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Sample records for amp-binding protein gene

  1. Ethanol-induced loss of brain cyclic AMP binding proteins: correlation with growth suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, S.; Kalmus, G.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hypoplasia secondary to maternal ethanol consumption is a common fetal defect observed in all models of fetal alcohol syndrome. The molecular mechanism by which ethanol inhibits growth is unknown but has been hypothesized to involve ethanol-induced changes in the activity of cyclic-AMP stimulated protein kinase. Acute and chronic alcohol exposure elevate cyclic AMP level in many tissues, including brain. This increase in cyclic AMP should increase the phosphorylating activity of kinase by increasing the amount of dissociated (active) kinase catalytic subunit. In 7-day embryonic chick brains, ethanol-induced growth suppression was correlated with increased brain cyclic AMP content but neither basal nor cyclic AMP stimulated kinase catalytic activity was increased. However, the levels of cyclic AMP binding protein (kinase regulatory subunit) were significantly lowered by ethanol exposure. Measured as either /sup 3/H cyclic AMP binding or as 8-azido cyclic AM/sup 32/P labeling, ethanol-exposed brains had significantly less cyclic AMP binding activity (51 +/- 14 versus 29 +/- 10 units/..mu..g protein for 8-azido cyclic AMP binding). These findings suggest that ethanol's effect on kinase activity may involve more than ethanol-induced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  2. The cAMP-binding Popdc proteins have a redundant function in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Thomas; Simrick, Subreena L.; Poon, Kar Lai; Schindler, Roland F.R.

    2014-01-01

    Popdc (Popeye-domain-containing) genes encode membrane-bound proteins and are abundantly present in cardiac myocytes and in skeletal muscle fibres. Functional analysis of Popdc1 (Bves) and Popdc2 in mice and of popdc2 in zebrafish revealed an overlapping role for proper electrical conduction in the heart and maintaining structural integrity of skeletal muscle. Popdc proteins mediate cAMP signalling and modulate the biological activity of interacting proteins. The two-pore channel TREK-1 interacts with all three Popdc proteins. In Xenopus oocytes, the presence of Popdc proteins causes an enhanced membrane transport leading to an increase in TREK-1 current, which is blocked when cAMP levels are increased. Another important Popdc-interacting protein is caveolin 3, and the loss of Popdc1 affects caveolar size. Thus a family of membrane-bound cAMP-binding proteins has been identified, which modulate the subcellular localization of effector proteins involved in organizing signalling complexes and assuring proper membrane physiology of cardiac myocytes. PMID:24646234

  3. cAMP-binding proteins in medullary tubules from rat kidney: effect of ADH

    SciTech Connect

    Gapstur, S.M.; Homma, S.; Dousa, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Little is known of the regulatory steps in the cellular action of vasopressin (AVP) on the renal epithelium, subsequent to the cAMP generation. We studied cAMP-binding proteins in the medullary collecting tubule (MCT) and the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (MTAL) microdissected from the rat kidney by use of photoaffinity labeling. Microdissected tubules were homogenized and photoaffinity labeled by incubation with 1 microM 32P-labeled 8-azido-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (N3-8-(32P)-cAMP); the incorporated 32P was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Both in MCT and MTAL preparations, the analyses showed incorporation of N3-8-(32P)cAMP into two bands (Mr = 49,000 and Mr = 55,000) that comigrated with standards of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits RI and RII. In MCT, most of the 32P (80%) was incorporated into RI, whereas in MTAL the 32P incorporated into RI and RII was equivalent. When freshly dissected MCT segments were incubated with 10(-12)-10(-6) M AVP, the subsequent photoaffinity labeling of RI with N3-8-(32P)cAMP was markedly diminished in a dose-dependent manner compared with controls. Our results suggest that cAMP binds in MCT and MTAL to regulatory subunits RI and RII of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, in MCT the dominant type of cAMP-dependent protein kinase appears to be type I. The outlined procedure is suitable to indirectly measure the occupancy of RI by endogenous cAMP generated in MCT cells in response to physiological levels (10(-12) M) of AVP.

  4. Detection of cyclic di-AMP using a competitive ELISA with a unique pneumococcal cyclic di-AMP binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Adam J.; Zhang, Yang; Metzger, Dennis W.; Bai, Guangchun

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a signaling molecule that has been shown to play important roles in bacterial physiology and infections. Currently, c-di-AMP detection and quantification relies mostly on the use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In this study, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of c-di-AMP was developed, which utilizes a novel pneumococcal c-di-AMP binding protein (CabP) and a newly commercialized c-di-AMP derivative. With this new method, c-di-AMP concentrations in biological samples can be quickly and accurately quantified. Furthermore, this assay is much more efficient than current methods as it requires less overall cost and training while processing many samples at once. Therefore, this assay can be extensively used in research into c-di-AMP signaling. PMID:25239824

  5. Role of the cAMP-binding protein Epac in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Métrich, Mélanie; Berthouze, Magali; Morel, Eric; Crozatier, Bertrand; Gomez, Ana Maria; Lezoualc'h, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Exchange proteins directly activated by cyclic AMP (Epac) were discovered 10 years ago as new sensors for the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Epac family, including Epac1 and Epac2, are guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like small GTPases Rap1 and Rap2 and function independently of protein kinase A. Given the importance of cAMP in the cardiovascular system, numerous molecular and cellular studies using specific Epac agonists have analyzed the role and the regulation of Epac proteins in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. The specific functions of Epac proteins may depend upon their microcellular environments as well as their expression and localization. This review discusses recent data showing the involvement of Epac in vascular cell migration, endothelial permeability, and inflammation through specific signaling pathways. In addition, we present evidence that Epac regulates the activity of various cellular compartments of the cardiac myocyte and influences calcium handling and excitation-contraction coupling. The potential role of Epac in cardiovascular disorders such as cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling is also discussed.

  6. An amphitropic cAMP-binding protein in yeast mitochondria. 1. Synergistic control of the intramitochondrial location by calcium and phospholipid

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, G. ); Bandlow, W. )

    1989-12-26

    A cAMP-binding protein is found to be integrated into the inner mitochondrial membrane of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under normal conditions. It resists solubilization by high salt and chaotropic agents. The protein is, however, converted to a soluble form which ten residues in the intermembrane space, when isolated mitochondria are incubated with low concentrations of calcium. Phospholipids or diacylglycerol (or analogues) dramatically increases the efficiency of receptor release from the inner membrane, whereas these compounds alone are ineffective. Photoaffinity labeling with 8-N{sub 3}-({sup 32}P)cAMP followed by mitochondrial subfractionation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis does not reveal differences in the apparent molecular weight between the membrane-bound and the soluble form of the cAMP receptor. The two forms differ, however, in the partitioning behavior in Triton X-114 as well as in their protease resistance, indicating that the release from the membrane is accompanied by a change in lipophilicity and conformation of the receptor protein. Evidence is presented that a change of the intramitochondrial location of the yeast cAMP-binding protein also occurs in vivo and leads to the activation of a mitochondrial cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The cAMP-binding protein is the first example of a mitochondrial protein with amphitropic character; i.e., it has the property to occur in two different locations as a membrane-embedded and a soluble form.

  7. Identification, Characterization, and Structure Analysis of the Cyclic di-AMP-binding PII-like Signal Transduction Protein DarA*

    PubMed Central

    Gundlach, Jan; Dickmanns, Achim; Schröder-Tittmann, Kathrin; Neumann, Piotr; Kaesler, Jan; Kampf, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Hammer, Elke; Schwede, Frank; Kaever, Volkhard; Tittmann, Kai; Stülke, Jörg; Ficner, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The cyclic dimeric AMP nucleotide c-di-AMP is an essential second messenger in Bacillus subtilis. We have identified the protein DarA as one of the prominent c-di-AMP receptors in B. subtilis. Crystal structure analysis shows that DarA is highly homologous to PII signal transducer proteins. In contrast to PII proteins, the functionally important B- and T-loops are swapped with respect to their size. DarA is a homotrimer that binds three molecules of c-di-AMP, each in a pocket located between two subunits. We demonstrate that DarA is capable to bind c-di-AMP and with lower affinity cyclic GMP-AMP (3′3′-cGAMP) but not c-di-GMP or 2′3′-cGAMP. Consistently the crystal structure shows that within the ligand-binding pocket only one adenine is highly specifically recognized, whereas the pocket for the other adenine appears to be promiscuous. Comparison with a homologous ligand-free DarA structure reveals that c-di-AMP binding is accompanied by conformational changes of both the fold and the position of the B-loop in DarA. PMID:25433025

  8. Identification, characterization, and structure analysis of the cyclic di-AMP-binding PII-like signal transduction protein DarA.

    PubMed

    Gundlach, Jan; Dickmanns, Achim; Schröder-Tittmann, Kathrin; Neumann, Piotr; Kaesler, Jan; Kampf, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Hammer, Elke; Schwede, Frank; Kaever, Volkhard; Tittmann, Kai; Stülke, Jörg; Ficner, Ralf

    2015-01-30

    The cyclic dimeric AMP nucleotide c-di-AMP is an essential second messenger in Bacillus subtilis. We have identified the protein DarA as one of the prominent c-di-AMP receptors in B. subtilis. Crystal structure analysis shows that DarA is highly homologous to PII signal transducer proteins. In contrast to PII proteins, the functionally important B- and T-loops are swapped with respect to their size. DarA is a homotrimer that binds three molecules of c-di-AMP, each in a pocket located between two subunits. We demonstrate that DarA is capable to bind c-di-AMP and with lower affinity cyclic GMP-AMP (3'3'-cGAMP) but not c-di-GMP or 2'3'-cGAMP. Consistently the crystal structure shows that within the ligand-binding pocket only one adenine is highly specifically recognized, whereas the pocket for the other adenine appears to be promiscuous. Comparison with a homologous ligand-free DarA structure reveals that c-di-AMP binding is accompanied by conformational changes of both the fold and the position of the B-loop in DarA. PMID:25433025

  9. CRIS—A Novel cAMP-Binding Protein Controlling Spermiogenesis and the Development of Flagellar Bending

    PubMed Central

    Krähling, Anke Miriam; Alvarez, Luis; Debowski, Katharina; Van, Qui; Gunkel, Monika; Irsen, Stephan; Al-Amoudi, Ashraf; Strünker, Timo; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Krause, Eberhard; Voigt, Ingo; Wörtge, Simone; Waisman, Ari; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Kaupp, Ulrich Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    The second messengers cAMP and cGMP activate their target proteins by binding to a conserved cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). Here, we identify and characterize an entirely novel CNBD-containing protein called CRIS (cyclic nucleotide receptor involved in sperm function) that is unrelated to any of the other members of this protein family. CRIS is exclusively expressed in sperm precursor cells. Cris-deficient male mice are either infertile due to a lack of sperm resulting from spermatogenic arrest, or subfertile due to impaired sperm motility. The motility defect is caused by altered Ca2+ regulation of flagellar beat asymmetry, leading to a beating pattern that is reminiscent of sperm hyperactivation. Our results suggest that CRIS interacts during spermiogenesis with Ca2+-regulated proteins that—in mature sperm—are involved in flagellar bending. PMID:24339785

  10. PRKAR1A gene analysis and protein kinase A activity in endometrial tumors.

    PubMed

    Tsigginou, A; Bimpaki, E; Nesterova, M; Horvath, A; Boikos, S; Lyssikatos, C; Papageorgiou, C; Dimitrakakis, C; Rodolakis, A; Stratakis, C A; Antsaklis, A

    2012-08-01

    PRKAR1A codes for the type 1a regulatory subunit (RIα) of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), an enzyme with an important role in cell cycle regulation and proliferation. PKA dysregulation has been found in various tumors, and PRKAR1A-inactivating mutations have been reported in mostly endocrine neoplasias. In this study, we investigated PKA activity and the PRKAR1A gene in normal and tumor endometrium. Specimens were collected from 31 patients with endometrial cancer. We used as controls 41 samples of endometrium that were collected from surrounding normal tissues or from women undergoing gynecological operations for other reasons. In all samples, we sequenced the PRKAR1A-coding sequence and studied PKA subunit expression; we also determined PKA activity and cAMP binding. PRKAR1A mutations were not found. However, PKA regulatory subunit protein levels, both RIα and those of regulatory subunit type 2b (RIIβ), were lower in tumor samples; cAMP binding was also lower in tumors compared with normal endometrium (P<0.01). Free PKA activity was higher in tumor samples compared with that of control tissue (P<0.01). There are significant PKA enzymatic abnormalities in tumors of the endometrium compared with surrounding normal tissue; as these were not due to PRKAR1A mutations, other mechanisms affecting PKA function ought to be explored. PMID:22461635

  11. Mapping the Free Energy Landscape of PKA Inhibition and Activation: A Double-Conformational Selection Model for the Tandem cAMP-Binding Domains of PKA RIα.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Madoka; McNicholl, Eric Tyler; Ramkissoon, Avinash; Moleschi, Kody; Taylor, Susan S; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Protein Kinase A (PKA) is the major receptor for the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) secondary messenger in eukaryotes. cAMP binds to two tandem cAMP-binding domains (CBD-A and -B) within the regulatory subunit of PKA (R), unleashing the activity of the catalytic subunit (C). While CBD-A in RIα is required for PKA inhibition and activation, CBD-B functions as a "gatekeeper" domain that modulates the control exerted by CBD-A. Preliminary evidence suggests that CBD-B dynamics are critical for its gatekeeper function. To test this hypothesis, here we investigate by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) the two-domain construct RIα (91-379) in its apo, cAMP2, and C-bound forms. Our comparative NMR analyses lead to a double conformational selection model in which each apo CBD dynamically samples both active and inactive states independently of the adjacent CBD within a nearly degenerate free energy landscape. Such degeneracy is critical to explain the sensitivity of CBD-B to weak interactions with C and its high affinity for cAMP. Binding of cAMP eliminates this degeneracy, as it selectively stabilizes the active conformation within each CBD and inter-CBD contacts, which require both cAMP and W260. The latter is contributed by CBD-B and mediates capping of the cAMP bound to CBD-A. The inter-CBD interface is dispensable for intra-CBD conformational selection, but is indispensable for full activation of PKA as it occludes C-subunit recognition sites within CBD-A. In addition, the two structurally homologous cAMP-bound CBDs exhibit marked differences in their residual dynamics profiles, supporting the notion that conservation of structure does not necessarily imply conservation of dynamics.

  12. Mapping the Free Energy Landscape of PKA Inhibition and Activation: A Double-Conformational Selection Model for the Tandem cAMP-Binding Domains of PKA RIα

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Madoka; McNicholl, Eric Tyler; Ramkissoon, Avinash; Moleschi, Kody; Taylor, Susan S.; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Protein Kinase A (PKA) is the major receptor for the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) secondary messenger in eukaryotes. cAMP binds to two tandem cAMP-binding domains (CBD-A and -B) within the regulatory subunit of PKA (R), unleashing the activity of the catalytic subunit (C). While CBD-A in RIα is required for PKA inhibition and activation, CBD-B functions as a “gatekeeper” domain that modulates the control exerted by CBD-A. Preliminary evidence suggests that CBD-B dynamics are critical for its gatekeeper function. To test this hypothesis, here we investigate by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) the two-domain construct RIα (91–379) in its apo, cAMP2, and C-bound forms. Our comparative NMR analyses lead to a double conformational selection model in which each apo CBD dynamically samples both active and inactive states independently of the adjacent CBD within a nearly degenerate free energy landscape. Such degeneracy is critical to explain the sensitivity of CBD-B to weak interactions with C and its high affinity for cAMP. Binding of cAMP eliminates this degeneracy, as it selectively stabilizes the active conformation within each CBD and inter-CBD contacts, which require both cAMP and W260. The latter is contributed by CBD-B and mediates capping of the cAMP bound to CBD-A. The inter-CBD interface is dispensable for intra-CBD conformational selection, but is indispensable for full activation of PKA as it occludes C-subunit recognition sites within CBD-A. In addition, the two structurally homologous cAMP-bound CBDs exhibit marked differences in their residual dynamics profiles, supporting the notion that conservation of structure does not necessarily imply conservation of dynamics. PMID:26618408

  13. The Crystal Structures of Apo and cAMP-Bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum Reveal Structural and Dynamic Changes upon cAMP Binding in CRP/FNR Family Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Philip D.; Jungwirth, Britta; Pojer, Florence; Bußmann, Michael; Money, Victoria A.; Cole, Stewart T.; Pühler, Alfred; Tauch, Andreas; Bott, Michael; Cann, Martin J.; Pohl, Ehmke

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator) transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition. PMID:25469635

  14. NMR studies of the AMP-binding site and mechanism of adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1987-03-24

    NMR has previously been used to determine the conformation of enzyme-bound MgATP and to locate the MgATP-binding site on adenylate kinase [Fry, D. C., Kuby, S. A., & Mildvan, A. S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. To determine the conformation and location of the other substrate, AMP, distances have been measured from Cr3+AMPPCP, a linear competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP, to six protons and to the phosphorus atom of AMP on adenylate kinase, with the paramagnetic probe-T1 method. Time-dependent nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) have been used to measure five interproton distances on enzyme-bound AMP. These distances were used to determine the conformation of bound AMP in addition to its position with respect to metal-ATP. Enzyme-bound AMP exhibits a high anti-glycosyl torsional angle (chi = 110 +/- 10 degrees), a 3'-endo,2'-exo ribose pucker (delta = 105 +/- 10 degrees), and gauche-trans orientations about the C4'-C5' bond (gamma = 180 +/- 10 degrees) and the C5'-O5' bond (beta = 170 +/- 20 degrees). The distance from Cr3+ to the phosphorus of AMP is 5.9 +/- 0.3 A, indicating a reaction coordinate distance of approximately 3 A, which is consistent with an associative SN2 mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer. Ten intermolecular NOEs, from protons of the enzyme to those of AMP, were detected, indicating the proximity of at least three hydrophobic amino acids to bound AMP. These constraints, together with the conformation of AMP and the intersubstrate distances, were used to position AMP into the X-ray structure of adenylate kinase. The AMP binding site is found to be near (less than or equal to 4 A from) Leu-116, Arg-171, Val-173, Val-182, and Leu-190; all of these residues have been found to be invariant in muscle-type rabbit, calf, human, porcine [Kuby, S. A., Palmieri, R. H., Frischat, A., Fischer, A. H., Wu, L. H., Maland, L., & Manship, M. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 2393-2399], and chicken adenylate kinase [Kishi, F., Maruyama, M., Tanizawa, Y

  15. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the mig gene of Mycobacterium avium, which codes for a secreted macrophage-induced protein.

    PubMed Central

    Plum, G; Brenden, M; Clark-Curtiss, J E; Pulverer, G

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen that has evolved to be a frequent cause of disseminated infection in immunocompromised patients. Although these bacilli are readily phagocytized, they are able to survive and even multiply within human macrophages. The process whereby mycobacteria circumvent the lytic functions of the macrophages is currently not well understood, but this is a key aspect in the pathogenicity of all pathogenic mycobacteria. Previously, we identified a gene in M. avium, designated mig (for macrophage-induced gene), the expression of which is induced when the bacilli grow in human macrophages (G. Plum and J. E. Clark-Curtiss, Infect. Immun. 62:476-483, 1994). In the present study we show that (i) the nucleotide sequence of the mig gene has an open reading frame of 295 amino acids with a strong bias for mycobacterial codon usage, (ii) the mig gene also codes for a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues, (iii) mig is induced by acidity to be expressed as an early-secreted 30-kDa protein, and (iv) the Mig protein exhibits an AMP-binding domain signature. However, beyond this motif which is common to enzymes that activate a large variety of substrates, no homologies to known sequences are found. We also show that (v) Mycobacterium smegmatis strains expressing the Mig protein have a limited advantage for survival in macrophages. These findings may be concordant with a role of the mig gene in the virulence of M. avium. PMID:9353032

  16. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  17. Combined protein construct and synthetic gene engineering for heterologous protein expression and crystallization using Gene Composer

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Amy; Lovell, Scott; Lorimer, Don; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Wallace, Ellen; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Archer, Kimberly; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-12-01

    With the goal of improving yield and success rates of heterologous protein production for structural studies we have developed the database and algorithm software package Gene Composer. This freely available electronic tool facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their engineered synthetic gene sequences, as detailed in the accompanying manuscript. In this report, we compare heterologous protein expression levels from native sequences to that of codon engineered synthetic gene constructs designed by Gene Composer. A test set of proteins including a human kinase (P38{alpha}), viral polymerase (HCV NS5B), and bacterial structural protein (FtsZ) were expressed in both E. coli and a cell-free wheat germ translation system. We also compare the protein expression levels in E. coli for a set of 11 different proteins with greatly varied G:C content and codon bias. The results consistently demonstrate that protein yields from codon engineered Gene Composer designs are as good as or better than those achieved from the synonymous native genes. Moreover, structure guided N- and C-terminal deletion constructs designed with the aid of Gene Composer can lead to greater success in gene to structure work as exemplified by the X-ray crystallographic structure determination of FtsZ from Bacillus subtilis. These results validate the Gene Composer algorithms, and suggest that using a combination of synthetic gene and protein construct engineering tools can improve the economics of gene to structure research.

  18. Making the Chromosome-Gene-Protein Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvihill, Charlotte

    1996-01-01

    Presents an exercise that demonstrates the chromosome-gene-protein connection using sickle-cell anemia, a genetic disease with a well-characterized molecular basis. Involves connecting changes in DNA to protein outcomes and tying them into the next generation by meiosis and gamete formation with genetic crosses. Motivates students to integrate…

  19. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  20. Transcriptional enhancer from milk protein genes

    DOEpatents

    Casperson, Gerald F.; Schmidhauser, Christian T.; Bissell, Mina J.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to novel enhancer nucleotide sequences which stimulate transcription of heterologous DNA in cells in culture. The enhancers are derived from major milk protein genes by the process of deletion mapping and functional analysis. The invention also relates to expression vectors containing the novel enhancers.

  1. Stress Genes and Proteins in the Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Macario, Alberto J. L.; Lange, Marianne; Ahring, Birgitte K.; De Macario, Everly Conway

    1999-01-01

    The field covered in this review is new; the first sequence of a gene encoding the molecular chaperone Hsp70 and the first description of a chaperonin in the archaea were reported in 1991. These findings boosted research in other areas beyond the archaea that were directly relevant to bacteria and eukaryotes, for example, stress gene regulation, the structure-function relationship of the chaperonin complex, protein-based molecular phylogeny of organisms and eukaryotic-cell organelles, molecular biology and biochemistry of life in extreme environments, and stress tolerance at the cellular and molecular levels. In the last 8 years, archaeal stress genes and proteins belonging to the families Hsp70, Hsp60 (chaperonins), Hsp40(DnaJ), and small heat-shock proteins (sHsp) have been studied. The hsp70(dnaK), hsp40(dnaJ), and grpE genes (the chaperone machine) have been sequenced in seven, four, and two species, respectively, but their expression has been examined in detail only in the mesophilic methanogen Methanosarcina mazei S-6. The proteins possess markers typical of bacterial homologs but none of the signatures distinctive of eukaryotes. In contrast, gene expression and transcription initiation signals and factors are of the eucaryal type, which suggests a hybrid archaeal-bacterial complexion for the Hsp70 system. Another remarkable feature is that several archaeal species in different phylogenetic branches do not have the gene hsp70(dnaK), an evolutionary puzzle that raises the important question of what replaces the product of this gene, Hsp70(DnaK), in protein biogenesis and refolding and for stress resistance. Although archaea are prokaryotes like bacteria, their Hsp60 (chaperonin) family is of type (group) II, similar to that of the eukaryotic cytosol; however, unlike the latter, which has several different members, the archaeal chaperonin system usually includes only two (in some species one and in others possibly three) related subunits of ∼60 kDa. These

  2. cAMP-dependent activation of protein kinase A as a therapeutic target of skin hyperpigmentation by diphenylmethylene hydrazinecarbothioamide

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyoeun; Hong, Seung Deok; Roh, Eunmiri; Jung, Sang-Hun; Cho, Won-Jea; Hong Park, Sun; Yoon, Da Young; Ko, Seon Mi; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Hong, Jin Tae; Heo, Tae-Young; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose cAMP as a second messenger stimulates expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) or the tyrosinase gene in UVB-induced skin pigmentation. Diphenylmethylene hydrazinecarbothioamide (QNT 3-80) inhibits α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-induced melanin production in B16 murine melanoma cells but its molecular basis remains to be defined. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying the amelioration of skin hyperpigmentation by QNT 3-80. Experimental Approach We used melanocyte cultures with raised levels of cAMP and UVB-irradiated dorsal skin of guinea pigs for pigmentation assays. Immunoprecipitation, kemptide phosphorylation, fluorescence analysis and docking simulation were applied to elucidate a molecular mechanism of QNT 3-80. Key Results QNT 3-80 inhibited melanin production in melanocyte cultures with elevated levels of cAMP, including those from human foreskin. This compound also ameliorated hyperpigmentation in vivo in UVB-irradiated dorsal skin of guinea pigs. As a mechanism, QNT 3-80 directly antagonized cAMP binding to the regulatory subunit of PKA, nullified the dissociation and activation of inactive PKA holoenzyme in melanocytes and fitted into the cAMP-binding site on the crystal structure of human PKA under the most energetically favourable simulation. QNT 3-80 consequently inhibited cAMP- or UVB-induced phosphorylation (activation) of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein in vitro and in vivo, thus down-regulating expression of genes for MITF or tyrosinase in the melanogenic process. Conclusions and Implications Our data suggested that QNT 3-80 could contribute significantly to the treatment of skin disorders with hyperpigmented patches with the cAMP-binding site of PKA as its molecular target. PMID:25766244

  3. Regulation of gene transcription by Polycomb proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Sergi; Mas, Gloria; Di Croce, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins defines a subset of factors that physically associate and function to maintain the positional identity of cells from the embryo to adult stages. PcG has long been considered a paradigmatic model for epigenetic maintenance of gene transcription programs. Despite intensive research efforts to unveil the molecular mechanisms of action of PcG proteins, several fundamental questions remain unresolved: How many different PcG complexes exist in mammalian cells? How are PcG complexes targeted to specific loci? How does PcG regulate transcription? In this review, we discuss the diversity of PcG complexes in mammalian cells, examine newly identified modes of recruitment to chromatin, and highlight the latest insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the function of PcGs in transcription regulation and three-dimensional chromatin conformation. PMID:26665172

  4. Molecular mechanisms of ribosomal protein gene coregulation

    PubMed Central

    Reja, Rohit; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Ghosh, Sujana; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The 137 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) of Saccharomyces provide a model for gene coregulation. We examined the positional and functional organization of their regulators (Rap1 [repressor activator protein 1], Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1), the transcription machinery (TFIIB, TFIID, and RNA polymerase II), and chromatin at near-base-pair resolution using ChIP-exo, as RPGs are coordinately reprogrammed. Where Hmo1 is enriched, Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1 cross-linked broadly to promoter DNA in an RPG-specific manner and demarcated by general minor groove widening. Importantly, Hmo1 extended 20–50 base pairs (bp) downstream from Fhl1. Upon RPG repression, Fhl1 remained in place. Hmo1 dissociated, which was coupled to an upstream shift of the +1 nucleosome, as reflected by the Hmo1 extension and core promoter region. Fhl1 and Hmo1 may create two regulatable and positionally distinct barriers, against which chromatin remodelers position the +1 nucleosome into either an activating or a repressive state. Consistent with in vitro studies, we found that specific TFIID subunits, in addition to cross-linking at the core promoter, made precise cross-links at Rap1 sites, which we interpret to reflect native Rap1–TFIID interactions. Our findings suggest how sequence-specific DNA binding regulates nucleosome positioning and transcription complex assembly >300 bp away and how coregulation coevolved with coding sequences. PMID:26385964

  5. What's that gene (or protein)? Online resources for exploring functions of genes, transcripts, and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, James R. A.

    2014-01-01

    The genomic era has enabled research projects that use approaches including genome-scale screens, microarray analysis, next-generation sequencing, and mass spectrometry–based proteomics to discover genes and proteins involved in biological processes. Such methods generate data sets of gene, transcript, or protein hits that researchers wish to explore to understand their properties and functions and thus their possible roles in biological systems of interest. Recent years have seen a profusion of Internet-based resources to aid this process. This review takes the viewpoint of the curious biologist wishing to explore the properties of protein-coding genes and their products, identified using genome-based technologies. Ten key questions are asked about each hit, addressing functions, phenotypes, expression, evolutionary conservation, disease association, protein structure, interactors, posttranslational modifications, and inhibitors. Answers are provided by presenting the latest publicly available resources, together with methods for hit-specific and data set–wide information retrieval, suited to any genome-based analytical technique and experimental species. The utility of these resources is demonstrated for 20 factors regulating cell proliferation. Results obtained using some of these are discussed in more depth using the p53 tumor suppressor as an example. This flexible and universally applicable approach for characterizing experimental hits helps researchers to maximize the potential of their projects for biological discovery. PMID:24723265

  6. Gene-culture coevolution between cattle milk protein genes and human lactase genes.

    PubMed

    Beja-Pereira, Albano; Luikart, Gordon; England, Phillip R; Bradley, Daniel G; Jann, Oliver C; Bertorelle, Giorgio; Chamberlain, Andrew T; Nunes, Telmo P; Metodiev, Stoitcho; Ferrand, Nuno; Erhardt, Georg

    2003-12-01

    Milk from domestic cows has been a valuable food source for over 8,000 years, especially in lactose-tolerant human societies that exploit dairy breeds. We studied geographic patterns of variation in genes encoding the six most important milk proteins in 70 native European cattle breeds. We found substantial geographic coincidence between high diversity in cattle milk genes, locations of the European Neolithic cattle farming sites (>5,000 years ago) and present-day lactose tolerance in Europeans. This suggests a gene-culture coevolution between cattle and humans.

  7. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms That Cause Structural Changes in the Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Transcriptional Regulator of the Tuberculosis Vaccine Strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG Alter Global Gene Expression without Attenuating Growth▿

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Debbie M.; Saldanha, José W.; Brennan, John F.; Benjamin, Pearline; Strom, Molly; Cole, Jeffrey A.; Spreadbury, Claire L.; Buxton, Roger S.

    2008-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are present in the global transcriptional regulator cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) of the attenuated vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). We have found that these SNPs resulted in small but significant changes in the expression of a number of genes in M. tuberculosis when a deletion of the Rv3676 CRP was complemented by the BCG allele, compared to complementation by the M. tuberculosis allele. We can explain these changes in gene expression by modeling the structure of the mycobacterial protein on the known structure of CRP from Escherichia coli. Thus, the SNP change in the DNA-binding domain, Lys178, is predicted to form a hydrogen bond with the phosphate backbone of the DNA, as does the equivalent residue in E. coli, whereas Glu178 in M. tuberculosis/M. bovis does not, thus explaining the stronger binding reported for CRP of BCG to CRP-binding sites in mycobacterial DNA. In contrast, the SNP change in the nucleotide binding domain (Leu47Pro) is predicted to result in the loss of one hydrogen bond, which is accommodated by the structure, and would not therefore be expected to cause any change in function relating to cAMP binding. The BCG allele fully complemented the growth defect caused by the deletion of the Rv3676 protein in M. tuberculosis, both in vitro and in macrophage and mouse infections, suggesting that these SNPs do not play any role in the attenuation of BCG. However, they may have allowed BCG to grow better under the in vitro-selective conditions used in its derivation from the M. bovis wild type. PMID:18332206

  8. Binding of IKe gene 5 protein to polynucleotides. Fluorescence binding experiments of IKe gene 5 protein and mutual cooperativity of IKe and M13 gene 5 proteins.

    PubMed

    de Jong, E A; Harmsen, B J; Konings, R N; Hilbers, C W

    1987-04-01

    Fluorescence studies of the binding of IKe gene 5 protein to various polynucleotides were performed to obtain insight into the question as to what extent the binding characteristics of the gene 5 proteins of the IKe and M13 phages resemble and/or differ from each other. The fluorescence of IKe gene 5 protein is quenched 60% upon binding to most polynucleotides. At moderate salt concentrations, i.e., below 1 M salt, the binding stoichiometry is 4.0 +/- 0.5 nucleotides per IKe gene 5 protein monomer. The affinity of the protein for homopolynucleotides depends strongly on sugar and base type; in order of increasing affinities we find poly(rC) less than poly(dA) less than poly(rA) less than poly(dI) less than poly(rU) less than poly(dU) less than poly(dT). For most polynucleotides studied, the affinity depends linearly on the salt concentration: [d log (Kint omega)]/(d log [M+]) = -3. The binding is highly cooperative. The cooperativity parameter omega, as deduced from protein titration curves, is 300 +/- 150 and appears independent of the type of polynucleotide studied. Estimation of this binding parameter from salt titrations of gene 5 protein-polynucleotide complexes results in systematically higher values. A comparison of the binding data of the IKe and M13 gene 5 proteins shows that the fluorescence quenching, stoichiometry, order of binding affinities, and cooperativity in the binding are similar for both proteins. From this it is concluded that at least the DNA binding grooves of both proteins must show a close resemblance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Relating protein adduction to gene expression changes: a systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Shi, Zhiao; Duncan, Dexter T; Prodduturi, Naresh; Marnett, Lawrence J; Liebler, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Modification of proteins by reactive electrophiles such as the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) plays a critical role in oxidant-associated human diseases. However, little is known about protein adduction and the mechanism by which protein damage elicits adaptive effects and toxicity. We developed a systems approach for relating protein adduction to gene expression changes through the integration of protein adduction, gene expression, protein-DNA interaction, and protein-protein interaction data. Using a random walk strategy, we expanded a list of responsive transcription factors inferred from gene expression studies to upstream signaling networks, which in turn allowed overlaying protein adduction data on the network for the prediction of stress sensors and their associated regulatory mechanisms. We demonstrated the general applicability of transcription factor-based signaling network inference using 103 known pathways. Applying our workflow on gene expression and protein adduction data from HNE-treatment not only rediscovered known mechanisms of electrophile stress but also generated novel hypotheses regarding protein damage sensors. Although developed for analyzing protein adduction data, the framework can be easily adapted for phosphoproteomics and other types of protein modification data. PMID:21594272

  10. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Y. Murakawa, T. Shimamura, K. Oishi, M. Ohyama, T. Kurita, N.

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  11. Gene duplication and the evolution of moonlighting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; Ascencio, Diana; Barona-Gómez, Francisco; DeLuna, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication is a recurring phenomenon in genome evolution and a major driving force in the gain of biological functions. Here, we examine the role of gene duplication in the origin and maintenance of moonlighting proteins, with special focus on functional redundancy and innovation, molecular tradeoffs, and genetic robustness. An overview of specific examples-mainly from yeast-suggests a widespread conservation of moonlighting behavior in duplicate genes after long evolutionary times. Dosage amplification and incomplete subfunctionalization appear to be prevalent in the maintenance of multifunctionality. We discuss the role of gene-expression divergence and paralog responsiveness in moonlighting proteins with overlapping biochemical properties. Future studies analyzing multifunctional genes in a more systematic and comprehensive manner will not only enable a better understanding of how this emerging class of protein behavior originates and is maintained, but also provide new insights on the mechanisms of evolution by gene duplication. PMID:26217376

  12. Protein glycosylation--an evolutionary crossroad between genes and environment.

    PubMed

    Lauc, Gordan; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2010-12-01

    The majority of molecular processes in higher organisms are performed by various proteins and are thus determined by genes that encode these proteins. However, a significant structural component of at least half of all cellular proteins is not a polypeptide encoded by a single gene, but an oligosaccharide (glycan) synthesized by a network of proteins, resulting from the expression of hundreds of different genes. Relationships between hundreds of individual proteins that participate in glycan biosynthesis are very complex which enables the influence of environmental factors on the final structure of glycans, either by direct effects on individual enzymatic processes, or by induction of epigenetic changes that modify gene expression patterns. Until recently, the complexity of glycan structures prevented large scale studies of protein glycosylation, but recent advances in both glycan analysis and genotyping technologies, enabled the first insights into the intricate field of complex genetics of protein glycosylation. Mutations which inactivate genes involved in the synthesis of common N-glycan precursors are embryonically lethal. However, mutations in genes involved in modifications of glycan antennas are common and apparently contribute largely to individual phenotypic variations that exist in humans and other higher organisms. Some of these variations can be recognized as specific glyco-phenotypes that might represent specific evolutionary advantages or disadvantages. They are however, amenable to environmental influences and are thus less pre-determined than classical Mendelian mutations.

  13. Differential Expression of Potato Tuber Protein Genes 1

    PubMed Central

    Hannapel, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Patatin and the 22-kilodalton protein complex make up more than 50% of the soluble protein present in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and these two proteins are coordinately regulated during tuber development. Although genomic sequences related to these tuber genes exist in the genome of potato species that do not bear tubers, they cannot be induced into expression under the tested conditions. These genes are not expressed during substantial starch accumulation in petioles from a model petiole-leaf cutting system in nontuber-bearing plants, indicating that starch accumulation and synthesis of the major tuber proteins occur independently. Tuber protein gene expression also has been examined in hybrid potato plants that contain genomes from both tuberizing and nontuberizing species. One such triploid hybrid produced only stolons, whereas a pentaploid hybrid with an increased number of tuber genomes produced tubers. It was shown, using immunoblotting and Northern blot hybridization, that these two hybrids actively expressed both patatin and the 22-kilodalton tuber protein in induced petioles from the leaf-cutting system. The induced accumulation of patatin transcripts was consistent in all genotypes containing some tuberizing genome. The induced accumulation of the 22-kilodalton protein transcripts, however, was lower in genotypes containing some nontuberizing genome. Sucrose induction of these genes in leaves corroborates the induction patterns in petioles. A correlation exists between 22-kilodalton protein gene expression and a potato plant's ability to produce stolons or tubers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:16667872

  14. Selection for Genes Encoding Secreted Proteins and Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Robert D.; Gu, Qimin; Goddard, Audrey; Rosenthal, Arnon

    1996-07-01

    Extracellular proteins play an essential role in the formation, differentiation, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Despite that, the systematic identification of genes encoding these proteins has not been possible. We describe here a highly efficient method to isolate genes encoding secreted and membrane-bound proteins by using a single-step selection in yeast. Application of this method, termed signal peptide selection, to various tissues yielded 559 clones that appear to encode known or novel extracellular proteins. These include members of the transforming growth factor and epidermal growth factor protein families, endocrine hormones, tyrosine kinase receptors, serine/threonine kinase receptors, seven transmembrane receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, plasma proteins, and ion channels. The eventual identification of most, or all, extracellular signaling molecules will advance our understanding of fundamental biological processes and our ability to intervene in disease states.

  15. Methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein III and transducer gene trg.

    PubMed Central

    Hazelbauer, G L; Engström, P; Harayama, S

    1981-01-01

    A comparison of the two-dimensional gel patterns of methyl-3H- and 35S-labeled membrane proteins from trg+ and trg null mutant strains of Escherichia coli indicated that the product of trg is probably methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein III. Like the other known methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, the trg product is a membrane protein that migrates as more than one species in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, implying that it too is multiple methylated. It appears likely that all chemoreceptors are linked to the tumble regulator through a single class of membrane protein transducers which are methyl-accepting proteins. Three transducers are coded for by genes tsr, tar, and, probably, trg. Another methyl-accepting protein, which is not related to any of these genes, was observed. Images PMID:7007323

  16. Phytochrome activation of two nuclear genes requires cytoplasmic protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, E; Green, P J; Wong, M; Chua, N H

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of protein synthesis inhibitors on light-induced expression of two plant nuclear genes, Cab and rbcS, in wheat, pea and transgenic tobacco. Light activation of these two genes is very sensitive to cycloheximide, an inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis but not to chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of organellar protein synthesis. Studies with chimeric gene constructs in transgenic tobacco seedlings show that cycloheximide exerts its effect at the transcriptional level. As a control, we show that the expression of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter is enhanced by cycloheximide treatment, irrespective of the coding sequence used. Escape-time analyses with green wheat seedlings show that the cycloheximide block for Cab gene expression is after the primary signal transduction step linked to phytochrome photoconversion. Our results suggest that phytochrome activation of Cab and rbcS is mediated by a labile protein factor(s) synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Images PMID:2583082

  17. Major cancer protein amplifies global gene expression

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists may have discovered why a protein called MYC can provoke a variety of cancers. Like many proteins associated with cancer, MYC helps regulate cell growth. A new study carried out by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and colleagues

  18. The KP4 killer protein gene family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Killer protein 4 (KP4) is a well studied toxin secreted by the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis that kills sensitive Ustilago strains as well as inhibits Fusarium and plant root growth. This small, cysteine rich protein is encoded by a virus that depends on host survival for replication. KP4 functi...

  19. Light-Inducible Gene Regulation with Engineered Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of light-inducible protein-protein interactions with gene regulation systems has enabled the control of gene expression with light. In particular, heterodimer protein pairs from plants can be used to engineer a gene regulation system in mammalian cells that is reversible, repeatable, tunable, controllable in a spatiotemporal manner, and targetable to any DNA sequence. This system, Light-Inducible Transcription using Engineered Zinc finger proteins (LITEZ), is based on the blue light-induced interaction of GIGANTEA and the LOV domain of FKF1 that drives the localization of a transcriptional activator to the DNA-binding site of a highly customizable engineered zinc finger protein. This chapter provides methods for modifying LITEZ to target new DNA sequences, engineering a programmable LED array to illuminate cell cultures, and using the modified LITEZ system to achieve spatiotemporal control of transgene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24718797

  20. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Riley, M

    1998-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins, representing groups of paralogous genes, with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can be accessed at the URL http://www.mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html PMID:9399799

  1. Detecting protein complexes from active protein interaction networks constructed with dynamic gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein interaction networks (PINs) are known to be useful to detect protein complexes. However, most available PINs are static, which cannot reflect the dynamic changes in real networks. At present, some researchers have tried to construct dynamic networks by incorporating time-course (dynamic) gene expression data with PINs. However, the inevitable background noise exists in the gene expression array, which could degrade the quality of dynamic networkds. Therefore, it is needed to filter out contaminated gene expression data before further data integration and analysis. Results Firstly, we adopt a dynamic model-based method to filter noisy data from dynamic expression profiles. Then a new method is proposed for identifying active proteins from dynamic gene expression profiles. An active protein at a time point is defined as the protein the expression level of whose corresponding gene at that time point is higher than a threshold determined by a standard variance involved threshold function. Furthermore, a noise-filtered active protein interaction network (NF-APIN) is constructed. To demonstrate the efficiency of our method, we detect protein complexes from the NF-APIN, compared with those from other dynamic PINs. Conclusion A dynamic model based method can effectively filter out noises in dynamic gene expression data. Our method to compute a threshold for determining the active time points of noise-filtered genes can make the dynamic construction more accuracy and provide a high quality framework for network analysis, such as protein complex prediction. PMID:24565281

  2. Rare disease relations through common genes and protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Novo, Sara; Pazos, Florencio; Chagoyen, Monica

    2016-06-01

    ODCs (Orphan Disease Connections), available at http://csbg.cnb.csic.es/odcs, is a novel resource to explore potential molecular relations between rare diseases. These molecular relations have been established through the integration of disease susceptibility genes and human protein-protein interactions. The database currently contains 54,941 relations between 3032 diseases.

  3. Calreticulin: one protein, one gene, many functions.

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, M; Corbett, E F; Mesaeli, N; Nakamura, K; Opas, M

    1999-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a critical role in the synthesis and chaperoning of membrane-associated and secreted proteins. The membrane is also an important site of Ca(2+) storage and release. Calreticulin is a unique ER luminal resident protein. The protein affects many cellular functions, both in the ER lumen and outside of the ER environment. In the ER lumen, calreticulin performs two major functions: chaperoning and regulation of Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Calreticulin is a highly versatile lectin-like chaperone, and it participates during the synthesis of a variety of molecules, including ion channels, surface receptors, integrins and transporters. The protein also affects intracellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis by modulation of ER Ca(2+) storage and transport. Studies on the cell biology of calreticulin revealed that the ER membrane is a very dynamic intracellular compartment affecting many aspects of cell physiology. PMID:10567207

  4. Nucleotide sequence of Bacillus phage Nf terminal protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, M C; Ito, J

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of Bacillus phage Nf gene E has been determined. Gene E codes for phage terminal protein which is the primer necessary for the initiation of DNA replication. The deduced amino acid sequence of Nf terminal protein is approximately 66% homologous with the terminal proteins of Bacillus phages PZA and luminal diameter 29, and shows similar hydropathy and secondary structure predictions. A serine which has been identified as the residue which covalently links the protein to the 5' end of the genome in luminal diameter 29, is conserved in all three phages. The hydropathic and secondary structural environment of this serine is similar in these phage terminal proteins and also similar to the linking serine of adenovirus terminal protein. PMID:3601672

  5. Gene evolution and functions of extracellular matrix proteins in teeth

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) not only provides physical support for tissues, but it is also critical for tissue development, homeostasis and disease. Over 300 ECM molecules have been defined as comprising the “core matrisome” in mammals through the analysis of whole genome sequences. During tooth development, the structure and functions of the ECM dynamically change. In the early stages, basement membranes (BMs) separate two cell layers of the dental epithelium and the mesenchyme. Later in the differentiation stages, the BM layer is replaced with the enamel matrix and the dentin matrix, which are secreted by ameloblasts and odontoblasts, respectively. The enamel matrix genes and the dentin matrix genes are each clustered in two closed regions located on human chromosome 4 (mouse chromosome 5), except for the gene coded for amelogenin, the major enamel matrix protein, which is located on the sex chromosomes. These genes for enamel and dentin matrix proteins are derived from a common ancestral gene, but as a result of evolution, they diverged in terms of their specific functions. These matrix proteins play important roles in cell adhesion, polarity, and differentiation and mineralization of enamel and dentin matrices. Mutations of these genes cause diseases such as odontogenesis imperfect (OI) and amelogenesis imperfect (AI). In this review, we discuss the recently defined terms matrisome and matrixome for ECMs, as well as focus on genes and functions of enamel and dentin matrix proteins. PMID:23539364

  6. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Keith, Benjamin P; Robertson, David L; Hentges, Kathryn E

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorized according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest additional genes that may contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity.

  7. Ribosomal Protein Gene Knockdown Causes Developmental Defects in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Uechi, Tamayo; Nakajima, Yukari; Nakao, Akihiro; Torihara, Hidetsugu; Chakraborty, Anirban; Inoue, Kunio; Kenmochi, Naoya

    2006-01-01

    The ribosomal proteins (RPs) form the majority of cellular proteins and are mandatory for cellular growth. RP genes have been linked, either directly or indirectly, to various diseases in humans. Mutations in RP genes are also associated with tissue-specific phenotypes, suggesting a possible role in organ development during early embryogenesis. However, it is not yet known how mutations in a particular RP gene result in specific cellular changes, or how RP genes might contribute to human diseases. The development of animal models with defects in RP genes will be essential for studying these questions. In this study, we knocked down 21 RP genes in zebrafish by using morpholino antisense oligos to inhibit their translation. Of these 21, knockdown of 19 RPs resulted in the development of morphants with obvious deformities. Although mutations in RP genes, like other housekeeping genes, would be expected to result in nonspecific developmental defects with widespread phenotypes, we found that knockdown of some RP genes resulted in phenotypes specific to each gene, with varying degrees of abnormality in the brain, body trunk, eyes, and ears at about 25 hours post fertilization. We focused further on the organogenesis of the brain. Each knocked-down gene that affected the morphogenesis of the brain produced a different pattern of abnormality. Among the 7 RP genes whose knockdown produced severe brain phenotypes, 3 human orthologs are located within chromosomal regions that have been linked to brain-associated diseases, suggesting a possible involvement of RP genes in brain or neurological diseases. The RP gene knockdown system developed in this study could be a powerful tool for studying the roles of ribosomes in human diseases. PMID:17183665

  8. Ribosomal protein gene mapping and human chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmochi, N.; Goodman, N.; Page, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    In Drosophila, the Minute phenotype (reduced body size, diminished viability and fertility, and short, thin bristles) results from heterozygous deficiencies (deletions) at any one of 50 loci scattered about the genome. A handful of these Minute loci have been molecularly characterized, and all have been found to encode ribosomal proteins. Thus, the Minute phenotype appears to result from reduced protein synthetic capacity in flies with one rather than two copies of a given ribosomal protein (rp) gene. We are pursuing the possibility that similar reductions in protein synthetic capacity--again resulting from rp gene deficiencies--might underlie phenotypes associated with certain chromosomal disorders in humans. We and our colleagues have reported findings consistent with a role for RPS4 deficiency in the etiology of certain features of Turner syndrome, a complex human disorder classically associated with an XO karyotype. We are intrigued by the possibility that deficiencies of other human rp genes might cause phenotypic abnormalities similar to those seen in Turner syndrome--just as deficiencies of any of a number of Drosophila rp genes cause the Minute phenotype. We must first learn the chromosomal map position of each of the estimated 83 human rp genes. The task of mapping the functional (intron-containing) rp genes is complicated by the existence of processed pseudogenes elsewhere in the genome. To date, we have assigned (or confirmed the previous assignment of) 38 rp genes to individual human chromosomes by PCR analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids containing subsets of human chromosomes, with all but four chromosomes carrying at least one rp gene. We have also identified more than 100 large-insert human YAC (yeast artificial chromosome) clones that contain individual rp genes. Such screening of YAC libraries will result in precise positioning of the rp genes on the emerging physical map of the human genome.

  9. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  10. The p53 gene and protein in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N. )

    1994-01-01

    Because p53 gene alterations are commonplace in human tumors and because p53 protein is involved in a number of important cellular pathways, p53 has become a topic of intensive investigation, both by basic scientists and clinicians. p53 was initially identified by two independent laboratories in 1979 as a 53 kilodalton (kD) protein that complexes with the large T antigen of SV40 virus. Shortly thereafter, it was shown that the E1B oncoprotein of adenovirus also binds p53. The binding of two different oncogenic viral tumor proteins to the same cellular protein suggested that p53 might be integral to tumorigenesis. The human p53 cDNA and gene were subsequently cloned in the mid-1980s, and analysis of p53 gene alterations in human tumors followed a few year later. During these 10 years, researchers grappling with the vagaries of p53 first characterized the gene as an oncogene, then as a tumor suppressor gene, and most recently as both a tumor suppressor gene and a so-called [open quotes]dominant negative[close quotes] oncogene. The last few years have seen an explosion in work on this single gene and its protein product. A review of a computerized medical database revealed approximately 650 articles on p53 in 1992 alone. p53 has assumed importance in neuro-oncology because p53 mutations and protein alterations are frequent in the common diffuse, fibrillary astrocytic tumors of adults. p53 mutations in astrocytomas were first described in 1989 and were followed by more extensive analyses of gene mutations and protein alterations in adult astrocytomas. The gene has also been studied in less common brain tumors. Elucidating the role of p53 in brain tumorigenesis will not only enhance understanding of brain tumor biology but may also contribute to improved diagnosis and therapy. This discussion reviews key aspects of the p53 gene and protein, and describe their emerging roles in central nervous system neoplasia. 102 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: a macroarray study.

    PubMed

    Futyma, Konrad; Miotła, Paweł; Różyńska, Krystyna; Zdunek, Małgorzata; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Wojcierowski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs.

  12. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.D.; Scott-Craig, J.S.

    1999-10-26

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is presented. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with vectors and seeds from the plants.

  13. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and cAMP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Thomas; Poon, Kar Lai; Simrick, Subreena; Schindler, Roland F.R.

    2016-01-01

    3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a second messenger, which plays an important role in the heart. It is generated in response to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Initially, it was thought that protein kinase A (PKA) exclusively mediates cAMP-induced cellular responses such as an increase in cardiac contractility, relaxation, and heart rate. With the identification of the exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC) and hyperpolarizing cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as cAMP effector proteins it became clear that a protein network is involved in cAMP signaling. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode yet another family of cAMP-binding proteins, which are prominently expressed in the heart. Loss-of-function mutations in mice are associated with cardiac arrhythmia and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Interestingly, the cardiac phenotype, which is present in both, Popdc1 and Popdc2 null mutants, is characterized by a stress-induced sinus bradycardia, suggesting that Popdc proteins participate in cAMP signaling in the sinuatrial node. The identification of the two-pore channel TREK-1 and Caveolin 3 as Popdc-interacting proteins represents a first step into understanding the mechanisms of heart rate modulation triggered by Popdc proteins. PMID:27500161

  14. Genomic structure of the human prion protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, C; Concannon, P; Casey, C; Hood, L

    1991-01-01

    Creutzfeld-Jacob disease and Gerstmann-Sträussler syndrome are rare degenerative disorders of the nervous system which have been genetically linked to the prion protein (PrP) gene. The PrP gene encodes a host glycoprotein of unknown function and is located on the short arm of chromosome 20, a region with few known genes or anonymous markers. The complete structure of the PrP gene in man has not been determined despite considerable interest in its relationship to these unusual disorders. We have determined that the human PrP gene has the same simple genomic structure seen in the hamster gene and consists of two exons and a single intron. In contrast to the hamster PrP gene the human gene appears to have a single major transcriptional start site. The region immediately 5' of the transcriptional start site of the human PrP gene demonstrates the GC-rich features commonly seen in housekeeping genes. Curiously, the genomic clone we have isolated contains a 24-bp deletion that removes one of five octameric peptide repeats predicted to form a B-pleated sheet in this region of the PrP. We have also identified 5' of the PrP gene an RFLP which has a high degree of heterozygosity and which should serve as a useful marker for the pter-12 region of human chromosome 20. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:1678248

  15. The human ubiquitin-52 amino acid fusion protein gene shares several structural features with mammalian ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, R T; Board, P G

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding ubiquitin fused to a 52 amino acid tail protein were isolated from human placental and adrenal gland cDNA libraries. The deduced human 52 amino acid tail protein is very similar to the homologous protein from other species, including the conservation of the putative metal-binding, nucleic acid-binding domain observed in these proteins. Northern blot analysis with a tail-specific probe indicated that the previously identified UbA mRNA species most likely represents comigrating transcripts of the 52 amino acid tail (UbA52) and 80 amino acid tail (UbA80) ubiquitin fusion genes. The UbA52 gene was isolated from a human genomic library and consists of five exons distributed over 3400 base pairs. One intron is in the 5' non-coding region, two interrupt the single ubiquitin coding unit, and the fourth intron is within the tail coding region. Several members of the Alu family of repetitive DNA are associated with the gene. The UbA52 promoter has several features in common with mammalian ribosomal protein genes, including its location in a CpG-rich island, initiation of transcription within a polypyrimidine tract, the lack of a consensus TATA motif, and the presence of Sp1 binding sites, observations that are consistent with the recent identification of the ubiquitin-free tail proteins as ribosomal proteins. Thus, in spite of its unusual feature of being translationally fused to ubiquitin, the 52 amino acid tail ribosomal protein is expressed from a structurally typical ribosomal protein gene. Images PMID:1850507

  16. Combining random gene fission and rational gene fusion to discover near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments that report on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Naresh; Nobles, Christopher L; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Maresso, Anthony W; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2015-05-15

    Gene fission can convert monomeric proteins into two-piece catalysts, reporters, and transcription factors for systems and synthetic biology. However, some proteins can be challenging to fragment without disrupting function, such as near-infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). We describe a directed evolution strategy that can overcome this challenge by randomly fragmenting proteins and concomitantly fusing the protein fragments to pairs of proteins or peptides that associate. We used this method to create libraries that express fragmented IFP as fusions to a pair of associating peptides (IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3) and proteins (CheA and CheY) and screened for fragmented IFP with detectable near-infrared fluorescence. Thirteen novel fragmented IFPs were identified, all of which arose from backbone fission proximal to the interdomain linker. Either the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides or CheA and CheY proteins could assist with IFP fragment complementation, although the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides consistently yielded higher fluorescence. These results demonstrate how random gene fission can be coupled to rational gene fusion to create libraries enriched in fragmented proteins with AND gate logic that is dependent upon a protein-protein interaction, and they suggest that these near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments will be suitable as reporters for pairs of promoters and protein-protein interactions within whole animals.

  17. High levels of gene expression explain the strong evolutionary constraint of mitochondrial protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Nabholz, Benoit; Ellegren, Hans; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2013-02-01

    The nearly neutral theory of molecular evolution has been widely accepted as the guiding principle for understanding how selection affects gene sequence evolution. One of its central predictions is that the rate at which proteins evolve should negatively scale with effective population size (N(e)). In contrast to the expectation of reduced selective constraint in the mitochondrial genome following from its lower N(e), we observe what can be interpreted as the opposite: for a taxonomically diverse set of organisms (birds, mammals, insects, and nematodes), mitochondrially encoded protein-coding genes from the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (mtOXPHOS; n = 12-13) show markedly stronger signatures of purifying selection (illustrated by low d(N)/d(S)) than their nuclear counterparts interacting in the same pathway (nuOXPHOS; n: ∼75). To understand these unexpected evolutionary dynamics, we consider a number of structural and functional parameters including gene expression, hydrophobicity, transmembrane position, gene ontology, GC content, substitution rate, proportion of amino acids in transmembrane helices, and protein-protein interaction. Across all taxa, unexpectedly large differences in gene expression levels (RNA-seq) between nuclear and mitochondrially encoded genes, and to a lower extent hydrophobicity, explained most of the variation in d(N)/d(S). Similarly, differences in d(N)/d(S) between functional OXPHOS protein complexes could largely be explained by gene expression differences. Overall, by including gene expression and other functional parameters, the unexpected mitochondrial evolutionary dynamics can be understood. Our results not only reaffirm the link between gene expression and protein evolution but also open new questions about the functional role of expression level variation between mitochondrial genes. PMID:23071102

  18. High levels of gene expression explain the strong evolutionary constraint of mitochondrial protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Nabholz, Benoit; Ellegren, Hans; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2013-02-01

    The nearly neutral theory of molecular evolution has been widely accepted as the guiding principle for understanding how selection affects gene sequence evolution. One of its central predictions is that the rate at which proteins evolve should negatively scale with effective population size (N(e)). In contrast to the expectation of reduced selective constraint in the mitochondrial genome following from its lower N(e), we observe what can be interpreted as the opposite: for a taxonomically diverse set of organisms (birds, mammals, insects, and nematodes), mitochondrially encoded protein-coding genes from the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (mtOXPHOS; n = 12-13) show markedly stronger signatures of purifying selection (illustrated by low d(N)/d(S)) than their nuclear counterparts interacting in the same pathway (nuOXPHOS; n: ∼75). To understand these unexpected evolutionary dynamics, we consider a number of structural and functional parameters including gene expression, hydrophobicity, transmembrane position, gene ontology, GC content, substitution rate, proportion of amino acids in transmembrane helices, and protein-protein interaction. Across all taxa, unexpectedly large differences in gene expression levels (RNA-seq) between nuclear and mitochondrially encoded genes, and to a lower extent hydrophobicity, explained most of the variation in d(N)/d(S). Similarly, differences in d(N)/d(S) between functional OXPHOS protein complexes could largely be explained by gene expression differences. Overall, by including gene expression and other functional parameters, the unexpected mitochondrial evolutionary dynamics can be understood. Our results not only reaffirm the link between gene expression and protein evolution but also open new questions about the functional role of expression level variation between mitochondrial genes.

  19. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  20. Cycloheximide resistance in yeast: the gene and its protein.

    PubMed Central

    Käufer, N F; Fried, H M; Schwindinger, W F; Jasin, M; Warner, J R

    1983-01-01

    Mutations in the yeast gene CYH2 can lead to resistance to cycloheximide, an inhibitor of eukaryotic protein synthesis. The gene product of CYH2 is ribosomal protein L29, a component of the 60S ribosomal subunit. We have cloned the wild-type and resistance alleles of CYH2 and determined their nucleotide sequence. Transcription of CYH2 appears to initiate and terminate at multiple sites, as judged by S1 nuclease analysis. The gene is transcribed into an RNA molecule of about 1082 nucleotides, containing an intervening sequence of 510 nucleotides. The splice junction of the intron resides within a codon near the 5' end of the gene. In confirmation of peptide analysis by Stocklein et al. (1) we find that resistance to cycloheximide is due to a transversion mutation resulting in the replacement of a glutamine by glutamic acid in position 37 of L29. Images PMID:6304624

  1. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  2. Evolution of yolk protein genes in the Echinodermata.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Thomas A A; Byrne, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Vitellogenin genes (vtg) encode large lipid transfer proteins (LLTPs) that are typically female-specific, functioning as precursors to major yolk proteins (MYPs). Within the phylum Echinodermata, however, the MYP of the Echinozoa (Echinoidea + Holothuroidea) is expressed by an unrelated transferrin-like gene that has a reproductive function in both sexes. We investigated egg proteins in the Asterozoa (Asteroidea + Ophiuroidea), a sister clade to the Echinozoa, showing that eggs of the asteroid Parvulastra exigua contain a vitellogenin protein (Vtg). vtg is expressed by P. exigua, a species with large eggs and nonfeeding larvae, and by the related asterinid Patiriella regularis which has small eggs and feeding larvae. In the Asteroidea, therefore, the reproductive function of vtg is conserved despite significant life history evolution. Like the echinozoan MYP gene, asteroid vtg is expressed in both sexes and may play a role in the development of both ovaries and testes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that a putative Vtg from the sea urchin genome, a likely pseudogene, does not clade with asteroid Vtg. We propose the following sequence as a potential pathway for the evolution of YP genes in the Echinodermata: (1) the ancestral echinoderm produced YPs derived from Vtg, (2) bisexual vtg expression subsequently evolved in the echinoderm lineage, (3) the reproductive function of vtg was assumed by a transferrin-like gene in the ancestral echinozoan, and (4) redundant echinozoan vtg was released from stabilizing selection.

