP, the authors inserted fragments from the 5' flanking region of the ..cap alpha..-subunit gene into a test vector containing the simian virus 40 early promoter (devoid of its enhancer) linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. Results from transient expression assays in BeWo cells indicated that a 1500-base-pair (bp) fragment conferred cAMP responsiveness on the CAT gene regardless of position or orientation of the insert relative to the viral promoter. A subfragment extending from position -169 to position -100 had the same effect on cAMP-induced expression. Furthermore, the entire stimulatory effect could be achieved with an 18-bp synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide corresponding to a direct repeat between position -146 and -111. In the absence of cAMP, the ..cap alpha..-subunit 5' flanking sequence also enhanced transcription from the simian virus 40 early promoter. They localized this enhancer activity to the same -169/-100 fragment containing the cAMP response element. The 18-bp element alone, however, had no effect on basal expression. Thus, this short DNA sequence serves as a cAMP response element and also functions independently of other promoter-regulatory elements located in the 5' flanking sequence of the ..cap alpha..-subunit gene.

  11. Stimulation of StAR expression by cAMP is controlled by inhibition of highly inducible SIK1 via CRTC2, a co-activator of CREB.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Takemori, Hiroshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2015-06-15

    In mouse steroidogenic cells the activation of cholesterol metabolism is mediated by steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Here, we visualized a coordinated regulation of StAR transcription, splicing and post-transcriptional processing, which are synchronized by salt inducible kinase (SIK1) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2). To detect primary RNA (pRNA), spliced primary RNA (Sp-RNA) and mRNA in single cells, we generated probe sets by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These methods allowed us to address the nature of StAR gene expression and to visualize protein-nucleic acid interactions through direct detection. We show that SIK1 represses StAR expression in Y1 adrenal and MA10 testis cells through inhibition of processing mediated by CRTC2. Digital image analysis matches qPCR analyses of the total cell culture. Evidence is presented for spatially separate accumulation of StAR pRNA and Sp-RNA at the gene loci in the nucleus. These findings establish that cAMP, SIK and CRTC mediate StAR expression through activation of individual StAR gene loci. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. RXRα ligand Z-10 induces PML-RARα cleavage and APL cell apoptosis through disrupting PML-RARα/RXRα complex in a cAMP-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zeng, Zhiping; Zhang, Weidong; Ren, Gaoang; Ling, Xiaobin; Huang, Fengyu; Xie, Peizhen; Su, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Kun; Zhou, Hu

    2017-02-14

    The major oncogenic driver of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is the fusion protein PML-RARα originated from the chromosomal translocation t(15;17). All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide cure most patients by directly targeting PML-RARα. However, major issues including the resistance of ATRA and arsenic therapy still remain in APL clinical management. Here we showed that compound Z-10, a nitro-ligand of retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), strongly promoted the cAMP-independent apoptosis of both ATRA- sensitive and resistant NB4 cells via the induction of caspase-mediated PML-RARα degradation. RXRα was vital for the stability of both PML-RARα and RARα likely through the interactions. The binding of Z-10 to RXRα dramatically inhibited the interaction of RXRα with PML-RARα but not with RARα, leading to Z-10's selective induction of PML-RARα but not RARα degradation. Z-36 and Z-38, two derivatives of Z-10, had improved potency of inducing PML-RARα reduction and NB4 cell apoptosis. Hence, RXRα ligand Z-10 and its derivatives could target both ATRA- sensitive and resistant APL cells through their distinct acting mechanism, and are potential drug leads for APL treatment.

  13. Interplay of the E box, the cyclic AMP response element, and HTF4/HEB in transcriptional regulation of the neurospecific, neurotrophin-inducible vgf gene.

    PubMed Central

    Di Rocco, G; Pennuto, M; Illi, B; Canu, N; Filocamo, G; Trani, E; Rinaldi, A M; Possenti, R; Mandolesi, G; Sirinian, M I; Jucker, R; Levi, A; Nasi, S

    1997-01-01

    vgf is a neurotrophin response-specific, developmentally regulated gene that codes for a neurosecretory polypeptide. Its transcription in neuronal cells is selectively activated by the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotrophin 3, which induce survival and differentiation, and not by epidermal growth factor. We studied a short region of the rat vgf promoter which is essential for its regulated expression. A cyclic AMP response element (CRE) within this region is necessary for NGF induction of vgf transcription. Two sites upstream of CRE, an E box and a CCAAT sequence, bind nuclear protein complexes and are involved in transcriptional control. The E box has a dual role. It acts as an inhibitor in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, together with a second E box located downstream, and as a stimulator in the NGF-responsive cell line PC12. By expression screening, we have isolated the cDNA for a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, a homolog of the HTF4/HEB E protein, that specifically binds the vgf promoter E box. The E protein was present in various cell lines, including PC12 cells, and was a component of a multiprotein nuclear complex that binds the promoter in vitro. The E box and CRE cooperate in binding to this complex, which may be an important determinant for neural cell-specific expression. PMID:9032251

  14. Stimulation of StAR expression by cAMP is controlled by inhibition of highly inducible SIK1 via CRTC2, a co-activator of CREB

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Takemori, Hiroshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2015-01-01

    In mouse steroidogenic cells the activation of cholesterol metabolism is mediated by steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Here, we visualized a coordinated regulation of StAR transcription, splicing and post-transcriptional processing, which are synchronized by salt inducible kinase (SIK1) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2). To detect primary RNA (pRNA), spliced primary RNA (Sp-RNA) and mRNA in single cells, we generated probe sets by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These methods allowed us to address the nature of StAR gene expression and to visualize protein–nucleic acid interactions through direct detection. We show that SIK1 represses StAR expression in Y1 adrenal and MA10 testis cells through inhibition of processing mediated by CRTC2. Digital image analysis matches qPCR analyses of the total cell culture. Evidence is presented for spatially separate accumulation of StAR pRNA and Sp-RNA at the gene loci in the nucleus. These findings establish that cAMP, SIK and CRTC mediate StAR expression through activation of individual StAR gene loci. PMID:25662274

  15. Chronic Glutathione Depletion Confers Protection against Alcohol-induced Steatosis: Implication for Redox Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Singh, Surendra; Matsumoto, Akiko; Manna, Soumen K.; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Golla, Srujana; Murphy, Robert C.; Dong, Hongbin; Song, Byoung-Joon; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is not well established. However, oxidative stress and associated decreases in levels of glutathione (GSH) are known to play a central role in ALD. The present study examines the effect of GSH deficiency on alcohol-induced liver steatosis in Gclm knockout (KO) mice that constitutively have ≈15% normal hepatic levels of GSH. Following chronic (6 week) feeding with an ethanol-containing liquid diet, the Gclm KO mice were unexpectedly found to be protected against steatosis despite showing increased oxidative stress (as reflected in elevated levels of CYP2E1 and protein carbonyls). Gclm KO mice also exhibit constitutive activation of liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway and nuclear factor-erythroid 2–related factor 2 target genes, and show enhanced ethanol clearance, altered hepatic lipid profiles in favor of increased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and concordant changes in expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. In summary, our data implicate a novel mechanism protecting against liver steatosis via an oxidative stress adaptive response that activates the AMPK pathway. We propose redox activation of the AMPK may represent a new therapeutic strategy for preventing ALD. PMID:27403993

  16. Metformin-induced mitochondrial function and ABCD2 up-regulation in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy involves AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspreet; Olle, Brittany; Suhail, Hamid; Felicella, Michelle M; Giri, Shailendra

    2016-07-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a progressive neurometabolic disease caused by mutations/deletions in the Abcd1 gene. Similar mutations/deletions in the Abcd1 gene often result in diagonally opposing phenotypes of mild adrenomyeloneuropathy and severe neuroinflammatory cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), which suggests involvement of downstream modifier genes. We recently documented the first evidence of loss of AMP-activated protein kinase α1 (AMPKα1) in ALD patient-derived cells. Here, we report the novel loss of AMPKα1 in postmortem brain white matter of patients with ALD phenotype. Pharmacological activation of AMPK can rescue the mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibit the pro-inflammatory response. The FDA approved anti-diabetic drug Metformin, a well-known AMPK activator, induces mitochondrial biogenesis and is documented for its anti-inflammatory role. We observed a dose-dependent activation of AMPKα1 in metformin-treated X-ALD patient-derived fibroblasts. Metformin also induced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and ATP levels in X-ALD patient-derived fibroblasts. Metformin treatment decreased very long chain fatty acid levels and pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expressions in X-ALD patient-derived cells. Abcd2 [adrenoleukodystrophy protein-related protein] levels were increased in metformin-treated X-ALD patient-derived fibroblasts and Abcd1-KO mice primary mixed glial cells. Abcd2 induction was AMPKα1-dependent since metformin failed to induce Abcd2 levels in AMPKα1-KO mice-derived primary mixed glial cells. In vivo metformin (100 mg/Kg) in drinking water for 60 days induced Abcd2 levels and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation protein levels in the brain and spinal cord of Abcd1-KO mice. Taken together, these results provide proof-of-principle for therapeutic potential of metformin as a useful strategy for correcting the metabolic and inflammatory derangements in X-ALD by targeting AMPK. There is no effective therapy for inherited

  17. Inflammatory Role of ROS-Sensitive AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in the Hypersensitivity of Lung Vagal C Fibers Induced by Intermittent Hypoxia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Huan; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Lai, Ching Jung; Kou, Yu Ru

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), manifested by airway exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH), is associated with excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in airways, airway inflammation, and hyperreactive airway diseases. The cause-effect relationship for these events remains unclear. We investigated the inflammatory role of ROS-sensitive AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in IH-induced airway hypersensitivity mediated by lung vagal C fibers (LVCFs) in rats. Conscious rats were exposed to room air (RA) or IH with or without treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant), Compound C (an AMPK inhibitor), ibuprofen (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor), or their vehicles. Immediately after exposure (24 h), we found that intravenous capsaicin, phenylbiguanide, or α,β-methylene-ATP evoked augmented LVCF-mediated apneic responses and LVCF afferent responses in rats subjected to IH exposure in comparison with those in RA rats. The potentiating effect of IH on LVCF responses decreased at 6 h after and vanished at 12 h after the termination of IH exposure. The potentiating effect of IH on LVCF-mediated apneic and LVCF afferent responses was significantly attenuated by treatment with NAC, compound C, or ibuprofen, but not by their vehicles. Further biochemical analysis revealed that rats exposed to IH displayed increased lung levels of lipid peroxidation (an index of oxidative stress), AMPK phosphorylation (an index of AMPK activation), and prostaglandin E2 (a cyclooxygenase metabolite), compared with those exposed to RA. IH-induced increase in lipid peroxidation was considerably suppressed by treatment with NAC but not by compound C or ibuprofen. IH-induced increase in AMPK phosphorylation was totally abolished by NAC or compound C but not by ibuprofen. IH-induced increase in prostaglandin E2 was considerably prevented by any of these three inhibitor treatments. The vehicles of these inhibitors exerted no significant effect on the three IH-induced responses. These

  18. Cyclic AMP Modulation of Estrogen-Induced Effects: A Novel Mechanism for Hormonal Resistance in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    Marden E, Martin G, MacKay H, Abbon- danza C, Brown M 1994 Estrogen receptor-associated proteins: possible mediators of hormone-induced tran...cells. Nucleic Ac- ids Res 19:6595-6602 42. Halachmi S, Marden E, Martin G, MacKay H, Abbon- danza C, Brown M 1994 Estrogen receptor-associated...the estrogen re- ceptor. EMBO J 14:3741-3751 26. Halachmi S, Marden E, Martin G, MacKay H, Abbon- danza C, Brown M 1994 Estrogen receptor-associated

  19. Berberine Reduces cAMP-Induced Chloride Secretion in T84 Human Colonic Carcinoma Cells through Inhibition of Basolateral KCNQ1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Alzamora, Rodrigo; O’Mahony, Fiona; Ko, Wing-Hung; Yip, Tiffany Wai-Nga; Carter, Derek; Irnaten, Mustapha; Harvey, Brian Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid with multiple pharmacological actions, including antidiarrhoeal activity and has been shown to inhibit Cl− secretion in distal colon. The aims of this study were to determine the molecular signaling mechanisms of action of berberine on Cl− secretion and the ion transporter targets. Monolayers of T84 human colonic carcinoma cells grown in permeable supports were placed in Ussing chambers and short-circuit current measured in response to secretagogues and berberine. Whole-cell current recordings were performed in T84 cells using the patch-clamp technique. Berberine decreased forskolin-induced short-circuit current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 80 ± 8 μM). In apically permeabilized monolayers and whole-cell current recordings, berberine inhibited a cAMP-dependent and chromanol 293B-sensitive basolateral membrane K+ current by 88%, suggesting inhibition of KCNQ1 K+ channels. Berberine did not affect either apical Cl− conductance or basolateral Na+–K+-ATPase activity. Berberine stimulated p38 MAPK, PKCα and PKA, but had no effect on p42/p44 MAPK and PKCδ. However, berberine pre-treatment prevented stimulation of p42/p44 MAPK by epidermal growth factor. The inhibitory effect of berberine on Cl− secretion was partially blocked by HBDDE (∼65%), an inhibitor of PKCα and to a smaller extent by inhibition of p38 MAPK with SB202190 (∼15%). Berberine treatment induced an increase in association between PKCα and PKA with KCNQ1 and produced phosphorylation of the channel. We conclude that berberine exerts its inhibitory effect on colonic Cl− secretion through inhibition of basolateral KCNQ1 channels responsible for K+ recycling via a PKCα-dependent pathway. PMID:21747769

  20. Piperidine alkaloids from Piperretrofractum Vahl. protect against high-fat diet-induced obesity by regulating lipid metabolism and activating AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung Jin; Lee, Myoung-Su; Jo, Keunae; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Piperidine alkaloids from Piperretrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, are isolated as the anti-obesity constituents. {yields} PRPA administration significantly reduces body weight gain without altering food intake and fat pad mass. {yields} PRPA reduces high-fat diet-induced triglyceride accumulation in liver. {yields} PRPAs attenuate HFD-induced obesity by activating AMPK and PPAR{delta}, and regulate lipid metabolism, suggesting their potential anti-obesity effects. -- Abstract: The fruits of Piperretrofractum Vahl. have been used for their anti-flatulent, expectorant, antitussive, antifungal, and appetizing properties in traditional medicine, and they are reported to possess gastroprotective and cholesterol-lowering properties. However, their anti-obesity activity remains unexplored. The present study was conducted to isolate the anti-obesity constituents from P. retrofractum Vahl. and evaluate their effects in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Piperidine alkaloids from P. retrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, were isolated as the anti-obesity constituents through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) transactivation assay. The molecular mechanism was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myocytes. PRPA treatment activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and PPAR{delta} protein and also regulated the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins. In the animal model, oral PRPA administration (50, 100, or 300 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks) significantly reduced HFD-induced body weight gain without altering the amount of food intake. Fat pad mass was reduced in the PRPA treatment groups, as evidenced by reduced adipocyte size. In addition, elevated serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total lipid, leptin, and lipase were suppressed by PRPA treatment. PRPA also

  1. An E-box/M-CAT hybrid motif and cognate binding protein(s) regulate the basal muscle-specific and cAMP-inducible expression of the rat cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M P; Gupta, M; Zak, R

    1994-11-25

    Expression of the cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) genes is regulated developmentally and by numerous epigenetic factors. Here we report the identification of a cis-regulatory element and cognate nuclear binding protein(s) responsible for cAMP-induced expression of the rat cardiac alpha-MHC gene. By Northern blot analysis, we found that, in primary cultures of fetal rat heart myocytes, the elevation of intracellular levels of cAMP results in up-regulation of alpha-MHC and down-regulation of beta-MHC mRNA expression. This effect of cAMP was dependent upon the basal level of expression of both MHC transcripts and was sensitive to cycloheximide. In transient expression analysis employing a series of alpha-MHC/CAT constructs, we identified a 31-base pair fragment located in the immediate upstream region (-71 to -40), which confers both muscle-specific and cAMP-inducible expression of the gene. Within this 31-base pair fragment there are two regions, an AT-rich portion and a hybrid motif which contains overlapping sequences of E-box and M-CAT binding sites (GGCACGTGGAATG). By substitution mutation analysis, both elements were found important for the basal muscle-specific expression; however, the cAMP-inducible expression of the gene is conferred only by the E-box/M-CAT hybrid motif (EM element). Using mobility gel shift competition assay, immunoblotting, and UV-cross-linking analyses, we found that a protein binding to the EM element is indistinguishable from the transcription enhancer factor-1 (TEF-1) in terms of sequence recognition, molecular mass, and immunoreactivity. Methylation interference and point mutation analyses indicate that, besides M-CAT sequences, center CG dinucleotides of the E-box motif CACGTG are essential for protein binding to the EM element and for its functional activity. Furthermore, our data also show that, in addition to TEF-1, another HF-1a-related factor may be recognized by the alpha-MHC gene EM element. These results are first to

  2. Synergistic effects of cyclic AMP and nerve growth factor on neurite outgrowth and microtubule stability of PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The outgrowth of neurites from rat PC12 cells stimulated by combined treatment of nerve growth factor (NGF) with cAMP is significantly more rapid and extensive than the outgrowth induced by either factor alone. We have compared the responses of PC12 cells under three different growth conditions, NGF alone, cAMP alone, and combined treatment, with respect to surface morphology, rapidity of neurite outgrowth, and stability of neurite microtubules, to understand the synergistic action of NGF and cAMP on PC12. Surface events at early times in these growth conditions varied, suggesting divergent pathways of action of NGF and cAMP. This suggestion is strongly supported by the finding that cells exposed to saturating levels of dibutyryl cAMP without substantial neurite outgrowth initiated neurites within 5 min of NGF. This response has been adopted as a convenient assay for NGF. Neurites that regenerated in the three growth conditions showed marked differences in stability to treatments that depolymerize microtubules. The results indicate that microtubules in cells treated with both NGF and cAMP are significantly more stable than in either growth factor alone. We suggest that a shift of the assembly equilibrium favoring tubulin assembly is a necessary prerequisite for the initiation of neurites by PC12. PMID:2982887

  3. Increased expression and secretion of r-Gsp protein, rat counterpart of complement C1s precursor, during cyclic AMP-induced differentiation in rat C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masanori; Nakashima, Shigeru; Banno, Yoshiko; Yamada, Jun; Sawada, Motoshi; Yoshimura, Shin ichi; Kaku, Yasuhiko; Iwama, Toru; Shinoda, Jun; Sakai, Noboru

    2002-10-15

    The gene, termed r-gsp, was originally isolated during identification of differentiation-associated molecules in rat C6 glial cells. Its mRNA expression was markedly increased during cAMP-induced glial cell differentiation. The deduced amino acid sequence of r-gsp was homologous to those of complement C1s precursors of hamsters and humans. In the present study, we raised anti-peptide antibody against r-Gsp protein and analyzed its change during cAMP-induced differentiation. The 90-kDa r-Gsp protein increased time-dependently and reached the maximal level ( approximately 7.6-fold increase) at 24 h in response to dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP) and theophylline. Moreover, it was secreted into the medium and then was cleaved to form disulfide-linked fragments, one of which was 30 kDa, similar to C1s, suggesting its processing in the extracellular space. In fact, the partially purified r-Gsp from culture medium was cleaved by active human C1r to form a 30-kDa polypeptide. Moreover, secreted r-Gsp protein cleaved human C4alpha to yield C4alpha' and associated with human serum C1-esterase inhibitor, strongly suggesting that r-Gsp protein is rat C1s. However, in C6 cells overexpressing r-Gsp, their morphology and proliferation rate were similar to those in parent C6 cells. These results suggest that r-Gsp protein could not induce glial differentiation alone, and suggest that r-Gsp protein was secreted as a proenzyme and processed in culture medium. Its possible role in glial cell differentiation will be discussed.

