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Sample records for ampa receptor-lacking glutamatergic

  1. CNQX and AMPA inhibit electrical synaptic transmission: a potential interaction between electrical and glutamatergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Burrell, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Electrical synapses play an important role in signaling between neurons and the synaptic connections between many neurons possess both electrical and chemical components. Although modulation of electrical synapses is frequently observed, the cellular processes that mediate such changes have not been studied as thoroughly as plasticity in chemical synapses. In the leech (Hirudo sp), the competitive AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX inhibited transmission at the rectifying electrical synapse of a mixed glutamatergic/electrical synaptic connection. This CNQX-mediated inhibition of the electrical synapse was blocked by concanavalin A (Con A) and dynamin inhibitory peptide (DIP), both of which are known to inhibit endocytosis of neurotransmitter receptors. CNQX-mediated inhibition was also blocked by pep2-SVKI (SVKI), a synthetic peptide that prevents internalization of AMPA-type glutamate receptor. AMPA itself also inhibited electrical synaptic transmission and this AMPA-mediated inhibition was partially blocked by Con A, DIP and SVKI. Low frequency stimulation induced long-term depression (LTD) in both the electrical and chemical components of these synapses and this LTD was blocked by SVKI. GYKI 52466, a selective non-competitive antagonist of AMPA receptors, did not affect the electrical EPSP, although it did block the chemical component of these synapses. CNQX did not affect non-rectifying electrical synapses in two different pairs of neurons. These results suggest an interaction between AMPA-type glutamate receptors and the gap junction proteins that mediate electrical synaptic transmission. This putative interaction between glutamate receptors and gap junction proteins represents a novel mechanism for regulating the strength of synaptic transmission. PMID:18601913

  2. Dopamine D4 receptors regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and glutamatergic transmission in GABAergic interneurons of prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Eunice Y; Yan, Zhen

    2009-01-14

    GABAergic interneurons in prefrontal cortex (PFC) play a critical role in cortical circuits by providing feedforward and feedback inhibition and synchronizing neuronal activity. Impairments in GABAergic inhibition to PFC pyramidal neurons have been implicated in the abnormal neural synchrony and working memory disturbances in schizophrenia. The dopamine D(4) receptor, which is strongly linked to neuropsychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia, is highly expressed in PFC GABAergic interneurons, while the physiological role of D(4) in these interneurons is largely unknown. In this study, we found that D(4) activation caused a persistent suppression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission in PFC interneurons. This effect of D(4) receptors on AMPAR-EPSC was via a mechanism dependent on actin/myosin V motor-based transport of AMPA receptors, which was regulated by cofilin, a major actin depolymerizing factor. Moreover, we demonstrated that the major cofilin-specific phosphatase Slingshot, which was activated by calcineurin downstream of D(4) signaling, was required for the D(4) regulation of glutamatergic transmission. Thus, D(4) receptors, by using the unique calcineurin/Slingshot/cofilin signaling mechanism, regulate actin dynamics and AMPAR trafficking in PFC GABAergic interneurons. It provides a potential mechanism for D(4) receptors to control the excitatory synaptic strength in local-circuit neurons and GABAergic inhibition in the PFC network, which may underlie the role of D(4) receptors in normal cognitive processes and mental disorders.

  3. Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors provide a common mechanism for LTP in glutamatergic synapses of distinct hippocampal interneuron types.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Andras; Somogyi, Jozsef; Cauli, Bruno; Lambolez, Bertrand; Somogyi, Peter; Lamsa, Karri P

    2012-05-09

    Glutamatergic synapses on some hippocampal GABAergic interneurons exhibit activity-induced long-term potentiation (LTP). Interneuron types within the CA1 area expressing mutually exclusive molecular markers differ in LTP responses. Potentiation that depends on calcium-permeable (CP) AMPA receptors has been characterized in oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons, which express parvalbumin and somatostatin (SM). However, it is unknown how widely CP-AMPAR-dependent plasticity is expressed among different GABAergic interneuron types. Here we examine synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampal O-LM cells and two other interneuron types expressing either nitric oxide synthase (NOS) or cholecystokinin (CCK), which are known to be physiologically and developmentally distinct. We report similar CP-AMPAR-dependent LTP in NOS-immunopositive ivy cells and SM-expressing O-LM cells to afferent fiber theta burst stimulation. The potentiation in both cell types is induced at postsynaptic membrane potentials below firing threshold, and induction is blocked by intense spiking simultaneously with afferent stimulation. The strong inward rectification and calcium permeability of AMPARs is explained by a low level of GluA2 subunit mRNA expression. LTP is not elicited in CCK-expressing Schaffer collateral-associated cells, which lack CP-AMPARs and express high levels of the GluA2 subunit. The results show that CP-AMPAR-mediated synaptic potentiation is common in hippocampal interneuron types and occurs in interneurons of both feedforward and feedback inhibitory pathways.

  4. Impact of subanesthetic doses of ketamine on AMPA-mediated responses in rats: An in vivo electrophysiological study on monoaminergic and glutamatergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    El Iskandrani, Kareem S; Oosterhof, Chris A; Blier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The rapid antidepressant action of a subanesthetic dose of ketamine in treatment-resistant patients represents the most striking recent breakthrough in the understanding of the antidepressant response. Evidence demonstrates tight interactions between the glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems. It is thus hypothesized that monoamine systems may play a role in the immediate/rapid effects of ketamine. In vivo electrophysiological recordings were carried in male rats following ketamine administration (10 and 25 mg/kg, i.p.) to first assess its effects on monoaminergic neuron firing. In a second series of experiments, the effects of ketamine administration on α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)- and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA)-evoked responses in hippocampus CA3 pyramidal neurons were also investigated using micro-iontophoretic applications. Although acute (~2 hours) ketamine administration did not affect the mean firing activity of dorsal raphe serotonin and ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons, it did increase that of locus coeruleus norepinephrine neurons. In the latter brain region, while ketamine also enhanced bursting activity, it did increase population activity of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. These effects of ketamine were prevented by the prior administration of the AMPA receptor antagonist 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide. An increase in AMPA-evoked response of CA3 pyramidal neurons was also observed 30 minutes following acute ketamine administration. The present findings suggest that acute ketamine administration produces a rapid enhancement of catecholaminergic neurons firing activity through an amplification of AMPA transmission. These effects may play a crucial role in the antidepressant effects of ketamine observed shortly following its infusion in depressed patients. PMID:25759403

  5. Long-term upregulation of cortical glutamatergic AMPA receptors in a mouse model of chronic visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shui-Bing; Zhang, Ming-Ming; Cheng, Lin-Feng; Shi, Jiao; Lu, Jing-Shan; Zhuo, Min

    2015-11-19

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders and it causes long-lasting visceral pain and discomfort. AMPA receptor mediated long-term potentiation (LTP) has been shown to play a critical role in animal models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. No report is available for central changes in the ACC of mice with chronic visceral pain. In this study, we used integrative methods to investigate potential central plastic changes in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of a visceral pain mouse model induced by intracolonic injection of zymosan. We found that visceral pain induced an increased expression of AMPA receptors (at the post synapses) in the ACC via an enhanced trafficking of the AMPA receptors to the membrane. Both GluA1 and GluA2/3 subunits were significantly increased. Supporting biochemical changes, excitatory synaptic transmission in the ACC were also significantly enhanced. Microinjection of AMPA receptor inhibitor IEM1460 into the ACC inhibited visceral and spontaneous pain behaviors. Furthermore, we found that the phosphorylation of GluA1 at the Ser845 site was increased, suggesting that GluA1 phosphorylation may contribute to AMPA receptor trafficking. Using genetically knockout mice lacking calcium-calmodulin stimulated adenylyl cyclase subtype 1 (AC1), we found that AMPA receptor phosphorylation and its membrane trafficking induced by zymosan injection were completely blocked. Our results provide direct evidence for cortical AMPA receptors to contribute to zymosan-induced visceral and spontaneous pain and inhibition of AC1 activity may help to reduce chronic visceral pain.

  6. NMDA but not AMPA glutamatergic receptors are involved in the antidepressant-like activity of MTEP during the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Poleszak, Ewa; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest an antidepressant-like activity for 3-[(methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]-pyridine (MTEP), a highly selective, non-competitive antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptors subtype 5 (mGluR(5)). This effect has been observed following both acute and chronic MTEP treatments in behavioral tests and experimental models of depression, such as the forced swim test (FST), the tail suspension test, and the olfactory bulbectomy model of depression. However, the mechanism of action for mGluR(5) antagonists remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the antidepressant-like action of MTEPis dependent on ionotropic glutamatergic receptors. Male Albino Swiss mice were used, and antidepressant-like activity was evaluated using the FST. The antidepressant-like effect of MTEP (0.3 mg/kg) was significantly antagonized by pre-treatment with the NMDA receptor agonist N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA, 75 mg/kg, i.p.). The AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect the MTEP activity. Our results indicate that the antidepressant-like activity of MTEP in the FST involves NMDA but not AMPA receptors and suggest that the interaction between mGluR(5) and NMDA receptors plays an important role in the underlying antidepressant mechanism(s).

  7. NMDA and AMPA/kainate glutamatergic receptors in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex modulate the elaborated defensive behavior and innate fear-induced antinociception elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Medeiros, Priscila; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA)/kainate receptors of the prelimbic (PL) division of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) on the panic attack-like reactions evoked by γ-aminobutyric acid-A receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus (MH). Rats were pretreated with NaCl 0.9%, LY235959 (NMDA receptor antagonist), and NBQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) in the PL at 3 different concentrations. Ten minutes later, the MH was treated with bicuculline, and the defensive responses were recorded for 10 min. The antagonism of NMDA receptors in the PL decreased the frequency and duration of all defensive behaviors evoked by the stimulation of the MH and reduced the innate fear-induced antinociception. However, the pretreatment of the PL cortex with NBQX was able to decrease only part of defensive responses and innate fear-induced antinociception. The present findings suggest that the NMDA-glutamatergic system of the PL is critically involved in panic-like responses and innate fear-induced antinociception and those AMPA/kainate receptors are also recruited during the elaboration of fear-induced antinociception and in panic attack-related response. The activation of the glutamatergic neurotransmission of PL division of the MPFC during the elaboration of oriented behavioral reactions elicited by the chemical stimulation of the MH recruits mainly NMDA receptors in comparison with AMPA/kainate receptors.

  8. The antidepressant-like effects of glutamatergic drugs ketamine and AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646 are preserved in bdnf⁺/⁻ heterozygous null mice.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Jesse S O; Autio, Henri; Vesa, Liisa; Antila, Hanna; Lindemann, Lothar; Hoener, Marius C; Skolnick, Phil; Rantamäki, Tomi; Castrén, Eero

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that biogenic amine-based antidepressants act, at least in part, via regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. Biogenic amine-based antidepressants increase BDNF synthesis and activate its signaling pathway through TrkB receptors. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effects of these molecules are abolished in BDNF deficient mice. Glutamate-based drugs, including the NMDA antagonist ketamine, and the AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646, mimic the effects of antidepressants in preclinical tests with high predictive validity. In humans, a single intravenous dose of ketamine produces an antidepressant effect that is rapid, robust and persistent. In this study, we examined the role of BDNF in expression of the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine and an AMPA receptor potentiator (LY 451646) in the forced swim test (FST). Ketamine and LY 451646 produced antidepressant-like effects in the FST in mice at 45 min after a single injection, but no effects were observed one week after a single ketamine injection. As previously reported, the effects of imipramine in the forced swim test were blunted in heterozygous BDNF knockout (bdnf(+/-)) mice. However ketamine and LY 451646 produced similar antidepressant-like responses in wildtype and bdnf(+/-) mice. Neither ketamine nor LY 451646 significantly influenced the levels BDNF or TrkB phosphorylation in the hippocampus when assessed at 45 min or 7 days after the drug administration. These data demonstrate that under the conditions tested, neither ketamine nor the AMPA-potentiator LY 451656 activate BDNF signaling, but produce a characteristic antidepressant-like response in heterozygous bdnf(+/-) mice. These data indicate that unlike biogenic amine-based agents, BDNF signaling does not play a pivotal role in the antidepressant effects of glutamate-based compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  9. AMPA-silent synapses in brain development and pathology.

    PubMed

    Hanse, Eric; Seth, Henrik; Riebe, Ilse

    2013-12-01

    Synapses are constantly generated at a high rate in the developing, prepubescent brain. Newly generated glutamatergic synapses lack functional AMPA receptor-mediated transmission. Most of these 'AMPA-silent' synapses are eliminated during the developmental period, but some are specifically selected for AMPA unsilencing by correlated pre-and postsynaptic activity as the first step in a process that leads to stabilization of the synapse. Premature, or delayed, unsilencing of AMPA-silent synapses has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, and abnormal generation of AMPA-silent synapses is associated with brain trauma, addiction and neurodegenerative disorders, further highlighting the importance of AMPA-silent synapses in brain pathology.

  10. AMPA receptor inhibition by synaptically released zinc

    PubMed Central

    Kalappa, Bopanna I.; Anderson, Charles T.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    The vast amount of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is mediated by AMPA-subtype glutamate receptors (AMPARs). As a result, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission is implicated in nearly all aspects of brain development, function, and plasticity. Despite the central role of AMPARs in neurobiology, the fine-tuning of synaptic AMPA responses by endogenous modulators remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that endogenous zinc, released by single presynaptic action potentials, inhibits synaptic AMPA currents in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and hippocampus. Exposure to loud sound reduces presynaptic zinc levels in the DCN and abolishes zinc inhibition, implicating zinc in experience-dependent AMPAR synaptic plasticity. Our results establish zinc as an activity-dependent, endogenous modulator of AMPARs that tunes fast excitatory neurotransmission and plasticity in glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26647187

  11. AMPA receptors as drug targets in neurological disease--advantages, caveats, and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Chang, Philip K-Y; Verbich, David; McKinney, R Anne

    2012-06-01

    Most excitatory transmission in the brain is mediated by the AMPA receptor subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors. In many neurological diseases, synapse structure and AMPA receptor function are altered, thus making AMPA receptors potential therapeutic targets for clinical intervention. The work summarized in this review suggests a link between AMPA receptor function and debilitating neuropathologies, and discusses the current state of therapies targeting AMPA receptors in four diseases. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, AMPA receptors allow cytotoxic levels of calcium into neurons, leading to motor neuron death. Likewise, in some epilepsies, overactivation of AMPA receptors leads to neuron damage. The same is true for ischemia, where oxygen deprivation leads to excitotoxicity. Conversely, Alzheimer's disease is characterized by decreased AMPA activation and synapse loss. Unfortunately, many clinical studies have had limited success by directly targeting AMPA receptors in these diseases. We also discuss how the use of AMPA receptor modulators, commonly known as ampakines, in neurological diseases initially seemed promising in animal studies, but mostly ineffective in clinical trials. We propose that indirectly affecting AMPA receptors, such as by modulating transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins or, more generally, by regulating glutamatergic transmission, may provide new therapeutic potential for neurological disorders.

  12. AMPA receptor potentiators for the treatment of CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Michael J; Bleakman, David; Zimmerman, Dennis M; Nisenbaum, Eric S

    2004-06-01

    Glutamate alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors mediate most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system and also participate in forms of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie memory and learning, and the formation of neural networks during development. Molecular cloning techniques have shown that the AMPA receptor family is composed of four different subunits named GluR1-4 or GluRA-D (newly termed as Glu(A1)-Glu(A4)) and native AMPA receptors are most likely tetramers generated by the assembly of one or more of these subunits, yielding homomeric or heteromeric receptors. Additional complexity among AMPA receptors is conferred by alternative splicing of RNA for each subunit giving rise to flip and flop variants. Clinical and experimental data have suggested that positive modulation of AMPA receptors may be therapeutically effective in the treatment of cognitive deficits. Several classes of AMPA receptor potentiators have been reported, including pyrroliddones (piracetam, aniracetam), benzothiazides (cyclothiazide), benzylpiperidines (CX-516, CX-546) and more recently biarylpropylsulfonamides (LY392098, LY404187 and LY503430). These molecules enhance cognitive function in rodents, which appears to correlate with increased hippocampal activity. In addition, clinical studies have suggested that AMPA receptor modulators enhance cognitive function in elderly subjects, as well as patients suffering from neurological and psychiatric disorders. Several independent studies have suggested that AMPA receptors can increase BDNF expression by both calcium-dependent and independent pathways. For example, recent studies have shown that AMPA receptors interact with the protein tyrosine kinase, Lyn. Activation of Lyn can recruit the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway and increase the expression of BDNF. Therefore, in addition to directly enhancing glutamatergic synaptic transmission, AMPA

  13. Activity Level-Dependent Synapse-Specific AMPA Receptor Trafficking Regulates Transmission Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J. Julius

    2009-01-01

    Central glutamatergic synapses may express AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors (AMPA-Rs) with distinct gating properties and exhibit different transmission dynamics, which are important for computing various synaptic inputs received at different populations of synapses. However, how glutamatergic synapses acquire AMPA-Rs with distinct kinetics to influence synaptic integration remains poorly understood. Here I report synapse-specific trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs in rat cortical layer 4 stellate and layer 5 pyramidal neurons. The analysis indicates that in single layer 4 stellate neurons thalamocortical synapses generate faster synaptic responses than intracortical synapses. Moreover, GluR1-containing AMPA-Rs traffic selectively into intracortical synapses, and this process requires sensory experience-dependent activity and slows down transmission kinetics. GluR4-containing AMPA-Rs traffic more heavily into thalamocortical synapses than intracortical synapses, and this process requires spontaneous synaptic activity and speeds up transmission kinetics. GluR2-containing AMPA-Rs traffic equally into both thalamocortical and intracortical synapses, and this process requires no synaptic activity and resets transmission kinetics. Notably, synaptic trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs differentially regulates synaptic integration. Thus, synapse-specific AMPA-R trafficking coarsely sets and synaptic activity finely tunes transmission kinetics and integration properties at different synapses in central neurons. PMID:19439609

  14. Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors in mouse olfactory bulb astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Droste, Damian; Seifert, Gerald; Seddar, Laura; Jädtke, Oliver; Steinhäuser, Christian; Lohr, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling in astrocytes is considered to be mainly mediated by metabotropic receptors linked to intracellular Ca2+ release. However, recent studies demonstrate a significant contribution of Ca2+ influx to spontaneous and evoked Ca2+ signaling in astrocytes, suggesting that Ca2+ influx might account for astrocytic Ca2+ signaling to a greater extent than previously thought. Here, we investigated AMPA-evoked Ca2+ influx into olfactory bulb astrocytes in mouse brain slices using Fluo-4 and GCaMP6s, respectively. Bath application of AMPA evoked Ca2+ transients in periglomerular astrocytes that persisted after neuronal transmitter release was inhibited by tetrodotoxin and bafilomycin A1. Withdrawal of external Ca2+ suppressed AMPA-evoked Ca2+ transients, whereas depletion of Ca2+ stores had no effect. Both Ca2+ transients and inward currents induced by AMPA receptor activation were partly reduced by Naspm, a blocker of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors lacking the GluA2 subunit. Antibody staining revealed a strong expression of GluA1 and GluA4 and a weak expression of GluA2 in periglomerular astrocytes. Our results indicate that Naspm-sensitive, Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors contribute to Ca2+ signaling in periglomerular astrocytes in the olfactory bulb. PMID:28322255

  15. Quantal release of glutamate generates pure kainate and mixed AMPA/kainate EPSCs in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cossart, Rosa; Epsztein, Jérôme; Tyzio, Roman; Becq, Hélène; Hirsch, June; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Crépel, Valérie

    2002-07-03

    The relative contribution of kainate receptors to ongoing glutamatergic activity is at present unknown. We report the presence of spontaneous, miniature, and minimal stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) that are mediated solely by kainate receptors (EPSC(kainate)) or by both AMPA and kainate receptors (EPSC(AMPA/kainate)). EPSC(kainate) and EPSC(AMPA/kainate) are selectively enriched in CA1 interneurons and mossy fibers synapses of CA3 pyramidal neurons, respectively. In CA1 interneurons, the decay time constant of EPSC(kainate) (circa 10 ms) is comparable to values obtained in heterologous expression systems. In both hippocampal neurons, the quantal release of glutamate generates kainate receptor-mediated EPSCs that provide as much as half of the total glutamatergic current. Kainate receptors are, therefore, key players of the ongoing glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus.

  16. Microglial activation enhances associative taste memory through purinergic modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Saucisse, Nicolas; Parkes, Shauna L; Lacabanne, Chloe; Aubert, Agnes; Casenave, Fabrice; Coutureau, Etienne; Sans, Nathalie; Layé, Sophie; Ferreira, Guillaume; Nadjar, Agnes

    2015-02-18

    The cerebral innate immune system is able to modulate brain functioning and cognitive processes. During activation of the cerebral innate immune system, inflammatory factors produced by microglia, such as cytokines and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), have been directly linked to modulation of glutamatergic system on one hand and learning and memory functions on the other hand. However, the cellular mechanisms by which microglial activation modulates cognitive processes are still unclear. Here, we used taste memory tasks, highly dependent on glutamatergic transmission in the insular cortex, to investigate the behavioral and cellular impacts of an inflammation restricted to this cortical area in rats. We first show that intrainsular infusion of the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide induces a local inflammation and increases glutamatergic AMPA, but not NMDA, receptor expression at the synaptic level. This cortical inflammation also enhances associative, but not incidental, taste memory through increase of glutamatergic AMPA receptor trafficking. Moreover, we demonstrate that ATP, but not proinflammatory cytokines, is responsible for inflammation-induced enhancement of both associative taste memory and AMPA receptor expression in insular cortex. In conclusion, we propose that inflammation restricted to the insular cortex enhances associative taste memory through a purinergic-dependent increase of glutamatergic AMPA receptor expression at the synapse. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353022-12$15.00/0.

  17. A model of dopamine regulation of glutamatergic synapse on medium size spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Vito; Ventriglia, Francesco; Santillo, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Spiny neurons of striatum receive glutamatergic synapses on dendritic spines on the neck of which project dopaminergic synapses. Dopamine modulates, by D1 type receptors, the glutamatergic synapses by inducing the phosphorylation of AMPA and NMDA receptors which produces an increased amplitude response. Herein we present a model where, in addition to phosphorylation, the direct modulation by dopamine of the spine resistance can cooperate in producing the observed effect on some of these synapses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. AMPA Receptors as a Molecular Target in Epilepsy Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rogawski, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic seizures occur as a result of episodic abnormal synchronous discharges in cerebral neuronal networks. Although a variety of nonconventional mechanisms may play a role in epileptic synchronization, cascading excitation within networks of synaptically connected excitatory glutamatergic neurons is a classical mechanism. As is the case throughout the central nervous system, fast synaptic excitation within and between brain regions relevant to epilepsy is mediated predominantly by AMPA receptors. By inhibiting glutamate-mediated excitation, AMPA receptor antagonists markedly reduce or abolish epileptiform activity in in vitro preparations and confer seizure protection in a broad range of animal seizure models. NMDA receptors may also contribute to epileptiform activity, but NMDA receptor blockade is not sufficient to eliminate epileptiform discharges. AMPA receptors move into and out of the synapse in a dynamic fashion in forms of synaptic plasticity, underlying learning and memory. Often the trigger for these dynamic movements is activation of NMDA receptors. While NMDA receptor antagonists inhibit these forms of synaptic plasticity, AMPA receptor antagonists do not impair synaptic plasticity and do not inhibit memory formation or retrieval. The demonstrated clinical efficacy of perampanel, a high-potency, orally active noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist, supports the concept that AMPA receptors are critical to epileptic synchronization and the generation and spread of epileptic discharges in human epilepsy. PMID:23480151

  19. AMPA receptors as a molecular target in epilepsy therapy.

    PubMed

    Rogawski, M A

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic seizures occur as a result of episodic abnormal synchronous discharges in cerebral neuronal networks. Although a variety of non-conventional mechanisms may play a role in epileptic synchronization, cascading excitation within networks of synaptically connected excitatory glutamatergic neurons is a classical mechanism. As is the case throughout the central nervous system, fast synaptic excitation within and between brain regions relevant to epilepsy is mediated predominantly by AMPA receptors. By inhibiting glutamate-mediated excitation, AMPA receptor antagonists markedly reduce or abolish epileptiform activity in in vitro preparations and confer seizure protection in a broad range of animal seizure models. NMDA receptors may also contribute to epileptiform activity, but NMDA receptor blockade is not sufficient to eliminate epileptiform discharges. AMPA receptors move into and out of the synapse in a dynamic fashion in forms of synaptic plasticity, underlying learning and memory. Often, the trigger for these dynamic movements is the activation of NMDA receptors. While NMDA receptor antagonists inhibit these forms of synaptic plasticity, AMPA receptor antagonists do not impair synaptic plasticity and do not inhibit memory formation or retrieval. The demonstrated clinical efficacy of perampanel, a high-potency, orally active non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonist, supports the concept that AMPA receptors are critical to epileptic synchronization and the generation and spread of epileptic discharges in human epilepsy.

  20. Lamina-specific abnormalities of AMPA receptor trafficking and signaling molecule transcripts in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Beneyto, Monica; Meador-Woodruff, James H

    2006-12-15

    Ampakines, positive AMPA receptor modulators, can improve cognitive function in schizophrenia, and enhancement of AMPA receptor-mediated currents by them potentiates the activity of antipsychotics. In vitro studies have revealed that trafficking of AMPA receptors is mediated by specific interactions of a complex network of proteins that also target and anchor them at the postsynaptic density (PSD). The aim of this study was to determine whether there are abnormalities of the molecules associated with trafficking and localization of AMPA receptors at the PSD in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in schizophrenia. We analyzed AMPA receptor expression in DLPFC in schizophrenia, major depression, bipolar disorder, and a control group, by examining transcript levels of all four AMPA receptor subunits by in situ hybridization. We found decreased GluR2 subunit expression in all three illnesses, decreased GluR3 in major depression, and decreased GluR4 in schizophrenia. However, autoradiography experiments showed no changes in AMPA receptor binding; thus, we hypothesized that these changes in receptor subunit stoichiometry do not alter binding to the assembled receptor, but rather intracellular processing. In situ hybridization for AMPA-trafficking molecules showed decreased expression of PICK1 and increased expression of stargazin in DLPFC in schizophrenia, both restricted to large cells of cortical layer III. These data suggest that AMPA-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission is compromised in schizophrenia, particularly at the level of AMPA-related PSD proteins that mediate AMPA receptor trafficking, synaptic surface expression, and intracellular signaling.

  1. Acute Footshock Stress Induces Time-Dependent Modifications of AMPA/NMDA Protein Expression and AMPA Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Daniela; Mora, Cristina; Tornese, Paolo; Sala, Nathalie; Filippini, Alice; La Via, Luca; Milanese, Marco; Calza, Stefano; Bonanno, Gianbattista; Racagni, Giorgio; Gennarelli, Massimo; Popoli, Maurizio; Musazzi, Laura; Barbon, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on patients with stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders reported functional and morphological changes in brain areas where glutamatergic transmission is predominant, including frontal and prefrontal areas. In line with this evidence, several preclinical works suggest that glutamate receptors are targets of both rapid and long-lasting effects of stress. Here we found that acute footshock- (FS-) stress, although inducing no transcriptional and RNA editing alterations of ionotropic AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor subunits, rapidly and transiently modulates their protein expression, phosphorylation, and localization at postsynaptic spines in prefrontal and frontal cortex. In total extract, FS-stress increased the phosphorylation levels of GluA1 AMPA subunit at Ser(845) immediately after stress and of GluA2 Ser(880) 2 h after start of stress. At postsynaptic spines, stress induced a rapid decrease of GluA2 expression, together with an increase of its phosphorylation at Ser(880), suggesting internalization of GluA2 AMPA containing receptors. GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA receptor subunits were found markedly upregulated in postsynaptic spines, 2 h after start of stress. These results suggest selected time-dependent changes in glutamatergic receptor subunits induced by acute stress, which may suggest early and transient enhancement of AMPA-mediated currents, followed by a transient activation of NMDA receptors.

  2. Acute Footshock Stress Induces Time-Dependent Modifications of AMPA/NMDA Protein Expression and AMPA Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Daniela; Mora, Cristina; Tornese, Paolo; Sala, Nathalie; Filippini, Alice; La Via, Luca; Milanese, Marco; Calza, Stefano; Bonanno, Gianbattista; Racagni, Giorgio; Gennarelli, Massimo; Popoli, Maurizio; Musazzi, Laura; Barbon, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on patients with stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders reported functional and morphological changes in brain areas where glutamatergic transmission is predominant, including frontal and prefrontal areas. In line with this evidence, several preclinical works suggest that glutamate receptors are targets of both rapid and long-lasting effects of stress. Here we found that acute footshock- (FS-) stress, although inducing no transcriptional and RNA editing alterations of ionotropic AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor subunits, rapidly and transiently modulates their protein expression, phosphorylation, and localization at postsynaptic spines in prefrontal and frontal cortex. In total extract, FS-stress increased the phosphorylation levels of GluA1 AMPA subunit at Ser845 immediately after stress and of GluA2 Ser880 2 h after start of stress. At postsynaptic spines, stress induced a rapid decrease of GluA2 expression, together with an increase of its phosphorylation at Ser880, suggesting internalization of GluA2 AMPA containing receptors. GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA receptor subunits were found markedly upregulated in postsynaptic spines, 2 h after start of stress. These results suggest selected time-dependent changes in glutamatergic receptor subunits induced by acute stress, which may suggest early and transient enhancement of AMPA-mediated currents, followed by a transient activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:26966584

  3. Activation of α7-containing nicotinic receptors on astrocytes triggers AMPA receptor recruitment to glutamateric synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xulong; Lippi, Giordano; Carlson, David M.; Berg, Darwin K.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes, an abundant form of glia, are known to promote and modulate synaptic signaling between neurons. They also express α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs), but the functional relevance of these receptors is unknown. We show here that stimulation of α7-nAChRs on astrocytes releases components that induce hippocampal neurons to acquire more a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors post-synaptically at glutamatergic synapses. The increase is specific in that no change is seen in synaptic NMDA receptor clusters or other markers for glutamatergic synapses, or in markers for GABAergic synapses. Moreover, the increases in AMPA receptors on the neuron surface are accompanied by increases in the frequency of spontaneous miniature synaptic currents mediated by the receptors and increases in the ratio of evoked synaptic currents mediated by AMPA versus NMDA receptors. This suggests that stimulating α7-nAChRs on astrocytes can convert ‘silent’ glutamatergic synapses to functional status. Astrocyte-derived thrombospondin is necessary but not sufficient for the effect, while tumor necrosis factor-α is sufficient but not necessary. The results identify astrocyte α7-nAChRs as a novel pathway through which nicotinic cholinergic signaling can promote the development of glutamatergic networks, recruiting AMPA receptors to post-synaptic sites and rendering the synapses more functional. PMID:24032433

  4. A model of dopamine modulated glutamatergic synapse.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Vito; Ventriglia, Francesco; Santillo, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    The dopamine neurotransmitter regulates important neural pathways and its action in the brain is very complex. When dopaminergic neurons make synapses on spiny neurons of the striatum nucleus, they tune the responsiveness of glutamatergic synapses by means of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. We studied the effect of dopamine D1 receptors on glutamatergic synapse of GABAergic spiny neurons in striatum nucleus where they are located on the neck of the same spine. The action of dopamine consists essentially in promoting the phosphorylation of AMPA and NMDA receptors thus increasing the Excitatory Post Synaptic Current peak amplitude. The consequence is a cooperative effect of glutamatergic and dopaminergic synapses for the regulation of the GABAergic neuronal code. The mechanisms by which the phosphorylation induces the increase of the EPSC amplitude still remain unclear although the lack of this regulation can be involved in several pathologies as, for example, the Parkinson's disease. We tested, by computational experiments based on our model of glutamatergic synapse, three parameters of the synaptic function that could be involved in dopamine action: (a) time binding of glutamate to receptors; (b) open probability of the receptors; and (c) single receptor conductance. For different reasons, any of the three parameters could be responsible of the increased EPSC-dopamine-dependent. Our computational results were compared and discussed with experimental results found in literature. Although for our model both the open probability and the single receptor conductance can reproduce the phosphorylation effect of dopamine, we argue that the dopamine effect consists essentially in an increase of the single receptor conductance due to a 3D rearrangement of the phosphorylated receptors.

  5. Presynaptic muscarinic control of glutamatergic synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Buño, W; Cabezas, C; Fernández de Sevilla, D

    2006-01-01

    The hippocampus receives cholinergic projections from the medial septal nucleus and Broca's diagonal band that terminate in the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus regions (Frotscher and Leranth, 1985). Glutamatergic synapses between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons are presynaptically inhibited by acetylcholine (ACh), via activation of muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) at the terminals of Schaffer collaterals (SCs) (Hounsgaard, 1978; Fernández de Sevilla et al., 2002, 2003). There are two types of SC-CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses. One type, called functional synapse, shows postsynaptic alpha- amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA)-receptor mediated currents at resting potential (Vm) and both AMPA and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated currents when depolarized. The other type, termed silent synapse, only displays postsynaptic NMDAR-mediated currents at depolarized Vms, but does not respond at the resting Vm (Isaac et al., 1995). Using hippocampal slices obtained from young Wistar rats, we examined the effects of activation of cholinergic afferents at the stratum oriens/alveus on excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked in CA1 pyramidal neurons by stimulation of SCs. We also tested the action of the nonhydrolyzable cholinergic agonist carbamylcholine chloride (CCh) on EPSCs evoked by minimal stimulation of SCs (which activates a single or very few synapses) in functional and silent synapses.

  6. Glutamatergic targets for new alcohol medications

    PubMed Central

    Spanagel, Rainer; Krystal, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale An increasingly compelling literature points to a major role for the glutamate system in mediating the effects of alcohol on behavior and the pathophysiology of alcoholism. Preclinical studies indicate that glutamate signaling mediates certain aspects of ethanol’s intoxicating and rewarding effects, and undergoes adaptations following chronic alcohol exposure that may contribute to the withdrawal, craving and compulsive drug-seeking that drive alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Objectives We discuss the potential for targeting the glutamate system as a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach to treating alcohol use disorders, focusing on five major components of the glutamate system: the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and specific NMDA subunits, the glycineB site on the NMDA receptors (NMDAR), L-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid ionotropic (AMPA) and kainate (KAR) receptors, metabotropic receptors (mGluR), and glutamate transporters. Results Chronic alcohol abuse produces a hyperglutamatergic state, characterized by elevated extracellular glutamate and altered glutamate receptors and transporters. Pharmacologically manipulating glutamatergic neurotransmission alters alcohol-related behaviors including intoxication, withdrawal, and alcohol-seeking, in rodents and human subjects. Blocking NMDA and AMPA receptors reduces alcohol consumption in rodents, but side-effects may limit this as a therapeutic approach. Selectively targeting NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits (e.g., GluN2B, GluA3), or the NMDAR glycineB site offers an alternative approach. Blocking mGluR5 potently affects various alcohol-related behaviors in rodents, and mGluR2/3 agonism also suppresses alcohol consumption. Finally, glutamate transporter upregulation may mitigate behavioral and neurotoxic sequelae of excess glutamate caused by alcohol. Conclusions Despite the many challenges that remain, targeting the glutamate system offers genuine promise for developing new

  7. Mechanisms for Antagonistic Regulation of AMPA and NMDA-D1 Receptor Complexes at Postsynaptic Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    From the analysis of these pathways we conclude that postsynaptic processes that regulate synaptic transmission undergo significant cross-talk with respect to glutamatergic and neuromodulatory (dopamine) signals. The main hypothesis is that of a compensatory regulation, a competitive switch between the induction of increased AMPA conductance by CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation and reduced expression of PP2A, and increased D1 receptor sensitivity and expression by increased PKA, PP2A and decreased PP-1/calcineurin expression. Both types of plasticity are induced by NMDA receptor activation and increased internal calcium, they require different internal conditions to become expressed. Specifically we propose that AMPA regulation and D1 regulation are inversely coupled;The net result may be a bifurcation of synaptic state into predominantly AMPA or NMDA-D1 synapses. This could have functional consequences: stable connections for AMPA and conditional gating for NMDA-D1 synapses.

  8. Individual stress vulnerability is predicted by short-term memory and AMPA receptor subunit ratio in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mathias V; Trümbach, Dietrich; Weber, Peter; Wagner, Klaus; Scharf, Sebastian H; Liebl, Claudia; Datson, Nicole; Namendorf, Christian; Gerlach, Tamara; Kühne, Claudia; Uhr, Manfred; Deussing, Jan M; Wurst, Wolfgang; Binder, Elisabeth B; Holsboer, Florian; Müller, Marianne B

    2010-12-15

    Increased vulnerability to aversive experiences is one of the main risk factors for stress-related psychiatric disorders as major depression. However, the molecular bases of vulnerability, on the one hand, and stress resilience, on the other hand, are still not understood. Increasing clinical and preclinical evidence suggests a central involvement of the glutamatergic system in the pathogenesis of major depression. Using a mouse paradigm, modeling increased stress vulnerability and depression-like symptoms in a genetically diverse outbred strain, and we tested the hypothesis that differences in AMPA receptor function may be linked to individual variations in stress vulnerability. Vulnerable and resilient animals differed significantly in their dorsal hippocampal AMPA receptor expression and AMPA receptor binding. Treatment with an AMPA receptor potentiator during the stress exposure prevented the lasting effects of chronic social stress exposure on physiological, neuroendocrine, and behavioral parameters. In addition, spatial short-term memory, an AMPA receptor-dependent behavior, was found to be predictive of individual stress vulnerability and response to AMPA potentiator treatment. Finally, we provide evidence that genetic variations in the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 are linked to the vulnerable phenotype. Therefore, we propose genetic variations in the AMPA receptor system to shape individual stress vulnerability. Those individual differences can be predicted by the assessment of short-term memory, thereby opening up the possibility for a specific treatment by enhancing AMPA receptor function.

  9. Excitatory Mechanisms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: The Role of AMPA/KA Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Stephan; Itri, Jason; Colwell, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of evidence suggests that the effects of light on the mammalian circadian system are mediated by direct retinal ganglion cell projection to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). This synaptic connection is glutamatergic and the release of glutamate is detected by both N-methyl-d-asparate (NMDA) and amino-methyl proprionic acid/kainate (AMPA/KA) iontotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs). It is well established that NMDA GluRs play a critical role in mediating the effects of light on the circadian system; however, the role of AMPA/KA GluRs has received less attention. In the present study, we sought to better understand the contribution of AMPA/KA-mediated currents in the circadian system based in the SCN. First, whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques were utilized to measure spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) from SCN neurons. These currents were widespread in the SCN and not just restricted to the retino-recipient region. The sEPSC frequency and amplitude did not vary with the daily cycle. Similarly, currents evoked by the exogenous application of AMPA onto SCN neurons were widespread within the SCN and did not exhibit a diurnal rhythm in their magnitude. Fluorometric techniques were utilized to estimate AMPA-induced calcium (Ca2+) concentration changes in SCN neurons. The resulting data indicate that AMPA-evoked Ca2+ transients were widespread in the SCN and that there was a daily rhythm in the magnitude of AMPA-induced Ca2+ transients that peaked during the night. By itself, blocking AMPA/KA GluRs with a receptor blocker decreased the spontaneous firing of some SCN neurons as well as reduced resting Ca2+ levels, suggesting tonic glutamatergic excitation. Finally, immunohistochemical techniques were used to describe expression of the AMPA-preferring GluR subunits GluR1 and GluR2/3s within the SCN. Overall, our data suggest that glutamatergic synaptic transmission mediated by AMPA/KA GluRs play an important role throughout

  10. Allosteric Modulators for the Treatment of Schizophrenia: Targeting Glutamatergic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Menniti, Frank S.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Pandit, Jayvardhan; Zagouras, Panayiotis; Volkmann, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly debilitating mental disorder which afflicts approximately 1% of the global population. Cognitive and negative deficits account for the lifelong disability associated with schizophrenia, whose symptoms are not effectively addressed by current treatments. New medicines are needed to treat these aspects of the disease. Neurodevelopmental, neuropathological, genetic, and behavioral pharmacological data indicate that schizophrenia stems from a dysfunction of glutamate synaptic transmission, particularly in frontal cortical networks. A number of novel pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms affecting glutamatergic synaptic transmission have emerged as viable targets for schizophrenia. While developing orthosteric glutamatergic agents for these targets has proven extremely difficult, targeting allosteric sites of these targets has emerged as a promising alternative. From a medicinal chemistry perspective, allosteric sites provide an opportunity of finding agents with better drug-like properties and greater target specificity. Furthermore, allosteric modulators are better suited to maintaining the highly precise temporal and spatial aspects of glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Herein, we review neuropathological and genomic/genetic evidence underscoring the importance of glutamate synaptic dysfunction in the etiology of schizophrenia and make a case for allosteric targets for therapeutic intervention. We review progress in identifying allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors, NMDA receptors, and metabotropic glutamate receptors, all with the aim of restoring physiological glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Challenges remain given the complexity of schizophrenia and the difficulty in studying cognition in animals and humans. Nonetheless, important compounds have emerged from these efforts and promising preclinical and variable clinical validation has been achieved. PMID:23409764

  11. Investigation of synapse formation and function in a glutamatergic-GABAergic two-neuron microcircuit.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ling; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Chao, Hsiao-Tuan; Jordan, Julia-Christine; Herman, Melissa A; Rosenmund, Christian

    2014-01-15

    Neural circuits are composed of mainly glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, which communicate through synaptic connections. Many factors instruct the formation and function of these synapses; however, it is difficult to dissect the contribution of intrinsic cell programs from that of extrinsic environmental effects in an intact network. Here, we perform paired recordings from two-neuron microculture preparations of mouse hippocampal glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons to investigate how synaptic input and output of these two principal cells develop. In our reduced preparation, we found that glutamatergic neurons showed no change in synaptic output or input regardless of partner neuron cell type or neuronal activity level. In contrast, we found that glutamatergic input caused the GABAergic neuron to modify its output by way of an increase in synapse formation and a decrease in synaptic release efficiency. These findings are consistent with aspects of GABAergic synapse maturation observed in many brain regions. In addition, changes in GABAergic output are cell wide and not target-cell specific. We also found that glutamatergic neuronal activity determined the AMPA receptor properties of synapses on the partner GABAergic neuron. All modifications of GABAergic input and output required activity of the glutamatergic neuron. Because our system has reduced extrinsic factors, the changes we saw in the GABAergic neuron due to glutamatergic input may reflect initiation of maturation programs that underlie the formation and function of in vivo neural circuits.

  12. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  13. How do tonic glutamatergic synapses evade receptor desensitization?

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-Jie; Gao, Fan; Barrow, Andrew; Jacoby, Roy A; Wu, Samuel M

    2008-01-01

    Photoreceptor output synapses are the best known tonic chemical synapses in the nervous system, in which glutamate is continuously released in darkness, activating AMPA/kainate receptors in postsynaptic neurons. It has been shown that glutamate receptors in certain types of second-order retinal cells are largely desensitized in darkness, leading to small postsynaptic currents and reduced response dynamic ranges. Here we show that the tonic glutamatergic synapses between photoreceptors and rod-dominated hyperpolarizing bipolar cells (HBCRs) in the salamander retina evade postsynaptic receptor desensitization by using (1) multiple invaginating ribbon junctions as releasing sites for low-frequency, synchronized multiquantal release at each site; and (2) the GluR4 AMPA receptors as the postsynaptic receptors. The multiquantal events exhibit faster decay time than the GluR4 receptor desensitization time constant and therefore self-desensitization is minimized, and the average inter-event duration in darkness is much longer than the GluR4 desensitization recovery time and thus mutual desensitization is avoided. Consequently, the HBCRs are not desensitized in darkness, allowing light signals to be encoded by the full operating range of the glutamate-gated postsynaptic currents. Our study illustrates for the first time how a tonic glutamatergic synapse avoids postsynaptic receptor desensitization, a strategy that may be shared by many other synapses in the nervous system that need extended operation capacity. PMID:18420706

  14. Incorporation of inwardly rectifying AMPA receptors at silent synapses during hippocampal long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Daiju; Rah, Jong Cheol; Isaac, John T R

    2014-01-05

    Despite decades of study, the mechanisms by which synapses express the increase in strength during long-term potentiation (LTP) remain an area of intense interest. Here, we have studied how AMPA receptor subunit composition changes during the early phases of hippocampal LTP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. We studied LTP at silent synapses that initially lack AMPA receptors, but contain NMDA receptors. We show that strongly inwardly rectifying AMPA receptors are initially incorporated at silent synapses during LTP and are then subsequently replaced by non-rectifying AMPA receptors. These findings suggest that silent synapses initially incorporate GluA2-lacking, calcium-permeable AMPA receptors during LTP that are then replaced by GluA2-containing calcium-impermeable receptors. We also show that LTP consolidation at CA1 synapses requires a rise in intracellular calcium concentration during the early phase of expression, indicating that calcium influx through the GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors drives their replacement by GluA2-containing receptors during LTP consolidation. Taken together with previous studies in hippocampus and in other brain regions, these findings suggest that a common mechanism for the expression of activity-dependent glutamatergic synaptic plasticity involves the regulation of GluA2-subunit composition and highlights a critical role for silent synapses in this process.