  3. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  4. Divinyl ether synthase gene, and protein and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2006-12-26

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  5. Divinyl ether synthase gene and protein, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2011-09-13

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  6. Binding of Cyclic Di-AMP to the Staphylococcus aureus Sensor Kinase KdpD Occurs via the Universal Stress Protein Domain and Downregulates the Expression of the Kdp Potassium Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Moscoso, Joana A.; Schramke, Hannah; Tosi, Tommaso; Dehbi, Amina; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nucleotide signaling molecules are important intracellular messengers that regulate a wide range of biological functions. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus produces the signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP). This molecule is common among Gram-positive bacteria and in many organisms is essential for survival under standard laboratory growth conditions. In this study, we investigated the interaction of c-di-AMP with the S. aureus KdpD protein. The sensor kinase KdpD forms a two-component signaling system with the response regulator KdpE and regulates the expression of the kdpDE genes and the kdpFABC operon coding for the Kdp potassium transporter components. Here we show that the S. aureus KdpD protein binds c-di-AMP specifically and with an affinity in the micromolar range through its universal stress protein (USP) domain. This domain is located within the N-terminal cytoplasmic region of KdpD, and amino acids of a conserved SXS-X20-FTAXY motif are important for this binding. We further show that KdpD2, a second KdpD protein found in some S. aureus strains, also binds c-di-AMP, and our bioinformatics analysis indicates that a subclass of KdpD proteins in c-di-AMP-producing bacteria has evolved to bind this signaling nucleotide. Finally, we show that c-di-AMP binding to KdpD inhibits the upregulation of the kdpFABC operon under salt stress, thus indicating that c-di-AMP is a negative regulator of potassium uptake in S. aureus. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen and a major cause of food poisoning in Western countries. A common method for food preservation is the use of salt to drive dehydration. This study sheds light on the regulation of potassium uptake in Staphylococcus aureus, an important aspect of this bacterium's ability to tolerate high levels of salt. We show that the signaling nucleotide c-di-AMP binds to a regulatory component of the Kdp potassium uptake system and that this binding has an inhibitory

  7. Differential rates of gene expression monitored by green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Lu, Canghai; Albano, C Renee; Bentley, William E; Rao, Govind

    2002-08-20

    The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter gene has made a broad impact in several areas, especially in studies of protein trafficking, localization, and expression analysis. GFP's many advantages are that it is small, autocatalytic, and does not require fixation, cell disruption, or the addition of cofactors or substrates. Two characteristics of GFP, extreme stability and chromophore cyclization lag time, pose a hindrance to the application of GFP as a real-time gene expression reporter in bioprocess applications. In this report, we present analytical methods that overcome these problems and enable the temporal visualization of discrete gene regulatory events. The approach we present measures the rate of change in GFP fluorescence, which in turn reflects the rate of gene expression. We conducted fermentation and microplate experiments using a protein synthesis inhibitor to illustrate the feasibility of this system. Additional experiments using the classic gene regulation of the araBAD operon show the utility of GFP as a near real-time indicator of gene regulation. With repetitive induction and repression of the arabinose promoter, the differential rate of GFP fluorescence emission shows corresponding cyclical changes during the culture.

  8. Targeting protein kinase A in cancer therapy: an update

    PubMed Central

    Sapio, Luigi; Di Maiolo, Francesca; Illiano, Michela; Esposito, Antonietta; Chiosi, Emilio; Spina, Annamaria; Naviglio, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Protein Kinase A (PKA) is a well known member of the serine-threonin protein kinase superfamily. PKA, also known as cAMP-dependent protein kinase, is a multi-unit protein kinase that mediates signal transduction of G-protein coupled receptors through its activation upon cAMP binding. The widespread expression of PKA subunit genes, and the myriad of mechanisms by which cAMP is regulated within a cell suggest that PKA signaling is one of extreme importance to cellular function. It is involved in the control of a wide variety of cellular processes from metabolism to ion channel activation, cell growth and differentiation, gene expression and apoptosis. Importantly, since it has been implicated in the initiation and progression of many tumors, PKA has been proposed as a novel biomarker for cancer detection, and as a potential molecular target for cancer therapy. Here, we highlight some features of cAMP/PKA signaling that are relevant to cancer biology and present an update on targeting PKA in cancer therapy. PMID:26417307

  9. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  10. Protein evolution of ANTP and PRD homeobox genes

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Although homeobox genes have been the subject of many studies, little is known about the main amino acid changes that occurred early in the evolution of genes belonging to different classes. Results In this study, we report a method for the fast and efficient retrieval of sequences belonging to the ANTP (HOXL and NKL) and PRD classes. Furthermore, we look for diagnostic amino acid residues that can be used to distinguish HOXL, NKL and PRD genes. Conclusion The reported protein features will facilitate the robust classification of homeobox genes from newly sequenced bilaterian genomes. Nevertheless, in non-bilaterian genomes our findings must be cautiously applied. In principle, as long as a good manually curated data set is available the approach here described can be applied to non-bilaterian organisms as well. Our results help focus experimental studies onto investigating the biochemical functions of key homeodomain residues in different gene classes. PMID:18620554

  11. The Xist RNA gene evolved in eutherians by pseudogenization of a protein-coding gene.

    PubMed

    Duret, Laurent; Chureau, Corinne; Samain, Sylvie; Weissenbach, Jean; Avner, Philip

    2006-06-16

    The Xist noncoding RNA is the key initiator of the process of X chromosome inactivation in eutherian mammals, but its precise function and origin remain unknown. Although Xist is well conserved among eutherians, until now, no homolog has been identified in other mammals. We show here that Xist evolved, at least partly, from a protein-coding gene and that the loss of protein-coding function of the proto-Xist coincides with the four flanking protein genes becoming pseudogenes. This event occurred after the divergence between eutherians and marsupials, which suggests that mechanisms of dosage compensation have evolved independently in both lineages.

  12. Darwinian and demographic forces affecting human protein coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Hubisz, Melissa J.; Hellmann, Ines; Torgerson, Dara; Andrés, Aida M.; Albrechtsen, Anders; Gutenkunst, Ryan; Adams, Mark D.; Cargill, Michele; Boyko, Adam; Indap, Amit; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2009-01-01

    Past demographic changes can produce distortions in patterns of genetic variation that can mimic the appearance of natural selection unless the demographic effects are explicitly removed. Here we fit a detailed model of human demography that incorporates divergence, migration, admixture, and changes in population size to directly sequenced data from 13,400 protein coding genes from 20 European-American and 19 African-American individuals. Based on this demographic model, we use several new and established statistical methods for identifying genes with extreme patterns of polymorphism likely to be caused by Darwinian selection, providing the first genome-wide analysis of allele frequency distributions in humans based on directly sequenced data. The tests are based on observations of excesses of high frequency–derived alleles, excesses of low frequency–derived alleles, and excesses of differences in allele frequencies between populations. We detect numerous new genes with strong evidence of selection, including a number of genes related to psychiatric and other diseases. We also show that microRNA controlled genes evolve under extremely high constraints and are more likely to undergo negative selection than other genes. Furthermore, we show that genes involved in muscle development have been subject to positive selection during recent human history. In accordance with previous studies, we find evidence for negative selection against mutations in genes associated with Mendelian disease and positive selection acting on genes associated with several complex diseases. PMID:19279335

  13. Challenges in biotechnology at LLNL: from genes to proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Albala, J S

    1999-03-11

    This effort has undertaken the task of developing a link between the genomics, DNA repair and structural biology efforts within the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program at LLNL. Through the advent of the I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression) Consortium, a world-wide effort to catalog the largest public collection of genes, accepted and maintained within BBRP, it is now possible to systematically express the protein complement of these to further elucidate novel gene function and structure. The work has ensued in four phases, outlined as follows: (1) Gene and System selection; (2) Protein expression and purification; (3) Structural analysis; and (4) biological integration. Proteins to be expressed have been those of high programmatic interest. This includes, in particular, proteins involved in the maintenance of genome integrity, particularly those involved in the repair of DNA damage, including ERCC1, ERCC4, XRCC2, XRCC3, XRCC9, HEX1, APN1, p53, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51. Full-length cDNA cognates of selected genes were isolated, and cloned into baculovirus-based expression vectors. The baculoviral expression system for protein over-expression is now well-established in the Albala laboratory. Procedures have been successfully optimized for full-length cDNA clining into expression vectors for protein expression from recombinant constructs. This includes the reagents, cell lines, techniques necessary for expression of recombinant baculoviral constructs in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. The laboratory has also generated a high-throughput baculoviral expression paradigm for large scale expression and purification of human recombinant proteins amenable to automation.

  14. Genomic analysis of the major bovine milk protein genes.

    PubMed

    Threadgill, D W; Womack, J E

    1990-12-11

    The genomic arrangement of the major bovine milk protein genes has been determined using a combination of physical mapping techniques. The major milk proteins consist of the four caseins, alpha s1 (CASAS1), alpha s2 (CASAS2), beta (CASB), and kappa (CASK), as well as the two major whey proteins, alpha-lactalbumin (LALBA) and beta-lactoglobulin (LGB). A panel of bovine X hamster hybrid somatic cells analyzed for the presence or absence of bovine specific restriction fragments revealed the genes coding for the major milk proteins to reside on three chromosomes. The four caseins were assigned to syntenic group U15 and localized to bovine chromosome 6 at q31-33 by in situ hybridization. LALBA segregated with syntenic group U3, while LGB segregated with U16. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis confirmed genetic mapping results indicating tight linkage of the casein genes. The four genes reside on less than 200 kb of DNA in the order CASAS1-CASB-CASAS2-CASK. Multiple restriction fragment length polymorphisms were also found at the six loci in three breeds of cattle.

  15. Protein Subcellular Relocalization Increases the Retention of Eukaryotic Duplicate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Byun, S. Ashley; Singh, Sarabdeep

    2013-01-01

    Gene duplication is widely accepted as a key evolutionary process, leading to new genes and novel protein functions. By providing the raw genetic material necessary for functional expansion, the mechanisms that involve the retention and functional diversification of duplicate genes are one of the central topics in evolutionary and comparative genomics. One proposed source of retention and functional diversification is protein subcellular relocalization (PSR). PSR postulates that changes in the subcellular location of eukaryotic duplicate proteins can positively modify function and therefore be beneficial to the organism. As such, PSR would promote retention of those relocalized duplicates and result in significantly lower death rates compared with death rates of nonrelocalized duplicate pairs. We surveyed both relocalized and nonrelocalized duplicate proteins from the available genomes and proteomes of 59 eukaryotic species and compared their relative death rates over a Ks range between 0 and 1. Using the Cox proportional hazard model, we observed that the death rates of relocalized duplicate pairs were significantly lower than the death rates of the duplicates without relocalization in most eukaryotic species examined in this study. These observations suggest that PSR significantly increases retention of duplicate genes and that it plays an important, but currently underappreciated, role in the evolution of eukaryotic genomes. PMID:24265504

  16. Expression of heat shock protein genes in insect stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are abundantly expressed in insects are important modulators of insect survival. Expression of HSP genes in insects is not only developmentally regulated, but also induced by various stressors in order to confer protection against such stressors. The expression o...

  17. Correlation of protein and gene expression profiles of inflammatory proteins after endotoxin challenge in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Uma; Conway, Theresa M; Murdock, Paul; Mooney, Jeff L; Clark, Steve; Hedge, Priti; Bond, Brian C; Jazwinska, Elizabeth C; Barnes, Michael R; Tobin, Frank; Damian-Iordachi, Valeriu; Greller, Larry; Hurle, Mark; Stubbs, Andrew P; Li, Zhong; Valoret, Elizabeth I; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Cass, Lisa; Levitt, Blanche; Davis, Hugh M; Jorkasky, Diane K; Williams, William V

    2005-07-01

    Administration of endotoxin (LPS) in humans results in profound physiological responses, including activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the release of inflammatory factors. The time course of the response of selected inflammatory proteins was examined in healthy subjects (n = 6) administered a single intravenous dose of the purified derivative of endotoxin (3.0 ng/kg). Microarray analysis demonstrated changes in the expression of a number of genes, which were confirmed in separate in vitro endotoxin stimulation experiments. Subsequent TaqMan analysis of genes of interest indicated time-dependent changes in the expression of many of these genes. This included pre-B cell enhancing factor, which was identified on microarray analysis as being markedly upregulated following endotoxin stimulation. Protein expression of the genes examined by TaqMan analysis was measured and demonstrated the appearance of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and sTNF-R proteins in the plasma beginning within 1 h after dosing, followed by other cytokines/ inflammatory markers (e.g., IL-1ra, G-CSF, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10) and suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS-1 and SOCS-3). In general, cytokine protein expression correlated well with gene expression; however, the temporal profile of expression of some genes did not correlate well with the protein data. For many of these proteins, the lack of correlation was attributable to alternate tissue sources, which were demonstrated on TaqMan analysis. Principal component analysis indicated that cytokines could be grouped according to their temporal pattern of response, with most transcript levels returning to baseline 24 h following endotoxin administration. The combination of cDNA microarray and TaqMan analysis to identify and quantify changes in gene expression, along with the analysis of protein expression, can be useful in investigating inflammatory and other diseases.

  18. Bioengineered Silk Protein-Based Gene Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Keiji; Subramanian, Balajikarthick; Currie, Heather A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Silk proteins self-assemble into mechanically robust material structures that are also biodegradable and non-cytotoxic, suggesting utility for gene delivery. Since silk proteins can also be tailored in terms of chemistry, molecular weight and other design features via genetic engineering, further control of this system for gene delivery can be considered. In the present study, silk-based block copolymers were bioengineered with poly(l-lysine) domains for gene delivery. Ionic complexes of these silk-polylysine based block copolymers with plasmid DNA (pDNA) were prepared for gene delivery to human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. The material systems were characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. The polymers self-assembled in solution and complexed plasmid DNA through ionic interactions. The pDNA complexes with 30-lysine residues prepared at a polymer/nucleotide ratio of 10 and with a solution diameter of 380 nm, showed the highest efficiency for transfection. The pDNA complexes were also immobilized on silk films and demonstrated direct cell transfection from these surfaces. The results demonstrate the potential of bioengineered silk proteins as a new family of highly tailored gene delivery systems. PMID:19577803

  19. Protein networks identify novel symbiogenetic genes resulting from plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Méheust, Raphaël; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-03-29

    The integration of foreign genetic information is central to the evolution of eukaryotes, as has been demonstrated for the origin of the Calvin cycle and of the heme and carotenoid biosynthesis pathways in algae and plants. For photosynthetic lineages, this coordination involved three genomes of divergent phylogenetic origins (the nucleus, plastid, and mitochondrion). Major hurdles overcome by the ancestor of these lineages were harnessing the oxygen-evolving organelle, optimizing the use of light, and stabilizing the partnership between the plastid endosymbiont and host through retargeting of proteins to the nascent organelle. Here we used protein similarity networks that can disentangle reticulate gene histories to explore how these significant challenges were met. We discovered a previously hidden component of algal and plant nuclear genomes that originated from the plastid endosymbiont: symbiogenetic genes (S genes). These composite proteins, exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, encode a cyanobacterium-derived domain fused to one of cyanobacterial or another prokaryotic origin and have emerged multiple, independent times during evolution. Transcriptome data demonstrate the existence and expression of S genes across a wide swath of algae and plants, and functional data indicate their involvement in tolerance to oxidative stress, phototropism, and adaptation to nitrogen limitation. Our research demonstrates the "recycling" of genetic information by photosynthetic eukaryotes to generate novel composite genes, many of which function in plastid maintenance. PMID:26976593

  20. Protein networks identify novel symbiogenetic genes resulting from plastid endosymbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Méheust, Raphaël; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The integration of foreign genetic information is central to the evolution of eukaryotes, as has been demonstrated for the origin of the Calvin cycle and of the heme and carotenoid biosynthesis pathways in algae and plants. For photosynthetic lineages, this coordination involved three genomes of divergent phylogenetic origins (the nucleus, plastid, and mitochondrion). Major hurdles overcome by the ancestor of these lineages were harnessing the oxygen-evolving organelle, optimizing the use of light, and stabilizing the partnership between the plastid endosymbiont and host through retargeting of proteins to the nascent organelle. Here we used protein similarity networks that can disentangle reticulate gene histories to explore how these significant challenges were met. We discovered a previously hidden component of algal and plant nuclear genomes that originated from the plastid endosymbiont: symbiogenetic genes (S genes). These composite proteins, exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, encode a cyanobacterium-derived domain fused to one of cyanobacterial or another prokaryotic origin and have emerged multiple, independent times during evolution. Transcriptome data demonstrate the existence and expression of S genes across a wide swath of algae and plants, and functional data indicate their involvement in tolerance to oxidative stress, phototropism, and adaptation to nitrogen limitation. Our research demonstrates the “recycling” of genetic information by photosynthetic eukaryotes to generate novel composite genes, many of which function in plastid maintenance. PMID:26976593

  1. Protein networks identify novel symbiogenetic genes resulting from plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Méheust, Raphaël; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-03-29

    The integration of foreign genetic information is central to the evolution of eukaryotes, as has been demonstrated for the origin of the Calvin cycle and of the heme and carotenoid biosynthesis pathways in algae and plants. For photosynthetic lineages, this coordination involved three genomes of divergent phylogenetic origins (the nucleus, plastid, and mitochondrion). Major hurdles overcome by the ancestor of these lineages were harnessing the oxygen-evolving organelle, optimizing the use of light, and stabilizing the partnership between the plastid endosymbiont and host through retargeting of proteins to the nascent organelle. Here we used protein similarity networks that can disentangle reticulate gene histories to explore how these significant challenges were met. We discovered a previously hidden component of algal and plant nuclear genomes that originated from the plastid endosymbiont: symbiogenetic genes (S genes). These composite proteins, exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, encode a cyanobacterium-derived domain fused to one of cyanobacterial or another prokaryotic origin and have emerged multiple, independent times during evolution. Transcriptome data demonstrate the existence and expression of S genes across a wide swath of algae and plants, and functional data indicate their involvement in tolerance to oxidative stress, phototropism, and adaptation to nitrogen limitation. Our research demonstrates the "recycling" of genetic information by photosynthetic eukaryotes to generate novel composite genes, many of which function in plastid maintenance.

  2. Function of PPR proteins in plastid gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shikanai, Toshiharu; Fujii, Sota

    2013-01-01

    PPR proteins form a huge family in flowering plants and are involved in RNA maturation in plastids and mitochondria. These proteins are sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins that recruit the machinery of RNA processing. We summarize progress in the research on the functional mechanisms of divergent RNA maturation and on the mechanism by which RNA sequences are recognized. We further focus on two topics. RNA editing is an enigmatic process of RNA maturation in organelles, in which members of the PLS subfamily contribute to target site recognition. As the first topic, we speculate on why the PLS subfamily was selected by the RNA editing machinery. Second, we discuss how the regulation of plastid gene expression contributes to efficient photosynthesis. Although the molecular functions of PPR proteins have been studied extensively, information on the physiological significance of regulation by these proteins remains very limited.

  3. GenePainter: a fast tool for aligning gene structures of eukaryotic protein families, visualizing the alignments and mapping gene structures onto protein structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background All sequenced eukaryotic genomes have been shown to possess at least a few introns. This includes those unicellular organisms, which were previously suspected to be intron-less. Therefore, gene splicing must have been present at least in the last common ancestor of the eukaryotes. To explain the evolution of introns, basically two mutually exclusive concepts have been developed. The introns-early hypothesis says that already the very first protein-coding genes contained introns while the introns-late concept asserts that eukaryotic genes gained introns only after the emergence of the eukaryotic lineage. A very important aspect in this respect is the conservation of intron positions within homologous genes of different taxa. Results GenePainter is a standalone application for mapping gene structure information onto protein multiple sequence alignments. Based on the multiple sequence alignments the gene structures are aligned down to single nucleotides. GenePainter accounts for variable lengths in exons and introns, respects split codons at intron junctions and is able to handle sequencing and assembly errors, which are possible reasons for frame-shifts in exons and gaps in genome assemblies. Thus, even gene structures of considerably divergent proteins can properly be compared, as it is needed in phylogenetic analyses. Conserved intron positions can also be mapped to user-provided protein structures. For their visualization GenePainter provides scripts for the molecular graphics system PyMol. Conclusions GenePainter is a tool to analyse gene structure conservation providing various visualization options. A stable version of GenePainter for all operating systems as well as documentation and example data are available at http://www.motorprotein.de/genepainter.html. PMID:23496949

  4. Gene, protein, and network of male sterility in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Peng, Xiaojue; Ji, Yanxiao; Yang, Pingfang; Zhu, Yingguo; Li, Shaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important model crop plants whose heterosis has been well-exploited in commercial hybrid seed production via a variety of types of male-sterile lines. Hybrid rice cultivation area is steadily expanding around the world, especially in Southern Asia. Characterization of genes and proteins related to male sterility aims to understand how and why the male sterility occurs, and which proteins are the key players for microspores abortion. Recently, a series of genes and proteins related to cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), photoperiod-sensitive male sterility, self-incompatibility, and other types of microspores deterioration have been characterized through genetics or proteomics. Especially the latter, offers us a powerful and high throughput approach to discern the novel proteins involving in male-sterile pathways which may help us to breed artificial male-sterile system. This represents an alternative tool to meet the critical challenge of further development of hybrid rice. In this paper, we reviewed the recent developments in our understanding of male sterility in rice hybrid production across gene, protein, and integrated network levels, and also, present a perspective on the engineering of male-sterile lines for hybrid rice production.

  5. Abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of Arabidopsis SR protein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Tiago M D; Carvalho, Raquel F; Richardson, Dale N; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  6. Abscisic Acid (ABA) Regulation of Arabidopsis SR Protein Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Tiago M. D.; Carvalho, Raquel F.; Richardson, Dale N.; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  7. Intron retention in the Drosophila melanogaster Rieske iron sulphur protein gene generated a new protein

    PubMed Central

    Gontijo, Alisson M.; Miguela, Veronica; Whiting, Michael F.; Woodruff, R.C.; Dominguez, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Genomes can encode a variety of proteins with unrelated architectures and activities. It is known that protein-coding genes of de novo origin have significantly contributed to this diversity. However, the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary processes behind these originations are still poorly understood. Here we show that the last 102 codons of a novel gene, Noble, assembled directly from non-coding DNA following an intronic deletion that induced alternative intron retention at the Drosophila melanogaster Rieske Iron Sulphur Protein (RFeSP) locus. A systematic analysis of the evolutionary processes behind the origin of Noble showed that its emergence was strongly biased by natural selection on and around the RFeSP locus. Noble mRNA is shown to encode a bona fide protein that lacks an iron sulphur domain and localizes to mitochondria. Together, these results demonstrate the generation of a novel protein at a naturally selected site. PMID:21610726

  8. Specific protein-DNA and protein-protein interaction in the hig gene system, a plasmid-borne proteic killer gene system of plasmid Rts1.

    PubMed

    Tian, Q B; Ohnishi, M; Murata, T; Nakayama, K; Terawaki, Y; Hayashi, T

    2001-03-01

    The hig (host inhibition of growth) gene system of plasmid Rts1 belongs to the plasmid-encoded proteic killer gene family. Among the proteic killer genes described so far, hig is unique in that the toxin gene (higB) exists upstream of the antidote gene (higA). There are two promoters in the hig locus, Phig and PhigA, and only the former, which expresses both higB and higA genes, is negatively controlled by HigA and HigB proteins. In this study, we purified HigA protein by means of GST fusion. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay using the purified protein revealed that HigA specifically bound to the Phig region, but not to PhigA. The HigA-binding sequence was determined by DNase I footprinting assay to be a 56-bp sequence that completely covered the -35 and -10 boxes of Phig. The presence of two inverted repeats in the binding sequence and the identification of a dimer form of HigA by cross-linking experiment suggested that the protein bound to the Phig region as a dimer. HigB was purified as a GST fusion protein as well, though it was achieved only in the presence of HigA. HigA and GST-HigB formed a highly stable complex where the two proteins were present in an equimolar ratio.

  9. The ubiquitous octamer-binding protein(s) is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D G; Carayannopoulos, L; Capra, J D; Tucker, P W; Hanke, J H

    1990-03-01

    All immunoglobulin genes contain a conserved octanucleotide promoter element, ATGCAAAT, which has been shown to be required for their normal B-cell-specific transcription. Proteins that bind this octamer have been purified, and cDNAs encoding octamer-binding proteins have been cloned. Some of these proteins (referred to as OTF-2) are lymphoid specific, whereas at least one other, and possibly more (referred to as OTF-1), is found ubiquitously in all cell types. The exact role of these different proteins in directing the tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes is unclear. We have identified two human pre-B-cell lines that contain extremely low levels of OTF-2 yet still express high levels of steady-state immunoglobulin heavy-chain mRNA in vivo and efficiently transcribe an immunoglobulin gene in vitro. Addition of a highly enriched preparation of OTF-1 made from one of these pre-B cells or from HeLa cells specifically stimulated in vitro transcription of an immunoglobulin gene. Furthermore, OFT-1 appeared to have approximately the same transactivation ability as OTF-2 when normalized for binding activity. These results suggest that OTF-1, without OTF-2, is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes and that OTF-2 alone is not responsible for the B-cell-specific regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression.

  10. Gene3D: modelling protein structure, function and evolution.

    PubMed

    Yeats, Corin; Maibaum, Michael; Marsden, Russell; Dibley, Mark; Lee, David; Addou, Sarah; Orengo, Christine A

    2006-01-01

    The Gene3D release 4 database and web portal (http://cathwww.biochem.ucl.ac.uk:8080/Gene3D) provide a combined structural, functional and evolutionary view of the protein world. It is focussed on providing structural annotation for protein sequences without structural representatives--including the complete proteome sets of over 240 different species. The protein sequences have also been clustered into whole-chain families so as to aid functional prediction. The structural annotation is generated using HMM models based on the CATH domain families; CATH is a repository for manually deduced protein domains. Amongst the changes from the last publication are: the addition of over 100 genomes and the UniProt sequence database, domain data from Pfam, metabolic pathway and functional data from COGs, KEGG and GO, and protein-protein interaction data from MINT and BIND. The website has been rebuilt to allow more sophisticated querying and the data returned is presented in a clearer format with greater functionality. Furthermore, all data can be downloaded in a simple XML format, allowing users to carry out complex investigations at their own computers.

  11. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and their Function in Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Roland FR; Scotton, Chiara; French, Vanessa; Ferlini, Alessandra; Brand, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Popeye domain containing (POPDC) genes encode a novel class of cAMP effector proteins, which are abundantly expressed in heart and skeletal muscle. Here we will review their role in striated muscle as deduced from work in cell and animal models and the recent analysis of patients carrying a missense mutation in POPDC1. Evidence suggests that POPDC proteins control membrane trafficking of interacting proteins. Furthermore, we will discuss the current catalogue of established protein-protein interactions. In recent years, the number of POPDC-interacting proteins is rising and currently includes ion channels (TREK-1), sarcolemma-associated proteins serving functions in mechanical stability (Dystrophin), compartmentalization (Caveolin 3), scaffolding (ZO-1), trafficking (NDRG4, VAMP2/3) and repair (Dysferlin), or acting as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho-family GTPases (GEFT). Recent evidence suggests that POPDC proteins might also control the cellular level of the nuclear proto-oncoprotein c-Myc. These data suggests that this family of cAMP-binding proteins probably serves multiple roles in striated muscle. PMID:27347491

  12. Soybean seed lectin gene and flanking nonseed protein genes are developmentally regulated in transformed tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Okamuro, J K; Jofuku, K D; Goldberg, R B

    1986-01-01

    We introduced a 17.1-kilobase soybean DNA fragment containing the lectin gene and at least four nonseed protein genes into the tobacco genome. As in soybean plants, lectin mRNA is present in tobacco seeds, accumulates and decays during tobacco seed development, and is translated into a protein that accumulates prior to dormancy. Each soybean nonseed protein mRNA is present in tobacco leaves, roots, stems, and seeds at levels similar to that found in soybean plants. We conclude that a differentially expressed soybean gene cluster is correctly regulated in transformed tobacco plants and that sequences controlling their expression are recognized by regulatory factors present in tobacco cells. Images PMID:3464951

  13. Retroviral display in gene therapy, protein engineering, and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Urban, Johannes H; Merten, Christoph A

    2011-01-21

    The display and analysis of proteins expressed on biological surfaces has become an attractive tool for the study of molecular interactions in enzymology, protein engineering, and high-throughput screening. Among the growing number of established display systems, retroviruses offer a unique and fully mammalian platform for the expression of correctly folded and post-translationally modified proteins in the context of cell plasma membrane-derived particles. This is of special interest for therapeutic applications such as gene therapy and vaccine development and also offers advantages for the engineering of mammalian proteins toward customized binding affinities and catalytic activities. This review critically summarizes the basic concepts and applications of retroviral display and analyses its benefits in comparison to other display techniques.

  14. Correlation of gene and protein structures in the FXYD family proteins.

    PubMed

    Franzin, Carla M; Yu, Jinghua; Thai, Khang; Choi, Jungyuen; Marassi, Francesca M

    2005-12-01

    The FXYD family proteins are auxiliary subunits of the Na,K-ATPase, expressed primarily in tissues that specialize in fluid or solute transport, or that are electrically excitable. These proteins range in size from about 60 to 160 amino acid residues, and share a core homology of 35 amino acid residues in and around a single transmembrane segment. Despite their relatively small sizes, they are all encoded by genes with six to nine small exons. We show that the helical secondary structures of three FXYD family members, FXYD1, FXYD3, and FXYD4, determined in micelles by NMR spectroscopy, reflect the structures of their corresponding genes. The coincidence of helical regions, and connecting segments, with the positions of intron-exon junctions in the genes, support the hypothesis that the FXYD proteins may have been assembled from discrete structural modules through exon shuffling. PMID:16288923

  15. Controlling for gene expression changes in transcription factor protein networks.

    PubMed

    Banks, Charles A S; Lee, Zachary T; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L; Seidel, Chris W; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein-protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions.

  16. Identifying Gastric Cancer Related Genes Using the Shortest Path Algorithm and Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ying; Li, Li-Peng; Ren, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer, as one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide, causes about 800,000 deaths per year. Up to now, the mechanism underlying this disease is still not totally uncovered. Identification of related genes of this disease is an important step which can help to understand the mechanism underlying this disease, thereby designing effective treatments. In this study, some novel gastric cancer related genes were discovered based on the knowledge of known gastric cancer related ones. These genes were searched by applying the shortest path algorithm in protein-protein interaction network. The analysis results suggest that some of them are indeed involved in the biological process of gastric cancer, which indicates that they are the actual gastric cancer related genes with high probability. It is hopeful that the findings in this study may help promote the study of this disease and the methods can provide new insights to study various diseases. PMID:24729971

  17. The spc ribosomal protein operon of Escherichia coli: sequence and cotranscription of the ribosomal protein genes and a protein export gene.

    PubMed

    Cerretti, D P; Dean, D; Davis, G R; Bedwell, D M; Nomura, M

    1983-05-11

    The genes encoding the 52 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of Escherichia coli are organized into approximately 19 operons scattered throughout the chromosome. One of these, the spc operon, contains the genes for ten ribosomal proteins: L14, L24, L5, S14, S8, L6, L18, S5, L30 and L15 (rp1N, rp1X, rp1E, rpsN, rpsH, rp1F, rp1R, rpsE, rpmD, and rp1O). We now report the entire 5.9 kb nucleotide sequence of the spc operon. DNA sequence analysis has confirmed the genetic organization and refined the amino acid sequence of the ten r-proteins in this operon. It has also revealed the presence of two open reading frames past the last known gene (L15) of the spc operon. One of these corresponds to a gene (pr1A or secY) which recently has been shown by others to be involved in protein export. In addition, S1 mapping experiments indicate that a significant proportion of transcription initiated from the spc operon continues not only into the two putative genes, but also without termination into the downstream alpha r-protein operon.

  18. Evolution of seed storage protein genes: legumin genes of Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Häger, K P; Braun, H; Czihal, A; Müller, B; Bäumlein, H

    1995-10-01

    Legumin-like seed storage proteins have been intensively studied in crop plants. However, little is known about the molecular evolution of these proteins and their genes and it was assumed that they originated from an ancestral gene that already existed at the beginning of angiosperm evolution. We have evidence for the ubiquitous occurrence of homologous proteins in gymnosperms as well. We have characterized the major seed storage globulin from Ginkgo biloba by amino acid sequencing, which reveals clear homology to legumin-like proteins from angiosperms. The Ginkgo legumin is encoded by a gene family; we describe two of its members. The promoter regions contain sequence motifs which are known to function as regulatory elements involved in seed-specific expression of angiosperm legumins, although the tissues concerned are different in gymnosperms and angiosperms. The Ginkgo legumin gene structure is divergent from that of angiosperms and suggests that the evolution of legumin genes implicated loss of introns. From our data and from functional approaches recently described it becomes obvious that the posttranslational processing site of legumin precursors is less conserved than hitherto assumed. Finally, we present a phylogenetic analysis of legumin encoding sequences and discuss their utility as molecular markers for the reconstruction of seed plant evolution.

  19. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli (GenProtEc).

    PubMed

    Riley, M; Space, D B

    1996-01-01

    GenProtEc is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. The database is available as a PKZip file by ftp from mbl.edu/pub/ecoli.exe. The program runs under MS-DOS on IMB-compatible machines. GenProtEc can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html. PMID:8594596

  20. DING proteins: numerous functions, elusive genes, a potential for health.

    PubMed

    Bernier, François

    2013-09-01

    DING proteins, named after their conserved N-terminus, form an overlooked protein family whose members were generally discovered through serendipity. It is characterized by an unusually high sequence conservation, even between distantly related species, and by an outstanding diversity of activities and ligands. They all share a demonstrated capacity to bind phosphate with high affinity or at least a predicted phosphate-binding site. However, DING protein genes are conspicuously absent from databases. The many novel family members identified in recent years have confirmed that DING proteins are ubiquitous not only in animals and plants but probably also in prokaryotes. At the functional level, there is increasing evidence that they participate in many health-related processes such as cancers as well as bacterial (Pseudomonas) and viral (HIV) infections, by mechanisms that are now beginning to be understood. They thus represent potent targets for the development of novel therapeutic approaches, especially against HIV. The few genomic sequences that are now available are starting to give some clues on why DING protein genes and mRNAs are well conserved and difficult to clone. This could open a new era of research, of both fundamental and applied importance. PMID:23743708

  1. PPISEARCHENGINE: gene ontology-based search for protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Park, Byungkyu; Cui, Guangyu; Lee, Hyunjin; Huang, De-Shuang; Han, Kyungsook

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new search engine called PPISearchEngine which finds protein-protein interactions (PPIs) using the gene ontology (GO) and the biological relations of proteins. For efficient retrieval of PPIs, each GO term is assigned a prime number and the relation between the terms is represented by the product of prime numbers. This representation is hidden from users but facilitates the search for the interactions of a query protein by unique prime factorisation of the number that represents the query protein. For a query protein, PPISearchEngine considers not only the GO term associated with the query protein but also the GO terms at the lower level than the GO term in the GO hierarchy, and finds all the interactions of the query protein which satisfy the search condition. In contrast, the standard keyword-matching or ID-matching search method cannot find the interactions of a protein unless the interactions involve a protein with explicit annotations. To the best of our knowledge, this search engine is the first method that can process queries like 'for protein p with GO [Formula: see text], find p's interaction partners with GO [Formula: see text]'. PPISearchEngine is freely available to academics at http://search.hpid.org/.

  2. Expression data on liver metabolic pathway genes and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Raja Gopal Reddy, Mooli; Pavan Kumar, Chodisetti; Mahesh, Malleswarapu; Sravan Kumar, Manchiryala; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the expression data on various metabolic pathways of liver with special emphasize on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, both at gene and protein levels. The data were obtained to understand the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the expression status (both gene and protein levels) of some of the key factors involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride secretion, long chain PUFA, resolvin D1 synthesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis of liver, using modern biology tools, such as quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting techniques. This data article provides the supporting evidence to the article “Vitamin A deficiency suppresses high fructose-induced triglyceride synthesis and elevates resolvin D1 levels” [1] and therefore, these data may be referred back, for comprehensive understanding and interpretations and for future studies. PMID:26909377

  3. Ribozymes, riboswitches and beyond: regulation of gene expression without proteins

    PubMed Central

    Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Although various functions of RNA are carried out in conjunction with proteins, some catalytic RNAs, or ribozymes, which contribute to a range of cellular processes, require little or no assistance from proteins. Furthermore, the discovery of metabolite-sensing riboswitches and other types of RNA sensors has revealed RNA-based mechanisms that cells use to regulate gene expression in response to internal and external changes. Structural studies have shown how these RNAs can carry out a range of functions. In addition, the contribution of ribozymes and riboswitches to gene expression is being revealed as far more widespread than was previously appreciated. These findings have implications for understanding how cellular functions might have evolved from RNA-based origins. PMID:17846637

  4. Reactive oxygen species decrease cAMP response element binding protein expression in cardiomyocytes via a protein kinase D1-dependent mechanism that does not require Ser133 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ozgen, Nazira; Guo, Jianfen; Gertsberg, Zoya; Danilo, Peter; Rosen, Michael R; Steinberg, Susan F

    2009-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) exert pleiotropic effects on a wide array of signaling proteins that regulate cellular growth and apoptosis. This study shows that long-term treatment with a low concentration of H2O2 leads to the activation of signaling pathways involving extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ribosomal protein S6 kinase, and protein kinase D (PKD) that increase cAMP binding response element protein (CREB) phosphorylation at Ser(133) in cardiomyocytes. Although CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation typically mediates cAMP-dependent increases in CREB target gene expression, the H2O2-dependent increase in CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation is accompanied by a decrease in CREB protein abundance and no change in Cre-luciferase reporter activity. Mutagenesis studies indicate that H2O2 decreases CREB protein abundance via a mechanism that does not require CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation. Rather, the H2O2-dependent decrease in CREB protein is prevented by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin, by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase or protein kinase C activity, or by adenoviral-mediated delivery of a small interfering RNA that decreases PKD1 expression. A PKD1-dependent mechanism that links oxidative stress to decreased CREB protein abundance is predicted to contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure by influencing cardiac growth and apoptosis responses.

  5. Multidrug resistance protein gene expression in Trichoplusia ni caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jason; D'Souza, Olivia; Rheault, Mark; Donly, Cam

    2013-02-01

    Many insect species exhibit pesticide-resistant phenotypes. One of the mechanisms capable of contributing to resistance is the overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter proteins. Here we describe the cloning of three genes encoding MDR proteins from Trichoplusia ni: trnMDR1, trnMDR2 and trnMDR3. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) detected trnMDR mRNA in the whole nervous system, midgut and Malpighian tubules of final instar T. ni caterpillars. To test whether these genes are upregulated in response to chemical challenge in this insect, qPCR was used to compare trnMDR mRNA levels in unchallenged insects with those of insects fed the synthetic pyrethroid, deltamethrin. Only limited increases were detected in a single gene, trnMDR2, which is the most weakly expressed of the three MDR genes, suggesting that increased multidrug resistance of this type is not a significant part of the response to deltamethrin exposure.

  6. Protein-protein interaction inference based on semantic similarity of Gene Ontology terms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Bo; Tang, Qiang-Rong

    2016-07-21

    Identifying protein-protein interactions is important in molecular biology. Experimental methods to this issue have their limitations, and computational approaches have attracted more and more attentions from the biological community. The semantic similarity derived from the Gene Ontology (GO) annotation has been regarded as one of the most powerful indicators for protein interaction. However, conventional methods based on GO similarity fail to take advantage of the specificity of GO terms in the ontology graph. We proposed a GO-based method to predict protein-protein interaction by integrating different kinds of similarity measures derived from the intrinsic structure of GO graph. We extended five existing methods to derive the semantic similarity measures from the descending part of two GO terms in the GO graph, then adopted a feature integration strategy to combines both the ascending and the descending similarity scores derived from the three sub-ontologies to construct various kinds of features to characterize each protein pair. Support vector machines (SVM) were employed as discriminate classifiers, and five-fold cross validation experiments were conducted on both human and yeast protein-protein interaction datasets to evaluate the performance of different kinds of integrated features, the experimental results suggest the best performance of the feature that combines information from both the ascending and the descending parts of the three ontologies. Our method is appealing for effective prediction of protein-protein interaction.

  7. Protein-protein interaction inference based on semantic similarity of Gene Ontology terms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Bo; Tang, Qiang-Rong

    2016-07-21

    Identifying protein-protein interactions is important in molecular biology. Experimental methods to this issue have their limitations, and computational approaches have attracted more and more attentions from the biological community. The semantic similarity derived from the Gene Ontology (GO) annotation has been regarded as one of the most powerful indicators for protein interaction. However, conventional methods based on GO similarity fail to take advantage of the specificity of GO terms in the ontology graph. We proposed a GO-based method to predict protein-protein interaction by integrating different kinds of similarity measures derived from the intrinsic structure of GO graph. We extended five existing methods to derive the semantic similarity measures from the descending part of two GO terms in the GO graph, then adopted a feature integration strategy to combines both the ascending and the descending similarity scores derived from the three sub-ontologies to construct various kinds of features to characterize each protein pair. Support vector machines (SVM) were employed as discriminate classifiers, and five-fold cross validation experiments were conducted on both human and yeast protein-protein interaction datasets to evaluate the performance of different kinds of integrated features, the experimental results suggest the best performance of the feature that combines information from both the ascending and the descending parts of the three ontologies. Our method is appealing for effective prediction of protein-protein interaction. PMID:27117309

  8. Cloning, sequencing, gene organization, and localization of the human ribosomal protein RPL23A gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wufang; Christensen, M.; Eichler, E.

    1997-12-01

    The intron-containing gene for human ribosomal protein RPL23A has been cloned, sequenced, and localized. The gene is approximately 4.0 kb in length and contains five exons and four introns. All splice sites exactly match the AG/GT consensus rule. The transcript is about 0.6 kb and is detected in all tissues examined. In adult tissues, the RPL23A transcript is dramatically more abundant in pancreas, skeletal muscle, and heart, while much less abundant in kidney, brain, placenta, lung, and liver. A full-length cDNA clone of 576 nt was identified, and the nucleotide sequence was found to match the exon sequence precisely. The open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 156 amino acids, which is absolutely conserved with the rat RPL23A protein. In the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene, a canonical TATA sequence and a defined CAAT box were found for the first time in a mammalian ribosomal protein gene. The intron-containing RPL23A gene was mapped to cytogenetic band 17q11 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Photoregulated gene expression may involve ubiquitous DNA binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, U; Cashmore, A R

    1990-01-01

    Several promoter elements have previously been shown to influence the expression of the cab-E gene in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Here we demonstrate, by electrophoretic mobility shift and methylation interference assays, that a complex pattern of protein-DNA interactions characterizes this promoter. Among the multiple proteins identified, we focused on five different factors which either occupied important regulatory elements and/or were present in relatively large amounts in nuclear extracts. All of these proteins were distinguished on the basis of their recognition sequence and other biochemical parameters. One, GBF, interacted with a single sequence within the cab-E promoter homologous to the G-box found in many photoregulated and other plant promoters. A second factor, GA-1, bound to the GATA element which is located between the CAAT and TATA boxes of the cab-E and all other LHCII Type I CAB promoters. GA-1 also interacted in vitro with the I-boxes of the Arabidopsis rbcS-1A promoter and the as-2 site of the CaMV 35S promoter. Two other factors, GC-1 and AT-1, bound to multiple recognition sites localized within the GC-rich and AT-rich elements, respectively. GT-1, a protein which interacts with promoters of other light-regulated genes, bound to seven distinct sites distributed throughout the cab-E promoter. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig.5 Fig.6 Fig.7 PMID:2209551

  10. Molecular evolution of monotreme and marsupial whey acidic protein genes.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julie A; Lefèvre, Christophe; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP), a major whey protein present in milk of a number of mammalian species has characteristic cysteine-rich domains known as four-disulfide cores (4-DSC). Eutherian WAP, expressed in the mammary gland throughout lactation, has two 4-DSC domains, (DI-DII) whereas marsupial WAP, expressed only during mid-late lactation, contains an additional 4-DSC (DIII), and has a DIII-D1-DII configuration. We report the expression and evolution of echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and platypus (Onithorhynchus anatinus) WAP cDNAs. Predicted translation of monotreme cDNAs showed echidna WAP contains two 4-DSC domains corresponding to DIII-DII, whereas platypus WAP contains an additional domain at the C-terminus with homology to DII and has the configuration DIII-DII-DII. Both monotreme WAPs represent new WAP protein configurations. We propose models for evolution of the WAP gene in the mammalian lineage either through exon loss from an ancient ancestor or by rapid evolution via the process of exon shuffling. This evolutionary outcome may reflect differences in lactation strategy between marsupials, monotremes, and eutherians, and give insight to biological function of the gene products. WAP four-disulfide core domain 2 (WFDC2) proteins were also identified in echidna, platypus and tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) lactating mammary cells. WFDC2 proteins are secreted proteins not previously associated with lactation. Mammary gland expression of tammar WFDC2 during the course of lactation showed WFDC2 was elevated during pregnancy, reduced in early lactation and absent in mid-late lactation.

  11. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  12. Direct protein interaction underlies gene-for-gene specificity and coevolution of the flax resistance genes and flax rust avirulence genes.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Peter N; Lawrence, Gregory J; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Teh, Trazel; Wang, Ching-I A; Ayliffe, Michael A; Kobe, Bostjan; Ellis, Jeffrey G

    2006-06-01

    Plant resistance proteins (R proteins) recognize corresponding pathogen avirulence (Avr) proteins either indirectly through detection of changes in their host protein targets or through direct R-Avr protein interaction. Although indirect recognition imposes selection against Avr effector function, pathogen effector molecules recognized through direct interaction may overcome resistance through sequence diversification rather than loss of function. Here we show that the flax rust fungus AvrL567 genes, whose products are recognized by the L5, L6, and L7 R proteins of flax, are highly diverse, with 12 sequence variants identified from six rust strains. Seven AvrL567 variants derived from Avr alleles induce necrotic responses when expressed in flax plants containing corresponding resistance genes (R genes), whereas five variants from avr alleles do not. Differences in recognition specificity between AvrL567 variants and evidence for diversifying selection acting on these genes suggest they have been involved in a gene-specific arms race with the corresponding flax R genes. Yeast two-hybrid assays indicate that recognition is based on direct R-Avr protein interaction and recapitulate the interaction specificity observed in planta. Biochemical analysis of Escherichia coli-produced AvrL567 proteins shows that variants that escape recognition nevertheless maintain a conserved structure and stability, suggesting that the amino acid sequence differences directly affect the R-Avr protein interaction. We suggest that direct recognition associated with high genetic diversity at corresponding R and Avr gene loci represents an alternative outcome of plant-pathogen coevolution to indirect recognition associated with simple balanced polymorphisms for functional and nonfunctional R and Avr genes.

  13. Integrating gene synthesis and microfluidic protein analysis for rapid protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Matthew C.; Petrova, Ekaterina; Correia, Bruno E.; Maerkl, Sebastian J.

    2016-01-01

    The capability to rapidly design proteins with novel functions will have a significant impact on medicine, biotechnology and synthetic biology. Synthetic genes are becoming a commodity, but integrated approaches have yet to be developed that take full advantage of gene synthesis. We developed a solid-phase gene synthesis method based on asymmetric primer extension (APE) and coupled this process directly to high-throughput, on-chip protein expression, purification and characterization (via mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions, MITOMI). By completely circumventing molecular cloning and cell-based steps, APE-MITOMI reduces the time between protein design and quantitative characterization to 3–4 days. With APE-MITOMI we synthesized and characterized over 400 zinc-finger (ZF) transcription factors (TF), showing that although ZF TFs can be readily engineered to recognize a particular DNA sequence, engineering the precise binding energy landscape remains challenging. We also found that it is possible to engineer ZF–DNA affinity precisely and independently of sequence specificity and that in silico modeling can explain some of the observed affinity differences. APE-MITOMI is a generic approach that should facilitate fundamental studies in protein biophysics, and protein design/engineering. PMID:26704969

  14. Heat shock protein 70-hom gene polymorphism and protein expression in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Boiocchi, C; Monti, M C; Osera, C; Mallucci, G; Pistono, C; Ferraro, O E; Nosari, G; Romani, A; Cuccia, M; Govoni, S; Pascale, A; Montomoli, C; Bergamaschi, R

    2016-09-15

    Immune-mediated and neurodegenerative mechanisms are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS). Growing evidences highlight the role of HSP70 genes in the susceptibility of some neurological diseases. In this explorative study we analyzed a polymorphism (i.e. HSP70-hom rs2227956) of the gene HSPA1L, which encodes for the protein hsp70-hom. We sequenced the polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in 191 MS patients and 365 healthy controls. The hsp70-hom protein expression was quantified by western blotting. We reported a strong association between rs2227956 polymorphism and MS risk, which is independent from the association with HSP70-2 rs1061581, and a significant link between hsp70-hom protein expression and MS severity. PMID:27609295

  15. Prioritization of candidate genes for cattle reproductive traits, based on protein-protein interactions, gene expression, and text-mining.

    PubMed

    Hulsegge, Ina; Woelders, Henri; Smits, Mari; Schokker, Dirkjan; Jiang, Li; Sørensen, Peter

    2013-05-15

    Reproduction is of significant economic importance in dairy cattle. Improved understanding of mechanisms that control estrous behavior and other reproduction traits could help in developing strategies to improve and/or monitor these traits. The objective of this study was to predict and rank genes and processes in brain areas and pituitary involved in reproductive traits in cattle using information derived from three different data sources: gene expression, protein-protein interactions, and literature. We identified 59, 89, 53, 23, and 71 genes in bovine amygdala, dorsal hypothalamus, hippocampus, pituitary, and ventral hypothalamus, respectively, potentially involved in processes underlying estrus and estrous behavior. Functional annotation of the candidate genes points to a number of tissue-specific processes of which the "neurotransmitter/ion channel/synapse" process in the amygdala, "steroid hormone receptor activity/ion binding" in the pituitary, "extracellular region" in the ventral hypothalamus, and "positive regulation of transcription/metabolic process" in the dorsal hypothalamus are most prominent. The regulation of the functional processes in the various tissues operate at different biological levels, including transcriptional, posttranscriptional, extracellular, and intercellular signaling levels.

  16. Diverse nucleotide compositions and sequence fluctuation in Rubisco protein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Bienaime, R.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2011-10-01

    The Rubisco protein-enzyme is arguably the most abundance protein on Earth. The biology dogma of transcription and translation necessitates the study of the Rubisco genes and Rubisco-like genes in various species. Stronger correlation of fractal dimension of the atomic number fluctuation along a DNA sequence with Shannon entropy has been observed in the studied Rubisco-like gene sequences, suggesting a more diverse evolutionary pressure and constraints in the Rubisco sequences. The strategy of using metal for structural stabilization appears to be an ancient mechanism, with data from the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in Capsaspora owczarzaki and Monosiga brevicollis. Using the chi-square distance probability, our analysis supports the conjecture that the more ancient Rubisco-like sequence in Microcystis aeruginosa would have experienced very different evolutionary pressure and bio-chemical constraint as compared to Bordetella bronchiseptica, the two microbes occupying either end of the correlation graph. Our exploratory study would indicate that high fractal dimension Rubisco sequence would support high carbon dioxide rate via the Michaelis- Menten coefficient; with implication for the control of the whooping cough pathogen Bordetella bronchiseptica, a microbe containing a high fractal dimension Rubisco-like sequence (2.07). Using the internal comparison of chi-square distance probability for 16S rRNA (~ E-22) versus radiation repair Rec-A gene (~ E-05) in high GC content Deinococcus radiodurans, our analysis supports the conjecture that high GC content microbes containing Rubisco-like sequence are likely to include an extra-terrestrial origin, relative to Deinococcus radiodurans. Similar photosynthesis process that could utilize host star radiation would not compete with radiation resistant process from the biology dogma perspective in environments such as Mars and exoplanets.

  17. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  18. Gene delivery into plant cells for recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  19. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas.

  20. Evolutionary Characteristics of Missing Proteins: Insights into the Evolution of Human Chromosomes Related to Missing-Protein-Encoding Genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aishi; Li, Guang; Yang, Dong; Wu, Songfeng; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Xu, Ping; He, Fuchu

    2015-12-01

    Although the "missing protein" is a temporary concept in C-HPP, the biological information for their "missing" could be an important clue in evolutionary studies. Here we classified missing-protein-encoding genes into two groups, the genes encoding PE2 proteins (with transcript evidence) and the genes encoding PE3/4 proteins (with no transcript evidence). These missing-protein-encoding genes distribute unevenly among different chromosomes, chromosomal regions, or gene clusters. In the view of evolutionary features, PE3/4 genes tend to be young, spreading at the nonhomology chromosomal regions and evolving at higher rates. Interestingly, there is a higher proportion of singletons in PE3/4 genes than the proportion of singletons in all genes (background) and OTCSGs (organ, tissue, cell type-specific genes). More importantly, most of the paralogous PE3/4 genes belong to the newly duplicated members of the paralogous gene groups, which mainly contribute to special biological functions, such as "smell perception". These functions are heavily restricted into specific type of cells, tissues, or specific developmental stages, acting as the new functional requirements that facilitated the emergence of the missing-protein-encoding genes during evolution. In addition, the criteria for the extremely special physical-chemical proteins were first set up based on the properties of PE2 proteins, and the evolutionary characteristics of those proteins were explored. Overall, the evolutionary analyses of missing-protein-encoding genes are expected to be highly instructive for proteomics and functional studies in the future.

  1. Analysis of the protein-protein interaction networks of differentially expressed genes in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Yinghua; Duan, Qianglin; Gong, Zhu; Liang, Aibin; Song, Haoming; Wang, Lemin

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the function and interaction of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in pulmonary embolism (PE). The gene expression profile GSE13535, was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The DEGs 2 and 18 h post‑PE initiation were identified using the affy package in R software. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of the DEGs were analyzed using Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) online analytical tools. In addition, protein‑protein interaction (PPI) networks of the DEGs were constructed using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins. The PPI network at 18 h was modularized using Clusterone, and a functional enrichment analysis of the DEGs in the top three modules was performed with DAVID. Overall, 80 and 346 DEGs were identified 2 and 18 h after PE initiation, respectively. The KEGG pathways, including chemokine signaling and toll‑like receptor signaling, were shown to be significantly enriched. The five highest degree nodes in the PPI networks at 2 or 18 h were screened. The module analysis of the PPI network at 18 h revealed 11 hub nodes. A Gene Ontology terms analysis demonstrated that the DEGs in the top three modules were associated with the inflammatory, defense and immune responses. The results of the present study suggest that the DEGs identified, including chemokine‑related genes TFPI2 and TNF, may be potential target genes for the treatment of PE. The chemokine signaling pathway, inflammatory response and immune response were explored, and it may be suggested that these pathways have important roles in PE.

  2. pGenN, a Gene Normalization Tool for Plant Genes and Proteins in Scientific Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ruoyao; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Lee, Jung-Youn; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Automatically detecting gene/protein names in the literature and connecting them to databases records, also known as gene normalization, provides a means to structure the information buried in free-text literature. Gene normalization is critical for improving the coverage of annotation in the databases, and is an essential component of many text mining systems and database curation pipelines. Methods In this manuscript, we describe a gene normalization system specifically tailored for plant species, called pGenN (pivot-based Gene Normalization). The system consists of three steps: dictionary-based gene mention detection, species assignment, and intra species normalization. We have developed new heuristics to improve each of these phases. Results We evaluated the performance of pGenN on an in-house expertly annotated corpus consisting of 104 plant relevant abstracts. Our system achieved an F-value of 88.9% (Precision 90.9% and Recall 87.2%) on this corpus, outperforming state-of-art systems presented in BioCreative III. We have processed over 440,000 plant-related Medline abstracts using pGenN. The gene normalization results are stored in a local database for direct query from the pGenN web interface (proteininformationresource.org/pgenn/). The annotated literature corpus is also publicly available through the PIR text mining portal (proteininformationresource.org/iprolink/). PMID:26258475

  3. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Eileen Marie; Zaki, Nazar; Amin, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, questions arise regarding potential ways to improve them, in addition to ameliorative guidelines to introduce novel approaches. A close interpretation leads to the assent that the way in which protein interaction networks are initially viewed should be adjusted. These networks are dynamic in reality and it is necessary to consider this fact to enhance the detection of protein complexes. In this paper, we present “DyCluster”, a framework to model the dynamic aspect of protein interaction networks by incorporating gene expression data, through biclustering techniques, prior to applying complex-detection algorithms. The experimental results show that DyCluster leads to higher numbers of correctly-detected complexes with better evaluation scores. The high accuracy achieved by DyCluster in detecting protein complexes is a valid argument in favor of the proposed method. DyCluster is also able to detect biologically meaningful protein groups. The code and datasets used in the study are downloadable from https://github.com/emhanna/DyCluster. PMID:26641660

  4. Zinc-finger protein-targeted gene regulation: Genomewide single-gene specificity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siyuan; Guschin, Dmitry; Davalos, Albert; Lee, Ya-Li; Snowden, Andrew W.; Jouvenot, Yann; Zhang, H. Steven; Howes, Katherine; McNamara, Andrew R.; Lai, Albert; Ullman, Chris; Reynolds, Lindsey; Moore, Michael; Isalan, Mark; Berg, Lutz-Peter; Campos, Bradley; Qi, Hong; Spratt, S. Kaye; Case, Casey C.; Pabo, Carl O.; Campisi, Judith; Gregory, Philip D.

    2003-01-01

    Zinc-finger protein transcription factors (ZFP TFs) can be designed to control the expression of any desired target gene, and thus provide potential therapeutic tools for the study and treatment of disease. Here we report that a ZFP TF can repress target gene expression with single-gene specificity within the human genome. A ZFP TF repressor that binds an 18-bp recognition sequence within the promoter of the endogenous CHK2 gene gives a >10-fold reduction in CHK2 mRNA and protein. This level of repression was sufficient to generate a functional phenotype, as demonstrated by the loss of DNA damage-induced CHK2-dependent p53 phosphorylation. We determined the specificity of repression by using DNA microarrays and found that the ZFP TF repressed a single gene (CHK2) within the monitored genome in two different cell types. These data demonstrate the utility of ZFP TFs as precise tools for target validation, and highlight their potential as clinical therapeutics. PMID:14514889

  5. Bioinformatic tools for DNA/protein sequence analysis, functional assignment of genes and protein classification.

    PubMed

    Rehm, B H

    2001-12-01

    The development of efficient DNA sequencing methods has led to the achievement of the DNA sequence of entire genomes from (to date) 55 prokaryotes, 5 eukaryotic organisms and 10 eukaryotic chromosomes. Thus, an enormous amount of DNA sequence data is available and even more will be forthcoming in the near future. Analysis of this overwhelming amount of data requires bioinformatic tools in order to identify genes that encode functional proteins or RNA. This is an important task, considering that even in the well-studied Escherichia coli more than 30% of the identified open reading frames are hypothetical genes. Future challenges of genome sequence analysis will include the understanding of gene regulation and metabolic pathway reconstruction including DNA chip technology, which holds tremendous potential for biomedicine and the biotechnological production of valuable compounds. The overwhelming volume of information often confuses scientists. This review intends to provide a guide to choosing the most efficient way to analyze a new sequence or to collect information on a gene or protein of interest by applying current publicly available databases and Web services. Recently developed tools that allow functional assignment of genes, mainly based on sequence similarity of the deduced amino acid sequence, using the currently available and increasing biological databases will be discussed.