  4. Activated PKCδ and PKCϵ Inhibit Epithelial Chloride Secretion Response to cAMP via Inducing Internalization of the Na+-K+-2Cl− Cotransporter NKCC1*

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Bouyer, Patrice; Mykoniatis, Andreas; Buschmann, Mary; Matlin, Karl S.; Matthews, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    The basolateral Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1) is a key determinant of transepithelial chloride secretion and dysregulation of chloride secretion is a common feature of many diseases including secretory diarrhea. We have previously shown that activation of protein kinase C (PKC) markedly reduces transepithelial chloride secretion in human colonic T84 cells, which correlates with both functional inhibition and loss of the NKCC1 surface expression. In the present study, we defined the specific roles of PKC isoforms in regulating epithelial NKCC1 and chloride secretion utilizing adenoviral vectors that express shRNAs targeting human PKC isoforms (α, δ, ϵ) (shPKCs) or LacZ (shLacZ, non-targeting control). After 72 h of adenoviral transduction, protein levels of the PKC isoforms in shPKCs-T84 cells were decreased by ∼90% compared with the shLacZ-control. Activation of PKCs by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) caused a redistribution of NKCC1 immunostaining from the basolateral membrane to intracellular vesicles in both shLacZ- and shPKCα-T84 cells, whereas the effect of PMA was not observed in shPKCδ- and shPKCϵ- cells. These results were further confirmed by basolateral surface biotinylation. Furthermore, activation of PKCs by PMA inhibited cAMP-stimulated chloride secretion in the uninfected, shLacZ- and shPKCα-T84 monolayers, but the inhibitory effect was significantly attenuated in shPKCδ- and shPKCϵ-T84 monolayers. In conclusion, the activated novel isoforms PKCδ or PKCϵ, but not the conventional isoform PKCα, inhibits transepithelial chloride secretion through inducing internalization of the basolateral surface NKCC1. Our study reveals that the novel PKC isoform-regulated NKCC1 surface expression plays an important role in the regulation of chloride secretion. PMID:20732874

  5. AMP-activated protein kinase is required for exercise-induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor co-activator 1 translocation to subsarcolemmal mitochondria in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brennan K; Mukai, Kazutaka; Lally, James S; Maher, Amy C; Gurd, Brendon J; Heigenhauser, George J F; Spriet, Lawrence L; Holloway, Graham P

    2013-03-15

    In skeletal muscle, mitochondria exist as two subcellular populations known as subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria. SS mitochondria preferentially respond to exercise training, suggesting divergent transcriptional control of the mitochondrial genomes. The transcriptional co-activator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) have been implicated in the direct regulation of the mitochondrial genome in mice, although SS and IMF differences may exist, and the potential signalling events regulating the mitochondrial content of these proteins have not been elucidated. Therefore, we examined the potential for PGC-1α and Tfam to translocate to SS and IMF mitochondria in human subjects, and performed experiments in rodents to identify signalling mechanisms regulating these translocation events. Acute exercise in humans and rats increased PGC-1α content in SS but not IMF mitochondria. Acute exposure to 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-ribofuranoside in rats recapitulated the exercise effect of increased PGC-1α protein within SS mitochondria only, suggesting that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling is involved. In addition, rendering AMPK inactive (AMPK kinase dead mice) prevented exercise-induced PGC-1α translocation to SS mitochondria, further suggesting that AMPK plays an integral role in these translocation events. In contrast to the conserved PGC-1α translocation to SS mitochondria across species (humans, rats and mice), acute exercise only increased mitochondrial Tfam in rats. Nevertheless, in rat resting muscle PGC-1α and Tfam co-immunoprecipate with α-tubulin, suggesting a common cytosolic localization. These data suggest that exercise causes translocation of PGC-1α preferentially to SS mitochondria in an AMPK-dependent manner.

  6. Activation of SIRT1 Attenuates Klotho Deficiency-Induced Arterial Stiffness and Hypertension by Enhancing AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Diansa; Zuo, Zhong; Tian, Jing; Ali, Quaisar; Lin, Yi; Lei, Han; Sun, Zhongjie

    2016-11-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor for stroke and myocardial infarction. This study was designed to investigate the role of SIRT1, an important deacetylase, and its relationship with Klotho, a kidney-derived aging-suppressor protein, in the pathogenesis of arterial stiffness and hypertension. We found that the serum level of Klotho was decreased by ≈45% in patients with arterial stiffness and hypertension. Interestingly, Klotho haplodeficiency caused arterial stiffening and hypertension, as evidenced by significant increases in pulse wave velocity and blood pressure in Klotho-haplodeficient (KL(+/-)) mice. Notably, the expression and activity of SIRT1 were decreased significantly in aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells in KL(+/-) mice, suggesting that Klotho deficiency downregulates SIRT1. Treatment with SRT1720 (15 mg/kg/d, IP), a specific SIRT1 activator, abolished Klotho deficiency-induced arterial stiffness and hypertension in KL(+/-) mice. Klotho deficiency was associated with significant decreases in activities of AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in aortas, which were abolished by SRT1720. Furthermore, Klotho deficiency upregulated NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide production, increased collagen expression, and enhanced elastin fragmentation in the media of aortas. These Klotho deficiency-associated changes were blocked by SRT1720. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that Klotho deficiency downregulates SIRT1 activity in arterial endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Pharmacological activation of SIRT1 may be an effective therapeutic strategy for arterial stiffness and hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase in beneficial effects of betaine on high-sucrose diet-induced hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhenyuan; Deaciuc, Ion; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Song, Ming; Chen, Theresa; Hill, Daniell; McClain, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    Although simple steatosis was originally thought to be a pathologically inert histological change, fat accumulation in the liver may play a critical role not only in disease initiation, but also in the progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Therefore, prevention of fat accumulation in the liver may be an effective therapy for multiple stages of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Promising beneficial effects of betaine supplementation on human NAFLD have been reported in some pilot clinical studies; however, data related to betaine therapy in NAFLD are limited. In this study, we examined the effects of betaine on fat accumulation in the liver induced by high-sucrose diet and evaluated mechanisms by which betaine could attenuate or prevent hepatic steatosis in this model. Male C57BL/6 mice weighing 20 ± 0.5 g (means ± SE) were divided into four groups (8 mice per group) and started on one of four treatments: standard diet (SD), SD+betaine, high-sucrose diet (HS), and HS + betaine. Betaine was supplemented in the drinking water at a concentration of 1% (wt/vol) (anhydrous). Long-term feeding of high-sucrose diet to mice caused significant hepatic steatosis accompanied by markedly increased lipogenic activity. Betaine significantly attenuated hepatic steatosis in this animal model, and this change was associated with increased activation of hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and attenuated lipogenic capability (enzyme activities and gene expression) in the liver. Our findings are the first to suggest that betaine might serve as a therapeutic tool to attenuate hepatic steatosis by targeting the hepatic AMPK system. PMID:17702954

  8. Involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase in beneficial effects of betaine on high-sucrose diet-induced hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhenyuan; Deaciuc, Ion; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Song, Ming; Chen, Theresa; Hill, Daniell; McClain, Craig J

    2007-10-01

    Although simple steatosis was originally thought to be a pathologically inert histological change, fat accumulation in the liver may play a critical role not only in disease initiation, but also in the progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Therefore, prevention of fat accumulation in the liver may be an effective therapy for multiple stages of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Promising beneficial effects of betaine supplementation on human NAFLD have been reported in some pilot clinical studies; however, data related to betaine therapy in NAFLD are limited. In this study, we examined the effects of betaine on fat accumulation in the liver induced by high-sucrose diet and evaluated mechanisms by which betaine could attenuate or prevent hepatic steatosis in this model. Male C57BL/6 mice weighing 20 +/- 0.5 g (means +/- SE) were divided into four groups (8 mice per group) and started on one of four treatments: standard diet (SD), SD+betaine, high-sucrose diet (HS), and HS + betaine. Betaine was supplemented in the drinking water at a concentration of 1% (wt/vol) (anhydrous). Long-term feeding of high-sucrose diet to mice caused significant hepatic steatosis accompanied by markedly increased lipogenic activity. Betaine significantly attenuated hepatic steatosis in this animal model, and this change was associated with increased activation of hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and attenuated lipogenic capability (enzyme activities and gene expression) in the liver. Our findings are the first to suggest that betaine might serve as a therapeutic tool to attenuate hepatic steatosis by targeting the hepatic AMPK system.

  9. Temporal Analysis of the Magnaporthe Oryzae Proteome During Conidial Germination and Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated Appressorium Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Franck, William L.; Gokce, Emine; Oh, Yeonyee; Muddiman, David C.; Dean, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most serious threats to global rice production. During the earliest stages of rice infection, M. oryzae conidia germinate on the leaf surface and form a specialized infection structure termed the appressorium. The development of the appressorium represents the first critical stage of infectious development. A total of 3200 unique proteins were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS in a temporal study of conidial germination and cAMP-induced appressorium formation in M. oryzae. Using spectral counting based label free quantification, observed changes in relative protein abundance during the developmental process revealed changes in the cell wall biosynthetic machinery, transport functions, and production of extracellular proteins in developing appressoria. One hundred and sixty-six up-regulated and 208 down-regulated proteins were identified in response to cAMP treatment. Proteomic analysis of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A mutant that is compromised in the ability to form appressoria identified proteins whose developmental regulation is dependent on cAMP signaling. Selected reaction monitoring was used for absolute quantification of four regulated proteins to validate the global proteomics data and confirmed the germination or appressorium specific regulation of these proteins. Finally, a comparison of the proteome and transcriptome was performed and revealed little correlation between transcript and protein regulation. A subset of regulated proteins were identified whose transcripts show similar regulation patterns and include many of the most strongly regulated proteins indicating a central role in appressorium formation. A temporal quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed a strong correlation between transcript and protein abundance for some but not all genes. Collectively, the data presented here provide the first comprehensive view of the M. oryzae proteome during early infection-related development and

  10. Quercetin activates AMP-activated protein kinase by reducing PP2C expression protecting old mouse brain against high cholesterol-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Zheng, Yuan-Lin; Hu, Bin; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Shan, Qun; Zheng, Zi-Hui; Liu, Chan-Min; Wang, Yong-Jian

    2010-10-01

    It is known that a high-cholesterol diet induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and beta-amyloid (Abeta) accumulation in mouse brain, resulting in neurodegenerative changes. Quercetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to possess numerous biological activities beneficial to health. Our previous studies have demonstrated that quercetin protects mouse brain against D-galactose-induced oxidative damage. Against this background, we evaluated the effect of quercetin on high-cholesterol-induced neurotoxicity in old mice and explored its potential mechanism. Our results showed that oral administration of quercetin significantly improved the behavioural performance of high-cholesterol-fed old mice in both a step-through test and the Morris water maze task. This is at least in part caused by decreasing ROS and protein carbonyl levels and restoring Cu--Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD) activity. Furthermore, quercetin also significantly activated the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via down-regulation of protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C), which reduced the integral optical density (IOD) of activated microglia cells and CD11b expression, down-regulated iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, and decreased IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha expression in the brains of high-cholesterol-fed old mice through the suppression of NF-kappaB p65 nuclear translocation. Moreover, AMPK activation significantly increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation and reduced fatty acid synthase (FAS) expression in the brains of high-cholesterol-fed old mice, which reduced cholesterol levels, down-regulated cholesterol 24-hydroxylase (CYP46A1) and beta-amyloid converting enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression, decreased eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha) phosphorylation, and lowered Abeta deposits. However, the neuroprotective effect of quercetin was weakened by intraperitoneal

  11. G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr1 and G-protein Gpa2 of cAMP-dependent signaling pathway are involved in glucose-induced pexophagy in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nazarko, Volodymyr Y; Thevelein, Johan M; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2008-05-01

    In yeast cell, glucose induces various changes of cellular metabolism on genetic and metabolic levels. One of such changes is autophagic degradation of dispensable peroxisomes (pexophagy) which occurs in vacuoles. We have found that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defect of G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr1 and G-protein Gpa2, both the components of cAMP-signaling pathway, strongly suppressed glucose-induced degradation of matrix peroxisomal protein thiolase. We conclude that proteins Gpr1 and Gpa2 are involved in glucose sensing and signal transduction during pexophagy process in yeast.

  12. Lack of starvation-induced activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in the hypothalamus of the Lou/C rats resistant to obesity.

    PubMed

    Taleux, N; De Potter, I; Deransart, C; Lacraz, G; Favier, R; Leverve, X M; Hue, L; Guigas, B

    2008-04-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is involved in the control of food intake by the hypothalamus. The aim of this work was to investigate if modification of hypothalamic AMPK regulation could be related to the spontaneous food restriction of Lou/C rats, a strain resistant to obesity exhibiting a 40% reduction in caloric intake compared with their lean Wistar counterparts. Three-month-old male Lou/C rats were compared with age-matched male Wistar rats in both fed ad libitum and 24-h food deprivation state. We first confirmed that starvation activated both isoforms of AMPK catalytic alpha subunits and enhanced the phosphorylation state of its downstream targets acetyl-CoA carboxylase and elongation factor 2 in the hypothalamus of Wistar rats. These changes were not observed in the hypothalamus of Lou/C rats. Interestingly, the starvation-induced changes in hypothalamic mRNA levels of the main orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides were also blunted in the Lou/C rats. Analysis of the concentrations of circulating substrates and hormones known to regulate hypothalamic AMPK indicated that the starvation-induced changes in ghrelin, adiponectin and leptin were not observed in Lou/C rats. Furthermore, an increased phosphorylation state of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which admittedly mediates leptin signaling, was evidenced in the hypothalamus of the starved Lou/C rats, as well as modifications of expression of the leptin-sensitive genes suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 and stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1. In addition, despite reduced leptin level in fed Lou/C rats, the phosphorylation state of hypothalamic STAT3 remained similar to that found in fed Wistar rats, an adaptation that could be explained by the concomitant increase in ObRb leptin receptor mRNA expression. Activation of hypothalamic AMPK by starvation, which stimulates food intake through changes in (an)orexigenic neuropeptides in the normal rats, was not observed in

  13. TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma-induced iNOS expression increased by prostaglandin E2 in rat primary astrocytes via EP2-evoked cAMP/PKA and intracellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Han-Yun; Mak, Oi-Tong; Yang, Chung-Shi; Liu, Yu-Peng; Fang, Kuan-Ming; Tzeng, Shun-Fen

    2007-01-15

    Astrocytes, the most abundant glia in the central nervous system (CNS), produce a large amount of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in response to proinflammatory mediators after CNS injury. However, it is unclear whether PGE(2) has a regulatory role in astrocytic activity under the inflamed condition. In the present work, we showed that PGE(2) increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma (T/I) in astrocytes. Pharmacological and RNA interference approaches further indicated the involvement of the receptor EP2 in PGE(2)-induced iNOS upregulation in T/I-treated astrocytes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and gel mobility shift assays also demonstrated that PGE(2) increased iNOS transcription through EP2-induced cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. Consistently, the effect of EP2 was significantly attenuated by the PKA inhibitor KT-5720 and partially suppressed by the inhibitor (SB203580) of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), which serves as one of the downstream components of the PKA-dependent pathway. Interestingly, EP2-mediated PKA signaling appeared to increase intracellular Ca(2+) release through inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor activation, which might in turn stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) activation to promote iNOS production in T/I-primed astrocytes. By analyzing the expression of astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), we found that PGE(2) alone only triggered the EP2-induced cAMP/PKA/p38MAPK signaling pathway in astrocytes. Collectively, PGE(2) may enhance T/I-induced astrocytic activation by augmenting iNOS/NO production through EP2-mediated cross-talk between cAMP/PKA and IP3/Ca(2+) signaling pathways.

  14. Role of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, α Subunit and cAMP-Response Element Binding Protein 1 in Synergistic Release of Interleukin 8 by Prostaglandin E2 and Nickel in Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fabisiak, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have linked exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution with acute respiratory infection and chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that soluble nickel (Ni), a common component of PM, alters the release of CXC chemokines from cultured human lung fibroblasts (HLF) in response to microbial stimuli via a pathway dependent on disrupted prostaglandin (PG)E2 signaling. The current study sought to identify the molecular events underlying Ni-induced alterations in PGE2 signaling and its effects on IL-8 production. PGE2 synergistically enhances Ni-induced IL-8 release from HLF in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of PGE2 were mimicked by butaprost and PGE1-alcohol and inhibited with antagonists AH6809 and L-161,982, indicating PGE2 signals via PGE2 receptors 2 and 4. PGE2 and forskolin stimulated cAMP, but it was only in the presence of Ni-induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1, α subunit (HIF1A) that these agents stimulated IL-8 release. The Ni-induced HIF1A DNA binding was enhanced by PGE2 and mediated, in part, by activation of p38 MAPK. Negation of cAMP-response element binding protein 1 or HIF1A using short interfering RNA blocked the synergistic interactions between Ni and PGE2. The results of the current study provide novel information on the ability of atmospheric hypoxia-mimetic metals to disrupt the release of immune-modulating chemokines by HLF in response to PGE2. Moreover, in the presence of HIF1A, cAMP-mediated signaling pathways may be altered to exacerbate inflammatory-like processes in lung tissue, imparting a susceptibility of PM-exposed populations to adverse respiratory health effects. PMID:23526216

  15. cAMP and Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Valsecchi, Federica; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier S.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins has emerged as a major regulatory mechanism for metabolic adaptation. cAMP signaling and PKA phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins have just started to be investigated, and the presence of cAMP-generating enzymes and PKA inside mitochondria is still controversial. Here, we discuss the role of cAMP in regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics through protein phosphorylation and the evidence for soluble adenylyl cyclase as the source of cAMP inside mitochondria. PMID:23636265

  16. Antibiotic therapy for inducible AmpC β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacilli: what are the alternatives to carbapenems, quinolones and aminoglycosides?

    PubMed

    Harris, P N A; Ferguson, J K

    2012-10-01

    Some bacteria that possess chromosomally determined AmpC β-lactamases may express these enzymes at a high level following exposure to β-lactams, either by induction or selection for derepressed mutants. This may lead to clinical failure even if an isolate initially tests susceptible in vitro, a phenomenon best characterised by third-generation cephalosporin therapy for Enterobacter bacteraemia or meningitis. Several other Enterobacteriaceae, such as Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter freundii, Providencia spp. and Morganella morganii (often termed the 'ESCPM' group), may also express high levels of AmpC. However, the risk of clinical failure with β-lactams that test susceptible in vitro is less clear in these species than for Enterobacter. Laboratories frequently do not report β-lactam or β-lactamase inhibitor combination drug susceptibilities for ESCPM organisms, encouraging alternative therapy with quinolones, aminoglycosides or carbapenems. However, quinolones and carbapenems present problems with selective pressure for multiresistant organisms, and aminoglycosides with potential toxicity. The risk of emergent AmpC-mediated resistance for non-Enterobacter spp. appears rare in clinical studies. Piperacillin/tazobactam may remain effective and may be less selective for AmpC derepressed mutants than cephalosporins. The potential roles for agents such as cefepime or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole are also discussed. Clinical studies that better define optimal treatment for this group of bacteria are required.