  15. Calcium permeable AMPA receptors and autoreceptors in external tufted cells of rat olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Lowe, Graeme

    2007-01-01

    Glomeruli are functional units of the olfactory bulb responsible for early processing of odor information encoded by single olfactory receptor genes. Glomerular neural circuitry includes numerous external tufted (ET) cells whose rhythmic burst firing may mediate synchronization of bulbar activity with the inhalation cycle. Bursting is entrained by glutamatergic input from olfactory nerve terminals, so specific properties of ionotropic glutamate receptors on ET cells are likely to be important determinants of olfactory processing. Particularly intriguing is recent evidence that α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors of juxta-glomerular neurons may permeate calcium. This could provide a novel pathway for regulating ET cell signaling. We tested the hypothesis that ET cells express functional calcium-permeable AMPA receptors. In rat olfactory bulb slices, excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in ET cells were evoked by olfactory nerve shock, and by uncaging glutamate. We found attenuation of AMPA/kainate EPSCs by 1-naphthyl acetyl-spermine (NAS), an open-channel blocker specific for calcium permeable AMPA receptors. Cyclothiazide strongly potentiated EPSCs, indicating a major contribution from AMPA receptors. The current-voltage (I-V) relation of uncaging EPSCs showed weak inward rectification which was lost after > ~ 10 min of whole-cell dialysis, and was absent in NAS. In kainate-stimulated slices, Co2+ ions permeated cells of the glomerular layer. Large AMPA EPSCs were accompanied by fluorescence signals in fluo-4 loaded cells, suggesting calcium permeation. Depolarizing pulses evoked slow tail currents with pharmacology consistent with involvement of calcium permeable AMPA autoreceptors. Tail currents were abolished by Cd2+ and NBQX, and were sensitive to NAS block. Glutamate autoreceptors were confirmed by uncaging intracellular calcium to evoke a large inward current. Our results provide evidence that calcium permeable AMPA

  16. The Role of the Tripartite Glutamatergic Synapse in the Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Manji, Husseini K.; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2009-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are common, chronic, and recurrent mood disorders that affect the lives of millions of individuals worldwide. Growing evidence suggests that glutamatergic system dysfunction is directly involved in mood disorders. This article describes the role of the “tripartite glutamatergic synapse”, comprising presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons and glial cells, in the pathophysiology and therapeutics of mood disorders. Glutamatergic neurons and glia directly control synaptic and extrasynaptic glutamate levels/release through integrative effects that target glutamate excitatory amino-acid transporters, postsynaptic density proteins, ionotropic receptors (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole (AMPA), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), and kainate (KA)), and metabotropic receptors (mGluRs). This article also explores the glutamatergic modulators riluzole and ketamine, which are considered valuable proof of concept agents for developing the next generation of antidepressants and mood stabilizers. In therapeutically relevant paradigms, ketamine preferentially targets postsynaptic AMPA/NMDA receptors, and riluzole preferentially targets presynaptic voltage-operated channels and glia. PMID:19471044

  17. VTA glutamatergic inputs to nucleus accumbens drive aversion by acting on GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jia; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Hui-Ling; Barker, David J.; Miranda-Barrientos, Jorge; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is best known for its dopamine neurons, some of which project to nucleus accumbens (nAcc). However, the VTA also has glutamatergic neurons that project to nAcc. The function of the mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic pathway remains unknown. Here, we report that nAcc photoactivation of mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic fibers promotes aversion. Although we found that these mesoaccumbens-glutamate-fibers lack GABA, the aversion evoked by their photoactivation depends on glutamate and GABA receptor signaling, and not on dopamine receptor signaling. We found that mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic-fibers establish multiple asymmetric synapses on single parvalbumin-GABAergic interneurons, and that nAcc photoactivation of these fibers drives AMPA-mediated cellular firing of parvalbumin-GABAergic interneurons. These parvalbumin-GABAergic-interneurons, in turn, inhibit nAcc medium spiny output neurons, as such, controlling inhibitory neurotransmission within nAcc. The mesoaccumbens-glutamatergic pathway is the first glutamatergic input to nAcc shown to mediate aversion, instead of reward, and the first pathway shown to establish excitatory synapses on nAcc parvalbumin-GABAergic interneurons. PMID:27019014

  18. Mechanisms involved in systemic nicotine-induced glutamatergic synaptic plasticity on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ming; Jin, Yu; Yang, Kechun; Zhang, Die; Lukas, Ronald J.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Systemic exposure to nicotine induces glutamatergic synaptic plasticity on dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that single, systemic exposure in rats to nicotine (0.17 mg/kg free base) increases the ratio of DA neuronal currents mediated by AMPA relative to NMDA receptors (AMPA/NMDA ratio) assessed 24 hr later, based on slice patch recording. The AMPA/NMDA ratio increase is evident within 1 hr and lasts for at least 72 hr after nicotine exposure (and up to 8 days after repeated nicotine administration). This effect cannot be prevented by systemic injection of either α7-nAChR-selective (methyllycaconitine, MLA) or β2*-nAChR-selective (mecamylamine, MEC) antagonists but is prevented by co-injection of MLA and MEC. In either nAChR α7 or β2 subunit knock-out mice, systemic exposure to nicotine still increases the AMPA/NMDA ratio. Pre-injection in rats of a NMDA receptor antagonist (MK801), but neither DA receptor antagonists (SCH23390 plus haloperidol) nor a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine), prevents the nicotine-induced increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio. After systemic exposure to nicotine, glutamatergic (but not GABAergic) transmission onto rat VTA DA neuronal inputs is enhanced. Correspondingly, DA neuronal firing measured 24 hr after nicotine exposure using extracellular single unit recording in vivo is significantly faster, and there is conversion of silent to active DA neurons. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that systemic nicotine acting via either α7- or β2*-nAChRs increases pre- and post-synaptic glutamatergic function, and consequently initiates glutamatergic synaptic plasticity, which may be an important, early neuronal adaptation in nicotine reward and reinforcement. PMID:20943922

  19. AMPA experimental communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckerman, D.; Fass, S.; Keon, T.; Sielman, P.

    1982-01-01

    The program was conducted to demonstrate the satellite communication advantages of Adaptive Phased Array Technology. A laboratory based experiment was designed and implemented to demonstrate a low earth orbit satellite communications system. Using a 32 element, L-band phased array augmented with 4 sets of weights (2 for reception and 2 for transmission) a high speed digital processing system and operating against multiple user terminals and interferers, the AMPA system demonstrated: communications with austere user terminals, frequency reuse, communications in the face of interference, and geolocation. The program and experiment objectives are described, the system hardware and software/firmware are defined, and the test performed and the resultant test data are presented.

  20. Basal adenosine modulates the functional properties of AMPA receptors in mouse hippocampal neurons through the activation of A1R A2AR and A3R

    PubMed Central

    Di Angelantonio, Silvia; Bertollini, Cristina; Piccinin, Sonia; Rosito, Maria; Trettel, Flavia; Pagani, Francesca; Limatola, Cristina; Ragozzino, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a widespread neuromodulator within the CNS and its extracellular level is increased during hypoxia or intense synaptic activity, modulating pre- and postsynaptic sites. We studied the neuromodulatory action of adenosine on glutamatergic currents in the hippocampus, showing that activation of multiple adenosine receptors (ARs) by basal adenosine impacts postsynaptic site. Specifically, the stimulation of both A1R and A3R reduces AMPA currents, while A2AR has an opposite potentiating effect. The effect of ARs stimulation on glutamatergic currents in hippocampal cultures was investigated using pharmacological and genetic approaches. A3R inhibition by MRS1523 increased GluR1-Ser845 phosphorylation and potentiated AMPA current amplitude, increasing the apparent affinity for the agonist. A similar effect was observed blocking A1R with DPCPX or by genetic deletion of either A3R or A1R. Conversely, impairment of A2AR reduced AMPA currents, and decreased agonist sensitivity. Consistently, in hippocampal slices, ARs activation by AR agonist NECA modulated glutamatergic current amplitude evoked by AMPA application or afferent fiber stimulation. Opposite effects of AR subtypes stimulation are likely associated to changes in GluR1 phosphorylation and represent a novel mechanism of physiological modulation of glutamatergic transmission by adenosine, likely acting in normal conditions in the brain, depending on the level of extracellular adenosine and the distribution of AR subtypes. PMID:26528137

  1. Noradrenergic modulation of masseter muscle activity during natural rapid eye movement sleep requires glutamatergic signalling at the trigeminal motor nucleus.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Peter B; Mir, Saba; Peever, John H

    2014-08-15

    Noradrenergic neurotransmission in the brainstem is closely coupled to changes in muscle activity across the sleep-wake cycle, and noradrenaline is considered to be a key excitatory neuromodulator that reinforces the arousal-related stimulus on motoneurons to drive movement. However, it is unknown if α-1 noradrenoceptor activation increases motoneuron responsiveness to excitatory glutamate (AMPA) receptor-mediated inputs during natural behaviour. We studied the effects of noradrenaline on AMPA receptor-mediated motor activity at the motoneuron level in freely behaving rats, particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, a period during which both AMPA receptor-triggered muscle twitches and periods of muscle quiescence in which AMPA drive is silent are exhibited. Male rats were subjected to electromyography and electroencephalography recording to monitor sleep and waking behaviour. The implantation of a cannula into the trigeminal motor nucleus of the brainstem allowed us to perfuse noradrenergic and glutamatergic drugs by reverse microdialysis, and thus to use masseter muscle activity as an index of motoneuronal output. We found that endogenous excitation of both α-1 noradrenoceptor and AMPA receptors during waking are coupled to motor activity; however, REM sleep exhibits an absence of endogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor activity. Importantly, exogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor stimulation cannot reverse the muscle twitch suppression induced by AMPA receptor blockade and nor can it elevate muscle activity during quiet REM, a phase when endogenous AMPA receptor activity is subthreshold. We conclude that the presence of an endogenous glutamatergic drive is necessary for noradrenaline to trigger muscle activity at the level of the motoneuron in an animal behaving naturally.

  2. Motoneuron glutamatergic receptor expression following recovery from cervical spinal hemisection.

    PubMed

    Gransee, Heather M; Gonzalez Porras, Maria A; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2017-04-01

    Cervical spinal hemisection at C2 (SH) removes premotor drive to phrenic motoneurons located in segments C3-C5 in rats. Spontaneous recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm muscle activity is associated with increased phrenic motoneuron expression of glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and decreased expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionic acid (AMPA) receptors. Glutamatergic receptor expression is regulated by tropomyosin-related kinase receptor subtype B (TrkB) signaling in various neuronal systems, and increased TrkB receptor expression in phrenic motoneurons enhances recovery post-SH. Accordingly, we hypothesize that recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm muscle activity post-SH, whether spontaneous or enhanced by adenoassociated virus (AAV)-mediated upregulation of TrkB receptor expression, is associated with increased expression of glutamatergic NMDA receptors in phrenic motoneurons. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent diaphragm electromyography electrode implantation and SH surgery. Rats were injected intrapleurally with AAV expressing TrkB or GFP 3 weeks before SH. At 14 days post-SH, the proportion of animals displaying recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm activity increased in AAV-TrkB-treated (9/9) compared with untreated (3/5) or AAV-GFP-treated (4/10; P < 0.027) animals. Phrenic motoneuron NMDA NR1 subunit mRNA expression was approximately fourfold greater in AAV-TrkB- vs. AAV-GFP-treated SH animals (P < 0.004) and in animals displaying recovery vs. those not recovering (P < 0.005). Phrenic motoneuron AMPA glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2) subunit mRNA expression decreased after SH, and, albeit increased in animals displaying recovery vs. those not recovering, levels remained lower than control. We conclude that increased phrenic motoneuron expression of glutamatergic NMDA receptors is associated with spontaneous recovery after SH and enhanced recovery after AAV-TrkB treatment. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1192-1205, 2017.

  3. BDNF and AMPA receptors in the cNTS modulate the hyperglycemic reflex after local carotid body NaCN stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, R; Montero, S; Luquín, S; García-Estrada, J; Melnikov, V; Virgen-Ortiz, A; Lemus, M; Pineda-Lemus, M; de Álvarez-Buylla, E

    2017-07-01

    The application of sodium cyanide (NaCN) to the carotid body receptors (CBR) (CBR stimulation) induces rapid blood hyperglycemia and an increase in brain glucose retention. The commissural nucleus tractus solitarius (cNTS) is an essential relay nucleus in this hyperglycemic reflex; it receives glutamatergic afferents (that also release brain derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF) from the nodose-petrosal ganglia that relays CBR information. Previous work showed that AMPA in NTS blocks hyperglycemia and brain glucose retention after CBR stimulation. In contrast, BDNF, which attenuates glutamatergic AMPA currents in NTS, enhances these glycemic responses. Here we investigated the combined effects of BDNF and AMPA (and their antagonists) in NTS on the glycemic responses to CBR stimulation. Microinjections of BDNF plus AMPA into the cNTS before CBR stimulation in anesthetized rats, induced blood hyperglycemia and an increase in brain arteriovenous (a-v) of blood glucose concentration difference, which we infer is due to increased brain glucose retention. By contrast, the microinjection of the TrkB antagonist K252a plus AMPA abolished the glycemic responses to CBR stimulation similar to what is observed after AMPA pretreatments. In BDNF plus AMPA microinjections preceding CBR stimulation, the number of c-fos immunoreactive cNTS neurons increased. In contrast, in the rats microinjected with K252a plus AMPA in NTS, before CBR stimulation, c-fos expression in cNTS decreased. The expression of AMPA receptors GluR2/3 did not change in any of the studied groups. These results indicate that BDNF in cNTS plays a key role in the modulation of the hyperglycemic reflex initiated by CBR stimulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Targeting Glutamatergic Signaling for the Development of Novel Therapeutics for Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Vieira, R.; Salvadore, G.; Ibrahim, L.; DiazGranados, N.; Zarate, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    There have been no recent advances in drug development for mood disorders in terms of identifying drug targets that are mechanistically distinct from existing ones. As a result, existing antidepressants are based on decades-old notions of which targets are relevant to the mechanisms of antidepressant action. Low rates of remission, a delay of onset of therapeutic effects, continual residual depressive symptoms, relapses, and poor quality of life are unfortunately common in patients with mood disorders. Offering alternative options is requisite in order to reduce the individual and societal burden of these diseases. The glutamatergic system is a promising area of research in mood disorders, and likely to offer new possibilities in therapeutics. There is increasing evidence that mood disorders are associated with impairments in neuroplasticity and cellular resilience, and alterations of the glutamatergic system are known to play a major role in cellular plasticity and resilience. Existing antidepressants and mood stabilizers have prominent effects on the glutamate system, and modulating glutamatergic ionotropic or metabotropic receptors results in antidepressant-like properties in animal models. Several glutamatergic modulators targeting various glutamate components are currently being studied in the treatment of mood disorders, including release inhibitors of glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) throughput enhancers, and glutamate transporter enhancers. This paper reviews the currently available knowledge regarding the role of the glutamatergic system in the etiopathogenesis of mood disorders and putative glutamate modulators. PMID:19442176

  5. Cocaine-induced increases in medial prefrontal cortical GABA transmission involves glutamatergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Prathiba; Steketee, Jeffery D

    2006-02-15

    A recent study showed that cocaine-induced sensitization is associated with an increase in GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transmission in the medial prefrontal cortex. Since previous studies have demonstrated that sensitization is associated with enhanced medial prefrontal cortex glutamatergic transmission, the present study examined the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid/kainate (AMPA/KA) receptors in cocaine-induced increases in medial prefrontal cortex GABA levels. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received four daily injections of saline (1 ml/kg, i.p.) or cocaine (15 mg/kg). One day later, animals were infused with NMDA or AMPA/KA antagonists 3-[(R)-2 carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP) and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), respectively, into medial prefrontal cortex via microdialysis probe for 60 min before receiving systemic challenge injections of saline or cocaine. Cocaine-sensitized animals showed an increase in extracellular medial prefrontal cortex GABA levels that was blocked by prior medial prefrontal cortex infusion of DNQX, but not CPP. These data indicate that enhanced medial prefrontal cortex GABA transmission seen in cocaine-sensitized animals involves glutamatergic stimulation of AMPA receptors.

  6. Autoimmune-induced glutamatergic receptor dysfunctions: conceptual and psychiatric practice implications.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal-Simons, Ayelet; Durrant, Andrea R; Heresco-Levy, Uriel

    2013-12-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission is mediated via complex receptorial systems including N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolpropionic acid (AMPA) and metabotropic receptor subtypes and plays a critical role in the modulation of synaptic plasticity, mood, cognitive processes and motor behavior. Glutamatergic function deficits are hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, mood and movement disorders. Accumulating data are rapidly leading to the characterization of specific types of autoimmune encephalitis in which the receptors and proteins critically involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission, e.g., NMDA, AMPA receptors, are antigen targets. Characteristic of these syndromes, antibodies alter the structure and/or function of the corresponding neuronal antigen resulting in clinical pictures that resemble pharmacological disease models. Presently the best characterized autoimmune glutamatergic disorder is anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. This disorder manifests with intertwined psychiatric and neurological features, defines a new syndrome, reclassifies poorly defined clinical states and extends previous hypotheses, such as hypo-NMDA receptor function in schizophrenia. The characterization of autoimmune-induced glutamatergic receptor dysfunctions (AGRD) is likely to have a substantial conceptual impact upon our understanding of neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, affective and movement dysfunctions. Further definition of AGRD will provide additional guidelines for psychiatric diagnoses, identification of homogeneous patient subtypes within broad phenomenological classifications and will contribute to the development of personalized treatments. The body of knowledge already accumulated on anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis highlights the need for wide dissemination of these concepts among psychiatrists, and in suspected cases, for early recognition, prompt clinical

  7. Coexistence of glutamatergic spine synapses and shaft synapses in substantia nigra dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Miae; Bum Um, Ki; Jang, Jinyoung; Jin Kim, Hyun; Cho, Hana; Chung, Sungkwon; Kyu Park, Myoung

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra have long been believed to have multiple aspiny dendrites which receive many glutamatergic synaptic inputs from several regions of the brain. But, here, using high-resolution two-photon confocal microscopy in the mouse brain slices, we found a substantial number of common dendritic spines in the nigral dopamine neurons including thin, mushroom, and stubby types of spines. However, the number of dendritic spines of the dopamine neurons was approximately five times lower than that of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Immunostaining and morphological analysis revealed that glutamatergic shaft synapses were present two times more than spine synapses. Using local two-photon glutamate uncaging techniques, we confirmed that shaft synapses and spine synapses had both AMPA and NMDA receptors, but the AMPA/NMDA current ratios differed. The evoked postsynaptic potentials of spine synapses showed lower amplitudes but longer half-widths than those of shaft synapses. Therefore, we provide the first evidence that the midbrain dopamine neurons have two morphologically and functionally distinct types of glutamatergic synapses, spine synapses and shaft synapses, on the same dendrite. This peculiar organization could be a new basis for unraveling many physiological and pathological functions of the midbrain dopamine neurons. PMID:26435058

  8. Role of endocannabinoid and glutamatergic systems in DOI-induced head-twitch response in mice.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Nobuaki; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Okuno, Ryoko; Mishima, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Oishi, Ryozo; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2011-07-01

    We previously reported that systemic administration of the endocannabinoid anandamide inhibited the head-twitches induced by the hallucinogenic drug 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI) in mice, which is mediated via the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors. Endocannabinoid and glutamatergic systems have been suggested to modulate the function of 5-HT(2A) receptors. In the present study, we further investigated the role of endocannabinoid and glutamatergic systems in DOI-induced head-twitch response in mice. An anandamide transport inhibitor AM404 (0.3-3mg/kg, i.p.), a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 (0.1-10mg/kg, i.p.), a glutamate release inhibitor riluzole (0.3 and 1mg/kg, i.p.), a natural glutamate analog l-glutamylethylamide (theanine, 1 and 3mg/kg, p.o.) and an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist NBQX (0.01-0.3mg/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited DOI-induced head-twitch response. The AMPA receptor positive modulator aniracetam (30 or 100mg/kg, p.o.) reversed inhibition of head-twitch response by NBQX and URB597. These findings indicated that endocannabinoid and glutamatergic systems participate in the mechanism of action of DOI to induce head-twitch response.

  9. Coexistence of glutamatergic spine synapses and shaft synapses in substantia nigra dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Jang, Miae; Um, Ki Bum; Jang, Jinyoung; Kim, Hyun Jin; Cho, Hana; Chung, Sungkwon; Park, Myoung Kyu

    2015-10-05

    Dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra have long been believed to have multiple aspiny dendrites which receive many glutamatergic synaptic inputs from several regions of the brain. But, here, using high-resolution two-photon confocal microscopy in the mouse brain slices, we found a substantial number of common dendritic spines in the nigral dopamine neurons including thin, mushroom, and stubby types of spines. However, the number of dendritic spines of the dopamine neurons was approximately five times lower than that of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Immunostaining and morphological analysis revealed that glutamatergic shaft synapses were present two times more than spine synapses. Using local two-photon glutamate uncaging techniques, we confirmed that shaft synapses and spine synapses had both AMPA and NMDA receptors, but the AMPA/NMDA current ratios differed. The evoked postsynaptic potentials of spine synapses showed lower amplitudes but longer half-widths than those of shaft synapses. Therefore, we provide the first evidence that the midbrain dopamine neurons have two morphologically and functionally distinct types of glutamatergic synapses, spine synapses and shaft synapses, on the same dendrite. This peculiar organization could be a new basis for unraveling many physiological and pathological functions of the midbrain dopamine neurons.

  10. Glutamatergic Signaling at the Vestibular Hair Cell Calyx Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Soroush G.; Pyott, Sonja J.; Yu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    In the vestibular periphery a unique postsynaptic terminal, the calyx, completely covers the basolateral walls of type I hair cells and receives input from multiple ribbon synapses. To date, the functional role of this specialized synapse remains elusive. There is limited data supporting glutamatergic transmission, K+ or H+ accumulation in the synaptic cleft as mechanisms of transmission. Here the role of glutamatergic transmission at the calyx synapse is investigated. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from calyx endings were performed in an in vitro whole-tissue preparation of the rat vestibular crista, the sensory organ of the semicircular canals that sense head rotation. AMPA-mediated EPSCs showed an unusually wide range of decay time constants, from <5 to >500 ms. Decay time constants of EPSCs increased (or decreased) in the presence of a glutamate transporter blocker (or a competitive glutamate receptor blocker), suggesting a role for glutamate accumulation and spillover in synaptic transmission. Glutamate accumulation caused slow depolarizations of the postsynaptic membrane potentials, and thereby substantially increased calyx firing rates. Finally, antibody labelings showed that a high percentage of presynaptic ribbon release sites and postsynaptic glutamate receptors were not juxtaposed, favoring a role for spillover. These findings suggest a prominent role for glutamate spillover in integration of inputs and synaptic transmission in the vestibular periphery. We propose that similar to other brain areas, such as the cerebellum and hippocampus, glutamate spillover may play a role in gain control of calyx afferents and contribute to their high-pass properties. PMID:25355208

  11. Recycling Endosomes Supply AMPA Receptors for LTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mikyoung; Penick, Esther C.; Edwards, Jeffrey G.; Kauer, Julie A.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2004-09-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength, the most established cellular model of information storage in the brain, is expressed by an increase in the number of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. However, the source of AMPA receptors mobilized during LTP is unknown. We report that AMPA receptors are transported from recycling endosomes to the plasma membrane for LTP. Stimuli that triggered LTP promoted not only AMPA receptor insertion but also generalized recycling of cargo and membrane from endocytic compartments. Thus, recycling endosomes supply AMPA receptors for LTP and provide a mechanistic link between synaptic potentiation and membrane remodeling during synapse modification.

  12. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission participates in generating the hippocampal EEG.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Shen, Bixia

    2004-01-01

    The participation of ionotropic glutamatergic synapses in the generation of hippocampal electroencephalography (EEG) of behaving rats has not been systematically studied. In this study, field potentials in hippocampal CA1 were recorded following injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonists, or vehicle control, either into the lateral ventricles or directly into the hippocampus or the medial septum. Intraventricular (i.c.v.) AMPA receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX, 5-10 microg) decreased the commissural evoked potential and the amplitude of the hippocampal EEG, including the theta rhythm. Theta frequency was decreased by 10 microg, but not 5 microg DNQX i.c.v. Unilateral intrahippocampal injection of DNQX (5 microg) only decreased the amplitude, but not the frequency, of the theta rhythm near the site of injection, without affecting theta amplitude or frequency at the opposite hippocampus. Other than theta, the large irregular activity (with a delta frequency peak at 1-2 Hz) and gamma EEG (30-100 Hz) were also decreased by i.c.v. and intrahippocampal injections of DNQX. Intrahippocampal injection of NMDA receptor antagonist D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (D-APV, 2.5 microg) decreased the amplitude of the theta rhythm and, less consistently, the gamma EEG. The frequency of the theta rhythm and the peak of the commissural evoked potential were not significantly affected by intrahippocampal D-APV injection. Medial septal injections of D-APV or D,L-APV (2.24 microg in 0.4 microl), but not DNQX (10 microg in 0.4 microl), decreased the amplitude of the hippocampal theta significantly, but theta frequency was not significantly affected. It is concluded that both NMDA and AMPA receptors in the hippocampus are involved in generating the amplitude of the hippocampal EEG of theta and gamma frequencies, while NMDA receptors in the medial septum are involved in

  13. Elevated glucose concentration changes the content and cellular localization of AMPA receptors in the retina but not in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Castilho, A F; Liberal, J T; Baptista, F I; Gaspar, J M; Carvalho, A L; Ambrósio, A F

    2012-09-06

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic encephalopathy are two common complications of diabetes mellitus. The impairment of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the retina and hippocampus has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of these diabetic complications. In this study, we investigated the effect of elevated glucose concentration and diabetes on the protein content and surface expression of AMPA receptor subunits in the rat retina and hippocampus. We have used two models, cultured retinal and hippocampal cells exposed to elevated glucose concentration and an animal model of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes. The immunoreactivity of GluA1, GluA2 and GluA4 was evaluated by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. The levels of these subunits at the plasma membrane were evaluated by biotinylation and purification of plasma membrane-associated proteins. Elevated glucose concentration increased the total levels of GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors in retinal neural cells, but not of the subunits GluA1 or GluA4. However, at the plasma membrane, elevated glucose concentration induced an increase of all AMPA receptor subunits. In cultured hippocampal neurons, elevated glucose concentration did not induce significant alterations in the levels of AMPA receptor subunits. In the retinas of diabetic rats there were no persistent changes in the levels of AMPA receptor subunits comparing to aged-matched control retinas. Also, no consistent changes were detected in the levels of GluA1, GluA2 or GluA4 in the hippocampus of diabetic rats. We demonstrate that elevated glucose concentration induces early changes in AMPA receptor subunits, mainly in GluA2 subunit, in retinal neural cells. Conversely, hippocampal neurons seem to remain unaffected by elevated glucose concentration, concerning the expression of AMPA receptors, suggesting that AMPA receptors are more susceptible to the stress caused by elevated glucose concentration in retinal cells than in hippocampal neurons.

  14. Novel glutamatergic drugs for the treatment of mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, Kyle AB; Soleimani, Laili; Murrough, James W

    2013-01-01

    Mood disorders are common and debilitating, resulting in a significant public health burden. Current treatments are only partly effective and patients who have failed to respond to trials of existing antidepressant agents (eg, those who suffer from treatment-resistant depression [TRD]) require innovative therapeutics with novel mechanisms of action. Although neuroscience research has elucidated important aspects of the basic mechanisms of antidepressant action, most antidepressant drugs target monoaminergic mechanisms identified decades ago. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and glutamatergic dysfunction has been implicated in mood disorders. These data provide a rationale for the pursuit of glutamatergic agents as novel therapeutic agents. Here, we review preclinical and clinical investigations of glutamatergic agents in mood disorders with a focus on depression. We begin with discussion of evidence for the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine, followed by studies of the antidepressant efficacy of the currently marketed drugs riluzole and lamotrigine. Promising novel agents currently in development, including N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor modulators, 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (AMPA) receptor modulators, and drugs with activity at the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are then reviewed. Taken together, both preclinical and clinical evidence exists to support the pursuit of small molecule modulators of the glutamate system as novel therapeutic agents in mood disorders. It is hoped that by targeting neural systems outside of the monoamine system, more effective and perhaps faster acting therapeutics can be developed for patients suffering from these disabling disorders. PMID:23976856

  15. Vitamin D3 supplementation increases insulin level by regulating altered IP3 and AMPA receptor expression in the pancreatic islets of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Jayanarayanan, Sadanandan; Anju, Thoppil R; Smijin, Soman; Paulose, Cheramadathikudiyil Skaria

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic islets, particularly insulin-secreting β cells, share common characteristics with neurons. Glutamate is one of the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and pancreas, and its action is mediated through glutamate receptors. In the present work, we analysed the role of vitamin D3 in the modulation of AMPA receptor subunit and their functional role in insulin release. Radio receptor binding study in diabetic rats showed a significant increase in AMPA receptor density. Insulin AMPA colabelling study showed an altered AMPA GluR2 and GluR4 subunit expression in the pancreatic beta cells. We also found lowered IP3 content and decreased IP3 receptor in pancreas of diabetic rats. The alterations in AMPA and IP3 receptor resulted in reduced cytosolic calcium level concentration, which further blocks Ca(2+)-mediated insulin release. Vitamin D3 supplementation restored the alteration in vitamin D receptor expression, AMPA receptor density and AMPA and IP3 receptor expression in the pancreatic islets that helps to restore the calcium-mediated insulin secretion. Our study reveals the antidiabetic property of vitamin D3 that is suggested to have therapeutic role through regulating glutamatergic function in diabetic rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute inactivation of PSD-95 destabilizes AMPA receptors at hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Yudowski, Guillermo A; Olsen, Olav; Adesnik, Hillel; Marek, Kurt W; Bredt, David S

    2013-01-01

    Postsynatptic density protein (PSD-95) is a 95 kDa scaffolding protein that assembles signaling complexes at synapses. Over-expression of PSD-95 in primary hippocampal neurons selectively increases synaptic localization of AMPA receptors; however, mice lacking PSD-95 display grossly normal glutamatergic transmission in hippocampus. To further study the scaffolding role of PSD-95 at excitatory synapses, we generated a recombinant PSD-95-4c containing a tetracysteine motif, which specifically binds a fluorescein derivative and allows for acute and permanent inactivation of PSD-95. Interestingly, acute inactivation of PSD-95 in rat hippocampal cultures rapidly reduced surface AMPA receptor immunostaining, but did not affected NMDA or transferrin receptor localization. Acute photoinactivation of PSD-95 in dissociated neurons causes ∼80% decrease in GluR2 surface staining observed by live-cell microscopy within 15 minutes of PSD-95-4c ablation. These results confirm that PSD-95 stabilizes AMPA receptors at postsynaptic sites and provides insight into the dynamic interplay between PSD-95 and AMPA receptors in live neurons.

  17. Chronic Intermittent Ethanol and Withdrawal Differentially Modulate Basolateral Amygdala AMPA-type Glutamate Receptor Function and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Daniel T; Alexander, Nancy J; Diaz, Marvin R; Robinson, Stacey; McCool, Brian A

    2012-01-01

    The amygdala plays a critical role in the generation and expression of anxiety-like behaviors including those expressed following withdrawal (WD) from chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure. In particular, the BLA glutamatergic system controls the expression of both innate and pathological anxiety. Recent data suggests that CIE and WD may functionally alter this system in a manner that closely parallels memory-related phenomena like long term potentiation (LTP). We therefore specifically dissected CIE/WD-induced changes in glutamatergic signaling using electrophysiological and biochemical approaches with a particular focus on the plasticity-related components of this neurotransmitter system. Our results indicate that cortical glutamatergic inputs arriving at BLA principal via the external capsule undergo predominantly post-synaptic alterations in AMPA receptor function following CIE and WD. Biochemical analysis revealed treatment-dependent changes in AMPA receptor surface expression and subunit phosphorylation that are complemented by changes in total protein levels and/or phosphorylation status of several key, plasticity-associated protein kinases such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and protein kinase C (PKC). Together, these data show that CIE- and WD-induced changes in BLA glutamatergic function both functionally and biochemically mimic plasticity-related states. These mechanisms likely contribute to long-term increases in anxiety-like behavior following chronic ethanol exposure. PMID:22387532

  18. Chronic intermittent ethanol and withdrawal differentially modulate basolateral amygdala AMPA-type glutamate receptor function and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Christian, Daniel T; Alexander, Nancy J; Diaz, Marvin R; Robinson, Stacey; McCool, Brian A

    2012-06-01

    The amygdala plays a critical role in the generation and expression of anxiety-like behaviors including those expressed following withdrawal (WD) from chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure. In particular, the BLA glutamatergic system controls the expression of both innate and pathological anxiety. Recent data suggests that CIE and WD may functionally alter this system in a manner that closely parallels memory-related phenomena like long-term potentiation (LTP). We therefore specifically dissected CIE/WD-induced changes in glutamatergic signaling using electrophysiological and biochemical approaches with a particular focus on the plasticity-related components of this neurotransmitter system. Our results indicate that cortical glutamatergic inputs arriving at BLA principal via the external capsule undergo predominantly post-synaptic alterations in AMPA receptor function following CIE and WD. Biochemical analysis revealed treatment-dependent changes in AMPA receptor surface expression and subunit phosphorylation that are complemented by changes in total protein levels and/or phosphorylation status of several key, plasticity-associated protein kinases such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and protein kinase C (PKC). Together, these data show that CIE- and WD-induced changes in BLA glutamatergic function both functionally and biochemically mimic plasticity-related states. These mechanisms likely contribute to long-term increases in anxiety-like behavior following chronic ethanol exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of nucleus accumbens glutamatergic plasticity in drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Gabriel C

    2013-01-01

    . Antagonism of the CP-AMPARs reduces cravings. It is necessary to pursue further exploration of the AMPA receptor subunit composition and variations at the level of the NAc for a better understanding of glutamatergic plastic changes. It is known that cocaine and morphine are able to induce changes in dendritic spine morphology by modifying actin cycling. These changes include an initial increase in spine head diameter and increases in AMPA receptor expression, followed by a second stage of spine head diameter retraction and reduction of the AMPA receptors’ expression in spines. Besides glutamate and dopamine, other factors, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can influence NAc activity and induce changes in dendritic spine density. BDNF also induces drug-related behaviors like self-administration and relapse. Neither apoptosis nor neurogenesis plays a relevant role in the neurobiological processes subjacent to cocaine addiction in adults (rodent or human). Different therapeutic drugs like N-acetylcysteine (NAC), modafinil, acamprosate, and topiramate have been tested in preclinical and/or clinical models for alleviating drug relapse. Moreover, these therapeutic drugs target the glutamatergic circuitry between the PFC and the NAc. NAC and acamprosate have shown inconsistent results in clinical trials. Modafinil and topiramate have shown some success, but more clinical trials are necessary. Based on the current review findings, it could be recommendable to explore therapeutic approaches that include synergism between different drugs and neurotransmitter systems. The discrepancy in the results of some therapeutic drugs between preclinical versus clinical trials for alleviating relapse or drug dependence could be linked to the scarce exploration of preclinical models that mimic polydrug abuse patterns, for example, cocaine plus alcohol. At the clinical level, the pattern of polydrug consumption is a phenomenon of considerable frequency. Finally, as a complement at

  20. Role of nucleus accumbens glutamatergic plasticity in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Gabriel C

    2013-01-01

    . Antagonism of the CP-AMPARs reduces cravings. It is necessary to pursue further exploration of the AMPA receptor subunit composition and variations at the level of the NAc for a better understanding of glutamatergic plastic changes. It is known that cocaine and morphine are able to induce changes in dendritic spine morphology by modifying actin cycling. These changes include an initial increase in spine head diameter and increases in AMPA receptor expression, followed by a second stage of spine head diameter retraction and reduction of the AMPA receptors' expression in spines. Besides glutamate and dopamine, other factors, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can influence NAc activity and induce changes in dendritic spine density. BDNF also induces drug-related behaviors like self-administration and relapse. Neither apoptosis nor neurogenesis plays a relevant role in the neurobiological processes subjacent to cocaine addiction in adults (rodent or human). Different therapeutic drugs like N-acetylcysteine (NAC), modafinil, acamprosate, and topiramate have been tested in preclinical and/or clinical models for alleviating drug relapse. Moreover, these therapeutic drugs target the glutamatergic circuitry between the PFC and the NAc. NAC and acamprosate have shown inconsistent results in clinical trials. Modafinil and topiramate have shown some success, but more clinical trials are necessary. Based on the current review findings, it could be recommendable to explore therapeutic approaches that include synergism between different drugs and neurotransmitter systems. The discrepancy in the results of some therapeutic drugs between preclinical versus clinical trials for alleviating relapse or drug dependence could be linked to the scarce exploration of preclinical models that mimic polydrug abuse patterns, for example, cocaine plus alcohol. At the clinical level, the pattern of polydrug consumption is a phenomenon of considerable frequency. Finally, as a complement at the

  1. The role of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in depression: central mediators of pathophysiology and antidepressant activity?

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Florian; Celikel, Tansu; Reif, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Depression is a major psychiatric disorder affecting more than 120 million people worldwide every year. Changes in monoaminergic transmitter release are suggested to take part in the pathophysiology of depression. However, more recent experimental evidence suggests that glutamatergic mechanisms might play a more central role in the development of this disorder. The importance of the glutamatergic system in depression was particularly highlighted by the discovery that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists (particularly ketamine) exert relatively long-lasting antidepressant like effects with rapid onset. Importantly, the antidepressant-like effects of NMDA receptor antagonists, but also other antidepressants (both classical and novel), require activation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. Additionally, expression of AMPA receptors is altered in patients with depression. Moreover, preclinical evidence supports an important involvement of AMPA receptor-dependent signaling and plasticity in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Here we summarize work published on the involvement of AMPA receptors in depression and discuss a possible central role for AMPA receptors in the pathophysiology, course and treatment of depression.

  2. KCC2 Gates Activity-Driven AMPA Receptor Traffic through Cofilin Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chevy, Quentin; Heubl, Martin; Goutierre, Marie; Backer, Stéphanie; Moutkine, Imane; Eugène, Emmanuel; Bloch-Gallego, Evelyne; Lévi, Sabine; Poncer, Jean Christophe

    2015-12-02

    Expression of the neuronal K/Cl transporter KCC2 is tightly regulated throughout development and by both normal and pathological neuronal activity. Changes in KCC2 expression have often been associated with altered chloride homeostasis and GABA signaling. However, recent evidence supports a role of KCC2 in the development and function of glutamatergic synapses through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here we show that suppressing KCC2 expression in rat hippocampal neurons precludes long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synapses specifically by preventing activity-driven membrane delivery of AMPA receptors. This effect is independent of KCC2 transporter function and can be accounted for by increased Rac1/PAK- and LIMK-dependent cofilin phosphorylation and actin polymerization in dendritic spines. Our results demonstrate that KCC2 plays a critical role in the regulation of spine actin cytoskeleton and gates long-term plasticity at excitatory synapses in cortical neurons.

  3. Effects of 3 weeks GMP oral administration on glutamatergic parameters in mice neocortex.

    PubMed

    Ganzella, Marcelo; Moreira, Julia Dubois; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Böhmer, Ana Elisa; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Holmseth, Silvia; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2012-03-01

    Overstimulation of the glutamatergic system (excitotoxicity) is involved in various acute and chronic brain diseases. Several studies support the hypothesis that guanosine-5'-monophosphate (GMP) can modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronically administered GMP on brain cortical glutamatergic parameters in mice. Additionally, we investigated the neuroprotective potential of the GMP treatment submitting cortical brain slices to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Moreover, measurements of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) purine levels were performed after the treatment. Mice received an oral administration of saline or GMP during 3 weeks. GMP significantly decreases the cortical brain glutamate binding and uptake. Accordingly, GMP reduced the immunocontent of the glutamate receptors subunits, NR2A/B and GluR1 (NMDA and AMPA receptors, respectively) and glutamate transporters EAAC1 and GLT1. GMP treatment significantly reduced the immunocontent of PSD-95 while did not affect the content of Snap 25, GLAST and GFAP. Moreover, GMP treatment increased the resistance of neocortex to OGD insult. The chronic GMP administration increased the CSF levels of GMP and its metabolites. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential modulatory role of GMP on neocortex glutamatergic system by promoting functional and plastic changes associated to more resistance of mice neocortex against an in vitro excitotoxicity event.

  4. Architecture of fully occupied GluA2 AMPA receptor-TARP complex elucidated by cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Chen, Shanshuang; Yoshioka, Craig; Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-08-04

    Fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is largely carried out by AMPA-sensitive ionotropic glutamate receptors. Localized within the postsynaptic density of glutamatergic spines, AMPA receptors are composed of heterotetrameric receptor assemblies associated with auxiliary subunits, the most common of which are transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs). The association of TARPs with AMPA receptors modulates receptor trafficking and the kinetics of receptor gating and pharmacology. Here we report the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the homomeric rat GluA2 AMPA receptor saturated with TARP γ2 subunits, which shows how the TARPs are arranged with four-fold symmetry around the ion channel domain and make extensive interactions with the M1, M2 and M4 transmembrane helices. Poised like partially opened ‘hands’ underneath the two-fold symmetric ligand-binding domain (LBD) 'clamshells', one pair of TARPs is juxtaposed near the LBD dimer interface, whereas the other pair is near the LBD dimer-dimer interface. The extracellular ‘domains’ of TARP are positioned to not only modulate LBD clamshell closure, but also affect conformational rearrangements of the LBD layer associated with receptor activation and desensitization, while the TARP transmembrane domains buttress the ion channel pore.

  5. Glutamatergic drugs for schizophrenia treatment.

    PubMed

    Gibert-Rahola, Juan; Villena-Rodriguez, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    It is accepted that both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia may be due to hypofunction of glutamatergic pathways leading to altered dopaminergic neurotransmission activity. Specifically, there may be diminished glutamatergic signaling at the level of the NMDA receptors, but direct receptor agonists have no clinical utility due to their nonspecific actions and undesirable side effects. Given the problems of ineffectiveness or side effects of drugs that act directly on ionotropic and metabotropic mGlu2-3 receptors, clinical trials have been conducted with other drugs that have other mechanisms of action, especially indirect mechanisms, such as the co-administration of NMDA agonists (glycine or D-serine), glycine transporter inhibitors (sarcosine bitopertin), ampakines (CX-516), and mGlu5 receptor agonists. However, despite repeated failures, the glutamatergic approach to the treatment of schizophrenia has not been exhausted and all theoretical aspects that relate these complex neurochemical mechanisms with symptoms of schizophrenia should be reviewed until we find truly effective molecules with an acceptable side effect profile.

  6. Mechanisms involved in systemic nicotine-induced glutamatergic synaptic plasticity on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Jin, Yu; Yang, Kechun; Zhang, Die; Lukas, Ronald J; Wu, Jie

    2010-10-13

    Systemic exposure to nicotine induces glutamatergic synaptic plasticity on dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that single, systemic exposure in rats to nicotine (0.17 mg/kg free base) increases the ratio of DA neuronal currents mediated by AMPA relative to NMDA receptors (AMPA/NMDA ratio) assessed 24 h later, based on slice-patch recording. The AMPA/NMDA ratio increase is evident within 1 h and lasts for at least 72 h after nicotine exposure (and up to 8 d after repeated nicotine administration). This effect cannot be prevented by systemic injection of either α7-nAChR (nicotinic ACh receptor)-selective [methyllycaconitine (MLA)] or β2*-nAChR-selective [mecamylamine (MEC)] antagonists but is prevented by coinjection of MLA and MEC. In either nAChR α7 or β2 subunit knock-out mice, systemic exposure to nicotine still increases the AMPA/NMDA ratio. Preinjection in rats of a NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate), but neither DA receptor antagonists [SCH-23390 (R-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine) plus haloperidol] nor a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine), prevents the nicotine-induced increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio. After systemic exposure to nicotine, glutamatergic (but not GABAergic) transmission onto rat VTA DA neuronal inputs is enhanced. Correspondingly, DA neuronal firing measured 24 h after nicotine exposure using extracellular single-unit recording in vivo is significantly faster, and there is conversion of silent to active DA neurons. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that systemic nicotine acting via either α7- or β2*-nAChRs increases presynaptic and postsynaptic glutamatergic function, and consequently initiates glutamatergic synaptic plasticity, which may be an important, early neuronal adaptation in nicotine reward and reinforcement.

  7. Inhibition of tonic spinal glutamatergic activity induces antinociception in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tambeli, Claudia H; Parada, Carlos A; Levine, Jon D; Gear, Robert W

    2002-10-01

    Inhibition of tonic activity in spino-supraspinal projection neurons induces heterosegmental antinociception that is mediated by opioid receptors in nucleus accumbens. To investigate the origin of this tonic activity, we evaluated the ability of inhibiting neurotransmission in the spinal cord to produce heterosegmental antinociception in the trigeminal nociceptive jaw-opening reflex (JOR) in the rat. Spinal intrathecal administration of calcium channel blockers attenuated the JOR, suggesting that the tonic spinal activity depends on synaptic input. To identify the excitatory neurotransmitter receptors involved, selective antagonists for AMPA/kainate, mGluR1, NMDA or NK1 receptors were administered intrathecally to the spinal cord. The AMPA/kainate and mGluR1 receptor antagonists, but not the NMDA or NK1 receptor antagonists, induced antinociception, which was antagonized by intra-accumbens administration of the selective micro -opioid receptor antagonist CTOP. Thus, inhibition of tonic spinal glutamatergic activity resulted in supraspinally mediated antinociception. As this antinociception occurred in the absence of interventions that would produce a facilitated nociceptive state, this tonic glutamatergic activity is important in setting nociceptive threshold.