  6. Structure and polymorphism of the mouse prion protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Westaway, D; Cooper, C; Turner, S; Da Costa, M; Carlson, G A; Prusiner, S B

    1994-01-01

    Missense mutations in the prion protein (PrP) gene, overexpression of the cellular isoform of PrP (PrPC), and infection with prions containing the scrapie isoform of PrP (PrPSc) all cause neurodegenerative disease. To understand better the physiology and expression of PrPC, we retrieved mouse PrP gene (Prn-p) yeast artificial chromosome (YAC), cosmid, phage, and cDNA clones. Physical mapping positions Prn-p approximately 300 kb from ecotropic virus integration site number 4 (Evi-4), compatible with failure to detect recombination between Prn-p and Evi-4 in genetic crosses. The Prn-pa allele encompasses three exons, with exons 1 and 2 encoding the mRNA 5' untranslated region. Exon 2 has no equivalent in the Syrian hamster and human PrP genes. The Prn-pb gene shares this intron/exon structure but harbors an approximately 6-kb deletion within intron 2. While the Prn-pb open reading frame encodes two amino acid substitutions linked to prolonged scrapie incubation periods, a deletion of intron 2 sequences also characterizes inbred strains such as RIII/S and MOLF/Ei with shorter incubation periods, making a relationship between intron 2 size and scrapie pathogenesis unlikely. The promoter regions of a and b Prn-p alleles include consensus Sp1 and AP-1 sites, as well as other conserved motifs which may represent binding sites for as yet unidentified transcription factors. Images PMID:7912827

  7. PREFACE: Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Panchenko, Anna R.; Przytycka, Teresa

    2011-06-01

    networks have been identified, including scale free distribution of the vertex degree, network motifs, and modularity, to name a few. These studies of network organization require the network to be as complete as possible, which given the limitations of experimental techniques is not currently the case. Therefore, experimental procedures for detecting biomolecular interactions should be complemented by computational approaches. The paper by Lees et al provides a review of computational methods, integrating multiple independent sources of data to infer physical and functional protein-protein interaction networks. One of the important aspects of protein interactions that should be accounted for in the prediction of protein interaction networks is that many proteins are composed of distinct domains. Protein domains may mediate protein interactions while proteins and their interaction networks may gain complexity through gene duplication and expansion of existing domain architectures via domain rearrangements. The latter mechanisms have been explored in detail in the paper by Cohen-Gihon et al. Protein-protein interactions are not the only component of the cell's interactome. Regulation of cell activity can be achieved at the level of transcription and involve a transcription factor—DNA binding which typically requires recognition of a specific DNA sequence motif. Chip-Chip and the more recent Chip-Seq technologies allow in vivo identification of DNA binding sites and, together with novel in vitro approaches, provide data necessary for deciphering the corresponding binding motifs. Such information, complemented by structures of protein-DNA complexes and knowledge of the differences in binding sites among homologs, opens the door to constructing predictive binding models. The paper by Persikov and Singh provides an example of such a model in the Cys2His2 zinc finger family. Recent studies have indicated that the presence of such binding motifs is, however, neither necessary

  8. Nonhistone Proteins Control Gene Expression in Reconstituted Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, T.; Maryanka, D.; Hamlyn, P. H.; Gould, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    Chromatin was reconstituted from the purified DNA and histones of chicken erythrocytes and the nonhistone proteins of either chicken reticulocytes or chicken liver. Reconstituted chromatins, native chicken reticulocyte chromatin, and free DNA were transcribed with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and the concentrations of globin-specific sequences in the RNA products were measured by hybridization with [3H]DNA complementary to chicken globin messenger RNA. Reticulocyte, but not liver, nonhistone proteins were shown to activate the globin genes in reconstituted erythrocyte chromatin. The transcripts of native and reconstituted chromatins were indistinguishable in respect of both the total yield of the RNA and the fractional yield of globin-specific sequences. Images PMID:4140516

  9. Association between milk protein gene variants and protein composition traits in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Peñagaricano, F; Ahmad, K R; Lucey, J A; Weigel, K A; Khatib, H

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify DNA markers in the 4 casein genes (CSN1S1, CSN1S2, CSN2, and CSN3) and the 2 major whey protein genes (LALBA and LGB) that show associations with milk protein profile measured by reverse-phase HPLC. Fifty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were genotyped for cows in a unique resource population consisting of purebred Holstein and (Holstein × Jersey) × Holstein crossbred animals. Seven traits were analyzed, including concentrations of α(S)-casein (CN), β-CN, κ-CN, α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and 2 additional secondary traits, the total concentration of the above 5 milk proteins and the α(S)-CN to β-CN ratio. A substantial fraction of phenotypic variation could be explained by the additive genetic component for the 7 milk protein composition traits studied. Moreover, several SNP were significantly associated with all examined traits at an experiment-wise error rate of 0.05, except for α-lactalbumin. Importantly, the significant SNP explained a large proportion of the phenotypic variation of milk protein composition. Our findings could be used for selecting animals that produce milk with desired composition or desired processing and manufacturing properties.

  10. Gene protein products of SA11 simian rotavirus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Arias, C F; López, S; Espejo, R T

    1982-01-01

    When MA104 cells were infected with SA11 rotavirus, 12 protein classes, absent in mock-infected cells, could be distinguished by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. At least two of these proteins were glycosylated, and their synthesis could be blocked with tunicamycin. The oligosaccharides of both glycoproteins were cleaved by endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H, suggesting that they were residues of the "high-mannose" type. Of the 12 viral polypeptides observed in infected cells, 1 was probably the apoprotein of one of these glycoproteins; 5, including 1 glycoprotein, were structural components of the virions, whereas the other 6, including a second and possibly third glycoprotein, were nonstructural viral proteins. When the 11 double-stranded RNA genome segments of SA11 were translated, after denaturation, in an RNA-dependent cell-free translation system, at least 11 different polypeptides were synthesized. Ten of these polypeptides had electrophoretic migration patterns equal to those of viral proteins observed in tunicamycin-treated infected cells. Nine of the 11 double-stranded RNA genome segments were resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and were translated individually. Two were not resolved from each other and therefore were translated together. Correlation of each synthesized polypeptide with an individual RNA segment allowed us to make a probable gene-coding assignment for the different SA11 genome segments. Images PMID:6283128

  11. Identification of the major capsid protein gene of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Chee, M; Rudolph, S A; Plachter, B; Barrell, B; Jahn, G

    1989-01-01

    The coding region for the major capsid protein (MCP) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) was identified by comparing the protein sequence with the respective sequences of herpes simplex virus (HSV), Epstein-Barr virus, and varicella-zoster virus. The predicted length of the HCMV MCP was 1,370 amino acids. Comparison of the MCP sequences of the different human herpesviruses showed a homology of 25% to the MCP of HSV type 1, a homology of 29% to the MCP of Epstein-Barr virus, and a homology of 23% to the MCP of varicella-zoster virus. A subfragment of the HSV type 1 KpnI i fragment encoding the MCP VP5 cross-hybridized with the HCMV HindIII U fragment containing part of the MCP gene. Northern (RNA) blot analyses with subclones out of the coding region for the HCMV MCP detected one large transcript of about 8 kilobases. A portion of the open reading frame was expressed in Escherichia coli plasmid pBD2 IC2OH as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein and was used to generate polyclonal antibodies in New Zealand White rabbits. The obtained antisera reacted in Western immunoblots with the MCP of purified HCMV virions. A monoclonal antibody against the human MCP and a monospecific rabbit antiserum against strain Colburn of simian cytomegalovirus detected the fusion protein as well as the MCP of purified virions in immunoblots. Images PMID:2536837

  12. Expression cloning of genes encoding human peroxisomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Spathaky, J.M.; Tate, A.W.; Cox, T.M.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous metabolic disorders associated with diverse peroxisomal defects have been identified but their molecular characterization has been hampered by difficulties associated with the purification of proteins from this fragile organelle. We have utilized antibodies directed against the C-terminal tripeptide peroxisomal targeting signal to detect hitherto unknown peroxisomal proteins in tissue fractions and to isolate genes encoding peroxisonal proteins from human expression libraries. We immunized rabbits with a peptide conjugate encompassing the C-terminal nine amino acids of rat peroxisomal acyl CoA oxidase. Immunoprecipitation assays using radio-labelled peptide showed that the antibody specifically recognizes the terminal SKL motif as well as C-terminal SHL and SRL but not SHL at an internal position. Affinity-purified antibody was used to probe Western blots of crude and peroxisome-enriched monkey liver preparations and detected 8-10 proteins specifically in the peroxisome fractions. 100 positive clones were identified on screening a human liver cDNA expression library in {lambda}-gt11. Sequence analysis has confirmed the identity of cDNA clones for human acyl CoA oxidase and epoxide hydrolase. Four clones show no sequence identity and their putative role in the human peroxisome is being explored.

  13. ANKRD1, the Gene Encoding Cardiac Ankyrin Repeat Protein, Is a Novel Dilated Cardiomyopathy Gene

    PubMed Central

    Moulik, Mousumi; Vatta, Matteo; Witt, Stephanie H.; Arola, Anita M.; Murphy, Ross T.; McKenna, William J.; Boriek, Aladin M.; Oka, Kazuhiro; Labeit, Siegfried; Bowles, Neil E.; Arimura, Takuro; Kimura, Akinori; Towbin, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated ankyrin repeat domain 1 (ANKRD1), the gene encoding cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP), as a novel candidate gene for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) through mutation analysis of a cohort of familial or idiopathic DCM patients, based on the hypothesis that inherited dysfunction of mechanical stretch-based signaling is present in a subset of DCM patients. Background CARP, a transcription coinhibitor, is a member of the titin-N2A mechanosensory complex and translocates to the nucleus in response to stretch. It is up-regulated in cardiac failure and hypertrophy and represses expression of sarcomeric proteins. Its overexpression results in contractile dysfunction. Methods In all, 208 DCM patients were screened for mutations/variants in the coding region of ANKRD1 using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, and direct deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing. In vitro functional analyses of the mutation were performed using yeast 2-hybrid assays and investigating the effect on stretch-mediated gene expression in myoblastoid cell lines using quantitative real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Results Three missense heterozygous ANKRD1 mutations (P105S, V107L, and M184I) were identified in 4 DCM patients. The M184I mutation results in loss of CARP binding with Talin 1 and FHL2, and the P105S mutation in loss of Talin 1 binding. Intracellular localization of mutant CARP proteins is not altered. The mutations result in differential stretch-induced gene expression compared with wild-type CARP. Conclusions ANKRD1 is a novel DCM gene, with mutations present in 1.9% of DCM patients. The ANKRD1 mutations may cause DCM as a result of disruption of the normal cardiac stretch-based signaling. PMID:19608030

  14. A gene and protein expression study on four porcine genes related to intramuscular fat deposition.

    PubMed

    Zappaterra, Martina; Deserti, Marzia; Mazza, Roberta; Braglia, Silvia; Zambonelli, Paolo; Davoli, Roberta

    2016-11-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content has a prominent role in meat quality, affecting sensory attributes such as flavour and texture. In the present research, we studied in samples of porcine Semimembranosus muscle four genes related to lipid metabolism and whose gene expressions have been associated to IMF deposition: FASN, SCD, LIPE and LPL. We analysed both mRNA and protein expressions in two groups of Italian Large White pigs divergent for Semimembranosus IMF deposition, with the aim of comparing the levels of four genes and enzymes between the two groups and identifying possible coexpression links. The obtained results suggest a prominent role of LIPE enzyme in IMF hydrolysis, as the samples with low IMF deposition show a significantly higher amount of this lipase. Finally, a poorly known correlation was found between LIPE and FASN enzymes only in female individuals. These results provide new information for the understanding of IMF deposition. PMID:27236338

  15. [Expression of rice dwarf virus outer coat protein gene(S8) in insect cells].

    PubMed

    Li, S; Liu, H; Chen, Z; Li, Y

    2001-04-01

    Outer coat protein gene(S8) of RDV was cloned into the transfer vector pVL 1393 to construct a recombinant vector pVL1393-S8. The recombinant vector pVL1393-S8 and the linear baculovirus RP23. LacZ were cotransfected into sf9 cells to produce the recombinant virus RP23-S8. RP23-S8 infected sf9 cells were collected and analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot. The results showed that the S8 gene of RDV was expressed in sf9 cells and the expression level of sf9 cells was higher between 72-96 h after infected.

  16. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  17. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas. PMID:25773181

  18. Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported in gene transfer experiments using the soybean seed storage protein gene. The sequencing of gene Gmg ..cap alpha..' 17.1 has been completed. Several deletion mutants of this gene are being prepared for experiments to transfer the gene into the Ti-plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The purpose is to determine which, if any, of the upstream sequences are those which regulate the developmental expression of the gene. (ACR)

  19. SurfaceomeDB: a cancer-orientated database for genes encoding cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Jorge Estefano Santana; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; de Almeida, Renan Valieris Bueno; da Cunha, Julia Pinheiro Chagas; Ohara, Daniel Takatori; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Old, Lloyd J.; de Souza, Sandro José

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface proteins (CSPs) are excellent targets for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic reagents, and it is estimated that 10–20% of all genes in the human genome encode CSPs. In an effort to integrate all data publicly available for genes encoding cell surface proteins, a database (SurfaceomeDB) was developed. SurfaceomeDB is a gene-centered portal containing different types of information, including annotation for gene expression, protein domains, somatic mutations in cancer, and protein-protein interactions for all human genes encoding CSPs. SurfaceomeDB was implemented as an integrative and relational database in a user-friendly web interface, where users can search for gene name, gene annotation, or keywords. There is also a streamlined graphical representation of all data provided and links to the most important data repositories and databases, such as NCBI, UCSC Genome Browser, and EBI. PMID:23390370

  20. Topology association analysis in weighted protein interaction network for gene prioritization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shunyao; Shao, Fengjing; Zhang, Qi; Ji, Jun; Xu, Shaojie; Sun, Rencheng; Sun, Gengxin; Du, Xiangjun; Sui, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Although lots of algorithms for disease gene prediction have been proposed, the weights of edges are rarely taken into account. In this paper, the strengths of topology associations between disease and essential genes are analyzed in weighted protein interaction network. Empirical analysis demonstrates that compared to other genes, disease genes are weakly connected with essential genes in protein interaction network. Based on this finding, a novel global distance measurement for gene prioritization with weighted protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. Positive and negative flow is allocated to disease and essential genes, respectively. Additionally network propagation model is extended for weighted network. Experimental results on 110 diseases verify the effectiveness and potential of the proposed measurement. Moreover, weak links play more important role than strong links for gene prioritization, which is meaningful to deeply understand protein interaction network.

  1. (Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported on research directed toward introducing a gene (Gmg 17.1) encoding the ..cap alpha..'-subunit of ..beta..-conglycinin, a soybean seed protein, into petunia plants using gene transfer mechanisms. (ACR)

  2. Combinatorial codon scrambling enables scalable gene synthesis and amplification of repetitive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Nicholas C.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Most genes are synthesized using seamless assembly methods that rely on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, PCR of genes encoding repetitive proteins either fails or generates nonspecific products. Motivated by the need to efficiently generate new protein polymers through high-throughput gene synthesis, here we report a codon-scrambling algorithm that enables the PCR-based gene synthesis of repetitive proteins by exploiting the codon redundancy of amino acids and finding the least-repetitive synonymous gene sequence. We also show that the codon-scrambling problem is analogous to the well-known travelling salesman problem, and obtain an exact solution to it by using De Bruijn graphs and a modern mixed integer linear programme solver. As experimental proof of the utility of this approach, we use it to optimize the synthetic genes for 19 repetitive proteins, and show that the gene fragments are amenable to PCR-based gene assembly and recombinant expression.

  3. Combinatorial codon scrambling enables scalable gene synthesis and amplification of repetitive proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nicholas C; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Most genes are synthesized using seamless assembly methods that rely on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, PCR of genes encoding repetitive proteins either fails or generates nonspecific products. Motivated by the need to efficiently generate new protein polymers through high-throughput gene synthesis, here we report a codon-scrambling algorithm that enables the PCR-based gene synthesis of repetitive proteins by exploiting the codon redundancy of amino acids and finding the least-repetitive synonymous gene sequence. We also show that the codon-scrambling problem is analogous to the well-known travelling salesman problem, and obtain an exact solution to it by using De Bruijn graphs and a modern mixed integer linear programme solver. As experimental proof of the utility of this approach, we use it to optimize the synthetic genes for 19 repetitive proteins, and show that the gene fragments are amenable to PCR-based gene assembly and recombinant expression.

  4. Poxvirus protein evolution: Family-wide assessment of possible horizontal gene transfer events

    PubMed Central

    Odom, Mary R.; Hendrickson, R. Curtis; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the evolutionary origins of proteins encoded by the Poxviridae family of viruses, we examined all poxvirus protein coding genes using a method of characterizing and visualizing the similarity between these proteins and taxonomic subsets of proteins in GenBank. Our analysis divides poxvirus proteins into categories based on their relative degree of similarity to two different taxonomic subsets of proteins such as all eukaryote vs. all virus (except poxvirus) proteins. As an example, this allows us to identify, based on high similarity to only eukaryote proteins, poxvirus proteins that may have been obtained by horizontal transfer from their hosts. Although this method alone does not definitively prove horizontal gene transfer, it allows us to provide an assessment of the possibility of horizontal gene transfer for every poxvirus protein. Potential candidates can then be individually studied in more detail during subsequent investigation. Results of our analysis demonstrate that in general, proteins encoded by members of the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae exhibit greater similarity to eukaryote proteins than to proteins of other virus families. In addition, our results reiterate the important role played by host gene capture in poxvirus evolution; highlight the functions of many genes poxviruses share with their hosts; and illustrate which host-like genes are present uniquely in poxviruses and which are also present in other virus families. PMID:19464330

  5. Cytochrome b5 gene and protein of Candida tropicalis and methods relating thereto

    DOEpatents

    Craft, David L.; Madduri, Krishna M.; Loper, John C.

    2003-01-01

    A novel gene has been isolated which encodes cytochrome b5 (CYTb5) protein of the .omega.-hydroxylase complex of C. tropicalis 20336. Vectors including this gene, and transformed host cells are provided. Methods of increasing the production of a CYTb5 protein are also provided which involve transforming a host cell with a gene encoding this protein and culturing the cells. Methods of increasing the production of a dicarboxylic acid are also provided which involve increasing in the host cell the number of genes encoding this protein.

  6. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Modulate the Transcriptional Regulation of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription. PMID:24451378

  7. Molecular Principles of Gene Fusion Mediated Rewiring of Protein Interaction Networks in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Latysheva, Natasha S; Oates, Matt E; Maddox, Louis; Flock, Tilman; Gough, Julian; Buljan, Marija; Weatheritt, Robert J; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-18

    Gene fusions are common cancer-causing mutations, but the molecular principles by which fusion protein products affect interaction networks and cause disease are not well understood. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of the structural, interactomic, and regulatory properties of thousands of putative fusion proteins. We demonstrate that genes that form fusions (i.e., parent genes) tend to be highly connected hub genes, whose protein products are enriched in structured and disordered interaction-mediating features. Fusion often results in the loss of these parental features and the depletion of regulatory sites such as post-translational modifications. Fusion products disproportionately connect proteins that did not previously interact in the protein interaction network. In this manner, fusion products can escape cellular regulation and constitutively rewire protein interaction networks. We suggest that the deregulation of central, interaction-prone proteins may represent a widespread mechanism by which fusion proteins alter the topology of cellular signaling pathways and promote cancer. PMID:27540857

  8. Molecular Principles of Gene Fusion Mediated Rewiring of Protein Interaction Networks in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Latysheva, Natasha S; Oates, Matt E; Maddox, Louis; Flock, Tilman; Gough, Julian; Buljan, Marija; Weatheritt, Robert J; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-18

    Gene fusions are common cancer-causing mutations, but the molecular principles by which fusion protein products affect interaction networks and cause disease are not well understood. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of the structural, interactomic, and regulatory properties of thousands of putative fusion proteins. We demonstrate that genes that form fusions (i.e., parent genes) tend to be highly connected hub genes, whose protein products are enriched in structured and disordered interaction-mediating features. Fusion often results in the loss of these parental features and the depletion of regulatory sites such as post-translational modifications. Fusion products disproportionately connect proteins that did not previously interact in the protein interaction network. In this manner, fusion products can escape cellular regulation and constitutively rewire protein interaction networks. We suggest that the deregulation of central, interaction-prone proteins may represent a widespread mechanism by which fusion proteins alter the topology of cellular signaling pathways and promote cancer.

  9. Functional gene group analysis indicates no role for heterotrimeric G proteins in cognitive ability.

    PubMed

    Hill, W David; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Davies, Gail; Liewald, David Cherry McLachlan; Payton, Anthony; Craig, Leone C A; Whalley, Lawrence J; Horan, Mike; Ollier, William; Starr, John M; Pendleton, Neil; Posthuma, Danielle; Bates, Timothy C; Deary, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Previous functional gene group analyses implicated common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in heterotrimeric G protein coding genes as being associated with differences in human intelligence. Here, we sought to replicate this finding using five independent cohorts of older adults including current IQ and childhood IQ, and using both gene- and SNP-based analytic strategies. No significant associations were found between variation in heterotrimeric G protein genes and intelligence in any cohort at either of the two time points. These results indicate that, whereas G protein systems are important in cognition, common genetic variation in these genes is unlikely to be a substantial influence on human intelligence differences. PMID:24626473

  10. Mutagenesis of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli: targeting positions 72 and 82 of the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Belduz, A O; Lee, E J; Harman, J G

    1993-01-01

    The 3', 5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding pocket of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli was mutagenized to substitute leucine, glutamine, or aspartate for glutamate 72; and lysine, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, or glutamine for arginine 82. Substitutions were made in wild-type CRP and in a CRP*, or cAMP-independent, form of the protein to assess the effects of the amino acid substitutions on CRP structure. Cells containing the binding pocket residue-substituted forms of CRP were characterized through beta-galactosidase activity and by measurement of cAMP binding activity. This study confirms a role for both glutamate 72 and arginine 82 in cAMP binding and activation of CRP. Glutamine or leucine substitution of glutamate 72 produced forms of CRP having low affinity for the cAMP and unresponsive to the nucleotide. Aspartate substituted for glutamate 72 produced a low affinity cAMP-responsive form of CRP. CRP has a stringent requirement for the positioning of the position 72 glutamate carboxyl group within the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket. Results of this study also indicate that there are differences in the binding requirements of cAMP and cGMP, a competitive inhibitor of cAMP binding to CRP. PMID:8388097

  11. Absence of upregulated genes associated with protein accumulations in desmin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Raju, Raghavan; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2007-03-01

    In desmin myopathy but not hereditary inclusion-body myopathy (hIBM), there is accumulation of myofibrillar proteins including desmin, myotilin, dystrophin, gelsolin, actin, and CDC kinase. To assess the cause of protein excess, we studied the genes coding the accumulated proteins in desmin myopathy, hIBM, and controls. No differences were found among them. In desmin myopathy, protein accumulation is not due to upregulation of genes triggered by mutant desmin, but rather to posttranslational disassembly of intermediate filaments.

  12. Dosage Sensitivity of RPL9 and Concerted Evolution of Ribosomal Protein Genes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Devis, Deborah; Firth, Sue M.; Liang, Zhe; Byrne, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome in higher eukaryotes is a large macromolecular complex composed of four rRNAs and eighty different ribosomal proteins. In plants, each ribosomal protein is encoded by multiple genes. Duplicate genes within a family are often necessary to provide a threshold dose of a ribosomal protein but in some instances appear to have non-redundant functions. Here, we addressed whether divergent members of the RPL9 gene family are dosage sensitive or whether these genes have non-overlapping functions. The RPL9 family in Arabidopsis thaliana comprises two nearly identical members, RPL9B and RPL9C, and a more divergent member, RPL9D. Mutations in RPL9C and RPL9D genes lead to delayed growth early in development, and loss of both genes is embryo lethal, indicating that these are dosage-sensitive and redundant genes. Phylogenetic analysis of RPL9 as well as RPL4, RPL5, RPL27a, RPL36a, and RPS6 family genes in the Brassicaceae indicated that multicopy ribosomal protein genes have been largely retained following whole genome duplication. However, these gene families also show instances of tandem duplication, small scale deletion, and evidence of gene conversion. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of RPL9 genes in angiosperm species showed that genes within a species are more closely related to each other than to RPL9 genes in other species, suggesting ribosomal protein genes undergo convergent evolution. Our analysis indicates that ribosomal protein gene retention following whole genome duplication contributes to the number of genes in a family. However, small scale rearrangements influence copy number and likely drive concerted evolution of these dosage-sensitive genes. PMID:26734020

  13. Preservation of Gene Duplication Increases the Regulatory Spectrum of Ribosomal Protein Genes and Enhances Growth under Stress.

    PubMed

    Parenteau, Julie; Lavoie, Mathieu; Catala, Mathieu; Malik-Ghulam, Mustafa; Gagnon, Jules; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2015-12-22

    In baker's yeast, the majority of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are duplicated, and it was recently proposed that such duplications are preserved via the functional specialization of the duplicated genes. However, the origin and nature of duplicated RPGs' (dRPGs) functional specificity remain unclear. In this study, we show that differences in dRPG functions are generated by variations in the modality of gene expression and, to a lesser extent, by protein sequence. Analysis of the sequence and expression patterns of non-intron-containing RPGs indicates that each dRPG is controlled by specific regulatory sequences modulating its expression levels in response to changing growth conditions. Homogenization of dRPG sequences reduces cell tolerance to growth under stress without changing the number of expressed genes. Together, the data reveal a model where duplicated genes provide a means for modulating the expression of ribosomal proteins in response to stress. PMID:26686636

  14. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, and chromosomal localization of the human pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Dusetti, N.J.; Frigerio, J.M.; Dagorn, J.C.; Iovanna, J.L. ); Fox, M.F.; Swallow, D.M. )

    1994-01-01

    Pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) is a secretory pancreatic protein present in small amounts in normal pancreas and overexpressed during the acute phase of pancreatitis. In this paper, the authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human PAP gene. The gene spans 2748 bp and contains six exons interrupted by five introns. The gene has a typical promoter containing the sequences TATAAA and CCAAT 28 and 52 bp upstream of the cap site, respectively. They found striking similarities in genomic organization as well as in the promoter sequences between the human and rat PAP genes. The human PAP gene was mapped to chromosome 2p12 using rodent-human hybrid cells and in situ chromosomal hybridization. This localization coincides with that of the reg/lithostathine gene, which encodes a pancreatic secretory protein structurally related to PAP, suggesting that both genes derived from the same ancestral gene by duplication. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Molecular evolution of streptococcal M protein: cloning and nucleotide sequence of the type 24 M protein gene and relation to other genes of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Mouw, A R; Beachey, E H; Burdett, V

    1988-01-01

    The structural gene for the type 24 M protein of group A streptococci has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene and the 3' and 5' flanking regions was determined. The sequence includes an open reading frame of 1,617 base pairs encoding a pre-M24 protein of 539 amino acids and a predicted Mr of 58,738. The structural gene contains two distinct tandemly reiterated elements. The first repeated element consists of 5.3 units, and the second contains 2.7 units. Each element shows little variation of the basic 35-amino-acid unit. Comparison of the sequence of the M24 protein with the sequence of the M6 protein (S. K. Hollingshead, V. A. Fischetti, and J. R. Scott, J. Biol. Chem. 261:1677-1686, 1986) indicates that these molecules have are conserved except in the regions coding for the antigenic (type specific) determinant and they have three regions of homology within the structural genes: 38 of 42 amino acids within the amino terminal signal sequence, the second repeated element of the M24 protein is found in the M6 molecule at the same position in the protein, and the carboxy terminal 164 amino acids, including a membrane anchor sequence, are conserved in both proteins. In addition, the sequences flanking the two genes are strongly conserved. Images PMID:3276665

  16. Computer-aided design of modular protein devices: Boolean AND gene activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salis, H.; Kaznessis, Y. N.

    2006-12-01

    Many potentially useful synthetic gene networks require the expression of an engineered gene if and only if two different DNA-binding proteins exist in sufficient concentration. While some natural and engineered systems activate gene expression according to a logical AND-like behavior, they often utilize allosteric or cooperative protein-protein interactions, rendering their components unsuitable for a toolbox of modular parts for use in multiple applications. Here, we develop a quantitative model to demonstrate that a small system of interacting fusion proteins, called a protein device, can activate an engineered gene according to the Boolean AND behavior while using only modular protein domains and DNA sites. The fusion proteins are created from transactivating, DNA-binding, non-DNA binding, and protein-protein interaction domains along with the corresponding peptide ligands. Using a combined kinetic and thermodynamic model, we identify the characteristics of the molecular components and their rates of constitutive production that maximize the fidelity of AND behavior. These AND protein devices facilitate the creation of complex genetic programs and may be used to create gene therapies, biosensors and other biomedical and biotechnological applications that turn on gene expression only when multiple DNA-binding proteins are simultaneously present.

  17. An Introductory Bioinformatics Exercise to Reinforce Gene Structure and Expression and Analyze the Relationship between Gene and Protein Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Craig A.; Tardiff, Daniel F.; De Luca, Jane P.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed an introductory bioinformatics exercise for sophomore biology and biochemistry students that reinforces the understanding of the structure of a gene and the principles and events involved in its expression. In addition, the activity illustrates the severe effect mutations in a gene sequence can have on the protein product.…

  18. Centrin protein and genes in Trichomonas vaginalis and close relatives.

    PubMed

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    2000-01-01

    Anti-centrin monoclonal antibodies 20H5 and 11B2 produced against Clamydomononas centrin decorated the group of basal bodies as well as very closely attached structures in all trichomonads studied and in the devescovinids Foaina and Devescovina. Moreover, these antibodies decorated the undulating membrane in Trichomonas vaginalis, Trichomitus batrachorum, and Tritrichomonas foetus, and the cresta in Foaina. Centrin was not demonstrated in the dividing spindle and paradesmosis. Immunogold labeling, both in pre- and post-embedding, confirmed that centrin is associated with the basal body cylinder and is a component of the nine anchoring arms between the terminal plate of flagellar bases and the plasma-membrane. Centrin is also associated with the hook-shaped fibers attached to basal bodies (F1, F3), the X-fiber, and along sigmoid fibers (F2) at the pelta-axostyle junction, which is the microtubule organizing center for pelta-axostyle microtubules. There was no labeling on the striated costa and parabasal fibers nor on microtubular pelta-axostyle, but the fibrous structure inside the undulating membrane was labeled in T. vaginalis. Two proteins of 22-20 kDa corresponding to the centrin molecular mass were recognized by immunoblotting using these antibodies in the three trichomonad species examined. By screening a T. vaginalis cDNA library with 20H5 antibody, two genes encoding identical protein sequences were found. The sequence comprises the 4 typical EF-hand Ca++-binding domains present in every known centrin. Trichomonad centrin is closer to the green algal cluster (70% identity) than to the yeast Cdc31 cluster (55% identity) or the Alveolata cluster (46% identity). PMID:10750840

  19. The human RBPome: from genes and proteins to human disease.

    PubMed

    Neelamraju, Yaseswini; Hashemikhabir, Seyedsasan; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2015-09-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play a central role in mediating post transcriptional regulation of genes. However less is understood about them and their regulatory mechanisms. In this study, we construct a catalogue of 1344 experimentally confirmed RBPs. The domain architecture of RBPs enabled us to classify them into three groups - Classical (29%), Non-classical (19%) and unclassified (52%). A higher percentage of proteins with unclassified domains reveals the presence of various uncharacterised motifs that can potentially bind RNA. RBPs were found to be highly disordered compared to Non-RBPs (p<2.2e-16, Fisher's exact test), suggestive of a dynamic regulatory role of RBPs in cellular signalling and homeostasis. Evolutionary analysis in 62 different species showed that RBPs are highly conserved compared to Non-RBPs (p<2.2e-16, Wilcox-test), reflecting the conservation of various biological processes like mRNA splicing and ribosome biogenesis. The expression patterns of RBPs from human proteome map revealed that ~40% of them are ubiquitously expressed and ~60% are tissue-specific. RBPs were also seen to be highly associated with several neurological disorders, cancer and inflammatory diseases. Anatomical contexts like B cells, T-cells, foetal liver and foetal brain were found to be strongly enriched for RBPs, implying a prominent role of RBPs in immune responses and different developmental stages. The catalogue and meta-analysis presented here should form a foundation for furthering our understanding of RBPs and the cellular networks they control, in years to come. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:25982388

  20. General Theory for Integrated Analysis of Growth, Gene, and Protein Expression in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyu; Pabst, Breana; Klapper, Isaac; Stewart, Philip S.

    2013-01-01

    A theory for analysis and prediction of spatial and temporal patterns of gene and protein expression within microbial biofilms is derived. The theory integrates phenomena of solute reaction and diffusion, microbial growth, mRNA or protein synthesis, biomass advection, and gene transcript or protein turnover. Case studies illustrate the capacity of the theory to simulate heterogeneous spatial patterns and predict microbial activities in biofilms that are qualitatively different from those of planktonic cells. Specific scenarios analyzed include an inducible GFP or fluorescent protein reporter, a denitrification gene repressed by oxygen, an acid stress response gene, and a quorum sensing circuit. It is shown that the patterns of activity revealed by inducible stable fluorescent proteins or reporter unstable proteins overestimate the region of activity. This is due to advective spreading and finite protein turnover rates. In the cases of a gene induced by either limitation for a metabolic substrate or accumulation of a metabolic product, maximal expression is predicted in an internal stratum of the biofilm. A quorum sensing system that includes an oxygen-responsive negative regulator exhibits behavior that is distinct from any stage of a batch planktonic culture. Though here the analyses have been limited to simultaneous interactions of up to two substrates and two genes, the framework applies to arbitrarily large networks of genes and metabolites. Extension of reaction-diffusion modeling in biofilms to the analysis of individual genes and gene networks is an important advance that dovetails with the growing toolkit of molecular and genetic experimental techniques. PMID:24376726

  1. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  2. Cardiomyopathy Is Associated with Ribosomal Protein Gene Haplo-Insufficiency in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Casad, Michelle E.; Abraham, Dennis; Kim, Il-Man; Frangakis, Stephan; Dong, Brian; Lin, Na; Wolf, Matthew J.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    The Minute syndrome in Drosophila melanogaster is characterized by delayed development, poor fertility, and short slender bristles. Many Minute loci correspond to disruptions of genes for cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins, and therefore the phenotype has been attributed to alterations in translational processes. Although protein translation is crucial for all cells in an organism, it is unclear why Minute mutations cause effects in specific tissues. To determine whether the heart is sensitive to haplo-insufficiency of genes encoding ribosomal proteins, we measured heart function of Minute mutants using optical coherence tomography. We found that cardiomyopathy is associated with the Minute syndrome caused by haplo-insufficiency of genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. While mutations of genes encoding non-Minute cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins are homozygous lethal, heterozygous deficiencies spanning these non-Minute genes did not cause a change in cardiac function. Deficiencies of genes for non-Minute mitochondrial ribosomal proteins also did not show abnormal cardiac function, with the exception of a heterozygous disruption of mRpS33. We demonstrate that cardiomyopathy is a common trait of the Minute syndrome caused by haplo-insufficiency of genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. In contrast, most cases of heterozygous deficiencies of genes encoding non-Minute ribosomal proteins have normal heart function in adult Drosophila. PMID:21890737

  3. A homolog of an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, C. M.; White, F. F.; Heaton, L. A.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae gene with sequence similarity to an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene (phoS) produces a periplasmic protein of apparent M(r) 35,000 when expressed in E. coli. Amino terminal sequencing revealed that a signal peptide is removed during transport to the periplasm in E. coli.

  4. Identification of two rodent genes encoding homologues to seminal vesicle autoantigen: a gene family including the gene for prolactin-inducible protein.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Kaneko, M; Kurachi, H; Osawa, M

    2001-02-16

    We cloned two new paralogous genes that encode proteins homologous to seminal vesicle autoantigen (SVA) in rodents. The open reading frame of one mouse gene encodes a polypeptide consisting of 151 amino acid residues which has 43% identity to SVA. RT-PCR analysis showed selective expression in the colon, and thus the protein was tentatively named "SVA-like protein in the colon (SLP-C)". The other mouse gene has an open reading frame encoding 144 amino acid residues with 46 and 65% identity to SVA and SLP-C, respectively. Expression of this gene was detected in the mammary, submaxillary, parotid, and lacrimal glands, and this protein was named "SLP in the mammary gland (SLP-M)". Orthologs of both genes were also found in rats. The three homologous genes coding for SVA, SLP-C, and SLP-M may have been generated by gene duplication with divergence of tissue expression in the course of evolution. They comprise a unique structurally-related gene family. Moreover, these genes share significant sequence homology with that of another secretory glycoprotein, prolactin-inducible protein.

  5. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-03-25

    Hoxgenes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hoxgenes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteranBombyx mori In this species,Antennapedia(Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antpcan regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antpin the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such assericin-3,fhxh4, and fhxh5 These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antpactivates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putativesericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antpdirectly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. moriand the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori We suggest that Hoxgenes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes.

  6. Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein gene identification and regulation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wensheng; Walker, Virginia K

    2006-02-15

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a freeze susceptible, stored product pest. Its winter survival is facilitated by the accumulation of antifreeze proteins (AFPs), encoded by a small gene family. We have now isolated 11 different AFP genomic clones from 3 genomic libraries. All the clones had a single coding sequence, with no evidence of intervening sequences. Three genomic clones were further characterized. All have putative TATA box sequences upstream of the coding regions and multiple potential poly(A) signal sequences downstream of the coding regions. A TmAFP regulatory region, B1037, conferred transcriptional activity when ligated to a luciferase reporter sequence and after transfection into an insect cell line. A 143 bp core promoter including a TATA box sequence was identified. Its promoter activity was increased 4.4 times by inserting an exotic 245 bp intron into the construct, similar to the enhancement of transgenic expression seen in several other systems. The addition of a duplication of the first 120 bp sequence from the 143 bp core promoter decreased promoter activity by half. Although putative hormonal response sequences were identified, none of the five hormones tested enhanced reporter activity. These studies on the mechanisms of AFP transcriptional control are important for the consideration of any transfer of freeze-resistance phenotypes to beneficial hosts.

  7. Wool Keratin-Associated Protein Genes in Sheep—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hua; Zhou, Huitong; Forrest, Rachel H. J.; Li, Shaobin; Wang, Jiqing; Dyer, Jolon M.; Luo, Yuzhu; Hickford, Jon G. H.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of sheep’s wool in making textiles has inspired extensive research into its structure and the underlying genetics since the 1960s. Wool keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are a key structural component of the wool fibre. The characterisation of the genes encoding these proteins has progressed rapidly with advances in the nucleotide and protein sequencing. This review describes our knowledge of ovine KAPs, their categorisation into families, polymorphism in the proteins and genes, the clustering and chromosomal location of the genes, some characteristics of gene expression and some potential effects of the KAPs on wool traits. The extent and nature of genetic variation in wool KAP genes and its association with fibre characteristics, provides an opportunity for the development of gene-markers for selective breeding of sheep to produce better wool with properties highly matched to specific end-uses. PMID:27240405

  8. Mutagenesis of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli: targeting positions 83, 127 and 128 of the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, E J; Glasgow, J; Leu, S F; Belduz, A O; Harman, J G

    1994-01-01

    The cyclic 3', 5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding pocket of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli was mutagenized to substitute cysteine or glycine for serine 83; cysteine, glycine, isoleucine, or serine for threonine 127; and threonine or alanine for serine 128. Cells that expressed the binding pocket residue-substituted forms of CRP were characterized by measurements of beta-galactosidase activity. Purified wild-type and mutant CRP preparations were characterized by measurement of cAMP binding activity and by their capacity to support lacP activation in vitro. CRP structure was assessed by measurement of sensitivity to protease and DTNB-mediated subunit crosslinking. The results of this study show that cAMP interactions with serine 83, threonine 127 and serine 128 contribute to CRP activation and have little effect on cAMP binding. Amino acid substitutions that introduce hydrophobic amino acid side chain constituents at either position 127 or 128 decrease CRP discrimination of cAMP and cGMP. Finally, cAMP-induced CRP structural change(s) that occur in or near the CRP hinge region result from cAMP interaction with threonine 127; substitution of threonine 127 by cysteine, glycine, isoleucine, or serine produced forms of CRP that contained, independently of cAMP binding, structural changes similar to those of the wild-type CRP:cAMP complex. Images PMID:8065899

  9. Vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein inhibits host cell-directed transcription of target genes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Black, B L; Lyles, D S

    1992-01-01

    Infection by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) results in a rapid inhibition of host cell transcription and translation. To determine whether the viral matrix (M) protein was involved in this inhibition of host cell gene expression, an M protein expression vector was cotransfected with a target gene vector, encoding the target gene, encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Expression of M protein caused a decrease in CAT activity in a gene dosage-dependent manner, and inhibition was apparent by 12 h posttransfection. The inhibitory effect of M protein was quite potent. The level of M protein required for a 10-fold inhibition of CAT activity was less than 1% of the level of M protein produced during the sixth hour of VSV infection. Northern (RNA) analysis of cotransfected cells showed that expression of M protein caused a reduction in the steady-state level of the vector-encoded mRNAs. Expression of both CAT and M mRNAs was reduced in cells cotransfected with a plasmid encoding M protein, indicating that expression of small amounts of M protein from plasmid DNA inhibits further expression of both M and CAT mRNAs. Nuclear runoff transcription analysis demonstrated that expression of M protein inhibited transcription of the target genes. This is the first report of a viral gene product which is capable of inhibiting transcription in vivo in the absence of any other viral component. Images PMID:1318397

  10. The structure of the human sterol carrier protein X/sterol carrier protein 2 gene (SCP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohba, Takashi; Rennert, H.; Pfeifer, S.M.

    1994-11-15

    Sterol carrier protein X (SCPx) is a 58-kDa protein that is localized to peroxisomes. The amino acid sequence of the protein suggests that SCPx may function as a thiolase. The gene encoding SCPx also codes for a 15.3-kDa protein called sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). Here the authors report the structure of this gene (SCP2), which spans approximately 80 kb and consists of 16 exons and 15 introns. Multiple transcription start sites were identified. The 5{prime} flanking region has characteristics of other peroxisomal protein promoters, which include the absence of a TATA box and G+C-enriched region containing several reverse GC boxes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Prioritizing orphan proteins for further study using phylogenomics and gene expression profiles in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptomyces coelicolor, a model organism of antibiotic producing bacteria, has one of the largest genomes of the bacterial kingdom, including 7825 predicted protein coding genes. A large number of these genes, nearly 34%, are functionally orphan (hypothetical proteins with unknown function). However, in gene expression time course data, many of these functionally orphan genes show interesting expression patterns. Results In this paper, we analyzed all functionally orphan genes of Streptomyces coelicolor and identified a list of "high priority" orphans by combining gene expression analysis and additional phylogenetic information (i.e. the level of evolutionary conservation of each protein). Conclusions The prioritized orphan genes are promising candidates to be examined experimentally in the lab for further characterization of their function. PMID:21899768

  12. Molecular and expression analysis of a LIM protein gene family from flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, A; Gass, N; Mundel, C; Baltz, R; Kräuter, R; Evrard, J L; Steinmetz, A

    2000-10-01

    LIM-domain proteins participate in important cellular processes in eukaryotes, including gene transcription and actin cytoskeleton organization. They are predominantly found in animals, but have also been identified in yeast and plants. Following the characterization ofa LIM-domain protein in sunflower pollen, we carried out an extensive search for these proteins in flowering plants. We have isolated and studied cDNAs and/or genomic sequences for two novel LIM-domain proteins from sunflower, three from tobacco, and one from Arabidopsis. The plant proteins are structurally related to the cytoskeleton-associated CRP class of LIM proteins in animals, but show several distinctive features, including a second, atypical, LIM domain. We have performed comparative expression studies of these genes, as well as of one other gene from tobacco and two additional Arabidopsis genes whose sequences are available from databases. These studies, carried out by RT-PCR in the presence of gene-specific primers, showed that, in sunflower and tobacco, pollen grains and sporophytic tissues express different sets of LIM proteins. With the exception of one Arabidopsis gene--which has two introns--all the genes analyzed contain four introns at conserved positions, indicating that the ancestral gene from which the various copies evolved in higher plants allready had this split structure. PMID:11085265

  13. Ribosomal protein L7 as a suitable reference gene for quantifying gene expression in gastropod Bellamya aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Lei, Kun; Ma, Qingqing; Qiao, Fei; Li, Zi-Cheng; An, Li-Hui

    2016-04-01

    Expression levels of eight candidate reference genes were quantified in tissues of gastropod Bellamya aeruginosa exposed for 10 d to various stressors, including fasting, 17β-estradiol, 17α-methyltestosterone, and Cd(2+). The results showed that 18s rRNA was the most highly expressed of the candidate reference genes, while H2A was the least expressed. There were no significant changes (p>0.05) in the expression of the eight genes in tissues among the different treatments. Using RefFinder to evaluate the expression stabilities of the eight candidate reference genes, ribosomal protein was shown to be the most stable reference gene, and no effects were observed among the different stressor treatments. These results indicate that RPL 7 is the most suitable reference gene for quantifying gene expression in B. aeruginosa under environmental stress, which was verified in B. aeruginosa exposed to high doses of E2 for 24 and 72h. PMID:26991845

  14. Cross-tissue Analysis of Gene and Protein Expression in Normal and Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kosti, Idit; Jain, Nishant; Aran, Dvir; Butte, Atul J; Sirota, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology describes the translation of genetic information from mRNA to protein, but does not specify the quantitation or timing of this process across the genome. We have analyzed protein and gene expression in a diverse set of human tissues. To study concordance and discordance of gene and protein expression, we integrated mass spectrometry data from the Human Proteome Map project and RNA-Seq measurements from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project. We analyzed 16,561 genes and the corresponding proteins in 14 tissue types across nearly 200 samples. A comprehensive tissue- and gene-specific analysis revealed that across the 14 tissues, correlation between mRNA and protein expression was positive and ranged from 0.36 to 0.5. We also identified 1,012 genes whose RNA and protein expression was correlated across all the tissues and examined genes and proteins that were concordantly and discordantly expressed for each tissue of interest. We extended our analysis to look for genes and proteins that were differentially correlated in cancer compared to normal tissues, showing higher levels of correlation in normal tissues. Finally, we explored the implications of these findings in the context of biomarker and drug target discovery. PMID:27142790

  15. Cross-tissue Analysis of Gene and Protein Expression in Normal and Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kosti, Idit; Jain, Nishant; Aran, Dvir; Butte, Atul J; Sirota, Marina

    2016-05-04

    The central dogma of molecular biology describes the translation of genetic information from mRNA to protein, but does not specify the quantitation or timing of this process across the genome. We have analyzed protein and gene expression in a diverse set of human tissues. To study concordance and discordance of gene and protein expression, we integrated mass spectrometry data from the Human Proteome Map project and RNA-Seq measurements from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project. We analyzed 16,561 genes and the corresponding proteins in 14 tissue types across nearly 200 samples. A comprehensive tissue- and gene-specific analysis revealed that across the 14 tissues, correlation between mRNA and protein expression was positive and ranged from 0.36 to 0.5. We also identified 1,012 genes whose RNA and protein expression was correlated across all the tissues and examined genes and proteins that were concordantly and discordantly expressed for each tissue of interest. We extended our analysis to look for genes and proteins that were differentially correlated in cancer compared to normal tissues, showing higher levels of correlation in normal tissues. Finally, we explored the implications of these findings in the context of biomarker and drug target discovery.

  16. The doublesex proteins of Drosophila melanogaster bind directly to a sex-specific yolk protein gene enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Burtis, K C; Coschigano, K T; Baker, B S; Wensink, P C

    1991-01-01

    The doublesex (dsx) gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes both male-specific and female-specific polypeptides, whose synthesis is regulated by alternative sex-specific splicing of the primary dsx transcript. The alternative splicing of the dsx mRNA is the last known step in a cascade of regulatory gene interactions that involves both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Genetic studies have shown that the products of the dsx locus are required for correct somatic sexual differentiation of both sexes, and have suggested that each dsx product functions by repressing expression of terminal differentiation genes specific to the opposite sex. However, these studies have not shown whether the dsx gene products function directly to regulate the expression of target genes, or indirectly through another regulatory gene. We report here that the male- and female-specific DSX proteins, expressed in E.coli, bind directly and specifically in vitro to three DNA sequences located in an enhancer region that regulates female-specific expression of two target genes, the yolk protein genes 1 and 2. This result suggests strongly that dsx is a final regulatory gene in the hierarchy of regulatory genes controlling somatic sexual differentiation. Images PMID:1907913

  17. Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant outer membrane protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Sheping; Qiu, Xuemei

    2011-06-01

    Gram-negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals. The outer membrane protein of bacteria plays an important role in the infection and pathogenicity to the host. Thus, the outer membrane proteins are an ideal target for vaccines. We amplified a complete outer membrane protein gene (ompW) from V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802. We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The gene coded for a protein that was 42.78 kDa. We purified the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting, respectively. Our results provide a basis for future application of the OmpW protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by V. parahaemolyticus. In addition, the purified OmpW protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

  18. Experimental strategies for cloning or identifying genes encoding DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Carey, Michael F; Peterson, Craig L; Smale, Stephen T

    2012-02-01

    This article describes experimental strategies for cloning or identifying genes encoding DNA-binding proteins. DNA-binding proteins are most commonly identified by electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) or DNase I footprinting. To identify the gene encoding a protein detected by EMSA or DNase footprinting, the protein often needs to be purified and its sequence analyzed, as described here. Other methods are also available which do not resort to protein purification, including the one-hybrid screen, in vitro expression library screen, and mammalian expression cloning. These methods are outlined, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:22301659

  19. Protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression maps of ARFs and Aux/IAAs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Sarbottam; Shrestha, Sandesh K.; Binder, Brad; Stewart, C. Neal; Hewezi, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin regulates nearly all aspects of plant growth and development. Based on the current model in Arabidopsis thaliana, Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) proteins repress auxin-inducible genes by inhibiting auxin response transcription factors (ARFs). Experimental evidence suggests that heterodimerization between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins are related to their unique biological functions. The objective of this study was to generate the Aux/IAA-ARF protein-protein interaction map using full length sequences and locate the interacting protein pairs to specific gene co-expression networks in order to define tissue-specific responses of the Aux/IAA-ARF interactome. Pairwise interactions between 19 ARFs and 29 Aux/IAAs resulted in the identification of 213 specific interactions of which 79 interactions were previously unknown. The incorporation of co-expression profiles with protein-protein interaction data revealed a strong correlation of gene co-expression for 70% of the ARF-Aux/IAA interacting pairs in at least one tissue/organ, indicative of the biological significance of these interactions. Importantly, ARF4-8 and 19, which were found to interact with almost all Aux-Aux/IAA showed broad co-expression relationships with Aux/IAA genes, thus, formed the central hubs of the co-expression network. Our analyses provide new insights into the biological significance of ARF-Aux/IAA associations in the morphogenesis and development of various plant tissues and organs. PMID:25566309

  20. Two novel heat shock genes encoding proteins produced in response to heterologous protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Allen, S P; Polazzi, J O; Gierse, J K; Easton, A M

    1992-11-01

    In Escherichia coli high-level production of some heterologous proteins (specifically, human prorenin, renin, and bovine insulin-like growth factor 2) resulted in the induction of two new E. coli heat shock proteins, both of which have molecular masses of 16 kDa and are tightly associated with inclusion bodies formed during heterologous protein production. We named these inclusion body-associated proteins IbpA and IbpB. The coding sequences for IbpA and IbpB were identified and isolated from the Kohara E. coli gene bank. The genes for these proteins (ibpA and ibpB) are located at 82.5 min on the chromosome. Nucleotide sequencing of the two genes revealed that they are transcribed in the same direction and are separated by 110 bp. Putative Shine-Dalgarno sequences are located upstream from the initiation codons of both genes. A putative heat shock promoter is located upstream from ibpA, and a putative transcription terminator is located downstream from ibpB. A temperature upshift experiment in which we used a wild-type E. coli strain and an isogenic rpoH mutant strain indicated that a sigma 32-containing RNA polymerase is involved in the regulation of expression of these genes. There is 57.5% identity between the genes at the nucleotide level and 52.2% identity at the amino acid level. A search of the protein data bases showed that both of these 16-kDa proteins exhibit low levels of homology to low-molecular-weight heat shock proteins from eukaryotic species.

  1. Involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis: insight into the gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-08-01

    Regucalcin, which its gene is located on the X chromosome, plays a multifunctional role as a suppressor protein in cell signal transduction in various types of cells and tissues. The suppression of regucalcin gene expression has been shown to involve in carcinogenesis. Regucalcin gene expression was uniquely downregulated in carcinogenesis of rat liver in vivo, although the expression of other many genes was upregulated, indicating that endogenous regucalcin plays a suppressive role in the development of hepatocarcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin was found to suppress proliferation of rat cloned hepatoma cells in vitro. Moreover, the regucalcin gene and its protein levels were demonstrated specifically to downregulate in human hepatocellular carcinoma by analysis with multiple gene expression profiles and proteomics. Regucalcin gene expression was also found to suppress in human tumor tissues including kidney, lung, brain, breast and prostate, suggesting that repressed regucalcin gene expression leads to the development of carcinogenesis in various tissues. Regucalcin may play a role as a suppressor protein in carcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin is suggested to reveal preventive and therapeutic effects on carcinogenesis. Delivery of the regucalcin gene may be a novel useful tool in the gene therapy of carcinogenesis. This review will discuss regarding to an involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis in insight into the gene therapy.

  2. Tempo and Mode of Gene Duplication in Mammalian Ribosomal Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gajdosik, Matthew D.; Simon, Amanda; Nelson, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication has been widely recognized as a major driver of evolutionary change and organismal complexity through the generation of multi-gene families. Therefore, understanding the forces that govern the evolution of gene families through the retention or loss of duplicated genes is fundamentally important in our efforts to study genome evolution. Previous work from our lab has shown that ribosomal protein (RP) genes constitute one of the largest classes of conserved duplicated genes in mammals. This result was surprising due to the fact that ribosomal protein genes evolve slowly and transcript levels are very tightly regulated. In our present study, we identified and characterized all RP duplicates in eight mammalian genomes in order to investigate the tempo and mode of ribosomal protein family evolution. We show that a sizable number of duplicates are transcriptionally active and are very highly conserved. Furthermore, we conclude that existing gene duplication models do not readily account for the preservation of a very large number of intact retroduplicated ribosomal protein (RT-RP) genes observed in mammalian genomes. We suggest that selection against dominant-negative mutations may underlie the unexpected retention and conservation of duplicated RP genes, and may shape the fate of newly duplicated genes, regardless of duplication mechanism. PMID:25369106

  3. Response gene to complement 32 protein promotes macrophage phagocytosis via activation of protein kinase C pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Gui; Chen, Shi-You

    2014-08-15

    Macrophage phagocytosis plays an important role in host defense. The molecular mechanism, especially factors regulating the phagocytosis, however, is not completely understood. In the present study, we found that response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) is an important regulator of phagocytosis. Although RGC-32 is induced and abundantly expressed in macrophage during monocyte-macrophage differentiation, RGC-32 appears not to be important for this process because RGC-32-deficient bone marrow progenitor can normally differentiate to macrophage. However, both peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages with RGC-32 deficiency exhibit significant defects in phagocytosis, whereas RGC-32-overexpressed macrophages show increased phagocytosis. Mechanistically, RGC-32 is recruited to macrophage membrane where it promotes F-actin assembly and the formation of phagocytic cups. RGC-32 knock-out impairs F-actin assembly. RGC-32 appears to interact with PKC to regulate PKC-induced phosphorylation of F-actin cross-linking protein myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that RGC-32 is a novel membrane regulator for macrophage phagocytosis.

  4. Predicting Essential Genes and Proteins Based on Machine Learning and Network Topological Features: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue; Acencio, Marcio Luis; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins/genes are indispensable to the survival or reproduction of an organism, and the deletion of such essential proteins will result in lethality or infertility. The identification of essential genes is very important not only for understanding the minimal requirements for survival of an organism, but also for finding human disease genes and new drug targets. Experimental methods for identifying essential genes are costly, time-consuming, and laborious. With the accumulation of sequenced genomes data and high-throughput experimental data, many computational methods for identifying essential proteins are proposed, which are useful complements to experimental methods. In this review, we show the state-of-the-art methods for identifying essential genes and proteins based on machine learning and network topological features, point out the progress and limitations of current methods, and discuss the challenges and directions for further research. PMID:27014079

  5. Polymorphism in two genes for B2 high sulfur proteins of wool.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G R; Hickford, J G; Bickerstaffe, R

    1994-12-01

    Variation in the nucleotide sequence of the B2 high-sulfur protein genes has not been reported previously. This paper reports 15 nucleotide substitutions in each of the genes for the B2A and B2C proteins and a length of polymorphism in the B2A gene which translates to the insertion/deletion of one 30-nucleotide repeat sequence. Evidence is presented for gene conversion occurring within the B2 high-sulfur multigene family. These DNA polymorphisms may account for some of the microheterogeneity observed in the B2 high-sulfur proteins and may also be useful genetic markers of the B2 high-sulfur protein gene loci for future use in analysing wool fibre characteristics.

  6. Comparative study of p53 gene and protein alterations in human astrocytic tumors.

    PubMed

    Louis, D N; von Deimling, A; Chung, R Y; Rubio, M P; Whaley, J M; Eibl, R H; Ohgaki, H; Wiestler, O D; Thor, A D; Seizinger, B R

    1993-01-01

    The p53 gene is a tumor suppressor gene involved in many common malignancies, including astrocytomas. Genetic analysis of the p53 gene and immunohistochemistry of the p53 protein have each been used to screen astrocytomas. To compare these methods, we performed immunohistochemistry with the monoclonal antibody PAb 1801 and single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) with sequence analysis on 34 astrocytic tumors (WHO grades II, III and IV). Seven cases had detectable p53 protein and gene mutations, while twelve cases had neither detectable protein nor gene mutations. Four tumors had frameshift mutations in the p53 gene that were not revealed by immunohistochemistry. One tumor had a genetic polymorphism and no detectable p53 protein. Ten tumors had p53 protein accumulation but no mutations by SSCP; these cases may represent p53 mutations outside of the conserved exons or elevated levels of wild-type p53 protein. Thus, some p53 mutations are missed with PAb 1801 immunohistochemistry alone. p53 immunohistochemistry, however, may reveal p53 accumulation independent of mutations in the conserved portions of the gene. Finally, we suggest that glioblastomas with p53 mutations in the conserved region of the gene may be a subset that are more common in women and in younger patients.

  7. In silicio search for genes encoding peroxisomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kal, A J; Hettema, E H; van den Berg, M; Koerkamp, M G; van Ijlst, L; Distel, B; Tabak, H F

    2000-01-01

    The biogenesis of peroxisomes involves the synthesis of new proteins that after, completion of translation, are targeted to the organelle by virtue of peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). Two types of PTSs have been well characterized for import of matrix proteins (PTS1 and PTS2). Induction of the genes encoding these matrix proteins takes place in oleate-containing medium and is mediated via an oleate response element (ORE) present in the region preceding these genes. The authors have searched the yeast genome for OREs preceding open reading frames (ORFs), and for ORFs that contain either a PTS1 or PTS2. Of the ORFs containing an ORE, as well as either a PTS1 or a PTS2, many were known to encode bona fide peroxisomal matrix proteins. In addition, candidate genes were identified as encoding putative new peroxisomal proteins. For one case, subcellular location studies validated the in silicio prediction. This gene encodes a new peroxisomal thioesterase.

  8. Neurally expressed Drosophila genes encoding homologs of the NSF and SNAP secretory proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, R W; Pallanck, L; Ganetzky, B

    1994-01-01

    Several lines of investigation have now converged to indicate that the neurotransmitter release apparatus is formed by assembly of cytosolic proteins with proteins of the synaptic vesicle and presynaptic terminal membranes. We are undertaking a genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the functions of two types of cytosolic proteins thought to function in this complex: N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) and the soluble NSF attachment proteins (SNAPs). We have identified Drosophila homologs of the vertebrate and yeast NSF and SNAP genes. Both Drosophila genes encode polypeptides that closely resemble their vertebrate counterparts and are expressed in the nervous system; neither appears to be in a family of closely related Drosophila genes. These results indicate that the Drosophila NSF and SNAP genes are excellent candidates for mutational analysis of neurotransmitter release. Images PMID:8202553

  9. Distinguishing protein-coding and noncoding genes in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Clamp, Michele; Fry, Ben; Kamal, Mike; Xie, Xiaohui; Cuff, James; Lin, Michael F.; Kellis, Manolis; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Lander, Eric S.