  17. Mitotic activation of the DISC1-inducible cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase-4D9 (PDE4D9), through multi-site phosphorylation, influences cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Catherine L; Lee, Louisa C Y; Hill, Elaine V; Henderson, David J P; Anthony, Diana F; Houslay, Daniel M; Yalla, Krishna C; Cairns, Lynne S; Dunlop, Allan J; Baillie, George S; Huston, Elaine; Houslay, Miles D

    2014-09-01

    In Rat-1 cells, the dramatic decrease in the levels of both intracellular cyclic 3'5' adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP; cAMP) and in the activity of cAMP-activated protein kinase A (PKA) observed in mitosis was paralleled by a profound increase in cAMP hydrolyzing phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) activity. The decrease in PKA activity, which occurs during mitosis, was attributable to PDE4 activation as the PDE4 selective inhibitor, rolipram, but not the phosphodiesterase-3 (PDE3) inhibitor, cilostamide, specifically ablated this cell cycle-dependent effect. PDE4 inhibition caused Rat-1 cells to move from S phase into G2/M more rapidly, to transit through G2/M more quickly and to remain in G1 for a longer period. Inhibition of PDE3 elicited no observable effects on cell cycle dynamics. Selective immunopurification of each of the four PDE4 sub-families identified PDE4D as being selectively activated in mitosis. Subsequent analysis uncovered PDE4D9, an isoform whose expression can be regulated by Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1)/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) complex, as the sole PDE4 species activated during mitosis in Rat-1 cells. PDE4D9 becomes activated in mitosis through dual phosphorylation at Ser585 and Ser245, involving the combined action of ERK and an unidentified 'switch' kinase that has previously been shown to be activated by H2O2. Additionally, in mitosis, PDE4D9 also becomes phosphorylated at Ser67 and Ser81, through the action of MK2 (MAPKAPK2) and AMP kinase (AMPK), respectively. The multisite phosphorylation of PDE4D9 by all four of these protein kinases leads to decreased mobility (band-shift) of PDE4D9 on SDS-PAGE. PDE4D9 is predominantly concentrated in the perinuclear region of Rat-1 cells but with a fraction distributed asymmetrically at the cell margins. Our investigations demonstrate that the diminished levels of cAMP and PKA activity that characterise mitosis are due to enhanced cAMP degradation by PDE4D9. PDE4D9, was found to

  18. Tau-driven 26S proteasome impairment and cognitive dysfunction can be prevented early in disease by activating cAMP-PKA signaling.

    PubMed

    Myeku, Natura; Clelland, Catherine L; Emrani, Sheina; Kukushkin, Nikolay V; Yu, Wai Haung; Goldberg, Alfred L; Duff, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) degrades misfolded proteins including those implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the effects of tau accumulation on proteasome function in a mouse model of tauopathy and in a cross to a UPS reporter mouse (line Ub-G76V-GFP). Accumulation of insoluble tau was associated with a decrease in the peptidase activity of brain 26S proteasomes, higher levels of ubiquitinated proteins and undegraded Ub-G76V-GFP. 26S proteasomes from mice with tauopathy were physically associated with tau and were less active in hydrolyzing ubiquitinated proteins, small peptides and ATP. 26S proteasomes from normal mice incubated with recombinant oligomers or fibrils also showed lower hydrolyzing capacity in the same assays, implicating tau as a proteotoxin. Administration of an agent that activates cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling led to attenuation of proteasome dysfunction, probably through proteasome subunit phosphorylation. In vivo, this led to lower levels of aggregated tau and improvements in cognitive performance.

  19. Different effect of prostaglandin E2 on B-cell activation by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2: selective inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced antibody response through increases in intracellular cyclic AMP levels

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K.; Ono, S.; Takahama, Y.; Hirayama, F.; Hirano, H.; Itoh, K.; Dobashi, K.; Murakami, S.; Katoh, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Hamaoka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on murine B-cell activation induced by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2, were examined. A final differentiation of unprimed B cells into IgM-producing cells induced by B151-TRF2 was markedly inhibited by PGE2 at physiological concentrations (around 10-8 M), whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-induced antibody responses of unprimed as well as activated B cells were not affected by PGE2, even at 10-6 M. B-cell responses induced by B151-TRF2-like factors from autoimmune-prone MRL/1pr mice were also inhibited by PGE2. Biphasic increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were induced by culturing B cells with 10-6 or 10-8 M PGE2: rapid increases within 8 min and delayed increases around 16 hr. The direct addition of dibutyryl cAMP to cultures of B cells resulted in marked inhibition of antibody responses when stimulated with B151-TRF2 but not with B151-TRF1/IL-5. The B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses were also inhibited by cAMP-elevating reagents such as forskolin, cholera toxin and theophyline. Furthermore, 2′, 5′-dideoxyadenosine, which is an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, prevented the PGE2-mediated cAMP accumulation in unprimed B cells as well as the PGE2-mediated inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced B-cell responses when added at the initiation of culture. These results suggest that PGE2 inhibits B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses through the activation of adenylate cyclase and subsequent accumulation of intracellular cAMP, whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-responsive B cells are resistant to the inhibitory effect of PGE2 and cAMP. PMID:2553585

  20. Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside Protects against 1,3-Dichloro-2-Propanol-Induced Reduction of Progesterone by Up-regulation of Steroidogenic Enzymes and cAMP Level in Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianxia; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Cuijuan; Hu, Yunfeng; Jiang, Xinwei; Ou, Shiyi; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong; Jiao, Rui; Bai, Weibin

    2016-01-01

    1,3-Dichloro-2-propanol (1,3-DCP) is a food processing contaminant and has been shown to perturb male reproductive function. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (C3G), an anthocyanin antioxidant, is reported to have protective effects on many organs. However, it remains unclear whether C3G protects against chemical-induced reproductive toxicity. The present study was therefore to investigate the intervention of C3G on 1,3-DCP-induced reproductive toxicity in R2C Leydig cells. Results demonstrated that C3G inhibited the 1,3-DCP-induced cytotoxicity and cell shape damage with the effective doses being ranging from 10 to 40 μmol/L. In addition, 1,3-DCP (2 mmol/L) exposure significantly increased the ROS level and mitochondrial membrane potential damage ratio, leading to a decrease in progesterone production, while C3G intervention reduced the ROS level, and increased the progesterone production after 24 h treatment. Most importantly, C3G intervention could up-regulate the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level and protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. It was concluded that C3G is effective in reducing 1,3-DCP-induced reproductive toxicity via activating steroidogenic enzymes and cAMP level. PMID:27867356

  1. [Mode of action of cyclic amp in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, CAP and cAMP-dependent protein kinases].

    PubMed

    de Gunzburg, J

    1985-06-01

    cAMP is an ubiquitous compound which is involved in the regulation of many biological processes. In bacteria such as E. coli, cAMP mediates the activation of catabolic operons via the CAP protein. The CAP-cAMP complex, whose tridimensional structure has recently been established, binds to the promoter regions of catabolic operons at a specific site, and activates their transcription by inducing RNA polymerase to bind and initiate transcription at the correct site. Various phenomenons including protein-protein interactions or CAP-induced DNA bending or kinking could be involved in the process of forming the open transcription complex. In eukaryotes, cAMP activates cAMP dependent protein kinases which covalently modify proteins by phosphorylation on serine or threonine residues. The catalytically inactive holoenzyme is generally a tetramer containing two regulatory subunits, each capable of binding two molecules of cAMP, and two catalytic subunits. In mammalian cells, two types of cAMP dependent protein kinases (I and II) can be distinguished on the basis of their regulatory subunits; their relative proportion varies from tissue to tissue. Binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunits induces the dissociation of the holoenzyme and releases the free and active catalytic subunits. Phosphorylation of proteins occurs at sequences containing two basic residues in the vicinity of the phosphorylated serine or threonine. A heat-stable protein, present in most eukaryotic cells, specifically interacts with the catalytic subunit and inhibits its activity. The amino-acid sequence of cAMP dependent protein kinases has recently been determined. It is interesting to note that the domains responsible for cAMP binding by the regulatory subunits of mammalian cAMP dependent protein kinases and CAP share important sequence homologies. The same phenomenon is observed concerning the domain responsible for ATP binding to the catalytic subunit of cAMP dependent protein kinases and that of

  2. Effects of a water-soluble forskolin derivative (NKH477) and a membrane-permeable cyclic AMP analogue on noradrenaline-induced Ca2+ mobilization in smooth muscle of rabbit mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S.; Suzuki, S.; Itoh, T.

    1993-01-01

    1. Effects were studied of 6-(3-dimethylaminopropionyl) forskolin (NKH477), a water-soluble forskolin derivative and of dibutyryl-cyclic AMP, a membrane-permeable cyclic AMP analogue on noradrenaline (NA)-induced Ca2+ mobilization in smooth muscle strips of the rabbit mesenteric artery. The intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), isometric force and cellular concentration of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) were measured. 2. NA (10 microM) produced a phasic, followed by a tonic increase in both [Ca2+]i and force in a solution containing 2.6 mM Ca2+. NKH477 (0.01-0.3 microM) attenuated the phasic and the tonic increases in both [Ca2+]i and force induced by 10 microM NA, in a concentration-dependent manner. 3. In Ca(2+)-free solution containing 2 mM EGTA with 5.9 mM K+, NA (10 microM) produced only phasic increases in [Ca2+]i and force. NKH477 (0.01 microM) and dibutyryl-cyclic AMP (0.1 mM) each greatly inhibited these increases. 4. NA (10 microM) led to the production of InsP3 in intact smooth muscle strips and InsP3 (10 microM) increased Ca2+ in Ca(2+)-free solution after a brief application of Ca2+ in beta-escin-skinned smooth muscle strips. NKH477 (0.01 microM) or dibutyryl-cyclic AMP (0.1 mM) modified neither the NA-induced synthesis of InsP3 in intact muscle strips nor the InsP3-induced Ca2+ release in skinned strips. 5. In Ca(2+)-free solution, high K+ (40 and 128 mM) itself failed to increase [Ca2+]i but concentration-dependently enhanced the amplitude of the increase in [Ca2+]i induced by 10 microM NA with a parallel enhancement of the maximum rate of rise.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8298800

  3. The characteristics of hepatic Gsα-cAMP axis in HSHF diet-fed obese insulin resistance rats and genetic diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Nina; Wei, Chen; Zhang, Lihong; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Lili

    2017-03-04

    Stimulatory G protein α-subunit (Gsα) mediated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signal is required for elevated hepatic glucose production (HGP) in diabetic patients. However, it remains obscure of the exact characteristics of hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis (including Gsα, glucagon receptor, β2-adrenergic receptor, cAMP, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase) in insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In current study, we investigated the changing characteristics of hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis and blood glucose in high-sugar-high-fat (HSHF)-diet-induced IR wistar rats and db/db diabetic mice. As expected, the HSHF-diet rats were characterized by hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance. According to a threshold (1.7) of HOMA-R, the process of IR in HSHF-diet rats could be divided into slight and high IR stages, with the week-23 as the cut-off point. In early slight IR stage, key molecules expressions of hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis in HSHF-diet rats were up-regulated with significantly elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) from 18 to 23 weeks. Unexpectedly, in high IR stage, hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis was recovered comparatively to that of normal chow-diet rats, and no significant differences in FBG levels were found. However, in diabetic db/db mice, up-regulation of hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis was responsible for its severely increased fasting hyperglycaemia. Our data revealed a positive correlation between hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis and FBG in slight IR stage of HSHF-diet rats and diabetic db/db mice. The current finding thus suggested hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis plays a central role in regulating of FBG during the occurrence and development of T2DM.

  4. Cyclic AMP Effectors Regulate Myometrial Oxytocin Receptor Expression.

    PubMed

    Yulia, Angela; Singh, Natasha; Lei, Kaiyu; Sooranna, Suren R; Johnson, Mark R

    2016-11-01

    The factors that initiate human labor are poorly understood. We have tested the hypothesis that a decline in cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) function leads to the onset of labor. Initially, we identified myometrial cAMP/PKA-responsive genes (six up-regulated and five down-regulated genes) and assessed their expression in myometrial samples taken from different stages of pregnancy and labor. We found that the oxytocin receptor (OTR) was one of the cAMP-repressed genes, and, given the importance of OTR in the labor process, we studied the mechanisms involved in greater detail using small interfering RNA, chemical agonists, and antagonists of the cAMP effectors. We found that cAMP-repressed genes, including OTR, increased with the onset of labor. Our in vitro studies showed that cAMP acting via PKA reduced OTR expression but that in the absence of PKA, cAMP acts via exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) to increase OTR expression. In early labor myometrial samples, PKA levels and activity declined and Epac1 levels increased, perhaps accounting for the increase in myometrial OTR mRNA and protein levels at this time. In vitro exposure of myometrial cells to stretch and IL-1β increased OTR levels and reduced basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP and PKA activity, as judged by phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein levels, but neither stretch nor IL-1β had any effect on PKA or EPAC1 levels. In summary, there is a reduction in the activity of the cAMP/PKA pathway with the onset of human labor potentially playing a critical role in regulating OTR expression and the transition from myometrial quiescence to activation.

  5. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-15

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells.

  6. Cyclic AMP is sufficient for triggering the exocytic recruitment of aquaporin-2 in renal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Dorothea; Krylov, Andrey; Hahm, Daniel; Hagen, Volker; Rosenthal, Walter; Pohl, Peter; Maric, Kenan

    2003-01-01

    The initial response of renal epithelial cells to the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) is an increase in cyclic AMP. By applying immunofluorescence, cell membrane capacitance and transepithelial water flux measurements we show that cAMP alone is sufficient to elicit the antidiuretic cellular response in primary cultured epithelial cells from renal inner medulla, namely the transport of aquaporin-2 (AQP2)-bearing vesicles to, and their subsequent fusion with, the plasma membrane (AQP2 shuttle). The AQP2 shuttle is evoked neither by AVP-independent Ca2+ increases nor by AVP-induced Ca2+ increases. However, clamping cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations below resting levels at 25 nM inhibited exocytosis. Exocytosis was confined to a slow monophasic response, and readily releasable vesicles were missing. Analysis of endocytic capacitance steps revealed that cAMP does not decelerate the retrieval of AQP2 from the plasma membrane. Our data suggest that cAMP initiates an early step, namely the transport of AQP2-bearing vesicles towards the plasma membrane, and do not support a regulatory function for Ca2+ in the AQP2 shuttle. PMID:12524527

  7. The local corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 2 signalling pathway partly mediates hypoxia-induced increases in lipolysis via the cAMP-protein kinase A signalling pathway in white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yanlei; Qu, Zhuan; Chen, Nan; Gong, Hui; Song, Mintao; Chen, Xuequn; Du, Jizeng; Xu, Chengli

    2014-07-05

    Our objective was to investigate the mechanisms by which the endogenous CRHR2 in white adipose tissue (WAT) regulates metabolic activities associated with lipogenesis and lipolysis under continuous exposure to hypoxia. We found that hypobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 5000 m significantly reduced the body weight, food intake, and WAT mass of rats. Hypoxia also accelerated lipolysis and suppressed lipogenesis in WAT. Pretreatment with astressin 2B, a selective CRHR2 antagonist, partly but significantly attenuated the hypoxia-induced reductions in body weight and WAT mass by blocking the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA)-hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL)/perilipin signalling pathway. Astressin 2B treatment failed to attenuate hypoxia induced lipogenic inhibition. In conclusion, activation of endogenous WAT Ucn2/3 autocrine/paracrine pathway was involved in hypoxia induced lipolysis via CRHR2 - cAMP-PKA signalling pathway. This study provides the novel understanding of local CRHR2 signaling pathway playing important role in WAT loss and lipid metabolism under hypoxia. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Caffeine Inhibits the Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Induced by Acetaldehyde via Adenosine A2A Receptor Mediated by the cAMP/PKA/SRC/ERK1/2/P38 MAPK Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanzhi; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Lv, Xiongwen; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis. Evidence suggests that adenosine aggravates liver fibrosis via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). Caffeine, which is being widely consumed during daily life, inhibits the action of adenosine. In this study, we attempted to validate the hypothesis that caffeine influences acetaldehyde-induced HSC activation by acting on A2AR. Acetaldehyde at 50, 100, 200, and 400 μM significantly increased HSC-T6 cells proliferation, and cell proliferation reached a maximum at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. Caffeine and the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 decreased the cell viability and inhibited the expression of procollagen type I and type III in acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells. In addition, the inhibitory effect of caffeine on the expression of procollagen type I was regulated by A2AR-mediated signal pathway involving cAMP, PKA, SRC, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, caffeine’s inhibitory effect on the expression of procollagen type III may depend upon the A2AR-mediated P38 MAPK-dependent pathway. Conclusions: Caffeine significantly inhibited acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells activation by distinct A2AR mediated signal pathway via inhibition of cAMP-PKA-SRC-ERK1/2 for procollagen type I and via P38 MAPK for procollagen type III. PMID:24682220

  9. Metformin inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced growth and VEGF expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells by suppressing AGEs receptor expression via AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Matsui, T; Takeuchi, M; Yamagishi, S

    2013-05-01

    Metformin use has been reported to decrease breast cancer incidence and mortality in diabetic patients. We have previously shown that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction stimulate growth and/or migration of pancreatic cancer and melanoma cells. However, effects of metformin on AGEs-RAGE axis in breast cancers remain unknown. We examined here whether and how metformin could block the AGEs-induced growth and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was measured with an electron coupling reagent WST-1 based colorimetric assay. Gene expression level was evaluated by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions. AGEs significantly increased cell proliferation of MCF-7 cells, which was completely prevented by the treatment with 0.01 or 0.1 mM metformin or anti-RAGE antibodies. Furthermore, metformin at 0.01 mM completely suppressed the AGEs-induced upregulation of RAGE and VEGF mRNA levels in MCF-7 cells. An inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase, compound C significantly blocked the growth-inhibitory and RAGE and VEGF suppressing effects of metformin in AGEs-exposed MCF-7 cells. Our present study suggests that metformin could inhibit the AGEs-induced growth and VEGF expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells by suppressing RAGE gene expression via AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. Metformin may protect against breast cancer expansion in diabetic patients by blocking the AGEs-RAGE axis.

  10. Early aldosterone-induced gene product regulates the epithelial sodium channel by deubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Fakitsas, Panagiotis; Adam, Gabriele; Daidié, Dorothée; van Bemmelen, Miguel X; Fouladkou, Fatemeh; Patrignani, Andrea; Wagner, Ulrich; Warth, Richard; Camargo, Simone M R; Staub, Olivier; Verrey, François

    2007-04-01

    The mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone controls sodium reabsorption and BP largely by regulating the cell-surface expression and function of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in target kidney tubules. Part of the stimulatory effect of aldosterone on ENaC is mediated by the induction of serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (Sgk1), a kinase that interferes with the ubiquitylation of ENaC by ubiquitin-protein ligase Nedd4-2. In vivo early aldosterone-regulated mRNA now has been identified in microselected mouse distal nephron by microarray. From 22 mRNA that displayed a two-fold or more change, 13 were downregulated and nine were upregulated. Besides Sgk1, the induced mRNA include Grem2 (protein related to DAN and cerebrus [PRDC]), activating transcription factor 3, cAMP responsive element modulator, and the ubiquitin-specific protease Usp2-45. The induction of this last enzyme isoform was verified in mouse distal nephron tubule at the protein level. With the use of Hek293 cells, Xenopus oocytes, and mpkCCD(c14) cells as expression systems, it was shown that Usp2-45 deubiquitylates ENaC and stimulates ENaC-mediated sodium transport, an effect that is not additive to that of Sgk1. A deubiquitylating enzyme that targets ENaC in vitro and thus may play a role in sodium transport regulation was identified within a series of new in vivo early aldosterone-regulated gene products.