  8. The role of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems on serotonin- induced feeding behavior in chicken.

    PubMed

    Mortezaei, Sepideh Seyedali; Zendehdel, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab; Hasani, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    It has been reported that serotonin can modulate glutamate and GABA release in central nervous system (CNS). The present study was designed to examine the role of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems on serotonin- induced feeding behavior in chickens. In Experiment 1 intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of MK- 801(NMDA receptor antagonist, 15 nmol) performed followed by serotonin (10 μg). In experiments 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 prior to serotonin injection, chickens received CNQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, 390 nmol), AIDA (mGluR1 antagonist, 2 nmol), LY341495 (mGluR2 antagonist, 150 nmol), UBP1112 (mGluR3 antagonist, 2 nmol), picrotoxin (GABA A receptor antagonist, 0.5 μg), CGP54626 (GABAB receptor antagonist, 20 ng) respectively. Cumulative food intake was determined at 3 h post injection. The results of this study showed that the hypophagic effect of serotonin was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with MK- 801 and CNQX (p < 0.05) but AIDA, LY341495 and UBP1112 had no effect (p > 0.05). Also, the inhibitory effect of serotonin on food intake was amplified by picrotoxin (p < 0.05) while CGP54626 had no effect (p > 0.05). These results suggest that serotonin as a modulator probably interacts with glutamatergic (via NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors) and GABAergic (via GABAA receptor) systems on feeding behavior in chicken.

  9. Structurally dissimilar antimanic agents modulate synaptic plasticity by regulating AMPA glutamate receptor subunit GluR1 synaptic expression.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Gray, Neil A; Falke, Cynthia; Yuan, Peixiong; Szabo, Steven; Manji, Husseini K

    2003-11-01

    A growing body of data from clinical and preclinical studies suggests that the glutamatergic system may represent a novel therapeutic target for severe recurrent mood disorders. Since synapse-specific glutamate receptor expression/localization is known to play critical roles in synaptic plasticity, we investigated the effects of mood stabilizers on AMPA receptor expression. Rats were treated chronically with lithium or valproate, hippocampal synaptosomes were isolated, and GluR1 levels were determined. Additionally, hippocampal neurons were prepared from E18 rat embryos and treated with lithium or valproate. Surface expression of GluR1 was determined using a biotinylation assay, and double-immunostaining with anti-GluR1 and anti-synaptotagmin antibodies was used to determine synaptic GluR1 levels. The AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 expression in hippocampal synaptosomes was significantly reduced by both chronic lithium and valproate. Overall, these studies show that AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 is a common target for two structurally highly dissimilar, but highly efficacious, mood stabilizers, lithium and valproate. These studies suggest that regulation of glutamatergically mediated synaptic plasticity may play a role in the treatment of mood disorders, and raise the possibility that agents more directly affecting synaptic GluR1 may represent novel therapies for this devastating illness.

  10. Effects of the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist DNQX in the nucleus accumbens on drug-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Layer, R T; Uretsky, N J; Wallace, L J

    1993-07-23

    Activation of AMPA/kainate glutamatergic receptors in the nucleus accumbens may be a component of the mechanism of drug induced reward. To test this hypothesis, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA)/kainate glutamatergic receptor anatagonist, was injected into the nucleus accumbens before the administration of amphetamine or morphine during the training phase (acquisition) of a conditioned place preference paradigm. Rats were then tested for place preference in the absence of drugs. In other experiments, DNQX was given before testing for place preference (expression) but not during the training phase. Bilateral injection of DNQX (1 microgram/0.5 microliters/side) inhibited acquisition of place preference to amphetamine (1 mg/kg) but not morphine (10 mg/kg). During acquisition, DNQX marginally attenuated the locomotor stimulation elicited by amphetamine during the first but not subsequent training sessions, while the combination of morphine plus DNQX produced marked akinesia during each training session. When given prior to testing, DNQX inhibited the expression of place preference induced by amphetamine and morphine but did not affect locomotor activity. The results suggest that activation of AMPA/kainate receptors is involved in the primary reward stimulation (acquisition of place preference) of amphetamine but not morphine and in behaviors elicited by memory of primary reward stimulation (expression of place preference) for both drugs. Furthermore, locomotor activity during conditioning is not necessary for acquisition of place preference.

  11. Long-term changes in glutamatergic synaptic transmission in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Glushakov, A V; Glushakova, O; Varshney, M; Bajpai, L K; Sumners, C; Laipis, P J; Embury, J E; Baker, S P; Otero, D H; Dennis, D M; Seubert, C N; Martynyuk, A E

    2005-02-01

    The cellular mechanisms that underlie impaired brain function during phenylketonuria (PKU), the most common biochemical cause of mental retardation in humans, remain unclear. Acute application of L-Phe at concentrations observed in the PKU brain depresses glutamatergic synaptic transmission but does not affect GABA receptor activity in cultured neurons. If these depressant effects of L-Phe take place in the PKU brain, then chronic impairment of the glutamate system, which may contribute to impaired brain function, could be detected as changes in postsynaptic glutamate receptors. This hypothesis was tested by using a combination of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, patch-clamp, radioligand binding and western blot approaches in forebrain tissue from heterozygous and homozygous (PKU) Pah(enu2) mice. Brain concentrations of L-Phe were nearly six-fold greater in PKU mice (863.12 +/- 17.96 micromol/kg) than in their heterozygous counterparts (149.32 +/- 10.23 micromol/kg). This concentration is significantly higher than the K(B) of 573 microM for L-Phe to compete for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Receptor binding experiments with [3H]MK-801 showed significant up-regulation of NMDA receptor density in PKU mice. Consistent with the depressant effects of L-Phe, expression of NMDA receptor NR2A and (RS)-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor Glu1 and Glu2/3 subunits was significantly increased, whereas expression of the NR2B subunit was decreased. There was no change in GABA alpha1 subunit expression. Given the role of the glutamatergic system in brain development and function, these changes may, at least in part, explain the brain disorders associated with PKU.

  12. In search of novel AMPA potentiators.

    PubMed

    Francotte, Pierre; de Tullio, Pascal; Fraikin, Pierre; Counerotte, Stéphane; Goffin, Eric; Pirotte, Bernard

    2006-11-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Amongst ionotropic receptors responding to glutamate, the AMPA subtype has been considered as essential for the fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and the expression and maintenance of long-term potentiation. As glutamate is known to be involved in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, AMPA receptors seem to represent interesting targets to develop therapeutic drugs. Hence, the enhancement of AMPA signals is an approach currently investigated for the management of Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia or mood disorders. In particular, many efforts are being conducted in the development of AMPA positive allosteric modulators ("potentiators"), which alter the rate of receptor desensitization. The major chemical families developed as AMPA potentiators are aniracetam derivatives, cyclothiazide derivatives and biarylpropylsulfonamides derivatives.

  13. AMPA receptor competitive antagonism reduces halothane MAC in rats.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, C; Warner, D S; Todd, M M; Nordholm, L

    1992-12-01

    Various subtypes of receptors have been identified for glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter. Previous studies have shown that antagonism of glutamate at the NMDA receptors reduces minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) for volatile anesthetics. NBQX (2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline) is a selective antagonist at the glutamatergic AMPA receptor. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether AMPA receptor antagonism influences halothane MAC in the rat. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with halothane in 50% O2/balance N2, tracheally intubated and the lungs were mechanically ventilated. Increasing doses of NBQX were intravenously infused in three groups while the control group was infused with vehicle (D5W). Halothane MAC was then determined by the tail-clamp method. Halothane MAC was log-linearly related to plasma NBQX concentrations (MAC = 0.125 (In plasma concentration NBQX) + 1.035, r2 = 0.77). A maximal 58% reduction of halothane MAC was achieved with an NBQX loading dose of 42 mg/kg followed by a continuous infusion rate of 36 mg x kg-1 x h-1 (control = 1.02 +/- 0.07%; NBQX = 0.43 +/- 0.12%; P < .01). Larger doses of NBQX were not possible because of the poor aqueous solubility of this compound. In a separate experiment, awake rats were randomly assigned to groups based on the dose of NBQX infused. Pa(CO2) and mean arterial pressure were measured at time 0 and at 5 and 30 min after start of NBQX infusion. The infusion was then stopped. Time until recovery of the righting reflex was recorded.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Discovery of 2-(2-oxo-1-phenyl-5-pyridin-2-yl-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile (perampanel): a novel, noncompetitive α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropanoic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Shigeki; Ueno, Koshi; Nagato, Satoshi; Kawano, Koki; Ito, Koichi; Norimine, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Osamu; Hanada, Takahisa; Yonaga, Masahiro

    2012-12-13

    Dysfunction of glutamatergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsy and numerous other neurological diseases. Here we describe the discovery of a series of 1,3,5-triaryl-1H-pyridin-2-one derivatives as noncompetitive antagonists of AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. The structure-activity relationships for this series of compounds were investigated by manipulating individual aromatic rings located at positions 1, 3, and 5 of the pyridone ring. This culminated in the discovery of 2-(2-oxo-1-phenyl-5-pyridin-2-yl-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile (perampanel, 6), a novel, noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist that showed potent activity in an in vitro AMPA-induced Ca2+ influx assay (IC50=60 nM) and in an in vivo AMPA-induced seizure model (minimum effective dose of 2 mg/kg po). Perampanel is currently in regulatory submission for partial-onset seizures associated with epilepsy.

  15. Somatostatin increases rat locomotor activity by activating sst(2) and sst (4) receptors in the striatum and via glutamatergic involvement.

    PubMed

    Santis, Stratos; Kastellakis, Andreas; Kotzamani, Dimitra; Pitarokoili, Kalliopi; Kokona, Despoina; Thermos, Kyriaki

    2009-02-01

    The involvement of striatal somatostatin receptors (sst(1), sst(2) and sst(4)) in locomotor activity was investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, 280-350 g, received in the striatum bilateral infusions of saline, somatostatin, and selective sst(1), sst(2), and sst(4) ligands. Spontaneous locomotor activity was recorded for 60 min. The involvement of excitatory amino acid receptors (AMPA and NMDA) on somatostatin's actions was also examined. Western blot analysis was employed for the identification of somatostatin receptors in striatal membranes. Somatostatin, sst(2) and sst(4), but not sst(1), selective ligands increased rat locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. Blockade of AMPA and NMDA receptors reversed somatostatin's actions. In conclusion, striatal somatostatin receptor activation differentially influence rat locomotor activity, while glutamatergic actions underlie the behavioral actions of somatostatin.

  16. Synaptic transmission and plasticity require AMPA receptor anchoring via its N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jake F; Ho, Hinze; Greger, Ingo H

    2017-03-14

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and are selectively recruited during activity-dependent plasticity to increase synaptic strength. A prerequisite for faithful signal transmission is the positioning and clustering of AMPARs at postsynaptic sites. The mechanisms underlying this positioning have largely been ascribed to the receptor cytoplasmic C-termini and to AMPAR-associated auxiliary subunits, both interacting with the postsynaptic scaffold. Here, using mouse organotypic hippocampal slices, we show that the extracellular AMPAR N-terminal domain (NTD), which projects midway into the synaptic cleft, plays a fundamental role in this process. This highly sequence-diverse domain mediates synaptic anchoring in a subunit-selective manner. Receptors lacking the NTD exhibit increased mobility in synapses, depress synaptic transmission and are unable to sustain long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, synaptic transmission and the expression of LTP are dependent upon an AMPAR anchoring mechanism that is driven by the NTD.

  17. Synaptic activity regulates AMPA receptor trafficking through different recycling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ning; Jeyifous, Okunola; Munro, Charlotte; Montgomery, Johanna M; Green, William N

    2015-01-01

    Changes in glutamatergic synaptic strength in brain are dependent on AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) recycling, which is assumed to occur through a single local pathway. In this study, we present evidence that AMPAR recycling occurs through different pathways regulated by synaptic activity. Without synaptic stimulation, most AMPARs recycled in dynamin-independent endosomes containing the GTPase, Arf6. Few AMPARs recycled in dynamin-dependent endosomes labeled by transferrin receptors (TfRs). AMPAR recycling was blocked by alterations in the GTPase, TC10, which co-localized with Arf6 endosomes. TC10 mutants that reduced AMPAR recycling had no effect on increased AMPAR levels with long-term potentiation (LTP) and little effect on decreased AMPAR levels with long-term depression. However, internalized AMPAR levels in TfR-containing recycling endosomes increased after LTP, indicating increased AMPAR recycling through the dynamin-dependent pathway with synaptic plasticity. LTP-induced AMPAR endocytosis is inconsistent with local recycling as a source of increased surface receptors, suggesting AMPARs are trafficked from other sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06878.001 PMID:25970033

  18. Spontaneous glutamatergic activity induces a BDNF-dependent potentiation of GABAergic synapses in the newborn rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kuczewski, Nicola; Langlois, Anais; Fiorentino, Hervé; Bonnet, Stéphanie; Marissal, Thomas; Diabira, Diabe; Ferrand, Nadine; Porcher, Christophe; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous ongoing synaptic activity is thought to play an instructive role in the maturation of the neuronal circuits. However the type of synaptic activity involved and how this activity is translated into structural and functional changes is not fully understood. Here we show that ongoing glutamatergic synaptic activity triggers a long-lasting potentiation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediated synaptic activity (LLPGABA-A) in the developing rat hippocampus. LLPGABA-A induction requires (i) the activation of AMPA receptors and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels, (ii) the release of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and (iii) the activation of postsynaptic tropomyosin-related kinase receptors B (TrkB). We found that spontaneous glutamatergic activity is required to maintain a high level of native BDNF in the newborn rat hippocampus and that application of exogenous BDNF induced LLPGABA-A in the absence of glutamatergic activity. These results suggest that ongoing glutamatergic synaptic activity plays a pivotal role in the functional maturation of hippocampal GABAergic synapses by means of a cascade involving BDNF release and downstream signalling through postsynaptic TrkB receptor activation. PMID:18772203

  19. Glutamatergic neurons of the mouse medial septum and diagonal band of Broca synaptically drive hippocampal pyramidal cells: relevance for hippocampal theta rhythm.

    PubMed

    Huh, Carey Y L; Goutagny, Romain; Williams, Sylvain

    2010-11-24

    Neurons of the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) provide an important input to the hippocampus and are critically involved in learning and memory. Although cholinergic and GABAergic MS-DBB neurons are known to modulate hippocampal activity, the role of recently described glutamatergic MS-DBB neurons is unknown. Here, we examined the electrophysiological properties of glutamatergic MS-DBB neurons and tested whether they provide a functional synaptic input to the hippocampus. To visualize the glutamatergic neurons, we used MS-DBB slices from transgenic mice in which the green fluorescent protein is expressed specifically by vesicular glutamate transporter 2-positive neurons and characterized their properties using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. For assessing the function of the glutamatergic projection, we used an in vitro septohippocampal preparation, electrically stimulated the fornix or chemically activated the MS-DBB using NMDA microinfusions and recorded postsynaptic responses in CA3 pyramidal cells. We found that glutamatergic MS-DBB neurons as a population display a highly heterogeneous set of firing patterns including fast-, cluster-, burst-, and slow-firing. Remarkably, a significant proportion exhibited fast-firing properties, prominent I(h), and rhythmic spontaneous firing at theta frequencies similar to those found in GABAergic MS-DBB neurons. Activation of the MS-DBB led to fast, AMPA receptor-mediated glutamatergic responses in CA3 pyramidal cells. These results describe for the first time the electrophysiological signatures of glutamatergic MS-DBB neurons, their rhythmic firing properties, and their capacity to drive hippocampal principal neurons. Our findings suggest that the glutamatergic septohippocampal pathway may play an important role in hippocampal theta oscillations and relevant cognitive functions.

  20. The balance of NMDA- and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated activity in normal adult goldfish and during optic nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew L; Rodger, Jennifer; Stirling, R Victoria; Beazley, Lyn D; Dunlop, Sarah A

    2005-10-01

    Retinotectal topography is established during development and relies on the sequential recruitment of glutamate receptors within postsynaptic tectal cells. NMDA receptors underpin plastic changes at early stages when retinal ganglion cell (RGC) terminal arbors are widespread and topography is coarse; AMPA/kainate receptors mediate fast secure neurotransmission characteristic of mature circuits once topography is refined. Here, we have examined the relative contributions of these receptors to visually evoked activity in normal adult goldfish, in which retinotectal topography is constantly adjusted to compensate for the continual neurogenesis and the addition of new RGC arbors. Furthermore, we examined animals at two stages of optic nerve regeneration. In the first, RGC arbors are widespread and receptive fields large resulting in coarse topography; in the second, RGC arbors are pruned to reduce receptive fields leading to refined topography. Antagonists were applied to the tectum during multiunit recording of postsynaptic responses. Normal goldfish have low levels of NMDA receptor-mediated activity and high levels of AMPA/kainate. When coarse topography has been restored, NMDA receptor-mediated activity is increased and that of AMPA/kainate decreased. Once topography has been refined, the balance of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated activity returns to normal. The data suggest that glutamatergic neurotransmission in normal adult goldfish is dual with NMDA receptors fine-tuning topography and AMPA receptors allowing stable synaptic function. Furthermore, the normal operation of both receptors allows a response to injury in which the balance can be transiently reversed to restore topography and vision.

  1. Active integration of glutamatergic input to the inferior olive generates bidirectional postsynaptic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Garden, Derek L. F.; Rinaldi, Arianna

    2016-01-01

    Key points We establish experimental preparations for optogenetic investigation of glutamatergic input to the inferior olive.Neurones in the principal olivary nucleus receive monosynaptic extra‐somatic glutamatergic input from the neocortex.Glutamatergic inputs to neurones in the inferior olive generate bidirectional postsynaptic potentials (PSPs), with a fast excitatory component followed by a slower inhibitory component.Small conductance calcium‐activated potassium (SK) channels are required for the slow inhibitory component of glutamatergic PSPs and oppose temporal summation of inputs at intervals ≤ 20 ms.Active integration of synaptic input within the inferior olive may play a central role in control of olivo‐cerebellar climbing fibre signals. Abstract The inferior olive plays a critical role in motor coordination and learning by integrating diverse afferent signals to generate climbing fibre inputs to the cerebellar cortex. While it is well established that climbing fibre signals are important for motor coordination, the mechanisms by which neurones in the inferior olive integrate synaptic inputs and the roles of particular ion channels are unclear. Here, we test the hypothesis that neurones in the inferior olive actively integrate glutamatergic synaptic inputs. We demonstrate that optogenetically activated long‐range synaptic inputs to the inferior olive, including projections from the motor cortex, generate rapid excitatory potentials followed by slower inhibitory potentials. Synaptic projections from the motor cortex preferentially target the principal olivary nucleus. We show that inhibitory and excitatory components of the bidirectional synaptic potentials are dependent upon AMPA (GluA) receptors, are GABAA independent, and originate from the same presynaptic axons. Consistent with models that predict active integration of synaptic inputs by inferior olive neurones, we find that the inhibitory component is reduced by blocking large conductance

  2. Active integration of glutamatergic input to the inferior olive generates bidirectional postsynaptic potentials.

    PubMed

    Garden, Derek L F; Rinaldi, Arianna; Nolan, Matthew F

    2017-02-15

    We establish experimental preparations for optogenetic investigation of glutamatergic input to the inferior olive. Neurones in the principal olivary nucleus receive monosynaptic extra-somatic glutamatergic input from the neocortex. Glutamatergic inputs to neurones in the inferior olive generate bidirectional postsynaptic potentials (PSPs), with a fast excitatory component followed by a slower inhibitory component. Small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels are required for the slow inhibitory component of glutamatergic PSPs and oppose temporal summation of inputs at intervals ≤ 20 ms. Active integration of synaptic input within the inferior olive may play a central role in control of olivo-cerebellar climbing fibre signals. The inferior olive plays a critical role in motor coordination and learning by integrating diverse afferent signals to generate climbing fibre inputs to the cerebellar cortex. While it is well established that climbing fibre signals are important for motor coordination, the mechanisms by which neurones in the inferior olive integrate synaptic inputs and the roles of particular ion channels are unclear. Here, we test the hypothesis that neurones in the inferior olive actively integrate glutamatergic synaptic inputs. We demonstrate that optogenetically activated long-range synaptic inputs to the inferior olive, including projections from the motor cortex, generate rapid excitatory potentials followed by slower inhibitory potentials. Synaptic projections from the motor cortex preferentially target the principal olivary nucleus. We show that inhibitory and excitatory components of the bidirectional synaptic potentials are dependent upon AMPA (GluA) receptors, are GABAA independent, and originate from the same presynaptic axons. Consistent with models that predict active integration of synaptic inputs by inferior olive neurones, we find that the inhibitory component is reduced by blocking large conductance calcium

  3. Cannabinoids: Glutamatergic Transmission and Kynurenines.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Aguilera, Gabriela; Santamaría, Abel

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) comprises a complex of receptors, enzymes, and endogenous agonists that are widely distributed in the central nervous system of mammals and participates in a considerable number of neuromodulatory functions, including neurotransmission, immunological control, and cell signaling. In turn, the kynurenine pathway (KP) is the most relevant metabolic route for tryptophan degradation to form the metabolic precursor NAD(+). Recent studies demonstrate that the control exerted by the pharmacological manipulation of the ECS on the glutamatergic system in the brain may offer key information not only on the development of psychiatric disorders like psychosis and schizophrenia-like symptoms, but it also may constitute a solid basis for the development of therapeutic strategies to combat excitotoxic events occurring in neurological disorders like Huntington's disease (HD). Part of the evidence pointing to the last approach is based on experimental protocols demonstrating the efficacy of cannabinoids to prevent the deleterious actions of the endogenous neurotoxin and KP metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN). These findings intuitively raise the question about what is the precise role of the ECS in tryptophan metabolism through KP and vice versa. In this chapter, we will review basic concepts on the physiology of both the ECS and the KP to finally describe those recent findings combining the components of these two systems and hypothesize the future course that the research in this emerging field will take in the next years.

  4. Numbers, Densities, and Colocalization of AMPA- and NMDA-Type Glutamate Receptors at Individual Synapses in the Superficial Spinal Dorsal Horn of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fukazawa, Yugo; Eördögh, Mária; Muszil, Dóra; Molnár, Elek; Itakura, Makoto; Takahashi, Masami; Shigemoto, Ryuichi

    2008-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors play important roles in spinal processing of nociceptive sensory signals and induction of central sensitization in chronic pain. Here we applied highly sensitive freeze-fracture replica labeling to laminae I–II of the spinal dorsal horn of rats and investigated the numbers, densities, and colocalization of AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors at individual postsynaptic membrane specializations with a high resolution. All glutamatergic postsynaptic membranes in laminae I–II expressed AMPA receptors, and most of them (96%) were also immunoreactive for the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors. The numbers of gold particles for AMPA and NMDA receptors at individual postsynaptic membranes showed a linear correlation with the size of postsynaptic membrane specializations and varied in the range of 8–214 and 5–232 with median values of 37 and 28, whereas their densities varied in the range of 325–3365/μm2 and 102–2263/μm2 with median values of 1115/μm2 and 777/μm2, respectively. Virtually all (99%) glutamatergic postsynaptic membranes expressed GluR2, and most of them (87%) were also immunoreactive for GluR1. The numbers of gold particles for pan-AMPA, NR1, and GluR2 subunits showed a linear correlation with the size of postsynaptic surface areas. Concerning GluR1, there may be two populations of synapses with high and low GluR1 densities. In synapses larger than 0.1 μm2, GluR1 subunits were recovered in very low numbers. Differential expression of GluR1 and GluR2 subunits suggests regulation of AMPA receptor subunit composition by presynaptic mechanism. PMID:18815255

  5. Glutamate controls the induction of GABA-mediated giant depolarizing potentials through AMPA receptors in neonatal rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Bolea, S; Avignone, E; Berretta, N; Sanchez-Andres, J V; Cherubini, E

    1999-05-01

    Glutamate controls the induction of GABA-mediated giant depolarizing potentials through AMPA receptors in neonatal rat hippocampal slices. Giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) are generated by the interplay of the depolarizing action of GABA and glutamate. In this study, single and dual whole cell recordings (in current-clamp configuration) were performed from CA3 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slices obtained from postnatal (P) days P1- to P6-old rats to evaluate the role of ionotropic glutamate receptors in GDP generation. Superfusion of 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) (10-40 microM) completely blocked GDPs. However, in the presence of CNQX, it was still possible to re-induce the appearance of GDPs with GABA (20 microM) or (RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxadepropionate (AMPA) (5 microM). This effect was prevented by the more potent and selective AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 53655 (50-100 microM). In the presence of GYKI 53655, both kainic or domoic acid (0.1-1 microM) were unable to induce GDPs. In contrast, bath application of D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (50 microM) or (+)-3-(2carboxy-piperazin-4-yl)-propyl-L-phosphonic acid (20 microM) produced only a 37 +/- 9% (SE) and 36 +/- 11% reduction in GDPs frequency, respectively. Cyclothiazide, a selective blocker of AMPA receptor desensitization, increased GDP frequency by 76 +/- 14%. Experiments were also performed with an intracellular solution containing KF to block GABAA receptor-mediated responses. In these conditions, a glutamatergic component of GDP was revealed. GDPs could still be recorded synchronous with those detected simultaneously with KCl-filled electrodes, although their amplitude was smaller. Similar results were found in pair recordings obtained from minislices containing only a small portion of the CA3 area. These data suggest that GDP generation requires activation of AMPA receptors by local release of glutamate from recurrent collaterals.

  6. Temporary inhibition of AMPA receptors induces a prolonged improvement of motor performance in a mouse model of juvenile Batten disease

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Attila D.; Saje, Angelika; Wong, Andrew; Szénási, Gábor; Kiricsi, Péter; Szabó, Éva; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Pearce, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the CLN3 gene cause juvenile Batten disease, a fatal pediatric neurodegenerative disorder. The Cln3-loss-of-function (Cln3Δex1-6) mouse model of the disease displays many pathological characteristics of the human disorder including a deficit in motor coordination. We have previously found that attenuation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA)-type glutamate receptor activity in one-month-old Cln3Δex1-6 mice resulted in an immediate improvement of their motor skills. Here we show that at a later stage of the disease, in 6-7-month-old Cln3Δex1-6 mice, acute inhibition of AMPA receptors by a single intraperitoneal injection (1 mg/kg) of the non-competitive AMPA antagonist, EGIS-8332, does not have an immediate effect. Instead, it induces a delayed but prolonged improvement of motor skills. Four days after the injection of the AMPA antagonist, Cln3Δex1-6 mice reached the same motor skill level as their wild type (WT) counterparts, an improvement that persisted for an additional four days. EGIS-8332 was rapidly eliminated from the brain as measured by HPLC-MS/MS. Histological analysis performed 8 days after the drug administration revealed that EGIS-8332 did not have any impact upon glial activation or the survival of vulnerable neuron populations in 7-month-old Cln3Δex1-6 mice. We propose that temporary inhibition of AMPA receptors can induce a prolonged correction of the pre-existing abnormal glutamatergic neurotransmission in vivo for juvenile Batten disease. PMID:20971125

  7. Acute neuregulin-1 signaling influences AMPA receptor mediated responses in cultured cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fenster, Catherine; Vullhorst, Detlef; Buonanno, Andres

    2012-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is a trophic and differentiation factor that signals through ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases to regulate nervous system development. Previous studies have demonstrated that NRG1 affects plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in principal glutamatergic neurons of the hippocampus and frontal cortex; however, immunohistochemical and genetic analyses strongly suggest these effects are indirect and mediated via ErbB4 receptors on GABAergic interneurons. Here, we used cultured cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) that express ErbB4 to analyze the cell-autonomous effects of NRG1 stimulation on glutamatergic function. These cultures have the advantage that they are relatively homogenous and consist primarily of granule neurons that express ErbB4. We show that acute NRG1 treatment does not affect whole-cell AMPA or NMDA receptor (NMDAR) mediated currents in CGCs at 10–12 days in vitro. NRG1 also does not affect the frequency or amplitude of spontaneous AMPAR or NMDAR mediated miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs). To further investigate the effects of NRG1 on activity-dependent plasticity of glutamatergic synapses in CGCs, we characterized the effects of activation of synaptic NMDAR with high-glyine/0 Mg2+ on AMPAR-mEPSC frequency and amplitude. We show that high-glycine induces a form of chemical long-term potentiation (chemLTP) in CGCs characterized by an increase in AMPAR-mEPSC frequency but not amplitude. Moreover, NRG1 induces a decrease in AMPAR-mEPSC frequency following chemLTP, but does not affect AMPAR-mEPSC amplitude. CGCs in our cultures conditions express low levels of GluR1, in contrast to dissociated hippocampal cultures, but do express the long isoform of GluR4. This study provides first evidence that (1) high-glycine can induce plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in CGCs, and (2) that acute NRG1/ErbB-signaling can regulate glutamatergic plasticity in CGCs. Taken together with previous reports, our results suggest that, similar

  8. Acute neuregulin-1 signaling influences AMPA receptor mediated responses in cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Fenster, Catherine; Vullhorst, Detlef; Buonanno, Andres

    2012-01-04

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is a trophic and differentiation factor that signals through ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases to regulate nervous system development. Previous studies have demonstrated that NRG1 affects plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in principal glutamatergic neurons of the hippocampus and frontal cortex; however, immunohistochemical and genetic analyses strongly suggest these effects are indirect and mediated via ErbB4 receptors on GABAergic interneurons. Here, we used cultured cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) that express ErbB4 to analyze the cell-autonomous effects of NRG1 stimulation on glutamatergic function. These cultures have the advantage that they are relatively homogenous and consist primarily of granule neurons that express ErbB4. We show that acute NRG1 treatment does not affect whole-cell AMPA or NMDA receptor (NMDAR) mediated currents in CGCs at 10-12 days in vitro. NRG1 also does not affect the frequency or amplitude of spontaneous AMPAR or NMDAR mediated miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs). To further investigate the effects of NRG1 on activity-dependent plasticity of glutamatergic synapses in CGCs, we characterized the effects of high-glyine/0 Mg(2+) (which activates synaptic NMDARs) on AMPAR-mEPSC frequency and amplitude. We show that high-glycine induces a form of chemical long-term potentiation (chemLTP) in CGCs characterized by an increase in AMPAR-mEPSC frequency but not amplitude. Moreover, NRG1 induces a decrease in AMPAR-mEPSC frequency following chemLTP, but does not affect AMPAR-mEPSC amplitude. CGCs in our cultures conditions express low levels of GluR1, in contrast to dissociated hippocampal cultures, but do express the long isoform of GluR4. This study provides first evidence that (1) high-glycine can induce plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in CGCs, and (2) that acute NRG1/ErbB-signaling can regulate glutamatergic plasticity in CGCs. Taken together with previous reports, our results suggest that, similar

  9. Antidepressant-like effect of chromium chloride in the mouse forced swim test: involvement of glutamatergic and serotonergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Anna; Młyniec, Katarzyna; Siwek, Agata; Dybała, Małgorzata; Opoka, Włodzimierz; Poleszak, Ewa; Nowak, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) (III), an essential microelement of living organisms, was reported to exhibit potential antidepressant properties in preclinical and clinical studies. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of CrCl(3) ip administration in the forced swim test (FST) in mice and the involvement of glutamatergic and serotonergic receptors in the antidepressant-like activity of chromium. CrCl(3) in a dose of 12 mg/kg, but not in doses of 6 or 32 mg/kg, reduced the immobility time in the FST. The locomotor activity was reduced by CrCl(3) in a dose of 32 mg/kg. Moreover, the reduction of the immobility time induced by the active dose (12 mg/kg) of CrCl(3) was completely abolished by NBQX (10 mg/kg; an antagonist of the AMPA receptor) pretreatment and partially inhibited by ritanserin (4 mg/kg; an antagonist of 5-HT(2A/C) receptor), WAY 1006335 (0.1 mg/kg; an antagonist of 5-HT(1A) receptor) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (75 mg/kg; agonist of NMDA receptor) administration. The present study demonstrates the antidepressant-like activity of chromium in the mouse FST and indicates the major role of the AMPA receptor and participation of NMDA glutamatergic and 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2A/C) serotonin receptors in this activity.

  10. Evidence for the presence of glutamatergic receptors in adult Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Silva, Dayde Lane; Pessôa, Renata Fittipaldi; Noël, François

    2002-11-01

    Several studies have suggested that L-glutamate is a putative neurotransmitter in helminths. The present study investigated the presence of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) ionotropic receptors for glutamate in four subcellular fractions from adult male Schistosoma mansoni. Low-affinity (K(d)=221+/-80 nM) binding sites for [3H]kainic acid (KA) were detected in the heterogeneous (P(1)) fraction, which contains pieces of unbroken worm tissues, tegument, nuclei, and some vesicles. This binding was inhibited by classical glutamatergic ligands in the following order of potency: KA>L-glutamate>alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA)>quisqualate congruent with 6,7-dinitroquinoline-2,3-dione (DNQX). However, neither NMDA, a selective agonist for NMDA receptors, nor DL-threo-beta-hydroxyaspartate (THA) and 1-trans-pyrollidine-2-dicarboxylic acid (PDC), inhibitors of high-affinity glutamate transporters, modified [3H]KA binding to the P(1) fraction. In addition, no specific binding for 10nM [3H]AMPA was detected in any subcellular fraction from S. mansoni. These results suggested the presence of KA receptors in adult male worms. This is supported by the evidence that direct application of 10 microM KA to whole worms produced a corkscrew-like coiling of their bodies, modifying the motility of the worms. The KA-induced response, measured as a decrease of the body area, was time-dependent and reversible. PDC was ineffective at blocking the KA effects, indicating that KA does not depend on high-affinity glutamate transporters to reach its site of action. On the other hand, DNQX, the non-NMDA antagonist, was able to partially inhibit KA-induced responses. As a whole, the present data support the presence of a glutamatergic signaling pathway in this parasite.

  11. Endocytic Trafficking and Recycling Maintain a Pool of Mobile Surface AMPA Receptors Required for Synaptic Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Enrica Maria; Lu, Jiuyi; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Ehlers, Michael D.; Choquet, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY At excitatory glutamatergic synapses, postsynaptic endocytic zones (EZs), which are adjacent to the postsynaptic density (PSD), mediate clathrin-dependent endocytosis of surface AMPA Receptors (AMPAR) as a first step to receptor recycling or degradation. However, it remains unknown if receptor recycling influences AMPARs lateral diffusion, and if EZs are important for the expression of synaptic potentiation. Here we demonstrate that the presence of both EZs and AMPAR recycling maintain a large pool of mobile AMPARs at synapses. In addition, we find that synaptic potentiation is accompanied by an accumulation and immobilization of AMPARs at synapses resulting from both their exocytosis and stabilization at the PSD. Displacement of EZs from the postsynaptic region impairs the expression of synaptic potentiation by blocking AMPAR recycling. Thus receptor recycling is crucial for maintaining a mobile population of surface AMPARs which can be delivered to synapses for increases in synaptic strength. PMID:19607795

  12. Modulation of NMDA and AMPA-mediated synaptic transmission by CB1 receptors in frontal cortical pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Yan, Haidun; Wilson, Wilkie A; Swartzwelder, H Scott

    2010-06-25

    Although the endogenous cannabinoid system modulates a variety of physiological and pharmacological processes, the specific role of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission and neural plasticity is not well understood. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques, evoked or spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs or sEPSCs) were recorded from visualized, layer II/III pyramidal cells in frontal cortical slices from rat brain. Bath application of the CB1 receptor agonist, WIN 55212-2 (WIN), reduced the amplitude of NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. When co-applied with the specific CB1 antagonists, AM251 or AM281, WIN did not suppress NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs. WIN also reduced the amplitude of evoked AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs, an effect that was also reversed by AM251. Both the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs were significantly reduced by WIN. In contrast, WIN reduced the frequency, but not the amplitude of miniature EPSCs, suggesting that the suppression of glutamatergic activity by CB1 receptors in the frontal neocortex is mediated by a presynaptic mechanism. Taken together, these data indicate a critical role for endocannabinoid signaling in the regulation of excitatory synaptic transmission in frontal neocortex, and suggest a possible neuronal mechanism whereby THC regulates cortical function.

  13. NASA Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA): An application study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Lee, S. W.; Gee, W.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed orbital geometry for the adaptive multibeam phased array (AMPA) communication system is reviewed and some of the system's capabilities and preliminary specifications are highlighted. Typical AMPA user link models and calculations are presented, the principal AMPA features are described, and the implementation of the system is demonstrated. System tradeoffs and requirements are discussed. Recommendations are included.

  14. Selective cholinergic depletion in medial septum leads to impaired long term potentiation and glutamatergic synaptic currents in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kanju, Patrick M; Parameshwaran, Kodeeswaran; Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Uthayathas, Subramaniam; Josephson, Eleanor M; Rajakumar, Nagalingam; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu

    2012-01-01

    Cholinergic depletion in the medial septum (MS) is associated with impaired hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. Here we investigated whether long term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic currents, mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the CA1 hippocampal region, are affected following cholinergic lesions of the MS. Stereotaxic intra-medioseptal infusions of a selective immunotoxin, 192-saporin, against cholinergic neurons or sterile saline were made in adult rats. Four days after infusions, hippocampal slices were made and LTP, whole cell, and single channel (AMPA or NMDA receptor) currents were recorded. Results demonstrated impairment in the induction and expression of LTP in lesioned rats. Lesioned rats also showed decreases in synaptic currents from CA1 pyramidal cells and synaptosomal single channels of AMPA and NMDA receptors. Our results suggest that MS cholinergic afferents modulate LTP and glutamatergic currents in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, providing a potential synaptic mechanism for the learning and memory deficits observed in the rodent model of selective MS cholinergic lesioning.

  15. Chronic ethanol and withdrawal differentially modulate pre- and postsynaptic function at glutamatergic synapses in rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Läck, Anna K; Diaz, Marvin R; Chappell, Ann; DuBois, Dustin W; McCool, Brian A

    2007-12-01

    Withdrawal anxiety is a significant factor contributing to continued alcohol abuse in alcoholics. This anxiety is long-lasting, can manifest well after the overt physical symptoms of withdrawal, and is frequently associated with relapse in recovering alcoholics. The neurobiological mechanisms governing these withdrawal-associated increases in anxiety are currently unknown. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is a major emotional center in the brain and regulates the expression of both learned fear and anxiety. Neurotransmitter system alterations within this brain region may therefore contribute to withdrawal-associated anxiety. Because evidence suggests that glutamate-gated neurotransmitter receptors are sensitive to acute ethanol exposure, we examined the effect of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) and withdrawal (WD) on glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the BLA. We found that slices prepared from CIE and WD animals had significantly increased contributions by synaptic NMDA receptors. In addition, CIE increased the amplitude of AMPA-receptor-mediated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs), whereas only WD altered the amplitude and kinetics of tetrodotoxin-resistant spontaneous events (mEPSCs). Similarly, the frequency of sEPSCs was increased in both CIE and WD neurons, although only WD increased the frequency of mEPSCs. These data suggest that CIE and WD differentially alter both pre- and postsynaptic properties of BLA glutamatergic synapses. Finally, we show that microinjection of the AMPA-receptor antagonist, DNQX, can attenuate withdrawal-related anxiety-like behavior. Together, our results suggest that increased glutamatergic function may contribute to anxiety expressed during withdrawal from chronic ethanol.

  16. Chronic Ethanol and Withdrawal Differentially Modulate Pre- and Post-synaptic Function at Glutamatergic Synapses in Rat Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Läck, Anna K.; Diaz, Marvin R.; Chappell, Ann; DuBois, Dustin W.; McCool, Brian A.

    2008-01-01

    Withdrawal anxiety is a significant factor contributing to continued alcohol abuse in alcoholics. This anxiety is long lasting, can manifest well after the overt physical symptoms of withdrawal, and is frequently associated with relapse in recovering alcoholics. The neurobiological mechanisms governing these withdrawal-associated increases in anxiety are currently unknown. The basolateral amygdala is a major emotional center in the brain and regulates the expression of both learned-fear and anxiety. Neurotransmitter system alterations within this brain region may therefore contribute to withdrawal-associated anxiety. Since evidence suggests that glutamate-gated neurotransmitter receptors are sensitive to acute ethanol exposure, we examined the effect of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) and withdrawal (WD) on glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the basolateral amygdala. We found that slices prepared from CIE and WD animals had significantly increased contributions by synaptic NMDA-receptors. In addition, CIE increased the amplitude of AMPA receptor-mediated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC), while only WD altered the amplitude and kinetics of tetrodotoxin-resistant spontaneous events (mEPSC). Similarly, the frequency of sEPSCs was increased in both CIE and WD neurons; but, only WD increased the frequency of mEPSCs. These data suggest that CIE and WD differentially alter both pre- and post-synaptic properties of BLA glutamatergic synapses. Finally, we show that microinjection of the AMPA receptor antagonist, DNQX, can attenuate withdrawal-related anxiety-like behavior. Together, our results suggest that increased glutamatergic function may contribute to anxiety expressed during withdrawal from chronic ethanol. PMID:17898152

  17. Glutamatergic Mechanisms Associated with Seizures and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Barker-Haliski, Melissa; White, H. Steve

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is broadly characterized by aberrant neuronal excitability. Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian brain; thus, much of past epilepsy research has attempted to understand the role of glutamate in seizures and epilepsy. Seizures induce elevations in extracellular glutamate, which then contribute to excitotoxic damage. Chronic seizures can alter neuronal and glial expression of glutamate receptors and uptake transporters, further contributing to epileptogenesis. Evidence points to a shared glutamate pathology for epilepsy and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including depression, which is often a comorbidity of epilepsy. Therapies that target glutamatergic neurotransmission are available, but many have met with difficulty because of untoward adverse effects. Better understanding of this system has generated novel therapeutic targets that directly and indirectly modulate glutamatergic signaling. Thus, future efforts to manage the epileptic patient with glutamatergic-centric treatments now hold greater potential. PMID:26101204

  18. Effects of positive AMPA receptor modulators on calpain-mediated spectrin degradation in cultured hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Jourdi, Hussam; Yanagihara, Ted; Martinez, Ulises; Bi, Xiaoning; Lynch, Gary; Baudry, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Positive modulators of AMPA receptors (AMPAr), also known as ampakines, are allosteric effectors of the receptors and have been extensively studied in past years due to their potential use as treatment for various diseases and ailments of the central nervous system such as mild cognitive impairment, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Ampakines have been shown to improve performance on memory tasks in animals and in human subjects, an effect linked to their ability to increase agonist-mediated ion influx through AMPAr, thus leading to enhanced synaptic responses and facilitation of long-term potentiation (LTP) induction at glutamatergic synapses. As LTP is associated with calpain activation and spectrin degradation, we determined the effects of ampakine treatment of cultured hippocampal slices on spectrin degradation. Calpain activation was evaluated by determining the levels of the 145-150kDa degradation products of spectrin. Our data indicated that incubation of hippocampal slices with some, but not all positive modulators of AMPA receptors resulted in enhanced spectrin degradation, an effect that was blocked by a calpain inhibitor. In addition, an antagonist of AMPAr but not of NMDAr blocked ampakine-induced spectrin degradation. These results indicate that prolonged treatment with selected ampakines leads to spectrin degradation mediated by activation of the calcium-dependent protease calpain.

  19. Accumbens shell AMPA receptors mediate expression of extinguished reward seeking through interactions with basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Millan, E Zayra; McNally, Gavan P

    2011-07-01

    Extinction is the reduction in drug seeking when the contingency between drug seeking behavior and the delivery of drug reward is broken. Here, we investigated a role for the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh). Rats were trained to respond for 4% (v/v) alcoholic beer in one context (Context A) followed by extinction in a second context (Context B). Rats were subsequently tested in the training context, A (ABA), or the extinction context, B (ABB). Pre-test injections of the glutamate AMPA receptor antagonist, NBQX (1 µg) into AcbSh had no effect on renewal of alcoholic beer seeking when rats were returned to the training context (ABA). However, NBQX increased responding when rats were tested in the extinction context (ABB). In a second experiment, rats received training, extinction, and test in the same context. Pre-test injections of NBQX (0, 0.3, and 1 µg) into the AcbSh dose-dependently attenuated expression of extinction. We also found that NBQX in the AcbSh had no effect on initial acquisition of extinction or the motivation to respond for reward as measured by break point on a progressive ratio schedule. Finally, we show that pharmacological disconnection of a basolateral amygdala (BLA) → AcbSh pathway via NBQX in AcbSh combined with reversible inactivation of the contralateral BLA attenuates expression of extinction. Together, these results suggest that AcbSh AMPA receptors mediate expression of extinguished reward seeking through glutamatergic inputs from the BLA.