    2007-01-01

    Although the Human Genome Project was completed 4 years ago, the catalog of human protein-coding genes remains a matter of controversy. Current catalogs list a total of ≈24,500 putative protein-coding genes. It is broadly suspected that a large fraction of these entries are functionally meaningless ORFs present by chance in RNA transcripts, because they show no evidence of evolutionary conservation with mouse or dog. However, there is currently no scientific justification for excluding ORFs simply because they fail to show evolutionary conservation: the alternative hypothesis is that most of these ORFs are actually valid human genes that reflect gene innovation in the primate lineage or gene loss in the other lineages. Here, we reject this hypothesis by carefully analyzing the nonconserved ORFs—specifically, their properties in other primates. We show that the vast majority of these ORFs are random occurrences. The analysis yields, as a by-product, a major revision of the current human catalogs, cutting the number of protein-coding genes to ≈20,500. Specifically, it suggests that nonconserved ORFs should be added to the human gene catalog only if there is clear evidence of an encoded protein. It also provides a principled methodology for evaluating future proposed additions to the human gene catalog. Finally, the results indicate that there has been relatively little true innovation in mammalian protein-coding genes. PMID:18040051

  10. Protein-DNA interactions in the promoter region of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene in human neocortex.

    PubMed

    Lukiw, W J; Rogaev, E I; Wong, L; Vaula, G; McLachlan, D R; St George Hyslop, P

    1994-03-01

    We have investigated protein-DNA interactions in the proximal promoter of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene in temporal lobe neocortical nuclei isolated from control and Alzheimer disease (AD) affected brains. We report that the human APP 5' promoter sequence from -203 to +55 bp, which has been previously reported to contain essential regulatory elements for APP gene transcription, lies in a deoxyribonuclease I, micrococcal nuclease- and restriction endonuclease-sensitive, G+C-rich nucleosome-free gap flanked both 5' and 3' by typical nucleosome structures. As analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, this extended internucleosomal linker DNA is heavily occupied by nuclear protein factors, and interacts differentially with nuclear protein extracts obtained from HeLa and human brain neocortical nuclei. This suggests that the chromatin conformation of the APP gene promoter may vary in different cell types, and may correlate with differences in APP gene expression. Human recombinant transcription factors AP1, SP1 and TFIID (but not AP2 or brain histones H1, H2B and H4) interact with the -203 to +55 bp of the human APP promoter sequence. Only minor differences were observed in the chromatin structure of the immediate APP promoter between non-AD and AD affected neocortical nuclei, suggesting either that post-transcriptional processes, or that regulatory elements lying elsewhere in the APP gene may be important in the aberrant accumulation of the APP gene product.

  11. Large-scale identification of encystment-related proteins and genes in Pseudourostyla cristata

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiuxia; Chen, Fenfen; Niu, Tao; Qu, Ruidan; Chen, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    The transformation of a ciliate into cyst is an advance strategy against an adverse situation. However, the molecular mechanism for the encystation of free-living ciliates is poorly understood. A large-scale identification of the encystment-related proteins and genes in ciliate would provide us with deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms for the encystations of ciliate. We identified the encystment-related proteins and genes in Pseudourostyla cristata with shotgun LC-MS/MS and scale qRT-PCR, respectively, in this report. A total of 668 proteins were detected in the resting cysts, 102 of these proteins were high credible proteins, whereas 88 high credible proteins of the 724 total proteins were found in the vegetative cells. Compared with the vegetative cell, 6 specific proteins were found in the resting cyst. However, the majority of high credible proteins in the resting cyst and the vegetative cell were co-expressed. We compared 47 genes of the co-expressed proteins with known functions in both the cyst and the vegetative cell using scale qRT-PCR. Twenty-seven of 47 genes were differentially expressed in the cyst compared with the vegetative cell. In our identifications, many uncharacterized proteins were also found. These results will help reveal the molecular mechanism for the formation of cyst in ciliates. PMID:26079518

  12. Recombinant HT.sub.m4 gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Bing; Adra, Chaker N.; Lelias, Jean-Michel

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein and a recombinant HT.sub.m4 protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy.

  13. Absence of repellents in Ustilago maydis induces genes encoding small secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Teertstra, Wieke R; Krijgsheld, Pauline; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-08-01

    The rep1 gene of the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis encodes a pre-pro-protein that is processed in the secretory pathway into 11 peptides. These so-called repellents form amphipathic amyloid fibrils at the surface of aerial hyphae. A SG200 strain in which the rep1 gene is inactivated (∆rep1 strain) is affected in aerial hyphae formation. We here assessed changes in global gene expression as a consequence of the inactivation of the rep1 gene. Microarray analysis revealed that only 31 genes in the ∆rep1 SG200 strain had a fold change in expression of ≥2. Twenty-two of these genes were up-regulated and half of them encode small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown functions. Seven of the SSP genes and two other genes that are over-expressed in the ∆rep1 SG200 strain encode proteins that can be classified as secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SCRPs). Interestingly, most of the SCRPs are predicted to form amyloids. The SCRP gene um00792 showed the highest up-regulation in the ∆rep1 strain. Using GFP as a reporter, it was shown that this gene is over-expressed in the layer of hyphae at the medium-air interface. Taken together, it is concluded that inactivation of rep1 hardly affects the expression profile of U. maydis, despite the fact that the mutant strain has a strong reduced ability to form aerial hyphae.

  14. The role of mammalian PPR domain proteins in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Oliver; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) domain proteins are a large family of RNA-binding proteins that are involved in the maturation and translation of organelle transcripts in eukaryotes. They were first identified in plant organelles and their important role in mammalian mitochondrial gene regulation is now emerging. Mammalian PPR proteins, like their plant counterparts, have diverse roles in mitochondrial transcription, RNA metabolism and translation and consequently are important for mitochondrial function and cell health. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the seven mammalian PPR proteins identified to date and their roles in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression. Furthermore we discuss the mitochondrial RNA targets of the mammalian PPR proteins and methods to investigate the RNA targets of these mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Gene Expression.

  15. Wolffish antifreeze protein genes are primarily organized as tandem repeats that each contain two genes in inverted orientation.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, G K; Hayes, P H; Fletcher, G L; Davies, P L

    1988-01-01

    The antifreeze protein genes of the wolffish (Anarhichas lupus) constitute a large multigene family of 80 to 85 copies, which can be classified into two sets. One-third of the genes were linked but irregularly spaced. The other two-thirds were organized as 8-kilobase-pair (kbp) tandem direct repeats that each contained two genes in inverted orientation; DNA sequence analysis suggests that both genes are functional. Except for a single region specific to each gene, the genes and their immediate flanking sequences were 99.2% identical. This degree of identity ended soon after a putative transcription termination sequence; as the 3' ends of the genes were only 1.3 kbp apart, these sequences might confer mutual protection from interference by transcriptional runoff. A Southern blot of wolffish DNA restricted with enzymes that do not cut within the tandem repeats indicated that the repeats were clustered in groups of six or more. The organization of antifreeze protein genes in the wolffish was very similar to that in the unrelated winter flounder, which produces a completely different antifreeze. This similarity might reflect common dynamics by which their progenitors adapted to life in ice-laden sea water. Images PMID:2851724

  16. HER2 protein expression and HER2 gene amplification are infrequent in small intestinal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gu, Mi Jin; Hong, Seung-Mo; Jung, Soo Jin

    2013-06-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) gene amplification and HER2 protein overexpression have been associated with clinicopathological parameters and clinical outcome in many carcinomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and prognostic impact of HER2 protein overexpression and gene amplification in small intestinal carcinoma (SIC). We performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) for HER2 protein and silver in situ hybridization for the HER2 gene in a total of 194 SICs. A total of 184 cases (94.8 %) were IHC 0 and 6 cases (3.1 %) were IHC 1+ with no gene amplification. HER2 protein overexpression (IHC 3+) with concordant gene amplification was detected in four cases (2.1 %), using the American Society of Clinical Oncology-College of American Pathologists guidelines for breast cancer. HER2 gene amplification was observed in an equivocal (IHC 2+) metastatic tumor in lymph node. No significant correlation was observed between HER2 status and clinicopathological parameters. Although HER2 protein overexpression and amplification were rare and did not correlate with clinicopathological parameters, further studies will be necessary to answer the question as to whether adjuvant therapy targeting the HER2 receptor might improve outcome in patients with a SIC with HER2 gene amplification and protein overexpression. PMID:23703294

  17. Accelerated Evolution of Schistosome Genes Coding for Proteins Located at the Host–Parasite Interface

    PubMed Central

    Philippsen, Gisele S.; Wilson, R. Alan; DeMarco, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Study of proteins located at the host–parasite interface in schistosomes might provide clues about the mechanisms utilized by the parasite to escape the host immune system attack. Micro-exon gene (MEG) protein products and venom allergen-like (VAL) proteins have been shown to be present in schistosome secretions or associated with glands, which led to the hypothesis that they are important components in the molecular interaction of the parasite with the host. Phylogenetic and structural analysis of genes and their transcripts in these two classes shows that recent species-specific expansion of gene number for these families occurred separately in three different species of schistosomes. Enrichment of transposable elements in MEG and VAL genes in Schistosoma mansoni provides a credible mechanism for preferential expansion of gene numbers for these families. Analysis of the ratio between synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) in the comparison between schistosome orthologs for the two classes of genes reveals significantly higher values when compared with a set of a control genes coding for secreted proteins, and for proteins previously localized in the tegument. Additional analyses of paralog genes indicate that exposure of the protein to the definitive host immune system is a determining factor leading to the higher than usual dN/dS values in those genes. The observation that two genes encoding S. mansoni vaccine candidate proteins, known to be exposed at the parasite surface, also display similar evolutionary dynamics suggests a broad response of the parasite to evolutionary pressure imposed by the definitive host immune system. PMID:25567667

  18. Identification of Gene-Expression Signatures and Protein Markers for Breast Cancer Grading and Staging

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Fang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Wei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The grade of a cancer is a measure of the cancer's malignancy level, and the stage of a cancer refers to the size and the extent that the cancer has spread. Here we present a computational method for prediction of gene signatures and blood/urine protein markers for breast cancer grades and stages based on RNA-seq data, which are retrieved from the TCGA breast cancer dataset and cover 111 pairs of disease and matching adjacent noncancerous tissues with pathologists-assigned stages and grades. By applying a differential expression and an SVM-based classification approach, we found that 324 and 227 genes in cancer have their expression levels consistently up-regulated vs. their matching controls in a grade- and stage-dependent manner, respectively. By using these genes, we predicted a 9-gene panel as a gene signature for distinguishing poorly differentiated from moderately and well differentiated breast cancers, and a 19-gene panel as a gene signature for discriminating between the moderately and well differentiated breast cancers. Similarly, a 30-gene panel and a 21-gene panel are predicted as gene signatures for distinguishing advanced stage (stages III-IV) from early stage (stages I-II) cancer samples and for distinguishing stage II from stage I samples, respectively. We expect these gene panels can be used as gene-expression signatures for cancer grade and stage classification. In addition, of the 324 grade-dependent genes, 188 and 66 encode proteins that are predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively; and of the 227 stage-dependent genes, 123 and 51 encode proteins predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively. We anticipate that some combinations of these blood and urine proteins could serve as markers for monitoring breast cancer at specific grades and stages through blood and urine tests. PMID:26375396

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the transcriptional regulation of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-a gene: interactive roles of modified histones, histone acetyltransferase, p300, AND Sp1.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2014-03-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription.

  20. The priA gene encoding the primosomal replicative n' protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, E H; Masai, H; Allen, G C; Kornberg, A

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gene encoding protein n' has been isolated and named priA for primosomal protein A. Protein n' is absolutely required for the conversion of single-stranded phi X174 DNA to the duplex replicative form in an in vitro-reconstituted system. The gene maps to 88.7 minutes on the chromosome adjacent to the cytR locus. Soluble protein extracts from cells harboring the priA gene on a multicopy plasmid contained 45-fold more n' replication activity than wild-type extracts. Enhanced overproduction of greater than 1000-fold was achieved by replacing the natural Shine-Dalgarno sequence with that of the phage T7 phi 10 gene and placing this priA under the control of the T7 phage promoter and RNA polymerase. The priA sequence reveals a 732-amino acid open reading frame and a nucleotide-binding consensus site consistent with the size and ATPase activity of the purified protein. The gene for protein n has been named priB and the putative gene for protein n", priC. Images PMID:2162050

  1. Protein-protein interaction and pathway analyses of top schizophrenia genes reveal schizophrenia susceptibility genes converge on common molecular networks and enrichment of nucleosome (chromatin) assembly genes in schizophrenia susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Jia, Peilin; Li, Ming; Su, Bing; Zhao, Zhongming; Gan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified many promising schizophrenia candidate genes and demonstrated that common polygenic variation contributes to schizophrenia risk. However, whether these genes represent perturbations to a common but limited set of underlying molecular processes (pathways) that modulate risk to schizophrenia remains elusive, and it is not known whether these genes converge on common biological pathways (networks) or represent different pathways. In addition, the theoretical and genetic mechanisms underlying the strong genetic heterogeneity of schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Using 4 well-defined data sets that contain top schizophrenia susceptibility genes and applying protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis, we investigated the interactions among proteins encoded by top schizophrenia susceptibility genes. We found proteins encoded by top schizophrenia susceptibility genes formed a highly significant interconnected network, and, compared with random networks, these PPI networks are statistically highly significant for both direct connectivity and indirect connectivity. We further validated these results using empirical functional data (transcriptome data from a clinical sample). These highly significant findings indicate that top schizophrenia susceptibility genes encode proteins that significantly directly interacted and formed a densely interconnected network, suggesting perturbations of common underlying molecular processes or pathways that modulate risk to schizophrenia. Our findings that schizophrenia susceptibility genes encode a highly interconnected protein network may also provide a novel explanation for the observed genetic heterogeneity of schizophrenia, ie, mutation in any member of this molecular network will lead to same functional consequences that eventually contribute to risk of schizophrenia.

  2. Yeast PPR proteins, watchdogs of mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Christopher J; Golik, Pawel; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    PPR proteins are a family of ubiquitous RNA-binding factors, found in all the Eukaryotic lineages, and are particularly numerous in higher plants. According to recent bioinformatic analyses, yeast genomes encode from 10 (in S. pombe) to 15 (in S. cerevisiae) PPR proteins. All of these proteins are mitochondrial and very often interact with the mitochondrial membrane. Apart from the general factors, RNA polymerase and RNase P, most yeast PPR proteins are involved in the stability and/or translation of mitochondrially encoded RNAs. At present, some information concerning the target RNA(s) of most of these proteins is available, the next challenge will be to refine our understanding of the function of the proteins and to resolve the yeast PPR-RNA-binding code, which might differ significantly from the plant PPR code.

  3. A Novel E2F-like Protein Involved in Transcriptional Activation of Cyst Wall Protein Genes in Giardia lamblia*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Li-Hsin; Pan, Yu-Jiao; Huang, Yu-Chang; Cho, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Chia-Wei; Huang, Shao-Wei; Chuang, Sheng-Fung; Sun, Chin-Hung

    2011-01-01

    Giardia lamblia differentiates into resistant walled cysts for survival outside the host and transmission. During encystation, synthesis of cyst wall proteins is coordinately induced. The E2F family of transcription factors in higher eukaryotes is involved in cell cycle progression and cell differentiation. We asked whether Giardia has E2F-like genes and whether they influence gene expression during Giardia encystation. Blast searches of the Giardia genome database identified one gene (e2f1) encoding a putative E2F protein with two putative DNA-binding domains. We found that the e2f1 gene expression levels increased significantly during encystation. Epitope-tagged E2F1 was found to localize to nuclei. Recombinant E2F1 specifically bound to the thymidine kinase and cwp1–3 gene promoters. E2F1 contains several key residues for DNA binding, and mutation analysis revealed that its binding sequence is similar to those of the known E2F family proteins. The E2F1-binding sequences were positive cis-acting elements of the thymidine kinase and cwp1 promoters. We also found that E2F1 transactivated the thymidine kinase and cwp1 promoters through its binding sequences in vivo. Interestingly, E2F1 overexpression resulted in a significant increase of the levels of CWP1 protein, cwp1–3 gene mRNA, and cyst formation. We also found E2F1 can interact with Myb2, a transcription factor that coordinate up-regulates the cwp1–3 genes during encystation. Our results suggest that E2F family has been conserved during evolution and that E2F1 is an important transcription factor in regulation of the Giardia cwp genes, which are key to Giardia differentiation into cysts. PMID:21835923

  4. New LIC Vectors For Production of Proteins from Genes Containing Rare Codons

    PubMed Central

    Eschenfeldt, William H.; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Stols, Lucy; Donnelly, Mark; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    In the effort to produce proteins coded by diverse genomes, structural genomics projects often must express genes containing codons that are rare in the production strain. To address this problem, genes expressing tRNAs corresponding to those codons are typically coexpressed from a second plasmid in the host strain, or from genes incorporated into production plasmids. Here we describe the modification of a series of LIC pMCSG vectors currently used in the high-throughput production of proteins to include crucial tRNA genes covering rare codons for Arg (AGG/AGA) and Ile (AUA). We also present variants of these new vectors that allow analysis of ligand binding or co-expression of multiple proteins introduced through two independent LIC steps. Additionally, to accommodate the cloning of multiple large proteins, the size of the plasmids was reduced by approximately one kilobase through the removal of non-essential DNA from the base vector. Production of proteins from core vectors of this series validated the desired enhanced capabilities: higher yields of proteins expressed from genes with rare codons occurred in most cases, biotinylated derivatives enabled detailed automated ligand binding analysis, and multiple proteins introduced by dual LIC cloning were expressed successfully and in near balanced stoichiometry, allowing tandem purification of interacting proteins. PMID:24057978

  5. Recombinant HT{sub m4} gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, B.; Adra, C.N.; Lelias, J.M.

    1996-09-03

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein and a recombinant HT{sub m4} protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy. 2 figs.

  6. Nucleotide sequence of a Dictyostelium discoideum gene encoding a protein homologous to the yeast ribosomal protein S31.

    PubMed

    Hoja, U; Hofmann, J; Marschalek, R; Dingermann, T

    1993-01-15

    A cDNA clone has been isolated whose coding potential is significantly homologous to the yeast ribosomal protein S31. The single copy genomic gene contains a 271 bp intron immediately downstream from the ATG translation initiation codon and is flanked by cannonical exon/intron junctions. The intron carries a CAATCAAT motif which has been described as inducer element for discoidin I gamma expression and which has also been found within the intron of the rp29 gene form D. discoideum. The deduced protein contains 110 amino acids and is slightly basic. PMID:7916591

  7. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay for protein-protein interaction in onion cells using the helios gene gun.

    PubMed

    Hollender, Courtney A; Liu, Zhongchi

    2010-06-12

    Investigation of gene function in diverse organisms relies on knowledge of how the gene products interact with each other in their normal cellular environment. The Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Assay(1) allows researchers to visualize protein-protein interactions in living cells and has become an essential research tool. This assay is based on the facilitated association of two fragments of a fluorescent protein (GFP) that are each fused to a potential interacting protein partner. The interaction of the two protein partners would facilitate the association of the N-terminal and C-terminal fragment of GFP, leading to fluorescence. For plant researchers, onion epidermal cells are an ideal experimental system for conducting the BiFC assay because of the ease in obtaining and preparing onion tissues and the direct visualization of fluorescence with minimal background fluorescence. The Helios Gene Gun (BioRad) is commonly used for bombarding plasmid DNA into onion cells. We demonstrate the use of Helios Gene Gun to introduce plasmid constructs for two interacting Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors, SEUSS (SEU) and LEUNIG HOMOLOG (LUH)(2) and the visualization of their interactions mediated by BiFC in onion epidermal cells.

  8. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Assay for Protein-Protein Interaction in Onion Cells Using the Helios Gene Gun

    PubMed Central

    Hollender, Courtney A.; Liu, Zhongchi

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of gene function in diverse organisms relies on knowledge of how the gene products interact with each other in their normal cellular environment. The Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Assay1 allows researchers to visualize protein-protein interactions in living cells and has become an essential research tool. This assay is based on the facilitated association of two fragments of a fluorescent protein (GFP) that are each fused to a potential interacting protein partner. The interaction of the two protein partners would facilitate the association of the N-terminal and C-terminal fragment of GFP, leading to fluorescence. For plant researchers, onion epidermal cells are an ideal experimental system for conducting the BiFC assay because of the ease in obtaining and preparing onion tissues and the direct visualization of fluorescence with minimal background fluorescence. The Helios Gene Gun (BioRad) is commonly used for bombarding plasmid DNA into onion cells. We demonstrate the use of Helios Gene Gun to introduce plasmid constructs for two interacting Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors, SEUSS (SEU) and LEUNIG HOMOLOG (LUH)2 and the visualization of their interactions mediated by BiFC in onion epidermal cells. PMID:20567209

  9. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay for protein-protein interaction in onion cells using the helios gene gun.

    PubMed

    Hollender, Courtney A; Liu, Zhongchi

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of gene function in diverse organisms relies on knowledge of how the gene products interact with each other in their normal cellular environment. The Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Assay(1) allows researchers to visualize protein-protein interactions in living cells and has become an essential research tool. This assay is based on the facilitated association of two fragments of a fluorescent protein (GFP) that are each fused to a potential interacting protein partner. The interaction of the two protein partners would facilitate the association of the N-terminal and C-terminal fragment of GFP, leading to fluorescence. For plant researchers, onion epidermal cells are an ideal experimental system for conducting the BiFC assay because of the ease in obtaining and preparing onion tissues and the direct visualization of fluorescence with minimal background fluorescence. The Helios Gene Gun (BioRad) is commonly used for bombarding plasmid DNA into onion cells. We demonstrate the use of Helios Gene Gun to introduce plasmid constructs for two interacting Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors, SEUSS (SEU) and LEUNIG HOMOLOG (LUH)(2) and the visualization of their interactions mediated by BiFC in onion epidermal cells. PMID:20567209

  10. Gene Models, Expression Repertoire, and Immune Response of Plasmodium vivax Reticulocyte Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hietanen, Jenni; Chim-Ong, Anongruk; Chiramanewong, Thanprakorn; Gruszczyk, Jakub; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Tham, Wai-Hong; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Nguitragool, Wang

    2016-03-01

    Members of the Plasmodium vivax reticulocyte binding protein (PvRBP) family are believed to mediate specific invasion of reticulocytes by P. vivax. In this study, we performed molecular characterization of genes encoding members of this protein family. Through cDNA sequencing, we constructed full-length gene models and verified genes that are protein coding and those that are pseudogenes. We also used quantitative PCR to measure their in vivo transcript abundances in clinical P. vivax isolates. Like genes encoding related invasion ligands of P. falciparum, Pvrbp expression levels vary broadly across different parasite isolates. Through antibody measurements, we found that host immune pressure may be the driving force behind the distinctly high diversity of one of the family members, PvRBP2c. Mild yet significant negative correlation was found between parasitemia and the PvRBP2b antibody level, suggesting that antibodies to the protein may interfere with invasion. PMID:26712206

  11. Regulation of Drosophila yolk protein genes by an ovary-specific GATA factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lossky, M.; Wensink, P.C.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates the expression of the genes for yolk protein of Drosophila melanogaster and the tissue specific function of the regulatory element which activates transcription in vivo. 70 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Breaking the Silence: Protein Stabilization Uncovers Silenced Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in the Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Jennifer; Bayram, Özgür; Feussner, Kirstin; Landesfeind, Manuel; Shelest, Ekaterina; Feussner, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of filamentous fungi comprise numerous putative gene clusters coding for the biosynthesis of chemically and structurally diverse secondary metabolites (SMs), which are rarely expressed under laboratory conditions. Previous approaches to activate these genes were based primarily on artificially targeting the cellular protein synthesis apparatus. Here, we applied an alternative approach of genetically impairing the protein degradation apparatus of the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans by deleting the conserved eukaryotic csnE/CSN5 deneddylase subunit of the COP9 signalosome. This defect in protein degradation results in the activation of a previously silenced gene cluster comprising a polyketide synthase gene producing the antibiotic 2,4-dihydroxy-3-methyl-6-(2-oxopropyl)benzaldehyde (DHMBA). The csnE/CSN5 gene is highly conserved in fungi, and therefore, the deletion is a feasible approach for the identification of new SMs. PMID:23001671

  13. A Neurospora crassa ribosomal protein gene, homologous to yeast CRY1, contains sequences potentially coordinating its transcription with rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, B M; Harrison, K

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced a Neurospora crassa ribosomal protein gene (designated crp-2) strongly homologous to the rp59 gene (CRY1) of yeast and the S14 ribosomal protein gene of mammals. The inferred sequence of the crp-2 protein is more homologous (83%) to the mammalian S14 sequence than to the yeast rp59 sequence (69%). The gene has three intervening sequences (IVSs) two of which are offset 7 bp from the position of IVSs in the mammalian genes. None correspond to the position of the IVS in the yeast gene. Crp-2 was mapped by RFLP analysis to the right arm of linkage group III. The 5' region of the gene contains three copies of a sequence, the Ribo box, previously shown to be required for transcription of both 5S and 40S rRNA genes. We speculate that the Ribo box may coordinate ribosomal protein and rRNA gene transcription. Images PMID:1977135

  14. Genes for Drosophila small heat shock proteins are regulated differently by ecdysterone

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, J.; Voellmy, R. ); Mestril, R. )

    1991-12-01

    Genes for small heat shock proteins (hsp27 to hsp22) are activated in late third-instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster in the absence of heat stress. This regulation has been stimulated in cultured Drosophila cells in which the genes are activated by the addition of ecdysterone. Sequence elements (HERE) involved in ecdysterone regulation of the hsp27 and hsp23 genes have been defined by transfection studies and have recently been identified as binding sites for ecdysterone receptor. The authors report here that the shp27 and hsp23 genes are regulated differently by ecdysterone. The hsp27 gene is activated rapidly by ecdysterone, even in the absence of protein synthesis. In contrast, high-level expression of the hsp23 gene begins only after a lag of about 6 h, is dependent on the continuous presence of ecdysterone, and is sensitive to low concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors. Transfection experiments with reported constructs show that this difference in regulation is at the transcriptional level. Synthetic hsp27 or hsp23 HERE sequences confer hsp27- or hsp23-type ecdysterone regulation on a basal promoter. These findings indicate that the hsp27 gene is primary, and the hsp23 gene is mainly a secondary, hormone-responsive gene. Ecdysterone receptor is implied to play a role in the regulation of both genes.

  15. Molecular characterization of a human gene for S28 ribosomal binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.; Borst, D.E.; Chader, G.J.

    1994-09-01

    The mechanism of ribosome action and the ribosomal binding proteins which cooperatively interact in the working of this structure are not completely understood. Theoretically, mutations in genes that encode these proteins may compromise the efficiency of protein synthesis and therefore lead to a functional disorder. In the course of our search for human genes which show homology to the C. elegans CED-4 death gene, we have serendipitously identified one of the human S28 ribosomal binding protein genes as a random fragment fused to the end of one of our putative CED-4 positive homologue clones. The cloned S28 fragment consists of 381 nucleotides with a putative open reading frame of 113 amino acids. Sequence comparisons to GenBank revealed significant homologies to ribosomal binding protein genes in other species (including the rat S28 ribosomal binding protein gene) indicating that the S28 gene sequence is highly conserved. This finding is confirmed by zooblot analysis. Significant homologies also exist to two human expressed tagged sites (HUMRIBPROB; L05091 and HSAFIF072; Z21908). Analysis of the putative S28 peptide sequence allows insights into possible functional regions of the protein. The identification of 8 distinct bands upon Southern analysis of the S28 fragments suggests that there are multiple copies of the S28 gene in the human genome. Mapping of the S28 fragment on somatic cell hybrid panels identified distinct S28 gene loci on chromosomes 1, 2, 7, 10, 11, 12, 17 expression in adult tissues (pancreas, kidney, muscle, liver, lung, placenta, brain, heart, and retina) as well as in fetal tissues (kidney, liver, lung, brain, and heart).

  16. Predicting protein phosphorylation from gene expression: top methods from the IMPROVER Species Translation Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Biehl, Michael; Bilal, Erhan; Hormoz, Sahand; Meyer, Pablo; Norel, Raquel; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Bhanot, Gyan; Luo, Feng; Tarca, Adi L.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Using gene expression to infer changes in protein phosphorylation levels induced in cells by various stimuli is an outstanding problem. The intra-species protein phosphorylation challenge organized by the IMPROVER consortium provided the framework to identify the best approaches to address this issue. Results: Rat lung epithelial cells were treated with 52 stimuli, and gene expression and phosphorylation levels were measured. Competing teams used gene expression data from 26 stimuli to develop protein phosphorylation prediction models and were ranked based on prediction performance for the remaining 26 stimuli. Three teams were tied in first place in this challenge achieving a balanced accuracy of about 70%, indicating that gene expression is only moderately predictive of protein phosphorylation. In spite of the similar performance, the approaches used by these three teams, described in detail in this article, were different, with the average number of predictor genes per phosphoprotein used by the teams ranging from 3 to 124. However, a significant overlap of gene signatures between teams was observed for the majority of the proteins considered, while Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways were enriched in the union of the predictor genes of the three teams for multiple proteins. Availability and implementation: Gene expression and protein phosphorylation data are available from ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-2091). Software implementation of the approach of Teams 49 and 75 are available at http://bioinformaticsprb.med.wayne.edu and http://people.cs.clemson.edu/∼luofeng/sbv.rar, respectively. Contact: gyanbhanot@gmail.com or luofeng@clemson.edu or atarca@med.wayne.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25061067

  17. LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hundertmark, Michaela; Hincha, Dirk K

    2008-01-01

    Background LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins have first been described about 25 years ago as accumulating late in plant seed development. They were later found in vegetative plant tissues following environmental stress and also in desiccation tolerant bacteria and invertebrates. Although they are widely assumed to play crucial roles in cellular dehydration tolerance, their physiological and biochemical functions are largely unknown. Results We present a genome-wide analysis of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 51 LEA protein encoding genes in the Arabidopsis genome that could be classified into nine distinct groups. Expression studies were performed on all genes at different developmental stages, in different plant organs and under different stress and hormone treatments using quantitative RT-PCR. We found evidence of expression for all 51 genes. There was only little overlap between genes expressed in vegetative tissues and in seeds and expression levels were generally higher in seeds. Most genes encoding LEA proteins had abscisic acid response (ABRE) and/or low temperature response (LTRE) elements in their promoters and many genes containing the respective promoter elements were induced by abscisic acid, cold or drought. We also found that 33% of all Arabidopsis LEA protein encoding genes are arranged in tandem repeats and that 43% are part of homeologous pairs. The majority of LEA proteins were predicted to be highly hydrophilic and natively unstructured, but some were predicted to be folded. Conclusion The analyses indicate a wide range of sequence diversity, intracellular localizations, and expression patterns. The high fraction of retained duplicate genes and the inferred functional diversification indicate that they confer an evolutionary advantage for an organism under varying stressful environmental conditions. This comprehensive analysis will be an important starting point for future efforts to elucidate

  18. Rapid Evolution of the Sequences and Gene Repertoires of Secreted Proteins in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins secreted to the extracellular environment or to the periphery of the cell envelope, the secretome, play essential roles in foraging, antagonistic and mutualistic interactions. We hypothesize that arms races, genetic conflicts and varying selective pressures should lead to the rapid change of sequences and gene repertoires of the secretome. The analysis of 42 bacterial pan-genomes shows that secreted, and especially extracellular proteins, are predominantly encoded in the accessory genome, i.e. among genes not ubiquitous within the clade. Genes encoding outer membrane proteins might engage more frequently in intra-chromosomal gene conversion because they are more often in multi-genic families. The gene sequences encoding the secretome evolve faster than the rest of the genome and in particular at non-synonymous positions. Cell wall proteins in Firmicutes evolve particularly fast when compared with outer membrane proteins of Proteobacteria. Virulence factors are over-represented in the secretome, notably in outer membrane proteins, but cell localization explains more of the variance in substitution rates and gene repertoires than sequence homology to known virulence factors. Accordingly, the repertoires and sequences of the genes encoding the secretome change fast in the clades of obligatory and facultative pathogens and also in the clades of mutualists and free-living bacteria. Our study shows that cell localization shapes genome evolution. In agreement with our hypothesis, the repertoires and the sequences of genes encoding secreted proteins evolve fast. The particularly rapid change of extracellular proteins suggests that these public goods are key players in bacterial adaptation. PMID:23189144

  19. A family of wound-induced genes in Populus shares common features with genes encoding vegetative storage proteins.

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Egelkrout, E E; Coleman, G D; Chen, T H; Haissig, B E; Riemenschneider, D E; Gordon, M P

    1993-10-01

    Two wound-inducible cDNAs from poplar leaves show sequence identity to vegetative storage proteins (VSP) that accumulate seasonally in poplar bark tissues. We have compared the genomic organization, cDNA sequences and expression of the genes encoding the wound-inducible cDNAs (win4) with that of a bark VSP (called bark storage protein, or BSP). There appear to be several win4 genes in the poplar genome which segregate as a single locus and are therefore likely to be clustered. The same is true of the BSP genes. The win4 locus is linked (map distance of 5 cM) to the BSP locus, consistent with a common evolutionary origin of the genes. A near full-length win4 cDNA shows 75% sequence identity to BSP cDNAs. Both win4 and BSP are systemically wound-inducible; win4 transcripts accumulate in leaves and stems, whereas BSP transcripts accumulate almost exclusively in stems. A phloem transport-dependent signaling mechanism appears to be involved in systemic win4 expression after wounding. In contrast to BSP gene expression, win4 genes are not expressed in response to short day conditions. The data indicate win4 and BSP genes are differentially regulated, and their products may play important roles in the storage and reallocation of nitrogen in perennial plants.

  20. Molecular cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, D P; Kubiniec, M A; Yoshimura, F; Genco, R J

    1988-01-01

    The gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis 381, fimbrilin, has been cloned and sequenced. The gene was present as a single copy on the bacterial chromosome, and the codon usage in the gene conformed closely to that expected for an abundant protein. The predicted size of the mature protein was 35,924 daltons, and the secretory form may have had a 10-amino-acid, hydrophilic leader sequence similar to the leader sequences of the MePhe fimbriae family. The protein sequence had no marked similarity to known fimbrial sequences, and no homologous sequences could be found in other black-pigmented Bacteroides species, suggesting that fimbrillin represents a class of fimbrial subunit protein of limited distribution. Images PMID:2895100

  1. Using CATH-Gene3D to Analyze the Sequence, Structure, and Function of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sillitoe, Ian; Lewis, Tony; Orengo, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The CATH database is a classification of protein structures found in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Protein structures are chopped into individual units of structural domains, and these domains are grouped together into superfamilies if there is sufficient evidence that they have diverged from a common ancestor during the process of evolution. A sister resource, Gene3D, extends this information by scanning sequence profiles of these CATH domain superfamilies against many millions of known proteins to identify related sequences. Thus the combined CATH-Gene3D resource provides confident predictions of the likely structural fold, domain organisation, and evolutionary relatives of these proteins. In addition, this resource incorporates annotations from a large number of external databases such as known enzyme active sites, GO molecular functions, physical interactions, and mutations. This unit details how to access and understand the information contained within the CATH-Gene3D Web pages, the downloadable data files, and the remotely accessible Web services.

  2. mRNA sequence of three respiratory syncytial virus genes encoding two nonstructural proteins and a 22K structural protein.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    An mRNA sequence of two human respiratory syncytial viral nonstructural protein genes and of a gene for a 22,000-molecular-weight (22K) protein was obtained by cDNA cloning and DNA sequencing. Sequences corresponding to the 5' ends of the respective transcripts were deduced directly by primer extension and dideoxy nucleotide sequencing of the mRNAs. The availability of a bicistronic clone (pRSC6) confirmed the gene order for this portion of the genome. Contrary to other unsegmented negative-stranded RNA viruses, a 19-nucleotide intercistronic sequence was present between the NS1 and NS2 genes. The translation of cloned viral sequences in the bicistronic and monocistronic clones (pRSNS1 and pRSNS2) revealed two moderately hydrophobic proteins of 15,568 and 14,703 daltons. Their similarity in molecular size explained our earlier inability to resolve these proteins. A DNA sequence of an additional recombinant plasmid (pRSA2) revealed a long open reading frame encoding a 22,156-dalton protein containing 194 amino acids. It was relatively basic and moderately hydrophobic. A protein of this size was readily translated in vitro from a viral mRNA hybrid selected by this plasmid and corresponded to an unglycosylated 22K protein seen in purified extracellular virus but not associated with detergent- and salt-resistant cores. A second open reading frame of 90 amino acids partially overlapping with the C terminus of the 22K protein was also present within this sequence. This was reminiscent of the viral matrix protein gene which was previously shown by us to contain two overlapping reading frames. The finding of three additional viral transcripts encoding at least three identifiable proteins in human respiratory syncytial virus was a novel departure from the usual genetic organization of paramyxoviruses. The 5' ends of all three transcripts had a 5'NGGGCAAAU sequence that is common to all viral transcripts analyzed so far. Although there was no obvious homology immediately

  3. Over-expression of a protein kinase gene enhances the defense of tobacco against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Osmany; González, Marleny; López, Yunior; Portieles, Roxana; Pujol, Merardo; González, Ernesto; Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Borrás-Hidalgo, Orlando

    2010-03-01

    To identify Nicotiana tabacum genes involved in resistance and susceptibility to Rhizoctonia solani, suppression subtractive hybridization was used to generate a cDNA library from transcripts that are differentially expressed during a compatible and incompatible interaction. This allowed the isolation of a protein kinase cDNA that was down-regulated during a compatible and up-regulated during an incompatible interaction. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of this gene confirmed the differential expression patterns between the compatible and incompatible interactions. Over-expression of this gene in tobacco enhanced the resistance to damping-off produced by an aggressive R. solani strain. Furthermore, silencing of this protein kinase gene reduced the resistance to a non-aggressive R. solani strain. A set of reported tobacco-resistant genes were also evaluated in tobacco plants over-expressing and silencing the protein kinase cDNA. Several genes previously associated with resistance in tobacco, like manganese superoxide dismutase, Hsr203J, chitinases and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, were up-regulated in tobacco plants over-expressing the protein kinase cDNA. Potentially, the protein kinase gene could be used to engineer resistance to R. solani in tobacco cultivars susceptible to this important pathogen.

  4. Kinetics of single DNA molecule denaturation by T4 Gene 32 protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Kiran; Karpel, Richard L.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-03-01

    Bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein (32 protein) specifically binds single-stranded DNA, a property essential for its role in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. Although on a thermodynamic basis, single-stranded DNA binding proteins should lower the thermal melting temperature of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), 32 protein does not. Using single molecule force spectroscopy, we show for the first time that 32 protein is capable of slowly destabilizing natural dsDNA. Direct measurements of single DNA molecule denaturation and renaturation kinetics in the presence of 32 protein and its proteolytic fragments reveal three types of kinetic behavior, attributable to specific protein structural domains, which regulate 32 protein's helix-destabilizing capabilities. This regulation is potentially biologically significant because uncontrolled helix-destabilization would be lethal to the cell. We also obtain equilibrium measurements of the DNA helix-coil transition free energy in the presence of these proteins for the first time.

  5. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah.; Cho, Michael H.; Mancini, John D.; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M.; Litonjua, Gus; Bakke, Per S.; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Perrella, Mark A.; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog Interacting Protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:23459001

  6. Recommended nomenclature for five mammalian carboxylesterase gene families: human, mouse, and rat genes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Wright, Matthew W; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Cox, Laura A; Hosokawa, Masakiyo; Imai, Teruko; Ishibashi, Shun; Lehner, Richard; Miyazaki, Masao; Perkins, Everett J; Potter, Phillip M; Redinbo, Matthew R; Robert, Jacques; Satoh, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Yan, Bingfan; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Zechner, Rudolf; Maltais, Lois J

    2010-10-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES or Ces) genes encode enzymes that participate in xenobiotic, drug, and lipid metabolism in the body and are members of at least five gene families. Tandem duplications have added more genes for some families, particularly for mouse and rat genomes, which has caused confusion in naming rodent Ces genes. This article describes a new nomenclature system for human, mouse, and rat carboxylesterase genes that identifies homolog gene families and allocates a unique name for each gene. The guidelines of human, mouse, and rat gene nomenclature committees were followed and "CES" (human) and "Ces" (mouse and rat) root symbols were used followed by the family number (e.g., human CES1). Where multiple genes were identified for a family or where a clash occurred with an existing gene name, a letter was added (e.g., human CES4A; mouse and rat Ces1a) that reflected gene relatedness among rodent species (e.g., mouse and rat Ces1a). Pseudogenes were named by adding "P" and a number to the human gene name (e.g., human CES1P1) or by using a new letter followed by ps for mouse and rat Ces pseudogenes (e.g., Ces2d-ps). Gene transcript isoforms were named by adding the GenBank accession ID to the gene symbol (e.g., human CES1_AB119995 or mouse Ces1e_BC019208). This nomenclature improves our understanding of human, mouse, and rat CES/Ces gene families and facilitates research into the structure, function, and evolution of these gene families. It also serves as a model for naming CES genes from other mammalian species.

  7. Gene V protein dimerization and cooperativity of binding of poly(dA).

    PubMed

    Terwilliger, T C

    1996-12-24

    Gene V protein of bacteriophage f1 is a dimeric protein that binds cooperatively to single-stranded nucleic acids. In order to determine whether a monomer-dimer equilibrium has an appreciable effect upon the thermodynamics of gene V protein binding to nucleic acids, the dissociation constant for the protein dimer was investigated using size-exclusion chromatography. At concentrations ranging from 5 x 10(-10) to 1.2 x 10(-5) M, the Stokes radius of the protein was that expected of the dimer of the gene V protein. The Stokes radius of the protein was also independent of salt concentration from 0.2 to 1.0 M NaCl in a buffer containing 10 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.4, and 1 mM EDTA. The binding of the dimeric gene V protein to poly(dA) was studied using a simplified lattice model for protein-protein interactions adapted for use with a dimeric protein that binds simultaneously to two strands of nucleic acid. Interpretation of the salt dependence, C = [d log(Kint omega)]/[d log(NaCl)], of binding of such a dimeric protein to nucleic acid using the theory of Record et al. (Record, M. T., et al. (1976) J. Mol. Biol. 107, 145-158) indicates that C is a function of the numbers of cations and anions released from protein and nucleic acid upon binding of the dimer, not of the monomer. Cooperativity of gene V protein binding to poly(dA) was studied with titration experiments that are sensitive to the degree of cooperativity of binding. The cooperativity factor omega, defined as the ratio of the binding constant for a site adjacent to a previously bound dimer to that for an isolated site, was found to be relatively insensitive to salt, with a value in the range of 2000-7000 for binding to poly(dA) at 3 degrees C and at 23 degrees C. This high cooperativity factor supports the suggestion that protein-protein contacts play a major role in the formation of the superhelical gene V protein-single-stranded nucleic acid complex.

  8. Systematic analysis of mutation distribution in three dimensional protein structures identifies cancer driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Okada, Yukinori; Boroevich, Keith A.; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure determines molecular function, interaction, and stability of the protein, therefore distribution of mutation in the tertiary structure can facilitate the identification of new driver genes in cancer. To analyze mutation distribution in protein tertiary structures, we applied a novel three dimensional permutation test to the mutation positions. We analyzed somatic mutation datasets of 21 types of cancers obtained from exome sequencing conducted by the TCGA project. Of the 3,622 genes that had ≥3 mutations in the regions with tertiary structure data, 106 genes showed significant skew in mutation distribution. Known tumor suppressors and oncogenes were significantly enriched in these identified cancer gene sets. Physical distances between mutations in known oncogenes were significantly smaller than those of tumor suppressors. Twenty-three genes were detected in multiple cancers. Candidate genes with significant skew of the 3D mutation distribution included kinases (MAPK1, EPHA5, ERBB3, and ERBB4), an apoptosis related gene (APP), an RNA splicing factor (SF1), a miRNA processing factor (DICER1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase (CUL1) and transcription factors (KLF5 and EEF1B2). Our study suggests that systematic analysis of mutation distribution in the tertiary protein structure can help identify cancer driver genes. PMID:27225414

  9. Molecular evolution of the fusion protein gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hirokazu; Nagasawa, Koo; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Tanaka, Ryota; Ishii, Haruyuki; Shimojo, Naoki; Kuroda, Makoto; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-09-01

    We studied the molecular evolution of the fusion protein (F) gene in the human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A (HRSV-A). We performed time-scaled phylogenetic analyses using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We also conducted genetic distance (p-distance), positive/negative selection, and Bayesian skyline plot analyses. Furthermore, we mapped the amino acid substitutions of the protein. The MCMC-constructed tree indicated that the HRSV F gene diverged from the bovine RSV (BRSV) gene approximately 550years ago and had a relatively low substitution rate (7.59×10(-4) substitutions/site/year). Moreover, a common ancestor of HRSV-A and -B diverged approximately 280years ago, which has since formed four distinct clusters. The present HRSV-A strains were assigned six genotypes based on F gene sequences and attachment glycoprotein gene sequences. The present strains exhibited high F gene sequence similarity values and low genetic divergence. No positive selection sites were identified; however, 50 negative selection sites were identified. F protein amino acid substitutions at 17 sites were distributed in the F protein. The effective population size of the gene has remained relatively constant, but the population size of the prevalent genotype (GA2) has increased in the last 10years. These results suggest that the HRSV-AF gene has evolved independently and formed some genotypes. PMID:27291709

  10. A review of the occurrence of grain softness protein-1 genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain softness protein-1 (Gsp-1) is a small, 495-bp intronless gene found throughout the Triticeae tribe at the distal end of group 5 chromosomes. With the Puroindolines, it constitutes a key component of the Hardness locus. In the polyploid wheats, Triticum aestivum and T. turgidum, the gene is pr...

  11. Systematic analysis of mutation distribution in three dimensional protein structures identifies cancer driver genes.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Okada, Yukinori; Boroevich, Keith A; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure determines molecular function, interaction, and stability of the protein, therefore distribution of mutation in the tertiary structure can facilitate the identification of new driver genes in cancer. To analyze mutation distribution in protein tertiary structures, we applied a novel three dimensional permutation test to the mutation positions. We analyzed somatic mutation datasets of 21 types of cancers obtained from exome sequencing conducted by the TCGA project. Of the 3,622 genes that had ≥3 mutations in the regions with tertiary structure data, 106 genes showed significant skew in mutation distribution. Known tumor suppressors and oncogenes were significantly enriched in these identified cancer gene sets. Physical distances between mutations in known oncogenes were significantly smaller than those of tumor suppressors. Twenty-three genes were detected in multiple cancers. Candidate genes with significant skew of the 3D mutation distribution included kinases (MAPK1, EPHA5, ERBB3, and ERBB4), an apoptosis related gene (APP), an RNA splicing factor (SF1), a miRNA processing factor (DICER1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase (CUL1) and transcription factors (KLF5 and EEF1B2). Our study suggests that systematic analysis of mutation distribution in the tertiary protein structure can help identify cancer driver genes. PMID:27225414

  12. Cloning and expression of prion protein encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Sun, Xiuqin; Zhang, Jinxing; Zan, Jindong

    2008-02-01

    The prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) was cloned. It was not interrupted by an intron. This gene has two promoters in its 5' upstream, indicating that its transcription may be intensive, and should have an important function. It was expressed in all 14 tissues tested, demonstrating that it is a house-keeping gene. Its expression in digestion and reproduction systems implies that the possible prions of fish may transfer horizontally.

  13. Mutations in Protein-Binding Hot-Spots on the Hub Protein Smad3 Differentially Affect Its Protein Interactions and Smad3-Regulated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schiro, Michelle M.; Stauber, Sara E.; Peterson, Tami L.; Krueger, Chateen; Darnell, Steven J.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Drinkwater, Norman R.; Newton, Michael A.; Hoffmann, F. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Hub proteins are connected through binding interactions to many other proteins. Smad3, a mediator of signal transduction induced by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), serves as a hub protein for over 50 protein-protein interactions. Different cellular responses mediated by Smad3 are the product of cell-type and context dependent Smad3-nucleated protein complexes acting in concert. Our hypothesis is that perturbation of this spectrum of protein complexes by mutation of single protein-binding hot-spots on Smad3 will have distinct consequences on Smad3-mediated responses. Methodology/Principal Findings We mutated 28 amino acids on the surface of the Smad3 MH2 domain and identified 22 Smad3 variants with reduced binding to subsets of 17 Smad3-binding proteins including Smad4, SARA, Ski, Smurf2 and SIP1. Mutations defective in binding to Smad4, e.g., D408H, or defective in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, e.g., W406A, were compromised in modulating the expression levels of a Smad3-dependent reporter gene or six endogenous Smad3-responsive genes: Mmp9, IL11, Tnfaip6, Fermt1, Olfm2 and Wnt11. However, the Smad3 mutants Y226A, Y297A, W326A, K341A, and E267A had distinct differences on TGF-β signaling. For example, K341A and Y226A both reduced the Smad3-mediated activation of the reporter gene by ∼50% but K341A only reduced the TGF-β inducibilty of Olfm2 in contrast to Y226A which reduced the TGF-β inducibility of all six endogenous genes as severely as the W406A mutation. E267A had increased protein binding but reduced TGF-β inducibility because it caused higher basal levels of expression. Y297A had increased TGF-β inducibility because it caused lower Smad3-induced basal levels of gene expression. Conclusions/Significance Mutations in protein binding hot-spots on Smad3 reduced the binding to different subsets of interacting proteins and caused a range of quantitative changes in the expression of genes induced by Smad3. This approach should be useful

  14. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II regulates renin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sandra; Roeser, Marc; Lachmann, Peter; Ishii, Sumiyashi; Suh, Jae Mi; Harlander, Sabine; Desch, Michael; Brunssen, Coy; Morawietz, Henning; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2012-07-13

    This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of the orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) in the regulation of renin gene expression. COUP-TFII colocalized with renin in the juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, which are the main source of renin in vivo. Protein-DNA binding studies demonstrated that COUP-TFII binds to an imperfect direct repeat COUP-TFII recognition sequence (termed hereafter proxDR) in the proximal renin promoter. Because cAMP signaling plays a central role in the control of the renin gene expression, we suggested that COUP-TFII may modulate this cAMP effect. Accordingly, knockdown of COUP-TFII in the clonal renin-producing cell lines As4.1 and Calu-6 diminished the stimulation of the renin mRNA expression by cAMP agonists. In addition, the mutation of the proxDR element in renin promoter reporter gene constructs abrogated the inducibility by cAMP. The proxDR sequence was found to be necessary for the function of a proximal renin promoter cAMP-response element (CRE). Knockdown of COUP-TFII or cAMP-binding protein (CREB), which is the archetypal transcription factor binding to CRE, decreased the basal renin gene expression. However, the deficiency of COUP-TFII did not further diminish the renin expression when CREB was knocked down. In agreement with the cell culture studies, mutant mice deficient in COUP-TFII have lower renin expression than their control strain. Altogether our data show that COUP-TFII is involved in the control of renin gene expression.

  15. Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor II Regulates Renin Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Sandra; Roeser, Marc; Lachmann, Peter; Ishii, Sumiyashi; Suh, Jae Mi; Harlander, Sabine; Desch, Michael; Brunssen, Coy; Morawietz, Henning; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Todorov, Vladimir T.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of the orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) in the regulation of renin gene expression. COUP-TFII colocalized with renin in the juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, which are the main source of renin in vivo. Protein-DNA binding studies demonstrated that COUP-TFII binds to an imperfect direct repeat COUP-TFII recognition sequence (termed hereafter proxDR) in the proximal renin promoter. Because cAMP signaling plays a central role in the control of the renin gene expression, we suggested that COUP-TFII may modulate this cAMP effect. Accordingly, knockdown of COUP-TFII in the clonal renin-producing cell lines As4.1 and Calu-6 diminished the stimulation of the renin mRNA expression by cAMP agonists. In addition, the mutation of the proxDR element in renin promoter reporter gene constructs abrogated the inducibility by cAMP. The proxDR sequence was found to be necessary for the function of a proximal renin promoter cAMP-response element (CRE). Knockdown of COUP-TFII or cAMP-binding protein (CREB), which is the archetypal transcription factor binding to CRE, decreased the basal renin gene expression. However, the deficiency of COUP-TFII did not further diminish the renin expression when CREB was knocked down. In agreement with the cell culture studies, mutant mice deficient in COUP-TFII have lower renin expression than their control strain. Altogether our data show that COUP-TFII is involved in the control of renin gene expression. PMID:22645148

  16. Comprehensive identification of LMW-GS genes and their protein products in a common wheat variety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it is well known that low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS) affect bread and noodle processing quality, the function of specific LMW-GS proteins remains unclear. It is important to find the genes that correspond to individual LMW-GS proteins in order to understand the functions o...

  17. Protein Methylation and Interaction with the Antiproliferative Gene, BTG2/TIS21/Pc3

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangduk

    2014-01-01

    The last one and half a decade witnessed an outstanding re-emergence of attention and remarkable progress in the field of protein methylation. In the present article, we describe the early discoveries in research and review the role protein methylation played in the biological function of the antiproliferative gene, BTG2/TIS21/PC3. PMID:24532495

  18. Expression of chicken CTCF gene in COS-1 cells and partial purification of CTCF protein.

    PubMed

    Kotova, E S; Sorokina, I V; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G; Sverdlov, E D

    2013-08-01

    The chicken gene for transcription factor CTCF was expressed in COS-1 mammalian cells. The CTCF protein containing polyhistidine tag was partially purified using metallo-affinity and ion-exchange chromatography. The expressed protein localized in the cell nucleus and was shown to be functionally active in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and specifically interacted with anti-CTCF antibodies. PMID:24228875

  19. Gene Sequence Variability of the Three Surface Proteins of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (HRSV) in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Lorena I.; Shaw, Chad A.; Aideyan, Letisha O.; Jewell, Alan M.; Dawson, Brian C.; Haq, Taha R.; Piedra, Pedro A.

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) has three surface glycoproteins: small hydrophobic (SH), attachment (G) and fusion (F), encoded by three consecutive genes (SH-G-F). A 270-nt fragment of the G gene is used to genotype HRSV isolates. This study genotyped and investigated the variability of the gene and amino acid sequences of the three surface proteins of HRSV strains collected from 1987 to 2005 from one center. Sixty original clinical isolates and 5 prototype strains were analyzed. Sequences containing SH, F and G genes were generated, and multiple alignments and phylogenetic trees were analyzed. Genetic variability by protein domains comparing virus genotypes was assessed. Complete sequences of the SH-G-F genes were obtained for all 65 samples: HRSV-A = 35; HRSV-B = 30. In group A strains, genotypes GA5 and GA2 were predominant. For HRSV-B strains, the genotype GB4 was predominant from 1992 to 1994 and only genotype BA viruses were detected in 2004–2005. Different genetic variability at nucleotide level was detected between the genes, with G gene being the most variable and the highest variability detected in the 270-nt G fragment that is frequently used to genotype the virus. High variability (>10%) was also detected in the signal peptide and transmembrane domains of the F gene of HRSV A strains. Variability among the HRSV strains resulting in non-synonymous changes was detected in hypervariable domains of G protein, the signal peptide of the F protein, a not previously defined domain in the F protein, and the antigenic site Ø in the pre-fusion F. Divergent trends were observed between HRSV -A and -B groups for some functional domains. A diverse population of HRSV -A and -B genotypes circulated in Houston during an 18 year period. We hypothesize that diverse sequence variation of the surface protein genes provide HRSV strains a survival advantage in a partially immune-protected community. PMID:24625544

  20. Functional features, biological pathways, and protein interaction networks of addiction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2010-05-01

    Addictions are chronic and common brain disorders affected by many genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Recent genome-wide linkage and association studies have revealed several promising genomic regions and multiple genes relating to addictions. To explore the underlying biological processes in the development of addictions, we used 62 genes recently reviewed by Li and Burmeister (2009) as representative addiction-related genes, and then we investigated their features in gene function, pathways, and protein interaction networks. We performed enrichment tests of their Gene Ontology (GO) annotations and of their pathways in the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) system. The tests revealed that these addiction-related genes were highly enriched in neurodevelopment-related processes. Interestingly, we found circadian rhythm signaling in one of the enriched pathways. Moreover, these addiction-related genes tended to have higher connectivity and shorter characteristic shortest-path distances compared to control genes in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. This investigation is the first of such kind in addiction studies, and it is useful for further addiction candidate-gene prioritization and verification, thus helping us to better understand molecular mechanisms of addictions.

  1. [Research on constructing phylogenetics trees of ruminants basing on the database of milk protein gene sequences].

    PubMed

    Fan, B L; Li, N; Wu, C X

    2000-01-01

    Primers designed according to the sequences of four milk protein genes of cow Bos taurus (alpha-lactoalbumin, beta-lactoglobin, beta- and kappa-casein) were used to amplify the full length gene of alpha-lactalbumin in yak Bos grunniens (2999 bp), water buffalo Bubalus arnee bubalis (278 bp), partial sequence of this gene in red deer cervus elaphs xanthopygus (1582 bp), 5' and 3' flanking region of beta-lactoglobin gene (2167 bp and 1096 bp in length respectively), 5'-flanking region and exon VIII to exon IX of beta-casein gene (987 bp and 1096 bp in length respectively), exonIV of kappa-casein gene (780 bp). All the amplified DNA fragments were cloned and the Nt sequences were determined. Phylogenetic tree containing 20 species (or subspecies) of ruminantia suborder was constructed according to the partial sequence of kappa-casein gene exon IV (363 bp in length), which shows good monophyly of the Bovidae. And trees constructed according to other milk protein genes indicate that all the milk protein genes have good features for drawing phylogenetics tree at least among species belonging to different subfamilies.

  2. Characterization of the sterol carrier protein-x/sterol carrier protein-2 gene in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Ma, Haihao; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Kaiyu; Peng, Jianxin; Lan, Que; Hong, Huazu

    2012-11-01

    Cholesterol is a membrane component and the precursor of ecdysteroids in insects, but insects cannot synthesize cholesterol de novo. Therefore, cholesterol uptake and transportation during the feeding larval stages are critical processes in insects. The sterol carrier protein-2 domain (SCP-2) in sterol carrier proteins-x (SCP-x) has been speculated to be involved in intracellular cholesterol transfer and metabolism in vertebrates. However, a direct association between SCP-x gene expression, cholesterol absorption and development in lepidopteran insects is poorly understood. We identified the Helicoverpa armigera sterol carrier protein-x/2 (HaSCP-x/2) gene from the larval midgut cDNAs. The HaSCP-x/2 gene is well conserved during evolution and relatively divergent in heterogenetic species. Transcripts of HaSCP-x/2 were detected by qRT-PCR at the highest level in the midgut of H. armigera during the larval stages. Expression knockdown of HaSCP-x/2 transcripts via dsRNA interference resulted in delayed larval development and decreased adult fecundity. Sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitors were lethal to young larvae and decreased fertility in adults emerged from treated elder larvae in H. armigera. The results taken together suggest that HaSCPx/2 gene is important for normal development and fertility in H. armigera.

  3. Differential analysis of "protein corona" profile adsorbed onto different nonviral gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caracciolo, Giulio; Caruso, Giuseppe; Foglia, Patrizia; Pozzi, Daniela; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2011-12-15

    A shotgun proteomics approach was used to characterize and compare the proteins that lead to the formation of a rich "protein corona" adsorbed onto the surfaces of cationic liposomes (CLs), lipoplexes, and lipid/polycation/DNA (LPD) complexes, when they come into contact with plasma. After separation of the nanoparticle-protein complex from plasma, the protein mixture was digested, and peptides were analyzed by nanoliquid chromatography-Orbitrap LTQ-XL mass spectrometry. The number of proteins bound to lipoplexes was double that of those identified in the corona of CLs (208 vs 105), while 77 proteins were common to both coronas. The number of proteins bound to the surface of the LPD complexes (158, 133 of which are common to lipoplexes) is intermediate between those found in the protein corona of both CLs and lipoplexes. About half of them were found in the protein corona of CLs. By overlapping the three formulations, it can be seen that only 12 proteins are peculiar to LPD complexes. These results may help in designing gene delivery systems capable of binding the minimum possible quantity of proteins that influence transfection negatively, binding selectively proteins capable of helping in steering in vivo the vector toward the target, and obtaining more efficient and effective gene therapy.

  4. Regulation of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brown, T A; Evangelista, C; Trumpower, B L

    1995-12-01

    Selection for mutants which release glucose repression of the CYB2 gene was used to identify genes which regulate repression of mitochondrial biogenesis. We have identified two of these as the previously described GRR1/CAT80 and ROX3 genes. Mutations in these genes not only release glucose repression of CYB2 but also generally release respiration of the mutants from glucose repression. In addition, both mutants are partially defective in CYB2 expression when grown on nonfermentable carbon sources, indicating a positive regulatory role as well. ROX3 was cloned by complementation of a glucose-inducible flocculating phenotype of an amber mutant and has been mapped as a new leftmost marker on chromosome 2. The ROX3 mutant has only a modest defect in glucose repression of GAL1 but is substantially compromised in galactose induction of GAL1 expression. This mutant also has increased SUC2 expression on nonrepressing carbon sources. We have also characterized the regulation of CYB2 in strains carrying null mutation in two other glucose repression genes, HXK2 and SSN6, and show that HXK2 is a negative regulator of CYB2, whereas SSN6 appears to be a positive effector of CYB2 expression.