  11. 1,N6-etheno-AMP and 1,N6-etheno-2'-deoxy-AMP as probes of the activator site of glycogen phosphorylase from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbunder, B; Morange, M; Buc, H

    1976-01-01

    Both 1,N6-etheno-AMP and 1,N6-etheno-2'-deoxy-AMP bind at the AMP site of phosphorylase b (1,4-alpha-D-glucan:orthophosphate alpha-glucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.1). Etheno-AMP induces the same activation as AMP, about 30-fold higher than the activation induced by etheno-dAMP. The fluorescence of etheno-AMP and etheno-dAMP is associated with the base moiety; therefore, when free in solution, the two derivatives have identical fluorescence properties. However, when bound to phosphorylase, the fluorescence of etheno-AMP is quenched more efficiently than the fluorescence of etheno-dAMP. This difference between the fluorescence properties of the bound nucleotides suggests that a modification in the ribose ring affects the position of the adenine in the AMP site of phosphorylase b. The observed quenching may be due to a stacking interaction between an aromatic residue and the base moiety of the bound nucleotide. PMID:1066682

  12. Overproduction of the regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase blocks the differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, M N; Driscoll, D; Mutzel, R; Part, D; Williams, J; Véron, M

    1989-01-01

    During the aggregation of Dictyostelium discoideum extracellular cAMP is known to act as a chemotractant and as an inducer of cellular differentiation. However, its intracellular role as a second messenger remains obscure. We have constructed a fusion gene consisting of the cDNA encoding the regulatory subunit (R) of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase fused to the promoter and N-terminal-proximal sequences of a Dictyostelium actin gene. Stable transformants, containing multiple copies of this gene, overproduce the R subunit which accumulates prematurely relative to the endogenous protein. These transformants fail to aggregate. Detailed analysis has shown that they are blocked at interphase, the period prior to aggregation, and that they are severely defective in most responses to cAMP including the induction of gene expression. Our observations suggest that intracellular cAMP acts, presumably by activation of the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, to facilitate early development. Images PMID:2551673

  13. Regulation of histamine- and UTP-induced increases in Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins (1,3,4,5)P4 and Ca2+ by cyclic AMP in DDT1 MF-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sipma, H; Duin, M; Hoiting, B; den Hertog, A; Nelemans, A

    1995-01-01

    1. Stimulation of P2U-purinoceptors with UTP or histamine H1-receptors with histamine gave rise to the formation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) and inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (Ins(1,3,4,5)P4) in DDT1 MF-2 smooth muscle cells. 2. Stimulation of P2U-purinoceptors or histamine H1-receptors caused an increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+, consisting of an initial peak, representing the release of Ca2+ from internal stores and a sustained phase representing Ca2+ influx. 3. The P2U-purinoceptor-mediated Ca(2+)-entry mechanism was more sensitive to UTP than Ca(2+)-mobilization (EC50: 3.3 microM +/- 0.4 microM vs 55.1 microM +/- 9.2 microM), in contrast to these processes activated by histamine H1-receptors (EC50: 5.8 microM +/- 0.6 microM vs 3.1 microM +/- 0.5 microM). 4. Pre-stimulation of cells with several adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) elevating agents, reduced the histamine H1-receptor-mediated formation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 and Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. Forskolin completely inhibited Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation (IC50: 158 +/- 24 nM) whereas Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 formation was inhibited by only 45% (IC50: 173 +/- 16 nM). The P2U-purinoceptor-mediated production of these inositol phosphates was not affected by cyclic AMP. 5. Forskolin and isoprenaline reduced the histamine-induced increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+, as measured in Ca2+ containing medium and in nominally Ca(2+)-free medium but did not change the UTP-induced increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+. 6. These results clearly demonstrate that cyclic AMP differentially regulates components of the histamine induced phospholipase C signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, cyclic AMP does not affect the phospholipase C pathway activated by stimulation of P2U-purinoceptors in DDT1 MF-2 cells.

  14. GLP-1(28-36) improves β-cell mass and glucose disposal in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and activates cAMP/PKA/β-catenin signaling in β-cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shao, Weijuan; Wang, Zhaoxia; Ip, Wilfred; Chiang, Yu-Ting; Xiong, Xiaoquan; Chai, Tuanyao; Xu, Catherine; Wang, Qinghua; Jin, Tianru

    2013-06-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the COOH-terminal fragment of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a nonapeptide GLP-1(28-36)amide, attenuates diabetes and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese mice. However, the effect of this nonapeptide in pancreatic β-cells remains largely unknown. Here, we show that in a streptozotocin-induced mouse diabetes model, GLP-1(28-36)amide improved glucose disposal and increased pancreatic β-cell mass and β-cell proliferation. An in vitro investigation revealed that GLP-1(28-36)amide stimulates β-catenin (β-cat) Ser(675) phosphorylation in both the clonal INS-1 cell line and rat primary pancreatic islet cells. In INS-1 cells, the stimulation was accompanied by increased nuclear β-cat content. GLP-1(28-36)amide was also shown to increase cellular cAMP levels, PKA enzymatic activity, and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor-1 (ATF-1) phosphorylation. Furthermore, GLP-1(28-36)amide treatment enhanced islet insulin secretion and increased the growth of INS-1 cells, which was associated with increased cyclin D1 expression. Finally, PKA inhibition attenuated the effect of GLP-1(28-36)amide on β-cat Ser(675) phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression in the INS-1 cell line. We have thus revealed the beneficial effect of GLP-1(28-36)amide in pancreatic β-cells in vitro and in vivo. Our observations suggest that GLP-1(28-36)amide may exert its effect through the PKA/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  15. “cAMP Sponge”: A Buffer for Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′-Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Moyer, Mary Pat; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M.

    2009-01-01

    Background While intracellular buffers are widely used to study calcium signaling, no such tool exists for the other major second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP). Methods/Principal Findings Here we describe a genetically encoded buffer for cAMP based on the high-affinity cAMP-binding carboxy-terminus of the regulatory subunit RIβ of protein kinase A (PKA). Addition of targeting sequences permitted localization of this fragment to the extra-nuclear compartment, while tagging with mCherry allowed quantification of its expression at the single cell level. This construct (named “cAMP sponge”) was shown to selectively bind cAMP in vitro. Its expression significantly suppressed agonist-induced cAMP signals and the downstream activation of PKA within the cytosol as measured by FRET-based sensors in single living cells. Point mutations in the cAMP-binding domains of the construct rendered the chimera unable to bind cAMP in vitro or in situ. Cyclic AMP sponge was fruitfully applied to examine feedback regulation of gap junction-mediated transfer of cAMP in epithelial cell couplets. Conclusions This newest member of the cAMP toolbox has the potential to reveal unique biological functions of cAMP, including insight into the functional significance of compartmentalized signaling events. PMID:19888343

  16. Involvement of mTOR and Regulation by AMPK in Early Iodine Deficiency-Induced Thyroid Microvascular Activation.

    PubMed

    Craps, J; Joris, V; De Jongh, B; Sonveaux, P; Horman, S; Lengelé, B; Bertrand, L; Many, M-C; Colin, I M; Gérard, A-C

    2016-06-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) induces TSH-independent microvascular activation in the thyroid via the reactive oxygen species/nitric oxide-hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway. We hypothesized the additional involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a positive regulator of this pathway and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as a negative feedback regulator to explain the transient nature of ID-induced microvascular changes under nonmalignant conditions. mTOR and AMPK involvement was investigated using an in vitro model (human thyrocytes in primary cultures) and 2 murine models of goitrogenesis (normal NMRI and RET-PTC mice [a papillary thyroid cancer model]). In NMRI mice, ID had no effect on the phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), a downstream target of mTOR. However, rapamycin inhibited ID-induced thyroid blood flow and VEGF protein expression. In the RET-PTC model, ID strongly increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K, whereas rapamycin completely inhibited the ID-induced increase in p70S6K phosphorylation, thyroid blood flow, and VEGF-A expression. In vitro, although ID increased p70S6K phosphorylation, the ID-stimulated hypoxia-inducible factor/VEGF pathway was inhibited by rapamycin. Activation of AMPK by metformin inhibited ID effects both in vivo and in vitro. In AMPK-α1 knockout mice, the ID-induced increase in thyroid blood flow and VEGF-A protein expression persisted throughout the treatment, whereas both parameters returned to control values in wild-type mice after 4 days of ID. In conclusion, mTOR is required for early ID-induced thyroid microvascular activation. AMPK negatively regulates this pathway, which may account for the transient nature of ID-induced TSH-independent vascular effects under benign conditions.

  17. AMP-18 Targets p21 to Maintain Epithelial Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peili; Li, Yan Chun; Toback, F. Gary

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated homeostasis of epithelial cells resulting in disruption of mucosal barrier function is an important pathogenic mechanism in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We have characterized a novel gastric protein, Antrum Mucosal Protein (AMP)-18, that has pleiotropic properties; it is mitogenic, anti-apoptotic and can stimulate formation of tight junctions. A 21-mer synthetic peptide derived from AMP-18 exhibits the same biological functions as the full-length protein and is an effective therapeutic agent in mouse models of IBD. In this study we set out to characterize therapeutic mechanisms and identify molecular targets by which AMP-18 maintains and restores disrupted epithelial homeostasis in cultured intestinal epithelial cells and a mouse model of IBD. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a pro-inflammatory cytokine known to mediate gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal injury in IBD, was used to induce intestinal epithelial cell injury, and study the effects of AMP-18 on apoptosis and the cell cycle. An apoptosis array used to search for targets of AMP-18 in cells exposed to TNF-α identified the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1. Treatment with AMP-18 blunted increases in p21 expression and apoptosis, while reversing disturbed cell cycle kinetics induced by TNF-α. AMP-18 appears to act through PI3K/AKT pathways to increase p21 phosphorylation, thereby reducing its nuclear accumulation to overcome the antiproliferative effects of TNF-α. In vitamin D receptor-deficient mice with TNBS-induced IBD, the observed increase in p21 expression in colonic epithelial cells was suppressed by treatment with AMP peptide. The results indicate that AMP-18 can maintain and/or restore the homeostatic balance between proliferation and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells to protect and repair mucosal barrier homeostasis and function, suggesting a therapeutic role in IBD. PMID:25919700

  18. [Clinical study of induced abortion of early-early pregnancy: an analysis of 10, 404 cases].

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Wang, Xue-fen; Zhang, Li; Liu, Jian-hua

    2012-01-03

    To evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of early-early pregnancy induced abortion (EPIA). A total of 10 404 cases of EPIA performed at our hospital from January 1993 to December 2003 were retrospectively analyzed and compared with 9434 cases of common induced abortion (CIA). The amount of hemorrhage and operative duration, degree of pain, rate of induced-abortion syndrome, rate of incomplete abortion, menstrual changes and post-operative onset of Asherman's syndrome were observed and compared between 2 groups. The average age, ratio of parous cases, ratio of the cases of first-pregnancy induced abortion were not different between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The amount of hemorrhage bleeding ((4.9 ± 3.2) ml), operative duration ((90.3 ± 12.4) s), degree of pain, rate of induced-abortion syndrome, menstrual changes and the rate of Asherman's syndrome in the EPIA group were all significantly less than those in the CIA group (P < 0.05). However, the rate of incomplete abortion (0.44%) in the EPIA group was significantly higher than that (0.21%) in the CIA group (P < 0.05). EPIA has the advantages of lesser hemorrhage, less pain, shorter operative duration and fewer complications over CIA. Therefore the recovery of EPIA cases is earlier than that of CIA cases. While the risk of incomplete abortion stays high.

  19. Forskolin and derivatives as tools for studying the role of cAMP.

    PubMed

    Alasbahi, R H; Melzig, M F

    2012-01-01

    Forskolin (7beta-acetoxy-1alpha,6beta,9alpha-trihydroxy-8,13-epoxy-labd-14-en-11-one) is the first main labdane diterpenoid isolated from the roots of the Indian Plectranthus barbatus ANDREWS and one of the most extensively studied constituents of this plant. The unique character of forskolin as a general direct, rapid and reversible activator of adenylyl cyclase not only underlies its wide range of pharmacological effects but also renders it as a valuable tool in the study of the role of cAMP. The purpose of this review is to provide data presenting the utility of forskolin--as a cAMP activator--for studying the function of cAMP from different biological viewpoints as follows: 1) Investigation on the role of cAMP in various cellular processes in different organs such as gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract, reproductive organs, endocrine system, urinary system, olfactory system, nervous system, platelet aggregating system, skin, bones, eyes, and smooth muscles. 2) Studies on the role of cAMP activation and inhibition to understand the pathogenesis (e.g. thyroid autoimmune disorders, leukocyte signal transduction defect in depression, acute malaria infection, secretory dysfunction in inflammatory diseases) as well as its possibly beneficial role for curing diseases such as the regulation of coronary microvascular NO production after heart failure, the attenuation of the development or progression of fibrosis in the heart and lungs, the augmentation of myo-protective effects of ischemic preconditioning especially in the failing hearts after myocardial infarction, the stimulation of the regeneration of injured retinal ganglion cells, the curing of glaucoma and inflammatory diseases, the reducing of cyst formation early in the polycystic kidney disease, and the management of autoimmune disorders by enhancing Fas-mediated apoptosis. 3) Studies on the role of cAMP in the mechanism of actions of a number of drugs and substances such as the effect of the

  20. Prunetin signals via G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30(GPER1): Stimulation of adenylyl cyclase and cAMP-mediated activation of MAPK signaling induces Runx2 expression in osteoblasts to promote bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kainat; Pal, Subhashis; Yadav, Manisha; Maurya, Rakesh; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2015-12-01

    Prunetin is found in red clover and fruit of Prunus avium (red cherry). The effect of prunetin on osteoblast function, its mode of action and bone regeneration in vivo were investigated. Cultures of primary osteoblasts, osteoblastic cell line and HEK293T cells were used for various in vitro studies. Adult female rats received drill-hole injury at the femur diaphysis to assess the bone regenerative effect of prunetin. Prunetin at 10nM significantly (a) increased proliferation and differentiation of primary cultures of osteoblasts harvested from rats and (b) promoted formation of mineralized nodules by bone marrow stromal/osteoprogenitor cells. At this concentration, prunetin did not activate any of the two nuclear estrogen receptors (α and β). However, prunetin triggered signaling via a G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30/GPER1, and enhanced cAMP levels in osteoblasts. G15, a selective GPR30 antagonist, abolished prunetin-induced increases in osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and intracellular cAMP. In osteoblasts, prunetin up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) protein through cAMP-dependent Erk/MAP kinase activation that ultimately resulted in the up-regulation of GPR30. Administration of prunetin at 0.25mg/kg given to rats stimulated bone regeneration at the site of drill hole and up-regulated Runx2 expression in the fractured callus and the effect was comparable to human parathyroid hormone, the only clinically used osteogenic therapy. We conclude that prunetin promotes osteoinduction in vivo and the mechanism is defined by signaling through GPR30 resulting in the up-regulation of the key osteogenic gene Runx2 that in turn up-regulates GPR30.

  1. Modulation of collagen production following bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in hamsters. Presence of a factor in lung that increases fibroblast prostaglandin E2 and cAMP and suppresses fibroblast proliferation and collagen production.

    PubMed

    Clark, J G; Kostal, K M; Marino, B A

    1982-07-25

    To elucidate mechanisms involved in the regulation of lung collagen content we studied hamsters with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Lung collagen in this model is increased as the result of greatly increased lung collagen synthesis rates. However, collagen synthesis rates are subsequently restored to normal. Hamster lung explants from both normal and bleomycin-exposed hamsters were cultured, and the effects of explant conditioned medium (CM) on lung fibroblast (IMR-90) proliferation and collagen production in vitro were determined. Lung explant CM increased fibroblast prostaglandin (PG)E2 production and intracellular cAMP, and decreased both fibroblast proliferation and collagen production in a dose-dependent manner. Greater activity was observed with lung explant CM from bleomycin-exposed lungs. Incubation of fibroblasts with indomethacin prior to addition of CM blocked CM-mediated changes in PGE2 and cAMP and inhibited changes in fibroblast proliferation and collagen production. Exogenous PGE2 or dibutyryl cAMP also suppressed fibroblast proliferation and collagen production. The suppressive activity in lung-conditioned medium is nondialyzable, has an apparent molecular weight of 15,000-20,000 by gel filtration, and is heat-stable. It is not species-restricted since CM from hamster lung affected human and hamster lung fibroblasts similarly. Activity is present preformed in lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, although bronchoalveolar macrophages produce a nondialyzable factor in culture which suppresses fibroblast proliferation. The suppressive activity identified in fibrotic lung may represent a means for limiting collagen accumulation following tumor injury.

  2. Resveratrol induces AMPK-dependent MDR1 inhibition in colorectal cancer HCT116/L-OHP cells by preventing activation of NF-κB signaling and suppressing cAMP-responsive element transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyuan; Zhang, Long; Ni, Zhenhua; Sun, Jian; Gao, Hong; Cheng, Zhuoan; Xu, Jianhua; Yin, Peihao

    2015-12-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound found in foods and beverages, has attracted increasing attention in recent years because of its potent chemopreventive and anti-tumor effects. In this study, the effects of resveratrol on the expression of P-glycoprotein/multi-drug resistance protein 1 (P-gp/MDR1), and the underlying molecular mechanisms, were investigated in oxaliplatin (L-OHP)-resistant colorectal cancer cells (HCT116/L-OHP). Resveratrol downregulated MDR1 protein and mRNA expression levels and reduced MDR1 promoter activity. It also enhanced the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123, suggesting that resveratrol can reverse multi-drug resistance by downregulating MDR1 expression and reducing drug efflux. Resveratrol treatment also reduced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity, reduced phosphorylation levels of IκBα, and reduced nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65. Moreover, downregulation of MDR1 expression and promoter activity was mediated by resveratrol-induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. The inhibitory effects of resveratrol on MDR1 expression and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation were reversed by AMPKα siRNA transfection. We found that the transcriptional activity of cAMP-responsive element (CRE) was inhibited by resveratrol. These results demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on MDR1 expression in HCT116/L-OHP cells were closely associated with the inhibition of NF-κB signaling and CREB activation in an AMPK-dependent manner.