  20. AMPK acts as a molecular trigger to coordinate glutamatergic signals and adaptive behaviours during acute starvation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Moloud; Roy, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The stress associated with starvation is accompanied by compensatory behaviours that enhance foraging efficiency and increase the probability of encountering food. However, the molecular details of how hunger triggers changes in the activity of neural circuits to elicit these adaptive behavioural outcomes remains to be resolved. We show here that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates neuronal activity to elicit appropriate behavioural outcomes in response to acute starvation, and this effect is mediated by the coordinated modulation of glutamatergic inputs. AMPK targets both the AMPA-type glutamate receptor GLR-1 and the metabotropic glutamate receptor MGL-1 in one of the primary circuits that governs behavioural response to food availability in C. elegans. Overall, our study suggests that AMPK acts as a molecular trigger in the specific starvation-sensitive neurons to modulate glutamatergic inputs and to elicit adaptive behavioural outputs in response to acute starvation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16349.001 PMID:27642785

  1. A Monte Carlo model reveals independent signaling at central glutamatergic synapses.

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Kevin M; Bartol, Thomas M; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a biophysically realistic model of receptor activation at an idealized central glutamatergic synapse that uses Monte Carlo techniques to simulate the stochastic nature of transmission following release of a single synaptic vesicle. For the a synapse with 80 AMPA and 20 NMDA receptors, a single quantum, with 3000 glutamate molecules, opened approximately 3 NMDARs and 20 AMPARs. The number of open receptors varied directly with the total number of receptors, and the fraction of open receptors did not depend on the ratio of co-localized AMPARs and NMDARs. Variability decreased with increases in either total receptor number or quantal size, and differences between the variability of AMPAR and NMDAR responses were due solely to unequal numbers of receptors at the synapse. Despite NMDARs having a much higher affinity for glutamate than AMPARs, quantal release resulted in similar occupancy levels in both receptor types. Receptor activation increased with number of transmitter molecules released or total receptor number, whereas occupancy levels were only dependent on quantal size. Tortuous diffusion spaces reduced the extent of spillover and the activation of extrasynaptic receptors. These results support the conclusion that signaling is spatially independent within and between central glutamatergic synapses. PMID:12414671

  2. AMPA receptors in post-mortem brains of Cloninger type 1 and 2 alcoholics: a whole-hemisphere autoradiography study.

    PubMed

    Kärkkäinen, Olli; Kupila, Jukka; Häkkinen, Merja; Laukkanen, Virpi; Tupala, Erkki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Tiihonen, Jari; Storvik, Markus

    2013-12-30

    Dysfunction of the brain glutamate system has been associated with alcoholism. Ionotropic glutamatergic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) play an important role in both neurotransmission and post-synaptic plasticity. Alterations in AMPAR densities may also play a role in the neurobiological changes associated with alcoholism. In the present study, [(3)H] AMPA binding density was evaluated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), frontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), dentate gyrus and hippocampus of Cloninger type 1 (n=9) and 2 (n=8) alcoholics, and compared with non-alcoholic control subjects (n=10) by post-mortem whole-hemisphere autoradiography. The [(3)H] AMPA binding density was significantly higher in the ACC of early onset type 2 alcoholics when compared with controls (p=0.011). There was also a significant negative correlation between [(3)H] AMPA binding and previously published results of dopamine transporter (DAT) density in the ACC in these same brain samples (R=-0.95, p=0.001). Although preliminary, and from a relatively small diagnostic group, the present results help to further explain the pathology of alcohol dependence and impulsive behaviour in type 2 alcoholics.

  3. Redefining the classification of AMPA-selective ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Abstract AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) represent the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptor in the developing and adult vertebrate CNS. They are crucial for the normal hardwiring of glutamatergic circuits but also fine tune synaptic strength by cycling into and out of synapses during periods of sustained patterned activity or altered homeostasis. AMPARs are grouped into two functionally distinct tetrameric assemblies based on the inclusion or exclusion of the GluA2 receptor subunit. GluA2-containing receptors are thought to be the most abundant AMPAR in the CNS, typified by their small unitary events, Ca2+ impermeability and insensitivity to polyamine block. In contrast, GluA2-lacking AMPARs exhibit large unitary conductance, marked divalent permeability and nano- to micromolar polyamine affinity. Here, I review evidence for the existence of a third class of AMPAR which, though similarly Ca2+ permeable, is characterized by its near-insensitivity to internal and external channel block by polyamines. This novel class of AMPAR is most notably found at multivesicular release synapses found in the avian auditory brainstem and mammalian retina. Curiously, these synapses lack NMDA-type iGluRs, which are conventionally associated with controlling AMPAR insertion. The lack of NMDARs suggests that a different set of rules may govern AMPAR cycling at these synapses. AMPARs with similar functional profiles are also found on some glial cells suggesting they may have a more widespread distribution in the mammalian CNS. I conclude by noting that modest changes to the ion-permeation pathway might be sufficient to retain divalent permeability whilst eliminating polyamine sensitivity. Consequently, this emerging AMPAR subclass need not be assembled from novel subunits, yet to be cloned, but could simply occur by varying the stoichiometry of existing proteins. PMID:22106175

  4. TARP redundancy is critical for maintaining AMPA receptor function.

    PubMed

    Menuz, Karen; O'Brien, Jessica L; Karmizadegan, Siavash; Bredt, David S; Nicoll, Roger A

    2008-08-27

    Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are AMPA receptor auxiliary subunits that influence diverse aspects of receptor function. However, the full complement of physiological roles for TARPs in vivo remains poorly understood. Here we find that double knock-out mice lacking TARPs gamma-2 and gamma-3 are profoundly ataxic and fail to thrive. We demonstrate that these TARPs are critical for the synaptic targeting and kinetics of AMPA receptors in cerebellar Golgi cells, but that either alone is sufficient to fully preserve function. By analyzing the few remaining synaptic AMPA receptors in the gamma-2, gamma-3 double knock-out mice, we unexpectedly find that these TARPs specify AMPA receptor subunit composition. This study establishes a new role for TARPs in regulating AMPA receptor assembly and suggests that TARPs are necessary for proper AMPA receptor localization and function in most, if not all, neurons of the CNS.

  5. IL1RAPL1 associated with mental retardation and autism regulates the formation and stabilization of glutamatergic synapses of cortical neurons through RhoA signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takashi; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Ra, Moonjin; Taguchi, Ryo; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1) is associated with X-linked mental retardation and autism spectrum disorder. We found that IL1RAPL1 regulates synapse formation of cortical neurons. To investigate how IL1RAPL1 controls synapse formation, we here screened IL1RAPL1-interacting proteins by affinity chromatography and mass spectroscopy. IL1RAPL1 interacted with Mcf2-like (Mcf2l), a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor, through the cytoplasmic Toll/IL-1 receptor domain. Knockdown of endogenous Mcf2l and treatment with an inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), the downstream kinase of RhoA, suppressed IL1RAPL1-induced excitatory synapse formation of cortical neurons. Furthermore, we found that the expression of IL1RAPL1 affected the turnover of AMPA receptor subunits. Insertion of GluA1-containing AMPA receptors to the cell surface was decreased, whereas that of AMPA receptors composed of GluA2/3 was enhanced. Mcf2l knockdown and ROCK inhibitor treatment diminished the IL1RAPL1-induced changes of AMPA receptor subunit insertions. Our results suggest that Mcf2l-RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway mediates IL1RAPL1-dependent formation and stabilization of glutamatergic synapses of cortical neurons.

  6. Glutamatergic contributions to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist-evoked cholinergic transients in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Vinay; Man, Kingson; Decker, Michael W; Sarter, Martin

    2008-04-02

    Because modulation of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission has been hypothesized to represent a necessary mechanism mediating the beneficial cognitive effects of nicotine and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype-selective agonists, we used choline-sensitive microelectrodes for the real-time measurement of ACh release in vivo, to characterize cholinergic transients evoked by nicotine and the alpha4beta2*-selective nAChR partial agonist 2-methyl-3-(2-(S)-pyrrolindinylmethoxy)pyridine dihydrochloride (ABT-089), a clinically effective cognition enhancer. In terms of cholinergic signal amplitudes, ABT-089 was significantly more potent than nicotine in evoking ACh cholinergic transients. Moreover, cholinergic signals evoked by ABT-089 were characterized by faster signal rise time and decay rate. The nAChR antagonist mecamylamine attenuated the cholinergic signals evoked by either compound. Cholinergic signals evoked by ABT-089 were more efficaciously attenuated by the relatively beta2*-selective nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine. The alpha7 antagonist methyllycaconitine did not affect choline signal amplitudes but partly attenuated the relatively slow decay rate of nicotine-evoked cholinergic signals. Furthermore, the AMPA receptor antagonist DNQX as well as the NMDA receptor antagonist APV more potently attenuated cholinergic signals evoked by ABT-089. Using glutamate-sensitive microelectrodes to measure glutamatergic transients, ABT-089 was more potent than nicotine in evoking glutamate release. Glutamatergic signals were highly sensitive to tetrodotoxin-induced blockade of voltage-regulated sodium channels. Together, the present evidence indicates that compared with nicotine, ABT-089 evokes more potent and sharper cholinergic transients in prefrontal cortex. Glutamatergic mechanisms necessarily mediate the cholinergic effects of nAChR agonists in the prefrontal cortex.

  7. In vivo effects of antibodies from patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: further evidence of synaptic glutamatergic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A severe encephalitis that associates with auto-antibodies to the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDA-R) was recently reported. Patients' antibodies cause a decrease of the density of NMDA-R and synaptic mediated currents, but the in vivo effects on the extracellular glutamate and glutamatergic transmission are unknown. Methods We investigated the acute metabolic effects of patients' CSF and purified IgG injected in vivo. Injections were performed in CA1 area of Ammon's horn and in premotor cortex in rats. Results Patient's CSF increased the concentrations of glutamate in the extracellular space. The increase was dose-dependent and was dramatic with purified IgG. Patients' CSF impaired both the NMDA- and the AMPA-mediated synaptic regulation of glutamate, and did not affect the glial transport of glutamate. Blockade of GABA-A receptors was associated with a marked elevation of extra-cellular levels of glutamate following a pretreatment with patients' CSF. Conclusion These results support a direct role of NMDA-R antibodies upon altering glutamatergic transmission. Furthermore, we provide additional evidence in vivo that NMDA-R antibodies deregulate the glutamatergic pathways and that the encephalitis associated with these antibodies is an auto-immune synaptic disorder. PMID:21110857

  8. In vivo effects of antibodies from patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: further evidence of synaptic glutamatergic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Dalmau, Josep; Didelot, Adrien; Rogemond, Véronique; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2010-11-26

    A severe encephalitis that associates with auto-antibodies to the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDA-R) was recently reported. Patients' antibodies cause a decrease of the density of NMDA-R and synaptic mediated currents, but the in vivo effects on the extracellular glutamate and glutamatergic transmission are unknown. We investigated the acute metabolic effects of patients' CSF and purified IgG injected in vivo. Injections were performed in CA1 area of Ammon's horn and in premotor cortex in rats. Patient's CSF increased the concentrations of glutamate in the extracellular space. The increase was dose-dependent and was dramatic with purified IgG. Patients' CSF impaired both the NMDA- and the AMPA-mediated synaptic regulation of glutamate, and did not affect the glial transport of glutamate. Blockade of GABA-A receptors was associated with a marked elevation of extra-cellular levels of glutamate following a pretreatment with patients' CSF. These results support a direct role of NMDA-R antibodies upon altering glutamatergic transmission. Furthermore, we provide additional evidence in vivo that NMDA-R antibodies deregulate the glutamatergic pathways and that the encephalitis associated with these antibodies is an auto-immune synaptic disorder.

  9. Optogenetic stimulation reveals distinct modulatory properties of thalamostriatal vs corticostriatal glutamatergic inputs to fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Ponterio, Giulia; Mandolesi, Georgia; Bonsi, Paola; Pisani, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Parvalbumin-containing fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) exert a powerful feed-forward GABAergic inhibition on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs), playing a critical role in timing striatal output. However, how glutamatergic inputs modulate their firing activity is still unexplored. Here, by means of a combined optogenetic and electrophysiological approach, we provide evidence for a differential modulation of cortico- vs thalamo-striatal synaptic inputs to FSIs in transgenic mice carrying light-gated ion channels channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in glutamatergic fibers. Corticostriatal synapses show a postsynaptic facilitation, whereas thalamostriatal synapses present a postsynaptic depression. Moreover, thalamostriatal synapses exhibit more prominent AMPA-mediated currents than corticostriatal synapses, and an increased release probability. Furthermore, during current-evoked firing activity, simultaneous corticostriatal stimulation increases bursting activity. Conversely, thalamostriatal fiber activation shifts the canonical burst-pause activity to a more prolonged, regular firing pattern. However, this change in firing pattern was accompanied by a significant rise in the frequency of membrane potential oscillations. Notably, the responses to thalamic stimulation were fully abolished by blocking metabotropic glutamate 1 (mGlu1) receptor subtype, whereas both acetylcholine and dopamine receptor antagonists were ineffective. Our findings demonstrate that cortical and thalamic glutamatergic input differently modulate FSIs firing activity through specific intrinsic and synaptic properties, exerting a powerful influence on striatal outputs. PMID:26572101

  10. AMPA receptors in epilepsy and as targets for antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Rogawski, M A; Donevan, S D

    1999-01-01

    alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are key mediators of seizure spread in the nervous system and represent promising targets for antiepileptic drugs. There is emerging evidence that AMPA receptors may play a role in epileptogenesis and in seizure-induced brain damage. This evidence suggests that AMPA receptor antagonists could have broad utility in epilepsy therapy. Regional, developmental, and disease-associated variations in AMPA receptors produced by differential expression of AMPA receptor subunits and variations in posttranscriptional processing, including alternative splicing and pre-mRNA editing, provide a diversity of functionally distinct AMPA receptor isoforms that allow opportunities for selective drug targeting. Four types of AMPA receptor antagonist are discussed in this chapter: (a) competitive AMPA recognition site antagonists, including those of the quinoxalinedione and newer nonquinoxalinedione classes, (b) 2,3-benzodiazepine noncompetitive (allosteric) antagonists, (c) desensitization enhancing antagonists, exemplified by SCN-, and (d) antagonists of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors, including polyamine amide arthropod toxins and their synthetic analogues. Competitive and noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonists are broad-spectrum anticonvulsants in animal seizure models. Their effectiveness and safety for humans remain to be determined. There is evidence that these antagonists can potentiate the antiseizure activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and conventional antiepileptic drugs. This evidence suggests that the preferred use of AMPA receptor antagonists may be in combination therapies. Agents that enhance desensitization may have advantages in comparison with other AMPA receptor antagonists to the extent that they preferentially block high-frequency synaptic signaling and avoid depressing AMPA receptors on interneurons, which would lead to disinhibition and enhanced excitability

  11. [Reciprocal suppression of the AMPA and NMDA components of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the CA1 area of the rat hippocampus in vitro].

    PubMed

    Bazhenov, A V; Kleshchevnikov, A M

    1998-01-01

    The interaction between N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)- and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)-dependent components of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSP) was studied in rat hippocampal slices. Responses evoked by stimulation of the collateral commissural fibers were recorded in the radial layer of the CA1 area. Contribution of the NMDA component was changed by application of solutions with different concentrations of magnesium. In solutions with low magnesium concentration, when both AMPA and NMDA components contribute significantly to EPSP, suppression of one of the components by application of selective antagonist resulted in increase in the area of another component. Thus, the sum of pharmacologically isolated AMPA and NMDA components was significantly higher than the control EPSP. For example, at 0.1 mM of magnesium in the extracellular solution the sum of the components was 340 +/- 120% of the control EPSP (p < 0.01, N = 6). The data imply that under the control conditions the EPSP components suppress each other. The mutual suppression of the AMPA and NMDA component of the EPSP can be an important factor which influences the conductivity and plastic properties of central glutamatergic synaptic pathways.

  12. Desensitization of AMPA receptors and AMPA-NMDA receptor interaction: an in vivo cyclic GMP microdialysis study in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, E.; Raiteri, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Desensitization is an important characteristic of glutamate receptors of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) type. 2. Stimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or AMPA receptors in cerebellum results in increased production of cyclic GMP. We have investigated AMPA receptor desensitization in vivo by monitoring extracellular cyclic GMP during intracerebellar microdialysis in conscious unrestrained adult rats. 3. Local infusion of AMPA (10 to 100 microM) caused dose-related elevations of cyclic GMP levels. The effect of AMPA was prevented by the non-NMDA receptor antagonist, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG). 4. In the absence of AMPA, DNQX lowered the basal levels of cyclic GMP whereas the NMDA receptor channel antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) was ineffective. 5. Cyclothiazide, a blocker of AMPA receptor desensitization, potentiated the cyclic GMP response to exogenous AMPA. Moreover, cyclothiazide (100-300 microM) produced on its own dose-dependent elevations of extracellular cyclic GMP. The cyclothiazide-induced response was prevented not only by DNQX but also by MK-801. 6. While the cyclic GMP response elicited by AMPA was totally insensitive to MK-801, the response produced by AMPA (10 microM) plus cyclothiazide (30 microM) was strongly attenuated by the NMDA receptor antagonist (30 microM). 7. The results suggest that (a) AMPA receptors linked to the NO-cyclic GMP pathway in the cerebellum can undergo desensitization in vivo during exposure to exogenous AMPA; cyclothiazide inhibits such desensitization; (b) AMPA receptors (but not NMDA receptors) are 'tonically' activated and kept in a partly desensitized state by endogenous glutamate; (c) if cyclothiazide is present, activation of AMPA receptors may permit endogenous activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:8882607

  13. AMPA receptor regulation mechanisms: future target for safer neuroprotective drugs.

    PubMed

    Jayakar, Selwyn S; Dikshit, Madhu

    2004-06-01

    The post-synaptic AMPA receptors play an important role in mediating fast excitatory transmission in the mammalian brain. Over-activated AMPA receptors induce excitotoxicity, implicated in a number of Chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and AIDS encephalitis. AMPA receptor antagonists offer protection against neurodegeneration in the experimental models even if they are given 24 h after the injury. Because AMPA receptors seem to be involved in the neurodegenerative diseases, modulating the activity of the AMPA receptors could be an attractive approach to reduce or prevent excitotoxicity. Studies conducted recently have exhibited a number of new mechanisms for AMPA receptor regulation. Modulations of these were found to have protective implications. AMPA receptor depolarization and desensitization are protective to the neurons. Receptor desensitization depends on the receptor subunit composition. The R/G editing site and the flip/flop cassettes in AMPA receptor subunits contribute to a great extent in receptor desensitization and recovery rates. Molecules that could quicken receptor desensitization or delay recovery could be of use. AMPA receptors limit neuronal entry of Ca2+ ions by regulating Ca2+-permeability. Ca2+-permeable receptor channels are made up of GluR1, GluR3, or GluR4 subunits, whereas presence of the GluR2 subunit restricts Ca2+ entry and renders the receptor Ca2+-impermeable. GluR2 levels, however, experience a fall after neuronal insult rendering the AMPA receptors Ca2+-permeable, thus factors that could interfere with this event might prove to be very beneficial against excitotoxicity. AMPA receptor clusters are stabilized by PSD-95, which requires palmitoylation at two sites. Targeting palmitoylation of the PSD-95 can also be a useful approach to disperse AMPA clusters at the synapse. In the perisynaptic region, mGluRs are present a little away from the synapse and are among the glutamate

  14. Adult AMPA GLUA1 receptor subunit loss in 5-HT neurons results in a specific anxiety-phenotype with evidence for dysregulation of 5-HT neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tillmann; Vogt, Miriam A; Gartside, Sarah E; Berger, Stefan M; Lujan, Rafael; Lau, Thorsten; Herrmann, Elke; Sprengel, Rolf; Bartsch, Dusan; Gass, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Both the glutamatergic and serotonergic (5-HT) systems are implicated in the modulation of mood and anxiety. Descending cortical glutamatergic neurons regulate 5-HT neuronal activity in the midbrain raphe nuclei through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. To analyze the functional role of GLUA1-containing AMPA receptors in serotonergic neurons, we used the Cre-ERT2/loxP-system for the conditional inactivation of the GLUA1-encoding Gria1 gene selectively in 5-HT neurons of adult mice. These Gria1(5-HT-/-) mice exhibited a distinct anxiety phenotype but showed no alterations in locomotion, depression-like behavior, or learning and memory. Increased anxiety-related behavior was associated with significant decreases in tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) expression and activity, and subsequent reductions in tissue levels of 5-HT, its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and norepinephrine in the raphe nuclei. However, TPH2 expression and activity as well as monoamine levels were unchanged in the projection areas of 5-HT neurons. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings of 5-HT neurons revealed that, while α1-adrenoceptor-mediated excitation was unchanged, excitatory responses to AMPA were enhanced and the 5-HT1A autoreceptor-mediated inhibitory response to 5-HT was attenuated in Gria1(5-HT-/-) mice. Our data show that a loss of GLUA1 protein in 5-HT neurons enhances AMPA receptor function and leads to multiple local molecular and neurochemical changes in the raphe nuclei that dysregulate 5-HT neuronal activity and induce anxiety-like behavior.

  15. Nucleus Accumbens AMPA Receptors Are Necessary for Morphine-Withdrawal-Induced Negative-Affective States in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Shayla E.; Puttick, Daniel J.; Sawyer, Allison M.; Potter, David N.; Mague, Stephen; Carlezon, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Dependence is a hallmark feature of opiate addiction and is defined by the emergence of somatic and affective withdrawal signs. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) integrates dopaminergic and glutamatergic inputs to mediate rewarding and aversive properties of opiates. Evidence suggests that AMPA glutamate-receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity within the NAc underlies aspects of addiction. However, the degree to which NAc AMPA receptors (AMPARs) contribute to somatic and affective signs of opiate withdrawal is not fully understood. Here, we show that microinjection of the AMPAR antagonist NBQX into the NAc shell of morphine-dependent rats prevented naloxone-induced conditioned place aversions and decreases in sensitivity to brain stimulation reward, but had no effect on somatic withdrawal signs. Using a protein cross-linking approach, we found that the surface/intracellular ratio of NAc GluA1, but not GluA2, increased with morphine treatment, suggesting postsynaptic insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPARs. Consistent with this, 1-naphthylacetyl spermine trihydrochloride (NASPM), an antagonist of GluA2-lacking AMPARs, attenuated naloxone-induced decreases in sensitivity to brain stimulation reward. Naloxone decreased the surface/intracellular ratio and synaptosomal membrane levels of NAc GluA1 in morphine-dependent rats, suggesting a compensatory removal of AMPARs from synaptic zones. Together, these findings indicate that chronic morphine increases synaptic availability of GluA1-containing AMPARs in the NAc, which is necessary for triggering negative-affective states in response to naloxone. This is broadly consistent with the hypothesis that activation of NAc neurons produces acute aversive states and raises the possibility that inhibiting AMPA transmission selectively in the NAc may have therapeutic value in the treatment of addiction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Morphine dependence and withdrawal result in profound negative-affective states that play a major role in the

  16. Nucleus Accumbens AMPA Receptors Are Necessary for Morphine-Withdrawal-Induced Negative-Affective States in Rats.

    PubMed

    Russell, Shayla E; Puttick, Daniel J; Sawyer, Allison M; Potter, David N; Mague, Stephen; Carlezon, William A; Chartoff, Elena H

    2016-05-25

    Dependence is a hallmark feature of opiate addiction and is defined by the emergence of somatic and affective withdrawal signs. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) integrates dopaminergic and glutamatergic inputs to mediate rewarding and aversive properties of opiates. Evidence suggests that AMPA glutamate-receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity within the NAc underlies aspects of addiction. However, the degree to which NAc AMPA receptors (AMPARs) contribute to somatic and affective signs of opiate withdrawal is not fully understood. Here, we show that microinjection of the AMPAR antagonist NBQX into the NAc shell of morphine-dependent rats prevented naloxone-induced conditioned place aversions and decreases in sensitivity to brain stimulation reward, but had no effect on somatic withdrawal signs. Using a protein cross-linking approach, we found that the surface/intracellular ratio of NAc GluA1, but not GluA2, increased with morphine treatment, suggesting postsynaptic insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPARs. Consistent with this, 1-naphthylacetyl spermine trihydrochloride (NASPM), an antagonist of GluA2-lacking AMPARs, attenuated naloxone-induced decreases in sensitivity to brain stimulation reward. Naloxone decreased the surface/intracellular ratio and synaptosomal membrane levels of NAc GluA1 in morphine-dependent rats, suggesting a compensatory removal of AMPARs from synaptic zones. Together, these findings indicate that chronic morphine increases synaptic availability of GluA1-containing AMPARs in the NAc, which is necessary for triggering negative-affective states in response to naloxone. This is broadly consistent with the hypothesis that activation of NAc neurons produces acute aversive states and raises the possibility that inhibiting AMPA transmission selectively in the NAc may have therapeutic value in the treatment of addiction. Morphine dependence and withdrawal result in profound negative-affective states that play a major role in the maintenance of addiction

  17. Sleep-Dependent Declarative Memory Consolidation—Unaffected after Blocking NMDA or AMPA Receptors but Enhanced by NMDA Coagonist D-Cycloserine

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Gordon B; Lange, Tanja; Gais, Steffen; Born, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Sleep has a pivotal role in the consolidation of declarative memory. The coordinated neuronal replay of information encoded before sleep has been identified as a key process. It is assumed that the repeated reactivation of firing patterns in glutamatergic neuron assemblies translates into plastic synaptic changes underlying the formation of longer-term neuronal representations. Here, we tested the effects of blocking and enhancing glutamatergic neurotransmission during sleep on declarative memory consolidation in humans. We conducted three placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind studies in which participants learned a word-pair association task. Afterwards, they slept in a sleep laboratory and received glutamatergic modulators. Our first two studies aimed at impairing consolidation by administering the NMDA receptor blocker ketamine and the AMPA receptor blocker caroverine during retention sleep, which, paradoxically, remained unsuccessful, inasmuch as declarative memory performance was unaffected by the treatment. However, in the third study, administration of the NMDA receptor coagonist D-cycloserine (DCS) during retention sleep facilitated consolidation of declarative memory (word pairs) but not consolidation of a procedural control task (finger sequence tapping). Administration of DCS during a wake interval remained without effect on retention of word pairs but improved encoding of numbers. From the overall pattern, we conclude that the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent declarative memory during sleep relies on NMDA-related plastic processes that differ from those processes leading to wake encoding. We speculate that glutamatergic activation during sleep is not only involved in consolidation but also in forgetting of hippocampal memory with both processes being differentially sensitive to DCS and unselective blockade of NMDA and AMPA receptors. PMID:23887151

  18. Sleep-dependent declarative memory consolidation--unaffected after blocking NMDA or AMPA receptors but enhanced by NMDA coagonist D-cycloserine.

    PubMed

    Feld, Gordon B; Lange, Tanja; Gais, Steffen; Born, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Sleep has a pivotal role in the consolidation of declarative memory. The coordinated neuronal replay of information encoded before sleep has been identified as a key process. It is assumed that the repeated reactivation of firing patterns in glutamatergic neuron assemblies translates into plastic synaptic changes underlying the formation of longer-term neuronal representations. Here, we tested the effects of blocking and enhancing glutamatergic neurotransmission during sleep on declarative memory consolidation in humans. We conducted three placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind studies in which participants learned a word-pair association task. Afterwards, they slept in a sleep laboratory and received glutamatergic modulators. Our first two studies aimed at impairing consolidation by administering the NMDA receptor blocker ketamine and the AMPA receptor blocker caroverine during retention sleep, which, paradoxically, remained unsuccessful, inasmuch as declarative memory performance was unaffected by the treatment. However, in the third study, administration of the NMDA receptor coagonist D-cycloserine (DCS) during retention sleep facilitated consolidation of declarative memory (word pairs) but not consolidation of a procedural control task (finger sequence tapping). Administration of DCS during a wake interval remained without effect on retention of word pairs but improved encoding of numbers. From the overall pattern, we conclude that the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent declarative memory during sleep relies on NMDA-related plastic processes that differ from those processes leading to wake encoding. We speculate that glutamatergic activation during sleep is not only involved in consolidation but also in forgetting of hippocampal memory with both processes being differentially sensitive to DCS and unselective blockade of NMDA and AMPA receptors.

  19. Cognitive improvement by acute growth hormone is mediated by NMDA and AMPA receptors and MEK pathway.

    PubMed

    Ramis, Margarita; Sarubbo, Fiorella; Sola, Jessica; Aparicio, Sara; Garau, Celia; Miralles, Antonio; Esteban, Susana

    2013-08-01

    It has been reported that Growth hormone (GH) has an immediate effect enhancing excitatory postsynaptic potentials mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors in hippocampal area CA1. As GH plays a role in adult memory processing, this work aims to study the acute effects of GH on working memory tasks in rodents and the possible involvement of NMDA and AMPA receptors and also the MEK/ERK signalling pathway. To evaluate memory processes, two different tests were used, the spatial working memory 8-arm radial maze, and the novel object recognition as a form of non-spatial working memory test. Acute GH treatment (1mg/kg i.p., 1h) improved spatial learning in the radial maze respect to the control group either in young rats (reduction of 46% in the performance trial time and 61% in the number of errors), old rats (reduction of 38% in trial time and 48% in the number of errors), and adult mice (reduction of 32% in the performance time and 34% in the number of errors). GH treatment also increased the time spent exploring the novel object respect to the familiar object compared to the control group in young rats (from 63% to 79%), old rats (from 53% to 70%), and adult mice (from 61 to 68%). The improving effects of GH on working memory tests were blocked by the NMDA antagonist MK801 dizocilpine (0.025 mg/kg i.p.) injected 10 min before the administration of GH, in both young and old rats. In addition, the AMPA antagonist DNQX (1mg/kg i.p.) injected 10 min before the administration of GH to young rats, blocked the positive effect of GH. Moreover, in mice, the MEK inhibitor SL 327 (20mg/kg i.p.) injected 30 min before the administration of GH, blocked the positive effect of GH on radial maze and the novel object recognition. In conclusion, GH improved working memory processes through both glutamatergic receptors NMDA and AMPA and it required the activation of extracellular MEK/ERK signalling pathway. These effects could be related to the enhancement of excitatory synaptic

  20. Revisiting AMPA receptors as an antiepileptic drug target.

    PubMed

    Rogawski, Michael A

    2011-03-01

    In the 1990s there was intense interest in ionotropic glutamate receptors as therapeutic targets for diverse neurological disorders, including epilepsy. NMDA receptors were thought to play a key role in the generation of seizures, leading to clinical studies of NMDA receptor blocking drugs in epilepsy. Disappointing results dampened enthusiasm for ionotropic glutamate receptors as a therapeutic target. Eventually it became appreciated that another type of ionotropic glutamate receptor, the AMPA receptor, is actually the predominant mediator of excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and moreover that AMPA receptors are critical to the generation and spread of epileptic activity. As drugs became available that selectively target AMPA receptors, it was possible to demonstrate that AMPA receptor antagonists have powerful antiseizure activity in in vitro and in vivo models. A decade later, promising clinical studies with AMPA receptor antagonists, including the potent noncompetitive antagonist perampanel, are once again focusing attention on AMPA receptors as a drug target for epilepsy therapy.

  1. Superactivation of AMPA receptors by auxiliary proteins

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Anna L.; Plested, Andrew J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate receptors form complexes in the brain with auxiliary proteins, which control their activity during fast synaptic transmission through a seemingly bewildering array of effects. Here we devise a way to isolate the activation of complexes using polyamines, which enables us to show that transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) exert their effects principally on the channel opening reaction. A thermodynamic argument suggests that because TARPs promote channel opening, receptor activation promotes AMPAR-TARP complexes into a superactive state with high open probability. A simple model based on this idea predicts all known effects of TARPs on AMPA receptor function. This model also predicts unexpected phenomena including massive potentiation in the absence of desensitization and supramaximal recovery that we subsequently detected in electrophysiological recordings. This transient positive feedback mechanism has implications for information processing in the brain, because it should allow activity-dependent facilitation of excitatory synaptic transmission through a postsynaptic mechanism. PMID:26744192

  2. Sucrose Ingestion Induces Rapid AMPA Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Tukey, David S.; Ferreira, Jainne M.; Antoine, Shannon O.; D’amour, James A.; Ninan, Ipe; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Incontro, Salvatore; Wincott, Charlotte; Horwitz, Julian K.; Hartner, Diana T.; Guarini, Carlo B.; Khatri, Latika; Goffer, Yossef; Xu, Duo; Titcombe, Roseann F.; Khatri, Megna; Marzan, Dave S.; Mahajan, Shahana S.; Wang, Jing; Froemke, Robert C.; Carr, Kenneth D.; Aoki, Chiye; Ziff, Edward B.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which natural rewards such as sugar affect synaptic transmission and behavior are largely unexplored. Here, we investigate regulation of nucleus accumbens synapses by sucrose intake. Previous studies have shown that AMPA receptor trafficking is a major mechanism for regulating synaptic strength, and that in vitro, trafficking of AMPA receptors containing the GluA1 subunit takes place by a two-step mechanism involving extrasynaptic and then synaptic receptor transport. We report that in rat, repeated daily ingestion of a 25% sucrose solution transiently elevated spontaneous locomotion and potentiated accumbens core synapses through incorporation of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CPARs), which are GluA1-containing, GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological, biochemical and quantitative electron microscopy studies revealed that sucrose training (7 days) induced a stable (>24 hr) intraspinous GluA1 population, and that in these rats a single sucrose stimulus rapidly (5 min) but transiently (<24 hr) elevated GluA1 at extrasynaptic sites. CPARs and dopamine D1 receptors were required in vivo for elevated locomotion after sucrose ingestion. Significantly, a 7-day protocol of daily ingestion of a 3% solution of saccharin, a non-caloric sweetener, induced synaptic GluA1 similarly to 25% sucrose ingestion. These findings identify multi-step GluA1 trafficking, previously described in vitro, as a mechanism for acute regulation of synaptic transmission in vivo by a natural orosensory reward. Trafficking is stimulated by a chemosensory pathway that is not dependent on the caloric value of sucrose. PMID:23554493

  3. AMPA receptors in the therapeutic management of depression.

    PubMed

    Bleakman, D; Alt, A; Witkin, J M

    2007-04-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence implicating a role for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4 isoxazoleproprionic acid (AMPA) receptors in major depression and in the actions of antidepressant drugs. Alterations in AMPA receptors and other ionotropic glutamate receptors have been reported in depression, and following antidepressant treatment. Compounds which augment signaling through AMPA receptors (AMPA receptor potentiators) exhibit antidepressant-like behavioral effects in animal models, and produce neuronal effects similar to those produced by currently available antidepressants, including neurotrophin induction and increases in hippocampal progenitor cell proliferation. Additionally, the antidepressant fluoxetine has been found to alter AMPA receptor phosphorylation in a manner that is expected to increase AMPA receptor signaling. Data from mutant mice suggest that AMPA receptors may regulate the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, a neurotrophin which has been implicated in the actions of antidepressant therapies. Combined, these data suggest that AMPA receptors may be in a key position to regulate mood disorders, and that compounds which target AMPA receptors may prove useful in the clinical management of depression.

  4. Overview of Glutamatergic Dysregulation in Central Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Miladinovic, Tanya; Nashed, Mina G.; Singh, Gurmit

    2015-01-01

    As the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate plays a key role in many central pathologies, including gliomas, psychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurodegenerative disorders. Post-mortem and serological studies have implicated glutamatergic dysregulation in these pathologies, and pharmacological modulation of glutamate receptors and transporters has provided further validation for the involvement of glutamate. Furthermore, efforts from genetic, in vitro, and animal studies are actively elucidating the specific glutamatergic mechanisms that contribute to the aetiology of central pathologies. However, details regarding specific mechanisms remain sparse and progress in effectively modulating glutamate to alleviate symptoms or inhibit disease states has been relatively slow. In this report, we review what is currently known about glutamate signalling in central pathologies. We also discuss glutamate’s mediating role in comorbidities, specifically cancer-induced bone pain and depression. PMID:26569330

  5. Cell type-specific long-term plasticity at glutamatergic synapses onto hippocampal interneurons expressing either parvalbumin or CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Wiebke; Szabo, Andras; Somogyi, Jozsef; Somogyi, Peter; Lamsa, Karri P

    2010-01-27

    Different GABAergic interneuron types have specific roles in hippocampal function, and anatomical as well as physiological features vary greatly between interneuron classes. Long-term plasticity of interneurons has mostly been studied in unidentified GABAergic cells and is known to be very heterogeneous. Here we tested whether cell type-specific plasticity properties in distinct GABAergic interneuron types might underlie this heterogeneity. We show that long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD), two common forms of synaptic plasticity, are expressed in a highly cell type-specific manner at glutamatergic synapses onto hippocampal GABAergic neurons. Both LTP and LTD are generated in interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV+), whereas interneurons with similar axon distributions but expressing cannabinoid receptor-1 show no lasting plasticity in response to the same protocol. In addition, LTP or LTD occurs in PV+ interneurons with different efferent target domains. Perisomatic-targeting PV+ basket and axo-axonic interneurons express LTP, whereas glutamatergic synapses onto PV+ bistratified cells display LTD. Both LTP and LTD are pathway specific, independent of NMDA receptors, and occur at synapses with calcium-permeable (CP) AMPA receptors. Plasticity in interneurons with CP-AMPA receptors strongly modulates disynaptic GABAergic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal cells. We propose that long-term plasticity adjusts the synaptic strength between pyramidal cells and interneurons in a cell type-specific manner and, in the defined CA1 interneurons, shifts the spatial pattern of inhibitory weight from pyramidal cell dendrites to the perisomatic region.

  6. Eugenol reduces acute pain in mice by modulating the glutamatergic and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) pathways.

    PubMed

    Dal Bó, Wladmir; Luiz, Ana Paula; Martins, Daniel F; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Santos, Adair R S

    2013-10-01

    Eugenol is utilized together with zinc oxide in odontological clinical for the cementation of temporary prostheses and the temporary restoration of teeth and cavities. This work explored the antinociceptive effects of the eugenol in different models of acute pain in mice and investigated its possible modulation of the inhibitory (opioid) and excitatory (glutamatergic and pro-inflammatory cytokines) pathways of nociceptive signaling. The administration of eugenol (3-300 mg/kg, p.o., 60 min or i.p., 30 min) inhibited 82 ± 10% and 90 ± 6% of the acetic acid-induced nociception, with ID₅₀ values of 51.3 and 50.2 mg/kg, respectively. In the glutamate test, eugenol (0.3-100 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the response behavior by 62 ± 5% with an ID₅₀ of 5.6 mg/kg. In addition, the antinociceptive effect of eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the glutamate test was prevented by the i.p. treatment for mice with naloxone. The pretreatment of mice with eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was able to inhibit the nociception induced by the intrathecal (i.t.) injection of glutamate (37 ± 9%), kainic (acid kainite) (41 ± 12%), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) (55 ± 5%), and substance P (SP) (39 ± 8%). Furthermore, eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) also inhibited biting induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, 65 ± 8%). These results extend our current knowledge of eugenol and confirm that it promotes significant antinociception against different mouse models of acute pain. The mechanism of action appears to involve the modulation of the opioid system and glutamatergic receptors (i.e., kainate and AMPA), and the inhibition of TNF-α. Thus, eugenol could represent an important compound in the treatment for acute pain.

  7. Neuroligin 1 modulates striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission in a pathway and NMDAR subunit-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Felipe; Xuan, Zhong; Liu, Shunan; Powell, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    Together with its presynaptic partner Neurexin 1 (Nxn1), Neuroligin 1 (NL1) participates in synapse specification and synapse maintenance. We and others have shown that NL1 can also modulate glutamatergic synaptic function in the central nervous system of rodent models. These molecular/cellular changes can translate into altered animal behaviors that are thought to be analogous to symptomatology of neuropsychiatric disorders. For example, in dorsal striatum of NL1 deletion mice, we previously reported that the ratio N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) mediated synaptic currents to α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (AMPAR) mediated synaptic currents (NMDA/AMPA) is reduced in medium spiny neuron (MSNs). Importantly, this reduction in NMDA/AMPA ratio correlated with increased repetitive grooming. The striatum is the input nucleus of the basal ganglia (BG). Classical models of this circuitry imply that there are two principal pathways that render distinct and somewhat opposite striatal outputs critical to the function of these nuclei in modulating motor behavior. Thus, we set out to better characterize the effects of NL1 deletion on direct and indirect pathways of the dorsal striatum by genetically labeling MSNs participating in the direct and indirect pathways. We demonstrate that a decrease in NMDAR-mediated currents is limited to MSNs of the direct pathway. Furthermore, the decrease in NMDAR-mediated currents is largely due to a reduction in function of NMDARs containing the GluN2A subunit. In contrast, indirect pathway MSNs in NL1 knockout (KO) mice showed a reduction in the frequency of miniature excitatory neurotransmission not observed in the direct pathway. Thus, NL1 deletion differentially affects direct and indirect pathway MSNs in dorsal striatum. These findings have potential implications for striatal function in NL1 KO mice. PMID:26283958

  8. Ethanol facilitates glutamatergic transmission to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Cheng; Shao, Xuesi Max; Olive, M Foster; Griffin, William C; Li, Ke-Yong; Krnjević, Kresimir; Zhou, Chunyi; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2009-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying alcohol addiction are poorly understood. In several brain areas, ethanol depresses glutamatergic excitatory transmission, but how it affects excitatory synapses on dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a crucial site for the development of drug addiction, is not known. We report here that in midbrain slices from rats, clinically relevant concentrations of ethanol (10-80 mM) increase the amplitude of evoked EPSCs and reduce their paired-pulse ratio in dopamine neurons in the VTA. The EPSCs were mediated by glutamate alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. In addition, ethanol increases the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs. Furthermore, ethanol increases extracellular glutamate levels in the VTA of midbrain slices. The effects of ethanol are mimicked by SKF 38393, a dopamine D(1) receptor agonist, and by GBR 12935, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, and they are blocked by SKF 83566, a D(1) antagonist, or by reserpine, which depletes dopamine stores. The enhancement of sEPSC frequency reaches a peak with 40 mM ethanol and declines with concentrations >or=80 mM ethanol, which is quite likely a result of D(2) receptor activation as raclopride, a D(2) receptor blocker, significantly enhanced 80 mM ethanol-induced enhancement of sEPSCs. Finally, 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione (DNQX), an AMPA receptor antagonist, attenuates ethanol-induced excitation of VTA DA neurons. We therefore conclude that, acting via presynaptic D(1) receptors, ethanol at low concentrations increases glutamate release in the VTA, thus raising somatodendritic dopamine release, which further activates the presynaptic D(1) receptors. Enhancement of this positive feedback loop may significantly contribute to the development of alcohol addiction.

  9. Ethanol Facilitates Glutamatergic Transmission to Dopamine Neurons in the Ventral Tegmental Area

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Cheng; Shao, Xuesi Max; Olive, M Foster; Griffin, William C; Li, Ke-Yong; Krnjević, Kresimir; Zhou, Chunyi; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2009-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying alcohol addiction are poorly understood. In several brain areas, ethanol depresses glutamatergic excitatory transmission, but how it affects excitatory synapses on dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a crucial site for the development of drug addiction, is not known. We report here that in midbrain slices from rats, clinically relevant concentrations of ethanol (10–80 mM) increase the amplitude of evoked EPSCs and reduce their paired-pulse ratio in dopamine neurons in the VTA. The EPSCs were mediated by glutamate α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. In addition, ethanol increases the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs. Furthermore, ethanol increases extracellular glutamate levels in the VTA of midbrain slices. The effects of ethanol are mimicked by SKF 38393, a dopamine D1 receptor agonist, and by GBR 12935, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, and they are blocked by SKF 83566, a D1 antagonist, or by reserpine, which depletes dopamine stores. The enhancement of sEPSC frequency reaches a peak with 40mM ethanol and declines with concentrations ≥80mM ethanol, which is quite likely a result of D2 receptor activation as raclopride, a D2 receptor blocker, significantly enhanced 80mM ethanol-induced enhancement of sEPSCs. Finally, 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione (DNQX), an AMPA receptor antagonist, attenuates ethanol-induced excitation of VTA DA neurons. We therefore conclude that, acting via presynaptic D1 receptors, ethanol at low concentrations increases glutamate release in the VTA, thus raising somatodendritic dopamine release, which further activates the presynaptic D1 receptors. Enhancement of this positive feedback loop may significantly contribute to the development of alcohol addiction. PMID:18596684

  10. Novel glutamatergic agents for major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Ibrahim, Lobna; Henter, Ioline D.; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Mood disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BPD) are common, chronic, recurrent mental illnesses that affect the lives and functioning of millions of individuals worldwide. Growing evidence suggests that the glutamatergic system is central to the neurobiology and treatment of these disorders. Here, we review data supporting the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology of mood disorders as well as the efficacy of glutamatergic agents as novel therapeutics. PMID:21971560

  11. Synaptic transmission and plasticity require AMPA receptor anchoring via its N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Jake F; Ho, Hinze; Greger, Ingo H

    2017-01-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and are selectively recruited during activity-dependent plasticity to increase synaptic strength. A prerequisite for faithful signal transmission is the positioning and clustering of AMPARs at postsynaptic sites. The mechanisms underlying this positioning have largely been ascribed to the receptor cytoplasmic C-termini and to AMPAR-associated auxiliary subunits, both interacting with the postsynaptic scaffold. Here, using mouse organotypic hippocampal slices, we show that the extracellular AMPAR N-terminal domain (NTD), which projects midway into the synaptic cleft, plays a fundamental role in this process. This highly sequence-diverse domain mediates synaptic anchoring in a subunit-selective manner. Receptors lacking the NTD exhibit increased mobility in synapses, depress synaptic transmission and are unable to sustain long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, synaptic transmission and the expression of LTP are dependent upon an AMPAR anchoring mechanism that is driven by the NTD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23024.001 PMID:28290985

  12. Benzoxazinones as potent positive allosteric AMPA receptor modulators: part I.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Rudolf; Li, Yong-Xin; Hampson, Aidan; Zhong, Sheng; Harris, Clayton; Marrs, Christopher; Rachwal, Stanislaw; Ulas, Jolanta; Nielsson, Lena; Rogers, Gary

    2011-07-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are an increasingly important therapeutic target in the CNS. Aniracetam, the first identified potentiator of AMPARs, led to the rigid and more potent CX614. This lead molecule was optimized in order to increase affinity towards the AMPA receptor. The substitution of the dioxine with a benzoxazinone ring system increased the activity and allowed further investigation of the sidechain SAR.