  5. Chromosomal localization of murine and human oligodendrocyte-specific protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bronstein, J.M.; Wu, S.; Korenberg, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    Oligodendrocyte-specific protein (OSP) is a recently described protein present only in myelin of the central nervous system. Several inherited disorders of myelin are caused by mutations in myelin genes but the etiology of many remain unknown. We mapped the location of the mouse OSP gene to the proximal region of chromosome 3 using two sets of multilocus crosses and to human chromosome 3 using somatic cell hybrids. Fine mapping with fluorescence in situ hybridization placed the OSP gene at human chromosome 3q26.2-q26.3. To date, there are no known inherited neurological disorders that localize to these regions. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Evidence for showing gene/protein name suggestions in bioscience literature search interfaces.

    PubMed

    Divoli, Anna; Hearst, Marti A; Wooldridge, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of two questionnaires asking biologists about the incorporation of text-extracted entity information, specifically gene and protein names, into bioscience literature search user interfaces. Among the findings are that study participants want to see gene/protein metadata in combination with organism information; that a significant proportion would like to see gene names grouped by type (synonym, homolog, etc.), and that most participants want to see information that the system is confident about immediately, and see less certain information after taking additional action. These results inform future interface designs.

  7. Oscillatory kinetics of gene expression: Protein conversion and slow mRNA transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2009-06-15

    The negative feedback between mRNA and regulatory-protein production may result in oscillations in the kinetics of gene expression if the mRNA-protein interplay includes protein conversion. Using a mean-field kinetic model, we show that such oscillations can be amplified due to limitations of the mRNA transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm. This effect may be dramatic for the mRNA population in the nucleus.

  8. Importin-β facilitates nuclear import of human GW proteins and balances cytoplasmic gene silencing protein levels.

    PubMed

    Schraivogel, Daniel; Schindler, Susann G; Danner, Johannes; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pfaff, Janina; Hannus, Stefan; Depping, Reinhard; Meister, Gunter

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) guide Argonaute (Ago) proteins to distinct target mRNAs leading to translational repression and mRNA decay. Ago proteins interact with a member of the GW protein family, referred to as TNRC6A-C in mammals, which coordinate downstream gene-silencing processes. The cytoplasmic functions of TNRC6 and Ago proteins are reasonably well established. Both protein families are found in the nucleus as well. Their detailed nuclear functions, however, remain elusive. Furthermore, it is not clear which import routes Ago and TNRC6 proteins take into the nucleus. Using different nuclear transport assays, we find that Ago as well as TNRC6 proteins shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. While import receptors might function redundantly to transport Ago2, we demonstrate that TNRC6 proteins are imported by the Importin-β pathway. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of both Ago2 and TNRC6 proteins can depend on each other suggesting actively balanced cytoplasmic Ago - TNRC6 levels.

  9. KNQ1, a Kluyveromyces lactis gene encoding a transmembrane protein, may be involved in iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Emmanuela; Lodi, Tiziana; Donnini, Claudia

    2007-08-01

    The original purpose of the experiments described in this article was to identify, in the biotechnologically important yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, gene(s) that are potentially involved in oxidative protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which often represents a bottleneck for heterologous protein production. Because treatment with the membrane-permeable reducing agent dithiothreitol inhibits disulfide bond formation and mimics the reducing effect that the normal transit of folding proteins has in the ER environment, the strategy was to search for genes that conferred higher levels of resistance to dithiothreitol when present in multiple copies. We identified a gene (KNQ1) encoding a drug efflux permease for several toxic compounds that in multiple copies conferred increased dithiothreitol resistance. However, the KNQ1 product is not involved in the excretion of dithiothreitol or in recombinant protein secretion. We generated a knq1 null mutant, and showed that both overexpression and deletion of the KNQ1 gene resulted in increased resistance to dithiothreitol. KNQ1 amplification and deletion resulted in enhanced transcription of iron transport genes, suggesting, for the membrane-associated protein Knq1p, a new, unexpected role in iron homeostasis on which dithiothreitol tolerance may depend.

  10. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  11. Ancient conserved regions in new gene sequences and the protein databases

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.; Hillier, L.; Waterston, R. ); Lipman, D.; States, D.; Claverie, J.M. )

    1993-03-19

    Sets of new gene sequences from human, nematode, and yeast were compared with each other and with a set of Escherichia coli genes in order to detect ancient evolutionarily conserved regions (ACRs) in the encoded proteins. Nearly all of the ACRs so identified were found to be homologous to sequences in the protein databases. This suggests that currently known proteins may already include representatives of most ACRs and that new sequences not similar to any database sequence are unlikely to contain ACRs. Preliminary analyses indicate that moderately expressed genes may be more likely to contain ACRs than rarely expressed genes. It is estimated that there are fewer than 900 ACRs in all. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Human, Mouse, and Pig Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Gene Structures.

    PubMed

    Eun, Kiyoung; Hwang, Seon-Ung; Jeon, Hye-Min; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Hyunggee

    2016-01-01

    Comparing the coding and regulatory sequences of genes in different species provides information on whether proteins translated from genes have conserved functions or gene expressions are regulated by analogical mechanisms. Herein, we compared the coding and regulatory sequences of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) from humans, mice, and pigs. The GFAP gene encodes a class III intermediate filament protein expressed specifically in astrocytes of the central nervous system. On comparing the mRNA, regulatory region (promoter), and protein sequences of GFAP gene in silico, we found that GFAP mRNA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), promoter, and amino acid sequences showed higher similarities between humans and pigs than between humans and mice. In addition, the promoter-luciferase reporter gene assay revealed that the pig GFAP promoter functioned in human astrocytes. Notably, the 1.8-kb promoter fragment upstream from transcription initiation site showed strongest transcriptional activity compared to 5.2-kb DNA fragment or other regions of GFAP promoter. We also found that pig GFAP mRNA and promoter activity increased in pig fibroblasts by human IL-1β treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that the regulatory mechanisms and functions of pig genes might be more similar to those of humans than mice, indicating that pigs, particularly miniature pigs, are a useful model for studying human biological and pathological events. PMID:26913554

  13. Structure and expression of the Drosophila ubiquitin-80-amino-acid fusion-protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, R; del Arco, A; Cabrera, H L; Arribas, C

    1994-01-01

    In the fruitfly Drosophila, as in all eukaryotes examined so far, some ubiquitin-coding sequences appear fused to unrelated open reading frames. Two of these fusion genes have been previously described (the homologues of UBI1-UBI2 and UBI4 in yeast), and we report here the organization and expression of a third one, the DUb80 gene (the homologue of UBI3 in yeast). This gene encodes a ubiquitin monomer fused to an 80-amino-acid extension which is homologous with the ribosomal protein encoded by the UB13 gene. The 5' regulatory region of DUb80 shares common features with another ubiquitin fusion gene, DUb52, and with the ribosomal protein genes of Drosophila, Xenopus and mouse. We also find helix-loop-helix protein-binding sequences (E-boxes). The DUb80 gene is transcribed to a 0.9 kb mRNA which is particularly abundant under conditions of high protein synthesis, such as in ovaries and exponentially growing cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8068011

  14. Comparative Analysis of Human, Mouse, and Pig Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Gene Structures.

    PubMed

    Eun, Kiyoung; Hwang, Seon-Ung; Jeon, Hye-Min; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Hyunggee

    2016-01-01

    Comparing the coding and regulatory sequences of genes in different species provides information on whether proteins translated from genes have conserved functions or gene expressions are regulated by analogical mechanisms. Herein, we compared the coding and regulatory sequences of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) from humans, mice, and pigs. The GFAP gene encodes a class III intermediate filament protein expressed specifically in astrocytes of the central nervous system. On comparing the mRNA, regulatory region (promoter), and protein sequences of GFAP gene in silico, we found that GFAP mRNA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), promoter, and amino acid sequences showed higher similarities between humans and pigs than between humans and mice. In addition, the promoter-luciferase reporter gene assay revealed that the pig GFAP promoter functioned in human astrocytes. Notably, the 1.8-kb promoter fragment upstream from transcription initiation site showed strongest transcriptional activity compared to 5.2-kb DNA fragment or other regions of GFAP promoter. We also found that pig GFAP mRNA and promoter activity increased in pig fibroblasts by human IL-1β treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that the regulatory mechanisms and functions of pig genes might be more similar to those of humans than mice, indicating that pigs, particularly miniature pigs, are a useful model for studying human biological and pathological events.

  15. The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Spt7 Gene Encodes a Very Acidic Protein Important for Transcription in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gansheroff, L. J.; Dollard, C.; Tan, P.; Winston, F.

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the SPT7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae originally were identified as suppressors of Ty and {delta small} insertion mutations in the 5' regions of the HIS4 and LYS2 genes. Other genes that have been identified in mutant hunts of this type have been shown to play a role in transcription. In this work we show that SPT7 is also important for proper transcription in vivo. We have cloned and sequenced the SPT7 gene and have shown that it encodes a large, acidic protein that is localized to the nucleus. The SPT7 protein contains a bromodomain sequence; a deletion that removes the bromodomain from the SPT7 protein causes no detectable mutant phenotype. Strains that contain an spt7 null mutation are viable but grow very slowly and have transcriptional defects at many loci including insertion mutations, Ty elements, the INO1 gene and the MFA1 gene. These transcriptional defects and other mutant phenotypes are similar to those caused by certain mutations in SPT15, which encodes the TATA binding protein (TBP). The similarity of the phenotypes of spt7 and spt15 mutants, including effects of spt7 mutations on the transcription start site of certain genes, suggests that SPT7 plays an important role in transcription initiation in vivo. PMID:7713415

  16. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  17. Analysis of the multi-copied genes and the impact of the redundant protein coding sequences on gene annotation in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia-Feng; Chen, Qing-Li; Ren, Jing; Yang, Yan-Ling; Wang, Ji-Hua; Sun, Xiao

    2015-07-01

    The important roles of duplicated genes in evolutional process have been recognized in bacteria, archaebacteria and eukaryotes, while there is very little study on the multi-copied protein coding genes that share sequence identity of 100%. In this paper, the multi-copied protein coding genes in a number of prokaryotic genomes are comprehensively analyzed firstly. The results show that 0-15.93% of the protein coding genes in each genome are multi-copied genes and 0-16.49% of the protein coding genes in each genome are highly similar with the sequence identity ≥ 80%. Function and COG (Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins) analysis shows that 64.64% of multi-copied genes concentrate on the function of transposase and 86.28% of the COG assigned multi-copied genes concentrate on the COG code of 'L'. Furthermore, the impact of redundant protein coding sequences on the gene prediction results is studied. The results show that the problem of protein coding sequence redundancies cannot be ignored and the consistency of the gene annotation results before and after excluding the redundant sequences is negatively related with the sequences redundancy degree of the protein coding sequences in the training set.

  18. Yeast prion architecture explains how proteins can be genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickner, Reed

    2013-03-01

    Prions (infectious proteins) transmit information without an accompanying DNA or RNA. Most yeast prions are self-propagating amyloids that inactivate a normally functional protein. A single protein can become any of several prion variants, with different manifestations due to different amyloid structures. We showed that the yeast prion amyloids of Ure2p, Sup35p and Rnq1p are folded in-register parallel beta sheets using solid state NMR dipolar recoupling experiments, mass-per-filament-length measurements, and filament diameter measurements. The extent of beta sheet structure, measured by chemical shifts in solid-state NMR and acquired protease-resistance on amyloid formation, combined with the measured filament diameters, imply that the beta sheets must be folded along the long axis of the filament. We speculate that prion variants of a single protein sequence differ in the location of these folds. Favorable interactions between identical side chains must hold these structures in-register. The same interactions must guide an unstructured monomer joining the end of a filament to assume the same conformation as molecules already in the filament, with the turns at the same locations. In this way, a protein can template its own conformation, in analogy to the ability of a DNA molecule to template its sequence by specific base-pairing. Bldg. 8, Room 225, NIH, 8 Center Drive MSC 0830, Bethesda, MD 20892-0830, wickner@helix.nih.gov, 301-496-3452

  19. Regulation of pathogenesis-related protein-1a gene expression in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Uknes, S; Dincher, S; Friedrich, L; Negrotto, D; Williams, S; Thompson-Taylor, H; Potter, S; Ward, E; Ryals, J

    1993-02-01

    Pathogenesis-related protein-1a (PR-1a) is a protein of unknown function that is strongly induced during the onset of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in tobacco. The expression of PR-1a is under complex regulation that is controlled at least partially by the rate of transcription. In this study, we demonstrated that 661 bp of 5' flanking DNA was sufficient to impart tobacco mosaic virus and salicylic acid inducibility to a reporter gene. The PR-1a promoter did not respond significantly to treatments with either auxin or cytokinin. Experiments with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide indicated that protein synthesis is required for salicylate-dependent mRNA accumulation. At flowering, the PR-1a gene was expressed primarily in the mesophyll and epidermal tissues of the leaf blade and the sepals of the flower. Several artifacts, most importantly ectopic expression in pollen, were associated with the use of the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene.

  20. Double replacement gene targeting for the production of a series of mouse strains with different prion protein gene alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.C.; Redhead, N.J.; Selfridge, J.

    1995-09-01

    We have developed a double replacement gene targeting strategy which enables the production of a series of mouse strains bearing different subtle alterations to endogenous genes. This is a two-step process in which a region of the gene of interest is first replaced with a selectable marker to produce an inactivated allele, which is then re-targeted with a second vector to reconstruct the inactivated allele, concomitantly introducing an engineered mutation. Five independent embryonic stem cell lines have been produced bearing different targeted alterations to the prion protein gene, including one which raises the level of expression. We have constructed mice bearing the codon 101 proline to leucine substitution linked to the human familial prion disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. We anticipate that this procedure will have applications to the study of human inherited diseases and the development of therapies. 43 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Developmental Regulation of Genes Encoding Universal Stress Proteins in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Mahmud, Ousman; Mbah, Andreas N; Simmons, Shaneka S; Avelar, Lívia; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V; Udensi, Udensi K; Ayensu, Wellington K; Cohly, Hari H; Brown, Shyretha D; Dates, Centdrika R; Hentz, Sonya D; Hughes, Shawntae J; Smith-McInnis, Dominique R; Patterson, Carvey O; Sims, Jennifer N; Turner, Kelisha T; Williams, Baraka S; Johnson, Matilda O; Adubi, Taiwo; Mbuh, Judith V; Anumudu, Chiaka I; Adeoye, Grace O; Thomas, Bolaji N; Nashiru, Oyekanmi; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    The draft nuclear genome sequence of the snail-transmitted, dimorphic, parasitic, platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni revealed eight genes encoding proteins that contain the Universal Stress Protein (USP) domain. Schistosoma mansoni is a causative agent of human schistosomiasis, a severe and debilitating Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) of poverty, which is endemic in at least 76 countries. The availability of the genome sequences of Schistosoma species presents opportunities for bioinformatics and genomics analyses of associated gene families that could be targets for understanding schistosomiasis ecology, intervention, prevention and control. Proteins with the USP domain are known to provide bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and plants with the ability to respond to diverse environmental stresses. In this research investigation, the functional annotations of the USP genes and predicted nucleotide and protein sequences were initially verified. Subsequently, sequence clusters and distinctive features of the sequences were determined. A total of twelve ligand binding sites were predicted based on alignment to the ATP-binding universal stress protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. In addition, six USP sequences showed the presence of ATP-binding motif residues indicating that they may be regulated by ATP. Public domain gene expression data and RT-PCR assays confirmed that all the S. mansoni USP genes were transcribed in at least one of the developmental life cycle stages of the helminth. Six of these genes were up-regulated in the miracidium, a free-swimming stage that is critical for transmission to the snail intermediate host. It is possible that during the intra-snail stages, S. mansoni gene transcripts for universal stress proteins are low abundant and are induced to perform specialized functions triggered by environmental stressors such as oxidative stress due to hydrogen peroxide that is present in the snail hemocytes. This report serves to catalyze the

  2. Developmental Regulation of Genes Encoding Universal Stress Proteins in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Mahmud, Ousman; Mbah, Andreas N; Simmons, Shaneka S; Avelar, Lívia; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V; Udensi, Udensi K; Ayensu, Wellington K; Cohly, Hari H; Brown, Shyretha D; Dates, Centdrika R; Hentz, Sonya D; Hughes, Shawntae J; Smith-McInnis, Dominique R; Patterson, Carvey O; Sims, Jennifer N; Turner, Kelisha T; Williams, Baraka S; Johnson, Matilda O; Adubi, Taiwo; Mbuh, Judith V; Anumudu, Chiaka I; Adeoye, Grace O; Thomas, Bolaji N; Nashiru, Oyekanmi; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    The draft nuclear genome sequence of the snail-transmitted, dimorphic, parasitic, platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni revealed eight genes encoding proteins that contain the Universal Stress Protein (USP) domain. Schistosoma mansoni is a causative agent of human schistosomiasis, a severe and debilitating Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) of poverty, which is endemic in at least 76 countries. The availability of the genome sequences of Schistosoma species presents opportunities for bioinformatics and genomics analyses of associated gene families that could be targets for understanding schistosomiasis ecology, intervention, prevention and control. Proteins with the USP domain are known to provide bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and plants with the ability to respond to diverse environmental stresses. In this research investigation, the functional annotations of the USP genes and predicted nucleotide and protein sequences were initially verified. Subsequently, sequence clusters and distinctive features of the sequences were determined. A total of twelve ligand binding sites were predicted based on alignment to the ATP-binding universal stress protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. In addition, six USP sequences showed the presence of ATP-binding motif residues indicating that they may be regulated by ATP. Public domain gene expression data and RT-PCR assays confirmed that all the S. mansoni USP genes were transcribed in at least one of the developmental life cycle stages of the helminth. Six of these genes were up-regulated in the miracidium, a free-swimming stage that is critical for transmission to the snail intermediate host. It is possible that during the intra-snail stages, S. mansoni gene transcripts for universal stress proteins are low abundant and are induced to perform specialized functions triggered by environmental stressors such as oxidative stress due to hydrogen peroxide that is present in the snail hemocytes. This report serves to catalyze the

  3. Identifying dynamic protein complexes based on gene expression profiles and PPI networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Chen, Weijie; Wang, Jianxin; Wu, Fang-Xiang; Pan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Identification of protein complexes from protein-protein interaction networks has become a key problem for understanding cellular life in postgenomic era. Many computational methods have been proposed for identifying protein complexes. Up to now, the existing computational methods are mostly applied on static PPI networks. However, proteins and their interactions are dynamic in reality. Identifying dynamic protein complexes is more meaningful and challenging. In this paper, a novel algorithm, named DPC, is proposed to identify dynamic protein complexes by integrating PPI data and gene expression profiles. According to Core-Attachment assumption, these proteins which are always active in the molecular cycle are regarded as core proteins. The protein-complex cores are identified from these always active proteins by detecting dense subgraphs. Final protein complexes are extended from the protein-complex cores by adding attachments based on a topological character of "closeness" and dynamic meaning. The protein complexes produced by our algorithm DPC contain two parts: static core expressed in all the molecular cycle and dynamic attachments short-lived. The proposed algorithm DPC was applied on the data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the experimental results show that DPC outperforms CMC, MCL, SPICi, HC-PIN, COACH, and Core-Attachment based on the validation of matching with known complexes and hF-measures. PMID:24963481

  4. Ribosomal protein gene expression is cell type specific during development in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Parrish, S N; Blumberg, D D

    1999-10-01

    Starvation for amino acids initiates the developmental cycle in the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum. Upon starvation one of the earliest developmental events is the selective loss of the ribosomal protein mRNAs from polysomes. This loss depends upon sequences in the 5' non-translated leader of the ribosomal protein (r-protein) mRNAs. Here evidence is presented which indicates that those cells which will become prestalk cells express the ribosomal protein genes during development under starvation conditions. Cells which enter the prespore pathway shut off r-protein synthesis. The promoter and 5' non-translated leader sequences from two ribosomal protein genes, the rp-L11 and the rp-S9 genes, are fused to the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase reporter gene. While beta-galactosidase enzyme activity is detected in situ in most growing cells, by 15 h of development beta-galactosidase enzyme activity is largely lost from the prespore cells although strong beta-galactosidase enzyme activity is present in the prestalk cells. These observations suggest the possibility that the ribosomal protein mRNAs are excluded from polysomes in a cell-type-specific manner. PMID:10550541

  5. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M.; Kirti, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2–3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in

  6. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M.; Kirti, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2–3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in

  7. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation.

    PubMed

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M; Kirti, P B

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2-3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in rice

  8. Response of maize serine/arginine-rich protein gene family in seedlings to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Guo, Yuqi; Cui, Weiling; Xu, Aihua; Tian, Zengyuan

    2014-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) in eukaryotic organisms is closely related to the gene regulation in plant abiotic stress responses, in which serine/arginine-rich proteins (SR proteins) act as key regulators. The genome sequence of maize inbred line B73 was analyzed, showing that the promoter regions of SR genes possess about three to eight kinds of cis-acting regulatory elements. Twenty-seven SR genes encode alkaline proteins, and 23 of which are divided into five subgroups in terms of the first RNA recognition motif (RRM) at the amino terminal. The expression of SR genes showed tissue-specific and genotype-dependent features under drought stress in the hybrid Zhengdan-958 and its parents, Zheng-58 and Chang-7-2 via bidirectional hierarchical clustering. SR genes were down-regulated in roots while they were up-regulated in shoots under drought stress. However, SR genes were down-regulated in both roots and shoots in three different rehydration stages after severe drought stress. Additionally, a widespread alternative splicing exists in all SR genes although SR genes showed differential expression tendency under drought stress and/or during rehydration stages. Results above will deepen our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant response to abiotic stress from the perspective of AS-network.

  9. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro ); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi )

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Single mage gene in the chicken genome encodes CMage, a protein with functional similarities to mammalian type II Mage proteins.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Noelia; González-Fernández, Zaira; Niinobe, Michio; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Frade, José María

    2007-07-18

    In mammals, the type II melanoma antigen (Mage) protein family is constituted by at least 10 closely related members that are expressed in different tissues, including the nervous system. These proteins are believed to regulate cell cycle withdrawal, neuronal differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the analysis of their specific function has been complicated by functional redundancy. In accordance with previous studies in teleosts and Drosophila, we present evidence that only one mage gene exists in genomes from protists, fungi, plants, nematodes, insects, and nonmammalian vertebrates. We have identified the chicken mage gene and cloned the cDNA encoding the chick Mage protein (CMage). CMage shares close homology with the type II Mage protein family, and, as previously shown for the type II Mage proteins Necdin and Mage-G1, it can interact with the transcription factor E2F-1. CMage is expressed in specific regions of the developing nervous system including the retinal ganglion cell layer, the ventral horn of the spinal cord, and the dorsal root ganglia, coinciding with the expression of the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75(NTR)) in these regions. We show that the intracellular domain of p75(NTR) can interact with both CMage and Necdin, thus preventing the binding of the latter proteins to the transcription factor E2F-1, and facilitating the proapoptotic activity of E2F-1 in N1E-115 differentiating neurons. The presence of a single mage gene in the chicken genome, together with the close functional resemblance between CMage and Necdin, makes this species ideal to further analyze signal transduction through type II Mage proteins.

  11. GeneValidator: identify problems with protein-coding gene predictions

    PubMed Central

    Drăgan, Monica-Andreea; Moghul, Ismail; Priyam, Anurag; Bustos, Claudio; Wurm, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Genomes of emerging model organisms are now being sequenced at very low cost. However, obtaining accurate gene predictions remains challenging: even the best gene prediction algorithms make substantial errors and can jeopardize subsequent analyses. Therefore, many predicted genes must be time-consumingly visually inspected and manually curated. We developed GeneValidator (GV) to automatically identify problematic gene predictions and to aid manual curation. For each gene, GV performs multiple analyses based on comparisons to gene sequences from large databases. The resulting report identifies problematic gene predictions and includes extensive statistics and graphs for each prediction to guide manual curation efforts. GV thus accelerates and enhances the work of biocurators and researchers who need accurate gene predictions from newly sequenced genomes. Availability and implementation: GV can be used through a web interface or in the command-line. GV is open-source (AGPL), available at https://wurmlab.github.io/tools/genevalidator. Contact: y.wurm@qmul.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26787666

  12. Gene expression profiles on predicting protein interaction network and exploring of new treatments for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zehui; Zheng, Rui; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we aimed to explore disease-associated genes and their functions in lung cancer. We downloaded the gene expression profile GSE4115 from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Total 97 lung cancer and 90 adjacent non-tumor lung tissue (normal) samples were applied to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) by paired t test and variance analysis in spectral angle mapper (SAM) package in R. Gene Ontology (GO) functional enrichment analysis of DEGs were performed with Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery, followed by construction of protein-protein interaction (PPI) network from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD). Finally, network modules were analyzed by the MCODE algorithm to detect protein complexes in the PPI network. Total 3,102 genes were identified as DEGs at FDR < 0.05, including 1,146 down-regulated and 1,956 up-regulated DEGs. GO functional enrichment analysis revealed that up-regulated DEGs mainly participated in cell cycle and intracellular related functions, and down-regulated DEGs might influence cell functions. There were 39,240 pairs of PPIs in human obtained from HPRD databases, 3,102 DEGs were mapped to this PPI network, in which 2,429 pairs of PPIs and 1,342 genes were identified. With MCODE algorithm, 48 modules were selected, including five corresponding modules and three modules with differences in gene expressing profiles. In addition, three DGEs, FXR2, ARFGAP1 and ELAVL1 were discovered as potential lung cancer related genes. The discovery of featured genes which were probably related to lung cancer, has a great significance on studying mechanism, distinguishing normal and cancer tissues, and exploring new treatments for lung cancer. PMID:25205123

  13. Epithelial and endothelial expression of the green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of bovine prion protein (PrP) gene regulatory sequences in transgenic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire-Vieille, Catherine; Schulze, Tobias; Podevin-Dimster, Valérie; Follet, Jérome; Bailly, Yannick; Blanquet-Grossard, Françoise; Decavel, Jean-Pierre; Heinen, Ernst; Cesbron, Jean-Yves

    2000-05-01

    The expression of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrPc) gene is required for prion replication and neuroinvasion in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The identification of the cell types expressing PrPc is necessary to understanding how the agent replicates and spreads from peripheral sites to the central nervous system. To determine the nature of the cell types expressing PrPc, a green fluorescent protein reporter gene was expressed in transgenic mice under the control of 6.9 kb of the bovine PrP gene regulatory sequences. It was shown that the bovine PrP gene is expressed as two populations of mRNA differing by alternative splicing of one 115-bp 5' untranslated exon in 17 different bovine tissues. The analysis of transgenic mice showed reporter gene expression in some cells that have been identified as expressing PrP, such as cerebellar Purkinje cells, lymphocytes, and keratinocytes. In addition, expression of green fluorescent protein was observed in the plexus of the enteric nervous system and in a restricted subset of cells not yet clearly identified as expressing PrP: the epithelial cells of the thymic medullary and the endothelial cells of both the mucosal capillaries of the intestine and the renal capillaries. These data provide valuable information on the distribution of PrPc at the cellular level and argue for roles of the epithelial and endothelial cells in the spread of infection from the periphery to the brain. Moreover, the transgenic mice described in this paper provide a model that will allow for the study of the transcriptional activity of the PrP gene promoter in response to scrapie infection.

  14. New genes from non-coding sequence: the role of de novo protein-coding genes in eukaryotic evolutionary innovation

    PubMed Central

    McLysaght, Aoife; Guerzoni, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The origin of novel protein-coding genes de novo was once considered so improbable as to be impossible. In less than a decade, and especially in the last five years, this view has been overturned by extensive evidence from diverse eukaryotic lineages. There is now evidence that this mechanism has contributed a significant number of genes to genomes of organisms as diverse as Saccharomyces, Drosophila, Plasmodium, Arabidopisis and human. From simple beginnings, these genes have in some instances acquired complex structure, regulated expression and important functional roles. New genes are often thought of as dispensable late additions; however, some recent de novo genes in human can play a role in disease. Rather than an extremely rare occurrence, it is now evident that there is a relatively constant trickle of proto-genes released into the testing ground of natural selection. It is currently unknown whether de novo genes arise primarily through an ‘RNA-first’ or ‘ORF-first’ pathway. Either way, evolutionary tinkering with this pool of genetic potential may have been a significant player in the origins of lineage-specific traits and adaptations. PMID:26323763

  15. Identification and Validation of Selected Universal Stress Protein Domain Containing Drought-Responsive Genes in Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.).

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pallavi; Pazhamala, Lekha T; Singh, Vikas K; Saxena, Rachit K; Krishnamurthy, L; Azam, Sarwar; Khan, Aamir W; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    Pigeonpea is a resilient crop, which is relatively more drought tolerant than many other legume crops. To understand the molecular mechanisms of this unique feature of pigeonpea, 51 genes were selected using the Hidden Markov Models (HMM) those codes for proteins having close similarity to universal stress protein domain. Validation of these genes was conducted on three pigeonpea genotypes (ICPL 151, ICPL 8755, and ICPL 227) having different levels of drought tolerance. Gene expression analysis using qRT-PCR revealed 6, 8, and 18 genes to be ≥2-fold differentially expressed in ICPL 151, ICPL 8755, and ICPL 227, respectively. A total of 10 differentially expressed genes showed ≥2-fold up-regulation in the more drought tolerant genotype, which encoded four different classes of proteins. These include plant U-box protein (four genes), universal stress protein A-like protein (four genes), cation/H(+) antiporter protein (one gene) and an uncharacterized protein (one gene). Genes C.cajan_29830 and C.cajan_33874 belonging to uspA, were found significantly expressed in all the three genotypes with ≥2-fold expression variations. Expression profiling of these two genes on the four other legume crops revealed their specific role in pigeonpea. Therefore, these genes seem to be promising candidates for conferring drought tolerance specifically to pigeonpea. PMID:26779199

  16. Fusarium verticillioides SGE1 is required for full virulence and regulates expression of protein effector and secondary metabolite biosynthetic genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transition from one lifestyle to another in some fungi is initiated by a single orthologous gene, SGE1, that regulates markedly different genes in different fungi. Despite these differences, many of the regulated genes encode effector proteins or proteins involved in the synthesis of secondary m...

  17. Identification and Validation of Selected Universal Stress Protein Domain Containing Drought-Responsive Genes in Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.)

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Pallavi; Pazhamala, Lekha T.; Singh, Vikas K.; Saxena, Rachit K.; Krishnamurthy, L.; Azam, Sarwar; Khan, Aamir W.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Pigeonpea is a resilient crop, which is relatively more drought tolerant than many other legume crops. To understand the molecular mechanisms of this unique feature of pigeonpea, 51 genes were selected using the Hidden Markov Models (HMM) those codes for proteins having close similarity to universal stress protein domain. Validation of these genes was conducted on three pigeonpea genotypes (ICPL 151, ICPL 8755, and ICPL 227) having different levels of drought tolerance. Gene expression analysis using qRT-PCR revealed 6, 8, and 18 genes to be ≥2-fold differentially expressed in ICPL 151, ICPL 8755, and ICPL 227, respectively. A total of 10 differentially expressed genes showed ≥2-fold up-regulation in the more drought tolerant genotype, which encoded four different classes of proteins. These include plant U-box protein (four genes), universal stress protein A-like protein (four genes), cation/H(+) antiporter protein (one gene) and an uncharacterized protein (one gene). Genes C.cajan_29830 and C.cajan_33874 belonging to uspA, were found significantly expressed in all the three genotypes with ≥2-fold expression variations. Expression profiling of these two genes on the four other legume crops revealed their specific role in pigeonpea. Therefore, these genes seem to be promising candidates for conferring drought tolerance specifically to pigeonpea. PMID:26779199

  18. Flexibility and Disorder in Gene Regulation: LacI/GalR and Hox Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Bondos, Sarah E.; Swint-Kruse, Liskin; Matthews, Kathleen S.

    2015-01-01

    To modulate transcription, a variety of input signals must be sensed by genetic regulatory proteins. In these proteins, flexibility and disorder are emerging as common themes. Prokaryotic regulators generally have short, flexible segments, whereas eukaryotic regulators have extended regions that lack predicted secondary structure (intrinsic disorder). Two examples illustrate the impact of flexibility and disorder on gene regulation: the prokaryotic LacI/GalR family, with detailed information from studies on LacI, and the eukaryotic family of Hox proteins, with specific insights from investigations of Ultrabithorax (Ubx). The widespread importance of structural disorder in gene regulatory proteins may derive from the need for flexibility in signal response and, particularly in eukaryotes, in protein partner selection. PMID:26342073

  19. Regulation of expression of a soybean storage protein subunit gene. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.F.; Madison, J.T.

    1984-07-16

    We have found that soybean cotyledons could be cultured in vitro and that the storage proteins were formed essentially as on a plant. When methionine was added to the medium, the cotyledons grew faster, and the methionine content of the protein fraction was increased by over 20 percent. The high methionine content of the protein fraction was found to be due to a shift in the relative amounts of the two major storage proteins. The later effect was the result of methionine treatment suppressing the expression of one storage protein subunit gene. The goal was to determine the mechanism by which methionine is able to regulate the expression of the ..beta..-subunit gene.

  20. THE RNAissance Family: SR proteins as multifaceted regulators of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jonathan M.; Sanford, Jeremy R.

    2014-01-01

    Serine and Arginine-rich (SR) proteins play multiple roles in the eukaryotic gene expression pathway. Initially described as constitutive and alternative splicing factors, it is now clear that SR proteins are key determinants of exon identity and function as molecular adaptors, linking the pre-mRNA to the splicing machinery. In addition, SR proteins are now implicated in many aspects of mRNA and ncRNA processing well beyond splicing. These unexpected roles, including RNA transcription, export, translation and decay may prove to be the rule rather than the exception. To simply define this family of RNA binding proteins as splicing factors belies the broader roles of SR proteins in post-transcriptional gene expression. PMID:25155147

  1. Orthogonal Cas9 Proteins for RNA-Guided Gene Regulation and Editing

    PubMed Central

    Esvelt, Kevin M.; Mali, Prashant; Braff, Jonathan L.; Moosburner, Mark; Yaung, Stephanie J.; Church, George M.

    2013-01-01

    The Cas9 protein from the Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR-Cas immune system has been adapted for both RNA-guided genome editing and gene regulation in a variety of organisms, but can mediate only a single activity at a time within any given cell. Here we characterize a set of fully orthogonal Cas9 proteins and demonstrate their ability to mediate simultaneous and independently targeted gene regulation and editing in bacteria and in human cells. We find that Cas9 orthologs display consistent patterns in their recognition of target sequences and identify a highly targetable protein from Neisseria meningitidis. Our results provide a basal set of orthogonal RNA-guided proteins for controlling biological systems and establish a general methodology for characterizing additional proteins and adapting them to eukaryotic cells. PMID:24076762

  2. Pollen specific expression of maize genes encoding actin depolymerizing factor-like proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, I; Anthony, R G; Maciver, S K; Jiang, C J; Khan, S; Weeds, A G; Hussey, P J

    1996-01-01

    In pollen development, a dramatic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton takes place during the passage of the pollen grain into dormancy and on activation of pollen tube growth. A role for actin-binding proteins is implicated and we report here the identification of a small gene family in maize that encodes actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)-like proteins. The ADF group of proteins are believed to control actin polymerization and depolymerization in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Two of the maize genes ZmABP1 and ZmABP2 are expressed specifically in pollen and germinating pollen suggesting that the protein products may be involved in pollen actin reorganization. A third gene, ZmABP3, encodes a protein only 56% and 58% identical to ZmABP1 and ZmABP2, respectively, and its expression is suppressed in pollen and germinated pollen. The fundamental biochemical characteristics of the ZmABP proteins has been elucidated using bacterially expressed ZmABP3 protein. This has the ability to bind monomeric actin (G-actin) and filamentous actin (F-actin). Moreover, it decreases the viscosity of polymerized actin solutions consistent with an ability to depolymerize filaments. These biochemical characteristics, taken together with the sequence comparisons, support the inclusion of the ZmABP proteins in the ADF group. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8693008

  3. One, Two, Three: Polycomb Proteins Hit All Dimensions of Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    del Prete, Stefania; Mikulski, Pawel; Schubert, Daniel; Gaudin, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins contribute to the formation and maintenance of a specific repressive chromatin state that prevents the expression of genes in a particular space and time. Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) consist of several PcG proteins with specific regulatory or catalytic properties. PRCs are recruited to thousands of target genes, and various recruitment factors, including DNA-binding proteins and non-coding RNAs, are involved in the targeting. PcG proteins contribute to a multitude of biological processes by altering chromatin features at different scales. PcG proteins mediate both biochemical modifications of histone tails and biophysical modifications (e.g., chromatin fiber compaction and three-dimensional (3D) chromatin conformation). Here, we review the role of PcG proteins in nuclear architecture, describing their impact on the structure of the chromatin fiber, on chromatin interactions, and on the spatial organization of the genome in nuclei. Although little is known about the role of plant PcG proteins in nuclear organization, much is known in the animal field, and we highlight similarities and differences in the roles of PcG proteins in 3D gene regulation in plants and animals. PMID:26184319

  4. Yeast spindle pole body duplication gene MPS1 encodes an essential dual specificity protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lauzé, E; Stoelcker, B; Luca, F C; Weiss, E; Schutz, A R; Winey, M

    1995-01-01

    The MPS1 gene has been previously identified by a mutant allele that shows defects in spindle pole body (SPB) duplication and cell cycle control. The SPB is the centrosome-equivalent organelle in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and it nucleates all the microtubules in the cell. We report the isolation of the MPS1 gene, which encodes an essential protein kinase homolog. The MPS1 open reading frame has been fused to those that encode the LexA protein or the GST protein and both of these constructs function in yeast. The fusion proteins have been affinity-purified from yeast extracts and the GST chimeric protein has been found to be a phosphoprotein. Both proteins have been used to demonstrate intrinsic in vitro protein kinase activity of Mps1p against exogenous substrates and itself (autophosphorylation). A mutation predicted to abolish kinase function not only eliminates in vitro protein kinase activity, but also behaves like a null mutation in vivo, suggesting that kinase activity contributes to the essential function of the protein. Phosphoamino acid analysis of substrates phosphorylated by Mps1p indicates that this kinase can phosphorylate serine, threonine and tyrosine residues, identifying Mps1p as a dual specificity protein kinase. Images PMID:7737118

  5. Discovery of New Candidate Genes Related to Brain Development Using Protein Interaction Information

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Chu, Chen; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Human brain development is a dramatic process composed of a series of complex and fine-tuned spatiotemporal gene expressions. A good comprehension of this process can assist us in developing the potential of our brain. However, we have only limited knowledge about the genes and gene functions that are involved in this biological process. Therefore, a substantial demand remains to discover new brain development-related genes and identify their biological functions. In this study, we aimed to discover new brain-development related genes by building a computational method. We referred to a series of computational methods used to discover new disease-related genes and developed a similar method. In this method, the shortest path algorithm was executed on a weighted graph that was constructed using protein-protein interactions. New candidate genes fell on at least one of the shortest paths connecting two known genes that are related to brain development. A randomization test was then adopted to filter positive discoveries. Of the final identified genes, several have been reported to be associated with brain development, indicating the effectiveness of the method, whereas several of the others may have potential roles in brain development. PMID:25635857

  6. Vertebrate hepatic lipase genes and proteins: a review supported by bioinformatic studies.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Vandeberg, John L; Cox, Laura A

    2011-04-22

    Hepatic lipase (gene: LIPC; enzyme: HL; E.C.3.1.1.3) is one of three members of the triglyceride lipase family that contributes to vascular lipoprotein degradation and serves a dual role in triglyceride hydrolysis and in facilitating receptor-mediated lipoprotein uptake into the liver. Amino acid sequences, protein structures, and gene locations for vertebrate LIPC (or Lipc for mouse and rat) genes and proteins were sourced from previous reports and vertebrate genome databases. Lipc was distinct from other neutral lipase genes (Lipg encoding endothelial lipase and Lpl encoding lipoprotein lipase [LPL]) and was located on mouse chromosome 9 with nine coding exons on the negative strand. Exon 9 of human LIPC and mouse and rat Lipc genes contained "stop codons" in different positions, causing changes in C-termini length. Vertebrate HL protein subunits shared 58%-97% sequence identities, including active, signal peptide, disulfide bond, and N-glycosylation sites, as well as proprotein convertase ("hinge") and heparin binding regions. Predicted secondary and tertiary structures revealed similarities with the three-dimensional structure reported for horse and human pancreatic lipases. Potential sites for regulating LIPC gene expression included CpG islands near the 5″-untranslated regions of the mouse and rat LIPC genes. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of the vertebrate LIPC gene family with other neutral triglyceride lipase gene families (LIPG and LPL). We conclude that the triglyceride lipase ancestral gene for vertebrate neutral lipase genes (LIPC, LIPG, and LPL) predated the appearance of fish during vertebrate evolution. PMID:22408368

  7. Proteogenomics of rare taxonomic phyla: A prospective treasure trove of protein coding genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dhirendra; Mondal, Anupam Kumar; Kutum, Rintu; Dash, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable innovations in sequencing technologies have resulted in a torrent of microbial genome sequencing projects. However, the prokaryotic genomes sequenced so far are unequally distributed along their phylogenetic tree; few phyla contain the majority, the rest only a few representatives. Accurate genome annotation lags far behind genome sequencing. While automated computational prediction, aided by comparative genomics, remains a popular choice for genome annotation, substantial fraction of these annotations are erroneous. Proteogenomics utilizes protein level experimental observations to annotate protein coding genes on a genome wide scale. Benefits of proteogenomics include discovery and correction of gene annotations regardless of their phylogenetic conservation. This not only allows detection of common, conserved proteins but also the discovery of protein products of rare genes that may be horizontally transferred or taxonomy specific. Chances of encountering such genes are more in rare phyla that comprise a small number of complete genome sequences. We collated all bacterial and archaeal proteogenomic studies carried out to date and reviewed them in the context of genome sequencing projects. Here, we present a comprehensive list of microbial proteogenomic studies, their taxonomic distribution, and also urge for targeted proteogenomics of underexplored taxa to build an extensive reference of protein coding genes. PMID:26773550

  8. A Large Gene Cluster Encoding Several Magnetosome Proteins Is Conserved in Different Species of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Karen; Wawer, Cathrin; Tebo, Bradley M.; Schüler, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    In magnetotactic bacteria, a number of specific proteins are associated with the magnetosome membrane (MM) and may have a crucial role in magnetite biomineralization. We have cloned and sequenced the genes of several of these polypeptides in the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense that could be assigned to two different genomic regions. Except for mamA, none of these genes have been previously reported to be related to magnetosome formation. Homologous genes were found in the genome sequences of M. magnetotacticum and magnetic coccus strain MC-1. The MM proteins identified display homology to tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (MamA), cation diffusion facilitators (MamB), and HtrA-like serine proteases (MamE) or bear no similarity to known proteins (MamC and MamD). A major gene cluster containing several magnetosome genes (including mamA and mamB) was found to be conserved in all three of the strains investigated. The mamAB cluster also contains additional genes that have no known homologs in any nonmagnetic organism, suggesting a specific role in magnetosome formation. PMID:11571158

  9. Mammalian ets-1 and ets-2 genes encode highly conserved proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.K.; McWilliams, M.J.; Lapis, P.; Lautenberger, J.A.; Schweinfest, C.W.; Papas, T.S. )

    1988-11-01

    Cellular ets sequences homologous to v-ets of the avian leukemia virus E26 are highly conserved. In mammals the ets sequences are dispersed on two separate chromosomal loci, called ets-1 and ets-2. To determine the structure of these two genes and identify the open reading frames that code for the putative proteins, the authors have sequenced human ets-1 cDNAs and ets-2 cDNA clones obtained from both human and mouse. The human ETS1 gene is capable of encoding a protein of 441 amino acids. This protein is >95% identical to the chicken c-ets-1 gene product. Thus, the human ETS1 gene is homologous to the chicken c-ets-1 gene, the protooncogene that the E26 virus transduced. Human and mouse ets-2 cDNA clones are closely related and contain open reading frames capable of encoding proteins of 469 and 468 residues, respectively. Direct comparison of these data with previously published finding indicates that ets is a family of genes whose members share distinct domains.

  10. Differential expression of genes and proteins associated with wool follicle cycling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Li, Hegang; Liu, Kaidong; Yu, Juanjuan; Cheng, Ming; De, Wei; Liu, Jifeng; Shi, Shuyan; He, Yanghua; Zhao, Jinshan

    2014-08-01

    Sheep are valuable resources for the wool industry. Wool growth of Aohan fine wool sheep has cycled during different seasons in 1 year. Therefore, identifying genes that control wool growth cycling might lead to ways for improving the quality and yield of fine wool. In this study, we employed Agilent sheep gene expression microarray and proteomic technology to compare the gene expression patterns of the body side skins at August and December time points in Aohan fine wool sheep (a Chinese indigenous breed). Microarray study revealed that 2,223 transcripts were differentially expressed, including 1,162 up-regulated and 1,061 down-regulated transcripts, comparing body side skin at the August time point to the December one (A/D) in Aohan fine wool sheep. Then seven differentially expressed genes were selected to validated the reliability of the gene chip data. The majority of the genes possibly related to follicle development and wool growth could be assigned into the categories including regulation of receptor binding, extracellular region, protein binding and extracellular space. Proteomic study revealed that 84 protein spots showed significant differences in expression levels. Of the 84, 63 protein spots were upregulated and 21 were downregulated in A/D. Finally, 55 protein points were determined through MALDI-TOF/MS analyses. Furthermore, the regulation mechanism of hair follicle might resemble that of fetation. PMID:24847760

  11. A protein tagging system for signal amplification in gene expression and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Qi, Lei S.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Signals in many biological processes can be amplified by recruiting multiple copies of regulatory proteins to a site of action. Harnessing this principle, we have developed a novel protein scaffold, a repeating peptide array termed SunTag, which can recruit multiple copies of an antibody-fusion protein. We show that the SunTag can recruit up to 24 copies of GFP, thereby enabling long-term imaging of single protein molecules in living cells. We also use the SunTag to create a potent synthetic transcription factor by recruiting multiple copies of a transcriptional activation domain to a nuclease-deficient CRISPR/Cas9 protein and demonstrate strong activation of endogenous gene expression and re-engineered cell behavior with this system. Thus, the SunTag provides a versatile platform for multimerizing proteins on a target protein scaffold and is likely to have many applications in imaging and in controlling biological outputs. PMID:25307933

  12. Design and characterization of novel recombinant listeriolysin O-protamine fusion proteins for enhanced gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Hyung; Provoda, Chester; Lee, Kyung-Dall

    2015-02-01

    To improve the efficiency of gene delivery for effective gene therapy, it is essential that the vector carries functional components that can promote overcoming barriers in various steps leading to the transport of DNA from extracellular to ultimately nuclear compartment. In this study, we designed genetically engineered fusion proteins as a platform to incorporate multiple functionalities in one chimeric protein. Prototypes of such a chimera tested here contain two domains: one that binds to DNA; the other that can facilitate endosomal escape of DNA. The fusion proteins are composed of listeriolysin O (LLO), the endosomolytic pore-forming protein from Listeria monocytogenes, and a 22 amino acid sequence of the DNA-condensing polypeptide protamine (PN), singly or as a pair: LLO-PN and LLO-PNPN. We demonstrate dramatic enhancement of the gene delivery efficiency of protamine-condensed DNA upon incorporation of a small amount of LLO-PN fusion protein and further improvement with LLO-PNPN in vitro using cultured cells. Additionally, the association of anionic liposomes with cationic LLO-PNPN/protamine/DNA complexes, yielding a net negative surface charge, resulted in better in vitro transfection efficiency in the presence of serum. An initial, small set of data in mice indicated that the observed enhancement in gene expression could also be applicable to in vivo gene delivery. This study suggests that incorporation of a recombinant fusion protein with multiple functional components, such as LLO-protamine fusion protein, in a nonviral vector is a promising strategy for various nonviral gene delivery systems.

  13. Suspension array technology: new tools for gene and protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, J P; Mandy, F F

    2001-11-01

    Flow cytometry has long been a key tool in the analysis of lymphocytes and other cells, owing to its ability to make quantitative, homogeneous, multiparameter measurements of particles. New developments in illumination sources, digital signal processing and microsphere chemistry are driving the development of flow cytometry in new areas of biomedical research. In particular. the maturation of approaches to perform highly parallel analyses using suspension arrays of microspheres with different morphospectral features is making flow cytometry an important tool in protein and genetic analysis. In this paper, we review the development of suspension array technology (SAT), current applications in protein and genomic analysis, and the prospects for this platform in a variety of large scale screening applications. PMID:11838973

  14. Integron gene cassettes: a repository of novel protein folds with distinct interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Sureshan, Visaahini; Deshpande, Chandrika N; Boucher, Yan; Koenig, Jeremy E; Stokes, H W; Harrop, Stephen J; Curmi, Paul M G; Mabbutt, Bridget C

    2013-01-01

    Mobile gene cassettes captured within integron arrays encompass a vast and diverse pool of genetic novelty. In most cases, functional annotation of gene cassettes directly recovered by cassette-PCR is obscured by their characteristically high sequence novelty. This inhibits identification of those specific functions or biological features that might constitute preferential factors for lateral gene transfer via the integron system. A structural genomics approach incorporating x-ray crystallography has been utilised on a selection of cassettes to investigate evolutionary relationships hidden at the sequence level. Gene cassettes were accessed from marine sediments (pristine and contaminated sites), as well as a range of Vibrio spp. We present six crystal structures, a remarkably high proportion of our survey of soluble proteins, which were found to possess novel folds. These entirely new structures are diverse, encompassing all-α, α+β and α/β fold classes, and many contain clear binding pocket features for small molecule substrates. The new structures emphasise the large repertoire of protein families encoded within the integron cassette metagenome and which remain to be characterised. Oligomeric association is a notable recurring property common to these new integron-derived proteins. In some cases, the protein-protein contact sites utilised in homomeric assembly could instead form suitable contact points for heterogeneous regulator/activator proteins or domains. Such functional features are ideal for a flexible molecular componentry needed to ensure responsive and adaptive bacterial functions. PMID:23349695

  15. Cloning and characterization of a gene from Rhizobium melilotii 2011 coding for ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed Central

    Schnier, J; Thamm, S; Lurz, R; Hussain, A; Faist, G; Dobrinski, B

    1988-01-01

    A 7 kb chromosomal DNA fragment from R. melilotii was cloned, which complemented temperature-sensitivity of an E. coli amber mutant in rpsA, the gene for ribosomal protein S1 (ES1). From complementation and maxicell analysis a 58 kd protein was identified as the homolog of protein S1 (RS1). DNA sequence analysis of the R. melilotii rpsA gene identified a protein of 568 amino acids, which showed 47% identical amino acid homology to protein S1 from E. coli. The RS1 protein lacked the two Cys residues which had been reported to play an important role for the function of ES1. Two repeats containing Shine-Dalgarno sequences were identified upstream of the structural gene. Binding studies with RNA polymerase from E. coli and Pseudomonas putida located one RNA-polymerase binding site close to the RS1 gene and another one several hundred basepairs upstream. One possible promoter was also identified by DNA sequence comparison with the corresponding E. coli promoter. Images PMID:3368316

  16. Systems mechanobiology: tension-inhibited protein turnover is sufficient to physically control gene circuits.

    PubMed

    Dingal, P C Dave P; Discher, Dennis E

    2014-12-01

    Mechanotransduction pathways convert forces that stress and strain structures within cells into gene expression levels that impact development, homeostasis, and disease. The levels of some key structural proteins in the nucleus, cytoskeleton, or extracellular matrix have been recently reported to scale with tissue- and cell-level forces or mechanical properties such as stiffness, and so the mathematics of mechanotransduction becomes important to understand. Here, we show that if a given structural protein positively regulates its own gene expression, then stresses need only inhibit degradation of that protein to achieve stable, mechanosensitive gene expression. This basic use-it-or-lose-it module is illustrated by application to meshworks of nuclear lamin A, minifilaments of myosin II, and extracellular matrix collagen fibers—all of which possess filamentous coiled-coil/supercoiled structures. Past experiments not only suggest that tension suppresses protein degradation mediated and/or initiated by various enzymes but also that transcript levels vary with protein levels because key transcription factors are regulated by these structural proteins. Coupling between modules occurs within single cells and between cells in tissue, as illustrated during embryonic heart development where cardiac fibroblasts make collagen that cardiomyocytes contract. With few additional assumptions, the basic module has sufficient physics to control key structural genes in both development and disease. PMID:25468352

  17. Expression Divergence of Duplicate Genes in the Protein Kinase Superfamily in Pacific Oyster.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dahai; Ko, Dennis C; Tian, Xinmin; Yang, Guang; Wang, Liuyang

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication has been proposed to serve as the engine of evolutionary innovation. It is well recognized that eukaryotic genomes contain a large number of duplicated genes that evolve new functions or expression patterns. However, in mollusks, the evolutionary mechanisms underlying the divergence and the functional maintenance of duplicate genes remain little understood. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of duplicate genes in the protein kinase superfamily using whole genome and transcriptome data for the Pacific oyster. A total of 64 duplicated gene pairs were identified based on a phylogenetic approach and the reciprocal best BLAST method. By analyzing gene expression from RNA-seq data from 69 different developmental and stimuli-induced conditions (nine tissues, 38 developmental stages, eight dry treatments, seven heat treatments, and seven salty treatments), we found that expression patterns were significantly correlated for a number of duplicate gene pairs, suggesting the conservation of regulatory mechanisms following divergence. Our analysis also identified a subset of duplicate gene pairs with very high expression divergence, indicating that these gene pairs may have been subjected to transcriptional subfunctionalization or neofunctionalization after the initial duplication events. Further analysis revealed a significant correlation between expression and sequence divergence (as revealed by synonymous or nonsynonymous substitution rates) under certain conditions. Taken together, these results provide evidence for duplicate gene sequence and expression divergence in the Pacific oyster, accompanying its adaptation to harsh environments. Our results provide new insights into the evolution of duplicate genes and their expression levels in the Pacific oyster.

  18. Cloning and sequence of the gene for heat shock protein 60 from Chlamydia trachomatis and immunological reactivity of the protein.

    PubMed Central

    Cerrone, M C; Ma, J J; Stephens, R S

    1991-01-01

    We isolated and sequenced the gene for the chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (HSP-60) from a Chlamydia trachomatis genomic library by molecular genetic methods. The DNA sequence derived revealed an operon-like gene structure with two open reading frames encoding an 11,122- and a 57,956-Da protein. The translated amino acid sequence of the larger open reading frame showed a high degree of homology with known sequences for HSP-60 from several bacterial species as well as with plant and human sequences. By using the determined nucleotide sequence, fragments of the gene were cloned into the plasmid vector pGEX for expression as fusion proteins consisting of glutathione S-transferase and peptide portions of the chlamydial HSP-60. HSP-60 antigenic identity was confirmed by an immunoblot with anti-HSP-60 rabbit serum. Sera from patients that exhibited both high antichlamydial titers and reactivity to chlamydial HSP-60 showed reactivity on immunoblots to two fusion proteins that represented portions of the carboxyl-terminal half of the molecule, whereas fusion proteins defining the amino-terminal half were nonreactive. No reactivity with the fusion proteins was seen with sera from patients that had been previously screened as nonreactive to native chlamydial HSP-60 but which had high antichlamydial titers. Sera from noninfected control subjects also exhibited no reactivity. Definition of recognized HSP-60 epitopes may provide a predictive screen for those patients with C. trachomatis infections who may develop damaging sequelae, as well as providing tools for the study of immunopathogenic mechanisms of Chlamydia-induced disease. Images PMID:1987066

  19. Transgenic plums (Prunus domestica L.) express the plum pox virus coat protein gene.

    PubMed

    Scorza, R; Ravelonandro, M; Callahan, A M; Cordts, J M; Fuchs, M; Dunez, J; Gonsalves, D

    1994-11-01

    Plum hypocotyl slices were transformed with the coat protein (CP) gene of plum pox virus (PPV-CP) following cocultivation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens containing the plasmid pGA482GG/PPVCP-33. This binary vector carries the PPV-CP gene construct, as well as the chimeric neomycin phosphotransferase and β-glucuronidase genes. Integration and expression of the transferred genes into regenerated plum plants was verified through kan resistance, GUS assays, and PCR amplification of the PPV-CP gene. Twenty-two transgenic clones were identified from approximately 1800 hypocotyl slices. DNA, mRNA, and protein analyses of five transgenic plants confirmed the integration of the engineered CP gene, the accumulation of CP mRNA and of PPV-CP-immunoreactive protein. CP mRNA levels ranged from high to undetectable levels, apparently correlated with gene structure, as indicated by DNA blot analysis. Western analysis showed that transgenic plants produced amounts of CP which generally correlated with amounts of detected mRNA.

  20. Adenoviral-mediated imaging of gene transfer using a somatostatin receptor-cytosine deaminase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lears, K A; Parry, J J; Andrews, R; Nguyen, K; Wadas, T J; Rogers, B E

    2015-03-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy owing to the enzyme's ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  1. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the mouse homologue of rat OX40 protein.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, M L; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Barclay, A N

    1995-04-01

    The OX40 protein is expressed only on activated rat CD4+ T blasts and is a member of a superfamily of cell surface molecules which includes CD40, CD30, CD95 (Fas), CD27, 4-1BB antigens and the receptors for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF). The proteins of this group are related to each other by having three to six repeats of a cysteine-rich sequence in their extracellular domains. Members of this family of receptors have also been shown to bind to ligands which are structurally related to TNF. The mouse homologue of the rat OX40 protein was cloned at the cDNA and genomic levels. The gene structure shows that there are several intron/exon borders shared between OX40 and CD27, CD40, TNF receptor type I, CD95 and 4-1BB genes. This group of genes is less closely related structurally to the gene structure of the NGF receptor. The gene encoding murine OX40 has been placed on mouse chromosome 4, in an area which contains the genes for TNF receptor type II and 4-1BB, and is syntenic with a region of human chromosome 1 which contains human TNF receptor type II, OX40, and CD30 genes. PMID:7737295

  2. Sequence analysis of the prion protein gene in Mongolian gazelles (Procapra gutturosa).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiqin; Qin, Zhenkui; Bao, Yonggan; Qiao, Junwen; Yang, Lifeng; Zhao, Deming

    2009-10-01

    Prion diseases are a group of human and animal neurodegenerative conditions, which are caused by the deposition of an abnormal isoform prion protein (PrPSc) encoded by a single copy prion protein gene (Prnp). In sheep, genetic variations of Prnp were found to be associated with the incubation period, susceptibility, and species barrier to the scrapie disease. We investigated the sequence and polymorphisms of the prion protein gene of Mongolian gazelles (gPrnp). gPrnp gene sequence analysis of blood samples from 26 Mongolian gazelles showed high identity within species. The gPrnp gene was closely related to the Prnp genes of Thomson’s gazelle, blackbuck, and cattle with 100, 100, and 98.5% identity, respectively, whereas the gPrnp gene with a deletion was closely related to the Prnp genes of wildebeest, Western roe deer, and sheep with 99.3, 99.3, and 98.9% identity, respectively. Polymorphisms of the open reading frame of Prnp as amino acid substitutions were detected at codons 119(N --> S), 143(S --> G) or 160(Y --> H), 172(V --> A), 182(N --> S) and 221(V --> A). There was also deletion of one octapeptide repeat at the N-terminal octapeptide repeat region. The polymorphisms of gPrnp will assist the study of prion disease pathogenesis, resistance, and cross species transmission. PMID:19579063

  3. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  4. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the mouse homologue of rat OX40 protein.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, M L; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Barclay, A N

    1995-04-01

    The OX40 protein is expressed only on activated rat CD4+ T blasts and is a member of a superfamily of cell surface molecules which includes CD40, CD30, CD95 (Fas), CD27, 4-1BB antigens and the receptors for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF). The proteins of this group are related to each other by having three to six repeats of a cysteine-rich sequence in their extracellular domains. Members of this family of receptors have also been shown to bind to ligands which are structurally related to TNF. The mouse homologue of the rat OX40 protein was cloned at the cDNA and genomic levels. The gene structure shows that there are several intron/exon borders shared between OX40 and CD27, CD40, TNF receptor type I, CD95 and 4-1BB genes. This group of genes is less closely related structurally to the gene structure of the NGF receptor. The gene encoding murine OX40 has been placed on mouse chromosome 4, in an area which contains the genes for TNF receptor type II and 4-1BB, and is syntenic with a region of human chromosome 1 which contains human TNF receptor type II, OX40, and CD30 genes.