  3. Activated cAMP receptors switch encystation into sporulation.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Morio, Takahiro; James, John L; Prescott, Alan R; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Schaap, Pauline

    2009-04-28

    Metazoan embryogenesis is controlled by a limited number of signaling modules that are used repetitively at successive developmental stages. The development of social amoebas shows similar reiterated use of cAMP-mediated signaling. In the model Dictyostelium discoideum, secreted cAMP acting on 4 cAMP receptors (cARs1-4) coordinates cell movement during aggregation and fruiting body formation, and induces the expression of aggregation and sporulation genes at consecutive developmental stages. To identify hierarchy in the multiple roles of cAMP, we investigated cAR heterogeneity and function across the social amoeba phylogeny. The gene duplications that yielded cARs 2-4 occurred late in evolution. Many species have only a cAR1 ortholog that duplicated independently in the Polysphondylids and Acytostelids. Disruption of both cAR genes of Polysphondylium pallidum (Ppal) did not affect aggregation, but caused complete collapse of fruiting body morphogenesis. The stunted structures contained disorganized stalk cells, which supported a mass of cysts instead of spores; cAMP triggered spore gene expression in Ppal, but not in the cAR null mutant, explaining its sporulation defect. Encystation is the survival strategy of solitary amoebas, and lower taxa, like Ppal, can still encyst as single cells. Recent findings showed that intracellular cAMP accumulation suffices to trigger encystation, whereas it is a complementary requirement for sporulation. Combined, the data suggest that cAMP signaling in social amoebas evolved from cAMP-mediated encystation in solitary amoebas; cAMP secretion in aggregates prompted the starving cells to form spores and not cysts, and additionally organized fruiting body morphogenesis. cAMP-mediated aggregation was the most recent innovation.

  4. Hydrogen-rich water attenuates amyloid β-induced cytotoxicity through upregulation of Sirt1-FoxO3a by stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase in SK-N-MC cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Li; Huang, Wen-Nung; Li, Hsin-Hua; Huang, Chien-Ning; Hsieh, Sam; Lai, Copper; Lu, Fung-Jou

    2015-10-05

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are identified in cause of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous evidence suggests Aβ-induced neurotoxicity is linked to the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The accumulation of Aβ-induced ROS leads to increased mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers apoptotic cell death. This suggests antioxidant therapies may be beneficial for preventing ROS-related diseases such as AD. Recently, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) has been proven effective in treating oxidative stress-induced disorders because of its ROS-scavenging abilities. However, the precise molecular mechanisms whereby HRW prevents neuronal death are still unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the putative pathways by which HRW protects against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity. Our results indicated that HRW directly counteracts oxidative damage by neutralizing excessive ROS, leading to the alleviation of Aβ-induced cell death. In addition, HRW also stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in a sirtuin 1 (Sirt1)-dependent pathway, which upregulates forkhead box protein O3a (FoxO3a) downstream antioxidant response and diminishes Aβ-induced mitochondrial potential loss and oxidative stress. Taken together, our findings suggest that HRW may have potential therapeutic value to inhibit Aβ-induced neurotoxicity.

  5. Cell-cell contact mediates cAMP secretion in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Fontana, D R; Price, P L; Phillips, J C

    1991-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP) and cell-cell contact regulate developmental gene expression in Dictyostelium discoideum. Developing D. discoideum amoebae synthesize and secrete cAMP following the binding of cAMP to their surface cAMP receptor, a response called cAMP signaling. We have demonstrated two responses of developing D. discoideum amoebae to cell-cell contact. Cell-cell contact elicits cAMP secretion and alters the amount of cAMP secreted in a subsequent cAMP signaling response. Depending upon experimental conditions, bacterial-amoebal contact and amoebal-amoebal contact can enhance or diminish the amount of cAMP secreted during a subsequent cAMP signaling response. We have hypothesized that cell-cell contact regulates D. discoideum development by altering cellular and extracellular levels of cAMP. To begin testing this hypothesis, these responses were further characterized. The two responses to cell-cell contact are independent, i.e., they can each occur in the absence of the other. The responses to cell-cell contact also have unique temperature dependences when compared to each other, cAMP signaling, and phagocytosis. This suggests that these four responses have unique steps in their transduction mechanisms. The secretion of cAMP in response to cell-cell contact appears to be a non-specific response; contact between D. discoideum amoebae and Enterobacter aerogenes, latex beads, or other amoebae elicits cAMP secretion. Despite the apparent similarities of the effects of bacterial-amoebal and amoebal-amoebal contact on the cAMP signaling response, this contact-induced response appears to be specific. Latex beads addition does not alter the magnitude of a subsequent cAMP signaling response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Stimulation by Alcohols of Cyclic AMP Metabolism in Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, John P.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Kelly, James P.; Parker, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    In this study ethanol and certain other short-chain aryl (benzyl and phenethyl) and aliphatic (methyl, propyl, butyl, and amyl) alcohols produced up to 10-fold increases in cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentrations in purified human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Ethanol concentrations as low as 80 mg/dl produced significant elevations in lymphocyte cAMP. Significant but less marked augmentation of cAMP in response to alcohols was observed in human platelets, human granulocytes, and rabbit alveolar macrophages. The mechanism of the alcohol-induced cAMP accumulation is probably secondary to membrane perturbation and consequent activation of adenylate cyclase, because ethanol directly stimulated this enzyme in lymphocyte membrane preparations but had no effect on lymphocyte phosphodiesterase activity. Lysosomal enzyme release, by phagocytosing human leukocytes, and aminoisobutyric acid transport in mitogen-stimulated human lymphocytes were shown to be inhibited by ethanol and other alcohols at concentrations which also elevate cAMP. In general, the magnitude of the inhibition of these inflammatory processes correlated with the ability of the alcohol to elevate cAMP concentrations. Lectin-and anti-thymocyte globulin-induced lymphocyte mitogenesis was inhibited or unaffected depending upon both the concentration and type of mitogenic stimulus and the concentration and type of alcohol utilized. Inflammatory mediator release from rat mast cells also was inhibited by ethanol and certain other alcohols, but whole cell cAMP was not increased. Ethanol may alter these inflammatory responses and other biologic processes at least in part by modulating cellular levels of cAMP. PMID:194924

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein and neuropeptide Y decline as early as middle age in the dentate gyrus and CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Rao, Muddanna S; Shetty, Geetha A; Shetty, Ashok K

    2005-10-01

    The hippocampus is very susceptible to aging. Severely diminished dentate neurogenesis at middle age is one of the most conspicuous early changes in the aging hippocampus, which is likely linked to an early decline in the concentration of neurotrophic factors and signaling proteins that influence neurogenesis. We analyzed three proteins that are well-known to promote dentate neurogenesis and learning and memory function in the dentate gyrus and the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields of young, middle-aged and aged F344 rats. These include the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the transcription factor phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) and the neuropeptide neuropeptide Y (NPY). The BDNF was analyzed via ELISA and BDNF immunohistochemistry, the p-CREB through densitometric analysis of p-CREB immunopositive cells, and the NPY via stereological counting of NPY-immunopositive interneurons. We provide new evidence that the BDNF concentration, the p-CREB immunoreactivity and the number of NPY immunopositive interneurons decline considerably by middle age in both dentate gyrus and CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus. However, both BDNF concentration and NPY immunopositive interneuron numbers exhibit no significant decrease between middle age and old age. In contrast, the p-CREB immunoreactivity diminishes further during this period, which is also associated with reduced BDNF immunoreaction within the soma of dentate granule cells and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Collectively, these results suggest that severely dampened dentate neurogenesis observed at middle age is linked at least partially to reduced concentrations of BDNF, p-CREB and NPY, as each of these proteins is a positive regulator of dentate neurogenesis. Dramatically diminished CREB phosphorylation (and persistently reduced levels of BDNF and NPY) at old age may underlie the learning and memory impairments observed during senescence.

  8. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  9. Activation of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in rat dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord contributes toward induction and maintenance of bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gui-Qin; Liu, Su; He, Duan-Duan; Liu, Yue-Peng; Song, Xue-Jun

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) signaling in the development of bone cancer pain in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (N=48) were divided randomly into four groups: sham (n=8), tumor cell implantation (TCI) (n=16), TCI+saline (n=8), and TCI+PKA inhibitor (n=16). Bone cancer-induced pain behaviors - thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia - were tested at postoperative days -3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14. A PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMPS (1 mmol/l/20 μl), was injected intrathecally on postoperative days 3, 4, and 5 (early phase) or 7, 8, and 9 postoperative days (late phase). The expression of PKA mRNA in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was detected by reverse transcription-PCR. The concentration of cAMP and activity of PKA in DRG and spinal cord were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TCI treatment induced significant pain behaviors, manifested as thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Spinal administration of the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMPS during the early phase and late phase significantly delayed or reversed, respectively, TCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. TCI treatment also led to obvious tumor growth and bone destruction. The level of PKA mRNA in the DRG, as well as the concentration of cAMP and the activity of PKA, in both the DRG and spinal cord were significantly increased after TCI treatment (P<0.01). We conclude that the inhibition of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway may reduce bone cancer pain.

  10. Early embryonic androgen exposure induces transgenerational epigenetic and metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ning; Chua, Angela K; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Ning-Ai; Goodarzi, Mark O

    2014-08-01

    Androgen excess is a central feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which affects 6% to 10% of young women. Mammals exposed to elevated androgens in utero develop PCOS-like phenotypes in adulthood, suggesting fetal origins of PCOS. We hypothesize that excess androgen exposure during early embryonic development may disturb the epigenome and disrupt metabolism in exposed and unexposed subsequent generations. Zebrafish were used to study the underlying mechanism of fetal origins. Embryos were exposed to androgens (testosterone and dihydrotestosterone) early at 26 to 56 hours post fertilization or late at 21 to 28 days post fertilization. Exposed zebrafish (F0) were grown to adults and crossed to generate unexposed offspring (F1). For both generations, global DNA methylation levels were examined in ovaries using a luminometric methylation assay, and fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels were measured. We found that early but not late androgen exposure induced changes in global methylation and glucose homeostasis in both generations. In general, F0 adult zebrafish exhibited altered global methylation levels in the ovary; F1 zebrafish had global hypomethylation. Fasting blood glucose levels were decreased in F0 but increased in F1; postprandial glucose levels were elevated in both F0 and F1. This androgenized zebrafish study suggests that transient excess androgen exposure during early development can result in transgenerational alterations in the ovarian epigenome and glucose homeostasis. Current data cannot establish a causal relationship between epigenetic changes and altered glucose homeostasis. Whether transgenerational epigenetic alteration induced by prenatal androgen exposure plays a role in the development of PCOS in humans deserves study.

  11. Perfluorododecanoic acid-induced steroidogenic inhibition is associated with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and reactive oxygen species in cAMP-stimulated Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhimin; Feng, Yixing; Wang, Jianshe; Zhang, Hongxia; Ding, Lina; Dai, Jiayin

    2010-04-01

    Perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA) can be detected in environmental matrices and human serum and has been shown to inhibit testicular steroidogenesis in rats. However, the mechanisms that are responsible for the toxic effects of PFDoA remain unknown. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanism of steroidogenesis inhibition by PFDoA and to identify the molecular target of PFDoA in Leydig cells. The effects of PFDoA on steroid synthesis in Leydig cells were assessed by radioimmunoassay. The expression of key genes and proteins in steroid biosynthesis was determined by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels were determined using bioluminescence assays. PFDoA inhibited adenosine 3',5'-cyclophosphate (cAMP)-stimulated steroidogenesis in mouse Leydig tumor cells (mLTC-1) and primary rat Leydig cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, PFDoA (1-100 microM) did not exhibit effects on cell viability and cellular ATP levels in mLTC-1 cells. PFDoA inhibited steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) promoter activity and StAR expression at the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels but did not affect mRNA levels of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, or 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in cAMP-stimulated mLTC-1 cells. PFDoA treatment also resulted in increased levels of mitochondrial ROS and H(2)O(2). After excessive ROS and H(2)O(2) were eliminated in PFDoA-treated mLTC-1 cells by MnTMPyP (a superoxide dismutase analog), progesterone production was partially restored and StAR mRNA and protein levels were partially recovered. These data show that PFDoA inhibits steroidogenesis in cAMP-stimulated Leydig cells by reducing the expression of StAR through a model of action involving oxidative stress.

  12. Phorbol esters modulate cyclic AMP accumulation in porcine thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Emoto, T.; Kasai, K.; Hiraiwa, M.; Shimoda, S.

    1988-01-01

    In cultured porcine thyroid cells, during 60 min incubation phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) had no effect on basal cyclic AMP accumulation and slightly stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) or forskolin. Cholera toxin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation was significantly stimulated by PMA. On the other hand, cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by prostaglandin E/sub 1/ or E/sub 2/ (PGE/sub 1/ and PGE/sub 2/) was markedly depressed by simultaneous addition of PMA. These opposing effects of PMA on cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by PGE and cholera toxin were observed in a dose-related fashion, with half-maximal effect of around 10/sup -9/ M in either case. The almost same effects of PMA on cyclic AMP accumulation in basal and stimulated conditions were also observed in freshly prepared thyroid cells. The present study was performed in the presence of phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-iso-butyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), indicating that PMA affected adenylate cyclase activity. Therefore, it is suggested that PMA may modulate the production of cyclic AMP in response to different stimuli, possibly by affecting several sites in the adenylate cyclase complex in thyroid cells.

  13. cAMP enhances BMP2-signaling through PKA and MKP1-dependent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ghayor, Chafik; Ehrbar, Martin; Miguel, Blanca San; Graetz, Klaus W.; Weber, Franz E.

    2009-04-03

    Recent studies suggest that the elevation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and the activation of the protein kinase A regulate BMP-induced osteogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the enhancing effect of cAMP on BMP2 signaling were not completely revealed. In this study we investigated the effect of elevated cAMP level and PKA activation on the BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation in pluripotent C2C12 cells. Alkaline phosphatase activity and its mRNA were consistently induced by BMP2 treatment. The pretreatment of C2C12 cells with Forskolin, a cAMP generating agent, dbcAMP, an analogue of cAMP, or IBMX (3-isobutyl 1-methyl xanthine), and a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases elicited further activation of alkaline phosphatase. Furthermore, elevated intracellular cAMP level increased BMP2-induced MKP1. On the other hand, BMP2-induced Erk phosphorylation (p44/p42) and cell proliferation were suppressed in the presence of cAMP. Thus, cAMP might enhance BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation by a MKP1-Erk-dependent mechanism.

  14. Early-warning indicators for rate-induced tipping.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Paul; Sieber, Jan

    2016-09-01

    A dynamical system is said to undergo rate-induced tipping when it fails to track its quasi-equilibrium state due to an above-critical-rate change of system parameters. We study a prototypical model for rate-induced tipping, the saddle-node normal form subject to time-varying equilibrium drift and noise. We find that both most commonly used early-warning indicators, increase in variance and increase in autocorrelation, occur not when the equilibrium drift is fastest but with a delay. We explain this delay by demonstrating that the most likely trajectory for tipping also crosses the tipping threshold with a delay, and therefore, the tipping itself is delayed. We find solutions of the variational problem determining the most likely tipping path using numerical continuation techniques. The result is a systematic study of the most likely tipping time in the plane of two parameters, distance from tipping threshold and noise intensity.

  15. Cyclic AMP and the regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Mats; Harvey, Alan R

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we present a brief review of studies that have reported therapeutic benefits of elevated cAMP on plasticity and regeneration after injury to the central nervous system (CNS). We also provide new data on the cellular mechanisms by which elevation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) promotes cytokine driven regeneration of adult CNS axons, using the visual system as the experimental model. cAMP is a second messenger for many intracellular signalling pathways. Elevation of cAMP in the eye by intravitreal injection of the cell permeant analogue (8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate; CPT-cAMP), when added to recombinant ciliary neurotrophic factor (rCNTF), significantly enhances rCNTF-induced regeneration of adult rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons into peripheral nerve (PN) grafted onto transected optic nerve. This effect is mediated to some extent by protein kinase A (PKA) signalling, but CPT-cAMP also acts via PI3K/Akt signalling to reduce suppressor of cytokine signalling protein 3 (SOCS3) activity in RGCs. Another target for cAMP is the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), which can also mediate cAMP-induced axonal growth. Here we describe some novel results and discuss to what extent the pro-regenerative effects of CPT-cAMP on adult RGCs are mediated via Epac as well as via PKA-dependent pathways. We used the established PN-optic nerve graft model and quantified the survival and regenerative growth of adult rat RGCs after intravitreal injection of rCNTF in combination with a selective activator of PKA and/or a specific activator of Epac. Viable RGCs were identified by βIII-tubulin immunohistochemistry and regenerating RGCs retrogradely labelled and quantified after an injection of fluorogold into the distal end of the PN grafts, 4 weeks post-transplantation. The specific agonists of either PKA or Epac were both effective in enhancing the effects of rCNTF on RGC axonal regeneration, but interestingly, injections

  16. Activation of the AMP-activated Protein Kinase – p38 MAP Kinase Pathway Mediates Apoptosis induced by Conjugated Linoleic Acid in p53-Mutant Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yung-Chung; Meng, Xiaojing; Ou, Lihui; Ip, Margot M.

    2009-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits tumorigenesis and tumor growth in most model systems, an effect mediated in part by its pro-apoptotic activity. We previously showed that trans-10,cis-12 CLA induced apoptosis of p53-mutant TM4t mouse mammary tumor cells through both mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways. In the current study, we investigated the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key player in fatty acid metabolism, in CLA-induced apoptosis in TM4t cells. We found that t10,c12-CLA increased phosphorylation of AMPK, and that CLA-induced apoptosis was enhanced by the AMPK agonist 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) and inhibited by the AMPK inhibitor compound C. The increased AMPK activity was not due to nutrient/energy depletion since ATP levels did not change in CLA-treated cells, and knockdown of the upstream kinase LKB1 did not affect its activity. Furthermore, our data do not demonstrate a role for the AMPK-modulated mTOR pathway in CLA-induced apoptosis. Although CLA decreased mTOR levels, activity was only modestly decreased. Moreover, rapamycin, which completely blocked the activity of mTORC1 and mTORC2, did not induce apoptosis, and attenuated rather than enhanced CLA-induced apoptosis. Instead, the data suggest that CLA-induced apoptosis is mediated by the AMPK-p38 MAPK-Bim pathway: CLA-induced phosphorylation of AMPK and p38 MAPK, and increased expression of Bim, occurred with a similar time course as apoptosis; phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was blocked by compound C; the increased Bim expression was blocked by p38 MAPK siRNA; CLA-induced apoptosis was attenuated by the p38 inhibitor SB-203580 and by siRNAs directed against p38 MAPK or Bim. PMID:19932174

  17. 5D imaging approaches reveal the formation of distinct intracellular cAMP spatial gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Trinh, Kenny; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel A.; Griswold, John R.; Deal, Joshua; Hoffman, Chase; West, Savannah; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2017-02-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions. Several lines of evidence suggest that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform. However, to date, no studies have measured the kinetics of 3D cAMP distributions within cells. This is largely due to the low signal-tonoise ratio of FRET-based probes. We previously reported that hyperspectral imaging improves the signal-to-noise ratio of FRET measurements. Here we utilized hyperspectral imaging approaches to measure FRET signals in five dimensions (5D) - three spatial (x, y, z), wavelength (λ), and time (t) - allowing us to visualize cAMP gradients in pulmonary endothelial cells. cAMP levels were measured using a FRET-based sensor (H188) comprised of a cAMP binding domain sandwiched between FRET donor and acceptor - Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. We observed cAMP gradients in response to 0.1 or 1 μM isoproterenol, 0.1 or 1 μM PGE1, or 50 μM forskolin. Forskolin- and isoproterenol-induced cAMP gradients formed from the apical (high cAMP) to basolateral (low cAMP) face of cells. In contrast, PGE1-induced cAMP gradients originated from both the basolateral and apical faces of cells. Data suggest that 2D (x,y) studies of cAMP compartmentalization may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D (x,y,z) studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity. Results demonstrate that 5D imaging technologies are powerful tools for measuring biochemical processes in discrete subcellular domains.