  13. AMPA Receptors as Therapeutic Targets for Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin; Goodman, Lucy; Fourie, Chantelle; Schenk, Susan; Leitch, Beulah; Montgomery, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Almost every neurological disease directly or indirectly affects synapse function in the brain. However, these diseases alter synapses through different mechanisms, ultimately resulting in altered synaptic transmission and/or plasticity. Glutamate is the major neurotransmitter that mediates excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain through activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptors. These receptors have therefore been identified as a target for the development of therapeutic treatments for neurological disorders including epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, autism, and drug addiction. The fact that AMPA receptors play a dominant role throughout the brain raises the significant challenge of selectively targeting only those regions affected by disease, and clinical trials have raised doubt regarding the feasibility of specifically targeting AMPA receptors for new therapeutic options. Benzamide compounds that act as positive allosteric AMPA receptor modulators, known as AMPAkines, can act on specific brain regions and were initially proposed to revolutionize the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with neurological disorders. Their therapeutic potential has since declined due to inconsistent results in clinical trials. However, recent advances in basic biomedical research are significantly increasing our knowledge of AMPA receptor structure, binding sites, and interactions with auxiliary proteins. In particular, the large complex of postsynaptic proteins that interact with AMPA receptor subunits have been shown to control AMPA receptor insertion, location, pharmacology, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. These proteins are now being considered as alternative therapeutic target sites for modulating AMPA receptors in neurological disorders.

  14. TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptors through lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sumioka, Akio; Yan, Dan; Tomita, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate across synapses, constructing neural circuits in the brain. AMPA-type glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors mediating fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors localize at synapses by forming protein complexes with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and PSD-95-like MAGUKs. Among the three classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-, NMDA, kainate-type), AMPA receptor activity is most regulatable by neuronal activity to adjust synaptic strength. Here, we mutated the prototypical TARP, stargazin, and found that TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptor activity in vivo. We also found that stargazin interacts with negatively-charged lipid bilayers in its phosphorylation dependent manner, and that the lipid interaction inhibited stargazin binding to PSD-95. Cationic lipids dissociated stargazin from lipid bilayers and enhanced synaptic AMPA receptor activity in a stargazin phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thus, TARP phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission via a lipid bilayer interaction. PMID:20547132

  15. TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptors through lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sumioka, Akio; Yan, Dan; Tomita, Susumu

    2010-06-10

    Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate across synapses, constructing neural circuits in the brain. AMPA-type glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors mediating fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors localize at synapses by forming protein complexes with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and PSD-95-like membrane-associated guanylate kinases. Among the three classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, NMDA, and kainate type), AMPA receptor activity is most regulatable by neuronal activity to adjust synaptic strength. Here, we mutated the prototypical TARP, stargazin, and found that TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptor activity in vivo. We also found that stargazin interacts with negatively charged lipid bilayers in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and that the lipid interaction inhibited stargazin binding to PSD-95. Cationic lipids dissociated stargazin from lipid bilayers and enhanced synaptic AMPA receptor activity in a stargazin phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thus, TARP phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission via a lipid bilayer interaction.

  16. The food intake-suppressive effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling in the ventral tegmental area are mediated by AMPA/kainate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G.; Ortinski, Pavel I.; Rupprecht, Laura E.; Olivos, Diana R.; Alhadeff, Amber L.; Pierce, R. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is physiologically relevant for the control of palatable food intake. Here, we tested whether the food intake-suppressive effects of VTA GLP-1R activation are mediated by glutamatergic signaling within the VTA. Intra-VTA injections of the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) reduced palatable high-fat food intake in rats primarily by reducing meal size; these effects were mediated in part via glutamatergic AMPA/kainate but not NMDA receptor signaling. Additional behavioral data indicated that GLP-1R expressed specifically within the VTA can partially mediate the intake- and body weight-suppressive effects of systemically administered Ex-4, offering the intriguing possibility that this receptor population may be clinically relevant for food intake control. Intra-VTA Ex-4 rapidly increased tyrosine hydroxylase levels within the VTA, suggesting that GLP-1R activation modulates VTA dopaminergic signaling. Further evidence for this hypothesis was provided by electrophysiological data showing that Ex-4 increased the frequency of AMPA-mediated currents and reduced the paired/pulse ratio in VTA dopamine neurons. Together, these data provide novel mechanisms by which GLP-1R agonists in the mesolimbic reward system control for palatable food intake. PMID:24105414

  17. Tricyclic antidepressants, but not the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, bind to the S1S2 domain of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Laura; Seguin, Sandlin; Gentile, Lisa

    2007-02-15

    The hypothesis that depression is caused solely by a decrease in synaptic availability of monoaminergic neurotransmitters has been questioned over the past two decades. Based on accumulating data, it seems more plausible that cross-talk exists between neurotransmitters in the CNS, including the glutamatergic system. Glutamate, the major fast excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS, is the natural agonist for the ionotropic glutamate receptors, a family of ligand-gated ion channels including NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate), AMPA (amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid), and kainate receptors. In this work, we show that five tricyclic antidepressants bind to the S1S2 domain of the GluR2 subunit of the AMPA receptor. A combination of fluorescence quenching, Stern-Volmer analyses, and protease protection assays differentiate the binding of each antidepressant. These analyses provide no evidence for the binding of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, to this domain. The data presented provides further support for a role of the glutamatergic system in antidepressant activity.

  18. NMDA and AMPA receptors are involved in the antidepressant-like activity of tianeptine in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Wlaź, Piotr; Kasperek, Regina; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Szumiło, Michał; Wróbel, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel; Poleszak, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    It is known that tianeptine exhibits antidepressant-like activity. Its influence on the glutamatergic system is also known, but the mechanisms involved in this activity remain to be established. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the glutamate pathway in the antidepressant-like action of tianeptine. We investigated the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor ligands on tianeptine-induced activity in the forced swim test (FST) in mice. The antidepressant-like activity of tianeptine (30 m/kg, ip) was significantly antagonized by D-serine (100 nmol/mouse icv) and NBQX (10 mg/kg, ip). Moreover, low, ineffective doses of the glycine/NMDA site antagonist L-701,324 (1 mg/kg, ip) administered together with low, ineffective doses of tianeptine (20 mg/kg, ip) exhibited a significant reduction of immobility time in the FST. These doses of the examined agents, which did have an effect in the FST, did not alter locomotor activity. The present study indicates that the antidepressant-like activity of tianeptine in the FST involves both NMDA and AMPA receptors and suggests that the interaction between serotonergic and glutamatergic transmission may play an important role in the action of tianeptine.

  19. Region-specific alterations of AMPA receptor phosphorylation and signaling pathways in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mark William; Lopes, Samantha Cristiane; Costa, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Rieger, Débora Kurrle; Peres, Tanara Vieira; Eyng, Helena; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Diaz, Alexandre Paim; Nunes, Jean Costa; Walz, Roger; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2015-08-01

    Disturbances in glutamatergic transmission and signaling pathways have been associated with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in humans. However, the profile of these alterations within specific regions of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex has not yet been examined. The pilocarpine model in rodents reproduces the main features of TLE in humans. The present study aims to characterize specific alterations of the glutamatergic transmission and signaling pathways in the dorsal (DH) and ventral hippocampus (VH) and temporal cortex (Ctx) of male adult Wistar rats 60 days after pilocarpine treatment (chronic period). The western blotting analyzes show a decrease of AMPA glutamate receptor subunit (GluA1)-Ser(845) phosphorylation; reduction of ERK1 and PKA activity; up-regulation of GFAP and down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAT2 expression in the DH. In contrast, in the VH it was observed a decrease of GluA1-Ser(831) phosphorylation and JNKp54 and PKC activity. In the Ctx, only ERK1 phosphorylation/activity decreased. The level of GluA1-Ser(845) phosphorylation and PKA activity (DH) and the level of GluA1-Ser(831) phosphorylation and PKC activity (VH) appear to be correlated, respectively. These findings suggest a differential imbalance of the signaling pathways involved in the site-specific phosphorylation of AMPA receptor in the hippocampus. Furthermore, we suggest that dorsal hippocampus is probably more susceptible to the impairment of glutamate uptake and gliose, since only this area displayed a significant decrease of EAAT2 and increment of GFAP. Taken together, our study suggests that specific neurochemical alterations take place in hippocampal sub regions. This approach may be valuable for understanding the onset of seizures and the alterations of neuronal excitability in specific regions and may help to establish therapeutic targets for treatment of this neuropathology.

  20. An endogenous glutamatergic drive onto somatic motoneurons contributes to the stereotypical pattern of muscle tone across the sleep-wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Christian; Lai, Diane; Siegel, Jerome; Peever, John

    2008-04-30

    Skeletal muscle tone is modulated in a stereotypical pattern across the sleep-wake cycle. Abnormalities in this modulation contribute to most of the major sleep disorders; therefore, characterizing the neurochemical substrate responsible for transmitting a sleep-wake drive to somatic motoneurons needs to be determined. Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter that modulates motoneuron excitability; however, its role in regulating motoneuron excitability and muscle tone during natural sleep-wake behaviors is unknown. Therefore, we used reverse-microdialysis, electrophysiology, pharmacological, and histological methods to determine how changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission within the trigeminal motor pool contribute to the sleep-wake pattern of masseter muscle tone in behaving rats. We found that blockade of non-NMDA and NMDA glutamate receptors (via CNQX and d-AP-5) on trigeminal motoneurons reduced waking masseter tone to sleeping levels, indicating that masseter tone is maximal during alert waking because motoneurons are activated by an endogenous glutamatergic drive. This wake-related drive is switched off in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and this contributes to the suppression of muscle tone during this state. We also show that a functional glutamatergic drive generates the muscle twitches that characterize phasic rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. However, loss of a waking glutamatergic drive is not sufficient for triggering the motor atonia that characterizes REM sleep because potent activation of either AMPA or NMDA receptors on trigeminal motoneurons was unable to reverse REM atonia. We conclude that an endogenous glutamatergic drive onto somatic motoneurons contributes to the stereotypical pattern of muscle tone during wakefulness, NREM sleep, and phasic REM sleep but not during tonic REM sleep.

  1. Involvement of glutamatergic receptors in the nucleus cuneiformis in modulating morphine-induced antinociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Haghparast, Abbas; Gheitasi, Izad-Panah; Lashgari, Reza

    2007-11-01

    The nucleus cuneiformis (CnF), located just ventrolateral to the periaqueductal gray, is part of the descending pain modulatory system. Neurons in the CnF project to medullary nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), which plays an important role on pain modulation. In this study, we investigated the effect of microinjection of the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801, the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist AP-7, and the kainate/AMPA receptor antagonist DNQX, alone or in combination with morphine into the nucleus cuneiformis on morphine-induced analgesia to understand the role of glutamatergic receptors in the modulating activity of morphine. Antinociception was assessed with the tail-flick test. Morphine (10, 20, 40 microg in 0.5 microl saline) had an antinociceptive effect, increasing tail-flick latency in a dose-dependent manner. Microinjection of MK-801 (10 microg/0.5 microl saline) and AP7 (3 microg/0.5 microl saline) prior to morphine microinjection (10 microg/0.5 microl saline) attenuated the antinociceptive effects of morphine, whereas DNQX (0.5 microg/0.5 microl saline) showed a partial antinociceptive effect and potentiated the analgesic effect of morphine. These results indicated that the NMDA receptor partially potentiates the antinociceptive effect of morphine. Our results suggest that NMDA but not non-NMDA receptors are involved in the antinociception produced by morphine in the CnF. The non-NMDA receptors in this area may have a facilitatory effect on nociceptive transmission. The fact that morphine's effect was potentiated by NMDA receptor suggests that projection neurons within the CnF are under tonic, glutamatergic input and when the influence of this input is blocked, the descending inhibitory system is inactivated.

  2. The Biochemistry, Ultrastructure, and Subunit Assembly Mechanism of AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-Rs) are tetrameric ligand-gated ion channels that play crucial roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Our knowledge about the ultrastructure and subunit assembly mechanisms of intact AMPA-Rs was very limited. However, the new studies using single particle EM and X-ray crystallography are revealing important insights. For example, the tetrameric crystal structure of the GluA2cryst construct provided the atomic view of the intact receptor. In addition, the single particle EM structures of the subunit assembly intermediates revealed the conformational requirement for the dimer-to-tetramer transition during the maturation of AMPA-Rs. These new data in the field provide new models and interpretations. In the brain, the native AMPA-R complexes contain auxiliary subunits that influence subunit assembly, gating, and trafficking of the AMPA-Rs. Understanding the mechanisms of the auxiliary subunits will become increasingly important to precisely describe the function of AMPA-Rs in the brain. The AMPA-R proteomics studies continuously reveal a previously unexpected degree of molecular heterogeneity of the complex. Because the AMPA-Rs are important drug targets for treating various neurological and psychiatric diseases, it is likely that these new native complexes will require detailed mechanistic analysis in the future. The current ultrastructural data on the receptors and the receptor-expressing stable cell lines that were developed during the course of these studies are useful resources for high throughput drug screening and further drug designing. Moreover, we are getting closer to understanding the precise mechanisms of AMPA-R-mediated synaptic plasticity. PMID:21080238

  3. CP-465,022, a selective noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist, blocks AMPA receptors but is not neuroprotective in vivo.

    PubMed

    Menniti, Frank S; Buchan, Alistair M; Chenard, Bertrand L; Critchett, Donald J; Ganong, Alan H; Guanowsky, Victor; Seymour, Patricia A; Welch, Willard M

    2003-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor inhibition has been hypothesized to provide neuroprotective efficacy after cerebral ischemia on the basis of the activity in experimental ischemia models of a variety of compounds with varying selectivity for AMPA over other glutamate receptor subtypes. CP-465,022 is a new, potent, and selective noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist. The present study investigated the ability of this compound to reduce neuronal loss after experimental cerebral ischemia to probe the neuroprotective potential of AMPA receptor inhibition. To demonstrate that CP-465,022 gains access to the brain, the effects of systemic administration of CP-465,022 were investigated on AMPA receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses in hippocampus and on chemically induced seizures in rats. The compound was then investigated for neuroprotective efficacy in rat global and focal ischemia models at doses demonstrated to be maximally effective in the electrophysiology and seizure models. CP-465,022 potently and efficaciously inhibited AMPA receptor-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission and the induction of seizures. However, at comparable doses, CP-465,022 failed to prevent CA1 neuron loss after brief global ischemia or to reduce infarct volume after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion. Given the high selectivity of CP-465,022 for AMPA over kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate subtypes of glutamate receptors, the lack of neuroprotective efficacy of the compound calls into question the neuroprotective efficacy of AMPA receptor inhibition after ischemia.

  4. Hippocampal GluA1-containing AMPA receptors mediate context-dependent sensitization to morphine.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Portugal, George S; Fakira, Amanda K; Melyan, Zara; Neve, Rachael; Lee, H Thomas; Russo, Scott J; Liu, Jie; Morón, Jose A

    2011-11-09

    Glutamatergic systems, including AMPA receptors (AMPARs), are involved in opiate-induced neuronal and behavioral plasticity, although the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated morphine administration on AMPAR expression, synaptic plasticity, and context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine. We found that morphine treatment produced changes of synaptic AMPAR expression in the hippocampus, a brain area that is critically involved in learning and memory. These changes could be observed 1 week after the treatment, but only when mice developed context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine in which morphine treatment was associated with drug administration environment. Context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine was also associated with increased basal synaptic transmission and disrupted hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas these effects were less robust when morphine administration was not paired with the drug administration environment. Interestingly, some effects may be related to the prior history of morphine exposure in the drug-associated environment, since alterations of AMPAR expression, basal synaptic transmission, and LTP were observed in mice that received a saline challenge 1 week after discontinuation of morphine treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of GluA1 AMPAR subunit plays a critical role in the acquisition and expression of context-dependent behavioral sensitization, as this behavior is blocked by a viral vector that disrupts GluA1 phosphorylation. These data provide evidence that glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus plays an important role in context-dependent sensitization to morphine and supports further investigation of glutamate-based strategies for treating opiate addiction.

  5. Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) dysregulation in anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Jana B.; Tucholski, Janusz; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H.

    2013-01-01

    The glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia proposes that abnormal glutamatergic neurotransmission occurs in this illness, and a major contribution may involve dysregulation of the AMPA subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptor (AMPAR). Transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) form direct associations with AMPARs to modulate the trafficking and biophysical functions of these receptors, and their dysregulation may alter the localization and activity of AMPARs, thus having a potential role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We performed comparative quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis to measure transcript (schizophrenia, N = 25; comparison subjects, N = 25) and protein (schizophrenia, N = 36; comparison subjects, N = 33) expression of TARPs (γ subunits 1-8) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in schizophrenia and a comparison group. TARP expression was also measured in frontal cortex of rats chronically treated with haloperidol decanoate (28.5 mg/kg every three weeks for nine months) to determine the effect of antipsychotic treatment on the expression of these molecules. We found decreased transcript expression of TARP γ-8 in schizophrenia. At the protein level, γ-3 and γ-5 were increased, while γ-4, γ-7 and γ-8 were decreased in schizophrenia. No changes in any of the molecules were noted in the frontal cortex of haloperidol-treated rats. TARPs are abnormally expressed at transcript and protein levels in ACC in schizophrenia, and these changes are likely due to the illness and not antipsychotic treatment. Alterations in the expression of TARPs may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and represent a potential mechanism of glutamatergic dysregulation in this illness. PMID:23566497

  6. Expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors, AMPA, kainite and NMDA, in the pigeon retina.

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate retina. A previous study found vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) mRNA in the pigeon retina, suggesting that bipolar and ganglion cells are glutamatergic. The present study examined the localization of ionotropic glutamate receptors to identify receptor cells in the pigeon retina using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Nine subunits of AMPA receptor (GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4), kainate receptor (GluK1, GluK2, and GluK4), and NMDA receptor (GluN1 and GluN2A) were found to be expressed in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layers. GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4 were primarily expressed in the inner half of INL, and the signal intensity was strong for GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4. GluK1 was intensely expressed in the outer half of INL, whereas GluK2 and GluK4 were mainly localized in the inner half of INL. GluN1 and GluN2A were moderately expressed in the inner half of INL. Horizontal cells expressed GluA3 and GluA4, and ganglion cells expressed all subunits examined. These results suggest that the glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pigeon retina is similar to that in mammals.

  7. Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) dysregulation in anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Jana B; Tucholski, Janusz; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H

    2013-06-01

    The glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia proposes that abnormal glutamatergic neurotransmission occurs in this illness, and a major contribution may involve dysregulation of the AMPA subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptor (AMPAR). Transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) form direct associations with AMPARs to modulate the trafficking and biophysical functions of these receptors, and their dysregulation may alter the localization and activity of AMPARs, thus having a potential role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We performed comparative quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis to measure transcript (schizophrenia, N=25; comparison subjects, N=25) and protein (schizophrenia, N=36; comparison subjects, N=33) expression of TARPs (γ subunits 1-8) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in schizophrenia and a comparison group. TARP expression was also measured in frontal cortex of rats chronically treated with haloperidol decanoate (28.5mg/kg every three weeks for nine months) to determine the effect of antipsychotic treatment on the expression of these molecules. We found decreased transcript expression of TARP γ-8 in schizophrenia. At the protein level, γ-3 and γ-5 were increased, while γ-4, γ-7 and γ-8 were decreased in schizophrenia. No changes in any of the molecules were noted in the frontal cortex of haloperidol-treated rats. TARPs are abnormally expressed at transcript and protein levels in ACC in schizophrenia, and these changes are likely due to the illness and not to the antipsychotic treatment. Alterations in the expression of TARPs may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and represent a potential mechanism of glutamatergic dysregulation in this illness.

  8. Loss of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in synapses of tonic firing substantia gelatinosa neurons in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yishen; Derkach, Victor A; Smith, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Synapses transmitting nociceptive information in the spinal dorsal horn undergo enduring changes following peripheral nerve injury. Indeed, such injury alters the expression of the GluA2 subunit of glutamatergic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the substantia gelatinosa and this predicts altered channel conductance and calcium permeability, leading to an altered function of excitatory synapses. We therefore investigated the functional properties of synaptic AMPA receptors in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons following 10-20d chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve; a model of neuropathic pain. We measured their single-channel conductance and sensitivity to a blocker of calcium permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs), IEM1460 (50μM). In putative inhibitory, tonic firing neurons, CCI reduced the average single-channel conductance of synaptic AMPAR from 14.4±3.5pS (n=12) to 9.2±1.0pS (n=10, p<0.05). IEM1460 also more effectively antagonized evoked, spontaneous and miniature EPSCs in tonic neurons from sham operated animals than in those from animals that had been subjected to CCI. By contrast, CCI did not change the effectiveness of IEM1460 in delay firing neurons although average single channel conductance was increased from 7.6±1.2pS (n=11) to 12.2±1.5pS (n=10, p<0.01). CCI thus elicits plastic changes in a specific set of glutamatergic synapses of substantia gelatinosa due to subunit recomposition and loss of GluA2-lacking CP-AMPAR. These insights reveal a molecular mechanism of nerve injury acting at synapses of inhibitory neurons to reduce their drive and therefore inhibitory tone in the spinal cord, therefore contributing to the central sensitization associated with neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of AMPA blockade on the spectral profile of human early visual cortex recordings studied with non-invasive MEG.

    PubMed

    Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Routley, Bethany; Droog, Wouter; Singh, Krish D; Hamandi, Khalid

    2016-08-01

    The generation of gamma-band (>30 Hz) cortical activity is thought to depend on the reciprocal connections of excitatory glutamatergic principal cells with inhibitory GABAergic interneurons. Both in vitro and in vivo animal studies have shown that blockade of glutamatergic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors reduces the amplitude of gamma-band activity. In this registered report, we hypothesised that similar effects would be observed in humans following administration of perampanel, a first in class AMPA antagonist, used in the treatment of epilepsy. In a single-blind placebo-controlled crossover study, 20 healthy male participants completed two study days. On one day participants were given a 6 mg dose of perampanel and on the other an inactive placebo. magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of brain activity were taken before and two hours after drug administration, with activity in the visual cortex probed using a stimulation protocol known to induce gamma-band activity in the primary visual cortex. As hypothesised, our results indicated a decrease in gamma-band amplitudes following perampanel administration. The decreases in gamma-band amplitudes observed were temporally restricted to the early time-period of stimulus presentation (up to 400 msec) with no significant effects observed on early evoked responses or alpha rhythms. This suggests that the early time-window of induced visual gamma-band activity, thought to reflect input to the visual cortex from the lateral geniculate nucleus, is most sensitive to AMPA blocking drugs.

  10. Ongoing intrinsic synchronous activity is required for the functional maturation of CA3-CA1 glutamatergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Huupponen, Johanna; Molchanova, Svetlana M; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi

    2013-11-01

    Fine-tuning of synaptic connectivity during development is guided by intrinsic activity of the immature networks characteristically consisting of intermittent bursts of synchronous activity. However, the role of synchronous versus asynchronous activity in synapse maturation in the brain is unclear. Here, we have pharmacologically prevented generation of synchronous activity in the immature rat CA3-CA1 circuitry in a manner that preserves unitary activity. Long-term desynchronization of the network resulted in weakening of AMPA-receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells. This weakening was dependent on protein phosphatases and mGluR activity, associated with an increase in the proportion of silent synapses and a decrease in the protein levels of GluA4 suggesting postsynaptic mechanisms of expression. The findings demonstrate that synchronous activity in the immature CA3-CA1 circuitry is critical for the induction and maintenance of glutamatergic synapses and underscores the importance of temporal activity patterns in shaping the synaptic circuitry during development.

  11. Sensory Input-Dependent Changes in Glutamatergic Neurotransmission- Related Genes and Proteins in the Adult Rat Trigeminal Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montoya, Julia; Buendia, Izaskun; Martin, Yasmina B; Egea, Javier; Negredo, Pilar; Avendaño, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent plasticity induces lasting changes in the structure of synapses, dendrites, and axons at both molecular and anatomical levels. Whilst relatively well studied in the cortex, little is known about the molecular changes underlying experience-dependent plasticity at peripheral levels of the sensory pathways. Given the importance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the somatosensory system and its involvement in plasticity, in the present study, we investigated gene and protein expression of glutamate receptor subunits and associated molecules in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) of young adult rats. Microarray analysis of naïve rat TG revealed significant differences in the expression of genes, coding for various glutamate receptor subunits and proteins involved in clustering and stabilization of AMPA receptors, between left and right ganglion. Long-term exposure to sensory-enriched environment increased this left-right asymmetry in gene expression. Conversely, unilateral whisker trimming on the right side almost eliminated the mentioned asymmetries. The above manipulations also induced side-specific changes in the protein levels of glutamate receptor subunits. Our results show that sustained changes in sensory input induce modifications in glutamatergic transmission-related gene expression in the TG, thus supporting a role for this early sensory-processing node in experience-dependent plasticity.

  12. Sensory Input-Dependent Changes in Glutamatergic Neurotransmission- Related Genes and Proteins in the Adult Rat Trigeminal Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Montoya, Julia; Buendia, Izaskun; Martin, Yasmina B.; Egea, Javier; Negredo, Pilar; Avendaño, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent plasticity induces lasting changes in the structure of synapses, dendrites, and axons at both molecular and anatomical levels. Whilst relatively well studied in the cortex, little is known about the molecular changes underlying experience-dependent plasticity at peripheral levels of the sensory pathways. Given the importance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the somatosensory system and its involvement in plasticity, in the present study, we investigated gene and protein expression of glutamate receptor subunits and associated molecules in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) of young adult rats. Microarray analysis of naïve rat TG revealed significant differences in the expression of genes, coding for various glutamate receptor subunits and proteins involved in clustering and stabilization of AMPA receptors, between left and right ganglion. Long-term exposure to sensory-enriched environment increased this left–right asymmetry in gene expression. Conversely, unilateral whisker trimming on the right side almost eliminated the mentioned asymmetries. The above manipulations also induced side-specific changes in the protein levels of glutamate receptor subunits. Our results show that sustained changes in sensory input induce modifications in glutamatergic transmission-related gene expression in the TG, thus supporting a role for this early sensory-processing node in experience-dependent plasticity. PMID:27965535

  13. Autoimmune encephalomyelitis ameliorated by AMPA antagonists.

    PubMed

    Smith, T; Groom, A; Zhu, B; Turski, L

    2000-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system leading to progressive decline of motor and sensory functions and permanent disability. The therapy of multiple sclerosis is only partially effective, despite anti-inflammatory, immunosuppresive and immunomodulatory measures. White matter inflammation and loss of myelin, the pathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis, are thought to determine disease severity. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis reproduces the features of multiple sclerosis in rodents and in nonhuman primates. The dominant early clinical symptom of acute autoimmune encephalomyelitis is progressive ascending muscle weakness. However, demyelination may not be profound and its extent may not correlate with severity of neurological decline, indicating that targets unrelated to myelin or oligodendrocytes may contribute to the pathogenesis of acute autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Here we report that within the spinal cord in the course of autoimmune encephalomyelitis not only myelin but also neurons are subject to lymphocyte attack and may degenerate. Blockade of glutamate AMPA receptors ameliorated the neurological sequelae of autoimmune encephalomyelitis, indicating the potential for AMPA antagonists in the therapy of multiple sclerosis.

  14. Sucrose ingestion induces rapid AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Tukey, David S; Ferreira, Jainne M; Antoine, Shannon O; D'amour, James A; Ninan, Ipe; Cabeza de Vaca, Soledad; Incontro, Salvatore; Wincott, Charlotte; Horwitz, Julian K; Hartner, Diana T; Guarini, Carlo B; Khatri, Latika; Goffer, Yossef; Xu, Duo; Titcombe, Roseann F; Khatri, Megna; Marzan, Dave S; Mahajan, Shahana S; Wang, Jing; Froemke, Robert C; Carr, Kenneth D; Aoki, Chiye; Ziff, Edward B

    2013-04-03

    The mechanisms by which natural rewards such as sugar affect synaptic transmission and behavior are largely unexplored. Here, we investigate regulation of nucleus accumbens synapses by sucrose intake. Previous studies have shown that AMPA receptor (AMPAR) trafficking is a major mechanism for regulating synaptic strength, and that in vitro, trafficking of AMPARs containing the GluA1 subunit takes place by a two-step mechanism involving extrasynaptic and then synaptic receptor transport. We report that in rat, repeated daily ingestion of a 25% sucrose solution transiently elevated spontaneous locomotion and potentiated accumbens core synapses through incorporation of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (CPARs), which are GluA1-containing, GluA2-lacking AMPARs. Electrophysiological, biochemical, and quantitative electron microscopy studies revealed that sucrose training (7 d) induced a stable (>24 h) intraspinous GluA1 population, and that in these rats a single sucrose stimulus rapidly (5 min) but transiently (<24 h) elevated GluA1 at extrasynaptic sites. CPARs and dopamine D1 receptors were required in vivo for elevated locomotion after sucrose ingestion. Significantly, a 7 d protocol of daily ingestion of a 3% solution of saccharin, a noncaloric sweetener, induced synaptic GluA1 similarly to 25% sucrose ingestion. These findings identify multistep GluA1 trafficking, previously described in vitro, as a mechanism for acute regulation of synaptic transmission in vivo by a natural orosensory reward. Trafficking is stimulated by a chemosensory pathway that is not dependent on the caloric value of sucrose.

  15. Alternative Splicing of AMPA Subunits in Prefrontal Cortical Fields of Cynomolgus Monkeys Following Chronic Ethanol Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Glen; Freidman, David P.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Hemby, Scott E.

    2012-01-01

    Functional impairment of the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex underlies deficits in executive control that characterize addictive disorders, including alcohol addiction. Previous studies indicate that alcohol alters glutamate neurotransmission and one substrate of these effects may be through the reconfiguration of the subunits constituting ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) complexes. Glutamatergic transmission is integral to cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical communication and alcohol-induced changes in the abundance of the receptor subunits and/or their splice variants may result in critical functional impairments of prefrontal cortex in alcohol dependence. To this end, the effects of chronic ethanol self-administration on glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA (GRIA) subunit variant and kainate (GRIK) subunit mRNA expression were studied in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of male cynomolgus monkeys. In DLPFC, total AMPA splice variant expression and total kainate receptor subunit expression were significantly decreased in alcohol drinking monkeys. Expression levels of GRIA3 flip and flop and GRIA4 flop mRNAs in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations (BEC) averaged over the 6 months prior to necropsy. In OFC, AMPA subunit splice variant expression was reduced in the alcohol treated group. GRIA2 flop mRNA levels in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and BEC averaged over the 6 months prior to necropsy. Results from these studies provide further evidence of transcriptional regulation of iGluR subunits in the primate brain following chronic alcohol self-administration. Additional studies examining the cellular localization of such effects in the framework of primate prefrontal cortical circuitry are warranted. PMID:22291662

  16. Genetic analysis of glutamatergic function in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, B.A.; Kankel, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential for communication between neurons and hence are vital in the overall integrative functioning of the nervous system. Previous work on acetylcholine metabolism in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has also raised the possibility that transmitter metabolism may play a prominent role in either the achievement or maintenance of the normal structure of the central nervous system in this species. Unfortunately, acetylcholine is rather poorly characterized as a neurotransmitter in Drosophila; consequently, we have begun an analysis of the role of glutamate (probably the best characterized transmitter in this organism) in the formation and/or maintenance of nervous system structure. We present here the results of a series of preliminary analyses. To suggest where glutamatergic function may be localized, an examination of the spatial distribution of high affinity (/sup 3/H)-glutamate binding sites are presented. We present the results of an analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of enzymatic activities thought to be important in the regulation of transmitter-glutamate pools (i.e., glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenase). To begin to examine whether mutations in any of these functions are capable of affecting glutamatergic activity, we present the results of an initial genetic analysis of one enzymatic function, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), chosen because of its differential distribution within the adult central nervous system and musculature.

  17. Regulation of AMPA receptor gating and pharmacology by TARP auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Aaron D; Nicoll, Roger A

    2008-07-01

    Presynaptic glutamate release elicits brief waves of membrane depolarization in neurons by activating AMPA receptors. Depending on its precise size and shape, current through AMPA receptors gates downstream processes like NMDA receptor activation and action potential generation. Over a decade of research on AMPA receptor structure and function has identified binding sites on AMPA receptors for agonists, antagonists and allosteric modulators as well as key residues underlying differences in the gating behavior of various AMPA receptor subtypes. However, the recent discovery that AMPA receptors are accompanied in the synaptic membrane by a family of auxiliary subunits known as transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) has revealed that the kinetics and pharmacology of neuronal AMPA receptors differ in many respects from those predicted by classical studies of AMPA receptors in heterologous systems. Here, we summarize recent work and discuss remaining questions concerning the structure and function of native TARP-AMPA receptor complexes.

  18. Neurotrophin-dependent modulation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Lessmann, V

    1998-11-01

    1. The protein family of the neurotrophins, consisting of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin-3, -4/5, and -6 (NT-3; NT-4/5; NT-6) is well known to enhance the survival and to stabilize the phenotype of different populations of neurons in the central and the peripheral nervous system. These effects are mediated via binding to specific tyrosine kinase receptors (Trks) and to the low-affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor. 2. The neurotrophins NGF, BDNF, and NT-3 and the BDNF and NT-3 selective receptors (TrkB, TrkC) are expressed at high levels in neurons of the basal forebrain, the hippocampus, and the neocortex of the mammalian brain. The expression and secretion of NGF and BDNF in these brain areas is regulated by (physiological levels of) neuronal activity. 3. Exogenous application of the neurotrophins to hippocampal and neocortical neurons can enhance excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission via activation of Trk receptors. In addition, long-term potentiation (a potential cellular correlate for learning and memory formation in mammals) in the rodent hippocampus depends on endogenous supply of neurons with BDNF. 4. Judged by the analysis of electrophysiological data, the BDNF- and NT-3-induced enhancement of glutamatergic synapses is mediated by increasing the efficacy of glutamate release from the presynaptic neuron. However, neurotrophin-dependent postsynaptic enhancement of NMDA (but not AMPA) receptor responsiveness has also been shown. 5. On the molecular level, neither the pre- nor the postsynaptic modulation of glutamatergic synapses by neurotrophins is well understood. However, neurotrophins were shown to acutely affect intraneuronal Ca2+ levels and to influence molecular components of the transmitter release machinery, which could underly the presynaptic modifications, whereas BDNF-induced phosphorylation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors could account for the postsynaptic effects. 6. Taken together

  19. Postsynaptic synaptotagmins mediate AMPA receptor exocytosis during LTP.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dick; Bacaj, Taulant; Morishita, Wade; Goswami, Debanjan; Arendt, Kristin L; Xu, Wei; Chen, Lu; Malenka, Robert C; Südhof, Thomas C

    2017-04-20

    Strengthening of synaptic connections by NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) shapes neural circuits and mediates learning and memory. During the induction of NMDA-receptor-dependent LTP, Ca(2+) influx stimulates recruitment of synaptic AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid) receptors, thereby strengthening synapses. How Ca(2+) induces the recruitment of AMPA receptors remains unclear. Here we show that, in the pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal CA1 region in mice, blocking postsynaptic expression of both synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and synaptotagmin-7 (Syt7), but not of either alone, abolished LTP. LTP was restored by expression of wild-type Syt7 but not of a Ca(2+)-binding-deficient mutant Syt7. Blocking postsynaptic expression of Syt1 and Syt7 did not impair basal synaptic transmission, reduce levels of synaptic or extrasynaptic AMPA receptors, or alter other AMPA receptor trafficking events. Moreover, expression of dominant-negative mutant Syt1 which inhibits Ca(2+)-dependent presynaptic vesicle exocytosis, also blocked Ca(2+)-dependent postsynaptic AMPA receptor exocytosis, thereby abolishing LTP. Our results suggest that postsynaptic Syt1 and Syt7 act as redundant Ca(2+)-sensors for Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of AMPA receptors during LTP, and thereby delineate a simple mechanism for the recruitment of AMPA receptors that mediates LTP.

  20. Cholinergic and glutamatergic alterations beginning at the early stages of Alzheimer disease: participation of the phospholipase A2 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Evelin L; Gattaz, Wagner F

    2008-05-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. A combination of cholinergic and glutamatergic dysfunction appears to underlie the symptomatology of AD, and thus, treatment strategies should address impairments in both systems. Evidence suggests the involvement of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) enzyme in memory impairment and neurodegeneration in AD via actions on both cholinergic and glutamatergic systems. To review cholinergic and glutamatergic alterations underlying cognitive impairment and neuropathology in AD and attempt to link PLA(2) with such alterations. Medline databases were searched (no date restrictions) for published articles with links among the terms Alzheimer disease (mild, moderate, severe), mild cognitive impairment, choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase, NGF, NGF receptor, muscarinic receptor, nicotinic receptor, NMDA, AMPA, metabotropic glutamate receptor, atrophy, glucose metabolism, phospholipid metabolism, sphingolipid, membrane fluidity, phospholipase A(2), arachidonic acid, attention, memory, long-term potentiation, beta-amyloid, tau, inflammation, and reactive species. Reference lists of the identified articles were checked to identify additional studies of interest. Overall, results suggest the hypothesis that persistent inhibition of cPLA(2) and iPLA(2) isoforms at early stages of AD may play a central role in memory deficits and beta-amyloid production through down-regulation of cholinergic and glutamate receptors. As the disease progresses, beta-amyloid induced up-regulation of cPLA(2) and sPLA(2) isoforms may play critical roles in inflammation and oxidative stress, thus participating in the neurodegenerative process. Activation and inhibition of specific PLA(2) isoforms at different stages of AD could be of therapeutic importance and delay cognitive dysfunction and neurodegeneration.

  1. Habitual responding for alcohol depends upon both AMPA and D2 receptor signaling in the dorsolateral striatum

    PubMed Central

    Corbit, Laura H.; Nie, Hong; Janak, Patricia H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcohol self-administration leads to alcohol-seeking behavior that is habitual and insensitive to changes in the value of the earned alcohol. Such behavior has been shown to rely on the dorsolateral region of the striatum in rats but the specific pharmacological control of output from this region is not yet understood. In the following experiments rats were trained to self-administer unsweetened 10% (v/v) ethanol in daily sessions for 8 weeks prior to testing for sensitivity to outcome devaluation. We examined the role of glutamatergic AMPA-receptor activation by testing the effects of the antagonist NBQX (0.3 and 1.0 μg/μl) infused specifically into the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) before devaluation testing. In a separate group of rats we examined the role of dopaminergic D2-receptor activation using the D2-receptor antagonist raclopride (0.2 and 1.0 μg/μl) infused into the DLS before devaluation testing. Following control (saline) infusions rats’ lever-press performance was insensitive to devaluation of ethanol thus showing evidence of habitual responding. NBQX and racolpride each restored goal-directed control of responding at doses that did not impair overall lever-press rates. These data demonstrate that expression of habitual alcohol seeking relies on glutamatergic inputs to the DLS and D2 receptors within the DLS. PMID:25228865

  2. Developing Medications Targeting Glutamatergic Dysfunction in Autism: Progress to Date

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Lawrence K.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic treatments targeting specific molecular mechanisms relevant for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are beginning to emerge in early drug development. This article reviews the evidence for the disruption of glutamatergic neurotransmission in animal models of social deficits and summarizes key pre-clinical and clinical efforts in developing pharmacologic interventions based on modulation of glutamatergic systems in individuals with ASD. Understanding the pathobiology of the glutamatergic system has led to the development of new investigational treatments for individuals with ASD. Specific examples of medications that modulate the glutamatergic system in preclinical and clinical studies are described. Finally, we will discuss the limitations of current strategies and future opportunities in developing medications targeting the glutamatergic system for treating individuals with ASD. PMID:26104862

  3. Wnt-5a occludes Abeta oligomer-induced depression of glutamatergic transmission in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cerpa, Waldo; Farías, Ginny G; Godoy, Juan A; Fuenzalida, Marco; Bonansco, Christian; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2010-01-18

    Soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta;) oligomers have been recognized to be early and key intermediates in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related synaptic dysfunction. Abeta oligomers block hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and impair rodent spatial memory. Wnt signaling plays an important role in neural development, including synaptic differentiation. We report here that the Wnt signaling activation prevents the synaptic damage triggered by Abeta oligomers. Electrophysiological analysis of Schaffer collaterals-CA1 glutamatergic synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices indicates that Wnt-5a increases the amplitude of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) and both AMPA and NMDA components of the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), without modifying the paired pulse facilitation (PPF). Conversely, in the presence of Abeta oligomers the fEPSP and EPSCs amplitude decreased without modification of the PPF, while the postsynaptic scaffold protein (PSD-95) decreased as well. Co-perfusion of hippocampal slices with Wnt-5a and Abeta oligomers occludes against the synaptic depression of EPSCs as well as the reduction of PSD-95 clusters induced by Abeta oligomers in neuronal cultures. Taken together these results indicate that Wnt-5a and Abeta oligomers inversely modulate postsynaptic components. These results indicate that post-synaptic damage induced by Abeta oligomers in hippocampal neurons is prevented by non-canonical Wnt pathway activation.