  5. Modification of the Sweetness and Stability of Sweet-Tasting Protein Monellin by Gene Mutation and Protein Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiulei; Li, Lei; Yang, Liu; Liu, Tianming; Cai, Chenggu; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Natural sweet protein monellin has a high sweetness and low calorie, suggesting its potential in food applications. However, due to its low heat and acid resistance, the application of monellin is limited. In this study, we show that the thermostability of monellin can be improved with no sweetness decrease by means of sequence, structure analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis. We analyzed residues located in the α-helix as well as an ionizable residue C41. Of the mutants investigated, the effects of E23A and C41A mutants were most remarkable. The former displayed significantly improved thermal stability, while its sweetness was not changed. The mutated protein was stable after 30 min incubation at 85°C. The latter showed increased sweetness and slight improvement of thermostability. Furthermore, we found that most mutants enhancing the thermostability of the protein were distributed at the two ends of α-helix. Molecular biophysics analysis revealed that the state of buried ionizable residues may account for the modulated properties of mutated proteins. Our results prove that the properties of sweet protein monellin can be modified by means of bioinformatics analysis, gene manipulation, and protein modification, highlighting the possibility of designing novel effective sweet proteins based on structure-function relationships. PMID:26881217

  6. A second rhodopsin-like protein in Cyanophora paradoxa: gene sequence and protein expression in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Frassanito, Anna Maria; Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    Here we report the identification and expression of a second rhodopsin-like protein in the alga Cyanophora paradoxa (Glaucophyta), named Cyanophopsin_2. This new protein was identified due to a serendipity event, since the RACE reaction performed to complete the sequence of Cyanophopsin_1, (the first rhodopsin-like protein of C. paradoxa identified in 2009 by our group), amplified a 619 bp sequence corresponding to a portion of a new gene of the same protein family. The full sequence consists of 1175 bp consisting of 849 bp coding DNA sequence and 4 introns of 326 bp. The protein is characterized by an N-terminal region of 47 amino acids, followed by a region with 7 α-helices of 213 amino acids and a C-terminal region of 22 amino acids. This protein showed high identity with Cyanophopsin_1 and other rhodopsin-like proteins of Archea, Bacteria, Fungi and Algae. Cyanophosin_2 (CpR2) was expressed in a cell-free expression system, and characterized by means of absorption spectroscopy. PMID:23851421

  7. Purification, characterization, and molecular gene cloning of an antifungal protein from Ginkgo biloba seeds.

    PubMed

    Sawano, Yoriko; Miyakawa, Takuya; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Tanokura, Masaru; Hatano, Ken-ichi

    2007-03-01

    A novel basic protein with antifungal activity was isolated from the seeds of Ginkgo biloba and purified to homogeneity. The protein inhibited the growth of some fungi (Fusarium oxysporum, Trichoderma reesei, and Candida albicans) but did not exhibit antibacterial action against Escherichia coli. Furthermore, this protein showed weak inhibitory activity against the aspartic protease pepsin. To design primers for gene amplification, the NH(2)-terminal and partial internal amino acid sequences were determined using peptides obtained from a tryptic digest of the oxidized protein. The full-length cDNA of the antifungal protein was cloned and sequenced by RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The cDNA contained a 402-bp open reading frame encoding a 134-aa protein with a potential signal peptide (26 residues), suggesting that this protein is synthesized as a preprotein and secreted outside the cells. The antifungal protein shows approximately 85% identity with embryo-abundant proteins from Picea abies and Picea glauca at the amino acid level; however, there is no homology between this protein and other plant antifungal proteins, such as defensin, and cyclophilin-, miraculin- and thaumatin-like proteins. PMID:17338634

  8. Correlation of gene expression and protein production rate - a system wide study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Growth rate is a major determinant of intracellular function. However its effects can only be properly dissected with technically demanding chemostat cultivations in which it can be controlled. Recent work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultivations provided the first analysis on genome wide effects of growth rate. In this work we study the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) that is an industrial protein production host known for its exceptional protein secretion capability. Interestingly, it exhibits a low growth rate protein production phenotype. Results We have used transcriptomics and proteomics to study the effect of growth rate and cell density on protein production in chemostat cultivations of T. reesei. Use of chemostat allowed control of growth rate and exact estimation of the extracellular specific protein production rate (SPPR). We find that major biosynthetic activities are all negatively correlated with SPPR. We also find that expression of many genes of secreted proteins and secondary metabolism, as well as various lineage specific, mostly unknown genes are positively correlated with SPPR. Finally, we enumerate possible regulators and regulatory mechanisms, arising from the data, for this response. Conclusions Based on these results it appears that in low growth rate protein production energy is very efficiently used primarly for protein production. Also, we propose that flux through early glycolysis or the TCA cycle is a more fundamental determining factor than growth rate for low growth rate protein production and we propose a novel eukaryotic response to this i.e. the lineage specific response (LSR). PMID:22185473

  9. Overlapping protein-encoding genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    PubMed

    Silby, Mark W; Levy, Stuart B

    2008-06-13

    The annotated genome sequences of prokaryotes seldom include overlapping genes encoded opposite each other by the same stretch of DNA. However, antisense transcription is becoming recognized as a widespread phenomenon in eukaryotes, and examples have been linked to important biological processes. Pseudomonas fluorescens inhabits aquatic and terrestrial environments, and can be regarded as an environmental generalist. The genetic basis for this ecological success is not well understood. In a previous search for soil-induced genes in P. fluorescens Pf0-1, ten antisense genes were discovered. These were termed 'cryptic' genes, as they had escaped detection by gene-hunting algorithms, and lacked easily recognizable promoters. In this communication, we designate such genes as 'non-predicted' or 'hidden'. Using reverse transcription PCR, we show that at each of six non-predicted gene loci chosen for study, transcription occurs from both 'sense' and 'antisense' DNA strands. Further, at least one of these hidden antisense genes, iiv14, encodes a protein, as does the sense transcript, both identified by poly-histidine tags on the C-terminus of the proteins. Mutational and complementation studies showed that this novel antisense gene was important for efficient colonization of soil, and multiple copies in the wildtype host improved the speed of soil colonization. Introduction of a stop codon early in the gene eliminated complementation, further implicating the protein in colonization of soil. We therefore designate iiv14 "cosA". These data suggest that, as is the case with eukaryotes, some bacterial genomes are more densely coded than currently recognized.

  10. A novel approach to identify genes that determine grain protein deviation in cereals.

    PubMed

    Mosleth, Ellen F; Wan, Yongfang; Lysenko, Artem; Chope, Gemma A; Penson, Simon P; Shewry, Peter R; Hawkesford, Malcolm J

    2015-06-01

    Grain yield and protein content were determined for six wheat cultivars grown over 3 years at multiple sites and at multiple nitrogen (N) fertilizer inputs. Although grain protein content was negatively correlated with yield, some grain samples had higher protein contents than expected based on their yields, a trait referred to as grain protein deviation (GPD). We used novel statistical approaches to identify gene transcripts significantly related to GPD across environments. The yield and protein content were initially adjusted for nitrogen fertilizer inputs and then adjusted for yield (to remove the negative correlation with protein content), resulting in a parameter termed corrected GPD. Significant genetic variation in corrected GPD was observed for six cultivars grown over a range of environmental conditions (a total of 584 samples). Gene transcript profiles were determined in a subset of 161 samples of developing grain to identify transcripts contributing to GPD. Principal component analysis (PCA), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and means of scores regression (MSR) were used to identify individual principal components (PCs) correlating with GPD alone. Scores of the selected PCs, which were significantly related to GPD and protein content but not to the yield and significantly affected by cultivar, were identified as reflecting a multivariate pattern of gene expression related to genetic variation in GPD. Transcripts with consistent variation along the selected PCs were identified by an approach hereby called one-block means of scores regression (one-block MSR).

  11. Contribution of protein Z gene single-nucleotide polymorphism to systemic lupus erythematosus in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Yousry, Sherif M; Shahin, Rasha M H; El Refai, Rasha M

    2016-09-01

    Protein Z has been reported to exert an important role in inhibiting coagulation. Polymorphisms in the protein Z gene (PROZ) may affect protein Z levels and thus play a role in thrombosis. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical significance of protein Z gene G79A polymorphism in Egyptian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We studied the distribution of the protein Z gene (rs17882561) (G79A) single-nucleotide polymorphism by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 100 Egyptian patients with SLE and 100 age, sex, and ethnically matched controls. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of the genotypes between SLE patients and the control group in our study (P = 0.103). But a statistically significant difference in the frequency of the alleles between SLE patients and controls was observed (P = 0.024). Also a significant association was detected between protein Z genotypes (and also A allele) and thrombosis, which is one of the manifestations of SLE (P = 0.004 and P = 0.001, respectively). Moreover, we observed a significant association between the protein Z AA and GA genotypes (and also A allele) and the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies (P = 0.016 and P = 0.004, respectively). The minor A allele of the G79A polymorphism in the protein Z gene might contribute to the genetic susceptibility of SLE in Egyptian patients. Also, an influence for this polymorphism on some of the disease manifestations has been elucidated, so protein Z G79A AG/AA may be a risk factor for thrombosis.

  12. Tobacco serine/threonine protein kinase gene NrSTK enhances black shank resistance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y-L; Wang, B-W; Xu, Z-L; Li, M-Y; Song, Z-B; Li, W-Z; Li, Y-P

    2015-01-01

    A serine/threonine protein kinase gene (NrSTK) was cloned from Nicotiana repanda based on the sequence of a previously isolated resistance gene analog (RGA). Expression of RGA was induced by challenge with the pathogen black shank. The NrSTK gene was predicted to encode a protein kinase that contained an ATP binding site at residues 41-69 and a serine/threonine protein kinase activation sequence spanning the region 161-173. Overexpression of NrSTK in the susceptible tobacco variety Honghuadajinyuan significantly enhanced resistance to black shank, indicating that NrSTK plays a role in incompatibility reactions between tobacco and the pathogen. Characterization of NrSTK will help elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in black shank resistance in N. repanda.

  13. Gene clusters for ribosomal proteins in the mitochondrial genome of a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, M; Oda, K; Yamato, K; Ohta, E; Nakamura, Y; Nozato, N; Akashi, K; Ohyama, K

    1992-01-01

    We detected 16 genes for ribosomal proteins in the complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA from a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha. The genes formed two major clusters, rps12-rps7 and rps10-rpl2-rps19-rps3-rpl16-rpl5- rps14-rps8- rpl6-rps13-rps11-rps1, very similar in organization to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein operons (str and S10-spc-alpha operons, respectively). In contrast, rps2 and rps4 genes were located separately in the liverwort mitochondrial genome (the latter was part of the alpha operon in E. coli). Furthermore, several ribosomal proteins encoded by the liverwort mitochondrial genome differed substantially in size from their counterparts in E. coli and liverwort chloroplast. PMID:1620617

  14. Identification and characterization of multiple Spidroin 1 genes encoding major ampullate silk proteins in Nephila clavipes.

    PubMed

    Gaines, W A; Marcotte, W R

    2008-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is primarily composed of proteins called major ampullate spidroins (MaSps) that consist of a large repeat array flanked by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains. Until recently, there has been little evidence for more than one gene encoding each of the two major spidroin silk proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2. Here, we report the deduced N-terminal domain sequences for two distinct MaSp1 genes from Nephila clavipes (MaSp1A and MaSp1B) and for MaSp2. All three MaSp genes are co-expressed in the major ampullate gland. A search of the GenBank database also revealed two distinct MaSp1 C-terminal domain sequences. Sequencing confirmed that both MaSp1 genes are present in all seven Nephila clavipes spiders examined. The presence of nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes confirmed that MaSp1A and MaSp1B are distinct genetic loci and not merely alleles of the same gene. We experimentally determined the transcription start sites for all three MaSp genes and established preliminary pairing between the two MaSp1 N- and C-terminal domains. Phylogenetic analysis of these new sequences and other published MaSp N- and C-terminal domain sequences illustrated that duplications of MaSp genes may be widespread among spider species.

  15. Identification and Characterization of Multiple Spidroin 1 Genes Encoding Major Ampullate Silk Proteins in Nephila clavipes

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, William A.; Marcotte, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is primarily composed of proteins called major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) that consist of a large repeat array flanked by non-repetitive N- and C-terminal domains. Until recently, there has been little evidence for more than one gene encoding each of the two major spidroin silk proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2. Here, we report the deduced N-terminal domain sequences for two distinct MaSp1 genes from Nephila clavipes (MaSp1A and MaSp1B) and for MaSp2. All three MaSp genes are co-expressed in the major ampullate gland. A search of the GenBank database also revealed two distinct MaSp1 C-terminal domain sequences. Sequencing confirmed that both MaSp1 genes are present in all seven Nephila clavipes spiders examined. The presence of nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes confirmed that MaSp1A and MaSp1B are distinct genetic loci and not merely alleles of the same gene. We have experimentally determined the transcription start sites for all three MaSp genes and established preliminary pairing between the two MaSp1 N- and C-terminal domains. Phylogenetic analysis of these new sequences and other published MaSp N- and C-terminal domain sequences illustrated that duplications of MaSp genes may be widespread among spider species. PMID:18828837

  16. Characterization of Mapuera virus: structure, proteins and nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Henderson, G W; Laird, C; Dermott, E; Rima, B K

    1995-10-01

    The molecular biology of Mapuera virus was studied at both the protein and nucleic acid levels. Seven virus-encoded proteins were detected in infected Vero cells. The sizes and characteristics of each of the proteins determined from various radiolabelling experiments allowed preliminary identification of the proteins as the large (L; 190 kDa), haemagglutinin neuraminidase (HN; 74 kDa), nucleocapsid (N; 66 kDa), fusion (F0; 63 kDa), phosphoprotein (P; 49 kDa), matrix (M; 43 kDa) and non-structural (V; 35 kDa) proteins. Western blot analysis showed that the HN, N and P proteins were major antigens recognized in the mouse. A cDNA library of total virus-infected cellular mRNA was created and screening of the library resulted in the detection of cDNA sequences representing the N mRNA transcript of Mapuera virus. The N mRNA sequence determined from the clones was 1731 nt in length and contained an ORF that encoded 537 amino acids, the complete 3' untranslated region and part of the 5' non-coding region. The calculated M(r) of the N protein was 59 kDa, which is close to the 66 kDa protein observed by SDS-PAGE. PMID:7595354

  17. Cloning and sequence analysis of the major outer membrane protein genes of two Chlamydia psittaci strains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y X; Morrison, S G; Caldwell, H D; Baehr, W

    1989-05-01

    We cloned and sequenced the gene encoding the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of two Chlamydia psittaci strains, guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) strain 1, and meningopneumonitis (Mn) strain Cal-10. Intraspecies alignment of the two C. psittaci MOMP genes revealed 80.6% similarity, and interspecies comparison of C. trachomatis and C. psittaci MOMP genes yielded about 68% similarity. As found previously for C. trachomatis MOMP sequences, stretches of predominantly conserved sequences of GPIC and Mn MOMPs were interrupted by four variable domains whose locations were identical to those of C. trachomatis MOMPs. Seven of eight cysteine residues were found at precisely the same positions in GPIC, Mn, and C. trachomatis MOMPs, emphasizing their importance in structure and function of the protein. Collectively, these results indicate that C. psittaci and C. trachomatis MOMP genes diverged from a common ancestor.

  18. Identification of a DNA binding protein that recognizes the nonamer recombinational signal sequence of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Halligan, B D; Desiderio, S V

    1987-10-01

    Extracts of nuclei from B- and T-lymphoid cells contain a protein that binds specifically to the conserved nonamer DNA sequence within the recombinational signals of immunoglobulin genes. Complexes with DNA fragments from four kappa light-chain joining (J) segments have the same electrophoretic mobility. Nonamer-containing DNA fragments from heavy-chain and light-chain genes compete for binding. Within the 5'-flanking DNA of the J kappa 4 gene segment, the binding site has been localized to a 27-base-pair interval spanning the nonamer region. The binding activity is recovered as a single peak after ion-exchange chromatography. The site of binding of the protein and its presence in nuclei of lymphoid cells suggest that it may function in the assembly of immunoglobulin genes.

  19. Structure and localization of the gene encoding human peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro ); Takahashi, Ei-Ichi ); Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi )

    1993-11-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2) is a small, basic, and cytoplasmic lipid-binding protein of peripheral myelin. In this paper, the authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human PMP2 gene. The gene is about 8 kb long and consists of four exons. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box) and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human PMP2 was assigned to chromosome 8q21.3-q22.1 by spot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Alterations in Gene Expression in Mutant Amyloid Precursor Protein Transgenic Mice Lacking Niemann-Pick Type C1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Maulik, Mahua; Thinakaran, Gopal; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused mostly by mutation in NPC1 gene, is pathologically characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in brain and other tissues. This is accompanied by gliosis and loss of neurons in selected brain regions, including the cerebellum. Recent studies have shown that NPC disease exhibits intriguing parallels with Alzheimer’s disease, including the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and increased levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP)-derived β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in vulnerable brain neurons. To evaluate the role of Aβ in NPC disease, we determined the gene expression profile in selected brain regions of our recently developed bigenic ANPC mice, generated by crossing APP transgenic (Tg) mice with heterozygous Npc1-deficient mice. The ANPC mice exhibited exacerbated neuronal and glial pathology compared to other genotypes [i.e., APP-Tg, double heterozygous (Dhet), Npc1-null and wild-type mice]. Analysis of expression profiles of 86 selected genes using real-time RT-PCR arrays showed a wide-spectrum of alterations in the four genotypes compared to wild-type controls. The changes observed in APP-Tg and Dhet mice are limited to only few genes involved mostly in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism, whereas Npc1-null and ANPC mice showed alterations in the expression profiles of a number of genes regulating cholesterol homeostasis, APP metabolism, vesicular trafficking and cell death mechanism in both hippocampus and cerebellum compared to wild-type mice. Intriguingly, ANPC and Npc1-null mice, with some exceptions, exhibited similar changes, although more genes were differentially expressed in the affected cerebellum than the relatively spared hippocampus. The altered gene profiles were found to match with the corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that lack of Npc1 protein can alter the expression profile of selected transcripts as well as proteins, and APP

  1. Aeromonas salmonicida possesses two genes encoding homologs of the major outer membrane protein, OmpA.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, G M; Vipond, R; MacIntyre, S

    1996-01-01

    Two homologs of the outer membrane protein OmpA were identified in Aeromonas salmonicida by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and amino-terminal sequence analyses. An A. salmonicida genomic DNA library was constructed by using lambda GEM-11 and recombinant phage carrying both genes ompAI and ompAII) selected by immunoscreening. A 5.0-kb BamHI fragment containing the two genes in tandem was subcloned in pBluescript and used for further subcloning and sequencing of the genes. The encoded proteins (Mr = 33,564 and 32,536 for mature OmpAI and OmpAII, respectively) had only 64% identity with each other and otherwise had the highest level of homology to OmpA proteins from the members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Based on the Escherichia coli OmpA model, an eight-stranded amphipathic beta-barrel model for the membrane assembly of the N-terminal half of OmpAI and OmpAII was predicted. Most variation between the two proteins was localized to the predicted surface loops and periplasmic turns, while the transmembrane strands and C-terminals domains were highly conserved. Expression of ompAI and ompAII separately in E. coli indicated that both genes could be independently transcribed from their own promoters and that both gene products were assembled into the E. coli outer membrane. A survey of different Aeromonas spp. by PCR revealed that possession of two tandem ompA genes was widespread among this genus. This is the first report of any bacterial species possessing two genes for homologs of this major outer membrane protein. PMID:8626290

  2. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Genes in Corn Roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Patil, S.; Bhatia, A.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two cDNAs encoding Ca-2(+) - Dependent Protein Kinases (CDPKs), Corn Root Protein Kinase 1 and 2 (CRPK 1, CRPK 2) were isolated from the root tip library of corn (Zea mays L., cv. Merit) and their nucleotide sequences were determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of both the clones have features characteristic of plant CDPKS, including all 11 conserved serine/threonine kinase subdomains, a junction domain and a calmodulin-like domain with four Ca-2(+), -binding sites. Northern analysis revealed that CRPKI mRNA is preferentially expressed in roots, especially in the root tip; whereas, the expression of CRPK2 mRNA was very low in all the tissues tested. In situ hybridization experiments revealed that CRPKI mRNA is highly expressed in the root apex, as compared to other parts of the root. Partially purified CDPK from the root tip phosphorylates syntide-2, a common peptide substrate for plant CDPKs, and the phosphorylation was stimulated 7-fold by the addition of Ca-2(+). Our results show that two CDPK isoforms are expressed in corn roots and they may be involved in the Ca-2(+)-dependent signal transduction process.

  3. Extracellular matrix protein gene expression in atherosclerotic hypertensive pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Botney, M. D.; Kaiser, L. R.; Cooper, J. D.; Mecham, R. P.; Parghi, D.; Roby, J.; Parks, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    Lobar pulmonary arteries from patients with unexplained pulmonary hypertension were obtained at the time of single-lung transplantation to determine the response of large elastic vessels to increased intraluminal pressure. Specifically, human pulmonary arteries were examined to determine if remodeling remained active at the time of surgery and whether remodeling was similar to previously reported remodeling observed in several animal models. Grossly, the hypertensive vessels appeared atherosclerotic. Histochemical stains revealed a thick, diffuse neointima in hypertensive vessels compared with normal vessels. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated elastin protein in the neointima and in situ hybridization studies demonstrated tropoelastin mRNA largely in the neointima. Similarly, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization detected cellular fibronectin, thrombospondin and type I collagen protein and mRNA within the thickened intima from hypertensive vessels. These studies provide evidence that hypertensive vessels in patients with severe chronic pulmonary hypertension are actively remodeling but that the pattern of remodeling is different from previously described animal models. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1739129

  4. Sequence and regulation of a gene encoding a human 89-kilodalton heat shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, E; Brandon, S E; Smale, G; Lloyd, D; Weber, L A

    1989-01-01

    Vertebrate cells synthesize two forms of the 82- to 90-kilodalton heat shock protein that are encoded by distinct gene families. In HeLa cells, both proteins (hsp89 alpha and hsp89 beta) are abundant under normal growth conditions and are synthesized at increased rates in response to heat stress. Only the larger form, hsp89 alpha, is induced by the adenovirus E1A gene product (M. C. Simon, K. Kitchener, H. T. Kao, E. Hickey, L. Weber, R. Voellmy, N. Heintz, and J. R. Nevins, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:2884-2890, 1987). We have isolated a human hsp89 alpha gene that shows complete sequence identity with heat- and E1A-inducible cDNA used as a hybridization probe. The 5'-flanking region contained overlapping and inverted consensus heat shock control elements that can confer heat-inducible expression on a beta-globin reporter gene. The gene contained 10 intervening sequences. The first intron was located adjacent to the translation start codon, an arrangement also found in the Drosophila hsp82 gene. The spliced mRNA sequence contained a single open reading frame encoding an 84,564-dalton polypeptide showing high homology with the hsp82 to hsp90 proteins of other organisms. The deduced hsp89 alpha protein sequence differed from the human hsp89 beta sequence reported elsewhere (N. F. Rebbe, J. Ware, R. M. Bertina, P. Modrich, and D. W. Stafford (Gene 53:235-245, 1987) in at least 99 out of the 732 amino acids. Transcription of the hsp89 alpha gene was induced by serum during normal cell growth, but expression did not appear to be restricted to a particular stage of the cell cycle. hsp89 alpha mRNA was considerably more stable than the mRNA encoding hsp70, which can account for the higher constitutive rate of hsp89 synthesis in unstressed cells. Images PMID:2527334

  5. Epigenetic Modifications Unlock the Milk Protein Gene Loci during Mouse Mammary Gland Development and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rijnkels, Monique; Freeman-Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Potluri, Vani; Wang, Liguo; Li, Wei; Lemay, Danielle G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike other tissues, development and differentiation of the mammary gland occur mostly after birth. The roles of systemic hormones and local growth factors important for this development and functional differentiation are well-studied. In other tissues, it has been shown that chromatin organization plays a key role in transcriptional regulation and underlies epigenetic regulation during development and differentiation. However, the role of chromatin organization in mammary gland development and differentiation is less well-defined. Here, we have studied the changes in chromatin organization at the milk protein gene loci (casein, whey acidic protein, and others) in the mouse mammary gland before and after functional differentiation. Methodology/Principal Findings Distal regulatory elements within the casein gene cluster and whey acidic protein gene region have an open chromatin organization after pubertal development, while proximal promoters only gain open-chromatin marks during pregnancy in conjunction with the major induction of their expression. In contrast, other milk protein genes, such as alpha-lactalbumin, already have an open chromatin organization in the mature virgin gland. Changes in chromatin organization in the casein gene cluster region that are present after puberty persisted after lactation has ceased, while the changes which occurred during pregnancy at the gene promoters were not maintained. In general, mammary gland expressed genes and their regulatory elements exhibit developmental stage- and tissue-specific chromatin organization. Conclusions/Significance A progressive gain of epigenetic marks indicative of open/active chromatin on genes marking functional differentiation accompanies the development of the mammary gland. These results support a model in which a chromatin organization is established during pubertal development that is then poised to respond to the systemic hormonal signals of pregnancy and lactation to achieve the

  6. Rotating wall vessel exposure alters protein secretion and global gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Helena; O'Neill, Alex J.; Blake, Katy L.; Walther, Meik; Long, Paul F.; Hinds, Jason; Taylor, Peter W.

    2012-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is routinely recovered from air and surface samples taken aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and poses a health threat to crew. As bacteria respond to the low shear forces engendered by continuous rotation conditions in a Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) and the reduced gravitational field of near-Earth flight by altering gene expression, we examined the effect of low-shear RWV growth on protein secretion and gene expression by three S. aureus isolates. When cultured under 1 g, the total amount of protein secreted by these strains varied up to fourfold; under continuous rotation conditions, protein secretion by all three strains was significantly reduced. Concentrations of individual proteins were differentially reduced and no evidence was found for increased lysis. These data suggest that growth under continuous rotation conditions reduces synthesis or secretion of proteins. A limited number of changes in gene expression under continuous rotation conditions were noted: in all isolates vraX, a gene encoding a polypeptide associated with cell wall stress, was down-regulated. A vraX deletion mutant of S. aureus SH1000 was constructed: no differences were found between SH1000 and ΔvraX with respect to colony phenotype, viability, protein export, antibiotic susceptibility, vancomycin kill kinetics, susceptibility to cold or heat and gene modulation. An ab initio protein-ligand docking simulation suggests a major binding site for β-lactam drugs such as imipenem. If such changes to the bacterial phenotype occur during spaceflight, they will compromise the capacity of staphylococci to cause systemic infection and to circumvent antibacterial chemotherapy.

  7. Identification and Expression Analysis of Candidate Odorant-Binding Protein and Chemosensory Protein Genes by Antennal Transcriptome of Sitobion avenae

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wenxin; Fan, Jia; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Qingxuan; Han, Zongli; Sun, Jingrui; Chen, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs) of aphids are thought to be responsible for the initial molecular interactions during olfaction that mediate detection of chemical signals. Analysis of the diversity of proteins involved comprises critical basic research work that will facilitate the development of sustainable pest control strategies. To help us better understand differences in the olfactory system between winged and wingless grain aphids, we constructed an antennal transcriptome from winged and wingless Sitobion avenae (Fabricius), one of the most serious pests of cereal fields worldwide. Among the 133,331 unigenes in the antennal assembly, 13 OBP and 5 CSP putative transcripts were identified with 6 OBP and 3 CSP sequences representing new S. avenae annotations. We used qPCR to examine the expression profile of these genes sets across S. avenae development and in various tissues. We found 7 SaveOBPs and 1 SaveCSP were specifically or significantly elevated in antennae compared with other tissues, and that some transcripts (SaveOBP8, SaveCSP2 and SaveCSP5) were abundantly expressed in the legs of winged or wingless aphids. The expression levels of the SaveOBPs and SaveCSPs varied depending on the developmental stage. Possible physiological functions of these genes are discussed. Further molecular and functional studies of these olfactory related genes will explore their potential as novel targets for controlling S. avenae. PMID:27561107

  8. Identification and Expression Analysis of Candidate Odorant-Binding Protein and Chemosensory Protein Genes by Antennal Transcriptome of Sitobion avenae.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenxin; Fan, Jia; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Qingxuan; Han, Zongli; Sun, Jingrui; Chen, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs) of aphids are thought to be responsible for the initial molecular interactions during olfaction that mediate detection of chemical signals. Analysis of the diversity of proteins involved comprises critical basic research work that will facilitate the development of sustainable pest control strategies. To help us better understand differences in the olfactory system between winged and wingless grain aphids, we constructed an antennal transcriptome from winged and wingless Sitobion avenae (Fabricius), one of the most serious pests of cereal fields worldwide. Among the 133,331 unigenes in the antennal assembly, 13 OBP and 5 CSP putative transcripts were identified with 6 OBP and 3 CSP sequences representing new S. avenae annotations. We used qPCR to examine the expression profile of these genes sets across S. avenae development and in various tissues. We found 7 SaveOBPs and 1 SaveCSP were specifically or significantly elevated in antennae compared with other tissues, and that some transcripts (SaveOBP8, SaveCSP2 and SaveCSP5) were abundantly expressed in the legs of winged or wingless aphids. The expression levels of the SaveOBPs and SaveCSPs varied depending on the developmental stage. Possible physiological functions of these genes are discussed. Further molecular and functional studies of these olfactory related genes will explore their potential as novel targets for controlling S. avenae. PMID:27561107

  9. An intron-encoded protein assists RNA splicing of multiple similar introns of different bacterial genes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing; Wang, Yanfei; Liu, Xiang-Qin

    2005-10-21

    Four group II introns were found in an unusually intron-rich dnaN gene (encoding the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III) of the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum, and they have strong similarities to two introns of the RIR gene (encoding ribonucleotide reductase) of the same organism. Of these six introns, only the RIR-3 intron encodes a maturase protein and showed efficient RNA splicing when expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The other five introns do not encode a maturase protein and did not show RNA splicing in E. coli. But these maturase-less introns showed efficient RNA splicing when the RIR-3 intron-encoded maturase protein was co-expressed from a freestanding gene in the same cell. These findings demonstrated that an intron-encoded protein could function as a general maturase for multiple introns of different genes. Major implications may include an intron-mediated co-regulation of the different genes and a resemblance of the evolutionary origin of spliceosomal introns.

  10. The Tzs protein and exogenous cytokinin affect virulence gene expression and bacterial growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Yang, Fong-Jhih; Cheng, Tun-Fang; Chen, Yi-Chun; Lee, Ying-Ling; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lai, Erh-Min

    2013-09-01

    The soil phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease in a wide range of plant species. The neoplastic growth at the infection sites is caused by transferring, integrating, and expressing transfer DNA (T-DNA) from A. tumefaciens into plant cells. A trans-zeatin synthesizing (tzs) gene is located in the nopaline-type tumor-inducing plasmid and causes trans-zeatin production in A. tumefaciens. Similar to known virulence (Vir) proteins that are induced by the vir gene inducer acetosyringone (AS) at acidic pH 5.5, Tzs protein is highly induced by AS under this growth condition but also constitutively expressed and moderately upregulated by AS at neutral pH 7.0. We found that the promoter activities and protein levels of several AS-induced vir genes increased in the tzs deletion mutant, a mutant with decreased tumorigenesis and transient transformation efficiencies, in Arabidopsis roots. During AS induction and infection of Arabidopsis roots, the tzs deletion mutant conferred impaired growth, which could be rescued by genetic complementation and supplementing exogenous cytokinin. Exogenous cytokinin also repressed vir promoter activities and Vir protein accumulation in both the wild-type and tzs mutant bacteria with AS induction. Thus, the tzs gene or its product, cytokinin, may be involved in regulating AS-induced vir gene expression and, therefore, affect bacterial growth and virulence during A. tumefaciens infection. PMID:23593941

  11. Transposon assisted gene insertion technology (TAGIT): a tool for generating fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Becker, Eric C; Jung, James; Tuwatananurak, Ida; Pogliano, Kit

    2010-01-01

    We constructed a transposon (transposon assisted gene insertion technology, or TAGIT) that allows the random insertion of gfp (or other genes) into chromosomal loci without disrupting operon structure or regulation. TAGIT is a modified Tn5 transposon that uses Kan(R) to select for insertions on the chromosome or plasmid, beta-galactosidase to identify in-frame gene fusions, and Cre recombinase to excise the kan and lacZ genes in vivo. The resulting gfp insertions maintain target gene reading frame (to the 5' and 3' of gfp) and are integrated at the native chromosomal locus, thereby maintaining native expression signals. Libraries can be screened to identify GFP insertions that maintain target protein function at native expression levels, allowing more trustworthy localization studies. We here use TAGIT to generate a library of GFP insertions in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor (LacI). We identified fully functional GFP insertions and partially functional insertions that bind DNA but fail to repress the lacZ operon. Several of these latter GFP insertions localize to lacO arrays integrated in the E. coli chromosome without producing the elongated cells frequently observed when functional LacI-GFP fusions are used in chromosome tagging experiments. TAGIT thereby faciliates the isolation of fully functional insertions of fluorescent proteins into target proteins expressed from the native chromosomal locus as well as potentially useful partially functional proteins. PMID:20090956

  12. Exact protein distributions for stochastic models of gene expression using partitioning of Poisson processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Platini, Thierry; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2013-04-01

    Stochasticity in gene expression gives rise to fluctuations in protein levels across a population of genetically identical cells. Such fluctuations can lead to phenotypic variation in clonal populations; hence, there is considerable interest in quantifying noise in gene expression using stochastic models. However, obtaining exact analytical results for protein distributions has been an intractable task for all but the simplest models. Here, we invoke the partitioning property of Poisson processes to develop a mapping that significantly simplifies the analysis of stochastic models of gene expression. The mapping leads to exact protein distributions using results for mRNA distributions in models with promoter-based regulation. Using this approach, we derive exact analytical results for steady-state and time-dependent distributions for the basic two-stage model of gene expression. Furthermore, we show how the mapping leads to exact protein distributions for extensions of the basic model that include the effects of posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulation. The approach developed in this work is widely applicable and can contribute to a quantitative understanding of stochasticity in gene expression and its regulation.

  13. Exact protein distributions for stochastic models of gene expression using partitioning of Poisson processes.

    PubMed

    Pendar, Hodjat; Platini, Thierry; Kulkarni, Rahul V

    2013-04-01

    Stochasticity in gene expression gives rise to fluctuations in protein levels across a population of genetically identical cells. Such fluctuations can lead to phenotypic variation in clonal populations; hence, there is considerable interest in quantifying noise in gene expression using stochastic models. However, obtaining exact analytical results for protein distributions has been an intractable task for all but the simplest models. Here, we invoke the partitioning property of Poisson processes to develop a mapping that significantly simplifies the analysis of stochastic models of gene expression. The mapping leads to exact protein distributions using results for mRNA distributions in models with promoter-based regulation. Using this approach, we derive exact analytical results for steady-state and time-dependent distributions for the basic two-stage model of gene expression. Furthermore, we show how the mapping leads to exact protein distributions for extensions of the basic model that include the effects of posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulation. The approach developed in this work is widely applicable and can contribute to a quantitative understanding of stochasticity in gene expression and its regulation.

  14. The Tzs protein and exogenous cytokinin affect virulence gene expression and bacterial growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Yang, Fong-Jhih; Cheng, Tun-Fang; Chen, Yi-Chun; Lee, Ying-Ling; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lai, Erh-Min

    2013-09-01

    The soil phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease in a wide range of plant species. The neoplastic growth at the infection sites is caused by transferring, integrating, and expressing transfer DNA (T-DNA) from A. tumefaciens into plant cells. A trans-zeatin synthesizing (tzs) gene is located in the nopaline-type tumor-inducing plasmid and causes trans-zeatin production in A. tumefaciens. Similar to known virulence (Vir) proteins that are induced by the vir gene inducer acetosyringone (AS) at acidic pH 5.5, Tzs protein is highly induced by AS under this growth condition but also constitutively expressed and moderately upregulated by AS at neutral pH 7.0. We found that the promoter activities and protein levels of several AS-induced vir genes increased in the tzs deletion mutant, a mutant with decreased tumorigenesis and transient transformation efficiencies, in Arabidopsis roots. During AS induction and infection of Arabidopsis roots, the tzs deletion mutant conferred impaired growth, which could be rescued by genetic complementation and supplementing exogenous cytokinin. Exogenous cytokinin also repressed vir promoter activities and Vir protein accumulation in both the wild-type and tzs mutant bacteria with AS induction. Thus, the tzs gene or its product, cytokinin, may be involved in regulating AS-induced vir gene expression and, therefore, affect bacterial growth and virulence during A. tumefaciens infection.

  15. Exon organization of the human FKBP-12 gene: Correlation with structural and functional protein domains

    SciTech Connect

    DiLella, A.G.; Craig, R.J. )

    1991-09-03

    FKBP-12, the major T-cell binding protein for the immunosuppressive agents FK506 and rapamycin, catalyzes the interconversion of the cis and trans rotamers of the peptidyl-prolyl amide bond of peptide and protein substrates. The function of rotamase activity in cells and the role of FKBP-12 in immunoregulation is uncertain. In this paper the authors report the cloning and characterization of the human chromosomal FKBP-12 gene and four processed FKBP-12 pseudogenes. The FKBP-12 gene is 24 kilobases in length and contains five exons. The protein-coding region of the gene is divided into four exon modules that correlate with the structural and functional domains of the protein. The novel structure of FKBP-12 resulting form the topology of the antiparallel {beta}-sheet is the topological crossing of two loops that are encoded by separate exons. Separate exons also encode the antiparallel {beta}-sheet and {alpha}-helical region that define the drug-binding pocket and enzyme activity site of FKBP-12. The exon organization of the FKBP-12 gene structure will enable inactivation of this gene by homologous recombination in cells to provide a model to study the role of FKBP-12 in immunoregulation and normal cellular processes.

  16. Ex vivo adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and immunomodulatory protein production in human cornea.

    PubMed

    Oral, H B; Larkin, D F; Fehervari, Z; Byrnes, A P; Rankin, A M; Haskard, D O; Wood, M J; Dallman, M J; George, A J

    1997-07-01

    One attractive strategy to prevent or control allograft rejection is to genetically modify the donor tissue before transplantation. In this study, we have examined the feasibility of gene transfer to human corneal endothelium, using a number of recombinant adenovirus constructs. Ex vivo infection of human corneas with adenoviral vectors containing lacZ, under transcriptional control of either cytomegalovirus (CMV) or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) promoters, provided high-level gene expression, which was largely restricted to endothelium. Expression of the reporter gene persisted at relatively high levels for up to 7 days, followed by a decline to indetectable levels by 28 days. RT-PCR analysis of lacZ transcription showed a similar picture with a short period (3-7 days) of RNA transcription after infection. In contrast, adenoviral DNA persisted for at least 56 days. Subsequently, we examined the expression of a potential therapeutic gene, CTLA-4 Ig fusion protein. Following infection of human corneas with adenoviral vectors encoding CTLA-4 Ig protein, high levels of the fusion protein were detected in corneal culture supernatants for up to 28 days. This protein was functionally active, as determined by binding to B7.1 (CD80)-expressing transfectants. This study suggests that genetic alteration of donor cornea before transplantation is a feasible approach for preventing or controlling allograft rejection. Similar gene-based strategies might also be feasible to prevent rejection of other transplanted tissues or organs. PMID:9282165

  17. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV) of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM) to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated) and 901 (CAM treated) THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold), eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold) between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the pathogen whether or not

  18. Theories of biological aging: genes, proteins, and free radicals.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2006-12-01

    Traditional categorization of theories of aging into programmed and stochastic ones is outdated and obsolete. Biological aging is considered to occur mainly during the period of survival beyond the natural or essential lifespan (ELS) in Darwinian terms. Organisms survive to achieve ELS by virtue of genetically determined longevity assuring maintenance and repair systems (MRS). Aging at the molecular level is characterized by the progressive accumulation of molecular damage caused by environmental and metabolically generated free radicals, by spontaneous errors in biochemical reactions, and by nutritional components. Damages in the MRS and other pathways lead to age-related failure of MRS, molecular heterogeneity, cellular dysfunctioning, reduced stress tolerance, diseases and ultimate death. A unified theory of biological aging in terms of failure of homeodynamics comprising of MRS, and involving genes, milieu and chance, is acquiring a definitive shape and wider acceptance. Such a theory also establishes the basis for testing and developing effective means of intervention, prevention and modulation of aging.

  19. Molecular Architecture and Evolution of a Modular Spider Silk Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Cheryl Y.; Lewis, Randolph V.

    2000-02-01

    Spider flagelliform silk is one of the most elastic natural materials known. Extensive sequencing of spider silk genes has shown that the exons and introns of the flagelliform gene underwent intragenic concerted evolution. The intron sequences are more homogenized within a species than are the exons. This pattern can be explained by extreme mutation and recombination pressures on the internally repetitive exons. The iterated sequences within exons encode protein structures that are critical to the function of silks. Therefore, attributes that make silks exceptional biomaterials may also hinder the fixation of optimally adapted protein sequences.

  20. Moara: a Java library for extracting and normalizing gene and protein mentions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene/protein recognition and normalization are important preliminary steps for many biological text mining tasks, such as information retrieval, protein-protein interactions, and extraction of semantic information, among others. Despite dedication to these problems and effective solutions being reported, easily integrated tools to perform these tasks are not readily available. Results This study proposes a versatile and trainable Java library that implements gene/protein tagger and normalization steps based on machine learning approaches. The system has been trained for several model organisms and corpora but can be expanded to support new organisms and documents. Conclusions Moara is a flexible, trainable and open-source system that is not specifically orientated to any organism and therefore does not requires specific tuning in the algorithms or dictionaries utilized. Moara can be used as a stand-alone application or can be incorporated in the workflow of a more general text mining system. PMID:20346105

  1. Cloning and characterization of the nucleoredoxin gene that encodes a novel nuclear protein related to thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Kato, Keizo; Minoguchi, Shigeru

    1997-02-01

    In a yeast artificial chromosome contig close to the nude locus on mouse chromosome 11, we identified a novel gene, nucleoredoxin, that encodes a protein with similarity to the active site of thioredoxins. Nucleoredoxin is conserved between mammalian species, and two homologous genes were found in Caenorhabditis elegans. The nucleoredoxin transcripts are expressed in all adult tissues examined, but restricted to the nervous system and the limb buds in Day 10.5-11.5 embryos. The nucleoredoxin protein is predominantly localized in the nucleus of cells transfected with the nucleoredoxin expression construct. Since the bacterially expressed protein of nucleoredoxin showed oxidoreductase activity of the insulin disulfide bonds with kinetics similar to that of thioredoxin, it may be a redox regulator of the nuclear proteins, such as transcription factors. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Identification and bioinformatic characterization of a multidrug resistance associated protein (ABCC) gene in Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    González-Pons, María; Szeto, Ada C; González-Méndez, Ricardo; Serrano, Adelfa E

    2009-01-01

    Background The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily is one of the largest evolutionarily conserved families of proteins. ABC proteins play key roles in cellular detoxification of endobiotics and xenobiotics. Overexpression of certain ABC proteins, among them the multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP), contributes to drug resistance in organisms ranging from human neoplastic cells to parasitic protozoa. In the present study, the Plasmodium berghei mrp gene (pbmrp) was partially characterized and the predicted protein was classified using bioinformatics in order to explore its putative involvement in drug resistance. Methods The pbmrp gene from the P. berghei drug sensitive, N clone, was sequenced using a PCR strategy. Classification and domain organization of pbMRP were determined with bioinformatics. The Plasmodium spp. MRPs were aligned and analysed to study their conserved motifs and organization. Gene copy number and organization were determined via Southern blot analysis in both N clone and the chloroquine selected line, RC. Chromosomal Southern blots and RNase protection assays were employed to determine the chromosomal location and expression levels of pbmrp in blood stages. Results The pbmrp gene is a single copy, intronless gene with a predicted open reading frame spanning 5820 nucleotides. Bioinformatic analyses show that this protein has distinctive features characteristic of the ABCC sub-family. Multiple sequence alignments reveal a high degree of conservation in the nucleotide binding and transmembrane domains within the MRPs from the Plasmodium spp. analysed. Expression of pbmrp was detected in asexual blood stages. Gene organization, copy number and mRNA expression was similar in both lines studied. A chromosomal translocation was observed in the chloroquine selected RC line, from chromosome 13/14 to chromosome 8, when compared to the drug sensitive N clone. Conclusion In this study, the pbmrp gene was sequenced and classified as a member of

  3. Ribosomal proteins are encoded by single copy genes in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Steel, L F; Jacobson, A

    1986-01-01

    Five recombinant plasmids which encode ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) from Dictyostelium discoideum have been isolated. Poly(A) + RNA was size-fractionated by preparative agarose gel electrophoresis and a fraction encoding proteins of less than 35 kDa was used to construct a cDNA library in the plasmid vector pBR322. Individual clones from the library were screened by hybrid-selected translation and those encoding r-proteins were identified by co-migration of the translation products in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with marker proteins purified from Dictyostelium ribosomes. Initial characterization using the five cDNA plasmids indicates that these r-proteins are encoded by single copy genes and that they are not tightly clustered in the genome.

  4. Gene networks in the synthesis and deposition of protein polymers during grain development of wheat.

    PubMed

    She, Maoyun; Ye, Xingguo; Yan, Yueming; Howit, C; Belgard, M; Ma, Wujun

    2011-03-01

    As the amino acid storing organelle, the protein bodies provide nutrients for embryo development, seed germination and early seedling growth through storage proteolysis in cereal plants, such as wheat and rice. In protein bodies, the monomeric and polymeric prolamins, i.e. gliadins and glutenins, form gluten and play a key role in determining dough functionality and end-product quality of wheat. The formation of intra- and intermolecular bonds, including disulphide and tyrosine bonds, in and between prolamins confers cohesivity, viscosity, elasticity and extensibility to wheat dough during mixing and processing. In this review, we summarize recent progress in wheat gluten research with a focus on the fundamental molecular biological aspects, including transcriptional regulation on genes coding for prolamin components, biosynthesis, deposition and secretion of protein polymers, formation of protein bodies, genetic control of seed storage proteins, the transportation of the protein bodies and key enzymes for determining the formation of disulphide bonds of prolamin polymers.

  5. Duplication, selection and gene conversion in a Drosophila mojavensis female reproductive protein family.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Erin S; Markow, Therese A

    2009-04-01

    Protein components of the Drosophila male ejaculate, several of which evolve rapidly, are critical modulators of reproductive success. Recent studies of female reproductive tract proteins indicate they also are extremely divergent between species, suggesting that reproductive molecules may coevolve between the sexes. Our current understanding of intersexual coevolution, however, is severely limited by the paucity of genetic and evolutionary studies on the female molecules involved. Physiological evidence of ejaculate-female coadaptation, paired with a promiscuous mating system, makes Drosophila mojavensis an exciting model system in which to study the evolution of reproductive proteins. Here we explore the evolutionary dynamics of a five-paralog gene family of female reproductive proteases within populations of D. mojavensis and throughout the repleta species group. We show that the proteins have experienced ongoing gene duplication and adaptive evolution and further exhibit dynamic patterns of pseudogenation, copy number variation, gene conversion, and selection within geographically isolated populations of D. mojavensis. The integration of these patterns in a single gene family has never before been documented in a reproductive protein.

  6. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21-24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed. PMID:25954206

  7. Association of mutations in mannose binding protein gene with childhood infection in consecutive hospital series.

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, J. A.; Sumiya, M.; Levin, M.; Turner, M. W.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent to which mutations in the mannose binding protein gene predispose to childhood infection. DESIGN: Clinical details and genotype of mannose binding protein determined in consecutive children attending a paediatric department. SETTING: Inner city hospital paediatric service in London. SUBJECTS: 617 children attending hospital between October 1993 and August 1995. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Infection as the cause for attendance or admission in relation to mutations in the mannose binding protein gene. RESULTS: The prevalence of mutations in the mannose binding protein gene in children with infection (146/345) was about twice that in children without infection (64/272) (P < 0.0001). Increased susceptibility to infection was found in both heterozygotic and homozygotic children. 13 out of 17 children homozygotic for variant alleles presented with strikingly severe infections, including 6 with septicaemia. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that mutations in the mannose binding protein gene are an important risk factor for infections in children. Screening for such mutations should be included in the investigation of severe or frequent infections. PMID:9154025

  8. Duplication, Selection and Gene Conversion in a Drosophila mojavensis Female Reproductive Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Erin S.; Markow, Therese A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein components of the Drosophila male ejaculate, several of which evolve rapidly, are critical modulators of reproductive success. Recent studies of female reproductive tract proteins indicate they also are extremely divergent between species, suggesting that reproductive molecules may coevolve between the sexes. Our current understanding of intersexual coevolution, however, is severely limited by the paucity of genetic and evolutionary studies on the female molecules involved. Physiological evidence of ejaculate–female coadaptation, paired with a promiscuous mating system, makes Drosophila mojavensis an exciting model system in which to study the evolution of reproductive proteins. Here we explore the evolutionary dynamics of a five-paralog gene family of female reproductive proteases within populations of D. mojavensis and throughout the repleta species group. We show that the proteins have experienced ongoing gene duplication and adaptive evolution and further exhibit dynamic patterns of pseudogenation, copy number variation, gene conversion, and selection within geographically isolated populations of D. mojavensis. The integration of these patterns in a single gene family has never before been documented in a reproductive protein. PMID:19204376

  9. Integron Gene Cassettes: A Repository of Novel Protein Folds with Distinct Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sureshan, Visaahini; Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Boucher, Yan; Koenig, Jeremy E.; Stokes, H. W.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile gene cassettes captured within integron arrays encompass a vast and diverse pool of genetic novelty. In most cases, functional annotation of gene cassettes directly recovered by cassette-PCR is obscured by their characteristically high sequence novelty. This inhibits identification of those specific functions or biological features that might constitute preferential factors for lateral gene transfer via the integron system. A structural genomics approach incorporating x-ray crystallography has been utilised on a selection of cassettes to investigate evolutionary relationships hidden at the sequence level. Gene cassettes were accessed from marine sediments (pristine and contaminated sites), as well as a range of Vibrio spp. We present six crystal structures, a remarkably high proportion of our survey of soluble proteins, which were found to possess novel folds. These entirely new structures are diverse, encompassing all-α, α+β and α/β fold classes, and many contain clear binding pocket features for small molecule substrates. The new structures emphasise the large repertoire of protein families encoded within the integron cassette metagenome and which remain to be characterised. Oligomeric association is a notable recurring property common to these new integron-derived proteins. In some cases, the protein–protein contact sites utilised in homomeric assembly could instead form suitable contact points for heterogeneous regulator/activator proteins or domains. Such functional features are ideal for a flexible molecular componentry needed to ensure responsive and adaptive bacterial functions. PMID:23349695

  10. Procedures to view aberrations--a travel from protein to gene: literature review.

    PubMed

    Premalatha, B; Ramesh, V; Babu, S P K Kennedy; Balamurali, P D

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of any pathology is fundamentally based on the microscopic structure of cells and tissues and this remains as the standard by which all other diagnostic tests are measured. In this era, the pathologists are relying on the examination of tissue section stained by histochemical means and it is supported by the advanced immunological, biochemical and molecular techniques. This review will provide the information about one of the way that can be followed to unravel the molecular mechanism in spotting the disease process. Technologies used to study the cellular process are same for the normal and the abnormal cell. Experimental strategy briefed here is also applicable for both. The cellular process can be studied either from protein to gene or from gene to protein. Earlier days biochemical analysis (isolation of protein, protein sequencing) was separate and genetic analysis (genomic mapping) was separate. But now with advent of recombinant DNA technology it is possible to have a link between the biochemical and genetic analysis. Intermediary step of development of oligonucleotide synthesis, complementary DNA probe and cloning has revolutionized the research process. Identified gene can be compared with the normal gene by comparative genomics or expressed proteins by expression proteomics. PMID:24748307

  11. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P.; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21–24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed. PMID:25954206

  12. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S.; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R.; Martin, Ina V.; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases. PMID:26423228

  13. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R; Martin, Ina V; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases.

  14. The androgen-binding protein gene is expressed in male and female rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y M; Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Petrusz, P; Joseph, D R

    1990-12-01

    Extracellular androgen-binding proteins (ABP) are thought to modulate the regulatory functions of androgens and the trans-acting nuclear androgen receptor. Testicular ABP and plasma sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which is produced in liver, are encoded by the same gene. We have now found that the ABP-SHBG gene is also expressed in male and female rat brain. Immunoreactive ABP was found to be present in neuronal cell bodies throughout the brain as well as in fibers of the hypothalamic median eminence. The highest concentrations of immunoreactive cell bodies were located in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. Likewise, ABP mRNA was present in all brain regions examined. Analysis of cDNA clones representing brain ABP mRNAs revealed amino acid sequence differences in brain and testicular ABPs. The protein encoded by an alternatively processed RNA has sequence characteristics suggesting that the protein could act as a competitior of ABP binding to cell surface receptors. These data and gene-sequencing experiments indicate that a specific ABP gene promoter is used for transcription initiation in brain. ABP may function in brain as an androgen carrier protein; however, in view of the widespread presence of ABP and ABP mRNA in brain, the protein may have a much broader, yet unknown, function. PMID:1701136

  15. Complement regulatory protein genes in channel catfish and their involvement in disease defense response.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chen; Zhang, Jiaren; Yao, Jun; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yun; Song, Lin; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is one of the most important defense systems of innate immunity, which plays a crucial role in disease defense responses in channel catfish. However, inappropriate and excessive complement activation could lead to potential damage to the host cells. Therefore the complement system is controlled by a set of complement regulatory proteins to allow normal defensive functions, but prevent hazardous complement activation to host tissues. In this study, we identified nine complement regulatory protein genes from the channel catfish genome. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses were conducted to determine their orthology relationships, supporting their correct annotation and potential functional inferences. The expression profiles of the complement regulatory protein genes were determined in channel catfish healthy tissues and after infection with the two main bacterial pathogens, Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare. The vast majority of complement regulatory protein genes were significantly regulated after bacterial infections, but interestingly were generally up-regulated after E. ictaluri infection while mostly down-regulated after F. columnare infection, suggesting a pathogen-specific pattern of regulation. Collectively, these findings suggested that complement regulatory protein genes may play complex roles in the host immune responses to bacterial pathogens in channel catfish.

  16. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M.

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Differentially expressed protein-coding genes and long noncoding RNA in early-stage lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Qiu, Mantang; Xu, Youtao; Mao, Qixing; Wang, Jie; Dong, Gaochao; Xia, Wenjia; Yin, Rong; Xu, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Due to the application of low-dose computed tomography screening, more and more early-stage lung cancers have been diagnosed. Thus, it is essential to characterize the gene expression profile of early-stage lung cancer to develop potential biomarkers for early diagnosis and therapeutic targets. Here, we analyzed microarray data of 181 early-stage lung cancer patients. By comparing gene expression between different tumor and lymph node metastasis stages, we identified various differentially expressed protein-coding genes and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) in the comparisons of T2 vs. T2 and N1- vs. N0-stage lung cancer. Functional analyses revealed that these differentially expressed genes were enriched in various tumorigenesis or metastasis-related pathways. Survival analysis indicated that two protein-coding genes, C7 and SCN7A, were significantly associated survival of lung cancer. Notably, a novel lncRNA, LINC00313, was highly expressed in both T2- and N1-stage lung cancers. On the other hand, LINC00313 was also upregulated in lung cancer and metastasized lung cancer tissues, compared with adjacent lung tissues and primary lung cancer tissues. Additionally, higher expression level of LINC00313 indicated poor prognosis of lung cancer (hazard ratio = 0.658). Overall, we characterized the expression profiles of protein-coding genes and lncRNA in early-stage lung cancer and found that LINC00313 could be a biomarker for lung cancer.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a novel insecticidal crystal protein gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J A; Jelen, A; Gilbert, M P; Jany, C S; Johnson, T B; Gawron-Burke, C

    1991-07-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai EG6346, a novel grain dust isolate, was analyzed by Southern blot hybridization for its insecticidal crystal protein (ICP) gene profile. Strain EG6346 lacks previously characterized cryIA ICP genes yet does possess novel cryI-related gene sequences. A recombinant genomic plasmid library was constructed for strain EG6346 in Escherichia coli. One recombinant plasmid, pEG640, isolated from the library contained a novel ICP gene on a 5.7-kb Sau3A insert. The sequence of this gene, designated cryIF, was related to, but distinct from, the published sequences for other cryI genes. A second novel cryI-related sequence was also located on pEG640, approximately 500 bp downstream from cryIF. Introduction of cryIF into a Cry- B. thuringiensis recipient strain via electroporation enabled sufficient production of CryIF protein for quantitative bioassay analyses of insecticidal specificity. The CryIF crystal protein was selectively toxic to a subset of lepidopteran insects tested, including the larvae of Ostrinia nubilalis and Spodoptera exigua. PMID:2061280

  19. Fatal infantile cardiac glycogenosis with phosphorylase kinase deficiency and a mutation in the gamma2-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Akman, Hasan O; Sampayo, James N; Ross, Fiona A; Scott, John W; Wilson, Gregory; Benson, Lee; Bruno, Claudio; Shanske, Sara; Hardie, D Grahame; Dimauro, Salvatore

    2007-10-01

    A 10-wk-old infant girl with severe hypertrophy of the septal and atrial walls by cardiac ultrasound, developed progressive ventricular wall thickening and died of aspiration pneumonia at 5 mo of age. Postmortem examination revealed ventricular hypertrophy and massive atrial wall thickening due to glycogen accumulation. A skeletal muscle biopsy showed increased free glycogen and decreased activity of phosphorylase b kinase (PHK). The report of a pathogenic mutation (R531Q) in the gene (PRKAG2) encoding the gamma2 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in three infants with congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, glycogen storage, and "pseudo PHK deficiency" prompted us to screen this gene in our patient. We found a novel (R384T) heterozygous mutation in PRKAG2, affecting an arginine residue in the N-terminal AMP-binding domain. Like R531Q, this mutation reduces the binding of AMP and ATP to the isolated nucleotide-binding domains, and prevents activation of the heterotrimer by metabolic stress in intact cells. The mutation was not found in DNA from the patient's father, the only available parent, and is likely to have arisen de novo. Our studies confirm that mutations in PRKAG2 can cause fatal infantile cardiomyopathy, often associated with apparent PHK deficiency.

  20. Structural evolution of the 4/1 genes and proteins in non-vascular and lower vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Sergey Y; Milyutina, Irina A; Bobrova, Vera K; Ryazantsev, Dmitry Y; Erokhina, Tatiana N; Zavriev, Sergey K; Agranovsky, Alexey A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Troitsky, Alexey V

    2015-12-01

    The 4/1 protein of unknown function is encoded by a single-copy gene in most higher plants. The 4/1 protein of Nicotiana tabacum (Nt-4/1 protein) has been shown to be alpha-helical and predominantly expressed in conductive tissues. Here, we report the analysis of 4/1 genes and the encoded proteins of lower land plants. Sequences of a number of 4/1 genes from liverworts, lycophytes, ferns and gymnosperms were determined and analyzed together with sequences available in databases. Most of the vascular plants were found to encode Magnoliophyta-like 4/1 proteins exhibiting previously described gene structure and protein properties. Identification of the 4/1-like proteins in hornworts, liverworts and charophyte algae (sister lineage to all land plants) but not in mosses suggests that 4/1 proteins are likely important for plant development but not required for a primary metabolic function of plant cell.