  18. Ebselen prevents early alcohol-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kono, H; Arteel, G E; Rusyn, I; Sies, H; Thurman, R G

    2001-02-15

    Oxidants have been shown to be involved in alcohol-induced liver injury. Moreover, 2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazole-3(2H)-one (ebselen), an organoselenium compound and glutathione peroxidase mimic, decreases oxidative stress and protects against stroke clinically. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that ebselen protects against early alcohol-induced liver injury in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed high-fat liquid diets with or without ethanol (10-16 g/kg/d) continuously for up to 4 weeks using the intragastric enteral feeding protocol developed by Tsukamoto and French. Ebselen (50 mg/kg twice daily, intragastrically) or vehicle (1% tylose) was administered throughout the experiment. Mean urine ethanol concentrations were not significantly different between treatment groups, and ebselen did not affect body weight gains or cyclic patterns of ethanol concentrations in urine. After 4 weeks, serum ALT levels were increased significantly about 4-fold over control values (37 +/- 5 IU/l) by enteral ethanol (112 +/- 7 IU/l); ebselen blunted this increase significantly (61 +/- 8 IU/l). Enteral ethanol also caused severe fatty accumulation, mild inflammation, and necrosis in the liver (pathology score: 4.3 +/- 0.3). In contrast, these pathological changes were blunted significantly by ebselen (pathology score: 2.5 +/- 0.4). While there were no significant effects of either ethanol or ebselen on glutathione peroxidase activity in serum or liver tissue, ebselen blocked the increase in serum nitrate/nitrite caused by ethanol. Furthermore, ethanol increased the activity of NF-kappaB over 5-fold, the number of infiltrating neutrophils 4-fold, and the accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal over 5-fold. Ebselen blunted all of these effects significantly. These results indicate that ebselen prevents early alcohol-induced liver injury, most likely by preventing oxidative stress, which decreases inflammation.

  19. Fraxetin Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression by Activation of Akt/Nrf2 or AMP-activated Protein Kinase α/Nrf2 Pathway in HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Juthika; Chae, In Gyeong; Chun, Kyung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Fraxetin (7,8-dihydroxy-6-methoxy coumarin), a coumarin derivative, has been reported to possess antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. A number of recent observations suggest that the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibits inflammation and tumorigenesis. In the present study, we determined the effect of fraxetin on HO-1 expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes and investigated its underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods Reverse transcriptase-PCR and Western blot analysis were performed to detect HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Cell viability was measured by the MTS test. The induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fraxetin was evaluated by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. Results Fraxetin upregulated mRNA and protein expression of HO-1. Incubation with fraxetin induced the localization of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the nucleus and increased the antioxidant response element-reporter gene activity. Fraxetin also induced the phosphorylation of Akt and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)α and diminished the expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog, a negative regulator of Akt. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt and AMPKα abrogated fraxetin-induced expression of HO-1 and nuclear localization of Nrf2. Furthermore, fraxetin generated ROS in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions Fraxetin induces HO-1 expression through activation of Akt/Nrf2 or AMPKα/Nrf2 pathway in HaCaT cells. PMID:27722139

  20. Temperature Change Induces the Expression of vuuA Encoding Vulnibactin Receptor and crp Encoding Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choon-Mee; Ahn, Young-Joon; Kim, Seong-Jung; Yoon, Dae-Heung; Shin, Sung-Heui

    2016-07-01

    Upon entering the human body, Vibrio vulnificus, a gram-negative marine bacterium, must withstand a temperature change (TC) from 25 to 37 °C. This bacterium acquires iron mainly via the vulnibactin receptor (VuuA)-mediated iron uptake system (IUS), which is under the positive control of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), a global regulator responsible for catabolite repression. In this study, we examined the effect of TC on the expression of vuuA and crp, and the reciprocal relation between VuuA-mediated IUS and CRP under iron-limited conditions. Iron limitation increased vuuA expression but decreased crp expression. TC resulted in increased vuuA and crp expression. A crp or vuuA mutation reciprocally decreased vuuA or crp expression. TC could increase vuuA or crp expression even in a crp- or vuuA-mutated background. These results indicate that TC increases the expression of both vuuA and crp by facilitating metabolism under iron-limited conditions, and that CRP and VuuA-mediated IUS interact coordinately toward optimal metabolism in V. vulnificus.

  1. A High-Concentrate Diet Induced Milk Fat Decline via Glucagon-Mediated Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Cao, Yang; Xie, Zhenglu; Zhang, Yuanshu

    2017-01-01

    Dairy cows are often fed a high-concentrate (HC) diet to meet lactation demands; however, long-term concentrate feeding is unhealthy and decreases milk fat. Therefore, we investigated the effects of liver lipid metabolism on milk fat synthesis. Ten lactating Holstein cows were assigned randomly into HC and LC (low-concentrate) diet groups. After 20 weeks of feeding, milk fat declined, and lipopolysaccharide levels in the jugular, portal, and hepatic veins increased in the HC group. Liver consumption and release of nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) into the bloodstream also decreased. AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα) was up-regulated significantly in the livers of the HC-fed cows. The HC diet also up-regulated the expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and its downstream targets involved in fatty acid oxidation, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1,2 (CPT-1, CPT-2), liver-fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO). The HC diet increased blood glucagon (GC) levels, and liver glucagon receptor (GCGR) expression was elevated. Cumulatively, a long-term HC diet decreased plasma concentrations of NEFA via the GC/GCGR-AMPK-PPARα signalling pathway and reduced their synthesis in the liver. The decreased NEFA concentration in the blood during HC feeding may explain the decline in the milk fat of lactating cows. PMID:28287130

  2. Functional analysis of chloroplast early light inducible proteins (ELIPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Carolyn M

    2005-02-22

    The objectives of this project were to characterize gene expression patterns of early light inducible protein (ELIP) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lycopersicon esculentum, to identify knock mutants of the 2 ELIP genes in Arabidopsis, and to characterize the effects of the knockouts. Expression in Arabidopsis was studied in response to thylakoid electron transport chain (PETC) capacity, where it was found that there is a signal for expression associated with reduction of the PETC. Expression in response to salt was also studied, with different responses of the two gene copies. Knockout lines for ELIP1 and ELIP2 have been identified and are being characterized. In tomato, it was found that the single-copy ELIP gene is highly expressed in ripening fruit during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition. Studies of expression in tomato ripening mutants are ongoing.

  3. Early-Onset Vemurafenib-Induced DRESS Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Munch, Marion; Peuvrel, Lucie; Brocard, Anabelle; Saint Jean, Mélanie; Khammari, Amir; Dreno, Brigitte; Quereux, Gaelle

    2016-01-01

    Vemurafenib is a BRAF inhibitor indicated in metastatic or unresectable melanoma in patients with BRAF mutations. Vemurafenib is frequently toxic, but the toxicity is often not serious. The third case of vemurafenib-induced drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is reported herein. The case is unusual in that the onset was early, with symptoms emerging as of day 8 of treatment. Treatment of DRESS syndrome is not currently based on precise recommendations, but systemic corticosteroid therapy is effective in serious cases. Severe toxidermias under vemurafenib are exceptional; immediate discontinuation of treatment upon diagnosis is imperative. Switching from vemurafenib to dabrafenib then seems to constitute an interesting therapeutic alternative, since its efficacy is the same but with fewer cutaneous adverse reactions. This case highlights the importance of awareness of the risk of DRESS syndrome associated with vemurafenib and monitoring for warning signs from treatment initiation. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Experiment definition studies for AMPS Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, H.

    1975-01-01

    The electrical charging of the space shuttle orbiter is discussed in relation to the AMPS Spacelab payload along with an operations research technique for the selection of AMPS Spacelab experiments. Experiments proposed for AMPS include: hydromagnetic wave experiments; bistatic sounder of AMPS wake; and an artificial meteor gun. Experiment objectives and instrument functions are given for all experiments.

  5. Catechin inhibits Candida albicans dimorphism by disrupting Cek1 phosphorylation and cAMP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hideo; Tamura, Muneaki; Imai, Kenichi; Ishigami, Tomohiko; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2013-03-01

    Candida albicans is a fungal pathogen that undergoes dimorphism (transformation from a yeast form to a hyphal form), wherein, the yeast form is identified as a disseminating form that plays a critical role in the early stages of Candida disease progression, while the hyphal form is found to exert additional pathogenicity by adapting to various environmental conditions. Here, we elucidated the effects of catechin on C. albicans hyphal formation. Flow cytometry analysis showed catechin inhibited FCS-induced hyphal formation. Moreover, hypha-specific gene expression in MAP kinase cascade and cAMP pathway was decreased ascribable to catechin. Furthermore, through Western blotting and cAMP synthesis analysis, we found catechin obstructs Cek1 phosphorylation in MAP kinase cascade and suppresses cAMP synthesis. These results suggest that catechin possesses anti-dimorphism activity by interfering with in vitro signal transduction. Similarly, this highlights the possible application of catechin in clinical therapy for the management and prevention of candidosis.

  6. Early Determinants of H2O2-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boulden, Beth M.; Widder, Julian D.; Allen, Jon C.; Smith, Debra A.; Al-Baldawi, Ruaa N.; Harrison, David G.; Dikalov, Sergey I.; Jo, Hanjoong; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2006-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can stimulate nitric oxide (NO•) production from the endothelium by transient activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). With continued or repeated exposure, NO• production is reduced, however. We investigated the early determinants of this decrease in NO• production. Following an initial H2O2 exposure, endothelial cells responded by increasing NO• production measured electrochemically. NO• concentrations peaked by 10 min with a slow reduction over 30 min. The decrease in NO• at 30 min was associated with a 2.7 fold increase O2•− production (p<0.05) and a 14 fold reduction of the eNOS cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4, p<0.05). Used as a probe for endothelial dysfunction, the integrated NO• production over 30 min upon repeat H2O2 exposure was attenuated by 2.1 fold (p=0.03). Endothelial dysfunction could be prevented by BH4 cofactor supplementation, by scavenging O2•− or peroxynitrite (ONOO−), or by inhibiting the NADPH oxidase. Hydroxyl radical (•OH) scavenging did not have an effect. In summary, early H2O2-induced endothelial dysfunction was associated with a decreased BH4 level and increased O2•− production. Dysfunction required O2•−, ONOO−, or a functional NADPH oxidase. Repeated activation of the NADPH oxidase by ROS may act as a feed forward system to promote endothelial dysfunction. PMID:16895801

  7. Association of early maternal hypertriglyceridemia with pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chandi, Anadeep; Sirohiwal, Daya; Malik, Roopa

    2015-11-01

    Hypertensive diseases are directly responsible for 24 % of maternal deaths in India. A screening method is yet to be discovered to reduce the morbidity and mortality related to it. Serum triglyceride (TG) levels are reported to increase in hypertensive pregnant women. To predict pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) by serum triglyceride values. This study is a prospective cohort study that was conducted over three hundred normotensive, primigravida women with singleton pregnancy at 14-20 weeks of gestation. These were divided into two groups on the basis of their TG concentration estimated at 14-20 weeks of gestation. The pregnancy was then followed till delivery and, signs and symptoms of PIH were noted in both the groups. Out of 300 women, 210 women completed the study. Fifty-nine women developed PIH and 151 women remained normotensive. Among 59 women, 45 women had raised TG values i.e., ≥160 mg/dL and 14 women were with normal TG levels i.e., <160 mg/dL. A significant positive correlation was found between serum TG concentration and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. It was observed that a cutoff of 162.50 mg/dL for TG could reliably predict PIH with sensitivity of 76 % and specificity of 85 %. Also, the mothers with hypertriglyceridemia were found to be at higher risk of developing early-onset PIH. Our study supports the evidence that early pregnancy hypertriglyceridemia is associated with an increased risk of PIH.

  8. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extracts enhance endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression through 5'-AMP activated protein kinase/Surtuin 1-Krüpple like factor 2 pathway and modulate blood pressure in ouabain induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaopei; Liu, Xiangju; Feng, Hua; Zhao, Shaohua; Gao, Haiqing

    2012-01-01

    Grape seed proanthocyanidin extracts (GSPE) belonging to polyphenols, possess various biological effects including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant, anti-aging, anti-atherosclerosis, etc. GSPE is potential in regulating endothelial function. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear yet. In this study, by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knocking down, we proved that GSPE increase endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression in human umbilical vessel cells (HUVECs) in vitro, which was attributed to its transcription factor Krüpple like factor 2 (KLF2) induction. Furthermore, GSPE activate 5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increase surtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein level, critical for KLF2 induction. We also illuminated the role of GSPE in hypertension treatment. By chronic administration of GSPE in ouabain induced hypertensive rats model, we access the effect of GSPE on blood pressure regulation and the possible mechanisms involved. After 5 weeks feeding, GSPE significantly block the ouabain induced blood pressure increase. The aortic NO production impaired by ouabain was improved. In conclusion, GSPE increase eNOS expression and NO production in an AMPK/SIRT1 dependent manner through KLF2 induction, and attenuate ouabain induced hypertension.

  9. Formononetin, an isoflavone, activates AMP-activated protein kinase/β-catenin signalling to inhibit adipogenesis and rescues C57BL/6 mice from high-fat diet-induced obesity and bone loss.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Jyoti; Khedgikar, Vikram; Kushwaha, Priyanka; Choudhary, Dharmendra; Nagar, Geet Kumar; Dev, Kapil; Dixit, Preety; Singh, Divya; Maurya, Rakesh; Trivedi, Ritu

    2017-03-01

    Balance between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation is the key link of disease progression in obesity and osteoporosis. We have previously reported that formononetin (FNT), an isoflavone extracted from Butea monosperma, stimulates osteoblast formation and protects against postmenopausal bone loss. The inverse relationship between osteoblasts and adipocytes prompted us to analyse the effect of FNT on adipogenesis and in vivo bone loss, triggered by high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. The anti-obesity effect and mechanism of action of FNT was determined in 3T3-L1 cells and HFD-induced obese male mice. Our findings show that FNT suppresses the adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts, through down-regulation of key adipogenic markers such as PPARγ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) and inhibits intracellular TAG accumulation. Increased intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation accompanied by stabilisation of β-catenin were attributed to the anti-adipogenic action of FNT. In vivo, 12 weeks of FNT treatment inhibited the development of obesity in mice by attenuating HFD-induced body weight gain and visceral fat accumulation. The anti-obesity effect of FNT results from increased energy expenditure. FNT also protects against HFD-induced dyslipidaemia and rescues deterioration of trabecular bone volume by increasing bone formation and decreasing bone resorbtion caused by HFD. FNT's rescuing action against obesity-induced osteoporosis commenced at the level of progenitors, as bone marrow progenitor cells, obtained from the HFD mice group supplemented with FNT, showed increased osteogenic and decreased adipogenic potentials. Our findings suggest that FNT inhibits adipogenesis through AMPK/β-catenin signal transduction pathways and protects against HFD-induced obesity and bone loss.

  10. Early stages of irradiation induced dislocations in urania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartier, A.; Onofri, C.; Van Brutzel, L.; Sabathier, C.; Dorosh, O.; Jagielski, J.

    2016-10-01

    The early stages of nucleation and growth of dislocations by irradiation in urania is clarified based on the combination of experiments and atomistic calculations. It is established that irradiation induced dislocations follow a five stage process: (i) point defects are first created by irradiation, (ii) they aggregate into clusters, (iii) from which nucleate Frank loops, (iv) which transform into unfaulted loops via Shockley that in turn grow, and (v) finally reorganize into forest dislocations. Stages (i)-(iii) participate in the lattice expansion while the onset of lattice contraction starts with stage (iv), i.e., when unfaulted loops nucleate. Irradiation induced dislocations operate in the spontaneous recombination regime, to be opposed to the thermal diffusion regime. Body of arguments collaborates to this statement, the main one is the comparison between characteristic distances estimated from the dose rate (Vat/(K0×τ ) ) 1/3 and from the diffusion coefficient (D×τ ) 1/2 . Such a comparison identifies materials under irradiation as belonging either into the recombination regime or not.

  11. AICAR induces astroglial differentiation of neural stem cells via activating the JAK/STAT3 pathway independently of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yi; Yu, Li-Fang; Pang, Tao; Fang, Lei-Ping; Feng, Xu; Wen, Tie-Qiao; Nan, Fa-Jun; Feng, Lin-Yin; Li, Jia

    2008-03-07

    Neural stem cell differentiation and the determination of lineage decision between neuronal and glial fates have important implications in the study of developmental, pathological, and regenerative processes. Although small molecule chemicals with the ability to control neural stem cell fate are considered extremely useful tools in this field, few were reported. AICAR is an adenosine analog and extensively used to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic "fuel gauge" of the biological system. In the present study, we found an unrecognized astrogliogenic activity of AICAR on not only immortalized neural stem cell line C17.2 (C17.2-NSC), but also primary neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from post-natal (P0) rat hippocampus (P0-NSC) and embryonic day 14 (E14) rat embryonic cortex (E14-NSC). However, another AMPK activator, Metformin, did not alter either the C17.2-NSC or E14-NSC undifferentiated state although both Metformin and AICAR can activate the AMPK pathway in NSC. Furthermore, overexpression of dominant-negative mutants of AMPK in C17.2-NSC was unable to block the gliogenic effects of AICAR. We also found AICAR could activate the Janus kinase (JAK) STAT3 pathway in both C17.2-NSC and E14-NSC but Metformin fails. JAK inhibitor I abolished the gliogenic effects of AICAR. Taken together, these results suggest that the astroglial differentiation effect of AICAR on neural stem cells was acting independently of AMPK and that the JAK-STAT3 pathway is essential for the gliogenic effect of AICAR.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits high glucose-induced matrix protein synthesis by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hak Joo; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Feliers, Denis; Cavaglieri, Rita C; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Abboud, Hanna E; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S

    2012-02-10

    Hydrogen sulfide, a signaling gas, affects several cell functions. We hypothesized that hydrogen sulfide modulates high glucose (30 mm) stimulation of matrix protein synthesis in glomerular epithelial cells. High glucose stimulation of global protein synthesis, cellular hypertrophy, and matrix laminin and type IV collagen content was inhibited by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), an H(2)S donor. High glucose activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1), shown by phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1, was inhibited by NaHS. High glucose stimulated mTORC1 to promote key events in the initiation and elongation phases of mRNA translation: binding of eIF4A to eIF4G, reduction in PDCD4 expression and inhibition of its binding to eIF4A, eEF2 kinase phosphorylation, and dephosphorylation of eEF2; these events were inhibited by NaHS. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, was examined. NaHS dose-dependently stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and restored AMPK phosphorylation reduced by high glucose. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, abolished NaHS modulation of high glucose effect on events in mRNA translation as well as global and matrix protein synthesis. NaHS induction of AMPK phosphorylation was inhibited by siRNA for calmodulin kinase kinase β, but not LKB1, upstream kinases for AMPK; STO-609, a calmodulin kinase kinase β inhibitor, had the same effect. Renal cortical content of cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase, hydrogen sulfide-generating enzymes, was significantly reduced in mice with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, coinciding with renal hypertrophy and matrix accumulation. Hydrogen sulfide is a newly identified modulator of protein synthesis in the kidney, and reduction in its generation may contribute to kidney injury in diabetes.