  4. Wnt-5a occludes Aβ oligomer-induced depression of glutamatergic transmission in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Soluble amyloid-β (Aβ;) oligomers have been recognized to be early and key intermediates in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related synaptic dysfunction. Aβ oligomers block hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and impair rodent spatial memory. Wnt signaling plays an important role in neural development, including synaptic differentiation. Results We report here that the Wnt signaling activation prevents the synaptic damage triggered by Aβ oligomers. Electrophysiological analysis of Schaffer collaterals-CA1 glutamatergic synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices indicates that Wnt-5a increases the amplitude of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) and both AMPA and NMDA components of the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), without modifying the paired pulse facilitation (PPF). Conversely, in the presence of Aβ oligomers the fEPSP and EPSCs amplitude decreased without modification of the PPF, while the postsynaptic scaffold protein (PSD-95) decreased as well. Co-perfusion of hippocampal slices with Wnt-5a and Aβ oligomers occludes against the synaptic depression of EPSCs as well as the reduction of PSD-95 clusters induced by Aβ oligomers in neuronal cultures. Taken together these results indicate that Wnt-5a and Aβ oligomers inversely modulate postsynaptic components. Conclusion These results indicate that post-synaptic damage induced by Aβ oligomers in hippocampal neurons is prevented by non-canonical Wnt pathway activation. PMID:20205789

  5. Organophosphates dysregulate dopamine signaling, glutamatergic neurotransmission, and induce neuronal injury markers in striatum

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Altoro, Melissa I.; Mathur, Brian N.; Drerup, Justin M.; Thomas, Rachel; Lovinger, David; O’Callaghan, James P.; Bibb, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The neurological effects of organophosphate pesticides, commonly used on foods and in households, are an important public health concern. Furthermore, subclinical exposure to combinations of organophosphates is implicated in Gulf War illness. Here we characterized the effects of the broadly-used insecticide chlorpyrifos on dopamine and glutamatergic neurotransmission effectors in corticostriatal motor/reward circuitry. Chlorpyrifos potentiated PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the striatal protein DARPP-32 and the GluR1 subunit of AMPA receptors in mouse brain slices. It also increased GluR1 phosphorylation by PKA when administered systemically. This correlated with enhanced glutamate release from cortical projections in rat striatum. Similar effects were induced by the sarin congener, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, alone or in combination with the putative neuroprotectant, pyridostigmine bromide and the pesticide DEET. This combination, meant to mimic the neurotoxicant exposure encountered by veterans of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, also induced hyperphosphorylation of the neurofibrillary tangle-associated protein tau. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate and pyrodostigmine bromide, alone or in combination, also increased the aberrant activity of the protein kinase, Cdk5, as indicated by conversion of its activating cofactor p35 to p25. Thus consistent with recent findings in humans and animals, organophosphate exposure causes dysregulation in the motor/reward circuitry and invokes mechanisms associated with neurological disorders and neurodegeneration. PMID:21848865

  6. Differences of AMPA and kainate receptor interactomes identify a novel AMPA receptor auxiliary subunit, GSG1L

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Natalie F.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Maruo, Tomohiko; Cais, Ondrej; Hirao, Atsushi; Oe, Souichi; Ghosh, Anirvan; Noda, Yasuko; Greger, Ingo H.; Yates, John R.; Nakagawa, Terunaga

    2012-01-01

    AMPA receptor (AMPA-R) complexes consist of channel forming subunits, GluA1–4 and auxiliary proteins including TARPs, CNIHs, synDIG1, and CKAMP44, which can modulate AMPA-R function in specific ways. Combinatorial effects of four GluA subunits binding to various auxiliary subunits amplify the functional diversity of AMPA-Rs. The significance and magnitude of molecular diversity, however, remain elusive. To gain insight into the molecular complexity of AMPA and kainate receptors (KA-Rs), we compared the proteins that co-purify with each receptor type in rat brain. This interactome study identified the majority of known interacting proteins and more importantly, provides novel candidates for further studies. We validate the claudin homologue GSG1L as a novel binding protein and unique modulator of AMPA-R gating, as determined by detailed molecular, cellular, electrophysiological, and biochemical experiments. GSG1L extends the functional variety of AMPA-R complexes and further investigation of other candidates may reveal additional complexity of ionotropic glutamate receptor function. PMID:22813734

  7. A subnanomolar concentration of Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) pre-synaptically modulates glutamatergic transmission in the rat hippocampus acting through acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, Valeria; Sardone, Lara Maria; Chisari, Mariangela; Licata, Flora; Li Volsi, Guido; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Ciranna, Lucia; Costa, Lara

    2017-01-06

    The neuropeptide PACAP modulates synaptic transmission in the hippocampus exerting multiple effects through different receptor subtypes: the underlying mechanisms have not yet been completely elucidated. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) also exerts a well-documented modulation of hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity. Since PACAP was shown to stimulate ACh release in the hippocampus, we tested whether PACAP acting through ACh might indirectly modulate glutamate-mediated synaptic transmission at a pre- and/or at a post-synaptic level. Using patch clamp on rat hippocampal slices, we tested PACAP effects on stimulation-evoked AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCsAMPA) in the CA3-CA1 synapse and on spontaneous miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons. A subnanomolar dose of PACAP (0.5nM) decreased EPSCsAMPA amplitude, enhanced EPSC paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) and reduced mEPSC frequency, indicating a pre-synaptic decrease of glutamate release probability: these effects were abolished by simultaneous blockade of muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors, indicating the involvement of endogenous ACh. The effect of subnanomolar PACAP was abolished by a PAC1 receptor antagonist but not by a VPAC receptor blocker. At a higher concentration (10nM), PACAP inhibited EPSCsAMPA: this effect persisted in the presence of ACh receptor antagonists and did not involve any change in PPF or in mEPSC frequency, thus was not mediated by ACh and was exerted post- synaptically on CA1 pyramidal neurons. We suggest that a high-affinity PAC1 receptor pre-synaptically modulates hippocampal glutamatergic transmission acting through ACh. Therefore, administration of PACAP at very low doses might be envisaged in cognitive diseases with reduced cholinergic transmission.

  8. What causes aberrant salience in schizophrenia? A role for impaired short-term habituation and the GRIA1 (GluA1) AMPA receptor subunit

    PubMed Central

    Barkus, C; Sanderson, DJ; Rawlins, JNP; Walton, ME; Harrison, PJ; Bannerman, DM

    2014-01-01

    The GRIA1 locus, encoding the GluA1 (also known as GluRA or GluR1) AMPA glutamate receptor subunit, shows genome-wide association to schizophrenia. As well as extending the evidence that glutamatergic abnormalities play a key role in the disorder, this finding draws attention to the behavioural phenotype of Gria1 knockout mice. These mice show deficits in short-term habituation. Importantly, under some conditions the attention being paid to a recently presented neutral stimulus can actually increase rather than decrease (sensitization). We propose that this mouse phenotype represents a cause of aberrant salience and, in turn, that aberrant salience (and the resulting positive symptoms) in schizophrenia may arise, at least in part, from a glutamatergic genetic predisposition and a deficit in short-term habituation. This proposal links an established risk gene with a psychological process central to psychosis, and is supported by findings of comparable deficits in short-term habituation in mice lacking the NMDAR receptor subunit Grin2a (which also shows association to schizophrenia). Since aberrant salience is primarily a dopaminergic phenomenon, the model supports the view that the dopaminergic abnormalities can be downstream of a glutamatergic aetiology. Finally, we suggest that, as illustrated here, the real value of genetically modified mice is not as ‘models of schizophrenia’, but as experimental tools which can link genomic discoveries with psychological processes, and help elucidate the underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:25224260

  9. Gestational nicotine exposure regulates expression of AMPA and NMDA receptors and their signaling apparatus in developing and adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Dávila-García, Martha I.; Yarl, Weonpo; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C.

    2011-01-01

    Untimely activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) by nicotine results in short- and long-term consequences on learning and behavior. In this study, the aim was to determine how prenatal nicotine exposure affects components of glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus during postnatal development. We investigated regulation of both nAChRs and glutamate receptors for α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), from postnatal day (P) 1 to P63 after a temporally restricted exposure to saline or nicotine for 14 days in utero. We analyzed postsynaptic density components associated with AMPAR and NMDAR signaling: Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), Calmodulin (CaM), and postsynaptic density-95 (PSD95), as well as presynaptically localized synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25). At P1, there was significantly heightened expression of AMPAR subunit GluR1 but not GluR2, and of NMDAR subunits NR1, NR2a and NR2d but not NR2b. NR2c was not detectable. At P1, the postsynaptic proteins CaMKIIα, CaM, and PSD95 were also significantly upregulated, together with presynaptic SNAP25. This enhanced expression of glutamate receptors and signaling proteins was concomitant with elevated levels of [3H] Epibatidine (EB) binding in prenatal nicotine-exposed hippocampus, indicating that α4β2 nAChR may influence glutamatergic function in the hippocampus at P1. By P14, neither [3H]EB binding nor the expression levels of subunits GluR1, GluR2, NR1, NR2a, NR2b, NR2c, or NR2d seemed changed with prenatal nicotine. However, CaMKIIα was significantly upregulated with nicotine treatment while CaM showed downregulation at P14. The effects of nicotine persisted in young adult brains at P63. They exhibited significantly downregulated GluR2, NR1, and NR2c expression levels in hippocampal homogenates and a considerably muted overall distribution of [3H]AMPA binding in areas CA1, CA2, CA3, and the dentate

  10. Cysteine 893 is a target of regulatory thiol modifications of GluA1 AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    von Ossowski, Lotta; Li, Li-Li; Möykkynen, Tommi; Coleman, Sarah K.; Courtney, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that glutamatergic signaling involves, and is regulated by, thiol modifying and redox-active compounds. In this study, we examined the role of a reactive cysteine residue, Cys-893, in the cytosolic C-terminal tail of GluA1 AMPA receptor as a potential regulatory target. Elimination of the thiol function by substitution of serine for Cys-893 led to increased steady-state expression level and strongly reduced interaction with SAP97, a major cytosolic interaction partner of GluA1 C-terminus. Moreover, we found that of the three cysteine residues in GluA1 C-terminal tail, Cys-893 is the predominant target for S-nitrosylation induced by exogenous nitric oxide donors in cultured cells and lysates. Co-precipitation experiments provided evidence for native association of SAP97 with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and for the potential coupling of Ca2+-permeable GluA1 receptors with nNOS via SAP97. Our results show that Cys-893 can serve as a molecular target for regulatory thiol modifications of GluA1 receptors, including the effects of nitric oxide. PMID:28152104

  11. The SOL-2/Neto auxiliary protein modulates the function of AMPA-subtype ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Mellem, Jerry E; Jensen, Michael; Brockie, Penelope J; Walker, Craig S; Hoerndli, Frédéric J; Hauth, Linda; Madsen, David M; Maricq, Andres V

    2012-09-06

    The neurotransmitter glutamate mediates excitatory synaptic transmission by gating ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). AMPA receptors (AMPARs), a subtype of iGluR, are strongly implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. We previously discovered two classes of AMPAR auxiliary proteins in C. elegans that modify receptor kinetics and thus change synaptic transmission. Here, we have identified another auxiliary protein, SOL-2, a CUB-domain protein that associates with both the related auxiliary subunit SOL-1 and with the GLR-1 AMPAR. In sol-2 mutants, behaviors dependent on glutamatergic transmission are disrupted, GLR-1-mediated currents are diminished, and GLR-1 desensitization and pharmacology are modified. Remarkably, a secreted variant of SOL-1 delivered in trans can rescue sol-1 mutants, and this rescue depends on in cis expression of SOL-2. Finally, we demonstrate that SOL-1 and SOL-2 have an ongoing role in the adult nervous system to control AMPAR-mediated currents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The SOL-2/Neto Auxiliary Protein Modulates the Function of AMPA-Subtype Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Mellem, Jerry E.; Jensen, Michael; Brockie, Penelope J.; Walker, Craig S.; Hoerndli, Frédéric J.; Madsen, David M.; Maricq, Andres V.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The neurotransmitter glutamate mediates excitatory synaptic transmission by gating ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). AMPA receptors (AMPARs), a subtype of iGluR, are strongly implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. We previously discovered two classes of AMPAR auxiliary proteins in C. elegans that modify receptor kinetics and thus change synaptic transmission. Here, we have identified another auxiliary protein, SOL-2, a CUB-domain protein that associates with both the related auxiliary subunit SOL-1 and with the GLR-1 AMPAR. In sol-2 mutants, behaviors dependent on glutamatergic transmission are disrupted, GLR-1-mediated currents are diminished, and GLR-1 desensitization and pharmacology are modified. Remarkably, a secreted variant of SOL-1 delivered in trans can rescue sol-1 mutants and this rescue depends on in cis expression of SOL-2. Finally, we demonstrate that SOL-1 and SOL-2 have an ongoing role in the adult nervous system to control AMPAR-mediated currents. PMID:22958824

  13. Erbin interacts with TARP γ-2 for surface expression of AMPA receptors in cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yanmei; Chen, Yong-Jun; Shen, Chengyong; Luo, Zhengyi; Bates, C Ryan; Lee, Daehoon; Marchetto, Sylvie; Gao, Tian-Ming; Borg, Jean-Paul; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-03-01

    Inhibitory neurons control the firing of glutamatergic neurons and synchronize brain activity. However, little is known about mechanisms of excitatory synapse formation in inhibitory neurons. Here we demonstrate that Erbin is specifically expressed in cortical inhibitory neurons. It localizes at excitatory synapses and regulates AMPA receptor (AMPAR) surface expression. Erbin mutation reduced mEPSCs and AMPAR currents specifically in parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons but not in pyramidal neurons. We found that the AMPAR auxiliary protein TARP γ-2 was specifically expressed in cortical interneurons. Erbin interacts with TARP γ-2 and is crucial for its stability. Deletion of the γ-2-interacting domain in Erbin attenuated surface AMPAR and excitatory transmission in PV-positive interneurons. Furthermore, we observed behavioral deficits in Erbin-null mice and in mice expressing an Erbin truncation mutant that is unable to interact with TARP γ-2. These observations demonstrate a crucial function for Erbin in AMPAR surface expression in cortical PV-positive interneurons and may contribute to a better understanding of psychiatric disorders.

  14. The Sorting Receptor SorCS1 Regulates Trafficking of Neurexin and AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Jeffrey N.; Ribeiro, Luís F.; Wierda, Keimpe D.; Wright, Rebecca; DeNardo, Laura A.; Rice, Heather C.; Chamma, Ingrid; Wang, Yi-Zhi; Zemla, Roland; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Vennekens, Kristel M.; O'Sullivan, Matthew L.; Antonios, Joseph K.; Hall, Elizabeth A.; Thoumine, Olivier; Attie, Alan D.; Ghosh, Anirvan; Yates, John R.; de Wit, Joris

    2015-01-01

    The formation, function, and plasticity of synapses require dynamic changes in synaptic receptor composition. Here we identify the sorting receptor SorCS1 as a key regulator of synaptic receptor trafficking. Four independent proteomic analyses identify the synaptic adhesion molecule neurexin and the AMPA glutamate receptor (AMPAR) as major proteins sorted by SorCS1. SorCS1 localizes to early and recycling endosomes and regulates neurexin and AMPAR surface trafficking. Surface proteome analysis of SorCS1-deficient neurons shows decreased surface levels of these, and additional, receptors. Quantitative in vivo analysis of SorCS1 knockout synaptic proteomes identifies SorCS1 as a global trafficking regulator and reveals decreased levels of receptors regulating adhesion and neurotransmission, including neurexins and AMPARs. Consequently, glutamatergic transmission at SorCS1–deficient synapses is reduced due to impaired AMPAR surface expression. SORCS1 mutations have been associated with autism and Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that perturbed receptor trafficking contributes to defects in synaptic composition and function underlying synaptopathies. PMID:26291160

  15. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, G. Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R.P.; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C.; Bowie, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  16. Regulation of AMPA receptor surface trafficking and synaptic plasticity by a cognitive enhancer and antidepressant molecule.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Etherington, L-A; Hafner, A-S; Belelli, D; Coussen, F; Delagrange, P; Chaouloff, F; Spedding, M; Lambert, J J; Choquet, D; Groc, L

    2013-04-01

    The plasticity of excitatory synapses is an essential brain process involved in cognitive functions, and dysfunctions of such adaptations have been linked to psychiatric disorders such as depression. Although the intracellular cascades that are altered in models of depression and stress-related disorders have been under considerable scrutiny, the molecular interplay between antidepressants and glutamatergic signaling remains elusive. Using a combination of electrophysiological and single nanoparticle tracking approaches, we here report that the cognitive enhancer and antidepressant tianeptine (S 1574, [3-chloro-6-methyl-5,5-dioxo-6,11-dihydro-(c,f)-dibenzo-(1,2-thiazepine)-11-yl) amino]-7 heptanoic acid, sodium salt) favors synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons both under basal conditions and after acute stress. Strikingly, tianeptine rapidly reduces the surface diffusion of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) through a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent mechanism that enhances the binding of AMPAR auxiliary subunit stargazin with PSD-95. This prevents corticosterone-induced AMPAR surface dispersal and restores long-term potentiation of acutely stressed mice. Collectively, these data provide the first evidence that a therapeutically used drug targets the surface diffusion of AMPAR through a CaMKII-stargazin-PSD-95 pathway, to promote long-term synaptic plasticity.

  17. The involvement of NMDA and AMPA receptors in the mechanism of antidepressant-like action of zinc in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, B; Poleszak, E; Sowa-Kućma, M; Wróbel, A; Słotwiński, S; Listos, J; Wlaź, P; Cichy, A; Siwek, A; Dybała, M; Gołembiowska, K; Pilc, A; Nowak, Gabriel

    2010-06-01

    Antidepressant-like activity of zinc in the forced swim test (FST) was demonstrated previously. Enhancement of such activity by joint administration of zinc and antidepressants was also shown. However, mechanisms involved in this activity have not yet been established. The present study examined the involvement of the NMDA and AMPA receptors in zinc activity in the FST in mice and rats. Additionally, the influence of zinc on both glutamate and aspartate release in the rat brain was also determined. Zinc-induced antidepressant-like activity in the FST in both mice and rats was antagonized by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA, 75 mg/kg, i.p.) administration. Moreover, low and ineffective doses of NMDA antagonists (CGP 37849, L-701,324, D-cycloserine, and MK-801) administered together with ineffective doses of zinc exhibit a significant reduction of immobility time in the FST. Additionally, we have demonstrated the reduction of immobility time by AMPA receptor potentiator, CX 614. The antidepressant-like activity of both CX 614 and zinc in the FST was abolished by NBQX (an antagonist of AMPA receptor, 10 mg/kg, i.p.), while the combined treatment of sub-effective doses of zinc and CX 614 significantly reduces the immobility time in the FST. The present study also demonstrated that zinc administration potentiated a veratridine-evoked glutamate and aspartate release in the rat's prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The present study further suggests the antidepressant properties of zinc and indicates the involvement of the NMDA and AMPA glutamatergic receptors in this activity.

  18. Novel bivalent positive allosteric modulators of AMPA receptor.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, M I; Grigor'ev, V V; Bachurin, S O; Palyulin, V A; Zefirov, N S

    2015-01-01

    A positive allosteric modulator of AMPA receptors has been designed using computer-aided molecular modeling techniques. It possessed a record high experimentally confirmed potency in the picomolar concentration range and belongs to a new type of bivalent AMPA receptor ligands containing bicyclo[3.3.1]nonane scaffold. The suggested structure could serve as a basis for further optimization and development of drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, cognition enhancement, and improvement of memory.

  19. Regulation of postsynaptic AMPA responses by synaptojanin 1.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liang-Wei; De Camilli, Pietro

    2008-11-11

    Endocytosis of postsynaptic AMPA receptors is a mechanism through which efficiency of neurotransmission is regulated. We have genetically tested the hypothesis that synaptojanin 1, a phosphoinositide phosphatase implicated in the endocytosis of synaptic vesicles presynaptically, may also function in the endocytosis of AMPA receptors postsynaptically. Electrophysiological recordings of cultured hippocampal neurons showed that miniature excitatory postsynaptic current amplitudes were larger in synaptojanin 1 knockout (KO) neurons because of an increase of surface-exposed AMPA receptors. This change did not represent an adaptive response to decreased presynaptic release in KO cultures and was rescued by the expression of wild type, but not catalytically inactive synaptojanin 1, in the postsynaptic neuron. NMDA-induced internalization of pHluorin-tagged AMPA receptors (GluR2) was impaired in KO neurons. These results reveal a function of synaptojanin 1 in constitutive and triggered internalization of AMPA receptors and thus indicate a role for phosphatidylinositol(4,5)-bisphosphate metabolism in the regulation of postsynaptic AMPA responses.

  20. 3’-Deoxyadenosine (Cordycepin) Produces a Rapid and Robust Antidepressant Effect via Enhancing Prefrontal AMPA Receptor Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bai; Hou, Yangyang; Zhu, Ming; Bao, Hongkun; Nie, Jun; Zhang, Grace Y.; Shan, Liping; Yao, Yao; Du, Kai; Yang, Hongju; Li, Meizhang; Zheng, Bingrong; Xu, Xiufeng; Xiao, Chunjie; Du, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of rapid and safe antidepressants for the treatment of major depression is in urgent demand. Converging evidence suggests that glutamatergic signaling seems to play important roles in the pathophysiology of depression. Methods: We studied the antidepressant effects of 3’-deoxyadenosine (3’-dA, Cordycepin) and the critical role of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor in male CD-1 mice via behavioral and biochemical experiments. After 3’-dA treatment, the phosphorylation and synaptic localization of the AMPA receptors GluR1 and GluR2 were determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HIP). The traditional antidepressant imipramine was applied as a positive control. Results: We found that an injection of 3’-dA led to a rapid and robust antidepressant effect, which was significantly faster and stronger than imipramine, after 45min in tail suspension and forced swim tests. This antidepressant effect remained after 5 days of treatment with 3’-dA. Unlike the psycho-stimulants, 3’-dA did not show a hyperactive effect in the open field test. After 45min or 5 days of treatment, 3’-dA enhanced GluR1 S845 phosphorylation in both the PFC and HIP. In addition, after 45min of treatment, 3’-dA significantly up-regulated GluR1 S845 phosphorylation and GluR1, but not GluR2 levels, at the synapses in the PFC. After 5 days of treatment, 3’-dA significantly enhanced GluR1 S845 phosphorylation and GluR1, but not GluR2, at the synapses in the PFC and HIP. Moreover, the AMPA-specific antagonist GYKI 52466 was able to block the rapid antidepressant effects of 3’-dA. Conclusion: This study identified 3’-dA as a novel rapid antidepressant with clinical potential and multiple beneficial mechanisms, particularly in regulating the prefrontal AMPA receptor signaling pathway. PMID:26443809

  1. Expression of glutamatergic genes in healthy humans across 16 brain regions; altered expression in the hippocampus after chronic exposure to alcohol or cocaine.

    PubMed

    Enoch, M-A; Rosser, A A; Zhou, Z; Mash, D C; Yuan, Q; Goldman, D

    2014-11-01

    We analyzed global patterns of expression in genes related to glutamatergic neurotransmission (glutamatergic genes) in healthy human adult brain before determining the effects of chronic alcohol and cocaine exposure on gene expression in the hippocampus. RNA-Seq data from 'BrainSpan' was obtained across 16 brain regions from nine control adults. We also generated RNA-Seq data from postmortem hippocampus from eight alcoholics, eight cocaine addicts and eight controls. Expression analyses were undertaken of 28 genes encoding glutamate ionotropic (AMPA, kainate, NMDA) and metabotropic receptor subunits, together with glutamate transporters. The expression of each gene was fairly consistent across the brain with the exception of the cerebellum, the thalamic mediodorsal nucleus and the striatum. GRIN1, encoding the essential NMDA subunit, had the highest expression across all brain regions. Six factors accounted for 84% of the variance in global gene expression. GRIN2B (encoding GluN2B), was up-regulated in both alcoholics and cocaine addicts (FDR corrected P = 0.008). Alcoholics showed up-regulation of three genes relative to controls and cocaine addicts: GRIA4 (encoding GluA4), GRIK3 (GluR7) and GRM4 (mGluR4). Expression of both GRM3 (mGluR3) and GRIN2D (GluN2D) was up-regulated in alcoholics and down-regulated in cocaine addicts relative to controls. Glutamatergic genes are moderately to highly expressed throughout the brain. Six factors explain nearly all the variance in global gene expression. At least in the hippocampus, chronic alcohol use largely up-regulates glutamatergic genes. The NMDA GluN2B receptor subunit might be implicated in a common pathway to addiction, possibly in conjunction with the GABAB1 receptor subunit. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Metabotropic glutamatergic receptors and their ligands in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Rup, Kinga; Pomierny, Bartosz; Niedzielska, Ewa; Kalivas, Peter W; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-06-01

    Glutamatergic excitatory transmission is implicated in physiological and pathological conditions like learning, memory, neuronal plasticity and emotions, while glutamatergic abnormalities are reported in numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, epilepsy, stroke, traumatic brain injury, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and pain. Also, several lines of evidence have accumulated indicating a pivotal role for glutamatergic neurotransmission in mediating addictive behaviors. Among the proteins regulating glutamatergic transmission, the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) are being developed as pharmacological targets for treating many neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. In this review we describe the molecular structure of mGluRs and their distribution, physiology and pharmacology in the central nervous system, as well as their use as targets in preclinical studies of drug addiction.

  3. Glutamatergic medications for the treatment of drug and behavioral addictions

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. Foster; Cleva, Richard M.; Kalivas, Peter W.; Malcolm, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, most pharmacological approaches to the treatment of addictive disorders have utilized either substitution-based methods (i.e., nicotine replacement or opioid maintenance) or have targeted monoaminergic or endogenous opioidergic neurotransmitter systems. However, substantial evidence has accumulated indicating that ligands acting on glutamatergic transmission are also of potential utility in the treatment of drug addiction, as well as various behavioral addictions such as pathological gambling. The purpose of this review is to summarize the pharmacological mechanisms of action and general clinical efficacy of glutamatergic medications that are currently approved or are being investigated for approval for the treatment of addictive disorders. Medications with effects on glutamatergic transmission that will be discussed include acamprosate, N-acetylcysteine, D-cycloserine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, memantine, modafinil, and topiramate. We conclude that manipulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission is relatively young but promising avenue for the development of improved therapeutic agents for the treatment of drug and behavioral addictions. PMID:21536062

  4. Glutamatergic signaling by mesolimbic dopamine neurons in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Patel, Jyoti C; Xenias, Harry; English, Daniel; Tadros, Ibrahim; Shah, Fulva; Berlin, Joshua; Deisseroth, Karl; Rice, Margaret E; Tepper, James M; Koos, Tibor

    2010-05-19

    Recent evidence suggests the intriguing possibility that midbrain dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons may use fast glutamatergic transmission to communicate with their postsynaptic targets. Because of technical limitations, direct demonstration of the existence of this signaling mechanism has been limited to experiments using cell culture preparations that often alter neuronal function including neurotransmitter phenotype. Consequently, it remains uncertain whether glutamatergic signaling between DAergic neurons and their postsynaptic targets exists under physiological conditions. Here, using an optogenetic approach, we provide the first conclusive demonstration that mesolimbic DAergic neurons in mice release glutamate and elicit excitatory postsynaptic responses in projection neurons of the nucleus accumbens. In addition, we describe the properties of the postsynaptic glutamatergic responses of these neurons during experimentally evoked burst firing of DAergic axons that reproduce the reward-related phasic population activity of the mesolimbic projection. These observations indicate that, in addition to DAergic mechanisms, mesolimbic reward signaling may involve glutamatergic transmission.

  5. Glutamatergic Signaling by Mesolimbic Dopamine Neurons in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Patel, Jyoti C.; Xenias, Harry; English, Daniel; Tadros, Ibrahim; Shah, Fulva; Berlin, Joshua; Deisseroth, Karl; Rice, Margaret E.; Tepper, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the intriguing possibility that midbrain dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons may use fast glutamatergic transmission to communicate with their postsynaptic targets. Because of technical limitations, direct demonstration of the existence of this signaling mechanism has been limited to experiments using cell culture preparations that often alter neuronal function including neurotransmitter phenotype. Consequently, it remains uncertain whether glutamatergic signaling between DAergic neurons and their postsynaptic targets exists under physiological conditions. Here, using an optogenetic approach, we provide the first conclusive demonstration that mesolimbic DAergic neurons in mice release glutamate and elicit excitatory postsynaptic responses in projection neurons of the nucleus accumbens. In addition, we describe the properties of the postsynaptic glutamatergic responses of these neurons during experimentally evoked burst firing of DAergic axons that reproduce the reward-related phasic population activity of the mesolimbic projection. These observations indicate that, in addition to DAergic mechanisms, mesolimbic reward signaling may involve glutamatergic transmission. PMID:20484653

  6. Activation of AMPA/kainate receptors but not acetylcholine receptors causes Mg2+ influx into Retzius neurones of the leech Hirudo medicinalis.

    PubMed

    Muller, Anja; Gunzel, Dorothee; Schlue, Wolf-Rudiger

    2003-12-01

    In Retzius neurones of the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, kainate activates ionotropic glutamate receptors classified as AMPA/kainate receptors. Activation of the AMPA/kainate receptor-coupled cation channels evokes a marked depolarization, intracellular acidification, and increases in the intracellular concentrations of Na+ ([Na+]i) and Ca2+. Qualitatively similar changes are observed upon the application of carbachol, an activator of acetylcholine receptor-coupled cation channels. Using multibarrelled ion-selective microelectrodes it was demonstrated that kainate, but not carbachol, caused additional increases in the intracellular free Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]i). Experiments were designed to investigate whether this kainate-induced [Mg2+]i increase was due to a direct Mg2+ influx through the AMPA/kainate receptor-coupled cation channels or a secondary effect due to the depolarization or the ionic changes. It was found that: (a) Similar [Mg2+]i increases were evoked by the application of glutamate or aspartate. (b) All kainate-induced effects were inhibited by the glutamatergic antagonist DNQX. (c) The magnitude of the [Mg2+]i increases depended on the extracellular Mg2+ concentration. (d) A reduction of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration increased kainate-induced [Mg2+]i increases, excluding possible Ca2+ interference at the Mg2+-selective microelectrode or at intracellular buffer sites. (e) Neither depolarizations evoked by the application of 30 mM K+, nor [Na+]i increases induced by the inhibition of the Na+/K+ ATPase caused comparable [Mg2+]i increases. (f) Inhibitors of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels did not affect the kainate-induced [Mg2+]i increases. Moreover, previous experiments had already shown that intracellular acidification evoked by the application of 20 mM propionate did not cause changes in [Mg2+]i. The results indicate that kainate-induced [Mg2+]i increases in leech Retzius neurones are due to an influx of extracellular Mg2+ through

  7. Activation of AMPA/Kainate Receptors but Not Acetylcholine Receptors Causes Mg2+ Influx into Retzius Neurones of the Leech Hirudo medicinalis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anja; Günzel, Dorothee; Schlue, Wolf-Rüdiger

    2003-01-01

    In Retzius neurones of the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, kainate activates ionotropic glutamate receptors classified as AMPA/kainate receptors. Activation of the AMPA/kainate receptor–coupled cation channels evokes a marked depolarization, intracellular acidification, and increases in the intracellular concentrations of Na+ ([Na+]i) and Ca2+. Qualitatively similar changes are observed upon the application of carbachol, an activator of acetylcholine receptor-coupled cation channels. Using multibarrelled ion-selective microelectrodes it was demonstrated that kainate, but not carbachol, caused additional increases in the intracellular free Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]i). Experiments were designed to investigate whether this kainate-induced [Mg2+]i increase was due to a direct Mg2+ influx through the AMPA/kainate receptor–coupled cation channels or a secondary effect due to the depolarization or the ionic changes. It was found that: (a) Similar [Mg2+]i increases were evoked by the application of glutamate or aspartate. (b) All kainate-induced effects were inhibited by the glutamatergic antagonist DNQX. (c) The magnitude of the [Mg2+]i increases depended on the extracellular Mg2+ concentration. (d) A reduction of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration increased kainate-induced [Mg2+]i increases, excluding possible Ca2+ interference at the Mg2+-selective microelectrode or at intracellular buffer sites. (e) Neither depolarizations evoked by the application of 30 mM K+, nor [Na+]i increases induced by the inhibition of the Na+/K+ ATPase caused comparable [Mg2+]i increases. (f) Inhibitors of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels did not affect the kainate-induced [Mg2+]i increases. Moreover, previous experiments had already shown that intracellular acidification evoked by the application of 20 mM propionate did not cause changes in [Mg2+]i. The results indicate that kainate-induced [Mg2+]i increases in leech Retzius neurones are due to an influx of extracellular Mg2

  8. Optogenetic Activation of Septal Glutamatergic Neurons Drive Hippocampal Theta Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer; Manseau, Frédéric; Ducharme, Guillaume; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Vigneault, Erika; El Mestikawy, Salah; Williams, Sylvain

    2016-03-09

    The medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) has an essential role for theta rhythm generation in the hippocampus and is critical for learning and memory. The MS-DBB contains cholinergic, GABAergic, and recently described glutamatergic neurons, but their specific contribution to theta generation is poorly understood. Here, we examined the role of MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons in theta rhythm using optogenetic activation and electrophysiological recordings performed in in vitro preparations and in freely behaving mice. The experiments in slices suggest that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons provide prominent excitatory inputs to a majority of local GABAergic and a minority of septal cholinergic neurons. In contrast, activation of MS-DBB glutamatergic fiber terminals in hippocampal slices elicited weak postsynaptic responses in hippocampal neurons. In the in vitro septo-hippocampal preparation, activation of MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons did increase the rhythmicity of hippocampal theta oscillations, whereas stimulation of septo-hippocampal glutamatergic fibers in the fornix did not have an effect. In freely behaving mice, activation of these neurons in the MS-DBB strongly synchronized hippocampal theta rhythms over a wide range of frequencies, whereas activation of their projections to the hippocampus through fornix stimulations had no effect on theta rhythms, suggesting that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons played a role in theta generation through local modulation of septal neurons. Together, these results provide the first evidence that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons modulate local septal circuits, which in turn contribute to theta rhythms in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/363016-08$15.00/0.

  9. Paradoxical upregulation of glutamatergic presynaptic boutons during mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen F S; Bennett, David A; Cuello, A Claudio

    2007-10-03

    Synaptic integrity is now recognized as a central component of Alzheimer's disease. Surprisingly, however, the structural status of glutamatergic synapses in Alzheimer's disease is unclear, despite the fact that glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter of the CNS and has key roles in excitotoxicity and long-term potentiation. The identification of specific markers of glutamatergic neurons now allows an assessment of the structural involvement of the glutamatergic system across progressive stages of the Alzheimer's pathology, an opportunity not afforded by previously used neurochemical approaches. Glutamatergic presynaptic bouton density and dystrophic neurite abundance were quantified in midfrontal gyrus brain tissue from subjects with no cognitive impairment, mild cognitive impairment, or mild- or severe-stage Alzheimer's disease. Our study demonstrates a striking pathology-dependent pattern of glutamatergic synaptic remodeling with disease progression. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment display a paradoxical elevation in glutamatergic presynaptic bouton density, a situation akin to that observed in the cholinergic system, which then depletes and drops with disease progression. This pattern of synaptic remodeling mirrors our previous findings in transgenic animal models and is of major relevance to current transmitter-based therapeutics.

  10. Lrp4 in astrocytes modulates glutamatergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang-Dong; Li, Lei; Liu, Fang; Huang, Zhi-Hui; Bean, Jonathan C; Jiao, Hui-Feng; Barik, Arnab; Kim, Seon-Myung; Wu, Haitao; Shen, Chengyong; Tian, Yun; Lin, Thiri W; Bates, Ryan; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Chen, Yong-Jun; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Lei; Lin, Hui-Ping; Hu, Jin-Xia; Li, Bao-Ming; Gao, Tian-Ming; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Neurotransmission requires precise control of neurotransmitter release from axon terminals. This process is regulated by glial cells; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We found that glutamate release in the brain was impaired in mice lacking low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), a protein that is critical for neuromuscular junction formation. Electrophysiological studies revealed compromised release probability in astrocyte-specific Lrp4 knockout mice. Lrp4 mutant astrocytes suppressed glutamatergic transmission by enhancing the release of ATP, whose level was elevated in the hippocampus of Lrp4 mutant mice. Consequently, the mutant mice were impaired in locomotor activity and spatial memory and were resistant to seizure induction. These impairments could be ameliorated by blocking the adenosine A1 receptor. The results reveal a critical role for Lrp4, in response to agrin, in modulating astrocytic ATP release and synaptic transmission. Our findings provide insight into the interaction between neurons and astrocytes for synaptic homeostasis and/or plasticity.

  11. Non-fibrillar beta-amyloid abates spike-timing-dependent synaptic potentiation at excitatory synapses in layer 2/3 of the neocortex by targeting postsynaptic AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Shemer, Isaac; Holmgren, Carl; Min, Rogier; Fülöp, Livia; Zilberter, Misha; Sousa, Kyle M; Farkas, Tamás; Härtig, Wolfgang; Penke, Botond; Burnashev, Nail; Tanila, Heikki; Zilberter, Yuri; Harkany, Tibor

    2006-04-01

    Cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD) stems from the progressive dysfunction of synaptic connections within cortical neuronal microcircuits. Recently, soluble amyloid beta protein oligomers (Abeta(ol)s) have been identified as critical triggers for early synaptic disorganization. However, it remains unknown whether a deficit of Hebbian-related synaptic plasticity occurs during the early phase of AD. Therefore, we studied whether age-dependent Abeta accumulation affects the induction of spike-timing-dependent synaptic potentiation at excitatory synapses on neocortical layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal cells in the APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mouse model of AD. Synaptic potentiation at excitatory synapses onto L2/3 pyramidal cells was significantly reduced at the onset of Abeta pathology and was virtually absent in mice with advanced Abeta burden. A decreased alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA)/N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated current ratio implicated postsynaptic mechanisms underlying Abeta synaptotoxicity. The integral role of Abeta(ol)s in these processes was verified by showing that pretreatment of cortical slices with Abeta((25-35)ol)s disrupted spike-timing-dependent synaptic potentiation at unitary connections between L2/3 pyramidal cells, and reduced the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents therein. A robust decrement of AMPA, but not NMDA, receptor-mediated currents in nucleated patches from L2/3 pyramidal cells confirmed that Abeta(ol)s perturb basal glutamatergic synaptic transmission by affecting postsynaptic AMPA receptors. Inhibition of AMPA receptor desensitization by cyclothiazide significantly increased the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials evoked by afferent stimulation, and rescued synaptic plasticity even in mice with pronounced Abeta pathology. We propose that soluble Abeta(ol)s trigger the diminution of synaptic plasticity in neocortical pyramidal cell networks during early

  12. Interactions between recording technique and AMPA receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bin; Colgin, Laura Lee; Brücher, Fernando Andres; Arai, Amy Christine; Lynch, Gary

    2002-11-15

    Whole cell recording (EPSCs) and extracellular recording (field EPSPs) were compared in hippocampal field CA1 with regard to the effects of experimental treatments that increase AMPA receptor gated currents. Cyclothiazide, which maintains AMPA receptors in the sensitized state, caused a rapid and pronounced increase in EPSCs but only minor changes in field EPSPs. This difference was evident in recordings carried out at 22 and 32 degrees C and with different solutions in the clamp pipette. The larger effect of cyclothiazide on EPSCs was unaffected by blockade of GABA and NMDA receptors. Two-dimensional current source density analyses derived from 64 recording sites were used to provide extracellular estimates of AMPA receptor mediated synaptic currents. With this method, cyclothiazide again had much smaller effects than were obtained with whole cell clamp. Differences between whole cell and extracellular recordings were present, although not as pronounced, for the ampakines, a class of drugs that slow both deactivation and desensitization of AMPA receptors. Additionally, increases in synaptic responses produced by frequency facilitation, a manipulation that enhances the number of bound receptors, were not qualitatively different between recording techniques. These results support the conclusion that the whole cell clamp technique may alter AMPA receptors in such a way as to increase the relative importance of desensitization.

  13. Are AMPA Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators Potential Pharmacotherapeutics for Addiction?

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Lucas R.; Olive, M. Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  14. Mechanism of Positive Allosteric Modulators Acting on AMPA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jin,R.; Clark, S.; Weeks, A.; Dudman, J.; Gouaux, E.; Partin, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels involved in the modulation of synaptic strength are the AMPA, kainate, and NMDA glutamate receptors. Small molecules that potentiate AMPA receptor currents relieve cognitive deficits caused by neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and show promise in the treatment of depression. Previously, there has been limited understanding of the molecular mechanism of action for AMPA receptor potentiators. Here we present cocrystal structures of the glutamate receptor GluR2 S1S2 ligand-binding domain in complex with aniracetam [1-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-2-pyrrolidinone] or CX614 (pyrrolidino-1, 3-oxazino benzo-1, 4-dioxan-10-one), two AMPA receptor potentiators that preferentially slow AMPA receptor deactivation. Both potentiators bind within the dimer interface of the nondesensitized receptor at a common site located on the twofold axis of molecular symmetry. Importantly, the potentiator binding site is adjacent to the 'hinge' in the ligand-binding core 'clamshell' that undergoes conformational rearrangement after glutamate binding. Using rapid solution exchange, patch-clamp electrophysiology experiments, we show that point mutations of residues that interact with potentiators in the cocrystal disrupt potentiator function. We suggest that the potentiators slow deactivation by stabilizing the clamshell in its closed-cleft, glutamate-bound conformation.

  15. Ca(2+)-Permeable AMPARs Mediate Glutamatergic Transmission and Excitotoxic Damage at the Hair Cell Ribbon Synapse.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Joy Y; Cho, Soyoun; Sheets, Lavinia; Rutherford, Mark A; von Gersdorff, Henrique; Raible, David W

    2017-06-21

    We report functional and structural evidence for GluA2-lacking Ca(2+)-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) at the mature hair cell ribbon synapse. By using the methodological advantages of three species (of either sex), we demonstrate that CP-AMPARs are present at the hair cell synapse in an evolutionarily conserved manner. Via a combination of in vivo electrophysiological and Ca(2+) imaging approaches in the larval zebrafish, we show that hair cell stimulation leads to robust Ca(2+) influx into afferent terminals. Prolonged application of AMPA caused loss of afferent terminal responsiveness, whereas blocking CP-AMPARs protects terminals from excitotoxic swelling. Immunohistochemical analysis of AMPAR subunits in mature rat cochlea show regions within synapses lacking the GluA2 subunit. Paired recordings from adult bullfrog auditory synapses demonstrate that CP-AMPARs mediate a major component of glutamatergic transmission. Together, our results support the importance of CP-AMPARs in mediating transmission at the hair cell ribbon synapse. Further, excess Ca(2+) entry via CP-AMPARs may underlie afferent terminal damage following excitotoxic challenge, suggesting that limiting Ca(2+) levels in the afferent terminal may protect against cochlear synaptopathy associated with hearing loss.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A single incidence of noise overexposure causes damage at the hair cell synapse that later leads to neurodegeneration and exacerbates age-related hearing loss. A first step toward understanding cochlear neurodegeneration is to identify the cause of initial excitotoxic damage to the postsynaptic neuron. Using a combination of immunohistochemical, electrophysiological, and Ca(2+) imaging approaches in evolutionarily divergent species, we demonstrate that Ca(2+)-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) mediate glutamatergic transmission at the adult auditory hair cell synapse. Overexcitation of the terminal causes Ca(2+) accumulation and swelling that can be prevented by blocking CP

  16. Major Impairments of Glutamatergic Transmission and Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity in the Hippocampus of Mice Lacking the Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Pachoud, Bastien; Adamantidis, Antoine; Ravassard, Pascal; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Grisar, Thierry; Lakaye, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamic neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) plays important roles in energy homeostasis, anxiety, and sleep regulation. Since the MCH receptor-1 (MCH-R1), the only functional receptor that mediates MCH functions in rodents, facilitates behavioral performance in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks, we investigated whether glutamatergic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells could be modulated in mice lacking the MCH-R1 gene (MCH-R1−/−). We found that both α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated transmissions were diminished in the mutant mice compared with their controls. This deficit was explained, at least in part, by a postsynaptic down-regulation of these receptors since the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and the NMDA/AMPA ratio were decreased. Long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) was also impaired in MCH-R1−/− mice. This was due to an altered induction, rather than an impaired, expression because repeating the induction stimulus restored LTP to a normal magnitude. In addition, long-term synaptic depression was strongly diminished in MCH-R1−/− mice. These results suggest that MCH exerts a facilitatory effect on CA1 glutamatergic synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity. Recently, it has been shown that MCH neurons fire exclusively during sleep and mainly during rapid eye movement sleep. Thus these findings provide a mechanism by which sleep might facilitate memory consolidation. PMID:20592115

  17. Glutamatergic substrates of drug addiction and alcoholism1

    PubMed Central

    Gass, Justin T.; Foster Olive, M.