  1. Structural evolution of the 4/1 genes and proteins in non-vascular and lower vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Sergey Y; Milyutina, Irina A; Bobrova, Vera K; Ryazantsev, Dmitry Y; Erokhina, Tatiana N; Zavriev, Sergey K; Agranovsky, Alexey A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Troitsky, Alexey V

    2015-12-01

    The 4/1 protein of unknown function is encoded by a single-copy gene in most higher plants. The 4/1 protein of Nicotiana tabacum (Nt-4/1 protein) has been shown to be alpha-helical and predominantly expressed in conductive tissues. Here, we report the analysis of 4/1 genes and the encoded proteins of lower land plants. Sequences of a number of 4/1 genes from liverworts, lycophytes, ferns and gymnosperms were determined and analyzed together with sequences available in databases. Most of the vascular plants were found to encode Magnoliophyta-like 4/1 proteins exhibiting previously described gene structure and protein properties. Identification of the 4/1-like proteins in hornworts, liverworts and charophyte algae (sister lineage to all land plants) but not in mosses suggests that 4/1 proteins are likely important for plant development but not required for a primary metabolic function of plant cell. PMID:26542289

  2. How the Sequence of a Gene Specifies Structural Symmetry in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaojuan; Huang, Tongcheng; Wang, Guanyu; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    Internal symmetry is commonly observed in the majority of fundamental protein folds. Meanwhile, sufficient evidence suggests that nascent polypeptide chains of proteins have the potential to start the co-translational folding process and this process allows mRNA to contain additional information on protein structure. In this paper, we study the relationship between gene sequences and protein structures from the viewpoint of symmetry to explore how gene sequences code for structural symmetry in proteins. We found that, for a set of two-fold symmetric proteins from left-handed beta-helix fold, intragenic symmetry always exists in their corresponding gene sequences. Meanwhile, codon usage bias and local mRNA structure might be involved in modulating translation speed for the formation of structural symmetry: a major decrease of local codon usage bias in the middle of the codon sequence can be identified as a common feature; and major or consecutive decreases in local mRNA folding energy near the boundaries of the symmetric substructures can also be observed. The results suggest that gene duplication and fusion may be an evolutionarily conserved process for this protein fold. In addition, the usage of rare codons and the formation of higher order of secondary structure near the boundaries of symmetric substructures might have coevolved as conserved mechanisms to slow down translation elongation and to facilitate effective folding of symmetric substructures. These findings provide valuable insights into our understanding of the mechanisms of translation and its evolution, as well as the design of proteins via symmetric modules. PMID:26641668

  3. SLocX: Predicting Subcellular Localization of Arabidopsis Proteins Leveraging Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Ryngajllo, Malgorzata; Childs, Liam; Lohse, Marc; Giorgi, Federico M.; Lude, Anja; Selbig, Joachim; Usadel, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing volume of experimentally validated knowledge about the subcellular localization of plant proteins, a well performing in silico prediction tool is still a necessity. Existing tools, which employ information derived from protein sequence alone, offer limited accuracy and/or rely on full sequence availability. We explored whether gene expression profiling data can be harnessed to enhance prediction performance. To achieve this, we trained several support vector machines to predict the subcellular localization of Arabidopsis thaliana proteins using sequence derived information, expression behavior, or a combination of these data and compared their predictive performance through a cross-validation test. We show that gene expression carries information about the subcellular localization not available in sequence information, yielding dramatic benefits for plastid localization prediction, and some notable improvements for other compartments such as the mitochondrion, the Golgi, and the plasma membrane. Based on these results, we constructed a novel subcellular localization prediction engine, SLocX, combining gene expression profiling data with protein sequence-based information. We then validated the results of this engine using an independent test set of annotated proteins and a transient expression of GFP fusion proteins. Here, we present the prediction framework and a website of predicted localizations for Arabidopsis. The relatively good accuracy of our prediction engine, even in cases where only partial protein sequence is available (e.g., in sequences lacking the N-terminal region), offers a promising opportunity for similar application to non-sequenced or poorly annotated plant species. Although the prediction scope of our method is currently limited by the availability of expression information on the ATH1 array, we believe that the advances in measuring gene expression technology will make our method applicable for all Arabidopsis proteins

  4. Automating gene library synthesis by structure-based combinatorial protein engineering: examples from plant sesquiterpene synthases.

    PubMed

    Dokarry, Melissa; Laurendon, Caroline; O'Maille, Paul E

    2012-01-01

    Structure-based combinatorial protein engineering (SCOPE) is a homology-independent recombination method to create multiple crossover gene libraries by assembling defined combinations of structural elements ranging from single mutations to domains of protein structure. SCOPE was originally inspired by DNA shuffling, which mimics recombination during meiosis, where mutations from parental genes are "shuffled" to create novel combinations in the resulting progeny. DNA shuffling utilizes sequence identity between parental genes to mediate template-switching events (the annealing and extension of one parental gene fragment on another) in PCR reassembly reactions to generate crossovers and hence recombination between parental genes. In light of the conservation of protein structure and degeneracy of sequence, SCOPE was developed to enable the "shuffling" of distantly related genes with no requirement for sequence identity. The central principle involves the use of oligonucleotides to encode for crossover regions to choreograph template-switching events during PCR assembly of gene fragments to create chimeric genes. This approach was initially developed to create libraries of hybrid DNA polymerases from distantly related parents, and later developed to create a combinatorial mutant library of sesquiterpene synthases to explore the catalytic landscapes underlying the functional divergence of related enzymes. This chapter presents a simplified protocol of SCOPE that can be integrated with different mutagenesis techniques and is suitable for automation by liquid-handling robots. Two examples are presented to illustrate the application of SCOPE to create gene libraries using plant sesquiterpene synthases as the model system. In the first example, we outline how to create an active-site library as a series of complex mixtures of diverse mutants. In the second example, we outline how to create a focused library as an array of individual clones to distil minimal combinations of

  5. Synthetic zinc finger proteins: the advent of targeted gene regulation and genome modification technologies.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, Charles A; Gaj, Thomas; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-08-19

    The understanding of gene regulation and the structure and function of the human genome increased dramatically at the end of the 20th century. Yet the technologies for manipulating the genome have been slower to develop. For instance, the field of gene therapy has been focused on correcting genetic diseases and augmenting tissue repair for more than 40 years. However, with the exception of a few very low efficiency approaches, conventional genetic engineering methods have only been able to add auxiliary genes to cells. This has been a substantial obstacle to the clinical success of gene therapies and has also led to severe unintended consequences in several cases. Therefore, technologies that facilitate the precise modification of cellular genomes have diverse and significant implications in many facets of research and are essential for translating the products of the Genomic Revolution into tangible benefits for medicine and biotechnology. To address this need, in the 1990s, we embarked on a mission to develop technologies for engineering protein-DNA interactions with the aim of creating custom tools capable of targeting any DNA sequence. Our goal has been to allow researchers to reach into genomes to specifically regulate, knock out, or replace any gene. To realize these goals, we initially focused on understanding and manipulating zinc finger proteins. In particular, we sought to create a simple and straightforward method that enables unspecialized laboratories to engineer custom DNA-modifying proteins using only defined modular components, a web-based utility, and standard recombinant DNA technology. Two significant challenges we faced were (i) the development of zinc finger domains that target sequences not recognized by naturally occurring zinc finger proteins and (ii) determining how individual zinc finger domains could be tethered together as polydactyl proteins to recognize unique locations within complex genomes. We and others have since used this modular

  6. Characterization of a tomato protein kinase gene induced by infection by Potato spindle tuber viroid.

    PubMed

    Hammond, R W; Zhao, Y

    2000-09-01

    Viroids--covalently closed, circular RNA molecules in the size range of 250 to 450 nucleotides-are the smallest known infectious agents and cause a number of diseases of crop plants. Viroids do not encode proteins and replicate within the nucleus without a helper virus. In many cases, viroid infection results in symptoms of stunting, epinasty, and vein clearing. In our study of the molecular basis of the response of tomato cv. Rutgers to infection by Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), we have identified a specific protein kinase gene, pkv, that is transcriptionally activated in plants infected with either the intermediate or severe strain of PSTVd, at a lower level in plants inoculated with a mild strain, and not detectable in mock-inoculated plants. A full-length copy of the gene encoding the 55-kDa PKV (protein kinase viroid)-induced protein has been isolated and sequence analysis revealed significant homologies to cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases. Although the sequence motifs in the catalytic domain suggest that it is a serine/threonine protein kinase, the recombinant PKV protein autophosphorylates in vitro on serine and tyrosine residues, suggesting that it is a putative member of the class of dual-specificity protein kinases. PMID:10975647

  7. Insights into Bacteriophage T5 Structure from Analysis of Its Morphogenesis Genes and Protein Components

    PubMed Central

    Zivanovic, Yvan; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Ponchon, Luc; Lurz, Rudi; Chami, Mohamed; Flayhan, Ali; Renouard, Madalena; Huet, Alexis; Decottignies, Paulette; Davidson, Alan R.; Breyton, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5 represents a large family of lytic Siphoviridae infecting Gram-negative bacteria. The low-resolution structure of T5 showed the T=13 geometry of the capsid and the unusual trimeric organization of the tail tube, and the assembly pathway of the capsid was established. Although major structural proteins of T5 have been identified in these studies, most of the genes encoding the morphogenesis proteins remained to be identified. Here, we combine a proteomic analysis of T5 particles with a bioinformatic study and electron microscopic immunolocalization to assign function to the genes encoding the structural proteins, the packaging proteins, and other nonstructural components required for T5 assembly. A head maturation protease that likely accounts for the cleavage of the different capsid proteins is identified. Two other proteins involved in capsid maturation add originality to the T5 capsid assembly mechanism: the single head-to-tail joining protein, which closes the T5 capsid after DNA packaging, and the nicking endonuclease responsible for the single-strand interruptions in the T5 genome. We localize most of the tail proteins that were hitherto uncharacterized and provide a detailed description of the tail tip composition. Our findings highlight novel variations of viral assembly strategies and of virion particle architecture. They further recommend T5 for exploring phage structure and assembly and for deciphering conformational rearrangements that accompany DNA transfer from the capsid to the host cytoplasm. PMID:24198424

  8. Identification of a nonhistone chromosomal protein associated with heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster and its gene.

    PubMed Central

    James, T C; Elgin, S C

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against a fraction of nuclear proteins of Drosophila melanogaster identified as tightly binding to DNA. Four of these antibodies were directed against a 19-kilodalton nuclear protein; immunofluorescence staining of the polytene chromosomes localized the antigen to the alpha, beta, and intercalary heterochromatic regions. Screening of a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library with one of the monoclonal antibodies identified a recombinant DNA phage clone that produced a fusion protein immunologically similar to the heterochromatin-associated protein. Polyclonal sera directed against the bacterial lacZ fusion protein recognized the same nuclear protein on Western blots. A full-length cDNA clone was isolated from a lambda gt10 library, and its DNA sequence was obtained. Analysis of the open reading frame revealed an 18,101-dalton protein encoded by this cDNA. Two overlapping genomic DNA clones were isolated from a Charon 4 library of D. melanogaster with the cDNA clone, and a restriction map was obtained. In situ hybridization with these probes indicated that the gene maps to a single chromosome location at 29A on the 2L chromosome. This general strategy should be effective for cloning the genes and identifying the genetic loci of chromosomal proteins which cannot be readily assayed by other means. Images PMID:3099166

  9. A New Family of Giardial Cysteine-Rich Non-VSP Protein Genes and a Novel Cyst Protein

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Shanda R.; Preheim, Sarah P.; Cipriano, Michael J.; McArthur, Andrew G.; Gillin, Frances D.

    2006-01-01

    Since the Giardia lamblia cyst wall is necessary for survival in the environment and host infection, we tested the hypothesis that it contains proteins other than the three known cyst wall proteins. Serial analysis of gene expression during growth and encystation revealed a gene, “HCNCp” (High Cysteine Non-variant Cyst protein), that was upregulated late in encystation, and that resembled the classic Giardia variable surface proteins (VSPs) that cover the trophozoite plasmalemma. HCNCp is 13.9% cysteine, with many “CxxC” tetrapeptide motifs and a transmembrane sequence near the C-terminus. However, HCNCp has multiple “CxC” motifs rarely found in VSPs, and does not localize to the trophozoite plasmalemma. Moreover, the HCNCp C-terminus differed from the canonical VSP signature. Full-length epitope-tagged HCNCp expressed under its own promoter was upregulated during encystation with highest expression in cysts, including 42 and 21 kDa C-terminal fragments. Tagged HCNCp targeted to the nuclear envelope in trophozoites, and co-localized with cyst proteins to encystation-specific secretory vesicles during encystation. HCNCp defined a novel trafficking pathway as it localized to the wall and body of cysts, while the cyst proteins were exclusively in the wall. Unlike VSPs, HCNCp is expressed in at least five giardial strains and four WB subclones expressing different VSPs. Bioinformatics identified 60 additional large high cysteine membrane proteins (HCMp) containing ≥20 CxxC/CxC's lacking the VSP-specific C-terminal CRGKA. HCMp were absent or rare in other model or parasite genomes, except for Tetrahymena thermophila with 30. MEME analysis classified the 61 gHCMp genes into nine groups with similar internal motifs. Our data suggest that HCNCp is a novel invariant cyst protein belonging to a new HCMp family that is abundant in the Giardia genome. HCNCp and the other HCMp provide a rich source for developing parasite-specific diagnostic reagents, vaccine

  10. Characterization of five subgroups of the sieve element occlusion gene family in Glycine max reveals genes encoding non-forisome P-proteins, forisomes and forisome tails.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Sascia; Ernst, Antonia M; Hawat, Susan; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Noll, Gundula A

    2014-09-01

    P-proteins are structural phloem proteins discussed to be involved in the rapid sealing of injured sieve elements. P-proteins are found in all dicotyledonous and some monocotyledonous plants, but additional crystalloid P-proteins, known as forisomes, have evolved solely in the Fabaceae. Both types are encoded by members of the sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family, which comprises seven phylogenetic subgroups. The Fabaceae-specific subgroup 1 contains genes encoding forisome subunits in e.g. Medicago truncatula, Vicia faba, Dipteryx panamensis and Canavalia gladiata whereas basal subgroup 5 encodes P-proteins in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) and Arabidopsis thaliana. The function of remaining subgroups is still unknown. We chose Glycine max (soybean) as a model to investigate SEO proteins representing different subgroups in one species. We isolated native P-proteins to determine the SEO protein composition and analyzed the expression pattern, localization and structure of the G. max SEO proteins representing five of the subgroups. We found that subgroup 1 GmSEO genes encode forisome subunits, a member of subgroup 5 encodes a non-forisome P-protein and subgroup 2 GmSEO genes encode the components of forisome tails, which are present in a restricted selection of Fabaceaen species. We therefore present the first molecular characterization of a Fabaceae non-forisome P-protein and the first evidence that forisome tails are encoded by a phylogenetically-distinct branch of the SEO gene family.

  11. Controllability analysis of the directed human protein interaction network identifies disease genes and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Gibson, Travis E.; Lee, Ho-Joon; Yilmazel, Bahar; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Kwon, Young; Sharma, Amitabh; Liu, Yang-Yu; Perrimon, Norbert; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    The protein–protein interaction (PPI) network is crucial for cellular information processing and decision-making. With suitable inputs, PPI networks drive the cells to diverse functional outcomes such as cell proliferation or cell death. Here, we characterize the structural controllability of a large directed human PPI network comprising 6,339 proteins and 34,813 interactions. This network allows us to classify proteins as “indispensable,” “neutral,” or “dispensable,” which correlates to increasing, no effect, or decreasing the number of driver nodes in the network upon removal of that protein. We find that 21% of the proteins in the PPI network are indispensable. Interestingly, these indispensable proteins are the primary targets of disease-causing mutations, human viruses, and drugs, suggesting that altering a network’s control property is critical for the transition between healthy and disease states. Furthermore, analyzing copy number alterations data from 1,547 cancer patients reveals that 56 genes that are frequently amplified or deleted in nine different cancers are indispensable. Among the 56 genes, 46 of them have not been previously associated with cancer. This suggests that controllability analysis is very useful in identifying novel disease genes and potential drug targets. PMID:27091990

  12. SR proteins in vertical integration of gene expression from transcription to RNA processing to translation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Pingping; Han, Joonhee; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2009-07-10

    SR proteins have been studied extensively as a family of RNA-binding proteins that participate in both constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing in mammalian cells. However, SR proteins were first discovered as factors that interact with transcriptionally active chromatin. Recent studies have now uncovered properties that connect these once apparently disparate functions, showing that a subset of SR proteins seem to bind directly to the histone 3 tail, play an active role in transcriptional elongation, and colocalize with genes that are engaged in specific intra- and interchromosome interactions for coordinated regulation of gene expression in the nucleus. These transcription-related activities are also coupled with a further expansion of putative functions of specific SR protein family members in RNA metabolism downstream of mRNA splicing, from RNA export to stability control to translation. These findings, therefore, highlight the broader roles of SR proteins in vertical integration of gene expression and provide mechanistic insights into their contributions to genome stability and proper cell-cycle progression in higher eukaryotic cells.

  13. Isolation of nuclear proteins from flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seed coats for gene expression regulation studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While seed biology is well characterized and numerous studies have focused on this subject over the past years, the regulation of seed coat development and metabolism is for the most part still non-elucidated. It is well known that the seed coat has an essential role in seed development and its features are associated with important agronomical traits. It also constitutes a rich source of valuable compounds such as pharmaceuticals. Most of the cell genetic material is contained in the nucleus; therefore nuclear proteins constitute a major actor for gene expression regulation. Isolation of nuclear proteins responsible for specific seed coat expression is an important prerequisite for understanding seed coat metabolism and development. The extraction of nuclear proteins may be problematic due to the presence of specific components that can interfere with the extraction process. The seed coat is a rich source of mucilage and phenolics, which are good examples of these hindering compounds. Findings In the present study, we propose an optimized nuclear protein extraction protocol able to provide nuclear proteins from flax seed coat without contaminants and sufficient yield and quality for their use in transcriptional gene expression regulation by gel shift experiments. Conclusions Routinely, around 250 μg of nuclear proteins per gram of fresh weight were extracted from immature flax seed coats. The isolation protocol described hereafter may serve as an effective tool for gene expression regulation and seed coat-focused proteomics studies. PMID:22230709

  14. The gene expression and deficiency phenotypes of Cockayne syndrome B protein in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myon Hee; Ahn, Byungchan; Choi, In Soon; Koo, Hyeon-Sook

    2002-07-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans Cockayne syndrome B protein homologue is encoded by 10 exons of the predicted open reading frame F53H4.1. The gene is expressed in germ cells and all somatic cells of the embryonic to adult stage. Although the gene expression was ubiquitous, its expression level was relatively higher in dividing cells and cells that play fundamental roles in essential physiological functions such as feeding, sensation, and reproduction. RNA interference of the gene hypersensitized C. elegans to UV radiation, as observed in enhanced germ cell proliferation arrest and apoptosis, and increased embryonic lethality, suggesting its role in nucleotide excision repair. PMID:12095617

  15. Regulation of contractile protein gene expression in unloaded mouse skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1996-01-01

    Hindlimb unloading was performed on mice in an effort to study the regulation of contractile protein genes. In particular, the regulation of myosin heavy chain IIb was examined. During unloading, muscle fibers undergo a type conversion. Preliminary data from this study does not support the hypothesis that the fiber type conversion is due to an increase in promoter activity of fast isoform genes, such as myosin heavy chain IIb. The consequences of this finding are examined, with particular focus on other factors controlling gene regulation.

  16. Evaluating the automatic mapping of human gene and protein mentions to unique identifiers.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Alexander A; Wellner, Benjamin; Colombe, Jeffrey B; Arens, Robert; Colosimo, Marc E; Hirschman, Lynette

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a challenge task for the second BioCreAtIvE (Critical Assessment of Information Extraction in Biology) that requires participating systems to provide lists of the EntrezGene (formerly LocusLink) identifiers for all human genes and proteins mentioned in a MEDLINE abstract. We are distributing 281 annotated abstracts and another 5,000 noisily annotated abstracts along with a gene name lexicon to participants. We have performed a series of baseline experiments to better characterize this dataset and form a foundation for participant exploration.

  17. The sequential mechanism of guanidine hydrochloride-induced denaturation of cAMP receptor protein from Escherichia coli. A fluorescent study using 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Malecki, J; Wasylewski, Z

    1998-11-01

    cAMP receptor protein (CRP) regulates expression of a number of genes in Escherichia coli. The protein is a homodimer and each monomer is folded into two structural domains. The biological activation of CRP upon cAMP binding may involve the subunit realignment as well as reorientation between the domains within each subunit. In order to study the interactions between the subunits or domains, we performed stopped-flow measurements of the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCI)-induced denaturation of CRP. The changes in CRP structure induced by GuHCl were monitored using both intrinsic Trp fluorescence as well as the fluorescence of an extrinsic probe, 8-anilino-1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS). Results of CRP denaturation using Trp fluorescence detection are consistent with a two-step model [Malecki, and Wasylewski, (1997), Eur. J. Biochem. 243, 660], where the dissociation of dimer into subunits is followed by the monomer unfolding. The denaturation of CRP monitored by ANS fluorescence reveals the existence of two additional processes. One occurs before the dissociation of CRP into subunits, whereas the second takes place after the dissociation, but prior to proper subunit unfolding. These additional processes suggest that CRP denaturation is described by a more complicated mechanism than a simple three-state equilibrium and may involve additional changes in both inter- and intrasubunit interactions. We also report the effect of cAMP on the kinetics of CRP subunit unfolding and refolding. PMID:9988521

  18. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia. PMID:19000924

  19. Characterization of the yellow fever mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene and ligand-bound protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, David H.; Vyazunova, Irina; Lorch, Jeffery M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Lan, Que

    2009-06-12

    The sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene (AeSCP-2L3), a new member of the SCP-2 protein family, is identified from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The predicted molecular weight of AeSCP-2L3 is 13.4 kDa with a calculated pI of 4.98. AeSCP-2L3 transcription occurs in the larval feeding stages and the mRNA levels decrease in pupae and adults. The highest levels of AeSCP-2L3 gene expression are found in the body wall, and possibly originated in the fat body. This is the first report of a mosquito SCP-2-like protein with prominent expression in tissue other than the midgut. The X-ray protein crystal structure of AeSCP-2L3 reveals a bound C16 fatty acid whose acyl tail penetrates deeply into a hydrophobic cavity. Interestingly, the ligand-binding cavity is slightly larger than previously described for AeSCP-2 (Dyer et al. J Biol Chem 278:39085-39091, 2003) and AeSCP-2L2 (Dyer et al. J Lipid Res M700460-JLR200, 2007). There are also an additional 10 amino acids in SCP-2L3 that are not present in other characterized mosquito SCP-2s forming an extended loop between {beta}3 and {beta}4. Otherwise, the protein backbone is exceedingly similar to other SCP-2 and SCP-2-like proteins. In contrast to this observed high structural homology of members in the mosquito SCP2 family, the amino acid sequence identity between the members is less than 30%. The results from structural analysis imply that there have been evolutionary constraints that favor the SCP-2 C{alpha} backbone fold while the specificity of ligand binding can be altered.

  20. Non-random retention of protein-coding overlapping genes in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Soldà, Giulia; Suyama, Mikita; Pelucchi, Paride; Boi, Silvia; Guffanti, Alessandro; Rizzi, Ermanno; Bork, Peer; Tenchini, Maria Luisa; Ciccarelli, Francesca D

    2008-01-01

    Background Although the overlap of transcriptional units occurs frequently in eukaryotic genomes, its evolutionary and biological significance remains largely unclear. Here we report a comparative analysis of overlaps between genes coding for well-annotated proteins in five metazoan genomes (human, mouse, zebrafish, fruit fly and worm). Results For all analyzed species the observed number of overlapping genes is always lower than expected assuming functional neutrality, suggesting that gene overlap is negatively selected. The comparison to the random distribution also shows that retained overlaps do not exhibit random features: antiparallel overlaps are significantly enriched, while overlaps lying on the same strand and those involving coding sequences are highly underrepresented. We confirm that overlap is mostly species-specific and provide evidence that it frequently originates through the acquisition of terminal, non-coding exons. Finally, we show that overlapping genes tend to be significantly co-expressed in a breast cancer cDNA library obtained by 454 deep sequencing, and that different overlap types display different patterns of reciprocal expression. Conclusion Our data suggest that overlap between protein-coding genes is selected against in Metazoa. However, when retained it may be used as a species-specific mechanism for the reciprocal regulation of neighboring genes. The tendency of overlaps to involve non-coding regions of the genes leads to the speculation that the advantages achieved by an overlapping arrangement may be optimized by evolving regulatory non-coding transcripts. PMID:18416813

  1. Myelin basic protein gene contains separate enhancers for oligodendrocyte and Schwann cell expression

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The DNA sequence between position +36 and -1907 of the murine myelin basic protein gene contains the enhancer and promoter elements necessary for abundant and cell specific expression in transgenic mice. Surprisingly, the pattern of expression promoted by this DNA fragment is a subset of that exhibited by the endogenous myelin basic protein (MBP) gene. Fusion genes prepared with this promoter/enhancer and a Lac Z reporter gene are expressed only in oligodendrocytes and not in Schwann cells, whereas the endogenous MBP gene is expressed in both cell types. The level of transgene expression measured by nuclear run- on experiments is very substantial and rivals that of the endogenous MBP gene. Furthermore, this 1.9-kb DNA fragment directs transcription on the same (or very similar) developmental schedule as the endogenous gene. These results indicate that the MBP promoter/enhancer sequences are at least tripartite: a core promoter, the oligodendrocyte enhancer elements, and a third component that either expands the specificity of the oligodendrocyte enhancer to include Schwann cells or acts independently to specifically stimulate transcription in Schwann cells. PMID:1383235

  2. Global Analysis of Predicted G Protein-Coupled Receptor Genes in the Filamentous Fungus, Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Ilva E; Pacentine, Itallia V; Lim, Andrew; Guerrero, Nayeli; Krystofova, Svetlana; Li, Liande; Michkov, Alexander V; Servin, Jacqueline A; Ahrendt, Steven R; Carrillo, Alexander J; Davidson, Liza M; Barsoum, Andrew H; Cao, Jackie; Castillo, Ronald; Chen, Wan-Ching; Dinkchian, Alex; Kim, Stephanie; Kitada, Sho M; Lai, Taffani H; Mach, Ashley; Malekyan, Cristin; Moua, Toua R; Torres, Carlos Rojas; Yamamoto, Alaina; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2015-10-13

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate facets of growth, development, and environmental sensing in eukaryotes, including filamentous fungi. The largest predicted GPCR class in these organisms is the Pth11-related, with members similar to a protein required for disease in the plant pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. However, the Pth11-related class has not been functionally studied in any filamentous fungal species. Here, we analyze phenotypes in available mutants for 36 GPCR genes, including 20 Pth11-related, in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We also investigate patterns of gene expression for all 43 predicted GPCR genes in available datasets. A total of 17 mutants (47%) possessed at least one growth or developmental phenotype. We identified 18 mutants (56%) with chemical sensitivity or nutritional phenotypes (11 uniquely), bringing the total number of mutants with at least one defect to 28 (78%), including 15 mutants (75%) in the Pth11-related class. Gene expression trends for GPCR genes correlated with the phenotypes observed for many mutants and also suggested overlapping functions for several groups of co-transcribed genes. Several members of the Pth11-related class have phenotypes and/or are differentially expressed on cellulose, suggesting a possible role for this gene family in plant cell wall sensing or utilization.

  3. Global Analysis of Predicted G Protein-Coupled Receptor Genes in the Filamentous Fungus, Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Ilva E; Pacentine, Itallia V; Lim, Andrew; Guerrero, Nayeli; Krystofova, Svetlana; Li, Liande; Michkov, Alexander V; Servin, Jacqueline A; Ahrendt, Steven R; Carrillo, Alexander J; Davidson, Liza M; Barsoum, Andrew H; Cao, Jackie; Castillo, Ronald; Chen, Wan-Ching; Dinkchian, Alex; Kim, Stephanie; Kitada, Sho M; Lai, Taffani H; Mach, Ashley; Malekyan, Cristin; Moua, Toua R; Torres, Carlos Rojas; Yamamoto, Alaina; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2015-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate facets of growth, development, and environmental sensing in eukaryotes, including filamentous fungi. The largest predicted GPCR class in these organisms is the Pth11-related, with members similar to a protein required for disease in the plant pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. However, the Pth11-related class has not been functionally studied in any filamentous fungal species. Here, we analyze phenotypes in available mutants for 36 GPCR genes, including 20 Pth11-related, in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We also investigate patterns of gene expression for all 43 predicted GPCR genes in available datasets. A total of 17 mutants (47%) possessed at least one growth or developmental phenotype. We identified 18 mutants (56%) with chemical sensitivity or nutritional phenotypes (11 uniquely), bringing the total number of mutants with at least one defect to 28 (78%), including 15 mutants (75%) in the Pth11-related class. Gene expression trends for GPCR genes correlated with the phenotypes observed for many mutants and also suggested overlapping functions for several groups of co-transcribed genes. Several members of the Pth11-related class have phenotypes and/or are differentially expressed on cellulose, suggesting a possible role for this gene family in plant cell wall sensing or utilization. PMID:26464358

  4. Differentiating disease subtypes by using pathway patterns constructed from gene expressions and protein networks.

    PubMed

    Hung, Fei-Hung; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression profiles differ in different diseases. Even if diseases are at the same stage, such diseases exhibit different gene expressions, not to mention the different subtypes at a single lesion site. Distinguishing different disease subtypes at a single lesion site is difficult. In early cases, subtypes were initially distinguished by doctors. Subsequently, further differences were found through pathological experiments. For example, a brain tumor can be classified according to its origin, its cell-type origin, or the tumor site. Because of the advancements in bioinformatics and the techniques for accumulating gene expressions, researchers can use gene expression data to classify disease subtypes. Because the operation of a biopathway is closely related to the disease mechanism, the application of gene expression profiles for clustering disease subtypes is insufficient. In this study, we collected gene expression data of healthy and four myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes and applied a method that integrated protein-protein interaction and gene expression data to identify different patterns of disease subtypes. We hope it is efficient for the classification of disease subtypes in adventure.

  5. [Cloning and identification of a mouse zinc finger protein gene ZF-12-related pseudogene].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian Zhong; Zhang, Ya Zhou; Wang, Shui Liang; Yang, Hua; Li, Jian; Yu, Long; Fu, Ji Liang

    2002-06-01

    The mouse zinc finger protein ZF-12 gene is homologous to human gene and encodes a protein of 368 amino acids, which contains four tandem C2H2-type zinc finger motifs in the N-terminal and one SCAN domain in the C-terminal. Some recent studies suggest that ZNF191 might be a hepatocarcinogenesis-associated gene. We screened a mouse lambda genomic library with a human ZNF191 cDNA probe and isolated a ZF-12-like gene, named ZF12p (GenBank AY040222). This intronless gene closely resembles ZF-12 but displays several mutations, suggesting that ZF12p represents a ZF-12-related pseudogene. RT-PCR analysis on total RNA from mouse tissue and bioinformatis analysis on promoter region of ZF12p gene, suggest the transcripts of ZF12p may be not synthesized. BLAST on the data of the human genome in the GenBank with ZNF191 cDNA and Southern blotting show there is no any psedogene related to ZNF191 gene in the human genome. The high similarity of ZF12p to ZF-12 might be of considerable importance for mutation and evolution analysis of ZF-12.

  6. Transcription of the procyclic acidic repetitive protein genes of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, C E; Fueri, J P; Itzhaki, J E; Bellofatto, V; Sherman, D R; Wisdom, G S; Vijayasarathy, S; Mowatt, M R

    1990-01-01

    The procyclic acidic repetitive protein (parp) genes of Trypanosoma brucei encode a small family of abundant surface proteins whose expression is restricted to the procyclic form of the parasite. They are found at two unlinked loci, parpA and parpB; transcription of both loci is developmentally regulated. The region of homology upstream of the A and B parp genes is only 640 base pairs long and may contain sequences responsible for transcriptional initiation and regulation. Transcription upstream of this putative promoter region is not developmentally regulated and is much less active than that of the parp genes; the polymerase responsible is inhibited by alpha-amanitin, whereas that transcribing the parp genes is not. Transcription of the parp genes is strongly stimulated by low levels of UV irradiation. The putative parp promoter, when placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, is sufficient to cause production of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in a T. brucei DNA transformation assay. Taken together, these results suggest that a promoter for an alpha-amanitin-resistant RNA polymerase lies less than 600 nucleotides upstream of the parp genes. Images PMID:2342468

  7. Developmental expression of tobacco pistil-specific genes encoding novel extensin-like proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M H; Pezzotti, M; Seurinck, J; Mariani, C

    1992-01-01

    We have sought to identify pistil-specific genes that can be used as molecular markers to study pistil development. For this purpose, a cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+ RNA extracted from tobacco stigmas and styles at different developmental stages. Differential screening of this library led to the isolation of cDNA clones that correspond to genes preferentially or specifically expressed in the pistil. Seven of these cDNA clones encode proteins containing repetitions of the pentapeptide Ser-Pro4, which is a typical motif found in extensins. Unlike extensin genes, the extensin-like genes described here are not induced under stress conditions. RNA gel blot hybridizations demonstrated the organ-specific expression of the extensin-like genes and their temporal regulation during pistil development. After pollination, the transcript levels of the pistil-specific extensin-like genes change relative to levels in unpollinated pistils. In situ hybridization experiments showed that at least one of these pistil-specific genes is specifically expressed in cells of the transmitting tissue. The possible roles of the extensin-like proteins in pistils are discussed. PMID:1392607

  8. [Identification and expressional analysis of green fluorescent protein genes in amphioxus].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Li, Wei-Ye; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2012-06-01

    Endogenous green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have recently been found in amphioxus, where different characteristics of light production in different development stages and between different individuals have manifested. We identified the GFP genes in an amphioxus species Branchiostoma belcheri and monitored real time fluorescence signals of GFPs during different developmental stages to provide an insight on the GFP function in amphioxus. We found there are at least 12 endogenous GFP genes in amphioxus genome, and fluorescent expression changes in body position during different developmental stages. Additionally, GFP expression after metamorphosis development differed significantly among different amphioxus individuals, suggesting that there are multiple GFP homologous genes responsible for fluorescent expression. Expression levels of these genes varied significantly during different developmental stages, indicating that different GFP genes may have their unique functions in the development of amphioxus during specific phases of growth.

  9. Methuselah/Methuselah-like G protein-coupled receptors constitute an ancient metazoan gene family

    PubMed Central

    de Mendoza, Alexandre; Jones, Jeffery W.; Friedrich, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Inconsistent conclusions have been drawn regarding the phylogenetic age of the Methuselah/Methuselah-like (Mth/Mthl) gene family of G protein-coupled receptors, the founding member of which regulates development and lifespan in Drosophila. Here we report the results from a targeted homolog search of 39 holozoan genomes and phylogenetic analysis of the conserved seven transmembrane domain. Our findings reveal that the Mth/Mthl gene family is ancient, has experienced numerous extinction and expansion events during metazoan evolution, and acquired the current definition of the Methuselah ectodomain during its exceptional expansion in arthropods. In addition, our findings identify Mthl1, Mthl5, Mthl14, and Mthl15 as the oldest Mth/Mthl gene family paralogs in Drosophila. Future studies of these genes have the potential to define ancestral functions of the Mth/Mthl gene family. PMID:26915348

  10. Versatile control of Plasmodium falciparum gene expression with an inducible protein-RNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Goldfless, Stephen J.; Wagner, Jeffrey C.; Niles, Jacquin C.

    2014-01-01

    The available tools for conditional gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum are limited. Here, to enable reliable control of target gene expression, we build a system to efficiently modulate translation. We overcame several problems associated with other approaches for regulating gene expression in P. falciparum. Specifically, our system functions predictably across several native and engineered promoter contexts, and affords control over reporter and native parasite proteins irrespective of their subcellular compartmentalization. Induction and repression of gene expression are rapid, homogeneous, and stable over prolonged periods. To demonstrate practical application of our system, we used it to reveal direct links between antimalarial drugs and their native parasite molecular target. This is an important out come given the rapid spread of resistance, and intensified efforts to efficiently discover and optimize new antimalarial drugs. Overall, the studies presented highlight the utility of our system for broadly controlling gene expression and performing functional genetics in P. falciparum. PMID:25370483

  11. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, A. S.; Thompson, D. K.; Khare, T.; Lim, H.; Brandt, C. C.; Li, G.; Murray, A. E.; Heidelberg, J. F.; Giometti, C. S.; Yates, J., III; Nealson, K. H.; Tiedje, J. M.; Zhou, J.; Biosciences Division; ORNL; Scripps Research Inst.; Michigan State Univ.; The Inst. for Genomic Research; Jet Propulsion Laboratory; California Inst. of Tech.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c{sub 552}, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data.

  12. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Beliaev, Alex S; Thompson, Dorothea K; Khare, Tripti; Lim, Hanjo; Brandt, Craig C; Li, Guangshan; Murray, Alison E; Heidelberg, John F; Giometti, Carol S; Yates, John; Nealson, Kenneth H; Tiedje, James M; Zhoui, Jizhong

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c552, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data. PMID:11881834

  13. Genomic organization of the murine G protein beta subunit genes and related processed pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, J; Wang, X B; Kitanaka, N; Hembree, C M; Uhl, G R

    2001-12-01

    The functional significance of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein) for the many physiological processes including the molecular mechanisms of drug addiction have been described. In investigating the changes of mRNA expression after acute psychostimulant administration, we previously identified a cDNA encoding a G protein beta1 subunit (Gbeta1) that was increased up to four-fold in certain brain regions after administration of psychostimulants. The mouse Gbeta1 gene (the mouse genetic symbol, GNB1) was mapped to chromosome 4, but little was known of its genetic features. To characterize the GNB1 gene further, we have cloned and analyzed the genomic structures of the mouse GNBI gene and its homologous sequences. The GNBI gene spans at least 50 kb, and consists of 12 exons and 11 introns. The exon/intron boundaries were determined and found to follow the GT/AG rule. Exons 3-11 encode the Gbeta1 protein, and the exon 2 is an alternative, resulting in putative two splicing variants. Although intron 11 is additional for GNBI compared with GNB2 and GNB3, the intron positions within the protein coding region of GNB1, GNB2 and GNB3 are identical, suggesting that GNB1 should have diverged from the ancestral gene family earlier than the genes for GNB2 and GNB3. We also found the 5'-truncated processed pseudogenes with 71-89% similarities to GNBI mRNA sequence, suggesting that the truncated cDNA copies, which have been reverse-transcribed from a processed mRNA for GNB1, might have been integrated into several new locations in the mouse genome. PMID:11913780

  14. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Kojun; Pflug, James M; Sproul, John S; Dasenko, Mark A; Maddison, David R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  15. Dehydration-Specific Induction of Hydrophilic Protein Genes in the Anhydrobiotic Nematode Aphelenchus avenae

    PubMed Central

    Browne, John A.; Dolan, Katharine M.; Tyson, Trevor; Goyal, Kshamata; Tunnacliffe, Alan; Burnell, Ann M.

    2004-01-01

    Some organisms can survive exposure to extreme desiccation by entering a state of suspended animation known as anhydrobiosis. The free-living nematode Aphelenchus avenae can be induced to enter the anhydrobiotic state by exposure to a moderate reduction in relative humidity. During this preconditioning period, the nematode accumulates large amounts of the disaccharide trehalose, which is thought to be necessary, but not sufficient, for successful anhydrobiosis. To identify other adaptations that are required for anhydrobiosis, we developed a novel SL1-based mRNA differential display technique to clone genes that are upregulated by dehydration in A. avenae. Three such genes, Aav-lea-1, Aav-ahn-1, and Aav-glx-1, encode, respectively, a late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) group 3 protein, a novel protein that we named anhydrin, and the antioxidant enzyme glutaredoxin. Strikingly, the predicted LEA and anhydrin proteins are highly hydrophilic and lack significant secondary structure in the hydrated state. The dehydration-induced upregulation of Aav-lea-1 and Aav-ahn-1 was confirmed by Northern hybridization and quantitative PCR experiments. Both genes were also upregulated by an osmotic upshift, but not by cold, heat, or oxidative stress. Experiments to investigate the relationship between mRNA levels and protein expression for these genes are in progress. LEA proteins occur commonly in plants, accumulating during seed maturation and desiccation stress; the presence of a gene encoding an LEA protein in an anhydrobiotic nematode suggests that some mechanisms of coping with water loss are conserved between plants and animals. PMID:15302829

  16. Identification and transcriptional control of Caulobacter crescentus genes encoding proteins containing a cold shock domain.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elza A S; Marques, Marilis V

    2004-09-01

    The cold shock proteins are small peptides that share a conserved domain, called the cold shock domain (CSD), that is important for nucleic acid binding. The Caulobacter crescentus genome has four csp genes that encode proteins containing CSDs. Three of these (cspA, cspB, and cspC) encode peptides of about 7 kDa and are very similar to the cold shock proteins of other bacteria. Analysis by reverse transcription-PCR of the fourth gene (cspD), which was previously annotated as encoding a 7-kDa protein, revealed that the mRNA is larger and probably encodes a putative 21-kDa protein, containing two CSDs. A search in protein sequences databases revealed that this new domain arrangement has thus far only been found among deduced peptides of alpha-proteobacteria. Expression of each Caulobacter csp gene was studied both in response to cold shock and to growth phase, and we have found that only cspA and cspB are induced by cold shock, whereas cspC and cspD are induced at stationary phase, with different induction rates. The transcription start sites were determined for each gene, and a deletion mapping of the cspD promoter region defined a sequence required for maximal levels of expression, indicating that regulation of this gene occurs at the transcriptional level. Deletion of cspA, but not cspD, caused a reduction in viability when cells were incubated at 10 degrees C for prolonged times, suggesting that cspA is important for adaptation to a low temperature.

  17. Changes in HSP gene and protein expression in natural scrapie with brain damage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsp) perform cytoprotective functions such as apoptosis regulation and inflammatory response control. These proteins can also be secreted to the extracellular medium, acting as inflammatory mediators, and their chaperone activity permits correct folding of proteins and avoids the aggregation of anomalous isoforms. Several studies have proposed the implication of Hsp in prion diseases. We analysed the gene expression and protein distribution of different members of the Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90 families in the central nervous system of sheep naturally infected with scrapie. Different expression profiles were observed in the areas analysed. Whereas changes in transcript levels were not observed in the cerebellum or medulla oblongata, a significant decrease in HSP27 and HSP90 was detected in the prefrontal cortex. In contrast, HSP73 was over-expressed in diencephalons of scrapie animals. Western blotting did not reveal significant differences in Hsp90 and Hsp70 protein expression between scrapie and control animals. Expression rates identified by real-time RT-PCR and western blotting were compared with the extent of classical scrapie lesions using stepwise regression. Changes in Hsp gene and protein expression were associated with prion protein deposition, gliosis and spongiosis rather than with apoptosis. Finally, immunohistochemistry revealed intense Hsp70 and Hsp90 immunolabelling in Purkinje cells of scrapie sheep. In contrast, controls displayed little or no staining in these cells. The observed differences in gene expression and protein distribution suggest that the heat shock proteins analysed play a role in the natural form of the disease. PMID:21314976

  18. Origin of a novel protein-coding gene family with similar signal sequence in Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evolution of novel protein-coding genes is the bedrock of adaptive evolution. Recently, we identified six protein-coding genes with similar signal sequence from Schistosoma japonicum egg stage mRNA using signal sequence trap (SST). To find the mechanism underlying the origination of these genes with similar core promoter regions and signal sequence, we adopted an integrated approach utilizing whole genome, transcriptome and proteome database BLAST queries, other bioinformatics tools, and molecular analyses. Results Our data, in combination with database analyses showed evidences of expression of these genes both at the mRNA and protein levels exclusively in all developmental stages of S. japonicum. The signal sequence motif was identified in 27 distinct S. japonicum UniGene entries with multiple mRNA transcripts, and in 34 genome contigs distributed within 18 scaffolds with evidence of genome-wide dispersion. No homolog of these genes or similar domain was found in deposited data from any other organism. We observed preponderance of flanking repetitive elements (REs), albeit partial copies, especially of the RTE-like and Perere class at either side of the duplication source locus. The role of REs as major mediators of DNA-level recombination leading to dispersive duplication is discussed with evidence from our analyses. We also identified a stepwise pathway towards functional selection in evolving genes by alternative splicing. Equally, the possible transcription models of some protein-coding representatives of the duplicons are presented with evidence of expression in vitro. Conclusion Our findings contribute to the accumulating evidence of the role of REs in the generation of evolutionary novelties in organisms’ genomes. PMID:22716200

  19. Porcine dentin matrix protein 1: gene structure, cDNA sequence, and expression in teeth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Wook; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Iwata, Takanori; Hu, Yuan Yuan; Zhang, Hengmin; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2006-02-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic non-collagenous protein that is necessary for the proper biomineralization of bone, cartilage, cementum, dentin, and enamel. Dentin matrix protein 1 is highly phosphorylated and potentially glycosylated, but there is no experimental data identifying which specific amino acids are modified. For the purpose of facilitating the characterization of DMP1 from pig, which has the advantage of large developing teeth for obtaining protein in quantity and extensive structural information concerning other tooth matrix proteins, we characterized the porcine DMP1 cDNA and gene structure, raised anti-peptide immunoglobulins that are specific for porcine DMP1, and detected DMP1 protein in porcine tooth extracts and histological sections. Porcine DMP1 has 510 amino acids, including a 16-amino acid signal peptide. The deduced molecular weight of the secreted, unmodified protein is 53.5 kDa. The protein has 93 serines and 12 threonines in the appropriate context for phosphorylation, and four asparagines in a context suitable for glycosylation. Dentin matrix protein 1 protein bands with apparent molecular weights between 30 and 45 kDa were observed in partially purified dentin extracts. In developing teeth, immunohistochemistry localized DMP1 in odontoblasts and the dentinal tubules of mineralized dentin and in ameloblasts, but not in the enamel matrix.

  20. In vitro expression of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein genes: autogenous inhibition of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, J L; Arfsten, A E; Nomura, M

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L1 (0.5 micro M) was found to inhibit the synthesis of both proteins of the L11 operon, L11 and L1, but not the synthesis of other proteins directed by lambda rifd 18 DNA. Similarly, S4 (1 micro M) selectively inhibited the synthesis of three proteins of the alpha operon, S13, S11, and S4, directed by lambda spcI DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment obtained from this DNA. S8 (3.6 micro M) also showed preferential inhibitory effects on the synthesis of some proteins encoded in the spc operon, L24 and L5 (and probably S14 and S8), directed by lambda spcl DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment carrying the genes for these proteins. The inhibitory effect of L1 was observed only with L1 and not with other proteins examined, including S4 and S8. Similarly, the effect of S4 was not observed with L1 or S8, and that of S8 was not seen with L1 or S4. Inhibition was shown to take place at the level of translation rather than transcription. Thus, at least some ribosomal proteins (L1 S4, and S8) have the ability to cause selective translational inhibition of the synthesis of certain ribosomal proteins whose genes are in the same operon as their own. These results support the hypothesis that certain free ribosomal proteins not assembled into ribosomes act as "autogenous" feedback inhibitors to regulate the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:6445562

  1. Light, redox state, thylakoid-protein phosphorylation and signaling gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zer, Hagit; Ohad, Itzhak

    2003-09-01

    Two recent publications concerning the chloroplast membrane-protein phosphorylation and state transition might lead to further progress in the elucidation of the mechanism and role of this process. A thylakoid-bound protein TSP9 is released to the chloroplast matrix upon redox-dependent stepwise phosphorylation of three threonine sites and might signal redox-dependent gene transcription. The state-transition process and phosphorylation of the light-harvesting complex II require the activity of a novel protein kinase Stt7. PMID:13678955

  2. The Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS gene encodes two secreted proteins required for genetic transformation of plants.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Larry D; Lee, Lan-Ying; McNett, Henry; Gelvin, Stanton B; Ream, Walt

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are related pathogens that cause crown gall and hairy root diseases, which result from integration and expression of bacterial genes in the plant genome. Single-stranded DNA (T strands) and virulence proteins are translocated into plant cells by a type IV secretion system. VirD2 nicks a specific DNA sequence, attaches to the 5' end, and pilots the DNA into plant cells. A. tumefaciens translocates single-stranded DNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells where it likely binds T strands and may aid in targeting them into the nucleus. Although some A. rhizogenes strains lack VirE2, they transfer T strands efficiently due to the GALLS gene, which complements an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation. Unlike VirE2, full-length GALLS (GALLS-FL) contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. GALLS-FL and VirE2 contain nuclear localization signals (NLS) and secretion signals. Mutations in any of these domains abolish the ability of the GALLS gene to substitute for virE2. Here, we show that the GALLS gene encodes two proteins from one open reading frame: GALLS-FL and a protein comprised of the C-terminal domain, which initiates at an internal in-frame start codon. On some hosts, both GALLS proteins were required to substitute for VirE2. GALLS-FL tagged with yellow fluorescent protein localized to the nucleus of tobacco cells in an NLS-dependent manner. In plant cells, the GALLS proteins interacted with themselves, VirD2, and each other. VirD2 interacted with GALLS-FL and localized inside the nucleus, where its predicted helicase activity may pull T strands into the nucleus. PMID:18952790

  3. The vacuolar protein sorting genes in insects: A comparative genome view.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaofei; Blissard, Gary

    2015-07-01

    In eukaryotic cells, regulated vesicular trafficking is critical for directing protein transport and for recycling and degradation of membrane lipids and proteins. Through carefully regulated transport vesicles, the endomembrane system performs a large and important array of dynamic cellular functions while maintaining the integrity of the cellular membrane system. Genetic studies in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified approximately 50 vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) genes involved in vesicle trafficking, and most of these genes are also characterized in mammals. The VPS proteins form distinct functional complexes, which include complexes known as ESCRT, retromer, CORVET, HOPS, GARP, and PI3K-III. Little is known about the orthologs of VPS proteins in insects. Here, with the newly annotated Manduca sexta genome, we carried out genomic comparative analysis of VPS proteins in yeast, humans, and 13 sequenced insect genomes representing the Orders Hymenoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Phthiraptera, Lepidoptera, and Coleoptera. Amino acid sequence alignments and domain/motif structure analyses reveal that most of the components of ESCRT, retromer, CORVET, HOPS, GARP, and PI3K-III are evolutionarily conserved across yeast, insects, and humans. However, in contrast to the VPS gene expansions observed in the human genome, only four VPS genes (VPS13, VPS16, VPS33, and VPS37) were expanded in the six insect Orders. Additionally, VPS2 was expanded only in species from Phthiraptera, Lepidoptera, and Coleoptera. These studies provide a baseline for understanding the evolution of vesicular trafficking across yeast, insect, and human genomes, and also provide a basis for further addressing specific functional roles of VPS proteins in insects.

  4. [Polycyclic musks exposure affects gene expression of specific proteins in earthworm Eisenia fetida].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Liu, Xiao-wei; Zheng, Shun-an; Zhou, Qi-xing; Li, Song

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the changes in gene expression of earthworm specific proteins following long-term exposure to low-dose polycyclic musks in soil, the mRNA expression levels of the four representative protein-coding genes (HSP70, CRT, cyPA, TCTP) were examined in earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to polycyclic musks using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The purpose of this study was to investigate mRNA expression profiles of test protein genes in response to sublethal galaxolide (HHCB) and tonalide (AHTN) for 28 d exposure. The analysis results of both sequence alignment and melting curves of RT-qPCR reactions showed that the selected primers were appropriately qualified for quantitative mRNA analysis. mRNA expressions of HSP70 gene were not significantly changed in Eisenia fetida exposed to low concentrations of AHTN (less than 30 microg x g(-1)) and HHCB (less than 50 microg x g(-1)). But HSP70 gene expressions were significantly down-regulated at concentrations of AHTN or HHCB equal to or greater than 30 or 50 microg x g(-1). However, up-regulation of CRT gene expressions was induced in response to all test concentrations of AHTN and HHCB. Both cyPA and TCTP gene expressions were not varied compared to control groups after 28 days of exposure. Overall, the results indicated that HSP70 and CRT genes expression patterns might be potential early molecular biomarkers for predicting the harmful exposure level and ecotoxicological effects of polycyclic musks contaminated soil.

  5. Engineering protein self-assembling in protein-based nanomedicines for drug delivery and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Rodríguez-Carmona, Escarlata; Corchero, José Luis; García-Fruitós, Elena; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Lack of targeting and improper biodistribution are major flaws in current drug-based therapies that prevent reaching high local concentrations of the therapeutic agent. Such weaknesses impose the administration of high drug doses, resulting in undesired side effects, limited efficacy and enhanced production costs. Currently, missing nanosized containers, functionalized for specific cell targeting will be then highly convenient for the controlled delivery of both conventional and innovative drugs. In an attempt to fill this gap, health-focused nanotechnologies have put under screening a growing spectrum of materials as potential components of nanocages, whose properties can be tuned during fabrication. However, most of these materials pose severe biocompatibility concerns. We review in this study how proteins, the most versatile functional macromolecules, can be conveniently exploited and adapted by conventional genetic engineering as efficient building blocks of fully compatible nanoparticles for drug delivery and how selected biological activities can be recruited to mimic viral behavior during infection. Although engineering of protein self-assembling is still excluded from fully rational approaches, the exploitation of protein nano-assemblies occurring in nature and the direct manipulation of protein-protein contacts in bioinspired constructs open intriguing possibilities for further development. These methodologies empower the construction of new and potent vehicles that offer promise as true artificial viruses for efficient and safe nanomedical applications.

  6. Drosophila TDP-43 RNA-Binding Protein Facilitates Association of Sister Chromatid Cohesion Proteins with Genes, Enhancers and Polycomb Response Elements

    PubMed Central

    Misulovin, Ziva; Gause, Maria; Rickels, Ryan A; Shilatifard, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The cohesin protein complex mediates sister chromatid cohesion and participates in transcriptional control of genes that regulate growth and development. Substantial reduction of cohesin activity alters transcription of many genes without disrupting chromosome segregation. Drosophila Nipped-B protein loads cohesin onto chromosomes, and together Nipped-B and cohesin occupy essentially all active transcriptional enhancers and a large fraction of active genes. It is unknown why some active genes bind high levels of cohesin and some do not. Here we show that the TBPH and Lark RNA-binding proteins influence association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and gene regulatory sequences. In vitro, TBPH and Lark proteins specifically bind RNAs produced by genes occupied by Nipped-B and cohesin. By genomic chromatin immunoprecipitation these RNA-binding proteins also bind to chromosomes at cohesin-binding genes, enhancers, and Polycomb response elements (PREs). RNAi depletion reveals that TBPH facilitates association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and regulatory sequences. Lark reduces binding of Nipped-B and cohesin at many promoters and aids their association with several large enhancers. Conversely, Nipped-B facilitates TBPH and Lark association with genes and regulatory sequences, and interacts with TBPH and Lark in affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation experiments. Blocking transcription does not ablate binding of Nipped-B and the RNA-binding proteins to chromosomes, indicating transcription is not required to maintain binding once established. These findings demonstrate that RNA-binding proteins help govern association of sister chromatid cohesion proteins with genes and enhancers. PMID:27662615

  7. A ubiquitous plant housekeeping gene, PAP, encodes a major protein component of bell pepper chromoplasts.

    PubMed

    Pozueta-Romero, J; Rafia, F; Houlné, G; Cheniclet, C; Carde, J P; Schantz, M L; Schantz, R

    1997-11-01

    We have isolated a cDNA (PAP) corresponding to a single nuclear gene that encodes an approximately 30-kD major protein of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) fruit chromoplasts. RNA and protein analyses revealed that, although at a low level, this gene is also expressed in every organ of the plant, the amount of the corresponding transcript and protein dramatically increasing in the latter stages of fruit development. Western-blot and immunocytochemical analyses of purified chloroplasts from leaves and fruits and of chromoplasts from red fruits showed that the encoded protein is the major component of plastoglobules and fibrils and is localized on the outer surface of these lipid structures. Analyses of PAP in plants belonging to different taxa revealed that it is expressed and highly conserved in both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. The presence of the protein in plastids not differentiating into chromoplasts indicates that PAP is expressed irrespective of the ontogeny of various plastid lines. In light of our results and since the encoded protein, identical to that previously named ChrB or fibrillin, is present in plastoglobules from several species and accumulates in the fibrils of bell pepper chromoplast, we propose to designate it as a plastid-lipid-associated protein.

  8. An antigenic protein gene of a phytoplasma associated with sweet potato witches' broom.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; Yeh, K W; Lin, C P

    1998-05-01

    A gene encoding the major antigenic protein of phytoplasma associated with sweet potato witches' broom (SPWB) was cloned and analysed by screening the genomic library of SPWB phytoplasma with monoclonal antibodies for SPWB phytoplasma. The entire predicted structural gene encoded an antigenic protein composed of 172 amino acids with a computed molecular mass of 19.15 kDa and a pl value of 9.78. The -10 region of the promoter and the terminator region of the gene were identified and found to be similar to those of prokaryotes. The hydropathy profile of the deduced amino acid sequence consisted of two distinct regions, a strongly hydrophobic N-terminus and a highly hydrophilic C-terminus. This major antigenic protein was also present in phytoplasma associated with peanut witches' broom (PNWB) and the two showed homology based on the results of Western blot analysis, Southern hybridization, Northern hybridization, primer extension analysis and PCR. The homologous genes of the antigenic protein of SPWB phytoplasma and PNWB phytoplasma were not found in other phytoplasmas tested.

  9. Relationship of the pelargonium flower break carmovirus (PFBV) coat protein gene with that of other carmoviruses.

    PubMed

    Berthomé, R; Kusiak, C; Renou, J P; Albouy, J; Freire, M A; Dinant, S

    1998-01-01

    The 3'-terminal 1500 nucleotides of the genome of pelargonium flower break carmovirus (PFBV) were sequenced from RT-PCR amplification products. One large ORF was found, encoding a 345 amino acid protein of Mr 37 kDa, which corresponds to the coat protein, as confirmed by immunoprecipitation of products of in vitro transcription and translation. The sequence also included the putative promoter of the coat protein gene subgenomic RNA, as well as its 5' and 3' untranslated regions. The PFBV coat protein was more similar to that of saguaro cactus virus and carnation mottle virus than to that of other carmoviruses. Despite the lower level of similarity of CP gene sequences compared to the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene sequences of small icosahedral viruses used in taxonomic studies, PFBV CP sequence comparisons and alignments confirmed that PFBV is related to carmoviruses, tombusviruses and a dianthovirus, as previously concluded from the analysis of a PFBV RdRp gene fragment. PMID:9787665

  10. Genetic variation of the prion protein gene (PRNP) in alpaca (Vicugna pacos)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are caused by accumulation of a misfolded form of the prion protein (PrP). The normal cellular isoform of PrP is produced by the prion gene (PRNP) and is highly expressed in the central nervous system. Currently, there is an absence of information rega...

  11. Dissociation between gene and protein expression of metabolic enzymes in a rodent model of heart failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in advanced heart failure show down-regulation of fatty acid oxidation genes, possibly due to decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factors peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha). We assessed mRNA and protein expressi...

  12. Novel reptilian uncoupling proteins: molecular evolution and gene expression during cold acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Murray, Shauna; Seebacher, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Many animals upregulate metabolism in response to cold. Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) increase proton conductance across the mitochondrial membrane and can thereby alleviate damage from reactive oxygen species that may form as a result of metabolic upregulation. Our aim in this study was to determine whether reptiles (Crocodylus porosus) possess UCP genes. If so, we aimed to place reptilian UCP genes within a phylogenetic context and to determine whether the expression of UCP genes is increased during cold acclimation. We provide the first evidence that UCP2 and UCP3 genes are present in reptiles. Unlike in other vertebrates, UCP2 and UPC3 are expressed in liver and skeletal muscle of the crocodile, and both are upregulated in liver during cold acclimation but not in muscle. We identified two transcripts of UCP3, one of which produces a truncated protein similar to the UCP3S transcript in humans, and the resulting protein lacks the predicted nucleotide-binding regulatory domain. Our molecular phylogeny suggests that uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) is ancestral and has been lost in archosaurs. In birds, UCP3 may have assumed a similar function as UCP1 in mammals, which has important ramifications for understanding endothermic heat production. PMID:18230589

  13. ANGIOGENES: knowledge database for protein-coding and noncoding RNA genes in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Raphael; Weirick, Tyler; John, David; Militello, Giuseppe; Chen, Wei; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Uchida, Shizuka

    2016-09-01

    Increasing evidence indicates the presence of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is specific to various cell types. Although lncRNAs are speculated to be more numerous than protein-coding genes, the annotations of lncRNAs remain primitive due to the lack of well-structured schemes for their identification and description. Here, we introduce a new knowledge database "ANGIOGENES" (http://angiogenes.uni-frankfurt.de) to allow for in silico screening of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs expressed in various types of endothelial cells, which are present in all tissues. Using the latest annotations of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs, publicly-available RNA-seq data was analyzed to identify transcripts that are expressed in endothelial cells of human, mouse and zebrafish. The analyzed data were incorporated into ANGIOGENES to provide a one-stop-shop for transcriptomics data to facilitate further biological validation. ANGIOGENES is an intuitive and easy-to-use database to allow in silico screening of expressed, enriched and/or specific endothelial transcripts under various conditions. We anticipate that ANGIOGENES serves as a starting point for functional studies to elucidate the roles of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs in angiogenesis.