  13. cAMP-independent signal pathways stimulate hyphal morphogenesis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Parrino, Salvatore M; Si, Haoyu; Naseem, Shamoon; Groudan, Kevin; Gardin, Justin; Konopka, James B

    2017-03-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans can transition from budding to hyphal growth, which promotes biofilm formation and invasive growth into tissues. Stimulation of adenylyl cyclase to form cAMP induces hyphal morphogenesis. The failure of cells lacking adenylyl cyclase (cyr1Δ) to form hyphae has suggested that cAMP signaling is essential for hyphal growth. However, cyr1Δ mutants also grow slowly and have defects in morphogenesis, making it unclear whether hyphal inducers must stimulate cAMP, or if normal basal levels of cAMP are required to maintain cellular health needed for hyphal growth. Interestingly, supplementation of cyr1Δ cells with low levels of cAMP enabled them to form hyphae in response to the inducer N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), suggesting that a basal level of cAMP is sufficient for stimulation. Furthermore, we isolated faster-growing cyr1Δ pseudorevertant strains that can be induced to form hyphae even though they lack cAMP. The pseudorevertant strains were not induced by CO2 , consistent with reports that CO2 directly stimulates adenylyl cyclase. Mutational analysis showed that induction of hyphae in a pseudorevertant strain was independent of RAS1, but was dependent on the EFG1 transcription factor that acts downstream of protein kinase A. Thus, cAMP-independent signals contribute to the induction of hyphal responses.

  14. AMP-activated Protein Kinase α2 and E2F1 Transcription Factor Mediate Doxorubicin-induced Cytotoxicity by Forming a Positive Signal Loop in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts and Non-carcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wookyeom; Park, In-Ja; Yun, Hee; Im, Dong-Uk; Ock, Sangmi; Kim, Jaetaek; Seo, Seon-Mi; Shin, Ha-Yeon; Viollet, Benoit; Kang, Insug; Choe, Wonchae; Kim, Sung-Soo; Ha, Joohun

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin is one of the most widely used anti-cancer drugs, but its clinical application is compromised by severe adverse effects in different organs including cardiotoxicity. In the present study we explored mechanisms of doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity by revealing a novel role for the AMP-activated protein kinase α2 (AMPKα2) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Doxorubicin robustly induced the expression of AMPKα2 in MEFs but slightly reduced AMPKα1 expression. Our data support the previous notion that AMPKα1 harbors survival properties under doxorubicin treatment. In contrast, analyses of Ampkα2−/− MEFs, gene knockdown of AMPKα2 by shRNA, and inhibition of AMPKα2 activity with an AMPK inhibitor indicated that AMPKα2 functions as a pro-apoptotic molecule under doxorubicin treatment. Doxorubicin induced AMPKα2 at the transcription level via E2F1, a transcription factor that regulates apoptosis in response to DNA damage. E2F1 directly transactivated the Ampkα2 gene promoter. In turn, AMPKα2 significantly contributed to stabilization and activation of E2F1 by doxorubicin, forming a positive signal amplification loop. AMPKα2 directly interacted with and phosphorylated E2F1. This signal loop was also detected in H9c2, C2C12, and ECV (human epithelial cells) cells as well as mouse liver under doxorubicin treatment. Resveratrol, which has been suggested to attenuate doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity, significantly blocked induction of AMPKα2 and E2F1 by doxorubicin, leading to protection of these cells. This signal loop appears to be non-carcinoma-specific because AMPKα2 was not induced by doxorubicin in five different tested cancer cell lines. These results suggest that AMPKα2 may serve as a novel target for alleviating the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin. PMID:24398673

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopic detection of early injury-induced atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Alexandra; Perk, Masis; Wen, Yue; Smith, Carol

    1992-08-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been used for the detection of advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Angioplasty balloon-mediated injury was examined spectroscopically in order to assess the sensitivity of fluorescence spectroscopy for detection of early atherosclerosis. Abdominal aortic balloon angioplasty was performed via femoral artery cutdown in nine White Leghorn roosters (five normal, four atherogenic diet). Roosters were sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 week intervals. Fluorescence emission spectra (n equals 114) were recorded from each aortic section (XeCl excimer laser, 308 nm, 1.5 - 2.0 mJ/pulse, 5 Hz). Changes in normalized fluorescence emission intensity were correlated with selected sections of histology. All balloon-injured segments showed intimal fibrous proliferation. For intimal thickness measuring > 70 (mu) , fluorescence emission intensity was decreased at 440 - 460 nm (p < 0.0005). Lesions complicated by thrombus also had lower fluorescence emission at 425 - 450 nm when compared to histologically normal aorta (p < 0.009). In injured segments high cholesterol diet resulted in lower recorded fluorescence emission at 440 - 460 nm (p < 0.001) associated with the increase in intimal thickness. Spectra from uninjured elastic aorta (aortic arch and thoracic aorta) had greater fluorescence intensity at 380 - 445 nm than muscular (abdominal) aorta (p < 0.01), therefore, only spectra from injured and uninjured segments of corresponding areas of the aorta were compared. The conclusion is: (1) Early intimal proliferative changes after angioplasty can be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. (2) Spectra from elastic thoracic aorta differ significantly from the spectra of muscular abdominal aorta.

  16. Is a decrease in cyclic AMP a necessary and sufficient signal for maturation of amphibian oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gelerstein, S.; Shapira, H.; Dascal, N.; Yekuel, R.; Oron, Y.

    1988-05-01

    Acetylcholine rapidly lowered the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in stage 5 and 6 Xenopus laevis oocytes. Acetylcholine alone did not induce oocyte maturation, though it did accelerate maturation induced by progesterone. The effect of acetylcholine on oocyte maturation was independent of extracellular calcium concentration. Adenosine increased cyclic AMP and abolished the progesterone-induced decrease in cyclic AMP levels in follicles and in denuded oocytes. This effect of adenosine was blocked by the Ra purinergic receptor antagonist, theophylline. Despite those effects, adenosine alone induced maturation in stage 6 oocytes and accelerated progesterone-induced maturation in both stage 5 and 6 cells. Adenosine also induced a significant increase in the rate of /sup 45/Ca efflux from oocytes in the presence and the absence of external calcium. We suggest that the activation of cell surface receptors involved in the release of calcium from cellular stores may induce or accelerate oocyte maturation independently of small changes in intracellular cyclic AMP concentration.

  17. The cyclic AMP response element-binding protein antisense oligonucleotide induced anti-nociception and decreased the expression of KIF17 in spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Jinhua; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yan; Liu, Xiaojie; Jiang, Ming; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds: The cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) plays an important role in neuropathic pain. Kinesin superfamily motor protein 17 (KIF17) is involved in long-term memory formation. CREB could increase the level of KIF17 when activated by synaptic input. This study is to investigate the role and mechanism of CREB antisense oligonucleotide (ODN) in neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in mice. Results: CCI surgery decreased thresholds of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia whereas CREB antisense oligonucleotide ODN significantly attenuated these pain behaviors (P < 0.05). CCI significantly induced the protein expression of phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) and KIF17, but not KIF5B, in the spinal cord of CCI mice (P < 0.05). Additionally, the mRNA expression of CREB and KIF17 was significantly increased by CCI (P < 0.05). However, CREB antisense ODN significantly decreased the protein expression of pCREB and KIF17 (but not KIF5B), and the mRNA expression of CREB and KIF17 (P < 0.05). Conclusions: CREB antisense oligonucleotide ODN may reduce neuropathic pain through targeting CREB and decreasing the expression of pCREB and KIF17. PMID:25664020

  18. S-allyl cysteine attenuates free fatty acid-induced lipogenesis in human HepG2 cells through activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Choi, Jae Ho; Do, Minh Truong; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2013-08-01

    S-Allyl cysteine (SAC), a nontoxic garlic compound, has a variety of pharmacological properties, including antioxidant and hepatoprotective properties. In this report, we provide evidence that SAC prevented free fatty acid (FFA)-induced lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity in hepatocytes. SAC significantly reduced FFA-induced generation of reactive oxygen species, caspase activation and subsequent cell death. Also, SAC mitigated total cellular lipid and triglyceride accumulation in steatotic HepG2 cells. SAC significantly increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) in HepG2 cells. Additionally, SAC down-regulated the levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) and its target genes, including ACC and fatty acid synthase. Use of a specific inhibitor showed that SAC activated AMPK via calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKK) and silent information regulator T1. Our results demonstrate that SAC activates AMPK through CaMKK and inhibits SREBP-1-mediated hepatic lipogenesis. Therefore, SAC has therapeutic potential for preventing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  19. Leishmania amazonensis-Induced cAMP Triggered by Adenosine A2B Receptor Is Important to Inhibit Dendritic Cell Activation and Evade Immune Response in Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Amanda Braga; Souza-Testasicca, Míriam Conceição; Mineo, Tiago Wilson Patriarca; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2017-01-01

    Differently from others Leishmania species, infection by the protozoan parasite L. amazonensis is associated with a lack of antigen-specific T-cell responses. Dendritic cells (DC) are essential for the innate immune response and for directing the differentiation of T-helper lymphocytes. Previously, we showed that L. amazonensis infection impairs DC activation through the activation of adenosine A2B receptor, and here, we evaluated the intracellular events triggered by this receptor in infected cells. To this aim, bone marrow-derived DC from C57BL/6J mice were infected with metacyclic promastigotes of L. amazonensis. Our results show, for the first time, that L. amazonensis increases the production of cAMP and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) in infected DC by a mechanism dependent on the A2B receptor. Furthermore, L. amazonensis impairs CD40 expression and IL-12 production by DC, and the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and ERK1/2 prevent these effects. The increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and the inhibition of DC activation by L. amazonensis are independent of protein kinase A (PKA). In addition, C57BL/6J mice were inoculated in the ears with metacyclic promastigotes, in the presence of PSB1115, an A2B receptor antagonist. PSB1115 treatment increases the percentage of CD40(+) DC on ears and draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, this treatment reduces lesion size and tissue parasitism. Lymph node cells from treated mice produce higher levels of IFN-γ than control mice, without altering the production of IL-10. In conclusion, we suggest a new pathway used by the parasite (A2B receptor → cAMP → PI3K → ERK1/2) to suppress DC activation, which may contribute to the decrease of IFN-γ production following by the deficiency in immune response characteristic of L. amazonensis infection.

  20. Early trauma induced coagulopathy (ETIC): prevalence across the injury spectrum.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Jana B A; Winkler, Anne M; McCoy, Cameron C; Hillyer, Christopher D; Shaz, Beth H

    2014-05-01

    Newer studies have hypothesised about a coagulopathy that occurs early after trauma, early trauma induced coagulopathy, ETIC, and is defined by an elevated admission prothrombin time (PT). Also, referred to by some authors as acute traumatic coagulopathy, it has been most often studied in cohorts of severely injured or hypotensive patients. However, we wanted to prospectively investigate ETIC in a large all-comers cohort to confirm its prevalence across the entire spectrum of injury, to evaluate its risk pattern and to determine a possible relationship to reduced survival. We conducted a prospective cohort study at a Level I trauma centre from July 15, 2008 to November 15, 2009. Demographics, injury mechanism, time from injury and to hospital arrival, fluid and blood administration and vital signs were collected at hospital arrival and to the time of first blood sample collection for all patients admitted for 24h or longer. Our primary outcome was the incidence of mortality by the 28th hospital day, referred to as 28 day in-hospital mortality. 701 patients were included in the final study cohort. There was 75.3% male, 25.7% penetrating, with a mean age of 39 years. The overall mortality was 7.3%. ETIC occurred in 114 patients (16.3%) and was found to be independently associated with death (odds of death (per 0.10s increase in PT): 1.10, p=0.001). ETIC patients, as a group, were more severely injured, had more hypotension and head injury and used more crystalloid and blood products than non-ETIC patients. However, even mildly injured patients, who had an ISS<16, normal RTS score, and no fluid resuscitation, had an ETIC prevalence of 11.7% (11/94). ETIC is an early, primary post-injury coagulopathy that occurs in 16.3% of admitted trauma patients. It is associated with an increase in mortality, even when controlling for crystalloids, vital signs, injury severity and head injury. It can also be found in approximately 11% of mildly injured patients (patients without

  1. Photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) reveals novel mechanisms underlying cAMP-dependent axonal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiwen; Tanaka, Kenji F.; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Koyama, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of axonal branching and elongation is essential in the development of refined neural circuits. cAMP is a key regulator of axonal growth; however, whether and how intracellular cAMP regulates axonal branching and elongation remain unclear, mainly because tools to spatiotemporally manipulate intracellular cAMP levels have been lacking. To overcome this issue, we utilized photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC), which produces cAMP in response to blue-light exposure. In primary cultures of dentate granule cells transfected with PAC, short-term elevation of intracellular cAMP levels induced axonal branching but not elongation, whereas long-term cAMP elevation induced both axonal branching and elongation. The temporal dynamics of intracellular cAMP levels regulated axonal branching and elongation through the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), respectively. Thus, using PAC, our study for the first time reveals that temporal cAMP dynamics could regulate axonal branching and elongation via different signaling pathways. PMID:26795422

  2. Photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) reveals novel mechanisms underlying cAMP-dependent axonal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiwen; Tanaka, Kenji F; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Koyama, Ryuta

    2016-01-22

    Spatiotemporal regulation of axonal branching and elongation is essential in the development of refined neural circuits. cAMP is a key regulator of axonal growth; however, whether and how intracellular cAMP regulates axonal branching and elongation remain unclear, mainly because tools to spatiotemporally manipulate intracellular cAMP levels have been lacking. To overcome this issue, we utilized photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC), which produces cAMP in response to blue-light exposure. In primary cultures of dentate granule cells transfected with PAC, short-term elevation of intracellular cAMP levels induced axonal branching but not elongation, whereas long-term cAMP elevation induced both axonal branching and elongation. The temporal dynamics of intracellular cAMP levels regulated axonal branching and elongation through the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), respectively. Thus, using PAC, our study for the first time reveals that temporal cAMP dynamics could regulate axonal branching and elongation via different signaling pathways.

  3. Nerve growth factor amplifies cyclic AMP production in the HT4 neuronal cell line.

    PubMed

    Berg, K A; Maayani, S; McKay, R; Clarke, W P

    1995-01-01

    There has been considerable interest and controversy in the relationship between nerve growth factor (NGF) and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) second messenger system. We have used a novel, neuronal cell line (HT4) to investigate the effect of NGF on the adenylyl cyclase signaling system. Treatment of cells with NGF (100 ng/ml, 15 min) amplified cAMP accumulation (approximately 75%) in response to activation of adenosine A2 receptors (5 min) with 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine or activation of adenylyl cyclase directly with forskolin. Basal cAMP accumulation was not altered by NGF. This amplification appears to be mediated by activation of protein kinase C (PKC) because (1) it was mimicked by activators (phorbol esters and a diacylglycerol analogue) of PKC, (2) the effects of NGF and phorbol ester on cAMP accumulation were not additive, (3) NGF amplification of cAMP accumulation was abolished by down-regulation of PKC, (4) NGF increased cytosolic PKC activity, and (5) inhibitors of PKC blocked the NGF-induced amplification of cAMP accumulation. Although NGF-induced amplification of cAMP accumulation was dependent upon PKC, mechanisms other than the classic activation pathway (i.e., hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids or the production of diacylglycerol) appeared to mediate PKC activation by NGF. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lavendustin A, blocked NGF-mediated amplification of cAMP accumulation, suggesting a novel interaction between a tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C.

  4. cAMP signaling prevents podocyte apoptosis via activation of protein kinase A and mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoying; Tao, Hua; Xie, Kewei; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng; Wei, Kai; Chuang, Peter Y; He, John Cijiang; Gu, Leyi

    2014-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR) and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator), PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP.

  5. cAMP Signaling Prevents Podocyte Apoptosis via Activation of Protein Kinase A and Mitochondrial Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kewei; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng; Wei, Kai; Chuang, Peter Y.; He, John Cijiang; Gu, Leyi

    2014-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR) and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator), PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP. PMID:24642777

  6. AmpG Inactivation Restores Susceptibility of Pan-β-Lactam-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, Laura; Reeve, Thomas M.; Juan, Carlos; Moyá, Bartolomé; Cabot, Gabriel; Vocadlo, David J.; Mark, Brian L.; Oliver, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive AmpC hyperproduction is the most frequent mechanism of resistance to the weak AmpC inducers antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins. Previously, we demonstrated that inhibition of the β-N-acetylglucosaminidase NagZ prevents and reverts this mechanism of resistance, which is caused by ampD and/or dacB (PBP4) mutations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we compared NagZ with a second candidate target, the AmpG permease for GlcNAc-1,6-anhydromuropeptides, for their ability to block AmpC expression pathways. Inactivation of nagZ or ampG fully restored the susceptibility and basal ampC expression of ampD or dacB laboratory mutants and impaired the emergence of one-step ceftazidime-resistant mutants in population analysis experiments. Nevertheless, only ampG inactivation fully blocked ampC induction, reducing the MICs of the potent AmpC inducer imipenem from 2 to 0.38 μg/ml. Moreover, through population analysis and characterization of laboratory mutants, we showed that ampG inactivation minimized the impact on resistance of the carbapenem porin OprD, reducing the MIC of imipenem for a PAO1 OprD mutant from >32 to 0.5 μg/ml. AmpG and NagZ targets were additionally evaluated in three clinical isolates that are pan-β-lactam resistant due to AmpC hyperproduction, OprD inactivation, and overexpression of several efflux pumps. A marked increase in susceptibility to ceftazidime and piperacillin-tazobactam was observed in both cases, while only ampG inactivation fully restored wild-type imipenem susceptibility. Susceptibility to meropenem, cefepime, and aztreonam was also enhanced, although to a lower extent due to the high impact of efflux pumps on the activity of these antibiotics. Thus, our results suggest that development of small-molecule inhibitors of AmpG could provide an excellent strategy to overcome the relevant mechanisms of resistance (OprD inactivation plus AmpC induction) to imipenem, the only currently available β-lactam not

  7. Early corticosteroid administration in experimental radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Stryker, J.A.; Abt, A.A.; Chung, C.K.; Whitesell, L.; Zelis, R.

    1980-02-01

    The ability of dexamethasone (DEX) to reduce the severity of the late stage of radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) was assessed in 25 New Zealand white rabbits. Ten rabbits served as unirradiated controls (CONT). In Group A, seven rabbits received intravenous DEX prior to irradiation and every 24 hours for three consecutive days. DEX was not administered to the eight rabbits in Group B. At 100 days postirradiation, the severity of the late state was determined by microscopic examination (MICRO) for myocardial fibrosis and determination of myocardial hydroxyproline content (MHP). Myocardial fibrosis was evident in groups A (40%) and B (80%) while none was present in CONT by MICRO. One rabbit in Group B with no fibrosis by MICRO had abnormally increased MHP. MHP was significantly increased in Groups A and B, as compared to CONT (p < 0.01). In addition to less fibrosis by MICRO, Group A demonstrated a significant reduction of MHP when compared to Group B (p < 0.05). Determination of MHP may be superior to MICRO in the detection of the late stage of RIHD. Also, early DEX administration appears to reduce myocardial collagen content (fibrosis) in this experimental model.