    2008-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a dramatic accumulation of evidence indicating that the excitatory amino acid glutamate plays an important role in drug addiction and alcoholism. The purpose of this review is to summarize findings on glutamatergic substrates of addiction, surveying data from both human and animal studies. The effects of various drugs of abuse on glutamatergic neurotransmission are discussed, as are the effects of pharmacological or genetic manipulation of various components of glutamate transmission on drug reinforcement, conditioned reward, extinction, and relapse-like behavior. In addition, glutamatergic agents that are currently in use or are undergoing testing in clinical trials for the treatment of addiction are discussed, including acamprosate, N-acetylcysteine, modafinil, topiramate, lamotrigine, gabapentin and mematine. All drugs of abuse appear to modulate glutamatergic transmission, albeit by different mechanisms, and this modulation of glutamate transmission is believed to result in long-lasting neuroplastic changes in the brain that may contribute to the perseveration of drug-seeking behavior and drug-associated memories. In general, attenuation of glutamatergic transmission reduces drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behavior. On the other hand, potentiation of glutamatergic transmission appears to facilitate the extinction of drug-seeking behavior. However, attempts at identifying genetic polymorphisms in components of glutamate transmission in humans have yielded only a limited number of candidate genes that may serve as risk factors for the development of addiction. Nonetheless, manipulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission appears to be a promising avenue of research in developing improved therapeutic agents for the treatment of drug addiction and alcoholism. PMID:17706608

  18. Transferrin Receptor Controls AMPA Receptor Trafficking Efficiency and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Lei, Run; Li, Qiong; Wang, Xin-Xin; Wu, Qian; An, Peng; Zhang, Jianchao; Zhu, Minyan; Xu, Zhiheng; Hong, Yang; Wang, Fudi; Shen, Ying; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TFR) is an important iron transporter regulating iron homeostasis and has long been used as a marker for clathrin mediated endocytosis. However, little is known about its additional function other than iron transport in the development of central nervous system (CNS). Here we demonstrate that TFR functions as a regulator to control AMPA receptor trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. The conditional knockout (KO) of TFR in neural progenitor cells causes mice to develop progressive epileptic seizure, and dramatically reduces basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). We further demonstrate that TFR KO remarkably reduces the binding efficiency of GluR2 to AP2 and subsequently decreases AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Thus, our study reveals that TFR functions as a novel regulator to control AMPA trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26880306

  19. Ganglioside Regulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Jillian; Umanah, George K.E.; Yoo, Seung-Wan; Lagerlöf, Olof; Motari, Mary G.; Cole, Robert N.; Huganir, Richard L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2014-01-01

    Gangliosides are major cell-surface determinants on all vertebrate neurons. Human congenital disorders of ganglioside biosynthesis invariably result in intellectual disability and are often associated with intractable seizures. To probe the mechanisms of ganglioside functions, affinity-captured ganglioside-binding proteins from rat cerebellar granule neurons were identified by quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry. Of the six proteins that bound selectively to the major brain ganglioside GT1b (GT1b:GM1 > 4; p < 10−4), three regulate neurotransmitter receptor trafficking: Thorase (ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 1), soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein (γ-SNAP), and the transmembrane protein Nicalin. Thorase facilitates endocytosis of GluR2 subunit-containing AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) in an ATPase-dependent manner; its deletion in mice results in learning and memory deficits (J. Zhang et al., 2011b). GluR2-containing AMPARs did not bind GT1b, but bound specifically to another ganglioside, GM1. Addition of noncleavable ATP (ATPγS) significantly disrupted ganglioside binding, whereas it enhanced AMPAR association with Thorase, NSF, and Nicalin. Mutant mice lacking GT1b expressed markedly higher brain Thorase, whereas Thorase-null mice expressed higher GT1b. Treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons with sialidase, which cleaves GT1b (and other sialoglycans), resulted in a significant reduction in the size of surface GluR2 puncta. These data support a model in which GM1-bound GluR2-containing AMPARs are functionally segregated from GT1b-bound AMPAR-trafficking complexes. Release of ganglioside binding may enhance GluR2-containing AMPAR association with its trafficking complexes, increasing endocytosis. Disrupting ganglioside biosynthesis may result in reduced synaptic expression of GluR2-contianing AMPARs resulting in intellectual deficits and seizure susceptibility in mice and humans. PMID:25253868

  20. Ganglioside regulation of AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Jillian; Umanah, George K E; Yoo, Seung-Wan; Lagerlöf, Olof; Motari, Mary G; Cole, Robert N; Huganir, Richard L; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2014-09-24

    Gangliosides are major cell-surface determinants on all vertebrate neurons. Human congenital disorders of ganglioside biosynthesis invariably result in intellectual disability and are often associated with intractable seizures. To probe the mechanisms of ganglioside functions, affinity-captured ganglioside-binding proteins from rat cerebellar granule neurons were identified by quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry. Of the six proteins that bound selectively to the major brain ganglioside GT1b (GT1b:GM1 > 4; p < 10(-4)), three regulate neurotransmitter receptor trafficking: Thorase (ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 1), soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein (γ-SNAP), and the transmembrane protein Nicalin. Thorase facilitates endocytosis of GluR2 subunit-containing AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) in an ATPase-dependent manner; its deletion in mice results in learning and memory deficits (J. Zhang et al., 2011b). GluR2-containing AMPARs did not bind GT1b, but bound specifically to another ganglioside, GM1. Addition of noncleavable ATP (ATPγS) significantly disrupted ganglioside binding, whereas it enhanced AMPAR association with Thorase, NSF, and Nicalin. Mutant mice lacking GT1b expressed markedly higher brain Thorase, whereas Thorase-null mice expressed higher GT1b. Treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons with sialidase, which cleaves GT1b (and other sialoglycans), resulted in a significant reduction in the size of surface GluR2 puncta. These data support a model in which GM1-bound GluR2-containing AMPARs are functionally segregated from GT1b-bound AMPAR-trafficking complexes. Release of ganglioside binding may enhance GluR2-containing AMPAR association with its trafficking complexes, increasing endocytosis. Disrupting ganglioside biosynthesis may result in reduced synaptic expression of GluR2-contianing AMPARs resulting in intellectual deficits and seizure susceptibility in mice and humans.

  1. Protein kinase CK2 increases glutamatergic input in the hypothalamus and sympathetic vasomotor tone in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zeng-You; Li, De-Pei; Li, Li; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2011-06-01

    Increased glutamatergic input in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is important for high sympathetic outflow in hypertension, but the associated molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we determined the role of protein kinase CK2 (formerly casein kinase II) in increased N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity in spinally projecting PVN neurons and sympathetic vasomotor tone in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). The selective CK2 inhibitors 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) or 4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBB) significantly decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) of labeled PVN neurons in SHRs but not in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) normotensive rats. Also, DRB abolished the inhibitory effect of the NMDAR antagonist AP5 on the frequency of mEPSCs in SHRs. Treatment with DRB or TBB significantly reduced the amplitude of evoked NMDA-EPSCs but not AMPA-EPSCs in SHRs. Furthermore, DRB significantly decreased the firing activity of PVN neurons in SHRs but not in WKY rats. The membrane protein level of CK2α in the PVN, but not brainstem and prefrontal cortex, was significantly higher in SHRs than in WKY rats. Lowering blood pressure with celiac ganglionectomy in SHRs did not alter the increased CK2α level and the effects of DRB on mEPSCs and NMDA-EPSCs. In addition, intracerebroventricular injection of DRB not only significantly reduced blood pressure and lumbar sympathetic nerve discharges but also eliminated the inhibitory effect of AP5 microinjected into the PVN on sympathetic nerve activity in SHRs. Our findings suggest that augmented CK2 activity critically contributes to increased presynaptic and postsynaptic NMDAR activity in the PVN and elevated sympathetic vasomotor tone in essential hypertension.

  2. Diversity of Glutamatergic Synaptic Strength in Lateral Prefrontal versus Primary Visual Cortices in the Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Luebke, Jennifer I.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding commonalities and differences in glutamatergic synaptic signaling is essential for understanding cortical functional diversity, especially in the highly complex primate brain. Previously, we have shown that spontaneous EPSCs differed markedly in layer 3 pyramidal neurons of two specialized cortical areas in the rhesus monkey, the high-order lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) and the primary visual cortex (V1). Here, we used patch-clamp recordings and confocal and electron microscopy to determine whether these distinct synaptic responses are due to differences in firing rates of presynaptic neurons and/or in the features of presynaptic or postsynaptic entities. As with spontaneous EPSCs, TTX-insensitive (action potential-independent) miniature EPSCs exhibited significantly higher frequency, greater amplitude, and slower kinetics in LPFC compared with V1 neurons. Consistent with these physiological differences, LPFC neurons possessed higher densities of spines, and the mean width of large spines was greater compared with those on V1 neurons. Axospinous synapses in layers 2–3 of LPFC had larger postsynaptic density surface areas and a higher proportion of large perforated synapses compared with V1. Axonal boutons in LPFC were also larger in volume and contained ∼1.6× more vesicles than did those in V1. Further, LPFC had a higher density of AMPA GluR2 receptor labeling than V1. The properties of spines and synaptic currents of individual layer 3 pyramidal neurons measured here were significantly correlated, consistent with the idea that significantly more frequent and larger synaptic currents are likely due to more numerous, larger, and more powerful synapses in LPFC compared with V1. PMID:25568107

  3. Irreversible loss of a subpopulation of cortical interneurons in the absence of glutamatergic network activity.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Ana Dolabela; Opitz, Thoralf; Voigt, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    In the cerebral cortex of mammals, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons represent 15-25% of all neurons, depending on the species and area being examined. Because converging evidence suggests that activity may play an important role in the neuritic maturation and synaptic function of GABAergic neurons, it is feasible that activity plays a role in the regulation of the proportion of GABAergic neurons. Here we provide direct evidence that early in cortical development activity blockade may deplete the network of a subpopulation of GABA immunoreactive neurons characterized by their small size and late generation in vitro. In a period of time coinciding with the emergence of synchronous network activity, the survival and morphological differentiation of GABAergic neurons was influenced by long-term blockade of synaptic activity. While GABA(A) receptor antagonists had a minor promoting effect on interneuronal survival during the second week in vitro, antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors strongly impaired survival and differentiation of immature GABAergic interneurons. Interneuronal loss was more severe when N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors were blocked than after blockade of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptors. The decrease in the density of GABAergic neurons was irreversible, but could be prevented by the simultaneous addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These results suggest that there is a narrow time window during neocortical development when glutamatergic activity, and specially NMDA receptor stimulation, is crucial to assure survival and maturation of a subpopulation of late developing GABAergic interneurons.

  4. Role of glutamatergic receptors located in the nucleus raphe magnus on antinociceptive effect of morphine microinjected into the nucleus cuneiformis of rat.

    PubMed

    Haghparast, Abbas; Soltani-Hekmat, Ava; Khani, Abbas; Komaki, Alireza

    2007-10-29

    Neurons in the nucleus cuneiformis (CnF), located just ventrolateral to the periaqueductal gray, project to medullary nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), which is a key medullary relay for descending pain modulation and is critically involved in opioid-induced analgesia. Previous studies have shown that antinociceptive response of CnF-microinjected morphine can be modulated by the specific subtypes of glutamatergic receptors within the CnF. In this study, we evaluated the role of NMDA and kainate/AMPA receptors that are widely distributed within the NRM on morphine-induced antinociception elicited from the CnF. Hundred and five male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g were used. Morphine (10, 20 and 40 microg) and NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (10 microg) or kainate/AMPA receptor antagonist, DNQX (0.5 microg) in 0.5 microl saline were stereotaxically microinjected into the CnF and NRM, respectively. The latency of tail-flick response was measured at set intervals (2, 7, 12, 17, 22, 27 min after microinjection) by using an automated tail-flick analgesiometer. The results showed that morphine microinjection into the CnF dose-dependently causes increase in tail-flick latency (TFL). MK-801 microinjected into the NRM, just 1 min before morphine injection into the CnF, significantly attenuated antinociceptive effects of morphine. On the other hand, DNQX microinjected into the NRM, significantly increased TFL after local application of morphine into the CnF. We suggest that morphine related antinociceptive effect elicited from the CnF is mediated, in part, by NMDA receptor at the level of the NRM whereas kainite/AMPA receptor has a net inhibitory influence at the same pathway.

  5. AMPA receptor/TARP stoichiometry visualized by single-molecule subunit counting.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Peter; Ulbrich, Maximilian H; Wang, Hui-Li; Arant, Ryan J; Lau, Anthony G; Zhang, Zhenjie; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Chen, Lu

    2013-03-26

    Members of the transmembrane AMPA receptor-regulatory protein (TARP) family modulate AMPA receptor (AMPA-R) trafficking and function. AMPA-Rs consist of four pore-forming subunits. Previous studies show that TARPs are an integral part of the AMPA-R complex, acting as accessory subunits for mature receptors in vivo. The TARP/AMPA-R stoichiometry was previously measured indirectly and found to be variable and dependent on TARP expression level, with at most four TARPs associated with each AMPA-R complex. Here, we use a single-molecule technique in live cells that selectively images proteins located in the plasma membrane to directly count the number of TARPs associated with each AMPA-R complex. Although individual GFP-tagged TARP subunits are observed as freely diffusing fluorescent spots on the surface of Xenopus laevis oocytes when expressed alone, coexpression with AMPA-R-mCherry immobilizes the stargazin-GFP spots at sites of AMPA-R-mCherry, consistent with complex formation. We determined the number of TARP molecules associated with each AMPA-R by counting bleaching steps for three different TARP family members: γ-2, γ-3, and γ-4. We confirm that the TARP/AMPA-R stoichiometry depends on TARP expression level and discover that the maximum number of TARPs per AMPA-R complex falls into two categories: up to four γ-2 or γ-3 subunits, but rarely above two for γ-4 subunit. This unexpected AMPA-R/TARP stoichiometry difference has important implications for the assembly and function of TARP/AMPA-R complexes.

  6. Two populations of neurokinin 1 receptor-expressing projection neurons in lamina I of the rat spinal cord that differ in AMPA receptor subunit composition and density of excitatory synaptic input

    PubMed Central

    Polgár, E.; Al Ghamdi, K.S.; Todd, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Lamina I of the spinal cord contains many projection neurons that express the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1r). It has been reported that these cells can undergo long-term potentiation (LTP), which may result from insertion of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPArs) containing GluA1 or GluA4 subunits. We therefore investigated synaptic AMPAr expression on these cells with immunocytochemistry following antigen-retrieval. We also examined their density of glutamatergic input (by analysing AMPAr synaptic puncta and contacts from glutamatergic boutons), and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (pERKs) following noxious stimulation. Our results indicate that there are two populations of NK1r-expressing projection neurons: large GluA4+/GluA1− cells with a high density of glutamatergic input and small GluA1+/GluA4− cells with a much lower input density. Results from pERK experiments suggested that the two groups may not differ in the types of noxious stimulus that activate them. Glutamatergic synapses on distal dendrites of the large cells were significantly longer than those on proximal dendrites, which presumably compensates for the greater attenuation of distally-generated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Both types of cell received contacts from peptidergic primary afferents, however, on the large cells these appeared to constitute over half of the glutamatergic synapses, and were often associated with elongated AMPAr puncta. This suggests that these afferents, which probably contain substance P, provide a powerful, secure synaptic input to large NK1r-expressing projection neurons. These results demonstrate the importance of GluA4-containing AMPArs in nociceptive transmission and raise the possibility that different forms of LTP in lamina I projection neurons may be related to differential expression of GluA1/GluA4. PMID:20303396

  7. Reciprocal inhibition of the AMPA and NMDA components of excitatory postsynaptic potentials in field CA1 of the rat hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bazhenov, A V; Kleshchevnikov, A M

    1999-01-01

    The mutual effects of components of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSP) induced by activation of glutamate receptors sensitive to alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) were studied on living slices of rat hippocampus. Evoked responses were recorded in the radial layer (stratum radialis) in field CA1 after stimulation of collateral-commissural fibers. The contribution of the NMDA component to the total EPSP was altered by extracellular application of solutions containing different concentrations of magnesium. At low magnesium concentrations, when both components made significant contributions to EPSP, inhibition of one of the components by application of antagonists of the appropriate receptors led to increases in the area of the other component. Thus, the total magnitude of pharmacologically isolated components were significantly greater than the control response (for example, at 0.1 mM magnesium, the sum of the components was 340 +/- 120% of the control two-component EPSP (p < 0.01; N = 6). These results suggest that in controls, the AMPA and NMDA components of EPSP inhibit each other. The mutual inhibition of components may be an important factor affecting the conductivity and plastic properties of central glutamatergic synaptic pathways.

  8. Stress at learning facilitates memory formation by regulating AMPA receptor trafficking through a glucocorticoid action.

    PubMed

    Conboy, Lisa; Sandi, Carmen

    2010-02-01

    Stress and glucocorticoids (GCs) can facilitate memory formation. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating their effects are largely unknown. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor (AMPAR) trafficking has been implicated in the changes in synaptic strength at central glutamatergic synapses associated with memory formation. In cell cultures, corticosterone has been shown to condition the synaptic trafficking of the AMPAR GluA2 subunit. In this study, we investigated the involvement of GluA2 trafficking in the facilitation of learning by stress. Using the water maze spatial task involving different stress levels, mice trained under more stressful conditions (water at 22 degrees C) showed better learning and memory, and higher post-training corticosterone levels, than mice trained under lower stress (water at 30 degrees C). Strikingly, this facilitated learning by stress was accompanied by enhanced synaptic expression of GluA2 AMPARs that was not observed in mice trained under less stressful conditions. Interfering with GC actions by injecting the GC synthesis inhibitor, metyrapone, blocked both the memory facilitation and the enhanced GluA2 trafficking induced by stressful learning. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the peptide, pep2m, that blocks GluA2 synaptic trafficking by interfering with the interaction between N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor and GluA2, impaired immediate performance at learning as well as long-term memory retrieval, supporting a causal role for GluA2 trafficking in stress-induced facilitation of spatial learning and memory. Evidence for the involvement of the neural cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin in interaction with GluA2 is also provided. These findings underscore a new mechanism whereby stress can improve memory function.

  9. Depalmitoylation preferentially downregulates AMPA induced Ca2+ signaling and neurotoxicity in motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Karthik; Mehta, Bhupesh; Singh, Mahendra; Tewari, Bhanu P; Joshi, Preeti G; Joshi, Nanda B

    2013-09-05

    Excessive activation of AMPA receptor has been implicated in motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, it is not clear why motor neurons are preferentially sensitive to AMPA receptor mediated excessive [Ca(2+)]i rise and excitotoxicity. In the present study we examined whether palmitoylation regulates Ca(2+) permeability of AMPA receptor and excitotoxicity in cultured spinal cord neurons. We adapted chronic 2-bromopalmitate (2-BrP) treatment to achieve depalmitoylation and examined its effect on the cytotoxicity in spinal cord neurons exposed to AMPA. The change in AMPA induced signaling and cytotoxicity in motor neurons and other spinal neurons under identical conditions of exposure to AMPA was studied. 2-BrP treatment inhibited AMPA induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i and cytotoxicity in both types of neurons but the degree of inhibition was significantly higher in motor neurons as compared to other spinal neurons. The AMPA induced [Na(+)]i rise was moderately affected in both type of neurons on depalmitoylation. Depalmitoylation reduced the expression levels of AMPA receptor subunits (GluR1 and GluR2) and also PSD-95 but stargazin levels remained unaffected. Our results demonstrate that 2-BrP attenuates AMPA receptor activated Ca(2+) signaling and cytotoxicity preferentially in motor neurons and suggest that AMPA receptor modulation by depalmitoylation could play a significant role in preventing motor neuron degeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. SynDIG1 promotes excitatory synaptogenesis independent of AMPA receptor trafficking and biophysical regulation.

    PubMed

    Lovero, Kathryn L; Blankenship, Sabine M; Shi, Yun; Nicoll, Roger A

    2013-01-01

    AMPA receptors-mediators of fast, excitatory transmission and synaptic plasticity in the brain-achieve great functional diversity through interaction with different auxiliary subunits, which alter both the trafficking and biophysical properties of these receptors. In the past several years an abundance of new AMPA receptor auxiliary subunits have been identified, adding astounding variety to the proteins known to directly bind and modulate AMPA receptors. SynDIG1 was recently identified as a novel AMPA receptor interacting protein that directly binds to the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 in heterologous cells. Functionally, SynDIG1 was found to regulate the strength and density of AMPA receptor containing synapses in hippocampal neurons, though the way in which SynDIG1 exerts these effects remains unknown. Here, we aimed to determine if SynDIG1 acts as a traditional auxiliary subunit, directly regulating the function and localization of AMPA receptors in the rat hippocampus. We find that, unlike any of the previously characterized AMPA receptor auxiliary subunits, SynDIG1 expression does not impact AMPA receptor gating, pharmacology, or surface trafficking. Rather, we show that SynDIG1 regulates the number of functional excitatory synapses, altering both AMPA and NMDA receptor mediated transmission. Our findings suggest that SynDIG1 is not a typical auxiliary subunit to AMPA receptors, but instead is a protein critical to excitatory synaptogenesis.

  11. TARP gamma-8 controls hippocampal AMPA receptor number, distribution and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Rouach, Nathalie; Byrd, Keith; Petralia, Ronald S; Elias, Guillermo M; Adesnik, Hillel; Tomita, Susumu; Karimzadegan, Siavash; Kealey, Colin; Bredt, David S; Nicoll, Roger A

    2005-11-01

    Synaptic plasticity involves activity-dependent trafficking of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Numerous cytoplasmic scaffolding proteins are postulated to control AMPA receptor trafficking, but the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that the transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) gamma-8, which is preferentially expressed in the mouse hippocampus, is important for AMPA receptor protein levels and extrasynaptic surface expression. By controlling the number of AMPA receptors, gamma-8 is also important in long-term potentiation, but not long-term depression. This study establishes gamma-8 as a critical protein for basal AMPA receptor expression and localization at extrasynaptic sites in the hippocampus and raises the possibility that TARP-dependent control of AMPA receptors during synapse development and plasticity may be widespread.

  12. Effects of cyclothiazide on GluR1/AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fucile, Sergio; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2006-01-01

    Cyclothiazide (CTZ), a positive allosteric modulator of ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors, is used frequently to block the desensitization of both native and heterologously expressed AMPA receptors. Specifically, CTZ is known to produce a fast inhibition of AMPA receptor desensitization and a much slower potentiation of the AMPA current. By using patch-clamp techniques, the effects of CTZ were studied in HEK 293 cells stably transfected with the rat flip GluR1 subunit. Upon CTZ treatment, we found an increased apparent affinity for the agonist, a slow whole-cell current potentiation, a fast inhibition of desensitization, and a lengthening of single-channel openings. Furthermore, we show that CTZ alters the channel gating events modifying the relative contribution of different single-channel classes of conductance (γ), increasing and decreasing, respectively, the contributions of γM (medium) and γL (low) without altering that of the γH (high) conductance channels. We also present a kinetic model that predicts well all of the experimental findings of CTZ action. Finally, we suggest a protocol for standard cell treatment with CTZ to attain maximal efficacy of CTZ on GluR1 receptors. PMID:16473938

  13. Bradykinin Enhances AMPA and NMDA Receptor Activity in Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn Neurons by Activating Multiple Kinases to Produce Pain Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Tatsuro; Wang, Haibin; Amaya, Fumimasa; Brenner, Gary J.; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Ji, Ru-Rong; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Bradykinin potentiates synaptic glutamate release and action in the spinal cord via presynaptic and postsynaptic B2 receptors, contributing thereby to activity-dependent central sensitization and pain hypersensitivity (Wang et al., 2005). We have now examined the signaling pathways that are responsible for the postsynaptic modulatory actions of bradykinin on glutamatergic action and transmission in superficial dorsal horn neurons. B2 receptors are coexpressed in dorsal horn neurons with protein kinase A (PKA) and the δ isoform of protein kinase C (PKC), and we find that the augmentation by bradykinin of AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated currents in lamina II neurons requires coactivation of both PKC and PKA. The activation of PKA is downstream of COX1 (cyclooxygenase-1). Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation is involved after the PKC and PKA coactivation, and intrathecal administration of bradykinin induces a thermal hyperalgesia in vivo, which is reduced by inhibition of ERK, PKA, and PKC. We conclude that bradykinin, by activating multiple kinases in dorsal horn neurons, potentiates glutamatergic synaptic transmission to produce pain hypersensitivity. PMID:18434532

  14. Ketamine as the prototype glutamatergic antidepressant: pharmacodynamic actions, and a systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Caddy, Caroline; Giaroli, Giovanni; White, Thomas P.; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.

    2014-01-01

    The burden of depressive disorders and the frequent inadequacy of their current pharmacological treatments are well established. The anaesthetic and hallucinogenic drug ketamine has provoked much interest over the past decade or so as an extremely rapidly acting antidepressant that does not modify ‘classical’ monoaminergic receptors. Current evidence has shown several ways through which it might exert therapeutic antidepressant actions: blockade of glutamatergic NMDA receptors and relative upregulation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) subtypes may alter cortical connectivity patterns; through intracellular changes in protein expression, including the proteins mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); and alteration of intracellular signalling cascades. The clinical evidence demonstrates rapid improvements in mood and suicidal thinking in most participants, although study numbers have generally been small and many trials are unblinded and methodologically weak. There is a small body of work to suggest ketamine might also augment electroconvulsive therapy and potentially have a role as a surgical anaesthetic in depressed patients. A major problem is that the effects of ketamine appear temporary, disappearing after days to weeks (although longer benefits have been sustained in some), and attempts to circumvent this through pharmacological augmentation have been disappointing thus far. These exciting data are providing new insights into neurobiological models of depression, and potentially opening up a new class of antidepressants, but there are significant practical and ethical issues about any future mainstream clinical role it might have. PMID:24688759

  15. Cannabinoid-glutamate interactions in the regulation of food intake in neonatal layer- type chicks: role of glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Keyshams, Negar; Zendehdel, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab; Baghbanzadeh, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the brain functions is likely the conclusion of its capability to interact with specific neurotransmitters in several brain regions. The present study was designed to examine the role of the glutamatergic system on cannabinoid-induced hyperphagia in chicken. In this survey 10 experiments designed to investigate interaction of cannabinoidergic and glutamatergic systems on feeding behavior in neonatal chickens. In experiment 1, chicken were intracerebroventricular (ICV) injected with saline, 2-AG (2-Arachidonoylglycerol, 5.28 nmol, CB1 receptors agonist), MK-801(NMDA receptor antagonist, 15 nmol) and co-administration of 2-AG + MK-801. In experiment 2, injection of saline, 2-AG (5.28 nmol), CNQX) AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, 390 nmol) and their combination (2-AG + CNQX) was done. In Experiment 3, injections were saline, 2-AG (5.28 nmol), AIDA)mGluR1 antagonist, 2 nmol) and 2-AG + AIDA. Experiments 4 and 5 were similar to experiment 3, except birds injected with LY341495 (mGLUR2 glutamate antagonist, 150 nmol) and UBP1112 (mGLUR3 glutamate antagonist, 2 nmol) instead of AIDA. Experiments 6-10 followed the procedure similar to experiments 1-5, except chickens received ICV injection of CB65 (CB2 receptor agonist, 3 nmol), instead of 2-AG. Then the cumulative food intake measured until 120 min post injection. According to the results, ICV injection of 2-AG and CB65 significantly increased food intake (P < 0.001). Co-injection of 2-AG and MK-801 significantly amplified hyperphagic effect of CB1 receptors agonist(P < 0.001). Moreover, co-administration of CB65 plus CNQX significantly increased CB65- induced hyperphagia in FD3 neonatal layer-type chickens (P < 0.001). These results suggest there is an interaction between endocannabinoids and glutamatergic systems via NMDA and AMPA receptors in feeding behavior of neonatal layer-type chickens.

  16. Reduced Anterior Cingulate Cortex Glutamatergic Concentrations in Childhood Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirza, Yousha; Tang, Jennifer; Russell, Aileen; Banerjee, S. Preeya; Bhandari, Rashmi; Ivey, Jennifer; Rose, Michelle; Moore, Gregory J.; Rosenberg, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine in vivo glutamatergic neurochemical alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic ([.sup.1]H-MRS) examinations of the anterior cingulate cortex were conducted in 13 psychotropic-naive children and adolescents with MDD…

  17. Glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the mesocorticolimbic system in addiction

    PubMed Central

    van Huijstee, Aile N.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2015-01-01

    Addictive drugs remodel the brain’s reward circuitry, the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system, by inducing widespread adaptations of glutamatergic synapses. This drug-induced synaptic plasticity is thought to contribute to both the development and the persistence of addiction. This review highlights the synaptic modifications that are induced by in vivo exposure to addictive drugs and describes how these drug-induced synaptic changes may contribute to the different components of addictive behavior, such as compulsive drug use despite negative consequences and relapse. Initially, exposure to an addictive drug induces synaptic changes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). This drug-induced synaptic potentiation in the VTA subsequently triggers synaptic changes in downstream areas of the mesocorticolimbic system, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the prefrontal cortex (PFC), with further drug exposure. These glutamatergic synaptic alterations are then thought to mediate many of the behavioral symptoms that characterize addiction. The later stages of glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the NAc and in particular in the PFC play a role in maintaining addiction and drive relapse to drug-taking induced by drug-associated cues. Remodeling of PFC glutamatergic circuits can persist into adulthood, causing a lasting vulnerability to relapse. We will discuss how these neurobiological changes produced by drugs of abuse may provide novel targets for potential treatment strategies for addiction. PMID:25653591

  18. Reduced Anterior Cingulate Cortex Glutamatergic Concentrations in Childhood Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirza, Yousha; Tang, Jennifer; Russell, Aileen; Banerjee, S. Preeya; Bhandari, Rashmi; Ivey, Jennifer; Rose, Michelle; Moore, Gregory J.; Rosenberg, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine in vivo glutamatergic neurochemical alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic ([.sup.1]H-MRS) examinations of the anterior cingulate cortex were conducted in 13 psychotropic-naive children and adolescents with MDD…

  19. Targeting the Glutamatergic System to Treat Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Daniel C.; Henter, Ioline D.; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a severe, debilitating medical illness that affects millions of individuals worldwide. The young age of onset and chronicity of the disorder has a significant impact on the long-term disability that affected individuals face. Most existing treatments have focused on the ‘monoamine hypothesis’ for rational design of compounds. However, patients continue to experience low remission rates, residual subsyndromal symptoms, relapses and overall functional impairment. In this context, growing evidence suggests that the glutamatergic system is uniquely central to the neurobiology and treatment of MDD. Here, we review data supporting the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology of MDD, and discuss the efficacy of glutamatergic agents as novel therapeutics. Preliminary clinical evidence has been promising, particularly with regard to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist ketamine as a ‘proof-of-concept’ agent. The review also highlights potential molecular and inflammatory mechanisms that may contribute to the rapid antidepressant response seen with ketamine. Because existing pharmacological treatments for MDD are often insufficient for many patients, the next generation of treatments needs to be more effective, rapid acting and better tolerated than currently available medications. There is extant evidence that the glutamatergic system holds considerable promise for developing the next generation of novel and mechanistically distinct agents for the treatment of MDD. PMID:22731961

  20. Optogenetic Stimulation of Prefrontal Glutamatergic Neurons Enhances Recognition Memory

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Gareth R. I.; Stuart, Sarah A.; Roloff, Eva v. L.; Teschemacher, Anja G.; Warburton, E. Clea

    2016-01-01

    Finding effective cognitive enhancers is a major health challenge; however, modulating glutamatergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance performance in recognition memory tasks. Previous studies using glutamate receptor antagonists have revealed that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a central role in associative recognition memory. The present study investigates short-term recognition memory using optogenetics to target glutamatergic neurons within the rodent mPFC specifically. Selective stimulation of glutamatergic neurons during the online maintenance of information enhanced associative recognition memory in normal animals. This cognitive enhancing effect was replicated by local infusions of the AMPAkine CX516, but not CX546, which differ in their effects on EPSPs. This suggests that enhancing the amplitude, but not the duration, of excitatory synaptic currents improves memory performance. Increasing glutamate release through infusions of the mGluR7 presynaptic receptor antagonist MMPIP had no effect on performance. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT These results provide new mechanistic information that could guide the targeting of future cognitive enhancers. Our work suggests that improved associative-recognition memory can be achieved by enhancing endogenous glutamatergic neuronal activity selectively using an optogenetic approach. We build on these observations to recapitulate this effect using drug treatments that enhance the amplitude of EPSPs; however, drugs that alter the duration of the EPSP or increase glutamate release lack efficacy. This suggests that both neural and temporal specificity are needed to achieve cognitive enhancement. PMID:27147648

  1. Serotonin modulates glutamatergic transmission to neurons in the lateral habenula.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guiqin; Zuo, Wanhong; Wu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenting; Wu, Wei; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-04-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is bilaterally connected with serotoninergic raphe nuclei, and expresses high density of serotonin receptors. However, actions of serotonin on the excitatory synaptic transmission to LHb neurons have not been thoroughly investigated. The LHb contains two anatomically and functionally distinct regions: lateral (LHbl) and medial (LHbm) divisions. We compared serotonin's effects on glutamatergic transmission across the LHb in rat brains. Serotonin bi-directionally and differentially modulated glutamatergic transmission. Serotonin inhibited glutamatergic transmission in higher percentage of LHbl neurons but potentiated in higher percentage of LHbm neurons. Magnitude of potentiation was greater in LHbm than in LHbl. Type 2 and 3 serotonin receptor antagonists attenuated serotonin's potentiation. The serotonin reuptake blocker, and the type 2 and 3 receptor agonists facilitated glutamatergic transmission in both LHbl and LHbm neurons. Thus, serotonin via activating its type 2, 3 receptors, increased glutamate release at nerve terminals in some LHb neurons. Our data demonstrated that serotonin affects both LHbm and LHbl. Serotonin might play an important role in processing information between the LHb and its downstream-targeted structures during decision-making. It may also contribute to a homeostatic balance underlying the neural circuitry between the LHb and raphe nuclei.

  2. Serotonin modulates glutamatergic transmission to neurons in the lateral habenula

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guiqin; Zuo, Wanhong; Wu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenting; Wu, Wei; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is bilaterally connected with serotoninergic raphe nuclei, and expresses high density of serotonin receptors. However, actions of serotonin on the excitatory synaptic transmission to LHb neurons have not been thoroughly investigated. The LHb contains two anatomically and functionally distinct regions: lateral (LHbl) and medial (LHbm) divisions. We compared serotonin’s effects on glutamatergic transmission across the LHb in rat brains. Serotonin bi-directionally and differentially modulated glutamatergic transmission. Serotonin inhibited glutamatergic transmission in higher percentage of LHbl neurons but potentiated in higher percentage of LHbm neurons. Magnitude of potentiation was greater in LHbm than in LHbl. Type 2 and 3 serotonin receptor antagonists attenuated serotonin’s potentiation. The serotonin reuptake blocker, and the type 2 and 3 receptor agonists facilitated glutamatergic transmission in both LHbl and LHbm neurons. Thus, serotonin via activating its type 2, 3 receptors, increased glutamate release at nerve terminals in some LHb neurons. Our data demonstrated that serotonin affects both LHbm and LHbl. Serotonin might play an important role in processing information between the LHb and its downstream-targeted structures during decision-making. It may also contribute to a homeostatic balance underlying the neural circuitry between the LHb and raphe nuclei. PMID:27033153

  3. Activation of AMPA receptor in the infralimbic cortex facilitates extinction and attenuates the heroin-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weisheng; Wang, Yiqi; Sun, Anna; Zhou, Linyi; Xu, Wenjin; Zhu, Huaqiang; Zhuang, Dingding; Lai, Miaojun; Zhang, Fuqiang; Zhou, Wenhua; Liu, Huifen

    2016-01-26

    Infralimbic cortex (IL) is proposed to suppress cocaine seeking after extinction, but whether the IL regulates the extinction and reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior is unknown. To address this issue, the male SD rats were trained to self-administer heroin under a FR1 schedule for consecutive 14 days, then the rats underwent 7 daily 2h extinction session in the operant chamber. The activation of IL by microinjection PEPA, an allosteric AMPA receptor potentiator into IL before each of extinction session facilitated the extinction responding after heroin self-administration, but did not alter the locomotor activity in an open field testing environment. Other rats were first trained under a FR1 schedule for heroin self-administration for 14 days, followed by 14 days of extinction training, and reinstatement of heroin-seeking induced by cues was measured for 2h. Intra-IL microinjecting of PEPA at 15min prior to test inhibited the reinstatement of heroin-seeking induced by cues. Moreover, the expression of GluR1 in the IL and NAc remarkably increased after treatment with PEPA during the reinstatement. These finding suggested that activation of glutamatergic projection from IL to NAc shell may be involved in the extinction and reinstatement of heroin-seeking.

  4. Role of glutamatergic system in nerve agent intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, G.; Lallement, G.; Carpentier, P.; De Groot, D.; Bodjarian, N.

    1993-05-13

    Our recent studies concerning soman-induced seizures mechanisms and subsequent brain damage are reviewed. (1) Seizure activity was associated with transient increases of extracellular concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh) and with long-lasting releases of glutamate (Glu) in all limbic areas studied. (2) Preventive intraseptal application of atropine abolished the hippocampal increases of extracellular AChi and Glu indicating a key role of septum in triggering seizure activity. (3) Early increases of hippocampal AMPA receptor binding occurred before activation of NMDA receptors. (4) Pretreatment with NBQX, an antagonist of AMPA receptor, prevented convulsions and brain damage even without atropine. In the same conditions, no protection was afforded by TCP, a non-competitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor. (5) On the contrary, in the presence of pyridostigmine and atropine, TCP blocked the seizures induced by 2 x LD50 of soman. The anticonvulsant potency of TCP was particularly obvious when administered curatively. (6) Mossy fibers sprouting takes place in the supragranular-molecular layers of rat hippocampus long after brain injury associated with abnormal neuronal excitability. (7) Altogether, it appears that an AMPA component is involved in combination with cholinergic mechanisms in initiating seizures. A subsequent and long-lasting recruitment of NMDA receptors is then essential in sustaining the seizures. New anticonvulsant and neuroprotective approaches using Glu antagonists against nerve agents intoxication are discussed.

  5. Prolonged activation of phospholipase D in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing platelet-activating-factor receptor lacking cytoplasmic C-terminal tail.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B; Nakashima, S; Adachi, T; Ito, Y; Takano, T; Shimizu, T; Nozawa, Y

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism and role of phospholipase D (PLD) activation by platelet-activating factor (PAF) were examined with Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing wild-type PAF receptor (WT-H cells) and truncated PAF receptor lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail (D-H cells). Treatment of D-H cells with PAF resulted in the rapid formation of Ins(1,4,5)P3, which was followed by a sustained phase for more than 10 min. In these cells, PAF-induced PLD activation lasted for more than 20 min. In contrast, PLD activation in WT-H cells was transient. PAF stimulation caused the biphasic formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) in both types of cell. The first phase was rapid and transient, coinciding with the Ins(1,4,5)P3 peak. The second sustained phase of DG formation was attenuated by butanol, which produces phosphatidylbutanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA) by transphosphatidylation activity of PLD, and by propranolol, a selective inhibitor for PA phosphohydrolase catalysing the conversion of PA into DG. The DG level returned nearly to basal at 20 min after PAF stimulation in WT-H cells, whereas in D-H cells the elevated DG level was sustained for more than 20 min. The profile of translocation of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) to membrane was similar to that of DG formation. In WT-H cells, PKCalpha was transiently associated with membranes and then returned to the cytosol. However, in D-H cells PKCalpha was rapidly translocated to and remained in membranes for more than 20 min. Butanol suppressed this sustained translocation of PKCalpha. Furthermore the mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun by PAF in WT-H cells were much lower than those in D-H cells. Propranolol and butanol at concentrations that inhibited the formation of DG suppressed the PAF-induced mRNA expression of c-fos and c-jun. Taken together, the prolonged PLD activation in D-H cells confirmed a primary role for phospholipase C/PKC in PLD activation by PAF. Furthermore the results obtained here suggest that

  6. AMPA receptor potentiation can prevent ethanol-induced intoxication.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicholas; Messenger, Marcus J; O'Neill, Michael J; Oldershaw, Anna; Gilmour, Gary; Simmons, Rosa M A; Iyengar, Smriti; Libri, Vincenzo; Tricklebank, Mark; Williams, Steve C R

    2008-06-01

    We present a substantial series of behavioral and imaging experiments, which demonstrate, for the first time, that increasing AMPA receptor-mediated neurotransmission via administration of potent and selective biarylsulfonamide AMPA potentiators LY404187 and LY451395 reverses the central effects of an acutely intoxicating dose of ethanol in the rat. Using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI), we observed that LY404187 attenuated ethanol-induced reductions in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) in the anesthetized rat brain. A similar attenuation was apparent when measuring local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) via C14-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography in freely moving conscious rats. Both LY404187 and LY451395 significantly and dose-dependently reversed ethanol-induced deficits in both motor coordination and disruptions in an operant task where animals were trained to press a lever for food reward. Both prophylactic and acute intervention treatment with LY404187 reversed ethanol-induced deficits in motor coordination. Given that LY451395 and related AMPA receptor potentiators/ampakines are tolerated in both healthy volunteers and elderly patients, these data suggest that such compounds may form a potential management strategy for acute alcohol intoxication.

  7. Glutamate mediates platelet activation through the AMPA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Craig N.; Sun, Henry; Ikeda, Masahiro; Beique, Jean-Claude; Swaim, Anne Marie; Mason, Emily; Martin, Tanika V.; Thompson, Laura E.; Gozen, Oguz; Ampagoomian, David; Sprengel, Rolf; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Faraday, Nauder; Huganir, Richard; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter that binds to the kainate receptor, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor (AMPAR). Each receptor was first characterized and cloned in the central nervous system (CNS). Glutamate is also present in the periphery, and glutamate receptors have been identified in nonneuronal tissues, including bone, heart, kidney, pancreas, and platelets. Platelets play a central role in normal thrombosis and hemostasis, as well as contributing greatly to diseases such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Despite the presence of glutamate in platelet granules, the role of glutamate during hemostasis is unknown. We now show that activated platelets release glutamate, that platelets express AMPAR subunits, and that glutamate increases agonist-induced platelet activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that glutamate binding to the AMPAR increases intracellular sodium concentration and depolarizes platelets, which are important steps in platelet activation. In contrast, platelets treated with the AMPAR antagonist CNQX or platelets derived from GluR1 knockout mice are resistant to AMPA effects. Importantly, mice lacking GluR1 have a prolonged time to thrombosis in vivo. Our data identify glutamate as a regulator of platelet activation, and suggest that the AMPA receptor is a novel antithrombotic target. PMID:18283118

  8. Amyloid-β-Induced Dysregulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Guntupalli, Sumasri; Widagdo, Jocelyn; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from neuropathological, genetic, animal model, and biochemical studies has indicated that the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) is associated with, and probably induces, profound neuronal changes in brain regions critical for memory and cognition in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is considerable evidence that synapses are particularly vulnerable to AD, establishing synaptic dysfunction as one of the earliest events in pathogenesis, prior to neuronal loss. It is clear that excessive Aβ levels can disrupt excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity, mainly due to dysregulation of the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors in the brain. Importantly, AMPA receptors are the principal glutamate receptors that mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission. This is essential for synaptic plasticity, a cellular correlate of learning and memory, which are the cognitive functions that are most disrupted in AD. Here we review recent advances in the field and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie Aβ-induced dysfunction of AMPA receptor trafficking. This review focuses primarily on NMDA receptor- and metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signaling. In particular, we highlight several mechanisms that underlie synaptic long-term depression as common signaling pathways that are hijacked by the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. PMID:27073700

  9. TARP γ-8 glycosylation regulates the surface expression of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chan-Ying; Chang, Kai; Suh, Young Ho; Roche, Katherine W

    2015-02-01

    TARP [transmembrane AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor regulatory protein] γ-8 is an auxiliary subunit of AMPA receptors that is widely distributed in the hippocampus. It has been shown that TARP γ-8 promotes surface expression of AMPA receptors; however, how TARP γ-8 regulates the expression of AMPA receptors remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of TARP glycosylation on AMPA receptor trafficking. We first showed that TARP γ-8 is an N-glycosylated protein, which contains two glycosylation sites, Asn53 and Asn56, and compared this with the glycosylation of TARP γ-2 and the AMPA receptor auxiliary protein CNIH-2 (cornichon homologue 2). We next examine the effect of TARP glycosylation on TARP trafficking and also on AMPA receptor surface expression. We find that TARP γ-8 glycosylation is critical for surface expression of both TARP γ-8 and GluA1 in heterologous cells and neurons. Specifically, knockdown of TARP γ-8 causes a decrease in both total and surface AMPA receptors. We find that the expression of unglycosylated TARP γ-8 in cultured neurons is unable to restore GluA1 expression fully. Furthermore, when the maturation of TARP γ-8 is impaired, a large pool of immature GluA1 is retained intracellularly. Taken together, our data reveal an important role for the maturation of TARP γ-8 in the trafficking and function of the AMPA receptor complex.

  10. GABAergic and glutamatergic identities of developing midbrain Pitx2 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Waite, MR; Skidmore, JM; Billi, AC; Martin, JF; Martin, DM

    2010-01-01

    Pitx2, a paired-like homeodomain transcription factor, is expressed in post-mitotic neurons within highly restricted domains of the embryonic mouse brain. Previous reports identified critical roles for PITX2 in histogenesis of the hypothalamus and midbrain, but the cellular identities of PITX2-positive neurons in these regions were not fully explored. This study characterizes Pitx2 expression with respect to midbrain transcription factor and neurotransmitter phenotypes in mid-to-late mouse gestation. In the dorsal midbrain, we identified Pitx2-positive neurons in the stratum griseum intermedium (SGI) as GABAergic and observed a requirement for PITX2 in GABAergic differentiation. We also identified two Pitx2-positive neuronal populations in the ventral midbrain, the red nucleus and a ventromedial population, both of which contain glutamatergic precursors. Our data suggest that PITX2 is present in regionally restricted subpopulations of midbrain neurons and may have unique functions which promote GABAergic and glutamatergic differentiation. PMID:21246650

  11. One aptamer, two functions: the full-length aptamer inhibits AMPA receptors, while the short one inhibits both AMPA and kainate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, William J.; Huang, Zhen; Wen, Wei; Wu, Andrew; Karl, Nicholas; Niu, Li

    2017-01-01

    AMPA and kainate receptors, along with NMDA receptors, are distinct subtypes of glutamate ion channels. Excessive activity of AMPA and kainate receptors has been implicated in neurological diseases, such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Antagonists that block their activities are therefore potential drug candidates. In a recent article in the Journal of Biological Chemistry by Jaremko et al. 2017, we have reported on the discovery and molecular characterization of an RNA aptamer of a dual functionality: the full-length RNA (101 nucleotide) inhibits AMPA receptors while the truncated or the short (55 nucleotide) RNA inhibits both the AMPA and kainate receptors. The full-length RNA aptamer was isolated through a specially designed, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) using only a single type of AMPA receptors expressed in HEK-293 cells. The design feature and the results of our recent article are highlighted here, as they demonstrate the utility of the SELEX approach and the potential of using a single AMPA receptor type to develop potent, novel RNA aptamers targeting multiple subunits and AMPA/kainate receptor subtypes with length-dependent functionalities. PMID:28804757

  12. Discovery of the First α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Antagonist Dependent upon Transmembrane AMPA Receptor Regulatory Protein (TARP) γ-8.