  14. Entamoeba dispar: genetic diversity of Iranian isolates based on serine-rich Entamoeba dispar protein gene.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, A; Rasti, S; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, E; Kazemi, B; Bandehpour, M; Nochi, Z; Hooshyar, H; Rezaian, M

    2008-12-01

    The nucleotide sequences of Serine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Protein (SREHP) gene have already exhibited stable and significant polymorphism in the gene studies. Serine-rich protein is also present and polymorphic in Entamoeba dispar which called SREDP. The polymorphism of the Serine-Rich Entamoeba dispar Protein (SREDP) gene among 8 isolates obtained from Iranian cyst carriers were analyzed by a nested PCR-RFLP followed by sequencing of the PCR products. From those isolates, six distinct DNA patterns were observed after PCR-RFLP of the nested PCR, whereas sequencing showed 8 different patterns among the isolates. The results demonstrate an extensive genetic variability among Iranian E. dispar isolates. The repeat-containing region of the SREDP was found extensively polymorphic in size, number and order of repeat units. Genetic diversity of Iranian E. dispar isolates based on the SREDP was more polymorphic in comparison of Serine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Protein (SREHP) of the E. histolytica isolates as well as were different from a few known SREDP genes.

  15. A sunflower helianthinin gene upstream sequence ensemble contains an enhancer and sites of nuclear protein interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Jordano, J; Almoguera, C; Thomas, T L

    1989-01-01

    Genes encoding helianthinin, the major seed protein in sunflower, are highly regulated. We have identified putative cis-acting and trans-acting elements that may function in the control of helianthinin expression. A 404-base pair DNA fragment on the sunflower helianthinin gene HaG3D, located 322 base pairs from the transcriptional start site, enhanced beta-glucuronidase expression in transgenic tobacco embryos. Sequences within this fragment were found to bind nuclear proteins present in both sunflower embryo and hypocotyl nuclear extracts. The binding site was localized by phenanthroline-copper ion footprinting experiments to A/T-rich sequences located from -705 to -654. Binding competition experiments revealed that these sunflower proteins also bind to upstream promoter sequences from another helianthinin gene (HaG3A) and two other plant embryo-specific genes, carrot DcG3 and French bean phaseolin. However, sequences of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter/enhancer complex failed to compete for its binding. Phenanthroline-copper ion footprinting experiments showed that the binding sites for the sunflower proteins in HaG3A (-1463 to -1514 and -702 to -653) and in phaseolin (-671 to -627) are also very A/T-rich, have similar sizes, and are located at similar distances from their respective promoters. PMID:2535527

  16. Expression of genes and proteins in human cultured lymphoblastoid cells during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2012-07-01

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression. Space experiments were performed with human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines at the first life science experiment to be conducted on the Japanese Experimental Module "Kibo" of the International Space Station (ISS). Under one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the ISS for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the spaceflight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (Panorama ^{TM} Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. We already reported the behavior of p53-dependent regulated genes and proteins after exposure to space radiations, microgravity, and the space environment during spaceflight. Next stage, we will profile the expression except for the p53 gene status and discuss the biological meaning during spaceflight

  17. ANGIOGENES: knowledge database for protein-coding and noncoding RNA genes in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Raphael; Weirick, Tyler; John, David; Militello, Giuseppe; Chen, Wei; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Uchida, Shizuka

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates the presence of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is specific to various cell types. Although lncRNAs are speculated to be more numerous than protein-coding genes, the annotations of lncRNAs remain primitive due to the lack of well-structured schemes for their identification and description. Here, we introduce a new knowledge database “ANGIOGENES” (http://angiogenes.uni-frankfurt.de) to allow for in silico screening of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs expressed in various types of endothelial cells, which are present in all tissues. Using the latest annotations of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs, publicly-available RNA-seq data was analyzed to identify transcripts that are expressed in endothelial cells of human, mouse and zebrafish. The analyzed data were incorporated into ANGIOGENES to provide a one-stop-shop for transcriptomics data to facilitate further biological validation. ANGIOGENES is an intuitive and easy-to-use database to allow in silico screening of expressed, enriched and/or specific endothelial transcripts under various conditions. We anticipate that ANGIOGENES serves as a starting point for functional studies to elucidate the roles of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs in angiogenesis. PMID:27582018

  18. ANGIOGENES: knowledge database for protein-coding and noncoding RNA genes in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Raphael; Weirick, Tyler; John, David; Militello, Giuseppe; Chen, Wei; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Uchida, Shizuka

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates the presence of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is specific to various cell types. Although lncRNAs are speculated to be more numerous than protein-coding genes, the annotations of lncRNAs remain primitive due to the lack of well-structured schemes for their identification and description. Here, we introduce a new knowledge database "ANGIOGENES" (http://angiogenes.uni-frankfurt.de) to allow for in silico screening of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs expressed in various types of endothelial cells, which are present in all tissues. Using the latest annotations of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs, publicly-available RNA-seq data was analyzed to identify transcripts that are expressed in endothelial cells of human, mouse and zebrafish. The analyzed data were incorporated into ANGIOGENES to provide a one-stop-shop for transcriptomics data to facilitate further biological validation. ANGIOGENES is an intuitive and easy-to-use database to allow in silico screening of expressed, enriched and/or specific endothelial transcripts under various conditions. We anticipate that ANGIOGENES serves as a starting point for functional studies to elucidate the roles of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs in angiogenesis. PMID:27582018

  19. Integrating gene and protein expression data with genome-scale metabolic networks to infer functional pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study of cellular metabolism in the context of high-throughput -omics data has allowed us to decipher novel mechanisms of importance in biotechnology and health. To continue with this progress, it is essential to efficiently integrate experimental data into metabolic modeling. Results We present here an in-silico framework to infer relevant metabolic pathways for a particular phenotype under study based on its gene/protein expression data. This framework is based on the Carbon Flux Path (CFP) approach, a mixed-integer linear program that expands classical path finding techniques by considering additional biophysical constraints. In particular, the objective function of the CFP approach is amended to account for gene/protein expression data and influence obtained paths. This approach is termed integrative Carbon Flux Path (iCFP). We show that gene/protein expression data also influences the stoichiometric balancing of CFPs, which provides a more accurate picture of active metabolic pathways. This is illustrated in both a theoretical and real scenario. Finally, we apply this approach to find novel pathways relevant in the regulation of acetate overflow metabolism in Escherichia coli. As a result, several targets which could be relevant for better understanding of the phenomenon leading to impaired acetate overflow are proposed. Conclusions A novel mathematical framework that determines functional pathways based on gene/protein expression data is presented and validated. We show that our approach is able to provide new insights into complex biological scenarios such as acetate overflow in Escherichia coli. PMID:24314206

  20. Characterization of the DNA binding protein encoded by the N-specific filamentous Escherichia coli phage IKe. Binding properties of the protein and nucleotide sequence of the gene.

    PubMed

    Peeters, B P; Konings, R N; Schoenmakers, J G

    1983-09-01

    A DNA binding protein encoded by the filamentous single-stranded DNA phage IKe has been isolated from IKe-infected Escherichia coli cells. Fluorescence and in vitro binding studies have shown that the protein binds co-operatively and with a high specificity to single-stranded but not to double-stranded DNA. From titration of the protein to poly(dA) it has been calculated that approximately four bases of the DNA are covered by one monomer of protein. These binding characteristics closely resemble those of gene V protein encoded by the F-specific filamentous phages M13 and fd. The nucleotide sequence of the gene specifying the IKe DNA binding protein has been established. When compared to the nucleotide sequence of gene V of phage M13 it shows an homology of 58%, indicating that these two phages are evolutionarily related. The IKe DNA binding protein is 88 amino acids long which is one amino acid residue larger than the gene V protein sequence. When the IKe DNA binding protein sequence is compared with that of gene V protein it was found that 39 amino acid residues have identical positions in both proteins. The positions of all five tyrosine residues, a number of which are known to be involved in DNA binding, are conserved. Secondary structure predictions indicate that the two proteins contain similar structural domains. It is proposed that the tyrosine residues which are involved in DNA binding are the ones in or next to a beta-turn, at positions 26, 41 and 56 in gene V protein and at positions 27, 42 and 57 in the IKe DNA binding protein.

  1. Structure and expression of the Drosophila ubiquitin-52-amino-acid fusion-protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, H L; Barrio, R; Arribas, C

    1992-01-01

    Ubiquitin belongs to a multigene family. In Drosophila two members of this family have been previously described. We report here the organization and expression of a third member, the DUb52 gene, isolated by screening a Drosophila melanogaster genomic library. This gene encodes an ubiquitin monomer fused to a 52-amino acid extension protein. There are no introns interrupting the coding sequence. Recently, it has been described that this extension encodes a ribosomal protein in Saccharomyces, Dictyostelium, and Arabidopsis. The present results show that the 5' regulatory region of DUb52 shares common features with the ribosomal protein genes of Drosophila, Xenopus and mouse, including GC- and pyrimidine-rich regions. Moreover, sequences similar to the consensus Ribo-box in Neurospora crassa have been identified. Furthermore, a sequence has been found that is similar to the binding site for the TFIIIA distal element factor from Xenopus laevis. The DUb52 gene is transcribed to a 0.9 kb mRNA that is expressed constitutively throughout development and is particularly abundant in ovaries. In addition, the DUb52 gene has been found to be preferentially transcribed in exponentially growing Drosophila cells. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1381584

  2. Developmental Robustness by Obligate Interaction of Class B Floral Homeotic Genes and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lenser, Thorsten; Theißen, Günter; Dittrich, Peter

    2009-01-01

    DEF-like and GLO-like class B floral homeotic genes encode closely related MADS-domain transcription factors that act as developmental switches involved in specifying the identity of petals and stamens during flower development. Class B gene function requires transcriptional upregulation by an autoregulatory loop that depends on obligate heterodimerization of DEF-like and GLO-like proteins. Because switch-like behavior of gene expression can be displayed by single genes already, the functional relevance of this complex circuitry has remained enigmatic. On the basis of a stochastic in silico model of class B gene and protein interactions, we suggest that obligate heterodimerization of class B floral homeotic proteins is not simply the result of neutral drift but enhanced the robustness of cell-fate organ identity decisions in the presence of stochastic noise. This finding strongly corroborates the view that the appearance of this regulatory mechanism during angiosperm phylogeny led to a canalization of flower development and evolution. PMID:19148269

  3. GeneSV - an Approach to Help Characterize Possible Variations in Genomic and Protein Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zemla, Adam; Kostova, Tanya; Gorchakov, Rodion; Volkova, Evgeniya; Beasley, David W C; Cardosa, Jane; Weaver, Scott C; Vasilakis, Nikos; Naraghi-Arani, Pejman

    2014-01-01

    A computational approach for identification and assessment of genomic sequence variability (GeneSV) is described. For a given nucleotide sequence, GeneSV collects information about the permissible nucleotide variability (changes that potentially preserve function) observed in corresponding regions in genomic sequences, and combines it with conservation/variability results from protein sequence and structure-based analyses of evaluated protein coding regions. GeneSV was used to predict effects (functional vs. non-functional) of 37 amino acid substitutions on the NS5 polymerase (RdRp) of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2), 36 of which are not observed in any publicly available DENV-2 sequence. 32 novel mutants with single amino acid substitutions in the RdRp were generated using a DENV-2 reverse genetics system. In 81% (26 of 32) of predictions tested, GeneSV correctly predicted viability of introduced mutations. In 4 of 5 (80%) mutants with double amino acid substitutions proximal in structure to one another GeneSV was also correct in its predictions. Predictive capabilities of the developed system were illustrated on dengue RNA virus, but described in the manuscript a general approach to characterize real or theoretically possible variations in genomic and protein sequences can be applied to any organism. PMID:24453480

  4. Angiotensin II induces monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Tummala, P E; Olbrych, M T; Alexander, R W; Medford, R M

    1998-11-01

    Monocyte infiltration into the vessel wall, a key initial step in the process of atherosclerosis, is mediated in part by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Hypertension, particularly in the presence of an activated renin-angiotensin system, is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. To investigate a potential molecular basis for a link between hypertension and atherosclerosis, we studied the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on MCP-1 gene expression in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Rat smooth muscle cells treated with Ang II exhibited a dose-dependent increase in MCP-1 mRNA accumulation that was prevented by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan. Ang II also activated MCP-1 gene transcription. Inhibition of NADH/NADPH oxidase, which generates superoxide and H2O2, with diphenylene iodonium or apocynin decreased Ang II-induced MCP-1 mRNA accumulation. Induction of MCP-1 gene expression by Ang II was inhibited by catalase, suggesting a second messenger role for H2O2. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor PD098059 inhibited Ang II-induced MCP-1 gene expression, consistent with a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling mechanism. Ang II may thus promote atherogenesis by direct activation of MCP-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  5. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Skin-Associated Genes Encoding Membrane and Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Martinez, Cynthia; Schrumpf, Holger; Gasis, Marcia; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115), and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7). Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics. PMID:23840300

  6. The EHV-1 UL4 protein that tempers viral gene expression interacts with cellular transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Charvat, Robert A; Kim, Seong K; O'Callaghan, Dennis J

    2014-01-20

    The UL4 gene is conserved within the genome of defective interfering particles of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) that mediate persistent infection. Here, we show that the UL4 protein inhibits EHV-1 reporter gene expression by decreasing the level of transcribed mRNA. The UL4 protein did not bind any gene class of EHV-1 promoters in electromobility or chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, but directly interacted with the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II both in vitro (GST-pulldown assays) and in infected cells (coimmunoprecipitation analyses). Microarray analyses of the expression of the 78 EHV-1 genes revealed that viral late genes important for virion assembly displayed enhanced expression in cells infected with UL4-null virus as compared to wild-type or UL4-restored EHV-1. Quantitative PCR analyses showed that viral DNA replication was not retarded in cells infected with the UL4-null virus as compared to wild-type EHV-1. PMID:24418534

  7. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    PubMed

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics. PMID:9148788

  8. Strategy for large scale solubilization of coal - characterization of Neurospora protein and gene

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Chen, Y.P.; Mishra, N.C.

    1995-12-31

    Low grade coal placed on mycelial mat of Neurospora crassa growing on Petri plate was found to be solubilized by this fungus. A heat stable protein has been purified to near homogeneity which can solubilize low grade coal in in vitro. The biochemical properties of the Neurospora protein will be presented. The nature of the product obtained after solubilization of coal by Neurospora protein in vivo and in vitro will also be presented. The N-terminus sequence of the amino acids of this protein will be used to design primer for possible cloning of gene for Neurospora protein capable of solubilization of coal in order to develop methodology for coal solubilization on a large scale.

  9. PIWI proteins and their interactors in piRNA biogenesis, germline development and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Hsueh-Yen; Lin, Haifan

    2014-01-01

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are a complex class of small non-coding RNAs that are mostly 24–32 nucleotides in length and composed of at least hundreds of thousands of species that specifically interact with the PIWI protein subfamily of the ARGONAUTE family. Recent studies revealed that PIWI proteins interact with a number of proteins, especially the TUDOR-domain-containing proteins, to regulate piRNA biogenesis and regulatory function. Current research also provides evidence that PIWI proteins and piRNAs are not only crucial for transposon silencing in the germline, but also mediate novel mechanisms of epigenetic programming, DNA rearrangements, mRNA turnover, and translational control both in the germline and in the soma. These new discoveries begin to reveal an exciting new dimension of gene regulation in the cell. PMID:25512877

  10. Isolation of the mouse (MFH-1) and human (FKHL14) mesenchyme fork head-1 genes reveals conservation of their gene and protein structures

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Naoyuki; Iida, Kiyoshi; Yang, Xiao-Li

    1997-05-01

    The very recently found evolutionarily conserved DNA-binding domain of 100 amino acids, termed the fork head domain, emerged from a sequence comparison of the rat hepatocyte transcription factor HNF-3{alpha} and the homeotic gene fork head of Drosophila. We previously isolated a new member of this family, the mesenchyme fork head-1 (MFH-1) gene, which is expressed in developing mesenchyme. Here we describe the isolation of the mouse (MFH-1) and human (FKHL14) chromosomal MFH-1 genes and the determination of the gene and protein structures of MFH-1. We found that the MFH-1 gene has no introns and that the identity of the amino acid sequences of mouse and human MFH-1 proteins is 94%. We also investigated the transcriptional activity of the mouse and human MFH-1 proteins and found that both proteins act as positive transactivators. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Gene Delivery from Supercharged Coiled-coil Protein and Cationic Lipid Hybrid Complex

    PubMed Central

    More, Haresh T.; Frezzo, Joseph A.; Dai, Jisen; Yamano, Seiichi; Montclare, Jin K.

    2014-01-01

    A lipoproteoplex comprised of an engineered supercharged coiled-coil protein (CSP) bearing multiple arginines and the cationic lipid formulation FuGENE HD (FG) was developed for effective condensation and delivery of nucleic acids. The CSP was able to maintain helical structure and self-assembly properties while exhibiting binding to plasmid DNA. The ternary CSP•DNA(8:1)•FG lipoproteoplex complex demonstrated enhanced transfection of β-galactosidase DNA into MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts. The lipoproteoplexes showed significant increases in transfection efficiency when compared to conventional FG and an mTat•FG lipopolyplex with a 6- and 2.5-fold increase in transfection, respectively. The CSP•DNA(8:1)•FG lipoproteoplex assembled into spherical particles with a net positive surface charge, enabling efficient gene delivery. These results support the application of lipoproteoplexes with protein engineered CSP for non-viral gene delivery. PMID:24875765

  12. Characterization of the gene encoding a fibrinogen-related protein expressed in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Skazina, M A; Gorbushin, A M

    2016-07-01

    Four exons of the CgFrep1 gene (3333 bp long) encode a putative fibrinogen-related protein (324 aa) bearing a single C-terminal FBG domain. Transcripts of the gene obtained from hemocytes of different Pacific oysters show prominent individual variation based on SNP and indels of tandem repeats resulted in polymorphism of N-terminus of the putative CgFrep1 polypeptide. The polypeptide chain bears N-terminal coiled-coil region potentially acting as inter-subunit interface in the protein oligomerization. It is suggested that CgFrep1 gene encodes the oligomeric lectin composed of at least two subunits. PMID:27189918

  13. Cloning and expression analysis of a prion protein encoding gene in guppy ( Poecilia reticulata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Suihan; Wei, Qiwei; Yang, Guanpin; Wang, Dengqiang; Zou, Guiwei; Chen, Daqing

    2008-11-01

    The full length cDNA of a prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of guppy ( Poecilia reticulata) and the corresponding genomic DNA were cloned. The cDNA was 2245 bp in length and contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 1545 bp encoding a protein of 515 amino acids, which held all typical structural characteristics of the functional PrP. The cloned genomic DNA fragment corresponding to the cDNA was 3720 bp in length, consisting of 2 introns and 2 exons. The 5' untranslated region of cDNA originated from the 2 exons, while the ORF originated from the second exon. Although the gene was transcribed in diverse tissues including brain, eye, liver, intestine, muscle and tail, its transcript was most abundant in the brain. In addition, the transcription of the gene was enhanced by 5 salinity, implying that it was associated with the response of guppy to saline stress.

  14. Genetic variability in the sable (Martes zibellina L.) with respect to genes encoding blood proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kashtanov, S.N.; Kazakova, T.I.

    1995-02-01

    Electrophoresis of blood proteins was used to determine, for the first time, the level of genetic variability of certain loci in the sable (Martes zibellina L., Mustelidae). Variation of 23 blood proteins encoded by 25 genes was analyzed. Polymorphism was revealed in six genes. The level of heterozygosity was estimated at 0.069; the proportion of polymorphic loci was 24%. Data on the history of the sable population maintained at the farm, on geographical distribution of natural sable populations, and on the number of animals selected for reproduction in captivity is presented. The great number of animals studies and the extensive range of natural sable populations, on the basis of which the population maintained in captivity was obtained, suggest that the results of this work can be used for estimating the variability of the gene pool of sable as a species. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Major ampullate spidroins from Euprosthenops australis: multiplicity at protein, mRNA and gene levels.

    PubMed

    Rising, A; Johansson, J; Larson, G; Bongcam-Rudloff, E; Engström, W; Hjälm, G

    2007-10-01

    Spider dragline silk possesses extraordinary mechanical properties. It consists of large fibrous proteins called spidroins that display modular structures. It is known to consist of two proteins: the major ampullate spidroin (MaSp) 1 and MaSp2. This study analyses MaSp sequences from the nursery-web spider Euprosthenops australis. We have identified a previously uncharacterized MaSp2 sequence and a new MaSp-like spidroin, which display distinct homogenous submotifs within their respective Gly-rich repeats. Furthermore, a group of MaSp1 cDNA clones show unexpected heterogeneity. Genomic PCR identified several MaSp1 gene variants within individual spiders, which suggests the presence of a gene cluster in E. australis. Finally, the evolution of spidroin genes is discussed in relation to phylogenetic analysis of nonrepetitive C-terminal domains from diverse species.

  16. Activation of multiple mitogen-activated protein kinases by recombinant calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, N; Disa, J; Spielman, W S; Brooks, D P; Nambi, P; Aiyar, N

    2000-02-18

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a 37-amino-acid neuropeptide and a potent vasodilator. Although calcitonin gene-related peptide has been shown to have a number of effects in a variety of systems, the mechanisms of action and the intracellular signaling pathways, especially the regulation of mitogen-activated protien kinase (MAPK) pathway, is not known. In the present study we investigated the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the regulation of MAPKs in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells stably transfected with a recombinant porcine calcitonin gene-related peptide-1 receptor. Calcitonin gene-related peptide caused a significant dose-dependent increase in cAMP response and the effect was inhibited by calcitonin gene-related peptide(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor antagonist. Calcitonin gene-related peptide also caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38 MAPK) activities, with apparently no significant change in cjun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase also stimulated ERK and P38 activities in these cells suggesting the invovement of cAMP in this process. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-stimulated ERK and P38 MAPK activities were inhibited significantly by calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist, calcitonin gene-related peptide-(8-37) suggesting the involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide-1 receptor. Preincubation of the cells with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor, H89 [¿N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, hydrochloride¿] inhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide-mediated activation of ERK and p38 kinases. On the other hand, preincubation of the cells with wortmannin ¿[1S-(1alpha,6balpha,9abeta,11alpha, 11bbeta)]-11-(acetyloxy)-1,6b,7,8,9a,10,11, 11b-octahydro-1-(methoxymethyl)-9a,11b-dimethyl-3H-furo[4,3, 2-de]indeno[4,5-h]-2

  17. Ets proteins: new factors that regulate immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rivera, R R; Stuiver, M H; Steenbergen, R; Murre, C

    1993-11-01

    We used a DNA-protein interaction screening method to isolate a cDNA, Erg-3, whose product binds to a site, designated pi, present in the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain gene enhancer. Erg-3 is an alternatively spliced product of the erg gene and contains an Ets DNA-binding domain. Fli-1 and PU.1, related Ets proteins, also bind to the same site. In addition, PU.1 binds to a second site, designated microB, in the Ig heavy-chain enhancer. We demonstrate that the pi binding site is crucial for Ig heavy-chain gene enhancer function. In addition, we show that Erg-3 and Fli.1, but not PU.1, can activate a reporter construct containing a multimer of protein-binding sites, synergistically with helix-loop-helix protein E12. We discuss how combinatorial interactions between members of the helix-loop-helix and Ets families may account for the tissue specificity of these proteins.

  18. Transient changes in intercellular protein variability identify sources of noise in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhyudai

    2014-11-01

    Protein levels differ considerably between otherwise identical cells, and these differences significantly affect biological function and phenotype. Previous work implicated various noise mechanisms that drive variability in protein copy numbers across an isogenic cell population. For example, transcriptional bursting of mRNAs has been shown to be a major source of noise in the expression of many genes. Additional expression variability, referred to as extrinsic noise, arises from intercellular variations in mRNA transcription and protein translation rates attributed to cell-to-cell differences in cell size, abundance of ribosomes, etc. We propose a method to determine the magnitude of different noise sources in a given gene of interest. The method relies on blocking transcription and measuring changes in protein copy number variability over time. Our results show that this signal has sufficient information to quantify both the extent of extrinsic noise and transcription bursting in gene expression. Moreover, if the mean mRNA count is known, then the relative contributions of transcription versus translation rate fluctuations to extrinsic noise can also be determined. In summary, our study provides an easy-to-implement method for characterizing noisy protein expression that complements existing techniques for studying stochastic dynamics of genetic circuits.

  19. [Cloning and expression analysis of a LIM-domain protein gene from cotton (Gossypium hirsuturm L.)].

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Xiao, Yue-Hua; Hou, Lei; Luo, Xiao-Ying; Li, De-Mou; Pei, Yan

    2003-02-01

    LIM-domain protein plays an important role in various cellular processes, including construction of cytoskeleton, transcription control and signal transduction. Based on cotton fiber EST database and contig analysis, the coding region of a cotton LIM-domain protein gene (GhLIM1) was obtained by RT-PCR from 4DPA (day post anthesis) ovule with fiber. The cloned fragment of 848 bp contains an open reading frame of 570 bp, coding for a polypeptide of 189 amino acids. It was demonstrated that the deduced GhLIM1 protein was highly homologous to the LIM-domain protein of sunflower (Helianthus annuus), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Arabidopsis thaliana. Two intact LIM-domains, with the conserved sequence of a double zinc-finger structure (C-X2-C-X17-19-H-X2-C-X2-C-X2-C-X16-24-C-X2-H), were found in the GhLIM1 protein. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis showed that GhLIM1 gene expressed in root, shoot tip, hypocotyls, bud, leaf, anther, ovule and fiber (4DPA, 12DPA, 18DPA). However it was preferentially expressed in the shoot tip, fiber and ovule. It was proposed that the express of GhLIM1 gene is related to cotton fiber development. PMID:12776607

  20. Cloning and sequencing of a gene coding for an actin binding protein of Saccharomyces exiguus.

    PubMed

    Lange, U; Steiner, S; Grolig, F; Wagner, G; Philippsen, P

    1994-03-01

    The actin binding protein Abp1p of the yeast Saccharomyces cervisiae is thought to be involved in the spatial organisation of cell surface growth. It contains a potential actin binding domain and an SH-3 region, a common motif of many signal transduction proteins [1]. We have cloned and sequenced an ABP1 homologous gene of Saccharomyces exiguus, a yeast which is only distantly related to S. cerevisiae. The protein encoded by this gene is slightly larger than the respective S. cerevisiae protein (617 versus 592 amino acids). The two genes are 67.4% identical and the deduced amino acid sequences share an overall identity of 59.8%. The most conserved regions are the 148 N-terminal amino acids containing the potential actin binding site and the 58 C-terminal amino acids including the SH3 domain. In addition, both proteins contain a repeated motif of unknown function which is rich in glutamic acids with the sequence EEEEEEEAPAPSLPSR in the S. exiguus Abp1p. PMID:8110838

  1. Effective identification of essential proteins based on priori knowledge, network topology and gene expressions.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zheng, Ruiqing; Zhang, Hanhui; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Yi

    2014-06-01

    Identification of essential proteins is very important for understanding the minimal requirements for cellular life and also necessary for a series of practical applications, such as drug design. With the advances in high throughput technologies, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which makes it possible to detect proteins' essentialities from the network level. Considering that most species already have a number of known essential proteins, we proposed a new priori knowledge-based scheme to discover new essential proteins from protein interaction networks. Based on the new scheme, two essential protein discovery algorithms, CPPK and CEPPK, were developed. CPPK predicts new essential proteins based on network topology and CEPPK detects new essential proteins by integrating network topology and gene expressions. The performances of CPPK and CEPPK were validated based on the protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The experimental results showed that the priori knowledge of known essential proteins was effective for improving the predicted precision. The predicted precisions of CPPK and CEPPK clearly exceeded that of the other 10 previously proposed essential protein discovery methods: Degree Centrality (DC), Betweenness Centrality (BC), Closeness Centrality (CC), Subgraph Centrality (SC), Eigenvector Centrality (EC), Information Centrality (IC), Bottle Neck (BN), Density of Maximum Neighborhood Component (DMNC), Local Average Connectivity-based method (LAC), and Network Centrality (NC). Especially, CPPK achieved 40% improvement in precision over BC, CC, SC, EC, and BN, and CEPPK performed even better. CEPPK was also compared to four other methods (EPC, ORFL, PeC, and CoEWC) which were not node centralities and CEPPK was showed to achieve the best results. PMID:24565748

  2. Effective identification of essential proteins based on priori knowledge, network topology and gene expressions.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zheng, Ruiqing; Zhang, Hanhui; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Yi

    2014-06-01

    Identification of essential proteins is very important for understanding the minimal requirements for cellular life and also necessary for a series of practical applications, such as drug design. With the advances in high throughput technologies, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which makes it possible to detect proteins' essentialities from the network level. Considering that most species already have a number of known essential proteins, we proposed a new priori knowledge-based scheme to discover new essential proteins from protein interaction networks. Based on the new scheme, two essential protein discovery algorithms, CPPK and CEPPK, were developed. CPPK predicts new essential proteins based on network topology and CEPPK detects new essential proteins by integrating network topology and gene expressions. The performances of CPPK and CEPPK were validated based on the protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The experimental results showed that the priori knowledge of known essential proteins was effective for improving the predicted precision. The predicted precisions of CPPK and CEPPK clearly exceeded that of the other 10 previously proposed essential protein discovery methods: Degree Centrality (DC), Betweenness Centrality (BC), Closeness Centrality (CC), Subgraph Centrality (SC), Eigenvector Centrality (EC), Information Centrality (IC), Bottle Neck (BN), Density of Maximum Neighborhood Component (DMNC), Local Average Connectivity-based method (LAC), and Network Centrality (NC). Especially, CPPK achieved 40% improvement in precision over BC, CC, SC, EC, and BN, and CEPPK performed even better. CEPPK was also compared to four other methods (EPC, ORFL, PeC, and CoEWC) which were not node centralities and CEPPK was showed to achieve the best results.

  3. Evolutionary history of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in Lotus, Medicago, and Phaseolus

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P; Benson, Benjamin V; MacArthur, Kenton J; Piya, Sarbottam

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) genes encode proteins that mediate various signaling pathways associated with biotic and abiotic stress responses in eukaryotes. The MAPK genes form a 3-tier signal transduction cascade between cellular stimuli and physiological responses. Recent identification of soybean MAPKs and availability of genome sequences from other legume species allowed us to identify their MAPK genes. The main objectives of this study were to identify MAPKs in 3 legume species, Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, and Phaseolus vulgaris, and to assess their phylogenetic relationships. We used approaches in comparative genomics for MAPK gene identification and named the newly identified genes following Arabidopsis MAPK nomenclature model. We identified 19, 18, and 15 MAPKs and 7, 4, and 9 MAPKKs in the genome of Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, and Phaseolus vulgaris, respectively. Within clade placement of MAPKs and MAPKKs in the 3 legume species were consistent with those in soybean and Arabidopsis. Among 5 clades of MAPKs, 4 founder clades were consistent to MAPKs of other plant species and orthologs of MAPK genes in the fifth clade-"Clade E" were consistent with those in soybean. Our results also indicated that some gene duplication events might have occurred prior to eudicot-monocot divergence. Highly diversified MAPKs in soybean relative to those in 3 other legume species are attributable to the polyploidization events in soybean. The identification of the MAPK genes in the legume species is important for the legume crop improvement; and evolutionary relationships and functional divergence of these gene members provide insights into plant genome evolution. PMID:24317362

  4. Divergent Transactivation of Maize Storage Protein Zein Genes by the Transcription Factors Opaque2 and OHPs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Ji, Chen; Wu, Yongrui

    2016-01-01

    Maize transcription factors (TFs) opaque2 (O2) and the O2 heterodimerizing proteins (OHP1 and OHP2) originated from an ancient segmental duplication. The 22-kDa (z1C) and 19-kDa (z1A, z1B, and z1D) α-zeins are the most abundant storage proteins in maize endosperm. O2 is known to regulate α-zein gene expression, but its target motifs in the 19-kDa α-zein gene promoters have not been identified. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of α-zein genes by these TFs are also not well understood. In this study, we found that the O2 binding motifs in the α-zein gene promoters are quite flexible, with ACGT being present in the z1C and z1A promoters and a variant, ACAT, being present in the z1B and z1D promoters. OHPs recognized and transactivated all of the α-zein promoters, although to much lower levels than did O2. In the presence of O2, the suppression of OHPs did not cause a significant reduction in the transcription of α-zein genes, but in the absence of O2, OHPs were critical for the expression of residual levels of α-zeins. These findings demonstrated that O2 is the primary TF and that OHPs function as minor TFs in this process. This relationship is the converse of that involved in 27-kDa γ-zein gene regulation, indicating that the specificities of O2 and the OHPs for regulating zein genes diverged after gene duplication. The prolamine-box binding factor by itself has limited transactivation activity, but it promotes the binding of O2 to O2 motifs, resulting in the synergistic transactivation of α-zein genes. PMID:27474726

  5. The Rh protein family: gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Han; Ye, Mao

    2010-04-01

    The Rh (Rhesus) genes encode a family of conserved proteins that share a structural fold of 12 transmembrane helices with members of the major facilitator superfamily. Interest in this family has arisen from the discovery of Rh factor's involvement in hemolytic disease in the fetus and newborn, and of its homologs widely expressed in epithelial tissues. The Rh factor and Rh-associated glycoprotein (RhAG), with epithelial cousins RhBG and RhCG, form four subgroups conferring upon vertebrates a genealogical commonality. The past decade has heralded significant advances in understanding the phylogenetics, allelic diversity, crystal structure, and biological function of Rh proteins. This review describes recent progress on this family and the molecular insights gleaned from its gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association. The focus is on its long evolutionary history and surprising structural conservation from prokaryotes to humans, pointing to the importance of its functional role, related to but distinct from ammonium transport proteins.

  6. Effects of fluoride on bacterial growth and its gene/protein expression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haili; Wu, Xiaohu; Yang, Meng; Wang, Jianmei; Wang, Jinming; Wang, Jundong

    2014-04-01

    To determine the effects of fluoride on bacterial growth, as well as upon its gene/protein expression, we grew Escherichia coli expressing GFPuv (E. coli-GFPuv) in Luria Bertani medium at different concentrations of NaF, 0, 0.1 mM, 1 mM, 10 mM and 100 mM. Results showed that E. coli-pGFPuv growth and expression of mRNA and protein of GFPuv were increased at 0.1 and 1 mM, but were inhibited at 10 and 100 mM, which demonstrated that fluoride has a classic rise/fall response of inducing E. coli-GFPuv growth and gene and protein expression of GFPuv at 1 mM. Our observation suggests that the effect of fluoride on bacterial growth may be from regulation of mRNA expression.

  7. Genome Wide Binding Site Analysis Reveals Transcriptional Coactivation of Cytokinin-Responsive Genes by DELLA Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marín-de la Rosa, Nora; Pfeiffer, Anne; Hill, Kristine; Locascio, Antonella; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P.; Miskolczi, Pal; Grønlund, Anne L.; Wanchoo-Kohli, Aakriti; Thomas, Stephen G.; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Lohmann, Jan U.; Blázquez, Miguel A.; Alabadí, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability of plants to provide a plastic response to environmental cues relies on the connectivity between signaling pathways. DELLA proteins act as hubs that relay environmental information to the multiple transcriptional circuits that control growth and development through physical interaction with transcription factors from different families. We have analyzed the presence of one DELLA protein at the Arabidopsis genome by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to large-scale sequencing and we find that it binds at the promoters of multiple genes. Enrichment analysis shows a strong preference for cis elements recognized by specific transcription factor families. In particular, we demonstrate that DELLA proteins are recruited by type-B ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATORS (ARR) to the promoters of cytokinin-regulated genes, where they act as transcriptional co-activators. The biological relevance of this mechanism is underpinned by the necessity of simultaneous presence of DELLAs and ARRs to restrict root meristem growth and to promote photomorphogenesis. PMID:26134422

  8. Expression of Agrobacterium Homolog Genes Encoding T-complex Recruiting Protein under Virulence Induction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Wu, Meixia; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Minliang; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    The proteins encoded by three Agrobacterial genes, atu5117, atu4860, and atu4856, are highly homologous to each other in amino acid sequence. All three proteins can bind to VirD2 and are named VBP1, VBP2, and VBP3 (VirD2-binding protein), respectively. VBP is involved in T-DNA transfer by recruiting the T-complex from the cytosol to the polar transport apparatus T4SS (type IV secretion system) and is defined as the “T-complex recruiting protein.” However, it remains unknown how these three homologous genes co-exist in a relatively small prokaryotic genome. To understand whether these three homologous genes are expressed differentially under virulence induction conditions, we examined the effects of virulence induction conditions, including various pH values, temperatures and acetosyringone (AS, an effective virulence inducer to Agrobacterium tumefaciens) concentrations, on the expression of the three VBP-encoding genes. Our data showed that vbp1 (atu5117) and vbp3 (atu4856) maintained constant expression under the tested induction conditions, whereas the expression of vbp2 (atu4860) was affected by the conditions. Culture conditions favorable to the expression of vbp2 differed from the reported induction conditions for other virulence proteins. In particular, the pH value was a crucial factor for the expression of vbp2. In addition, the deletion of vbp1 affected the expression of vbp2. Taken together, these results suggest that the mechanisms regulating the expression of these three homologous genes are different from the virulence induction mechanism and that VBP homologs are presumably involved in other biological processes in addition to T-complex recruitment. PMID:26696988

  9. Altered Protein Composition and Gene Expression in Strabismic Human Extraocular Muscles and Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Andrea B.; Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Altick, Amy L.; Quilici, David R.; Wen, Dan; Johnson, L. Alan; von Bartheld, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether structural protein composition and expression of key regulatory genes are altered in strabismic human extraocular muscles. Methods Samples from strabismic horizontal extraocular muscles were obtained during strabismus surgery and compared with normal muscles from organ donors. We used proteomics, standard and customized PCR arrays, and microarrays to identify changes in major structural proteins and changes in gene expression. We focused on muscle and connective tissue and its control by enzymes, growth factors, and cytokines. Results Strabismic muscles showed downregulation of myosins, tropomyosins, troponins, and titin. Expression of collagens and regulators of collagen synthesis and degradation, the collagenase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and its inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)1 and TIMP2, was upregulated, along with tumor necrosis factor (TNF), TNF receptors, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), as well as proteoglycans. Growth factors controlling extracellular matrix (ECM) were also upregulated. Among 410 signaling genes examined by PCR arrays, molecules with downregulation in the strabismic phenotype included GDNF, NRG1, and PAX7; CTGF, CXCR4, NPY1R, TNF, NTRK1, and NTRK2 were upregulated. Signaling molecules known to control extraocular muscle plasticity were predominantly expressed in the tendon rather than the muscle component. The two horizontal muscles, medial and lateral rectus, displayed similar changes in protein and gene expression, and no obvious effect of age. Conclusions Quantification of proteins and gene expression showed significant differences in the composition of extraocular muscles of strabismic patients with respect to important motor proteins, elements of the ECM, and connective tissue. Therefore, our study supports the emerging view that the molecular composition of strabismic muscles is substantially altered. PMID:27768799

  10. Expression of Agrobacterium Homolog Genes Encoding T-complex Recruiting Protein under Virulence Induction Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wu, Meixia; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Minliang; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    The proteins encoded by three Agrobacterial genes, atu5117, atu4860, and atu4856, are highly homologous to each other in amino acid sequence. All three proteins can bind to VirD2 and are named VBP1, VBP2, and VBP3 (VirD2-binding protein), respectively. VBP is involved in T-DNA transfer by recruiting the T-complex from the cytosol to the polar transport apparatus T4SS (type IV secretion system) and is defined as the "T-complex recruiting protein." However, it remains unknown how these three homologous genes co-exist in a relatively small prokaryotic genome. To understand whether these three homologous genes are expressed differentially under virulence induction conditions, we examined the effects of virulence induction conditions, including various pH values, temperatures and acetosyringone (AS, an effective virulence inducer to Agrobacterium tumefaciens) concentrations, on the expression of the three VBP-encoding genes. Our data showed that vbp1 (atu5117) and vbp3 (atu4856) maintained constant expression under the tested induction conditions, whereas the expression of vbp2 (atu4860) was affected by the conditions. Culture conditions favorable to the expression of vbp2 differed from the reported induction conditions for other virulence proteins. In particular, the pH value was a crucial factor for the expression of vbp2. In addition, the deletion of vbp1 affected the expression of vbp2. Taken together, these results suggest that the mechanisms regulating the expression of these three homologous genes are different from the virulence induction mechanism and that VBP homologs are presumably involved in other biological processes in addition to T-complex recruitment. PMID:26696988

  11. Association of milk protein genes with fertilization rate and early embryonic development in Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Peñagaricano, Francisco; Khatib, Hasan

    2012-02-01

    Concomitant with intensive selection for increased milk yield, reproductive performance of dairy cows has declined in the last decades, in part due to an unfavourable genetic relationship between these traits. Given that the six main milk protein genes (i.e. whey proteins and caseins) are directly involved in milk production and hence have been a target of the strong selection aimed at improving milk yield in dairy cattle, we hypothesized that these genes could show selection footprints associated with fertility traits. In this study, we used an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) system to test genetic association between 66 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the four caseins (αS1-casein, αS2-casein, β-casein and κ-casein) and the two whey protein genes (α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin) with fertilization rate and early embryonic development in the Holstein breed. A total of 6893 in-vitro fertilizations were performed and a total of 4661 IVF embryos were produced using oocytes from 399 ovaries and semen samples from 12 bulls. Associations between SNPs and fertility traits were analysed using a mixed linear model with genotype as fixed effect and ovary and bull as random effects. A multiple testing correction approach was used to account for the correlation between SNPs due to linkage disequilibrium. After correction, polymorphisms in the LALBA and LGB genes showed significant associations with fertilization success and blastocyst rate. No significant associations were detected between SNPs located in the casein region and IVF fertility traits. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the association between whey protein genes and fertility have not yet been characterized, this study provides the first evidence of association between these genes and fertility traits. Furthermore, these results could shed light on the antagonistic relationship that exists between milk yield and fertility in dairy cattle.

  12. The structure and expression of maize genes encoding the major heat shock protein, hsp70.

    PubMed

    Rochester, D E; Winer, J A; Shah, D M

    1986-03-01

    We have isolated and sequenced two maize genomic clones that are homologous to the Drosophila hsp70 gene. One of the maize hsp70 clones contains the entire hsp70 coding region and 81 nucleotides of the 5' nontranslated sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence for this maize protein is 68% homologous to the hsp70 of Drosophila. The second maize hsp70 clone contains only part of the coding sequence and 1.1 kb of the 5' flanking sequence. This 5' flanking sequence contains two sequences homologous to the consensus heat-shock-element sequence. Both maize genes are thermally inducible and each contains an intron in the same position as that of the heat-shock-cognate gene, hsc1, of Drosophila. The presence of an intron in the maize genes is a distinguishing feature in that no other thermally inducible hsp70 genes described to date contain an intron. We have constructed a hybrid hsp70 gene containing the entire hsp70 coding sequence with an intron, and 1.1 kb of the 5' flanking sequence. We demonstrate that this hybrid gene is thermally inducible in a transgenic petunia plant and that the gene is expressed from its own promoter.

  13. Family business: the multidrug-resistance related protein (MRP) ABC transporter genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kolukisaoglu, H Uner; Bovet, Lucien; Klein, Markus; Eggmann, Thomas; Geisler, Markus; Wanke, Dierk; Martinoia, Enrico; Schulz, Burkhard

    2002-11-01

    Despite the completion of the sequencing of the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the exact determination of each single gene and its function remains an open question. This is especially true for multigene families. An approach that combines analysis of genomic structure, expression data and functional genomics to ascertain the role of the members of the multidrug-resistance-related protein ( MRP) gene family, a subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters from Arabidopsis is presented. We used cDNA sequencing and alignment-based re-annotation of genomic sequences to define the exact genic structure of all known AtMRP genes. Analysis of promoter regions suggested different induction conditions even for closely related genes. Expression analysis for the entire gene family confirmed these assumptions. Phylogenetic analysis and determination of segmental duplication in the regions of AtMRP genes revealed that the evolution of the extraordinarily high number of ABC transporter genes in plants cannot solely be explained by polyploidisation during the evolution of the Arabidopsis genome. Interestingly MRP genes from Oryza sativa L. (rice; OsMRP) show very similar genomic structures to those from Arabidopsis. Screening of large populations of T-DNA-mutagenised lines of A. thaliana resulted in the isolation of AtMRP insertion mutants. This work opens the way for the defined analysis of a multigene family of important membrane transporters whose broad variety of functions expands their traditional role as cellular detoxifiers. PMID:12430019

  14. Heterogenic expression of genes encoding secreted proteins at the periphery of Aspergillus niger colonies.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Arman; de Bekker, Charissa; Ossin, Adam; Ohm, Robin A; de Vries, Ronald P; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-01-01

    Colonization of a substrate by fungi starts with the invasion of exploring hyphae. These hyphae secrete enzymes that degrade the organic material into small molecules that can be taken up by the fungus to serve as nutrients. We previously showed that only part of the exploring hyphae of Aspergillus niger highly express the glucoamylase gene glaA. This was an unexpected finding since all exploring hyphae are exposed to the same environmental conditions. Using GFP as a reporter, we here demonstrate that the acid amylase gene aamA, the α-glucuronidase gene aguA, and the feruloyl esterase gene faeA of A. niger are also subject to heterogenic expression within the exploring mycelium. Coexpression studies using GFP and dTomato as reporters showed that hyphae that highly express one of these genes also highly express the other genes encoding secreted proteins. Moreover, these hyphae also highly express the amylolytic regulatory gene amyR, and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene gpdA. In situ hybridization demonstrated that the high expressers are characterized by a high 18S rRNA content. Taken together, it is concluded that two subpopulations of hyphae can be distinguished within the exploring mycelium of A. niger. The experimental data indicate that these subpopulations differ in their transcriptional and translational activity.

  15. The human enamel protein gene amelogenin is expressed from both the X and the Y chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Salido, E.C. ); Yen, P.H.; Koprivnikar, K.; Shapiro, L.J. ); Yu, Lohchung )

    1992-02-01

    Amelogenins, a family of extracellular matrix proteins of the dental enamel, are transiently but abundantly expressed by ameloblasts during tooth development. In this paper the authors report the characterization of the AMGX and AMGY genes on the short arms of the human X and Y chromosomes which encode the amelogenins. Their studies on the expression of the amelogenin genes in male developing tooth buds showed that both the AMGX and AMGY genes are transcriptionally active and encode potentially functional proteins. They have isolated genomic and cDNA clones form both the AMGX and AMGY loci and have studied the sequence organization of these two genes. Reverse transcriptase (RT)PCR amplification of the 5[prime] portion of the amelogenin transcripts revealed several alternatively spliced products. This information will be useful for studying the molecular basis of X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta, for understanding the evolution and regulation of gene expression on the mammalian sex chromosomes, and for investigating the role of amelogenin genes during tooth development.

  16. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  17. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ODA3 Gene Encodes a Protein of the Outer Dynein Arm Docking Complex

    PubMed Central

    Koutoulis, Anthony; Pazour, Gregory J.; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Inaba, Kazuo; Sheng, Hong; Takada, Saeko; Witman, George B.

    1997-01-01

    We have used an insertional mutagenesis/ gene tagging technique to generate new Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants that are defective in assembly of the outer dynein arm. Among 39 insertional oda mutants characterized, two are alleles of the previously uncloned ODA3 gene, one is an allele of the uncloned ODA10 gene, and one represents a novel ODA gene (termed ODA12). ODA3 is of particular interest because it is essential for assembly of both the outer dynein arm and the outer dynein arm docking complex (ODA-DC) onto flagellar doublet microtubules (Takada, S., and R. Kamiya. 1994. J. Cell Biol. 126:737– 745). Beginning with the inserted DNA as a tag, the ODA3 gene and a full-length cDNA were cloned. The cloned gene rescues the phenotype of oda3 mutants. The cDNA sequence predicts a novel 83.4-kD protein with extensive coiled-coil domains. The ODA-DC contains three polypeptides; direct amino acid sequencing indicates that the largest of these polypeptides corresponds to ODA3. This protein is likely to have an important role in the precise positioning of the outer dynein arms on the flagellar axoneme. PMID:9166407

  18. Inhibitory PAS domain protein is a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Yuichi; Cao, Renhai; Svensson, Kristian; Bertilsson, Göran; Asman, Mikael; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Cao, Yihai; Berkenstam, Anders; Poellinger, Lorenz

    2001-11-01

    Alteration of gene expression is a crucial component of adaptive responses to hypoxia. These responses are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Here we describe an inhibitory PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain protein, IPAS, which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS protein structurally related to HIFs. IPAS contains no endogenous transactivation function but demonstrates dominant negative regulation of HIF-mediated control of gene expression. Ectopic expression of IPAS in hepatoma cells selectively impairs induction of genes involved in adaptation to a hypoxic environment, notably the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, and results in retarded tumour growth and tumour vascular density in vivo. In mice, IPAS was predominantly expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in corneal epithelium of the eye. Expression of IPAS in the cornea correlates with low levels of expression of the VEGF gene under hypoxic conditions. Application of an IPAS antisense oligonucleotide to the mouse cornea induced angiogenesis under normal oxygen conditions, and demonstrated hypoxia-dependent induction of VEGF gene expression in hypoxic corneal cells. These results indicate a previously unknown mechanism for negative regulation of angiogenesis and maintenance of an avascular phenotype.

  19. Cloning, sequencing, and mapping of the human chromosome 14 heat shock protein gene (HSPA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnycastle, L.L.C.; Chang-En Yu; Schellenberg, G.D.

    1994-09-01

    A genomic clone for the human heat shock protein (HSP) 70 gene located on chromosome 14 was isolated and sequenced. The gene, designated HSPA2, has a single open reading frame of 1917 bp that encodes a 639-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 70,030 Da. Analysis of the sequence indicates that HLPA2 is the human homologue of the murine Hsp 70-2 gene with 91.7% identity in the nucleotide coding sequence and 98.2% in the corresponding amino acid sequence. HSPA2 has less amino acid homology to other members of the human HSP70 gene family, 83.3% to the heat-inducible HSP70-1 gene and 86.1% with the human heat shock cognate gene HSC70. HSPA2 is constitutively expressed in most tissues, with very high levels in testis and skeletal muscle. Significant but lower levels are also expressed in ovary, small intestine, colon, brain, placenta, and kidney. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clone containing HSPA2 (YAC741H4) that also contained the polymorphic marker D14S63 was identified. This 670-kb YAC was mapped to 14q24.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Subsequent two-color FISH and genetic mapping placed HSPA2/D14S63 proximal to the markers D14S57 and D14S77. 50 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Genome-wide identification and gene expression profiling of ubiquitin ligases for endoplasmic reticulum protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Masayuki; Iwase, Ikuko; Yamasaki, Yuki; Takai, Tomoko; Wu, Yan; Kanemoto, Soshi; Matsuhisa, Koji; Asada, Rie; Okuma, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Takeshi; Imaizumi, Kazunori; Nomura, Yausyuki

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) is a mechanism by which unfolded proteins that accumulate in the ER are transported to the cytosol for ubiquitin–proteasome-mediated degradation. Ubiquitin ligases (E3s) are a group of enzymes responsible for substrate selectivity and ubiquitin chain formation. The purpose of this study was to identify novel E3s involved in ERAD. Thirty-seven candidate genes were selected by searches for proteins with RING-finger motifs and transmembrane regions, which are the major features of ERAD E3s. We performed gene expression profiling for the identified E3s in human and mouse tissues. Several genes were specifically or selectively expressed in both tissues; the expression of four genes (RNFT1, RNF185, CGRRF1 and RNF19B) was significantly upregulated by ER stress. To determine the involvement of the ER stress-responsive genes in ERAD, we investigated their ER localisation, in vitro autoubiquitination activity and ER stress resistance. All were partially localised to the ER, whereas CGRRF1 did not possess E3 activity. RNFT1 and RNF185, but not CGRRF1 and RNF19B, exhibited significant resistance to ER stressor in an E3 activity-dependent manner. Thus, these genes are possible candidates for ERAD E3s. PMID:27485036

  1. GATA1 and PU.1 Bind to Ribosomal Protein Genes in Erythroid Cells: Implications for Ribosomopathies

    PubMed Central

    Amanatiadou, Elsa P.; Papadopoulos, Giorgio L.; Strouboulis, John; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S.

    2015-01-01

    The clear connection between ribosome biogenesis dysfunction and specific hematopoiesis-related disorders prompted us to examine the role of critical lineage-specific transcription factors in the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes during terminal erythroid differentiation. By applying EMSA and ChIP methodologies in mouse erythroleukemia cells we show that GATA1 and PU.1 bind in vitro and in vivo the proximal promoter region of the RPS19 gene which is frequently mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. Moreover, ChIPseq data analysis also demonstrates that several RP genes are enriched as potential GATA1 and PU.1 gene targets in mouse and human erythroid cells, with GATA1 binding showing an association with higher ribosomal protein gene expression levels during terminal erythroid differentiation in human and mouse. Our results suggest that RP gene expression and hence balanced ribosome biosynthesis may be specifically and selectively regulated by lineage specific transcription factors during hematopoiesis, a finding which may be clinically relevant to ribosomopathies. PMID:26447946

  2. GATA1 and PU.1 Bind to Ribosomal Protein Genes in Erythroid Cells: Implications for Ribosomopathies.

    PubMed

    Amanatiadou, Elsa P; Papadopoulos, Giorgio L; Strouboulis, John; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S

    2015-01-01

    The clear connection between ribosome biogenesis dysfunction and specific hematopoiesis-related disorders prompted us to examine the role of critical lineage-specific transcription factors in the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes during terminal erythroid differentiation. By applying EMSA and ChIP methodologies in mouse erythroleukemia cells we show that GATA1 and PU.1 bind in vitro and in vivo the proximal promoter region of the RPS19 gene which is frequently mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. Moreover, ChIPseq data analysis also demonstrates that several RP genes are enriched as potential GATA1 and PU.1 gene targets in mouse and human erythroid cells, with GATA1 binding showing an association with higher ribosomal protein gene expression levels during terminal erythroid differentiation in human and mouse. Our results suggest that RP gene expression and hence balanced ribosome biosynthesis may be specifically and selectively regulated by lineage specific transcription factors during hematopoiesis, a finding which may be clinically relevant to ribosomopathies. PMID:26447946

  3. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  4. The gene for human E2 small nucleolar RNA resides in an intron of a laminin-binding protein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Selvamurugan, N.; Eliceiri, G.L.

    1995-11-20

    Several of the known small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) species have been shown to be required for processing of ribosomal RNA precursors (pre-rRNA). The genes of most of the known vertebrate snoRNA species are located in introns of genes for messenger RNA precursors. E2 RNA is a nucleolar species that is 154 nucleotides long in human; it belongs to a new family of snoRNAs because it does not have the sequences named box C, C{prime} or D that are present in most vertebrate snoRNA species, and it does not bind fibrillarin, the nucleolar protein associated with most snoRNAs. E2 snoRNA is found in all tissues tested and in all vertebrates analyzed. E2 snoRNA is expected to have a unique function in ribosome formation, because it psoralen-photocrosslinks in vivo to a unique internal segment of the 28S rRNA sequence of pre-rRNA. Two observations are compatible with the possibility that the human E2 RNA gene may be intronic. First, the human E2 RNA gene lacks the intragenic or flanking sequences that are functional in other genes. Second, the 5{prime} end of E2 RNA is monophosphorylated, suggesting that is formed by RNA processing. Intron-encoded snoRNAs have monophosphorylated 5{prime}termini. Until now, it was not known whether the E2 RNA gene resides in an intron. This information is important for studying the biosynthesis of E2 RNA. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  5. The yptV1 gene encodes a small G-protein in the green alga Volvox carteri: gene structure and properties of the gene product.

    PubMed

    Fabry, S; Nass, N; Huber, H; Palme, K; Jaenicke, L; Schmitt, R

    1992-09-10

    Small G-proteins encoded by ras-like genes are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells. These G-proteins are believed to play a role in central processes, such as signal transduction, cell differentiation and membrane vesicle transport. By screening genomic and cDNA libraries of the colonial alga, Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, with ypt DNA probes from Zea mays, we have identified the first member of a ypt gene family, yptV1, within a green alga. The 1538-bp yptV1 gene of V. carteri consists of nine exons and eight introns and has three potential polyadenylation sites 210, 420 and 500 bp downstream from the UGA stop codon. The derived 203-amino-acid polypeptide, YptV1, exhibits 81% similarity with Ypt1 from mouse, with the corresponding genes sharing four identical intron positions. Recombinant YptV1 (reYptV1) produced in Escherichia coli retains the ability to bind GTP after SDS-PAGE and immobilization on nitrocellulose. Immunological studies using polyclonal antibodies against reYptV1 indicate that the protein is present in the membrane fraction of a V. carteri extract and is expressed throughout the whole life-cycle of the alga. Similar to other Ras-like proteins, YptV1 contains two conserved C-terminal cysteine residues suggesting post-translational modification(s), such as isoprenylation or palmitoylation, required for membrane anchoring. The presumptive role of YptV1 in cytoplasmic vesicle transport is briefly discussed. PMID:1511889

  6. Antagonist minigenes identify genes regulated by parathyroid hormone through G protein-selective and G protein co-regulated mechanisms in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Gilchrist, A; Stern, P H

    2011-02-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the major hormone regulating bone remodeling. Binding of PTH to the PTH1 receptor (PTH1R), a heterotrimeric G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), can potentially trigger multiple signal transduction pathways mediated through several different G proteins. In this study, we employed G protein antagonist minigenes inhibiting Gα(s), Gα(q) or Gα₁₂ to selectively dissect out which of these G proteins were responsible for effects of PTH(1-34) in targeted signaling and osteogenesis arrays consisting of 159 genes. Among the 32 genes significantly regulated by 24h PTH treatment in UMR-106 osteoblastic cells, 9 genes were exclusively regulated through G(s), 6 genes were solely mediated through G(q), and 3 genes were only controlled through G₁₂. Such findings support the concept that there is some absolute specificity in downstream responses initiated at the G protein level following binding of PTH to the PTH1R. On the other hand, 6 PTH-regulated genes were regulated by both G(s) and G(q), 3 genes were regulated by both G(s) and G₁₂, and 3 genes were controlled by G(s), G(q) and G₁₂. These findings indicate potential overlapping or sequential interactions among different G protein-mediated pathways. In addition, two PTH-regulated genes were not regulated through any of the G proteins examined, suggesting that additional signaling mechanisms may be involved. Selectivity was largely maintained over a 2-48-hour time period. The minigene effects were mimicked by downstream inhibitors. The dissection of the differential effects of multiple G protein pathways on gene regulation provides a more complete understanding of PTH signaling in osteoblastic cells.

  7. Benzylglucosinolate Derived Isothiocyanate from Tropaeolum majus Reduces Gluconeogenic Gene and Protein Expression in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Pérez, Valentina; Bumke-Vogt, Christiane; Schreiner, Monika; Mewis, Inga; Borchert, Andrea; Pfeiffer, Andreas F. H.

    2016-01-01

    Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L.) contains high concentrations of benzylglcosinolate. We found that a hydrolysis product of benzyl glucosinolate—the benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC)—modulates the intracellular localization of the transcription factor Forkhead box O 1 (FOXO1). FoxO transcription factors can antagonize insulin effects and trigger a variety of cellular processes involved in tumor suppression, longevity, development and metabolism. The current study evaluated the ability of BITC—extracted as intact glucosinolate from nasturtium and hydrolyzed with myrosinase—to modulate i) the insulin-signaling pathway, ii) the intracellular localization of FOXO1 and, iii) the expression of proteins involved in gluconeogenesis, antioxidant response and detoxification. Stably transfected human osteosarcoma cells (U-2 OS) with constitutive expression of FOXO1 protein labeled with GFP (green fluorescent protein) were used to evaluate the effect of BITC on FOXO1. Human hepatoma HepG2 cell cultures were selected to evaluate the effect on gluconeogenic, antioxidant and detoxification genes and protein expression. BITC reduced the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT/PKB) and FOXO1; promoted FOXO1 translocation from cytoplasm into the nucleus antagonizing the insulin effect; was able to down-regulate the gene and protein expression of gluconeogenic enzymes; and induced the gene expression of antioxidant and detoxification enzymes. Knockdown analyses with specific siRNAs showed that the expression of gluconeogenic genes was dependent on nuclear factor (erythroid derived)-like2 (NRF2) and independent of FOXO1, AKT and NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-1 (SIRT1). The current study provides evidence that BITC might have a role in type 2 diabetes T2D by reducing hepatic glucose production and increasing antioxidant resistance. PMID:27622707

  8. Clinical Implications of FADD Gene Amplification and Protein Overexpression in Taiwanese Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Huei-Tzu; Cheng, Sou-De; Chu