  8. Radiation-induced bystander effect: early process and rapid assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, K N; Hou, Jue; Liu, Qian; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is a biological process that has received attention over the past two decades. RIBE refers to a plethora of biological effects in non-irradiated cells, including induction of genetic damages, gene expression, cell transformation, proliferation and cell death, which are initiated by receiving bystander signals released from irradiated cells. RIBE brings potential hazards to normal tissues in radiotherapy, and imparts a higher risk from low-dose radiation than we previously thought. Detection with proteins related to DNA damage and repair, cell cycle control, proliferation, etc. have enabled rapid assessment of RIBE in a number of research systems such as cultured cells, three-dimensional tissue models and animal models. Accumulated experimental data have suggested that RIBE may be initiated rapidly within a time frame as short as several minutes after radiation. These have led to the requirement of techniques capable of rapidly assessing RIBE itself as well as assessing the early processes involved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cyclic AMP and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    D'Ari, R; Jaffé, A; Bouloc, P; Robin, A

    1988-01-01

    We examined several aspects of cell division regulation in Escherichia coli which have been thought to be controlled by cyclic AMP (cAMP) and its receptor protein (CAP). Mutants lacking adenyl cyclase (cya) or CAP (crp) were rod shaped, not spherical, during exponential growth in LB broth or glucose-Casamino Acids medium, and lateral wall elongation was normal; in broth, stationary-phase cells became ovoid. Cell mass was smaller for the mutants than for the wild type, but it remained appropriate for their slower growth rate and thus probably does not reflect early (uncontrolled) septation. The slow growth did not seem to reflect a gross metabolic disorder, since the mutants gave a normal yield on limiting glucose; surprisingly, however, the cya mutant (unlike crp) was unable to grow anaerobically on glucose, suggesting a role for cAMP (but not for CAP) in the expression of some fermentation enzyme. Both cya and crp mutants are known to be resistant to mecillinam, an antibiotic which inhibits penicillin-binding protein 2 (involved in lateral wall elongation) and also affects septation. This resistance does not reflect a lack of PBP2. Furthermore, it was not simply the result of slow growth and small cell mass, since small wild-type cells growing in acetate remained sensitive. The cAMP-CAP complex may regulate the synthesis of some link between PBP2 and the septation apparatus. The ftsZ gene, coding for a cell division protein, was expressed at a higher level in the absence of cAMP, as measured with an ftsZ::lacZ fusion, but the amount of protein per cell, shown by others to be invariable over a 10-fold range of cell mass, was independent of cAMP, suggesting that ftsZ expression is not regulated by the cAMP-CAP complex. Images PMID:2826407

  10. cAMP stimulation of Dictyostelium discoideum destabilizes the mRNA for 117 antigen.

    PubMed

    Juliani, M H; Souza, G M; Klein, C

    1990-06-05

    Transcription of the 117 gene and changes in its mRNA levels in Dictyostelium discoideum were studied by mRNA hybridization with a cDNA probe. In wild type cells (Ax-2), the expression is developmentally regulated during cell aggregation, while in the aggregateless mutant, Agip 45, 117 mRNA is not detectable during cell starvation. Low concentrations of cAMP, given in the form of extracellular pulses to induce the development of starved Agip 45 cells to aggregation competence, are able to induce the appearance of 117 mRNA. The induction seems to be via the cell surface cAMP receptor and by a mechanism which does not involve changes in intracellular cAMP. Interestingly, high concentrations of cAMP, which down-regulate the cell surface cAMP receptor, elicit a rapid decrease in the level of 117 mRNA in aggregation-competent cells. Nuclear run-off and pulse-chase experiments show that the high concentrations of cAMP selectively destabilize the mRNA for 117 antigen. This destabilization requires both de novo mRNA synthesis and protein synthesis since the addition of inhibitors of these processes eliminates the effects of cAMP on 117 mRNA. The data suggest that a cAMP-induced protein(s) may be involved in the destabilization of selective mRNAs.

  11. Improved long-term memory via enhancing cGMP-PKG signaling requires cAMP-PKA signaling.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Eva; Puzzo, Daniela; Rutten, Kris; Privitera, Lucia; De Vry, Jochen; Vanmierlo, Tim; Kenis, Gunter; Palmeri, Agostino; D'Hooge, Rudi; Balschun, Detlef; Steinbusch, Harry M W; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos

    2014-10-01

    Memory consolidation is defined by the stabilization of a memory trace after acquisition, and consists of numerous molecular cascades that mediate synaptic plasticity. Commonly, a distinction is made between an early and a late consolidation phase, in which early refers to the first hours in which labile synaptic changes occur, whereas late consolidation relates to stable and long-lasting synaptic changes induced by de novo protein synthesis. How these phases are linked at a molecular level is not yet clear. Here we studied the interaction of the cyclic nucleotide-mediated pathways during the different phases of memory consolidation in rodents. In addition, the same pathways were studied in a model of neuronal plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP). We demonstrated that cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) signaling mediates early memory consolidation as well as early-phase LTP, whereas cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling mediates late consolidation and late-phase-like LTP. In addition, we show for the first time that early-phase cGMP/PKG signaling requires late-phase cAMP/PKA-signaling in both LTP and long-term memory formation.

  12. Improved Long-Term Memory via Enhancing cGMP-PKG Signaling Requires cAMP-PKA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Eva; Puzzo, Daniela; Rutten, Kris; Privitera, Lucia; De Vry, Jochen; Vanmierlo, Tim; Kenis, Gunter; Palmeri, Agostino; D'Hooge, Rudi; Balschun, Detlef; Steinbusch, Harry MW; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Memory consolidation is defined by the stabilization of a memory trace after acquisition, and consists of numerous molecular cascades that mediate synaptic plasticity. Commonly, a distinction is made between an early and a late consolidation phase, in which early refers to the first hours in which labile synaptic changes occur, whereas late consolidation relates to stable and long-lasting synaptic changes induced by de novo protein synthesis. How these phases are linked at a molecular level is not yet clear. Here we studied the interaction of the cyclic nucleotide-mediated pathways during the different phases of memory consolidation in rodents. In addition, the same pathways were studied in a model of neuronal plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP). We demonstrated that cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) signaling mediates early memory consolidation as well as early-phase LTP, whereas cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling mediates late consolidation and late-phase-like LTP. In addition, we show for the first time that early-phase cGMP/PKG signaling requires late-phase cAMP/PKA-signaling in both LTP and long-term memory formation. PMID:24813825

  13. Genistein Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Response through Inhibiting NF-κB following AMP Kinase Activation in RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Guiyuan; Zhang, Yupei; Yang, Qinhe; Cheng, Shaobin; Hao, Jing; Zhao, Xihong; Jiang, Zhuoqin

    2012-01-01

    Genistein, the major isoflavone in soybean, was recently reported to exert beneficial effects in metabolic disorders and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of a dietary concentration of genistein on the inflammatory response in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results demonstrated that genistein effectively inhibited the LPS-induced overproduction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), as well as LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. In addition, the data also showed that genistein prevented LPS-induced decrease in adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. These effects were obviously attenuated by an AMPK inhibitor. Taken together, our results suggest that the dietary concentration of genistein is able to attenuate inflammatory responses via inhibition of NF-κB activation following AMPK stimulation. The data provide direct evidence for the potential application of low concentrations of genistein in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23300870

  14. Inhibitory Effects of Chung Hun Wha Dam Tang (CHWDT) on High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity via AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activation.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jamal; Joe, Yeonsoo; Zheng, Min; Kim, Sena; Lee, Hoyoung; Kwon, Tae-Oh; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2012-01-01

    The Chung Hun Wha Dam Tang (CHWDT) herbal combination was reported to cease dizziness and phlegm. However, the effect of CHWDT in obesity has not yet been known mechanically. Therefore, we investigated whether this CHWDT could protect the cells from lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and inflammation in both in vivo and in vitro. CHWDT significantly decreased body weight, epididymal and perirenal fat content without affecting feed intake in high-fat diet-induced obese mice model. Additionally, CHWDT inhibited obesity-induced SREBP1, FAS, PGC1α, G6Pase, PEPCK and increased CPT1, ACO, and LCAD genes expression in vivo and in vitro. Proinflammatory cytokines like TNF-α and iNOS expression were reduced by CHWDT in both Raw264.7 macrophages and HepG2 cells. In addition, NO production was also significantly decreased by CHWDT in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Furthermore, AMPKα activation by CHWDT was involved in inhibition of obesity by reducing triglycerides production and increasing CPT1 expression. Based on all of the results, we suggest that CHWDT has inhibitory effects on obesity-induced lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and inflammation via AMPKα activation.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Sulfur Mustard Vesicant-Induced Cell Death: Early and Late Cell Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Mechanisms of Sulfur Mustard Vesicant-Induced Cell Death : Early and late cell responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...It possess mutagenic, carcinogenic, cytotoxic, vesicating effects, and results in cell death . However, the biomedical mechanism of cell death induced... cell death via apoptosis: • In early stage, It induces JNK activity and then triggers apoptosis pathway. • In late stage, sulphur mustard attacks the

  16. Glucose and GLP-1 Stimulate cAMP Production via Distinct Adenylyl Cyclases in INS-1E Insulinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Lavoisier S.; Zippin, Jonathan Hale; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2008-01-01

    In β cells, both glucose and hormones, such as GLP-1, stimulate production of the second messenger cAMP, but glucose and GLP-1 elicit distinct cellular responses. We now show in INS-1E insulinoma cells that glucose and GLP-1 produce cAMP with distinct kinetics via different adenylyl cyclases. GLP-1 induces a rapid cAMP signal mediated by G protein–responsive transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmAC). In contrast, glucose elicits a delayed cAMP rise mediated by bicarbonate, calcium, and ATP-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). This glucose-induced, sAC-dependent cAMP rise is dependent upon calcium influx and is responsible for the glucose-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) pathway. These results demonstrate that sAC-generated and tmAC-generated cAMP define distinct signaling cascades. PMID:18695009

  17. Zedoarondiol Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation via Regulating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mao, Huimin; Tao, Tianqi; Song, Dandan; Liu, Mi; Wang, Xiaoren; Liu, Xiuhua; Shi, Dazhuo

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferation contributes significantly to atherosclerosis and in-stent restenosis. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) plays a vital role in VSMCs proliferation. Zedoarondiol, a sesquiterpene lactone compound, has an anti-inflammatory activity. However, the role of zedoarondiol in PDGF-BB-mediated VSMCs proliferation remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of zedoarondiol on PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs proliferation and explored the possible mechanisms. The inhibitory effects of zedoarondiol on PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs proliferation were evaluated by direct cell counting and the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. DNA synthesis was examined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay. Cell cycle was assessed by propidium iodide staining. Western blotting was performed to determine the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), cyclin E, p53, p21, total and phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K). Zedoarondiol suppressed PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs proliferation and DNA synthesis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. In addition, zedoarondiol activated AMPK and ACC, inhibited the phosphorylation of mTOR and p70S6K, increased the expression of p53 and p21, and decreased the expression of CDK2 and cyclin E. Compound C (an AMPK inhibitor) abrogated, whereas 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-ribofuranoside (AICAR, an AMPK activator) enhanced zedoarondiol-mediated inhibition of VSMCs proliferation and DNA synthesis. Zedoarondiol inhibits PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs proliferation via AMPK-mediated down-regulation of the mTOR/p70S6K pathway and up-regulation of the p53/p21 pathway. These findings suggest that zedoarondiol might be a promising compound against atherosclerosis and in-stent restenosis. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Impact of AmpC Derepression on Fitness and Virulence: the Mechanism or the Pathway?

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gallego, Marcelo; Torrens, Gabriel; Castillo-Vera, Jane; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Hultenby, Kjell; Albertí, Sebastián; Mellroth, Peter; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Normark, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the interplay between antibiotic resistance and bacterial fitness and virulence is essential to guide individual treatments and improve global antibiotic policies. A paradigmatic example of a resistance mechanism is the intrinsic inducible chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC from multiple Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major nosocomial pathogen. The regulation of ampC expression is intimately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, and AmpC-mediated β-lactam resistance is frequently mediated by inactivating mutations in ampD, encoding an N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase, affecting the levels of ampC-activating muropeptides. Here we dissect the impact of the multiple pathways causing AmpC hyperproduction on P. aeruginosa fitness and virulence. Through a detailed analysis, we demonstrate that the lack of all three P. aeruginosa AmpD amidases causes a dramatic effect in fitness and pathogenicity, severely compromising growth rates, motility, and cytotoxicity; the latter effect is likely achieved by repressing key virulence factors, such as protease LasA, phospholipase C, or type III secretion system components. We also show that ampC overexpression is required but not sufficient to confer the growth-motility-cytotoxicity impaired phenotype and that alternative pathways leading to similar levels of ampC hyperexpression and resistance, such as those involving PBP4, had no fitness-virulence cost. Further analysis indicated that fitness-virulence impairment is caused by overexpressing ampC in the absence of cell wall recycling, as reproduced by expressing ampC from a plasmid in an AmpG (muropeptide permease)-deficient background. Thus, our findings represent a major step in the understanding of β-lactam resistance biology and its interplay with fitness and pathogenesis. PMID:27795406

  19. Cardiac Hypertrophy Is Inhibited by a Local Pool of cAMP Regulated by Phosphodiesterase 2.

    PubMed

    Zoccarato, Anna; Surdo, Nicoletta C; Aronsen, Jan M; Fields, Laura A; Mancuso, Luisa; Dodoni, Giuliano; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Livie, Craig; Jiang, He; Sin, Yuan Yan; Gesellchen, Frank; Terrin, Anna; Baillie, George S; Nicklin, Stuart A; Graham, Delyth; Szabo-Fresnais, Nicolas; Krall, Judith; Vandeput, Fabrice; Movsesian, Matthew; Furlan, Leonardo; Corsetti, Veronica; Hamilton, Graham; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Sjaastad, Ivar; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2015-09-25

    Chronic elevation of 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels has been associated with cardiac remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy. However, enhancement of particular aspects of cAMP/protein kinase A signaling seems to be beneficial for the failing heart. cAMP is a pleiotropic second messenger with the ability to generate multiple functional outcomes in response to different extracellular stimuli with strict fidelity, a feature that relies on the spatial segregation of the cAMP pathway components in signaling microdomains. How individual cAMP microdomains affect cardiac pathophysiology remains largely to be established. The cAMP-degrading enzymes phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play a key role in shaping local changes in cAMP. Here we investigated the effect of specific inhibition of selected PDEs on cardiac myocyte hypertrophic growth. Using pharmacological and genetic manipulation of PDE activity, we found that the rise in cAMP resulting from inhibition of PDE3 and PDE4 induces hypertrophy, whereas increasing cAMP levels via PDE2 inhibition is antihypertrophic. By real-time imaging of cAMP levels in intact myocytes and selective displacement of protein kinase A isoforms, we demonstrate that the antihypertrophic effect of PDE2 inhibition involves the generation of a local pool of cAMP and activation of a protein kinase A type II subset, leading to phosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells. Different cAMP pools have opposing effects on cardiac myocyte cell size. PDE2 emerges as a novel key regulator of cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo, and its inhibition may have therapeutic applications. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Regulation of intracellular cyclic AMP in skeletal muscle cells involves the efflux of cyclic nucleotide to the extracellular compartment

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Rosely Oliveira; Costa-Jr, Valter Luiz

    2003-01-01

    This report analyses the intracellular and extracellular accumulation of cyclic AMP in primary rat skeletal muscle cultures, after direct and receptor-dependent stimulation of adenylyl cyclase (AC). Isoprenaline, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and forskolin induced a transient increase in the intracellular cyclic AMP that peaked 5 min after onset stimulation. Under stimulation with isoprenaline or CGRP, the intracellular cyclic AMP initial rise was followed by an exponential decline, reaching 46 and 52% of peak levels in 10 min, respectively. Conversely, the forskolin-dependent accumulation of intracellular cyclic AMP decreased slowly and linearly, reaching 49% of the peak level in 30 min. The loss of intracellular cyclic AMP from peak levels, induced by direct or receptor-induced activation of AC, was followed by an increase in the extracellular cyclic AMP. This effect was independent on PDEs, since it was obtained in the presence of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Besides, in isoprenaline treated cells, the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol reduced both intra- and extracellular accumulation of cyclic AMP, whereas the organic anion transporter inhibitor probenecid reduced exclusively the extracellular accumulation. Together our data show that direct or receptor-dependent activation of skeletal muscle AC results in a transient increase in the intracellular cyclic AMP, despite the continuous presence of the stimulus. The temporal declining of intracellular cyclic AMP was not dependent on the cyclic AMP breakdown but associated to the efflux of cyclic nucleotide to the extracellular compartment, by an active transport since it was prevented by probenecid. PMID:12642402

  1. Phosphorylation of CREB and mechanical hyperalgesia is reversed by blockade of the cAMP pathway in a time-dependent manner after repeated intramuscular acid injections.

    PubMed

    Hoeger-Bement, Marie K; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2003-07-02

    Spinal activation of the cAMP pathway produces mechanical hyperalgesia, sensitizes nociceptive spinal neurons, and phosphorylates the transcription factor cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), which initiates gene transcription. This study examined the role of the cAMP pathway in a model of chronic muscle pain by assessing associated behavioral changes and phosphorylation of CREB. Bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia of the paw was induced by administering two injections of acidic saline, 5 d apart, into the gastrocnemius muscle of male Sprague Dawley rats. Interestingly, the increases in immunoreactivity for CREB and phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) in the spinal dorsal horn occur 24 hr, but not 1 week, after the second injection of acidic saline compared with pH 7.2 intramuscular injections. Spinal blockade of adenylate cyclase prevents the expected increase in p-CREB that occurs after intramuscular acid injection. The reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia by adenylate cyclase or protein kinase A inhibitors spinally follows a similar pattern with reversal at 24 hr, but not 1 week, compared with the vehicle controls. The p-CREB immunoreactivity in the superficial dorsal horn correlates with the mechanical withdrawal threshold such that increases in p-CREB are associated with decreases in threshold. Therefore, activation of the cAMP pathway in the spinal cord phosphorylates CREB and produces mechanical hyperalgesia associated with intramuscular acid injections. The mechanical hyperalgesia and phosphorylation of CREB depend on early activation of the cAMP pathway during the first 24 hr but are independent of the cAMP pathway by 1 week after intramuscular injection of acid.

  2. Molecular mechanism of telokin-mediated disinhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase and cAMP/cGMP-induced relaxation of gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Khromov, Alexander S; Momotani, Ko; Jin, Li; Artamonov, Mykhaylo V; Shannon, John; Eto, Masumi; Somlyo, Avril V

    2012-06-15

    Phospho-telokin is a target of elevated cyclic nucleotide concentrations that lead to relaxation of gastrointestinal and some vascular smooth muscles (SM). Here, we demonstrate that in telokin-null SM, both Ca(2+)-activated contraction and Ca(2+) sensitization of force induced by a GST-MYPT1(654-880) fragment inhibiting myosin light chain phosphatase were antagonized by the addition of recombinant S13D telokin, without changing the inhibitory phosphorylation status of endogenous MYPT1 (the regulatory subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase) at Thr-696/Thr-853 or activity of Rho kinase. Cyclic nucleotide-induced relaxation of force in telokin-null ileum muscle was reduced but not correlated with a change in MYPT1 phosphorylation. The 40% inhibited activity of phosphorylated MYPT1 in telokin-null ileum homogenates was restored to nonphosphorylated MYPT1 levels by addition of S13D telokin. Using the GST-MYPT1 fragment as a ligand and SM homogenates from WT and telokin KO mice as a source of endogenous pro