    PubMed

    Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Porter, Warren J; Reel, Jon K; Ornstein, Paul L; Spinazze, Patrick; Stevens, F Craig; Hahn, Patric; Hollinshead, Sean P; Mayhugh, Daniel; Schkeryantz, Jeff; Khilevich, Albert; De Frutos, Oscar; Gleason, Scott D; Kato, Akihiko S; Luffer-Atlas, Debra; Desai, Prashant V; Swanson, Steven; Burris, Kevin D; Ding, Chunjin; Heinz, Beverly A; Need, Anne B; Barth, Vanessa N; Stephenson, Gregory A; Diseroad, Benjamin A; Woods, Tim A; Yu, Hong; Bredt, David; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-05-26

    Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are a family of scaffolding proteins that regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and function. TARP γ-8 is one member of this family and is highly expressed within the hippocampus relative to the cerebellum. A selective TARP γ-8-dependent AMPA receptor antagonist (TDAA) is an innovative approach to modulate AMPA receptors in specific brain regions to potentially increase the therapeutic index relative to known non-TARP-dependent AMPA antagonists. We describe here, for the first time, the discovery of a noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist that is dependent on the presence of TARP γ-8. Three major iteration cycles were employed to improve upon potency, CYP1A2-dependent challenges, and in vivo clearance. An optimized molecule, compound (-)-25 (LY3130481), was fully protective against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in rats without the motor impairment associated with non-TARP-dependent AMPA receptor antagonists. Compound (-)-25 could be utilized to provide proof of concept for antiepileptic efficacy with reduced motor side effects in patients.

  13. Identification and Characterization of RNA Aptamers: A Long Aptamer Blocks the AMPA Receptor and a Short Aptamer Blocks Both AMPA and Kainate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, William J; Huang, Zhen; Wen, Wei; Wu, Andrew; Karl, Nicholas; Niu, Li

    2017-03-21

    AMPA and kainate receptors, along with NMDA receptors, represent different subtypes of glutamate ion channels. AMPA and kainate receptors share a high degree of sequence and structural similarities, and excessive activity of these receptors has been implicated in neurological diseases such as epilepsy. Therefore, blocking detrimental activity of both receptor types could be therapeutically beneficial. Here, we report the use of an in vitro evolution approach involving systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment with a single AMPA receptor target (i.e. GluA1/2R) to isolate RNA aptamers that can potentially inhibit both AMPA and kainate receptors. A full-length or 101-nucleotide (nt) aptamer selectively inhibited GluA1/2R with a KI of ~5 µM, along with GluA1 and GluA2 AMPA receptor subunits. Of note, its shorter version (55 nt) inhibited both AMPA and kainate receptors. In particular, this shorter aptamer blocked equally potently the activity of both the GluK1 and GluK2 kainate receptors. Using homologous binding and whole-cell recording assays, we found that an RNA aptamer most likely binds to the receptor's regulatory site and inhibits it noncompetitively. Our results suggest the potential of using a single receptor target to develop RNA aptamers with dual activity for effectively blocking both AMPA and kainate receptors.

  14. High-resolution immunogold localization of AMPA type glutamate receptor subunits at synaptic and non-synaptic sites in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Baude, A; Nusser, Z; Molnár, E; McIlhinney, R A; Somogyi, P

    1995-12-01

    particles for the GluRA, GluRB/C and GluRD subunits were present at type 1 synaptic membrane specializations on dendritic spines of pyramidal cells throughout all layers of the CA1 and CA3 areas. The most densely labelled synapses tended to be on the largest spines and many smaller spines remained unlabelled. Immunoparticle density at type 1 synapses on dendritic shafts of some non-principal cells was consistently higher than at labelled synapses of dendritic spines of pyramidal cells. Synapses established between dendritic spines and mossy fibre terminals, were immunoreactive for all studied subunits in stratum lucidum of the CA3 area. The postembedding immunogold method revealed that the AMPA type receptors are concentrated within the main body of the anatomically defined type 1 (asymmetrical) synaptic junction. Often only a part of the membrane specialization showed clustered immunoparticles. There was a sharp decrease in immunoreactive receptor density at the edge of the synaptic specialization. Immunolabelling was consistently demonstrated at extrasynaptic sites on dendrites, dendritic spines and somata. The results demonstrate that the GluRA, B/C and D subunits of the AMPA type glutamate receptor are present in many of the glutamatergic synapses formed by the entorhinal, CA3 pyramidal and mossy fibre terminals. Some interneurons have a higher density of AMPA type receptors in their asymmetrical afferent synapses than pyramidal cells. This may contribute to a lower activation threshold of interneurons as compared to principal cells by the same afferents in the hippocampal formation.

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation decreases long-term potentiation stability and affects some glutamatergic signaling proteins during hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J; Roffwarg, H P; Dreher, A; Bissette, G; Karolewicz, B; Shaffery, J P

    2008-04-22

    Development of the mammalian CNS requires formation and stabilization of neuronal circuits and synaptic connections. Sensory stimulation provided by the environment orchestrates neuronal circuit formation in the waking state. Endogenous sources of activation are also implicated in these processes. Accordingly we hypothesized that sleep, especially rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), the stage characterized by high neuronal activity that is more prominent in development than adulthood, provides endogenous stimulation, which, like sensory input, helps to stabilize and refine neuronal circuits during CNS development. Young (Y: postnatal day (PN) 16) and adolescent (A: PN44) rats were rapid eye movement sleep-deprived (REMSD) by gentle cage-shaking for only 4 h on 3 consecutive days (total 12 h). The effect of REMS deprivation in Y and A rats was tested 3-7 days after the last deprivation session (Y, PN21-25; A, PN49-53) and was compared with younger (immature, I, PN9-12) untreated, age-matched, treated and normal control groups. REMS deprivation negatively affected the stability of long-term potentiation (LTP) in Y but not A animals. LTP instability in Y-REMSD animals was similar to the instability in even the more immature, untreated animals. Utilizing immunoblots, we identified changes in molecular components of glutamatergic synapses known to participate in mechanisms of synaptic refinement and plasticity. Overall, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2A, AMPA receptor subunit 1 (GluR1), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), and calcium/calmodulin kinase II tended to be lower in Y REMSD animals (NR2B, GluR1 and PSD-95 were significantly lower) compared with controls, an effect not present in the A animals. Taken together, these data indicate that early-life REMS deprivation reduces stability of hippocampal neuronal circuits, possibly by hindering expression of mature glutamatergic synaptic components. The findings

  16. Role of ionotropic glutamatergic receptors and nitric oxide in the effects of flutriafol, a triazole fungicide, on the in vivo striatal dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Faro, Lilian R Ferreira; Alfonso, Miguel; Maués, Luis A L; Durán, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Flutriafol is a triazole fungicide that induces spontaneous and depolarization-stimulated release of dopamine from rat striatum, although the neurochemical mechanism by which this fungicide induces this effect is unknown. The purpose of the present work was to assess the implication of ionotropic glutamatergic receptors and nitric oxide (NO) production in the flutriafol-induced dopamine release from rat striatum. To this, we have used non-competitive antagonists of NMDA (dizocilpine, MK-801), and (AMPA)/kainate (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, CNQX) receptors, or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors (Nomega-nitro-L-arginine -L-NARG - and 7-nitro-indazol - 7-NI), to study the striatal dopamine release induced by flutriafol. Intrastriatal infusion of 6 mM flutriafol increased the dopamine levels to 984 ± 141%, with respect to basal levels. Infusion of flutriafol (6 mM) in MK-801 (500 μM) or CNQX (500 μM) pretreated animals, increased striatal dopamine levels to 489 ± 74% and 477 ± 78%, with respect to basal levels, respectively, these increases being 50.3% and 51.5% smaller than those induced by flutriafol in non-pretreated animals. Infusion of flutriafol (6 mM) in L-NARG (1 mM) or 7-NI (100 μM) pretreated animals, increased the extracellular dopamine levels to 400 ± 88.5 and 479 ± 69.4%, with respect to basal levels, respectively, these increases being 59.3 and 51% smaller than those induced by flutriafol in non-pretreated animals. In summary, flutriafol appears to act, at least in part, through an overstimulation of NMDA receptors with possible NO production to induce dopamine release, and the administration of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor antagonists and NOS inhibitors protects against flutriafol-induced dopamine release from rat striatum.

  17. Glutamatergic synapses are structurally and biochemically complex because of multiple plasticity processes: long-term potentiation, long-term depression, short-term potentiation and scaling.

    PubMed

    Lisman, John

    2017-03-05

    Synapses are complex because they perform multiple functions, including at least six mechanistically different forms of plasticity. Here, I comment on recent developments regarding these processes. (i) Short-term potentiation (STP), a Hebbian process that requires small amounts of synaptic input, appears to make strong contributions to some forms of working memory. (ii) The rules for long-term potentiation (LTP) induction in CA3 have been clarified: induction does not depend obligatorily on backpropagating sodium spikes but, rather, on dendritic branch-specific N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) spikes. (iii) Late LTP, a process that requires a dopamine signal (and is therefore neoHebbian), is mediated by trans-synaptic growth of the synapse, a growth that occurs about an hour after LTP induction. (iv) LTD processes are complex and include both homosynaptic and heterosynaptic forms. (v) Synaptic scaling produced by changes in activity levels are not primarily cell-autonomous, but rather depend on network activity. (vi) The evidence for distance-dependent scaling along the primary dendrite is firm, and a plausible structural-based mechanism is suggested.Ideas about the mechanisms of synaptic function need to take into consideration newly emerging data about synaptic structure. Recent super-resolution studies indicate that glutamatergic synapses are modular (module size 70-80 nm), as predicted by theoretical work. Modules are trans-synaptic structures and have high concentrations of postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor. These modules function as quasi-independent loci of AMPA-mediated transmission and may be independently modifiable, suggesting a new understanding of quantal transmission.This article is part of the themed issue 'Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity.'

  18. Insulin inhibits AMPA-induced neuronal damage via stimulation of protein kinase B (Akt).

    PubMed

    Kim, S-J; Han, Y

    2005-02-01

    We designed a series of experiments to explore the neuroprotective effects of insulin. Insulin significantly inhibited the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-induced neuronal cell damage as evidenced by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium-bromide (MTT) assay. However, insulin had little affect on the AMPA-induced glial cell damage. To determine whether insulin inhibits AMPA-induced excitotoxicity, we performed grease-gap recording assays using rat brain slices. In these experiments, insulin also significantly inhibited AMPA-induced depolarization. Flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation assays showed that insulin inhibits AMPA-induced apoptosis and DNA fragmentation, respectively. Insulin stimulated protein kinase B (Akt) activity, whereas AMPA pretreatment did not alter the insulin-stimulated Akt activity. On the contrary, insulin blocked induction of SAPK/JNK, which AMPA stimulated. Taken together, these results suggest that insulin exerts neuroprotective effects by inhibiting AMPA-induced excitotoxicity and apoptosis, possibly by activating Akt and blocking SAPK/JNK.

  19. Forebrain-selective AMPA-receptor antagonism guided by TARP γ-8 as an antiepileptic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihiko S; Burris, Kevin D; Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Porter, Warren J; Reel, Jon; Ding, Chunjin; Tu, Yuan; Schober, Douglas A; Lee, Matthew R; Heinz, Beverly A; Fitch, Thomas E; Gleason, Scott D; Catlow, John T; Yu, Hong; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Pasqui, Francesca; Wang, He; Qian, Yuewei; Sher, Emanuele; Zwart, Ruud; Wafford, Keith A; Rasmussen, Kurt; Ornstein, Paul L; Isaac, John T R; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Bredt, David S; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of specific neural circuits to optimize therapeutic index is an unrealized goal in neurology and psychiatry. AMPA receptors are important for excitatory synaptic transmission, and their antagonists are antiepileptic. Although efficacious, AMPA-receptor antagonists, including perampanel (Fycompa), the only approved antagonist for epilepsy, induce dizziness and motor impairment. We hypothesized that blockade of forebrain AMPA receptors without blocking cerebellar AMPA receptors would be antiepileptic and devoid of motor impairment. Taking advantage of an AMPA receptor auxiliary protein, TARP γ-8, which is selectively expressed in the forebrain and modulates the pharmacological properties of AMPA receptors, we discovered that LY3130481 selectively antagonized recombinant and native AMPA receptors containing γ-8, but not γ-2 (cerebellum) or other TARP members. Two amino acid residues unique to γ-8 determined this selectivity. We also observed antagonism of AMPA receptors expressed in hippocampal, but not cerebellar, tissue from an patient with epilepsy. Corresponding to this selective activity, LY3130481 prevented multiple seizure types in rats and mice and without motor side effects. These findings demonstrate the first rationally discovered molecule targeting specific neural circuitries for therapeutic advantage.

  20. Adjunctive Treatment with Asenapine Augments the Escitalopram-Induced Effects on Monoaminergic Outflow and Glutamatergic Neurotransmission in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Björkholm, Carl; Frånberg, Olivia; Malmerfelt, Anna; Marcus, Monica M.; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Schilström, Björn; Jardemark, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Substantial clinical data support the addition of low doses of atypical antipsychotic drugs to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to rapidly enhance the antidepressant effect in treatment-resistant depression. Preclinical studies suggest that this effect is at least partly explained by an increased catecholamine outflow in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Methods: In the present study we used in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats and in vitro intracellular recordings of pyramidal cells of the rat mPFC to investigate the effects of adding the novel atypical antipsychotic drug asenapine to the SSRI escitalopram with regards to monoamine outflow in the mPFC and dopamine outflow in nucleus accumbens as well as glutamatergic transmission in the mPFC. Results: The present study shows that addition of low doses (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) of asenapine to escitalopram (5 mg/kg) markedly enhances dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin release in the rat mPFC as well as dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Moreover, this drug combination facilitated both N-methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA)– and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)–induced currents as well as electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials in pyramidal cells of the rat mPFC. Conclusions: Our results support the notion that the augmentation of SSRIs by atypical antipsychotic drugs in treatment-resistant depression may, at least in part, be related to enhanced catecholamine output in the prefrontal cortex and that asenapine may be clinically used to achieve this end. In particular, the subsequent activation of the D1 receptor may be of importance for the augmented antidepressant effect, as this mechanism facilitated both NMDA and AMPA receptor-mediated transmission in the mPFC. Our novel observation that the drug combination, like ketamine, facilitates glutamatergic transmission in the mPFC may contribute to explain the rapid and potent antidepressant

  1. Afferent-specific innervation of two distinct AMPA receptor subtypes on single hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tóth, K; McBain, C J

    1998-11-01

    Using the polyamine toxin philanthotoxin, which selectively blocks calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, we show that synaptic transmission onto single hippocampal interneurons occurs by afferent-specific activation of philanthotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive AMPA receptors. Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors are found exclusively at synapses from mossy fibers. In contrast, synaptic responses evoked by stimulation of CA3 pyramidal neurons are mediated by calcium-impermeable AMPA receptors. Both pathways converge onto single interneurons and can be discriminated with Group II mGluR agonists. Thus, single interneurons target AMPA receptors of different subunit composition to specific postsynaptic sites, providing a mechanism to increase the synapse-specific computational properties of hippocampal interneurons.

  2. [Glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, E V; Popova, T S; Sal'nikov, P S

    2015-01-01

    The review include actual facts, demonstrating high probability of glutamatergic neurotransmitter system role in the regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity. These facts suggest significant role of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system dysfunction in forming motor activity disorders of the digestive tract, including in patients in critical condition. The analysis is based on results of multiple experimental and clinical researches of glutamic acid and other components of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in central nervous system and autonomic nervous system (with the accent on the enteral nervous system) in normal conditions and with functioning changes of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in case of inflammation, hupoxia, stress and in critical condition.

  3. Consolidation of remote fear memories involves Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH) receptor type 1-mediated enhancement of AMPA receptor GluR1 signaling in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Thoeringer, Christoph K; Henes, Kathrin; Eder, Matthias; Dahlhoff, Maik; Wurst, Wolfgang; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M; Moosmang, Sven; Wotjak, Carsten T

    2012-02-01

    Persistent dreadful memories and hyperarousal constitute prominent psychopathological features of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here, we used a contextual fear conditioning paradigm to demonstrate that conditional genetic deletion of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptor 1 within the limbic forebrain in mice significantly reduced remote, but not recent, associative and non-associative fear memories. Per os treatment with the selective CRHR1 antagonist DMP696 (3 mg/kg) attenuated consolidation of remote fear memories, without affecting their expression and retention. This could be achieved, if DMP696 was administered for 1 week starting as late as 24 h after foot shock. Furthermore, by combining electrophysiological recordings and western blot analyses, we demonstrate a delayed-onset and long-lasting increase in AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluR1-mediated signaling in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus 1 month after foot shock. These changes were absent from CRHR1-deficient mice and after DMP696 treatment. Inactivation of hippocampal GluR1-containing AMPARs by antisense oligonucleotides or philantotoxin 433 confirmed the behavioral relevance of AMPA-type glutamatergic neurotransmission in maintaining the high levels of remote fear in shocked mice with intact CRHR1 signaling. We conclude that limbic CRHR1 receptors enhance the consolidation of remote fear memories in the first week after foot shock by increasing the expression of Ca(2+)-permeable GluR1-containing AMPARs in the DG. These findings suggest both receptors as rational targets for the prevention and therapy, respectively, of psychopathology associated with exaggerated fear memories, such as PTSD.

  4. Involvement of ClC-3 chloride/proton exchangers in controlling glutamatergic synaptic strength in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Raul E; Alekov, Alexi K; Filippov, Mikhail; Hegermann, Jan; Fahlke, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    ClC-3 is a member of the CLC family of anion channels and transporters that localizes to early and late endosomes as well as to synaptic vesicles (SV). Its genetic disruption in mouse models results in pronounced hippocampal and retinal neurodegeneration, suggesting that ClC-3 might be important for normal excitatory and/or inhibitory neurotransmission in central neurons. To characterize the role of ClC-3 in glutamate accumulation in SV we compared glutamatergic synaptic transmission in cultured hippocampal neurons from WT and Clcn3-/- mice. In Clcn3-/- neurons the amplitude and frequency of miniature as well as the amplitudes of action-potential evoked EPSCs were significantly increased as compared to WT neurons. The low-affinity competitive AMPA receptor antagonist γ-DGG reduced the quantal size of synaptic events more effectively in WT than in Clcn3-/- neurons, whereas no difference was observed for the high-affinity competitive non-NMDA antagonist NBQX. Paired pulse ratios of evoked EPSCs were significantly reduced, whereas the size of the readily releasable pool was not affected by the genetic ablation of ClC-3. Electron microscopy revealed increased volumes of SV in hippocampi of Clcn3-/- mice. Our findings demonstrate that ClC-3 controls fast excitatory synaptic transmission by regulating the amount of neurotransmitter as well as the release probability of SV. These results provide novel insights into the role of ClC-3 in synaptic transmission and identify excessive glutamate release as a likely basis of neurodegeneration in Clcn3-/-.

  5. Lateral Hypothalamic Area Glutamatergic Neurons and Their Projections to the Lateral Habenula Regulate Feeding and Reward

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Alice M.; Van Swieten, Maaike; Basiri, Marcus L.; Blair, Grace A.; Kantak, Pranish

    2016-01-01

    The overconsumption of calorically dense, highly palatable foods is thought to be a major contributor to the worldwide obesity epidemic; however, the precise neural circuits that directly regulate hedonic feeding remain elusive. Here, we show that lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) glutamatergic neurons, and their projections to the lateral habenula (LHb), negatively regulate the consumption of palatable food. Genetic ablation of LHA glutamatergic neurons increased daily caloric intake and produced weight gain in mice that had access to a high-fat diet, while not altering general locomotor activity. Anterior LHA glutamatergic neurons send a functional glutamatergic projection to the LHb, a brain region involved in processing aversive stimuli and negative reward prediction outcomes. Pathway-specific, optogenetic stimulation of glutamatergic LHA-LHb circuit resulted in detectable glutamate-mediated EPSCs as well as GABA-mediated IPSCs, although the net effect of neurotransmitter release was to increase the firing of most LHb neurons. In vivo optogenetic inhibition of LHA-LHb glutamatergic fibers produced a real-time place preference, whereas optogenetic stimulation of LHA-LHb glutamatergic fibers had the opposite effect. Furthermore, optogenetic inhibition of LHA-LHb glutamatergic fibers acutely increased the consumption of a palatable liquid caloric reward. Collectively, these results demonstrate that LHA glutamatergic neurons are well situated to bidirectionally regulate feeding and potentially other behavioral states via their functional circuit connectivity with the LHb and potentially other brain regions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we show that the genetic ablation of LHA glutamatergic neurons enhances caloric intake. Some of these LHA glutamatergic neurons project to the lateral habenula, a brain area important for generating behavioral avoidance. Optogenetic stimulation of this circuit has net excitatory effects on postsynaptic LHb neurons. This is the

  6. AMPA receptor trafficking in recent vs. remote memory.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, Pasha

    2016-11-01

    It is now established that iteration of memory circuits takes place from hippocampus to cortical regions. The recall of recent event is largely dependent on the hippocampus networks, however, with passage of time, the cortical regions become largely involved in the recall of remote events. Molecular events, specifically, the AMPA receptor regulation underlying this iteration remains largely elusive. Separate groups of mice were fear conditioned using contextual fear conditioning paradigm. Memory retrieval test was performed 1 day post-training, for the recent memory group, together with respective controls. Where as, in case of remote group retrieval was performed 30 days post training. One hour post retrieval session, hippocampus and anterior cingulate regions were harvested after decapitation from all the groups, which were processed for synaptic membrane isolation and quantitative western blotting. We observed endocytosis of GluA1 and 2 exclusively in the anterior cingulate regions in the remote memory group, one hour post retrieval session, whereas in recent group, endocytosis of AMPA receptor units was only observed in the hippocampal regions. The endocytosis of GluA1-2 containing AMPARs upon retrieval, showed the weakened state of synapse. At this time point modification in content and strength of memory is possible for treatment of traumatic memories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell class-specific regulation of neocortical dendrite and spine growth by AMPA receptor splice and editing variants.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Mohammad I K; Ma-Högemeier, Zhan-Lu; Riedel, Christian; Conrads, Claudius; Veitinger, Thomas; Habijan, Tim; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Krause, Martin; Wirth, Marcus J; Hollmann, Michael; Wahle, Petra

    2011-10-01

    Glutamatergic transmission converging on calcium signaling plays a key role in dendritic differentiation. In early development, AMPA receptor (AMPAR) transcripts are extensively spliced and edited to generate subunits that differ in their biophysical properties. Whether these subunits have specific roles in the context of structural differentiation is unclear. We have investigated the role of nine GluA variants and revealed a correlation between the expression of flip variants and the period of major dendritic growth. In interneurons, only GluA1(Q)-flip increased dendritic length and branching. In pyramidal cells, GluA2(Q)-flop, GluA2(Q)-flip, GluA3(Q)-flip and calcium-impermeable GluA2(R)-flip promoted dendritic growth, suggesting that flip variants with slower desensitization kinetics are more important than receptors with elevated calcium permeability. Imaging revealed significantly higher calcium signals in pyramidal cells transfected with GluA2(R)-flip as compared with GluA2(R)-flop, suggesting a contribution of voltage-activated calcium channels. Indeed, dendritic growth induced by GluA2(R)-flip in pyramidal cells was prevented by blocking NMDA receptors (NMDARs) or voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), suggesting that they act downstream of AMPARs. Intriguingly, the action of GluA1(Q)-flip in interneurons was also dependent on NMDARs and VGCCs. Cell class-specific effects were not observed for spine formation, as GluA2(Q)-flip and GluA2(Q)-flop increased spine density in pyramidal cells as well as in interneurons. The results suggest that AMPAR variants expressed early in development are important determinants for activity-dependent dendritic growth in a cell type-specific and cell compartment-specific manner.

  8. Recruitment of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors during synaptic potentiation is regulated by CaM-kinase I.

    PubMed

    Guire, Eric S; Oh, Michael C; Soderling, Thomas R; Derkach, Victor A

    2008-06-04

    Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) at central glutamatergic synapses are of special interest because of their unique biophysical and signaling properties that contribute to synaptic plasticity and their roles in multiple neuropathologies. However, intracellular signaling pathways that recruit synaptic CP-AMPARs are unknown, and involvement of CP-AMPARs in hippocampal region CA1 synaptic plasticity is controversial. Here, we report that intracellular infusion of active CaM-kinase I (CaMKI) into cultured hippocampal neurons enhances miniature EPSC amplitude because of recruitment of CP-AMPARs, likely from an extrasynaptic pool. The ability of CaMKI, which regulates the actin cytoskeleton, to recruit synaptic CP-AMPARs was blocked by inhibiting actin polymerization with latrunculin A. CaMK regulation of CP-AMPARs was also confirmed in hippocampal slices. CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) after theta bursts, but not high-frequency tetani, produced a rapid, transient expression of synaptic CP-AMPARs that facilitated LTP. This component of TBS LTP was blocked by inhibition of CaM-kinase kinase (CaMKK), the upstream activator of CaMKI. Our calculations show that adding CP-AMPARs numbering <5% of existing synaptic AMPARs is sufficient to account for the potentiation observed in LTP. Thus, synaptic expression of CP-AMPARs is a very efficient mechanism for rapid enhancement of synaptic strength that depends on CaMKK/CaMKI signaling, actin dynamics, and the pattern of synaptic activity used to induce CA1 LTP.

  9. Differential dendritic targeting of AMPA receptor subunit mRNAs in adult rat hippocampal principal neurons and interneurons.

    PubMed

    Cox, David J; Racca, Claudia

    2013-06-15

    In hippocampal neurons, AMPA receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory postsynaptic responses at glutamatergic synapses, and are involved in various forms of synaptic plasticity. Dendritic local protein synthesis of selected AMPAR subunit mRNAs is considered an additional mechanism to independently and rapidly control the strength of individual synapses. We have used fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to analyze the localization of AMPAR subunit (GluA1-4) mRNAs and their relationship with the translation machinery in principal cells and interneurons of the adult rat hippocampus. The mRNAs encoding all four AMPAR subunits were detected in the somata and dendrites of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells and those of six classes of CA1 γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons. GluA1-4 subunit mRNAs were highly localized to the apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, whereas in interneurons they were present in multiple dendrites. In contrast, in the dentate gyrus, GluA1-4 subunit mRNAs were virtually restricted to the somata and were absent from the dendrites of granule cells. These different regional and cell type-specific labeling patterns also correlated with the localization of markers for components of the protein synthesis machinery. Our results support the local translation of GluA1-4 mRNAs in dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal cells and CA1 interneurons but not in granule cells of the dentate gyrus. Furthermore, the regional and cell type-specific differences we observed suggest that each cell type uses distinct ways of regulating the local translation of AMPAR subunits.

  10. Target- and input-dependent organization of AMPA and NMDA receptors in synaptic connections of the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Rubio, María E; Fukazawa, Yugo; Kamasawa, Naomi; Clarkson, Cheryl; Molnár, Elek; Shigemoto, Ryuichi

    2014-12-15

    We examined the synaptic structure, quantity, and distribution of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively) in rat cochlear nuclei by a highly sensitive freeze-fracture replica labeling technique. Four excitatory synapses formed by two distinct inputs, auditory nerve (AN) and parallel fibers (PF), on different cell types were analyzed. These excitatory synapse types included AN synapses on bushy cells (AN-BC synapses) and fusiform cells (AN-FC synapses) and PF synapses on FC (PF-FC synapses) and cartwheel cell spines (PF-CwC synapses). Immunogold labeling revealed differences in synaptic structure as well as AMPAR and NMDAR number and/or density in both AN and PF synapses, indicating a target-dependent organization. The immunogold receptor labeling also identified differences in the synaptic organization of FCs based on AN or PF connections, indicating an input-dependent organization in FCs. Among the four excitatory synapse types, the AN-BC synapses were the smallest and had the most densely packed intramembrane particles (IMPs), whereas the PF-CwC synapses were the largest and had sparsely packed IMPs. All four synapse types showed positive correlations between the IMP-cluster area and the AMPAR number, indicating a common intrasynapse-type relationship for glutamatergic synapses. Immunogold particles for AMPARs were distributed over the entire area of individual AN synapses; PF synapses often showed synaptic areas devoid of labeling. The gold-labeling for NMDARs occurred in a mosaic fashion, with less positive correlations between the IMP-cluster area and the NMDAR number. Our observations reveal target- and input-dependent features in the structure, number, and organization of AMPARs and NMDARs in AN and PF synapses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Episodic sucrose intake during food restriction increases synaptic abundance of AMPA receptors in nucleus accumbens and augments intake of sucrose following restoration of ad libitum feeding.

    PubMed

    Peng, X-X; Lister, A; Rabinowitsch, A; Kolaric, R; Cabeza de Vaca, S; Ziff, E B; Carr, K D

    2015-06-04

    Weight-loss dieting often leads to loss of control, rebound weight gain, and is a risk factor for binge pathology. Based on findings that food restriction (FR) upregulates sucrose-induced trafficking of glutamatergic AMPA receptors to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) postsynaptic density (PSD), this study was an initial test of the hypothesis that episodic "breakthrough" intake of forbidden food during dieting interacts with upregulated mechanisms of synaptic plasticity to increase reward-driven feeding. Ad libitum (AL) fed and FR subjects consumed a limited amount of 10% sucrose, or had access to water, every other day for 10 occasions. Beginning three weeks after return of FR rats to AL feeding, when 24-h chow intake and rate of body weight gain had normalized, subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR consumed more sucrose during a four week intermittent access protocol than the two AL groups and the group that had access to water during FR. In an experiment that substituted noncontingent administration of d-amphetamine for sucrose, FR subjects displayed an enhanced locomotor response during active FR but a blunted response, relative to AL subjects, during recovery from FR. This result suggests that the enduring increase in sucrose consumption is unlikely to be explained by residual enhancing effects of FR on dopamine signaling. In a biochemical experiment which paralleled the sucrose behavioral experiment, rats with a history of sucrose intake during FR displayed increased abundance of pSer845-GluA1, GluA2, and GluA3 in the NAc PSD relative to rats with a history of FR without sucrose access and rats that had been AL throughout, whether they had a history of episodic sucrose intake or not. A history of FR, with or without a history of sucrose intake, was associated with increased abundance of GluA1. A terminal 15-min bout of sucrose intake produced a further increase in pSer845-GluA1 and GluA2 in subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR

  12. Episodic Sucrose Intake During Food Restriction Increases Synaptic Abundance of AMPA Receptors in Nucleus Accumbens and Augments Intake of Sucrose Following Restoration of Ad Libitum Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xing-Xiang; Lister, Amanda; Rabinowitsch, Ariana; Kolaric, Rhonda; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Ziff, Edward B.; Carr, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Weight-loss dieting often leads to loss of control, rebound weight gain, and is a risk factor for binge pathology. Based on findings that food restriction (FR) upregulates sucrose-induced trafficking of glutamatergic AMPA receptors to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) postsynaptic density (PSD), this study was an initial test of the hypothesis that episodic “breakthrough” intake of forbidden food during dieting interacts with upregulated mechanisms of synaptic plasticity to increase reward-driven feeding. Ad libitum (AL) fed and FR subjects consumed a limited amount of 10% sucrose, or had access to water, every other day for ten occasions. Beginning three weeks after return of FR rats to AL feeding, when 24-hour chow intake and rate of body weight gain had normalized, subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR consumed more sucrose during a four week intermittent access protocol than the two AL groups and the group that had access to water during FR. In an experiment that substituted noncontingent administration of d-amphetamine for sucrose, FR subjects displayed an enhanced locomotor response during active FR but a blunted response, relative to AL subjects, during recovery from FR. This result suggests that the enduring increase in sucrose consumption is unlikely to be explained by residual enhancing effects of FR on dopamine signaling. In a biochemical experiment which paralleled the sucrose behavioral experiment, rats with a history of sucrose intake during FR displayed increased abundance of pSer845-GluA1, GluA2, and GluA3 in the NAc PSD relative to rats with a history of FR without sucrose access and rats that had been AL throughout, whether they had a history of episodic sucrose intake or not. A history of FR, with or without a history of sucrose intake, was associated with increased abundance of GluA1. A terminal 15-min bout of sucrose intake produced a further increase in pSer845-GluA1 and GluA2 in subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR

  13. Glutamatergic model psychoses: prediction error, learning, and inference.

    PubMed

    Corlett, Philip R; Honey, Garry D; Krystal, John H; Fletcher, Paul C

    2011-01-01

    Modulating glutamatergic neurotransmission induces alterations in conscious experience that mimic the symptoms of early psychotic illness. We review studies that use intravenous administration of ketamine, focusing on interindividual variability in the profundity of the ketamine experience. We will consider this individual variability within a hypothetical model of brain and cognitive function centered upon learning and inference. Within this model, the brains, neural systems, and even single neurons specify expectations about their inputs and responding to violations of those expectations with new learning that renders future inputs more predictable. We argue that ketamine temporarily deranges this ability by perturbing both the ways in which prior expectations are specified and the ways in which expectancy violations are signaled. We suggest that the former effect is predominantly mediated by NMDA blockade and the latter by augmented and inappropriate feedforward glutamatergic signaling. We suggest that the observed interindividual variability emerges from individual differences in neural circuits that normally underpin the learning and inference processes described. The exact source for that variability is uncertain, although it is likely to arise not only from genetic variation but also from subjects' previous experiences and prior learning. Furthermore, we argue that chronic, unlike acute, NMDA blockade alters the specification of expectancies more profoundly and permanently. Scrutinizing individual differences in the effects of acute and chronic ketamine administration in the context of the Bayesian brain model may generate new insights about the symptoms of psychosis; their underlying cognitive processes and neurocircuitry.

  14. Mechanisms of Nicotinic Modulation of Glutamatergic Neuroplasticity in Humans.

    PubMed

    Lugon, Marcelo Di Marcello Valladão; Batsikadze, Giorgi; Fresnoza, Shane; Grundey, Jessica; Kuo, Min-Fang; Paulus, Walter; Nakamura-Palacios, Ester Miyuki; Nitsche, Michael A

    2015-10-22

    The impact of nicotine (NIC) on plasticity is thought to be primarily determined via calcium channel properties of nicotinic receptor subtypes, and glutamatergic plasticity is likewise calcium-dependent. Therefore glutamatergic plasticity is likely modulated by the impact of nicotinic receptor-dependent neuronal calcium influx. We tested this hypothesis for transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)-induced long-term potentiation-like plasticity, which is abolished by NIC in nonsmokers. To reduce calcium influx under NIC, we blocked N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. We applied anodal tDCS combined with 15 mg NIC patches and the NMDA-receptor antagonist dextromethorphan (DMO) in 3 different doses (50, 100, and 150 mg) or placebo medication. Corticospinal excitability was monitored by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor-evoked potential amplitudes after plasticity induction. NIC abolished anodal tDCS-induced motor cortex excitability enhancement, which was restituted under medium dosage of DMO. Low-dosage DMO did not affect the impact of NIC on tDCS-induced plasticity and high-dosage DMO abolished plasticity. For DMO alone, the low dosage had no effect, but medium and high dosages abolished tDCS-induced plasticity. These results enhance our knowledge about the proposed calcium-dependent impact of NIC on plasticity in humans and might be relevant for the development of novel nicotinic treatments for cognitive dysfunction.

  15. Glutamatergic agents for schizophrenia: current evidence and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zink, Mathias; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-05-01

    Suboptimal outcomes in schizophrenia are a consequence of lacking insight into the etiology, biomarkers and treatment-relevant subgroups, the therapeutic restriction to dopaminergic-modulating antipsychotics that fail to significantly improve negative and cognitive symptoms, non-adherence, and, in the case of treatment-resistance, the underutilization of clozapine. Evidence suggests additional, extra-dopaminergic abnormalities in amino acid neurotransmission, particularly the glutamatergic system. Antidopaminergic antipsychotics modulate this system on several levels, as do mood stabilizers, including lamotrigine, topiramate and pregabaline. Recently, agonists at metabotropic glutamate receptors and glycine uptake inhibitors failed in large placebo-controlled trials for schizophrenia. Problems to overcome for successfully leveraging glutamatergic agents for schizophrenia are patient selection, focus on positive symptoms and late disease stages, and dose-response relationships. Because glutamate guides processes of brain development and maturation, clinical research should focus on the at-risk mental state or first-episode psychosis, address cognition and negative symptoms and use monotherapy designs in parallel to augmentation strategies.

  16. Major glutamatergic projection from subplate into visual cortex during development.

    PubMed

    Finney, E M; Stone, J R; Shatz, C J

    1998-08-17

    Subplate neurons, the first neurons of the cerebral cortex to differentiate and mature, are thought to be essential for the formation of connections between thalamus and cortex, such as the system of ocular dominance columns within layer 4 of visual cortex. To learn more about the requirement for subplate neurons in the formation of thalamocortical connections, we have sought to identify the neurotransmitters and peptides expressed by the specific class of subplate neurons that sends axonal projections into the overlying visual cortex. To label retrogradely subplate neurons, fluorescent latex microspheres were injected into primary visual cortex of postnatal day 28 ferrets, just prior to the onset of ocular dominance column formation. Subsequently, neurons were immunostained with antibodies against glutamate, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-67), parvalbumin, neuropeptide Y (NPY), somatostatin (SRIF), or nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Retrograde labeling results indicate that the majority of subplate neurons projecting into the cortical plate reside in the upper half of the subplate. Combined immunostaining and microsphere labeling reveal that about half of cortically projecting subplate neurons are glutamatergic; most microsphere-labeled subplate neurons do not stain for GAD-67, parvalbumin, NPY, SRIF, or NOS. These observations suggest that subplate neurons can provide a significant glutamatergic synaptic input to the cortical plate, including the neurons of layer 4. If so, excitation from the axons of subplate neurons may be required in addition to that from lateral geniculate nucleus neurons for the activity-dependent synaptic interactions that lead to the formation of ocular dominance columns during development.

  17. Glutamatergic Model Psychoses: Prediction Error, Learning, and Inference

    PubMed Central

    Corlett, Philip R; Honey, Garry D; Krystal, John H; Fletcher, Paul C

    2011-01-01

    Modulating glutamatergic neurotransmission induces alterations in conscious experience that mimic the symptoms of early psychotic illness. We review studies that use intravenous administration of ketamine, focusing on interindividual variability in the profundity of the ketamine experience. We will consider this individual variability within a hypothetical model of brain and cognitive function centered upon learning and inference. Within this model, the brains, neural systems, and even single neurons specify expectations about their inputs and responding to violations of those expectations with new learning that renders future inputs more predictable. We argue that ketamine temporarily deranges this ability by perturbing both the ways in which prior expectations are specified and the ways in which expectancy violations are signaled. We suggest that the former effect is predominantly mediated by NMDA blockade and the latter by augmented and inappropriate feedforward glutamatergic signaling. We suggest that the observed interindividual variability emerges from individual differences in neural circuits that normally underpin the learning and inference processes described. The exact source for that variability is uncertain, although it is likely to arise not only from genetic variation but also from subjects' previous experiences and prior learning. Furthermore, we argue that chronic, unlike acute, NMDA blockade alters the specification of expectancies more profoundly and permanently. Scrutinizing individual differences in the effects of acute and chronic ketamine administration in the context of the Bayesian brain model may generate new insights about the symptoms of psychosis; their underlying cognitive processes and neurocircuitry. PMID:20861831

  18. Urban contributions of glyphosate and its degradate AMPA to streams in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Lee, E.A.; Meyer, M.T.; Furlong, E.T.; Glassmeyer, S.T.

    2006-01-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world, being routinely applied to control weeds in both agricultural and urban settings. Microbial degradation of glyphosate produces aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). The high polarity and water-solubility of glyphosate and AMPA has, until recently, made their analysis in water samples problematic. Thus, compared to other herbicides (e.g. atrazine) there are relatively few studies on the environmental occurrence of glyphosate and AMPA. In 2002, treated effluent samples were collected from 10 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to study the occurrence of glyphosate and AMPA. Stream samples were collected upstream and downstream of the 10 WWTPs. Two reference streams were also sampled. The results document the apparent contribution of WWTP effluent to stream concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA, with roughly a two-fold increase in their frequencies of detection between stream samples collected upstream and those collected downstream of the WWTPs. Thus, urban use of glyphosate contributes to glyphosate and AMPA concentrations in streams in the United States. Overall, AMPA was detected much more frequently (67.5%) compared to glyphosate (17.5%).

  19. Glyphosate and AMPA inhibit cancer cell growth through inhibiting intracellular glycine synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingli; Lambrechts, Mark J; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Ge, Dongxia; Yin, Rutie; Xi, Mingrong; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    Glycine is a nonessential amino acid that is reversibly converted from serine intracellularly by serine hydroxymethyltransferase. Glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), are analogs to glycine, thus they may inhibit serine hydroxymethyltransferase to decrease intracellular glycine synthesis. In this study, we found that glyphosate and AMPA inhibited cell growth in eight human cancer cell lines but not in two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines. AMPA arrested C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cells in the G1/G0 phase and inhibited entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. AMPA also promoted apoptosis in C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cell lines. AMPA upregulated p53 and p21 protein levels as well as procaspase 9 protein levels in C4-2B cells, whereas it downregulated cyclin D3 protein levels. AMPA also activated caspase 3 and induced cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase. This study provides the first evidence that glyphosate and AMPA can inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of cancer cells but not normal cells, suggesting that they have potentials to be developed into a new anticancer therapy. PMID:23983455

  20. Hippocampal AMPA receptor gating controlled by both TARP and cornichon proteins.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihiko S; Gill, Martin B; Ho, Michelle T; Yu, Hong; Tu, Yuan; Siuda, Edward R; Wang, He; Qian, Yue-Wei; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Tomita, Susumu; Bredt, David S

    2010-12-22

    Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and cornichon proteins (CNIH-2/3) independently modulate AMPA receptor trafficking and gating. However, the potential for interactions of these subunits within an AMPA receptor complex is unknown. Here, we find that TARPs γ-4, γ-7, and γ-8, but not γ-2, γ-3, or γ-5, cause AMPA receptors to "resensitize" upon continued glutamate application. With γ-8, resensitization occurs with all GluA subunit combinations; however, γ-8-containing hippocampal neurons do not display resensitization. In recombinant systems, CNIH-2 abrogates γ-8-mediated resensitization and modifies AMPA receptor pharmacology and gating to match that of hippocampal neurons. In hippocampus, γ-8 and CNIH-2 associate in postsynaptic densities and CNIH-2 protein levels are markedly diminished in γ-8 knockout mice. Manipulating neuronal CNIH-2 levels modulates the electrophysiological properties of extrasynaptic and synaptic γ-8-containing AMPA receptors. Thus, γ-8 and CNIH-2 functionally interact with common hippocampal AMPA receptor complexes to modulate synergistically kinetics and pharmacology.

  1. Spinal nociceptin inhibits AMPA-induced nociceptive behavior and Fos expression in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Luis; Lastra, Ana; Villanueva, Noemí; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana

    2003-02-01

    The effects of intrathecal nociceptin (NOCI) on the nociceptive behavior (biting, scratching and licking; BSL) and the spinal Fos expression induced by intrathecal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA, 4 microg/rat) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA, 2 microg/rat) were studied. Coadministration of NOCI (3 and 10 nmol/rat) with NMDA did not modify the NMDA-induced BSL or Fos expression. In contrast, NOCI (0.1-3 nmol/rat) dose-dependently inhibited the BSL behavior induced by AMPA. Furthermore, coadministration of NOCI (3 and 10 nmol/rat) significantly reduced the AMPA-induced expression of Fos protein in the superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn. In order to test whether classical or opioid receptor-like type 1 (ORL1) receptors are involved in the inhibitions by NOCI of AMPA-evoked BSL, the corresponding antagonists were assayed. The administration of the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (10 mg/kg i.p.), did not modify the NOCI-induced inhibition of AMPA-evoked BSL. However, the selective ORL1 receptor antagonist, [N-Phe(1)]nociceptin-(1-13)-NH(2) (90 nmol/rat i.t.), completely prevented the NOCI-mediated inhibition of the nociceptive responses evoked by AMPA. In conclusion, NOCI, acting at ORL1 receptors can, at least in part, induce spinal analgesia by blocking the nociceptive responses produced through the stimulation of AMPA receptors.

  2. Phosphorylation of the AMPA receptor GluA1 subunit regulates memory load capacity.

    PubMed

    Olivito, Laura; Saccone, Paola; Perri, Valentina; Bachman, Julia L; Fragapane, Paola; Mele, Andrea; Huganir, Richard L; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Memory capacity (MC) refers to the number of elements one can maintain for a short retention interval. The molecular mechanisms underlying MC are unexplored. We have recently reported that mice as well as humans have a limited MC, which is reduced by hippocampal lesions. Here, we addressed the molecular mechanisms supporting MC. GluA1 AMPA-receptors (AMPA-R) mediate the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain and are critically involved in memory. Phosphorylation of GluA1 at serine residues S831 and S845 is promoted by CaMKII and PKA, respectively, and regulates AMPA-R function in memory duration. We hypothesized that AMPA-R phosphorylation may also be a key plastic process for supporting MC because it occurs in a few minutes, and potentiates AMPA-R ion channel function. Here, we show that knock-in mutant mice that specifically lack both of S845 and S831 phosphorylation sites on the GluA1 subunit had reduced MC in two different behavioral tasks specifically designed to assess MC in mice. This demonstrated a causal link between AMPA-R phosphorylation and MC. We then showed that information load regulates AMPA-R phosphorylation within the hippocampus, and that an overload condition associated with impaired memory is paralleled by a lack of AMPA-R phosphorylation. Accordingly, we showed that in conditions of high load, but not of low load, the pharmacological inhibition of the NMDA-CaMKII-PKA pathways within the hippocampus prevents memory as well as associated AMPA-R phosphorylation. These data provide the first identified molecular mechanism that regulates MC.

  3. Hippocampal Fast Glutamatergic Transmission Is Transiently Regulated by Corticosterone Pulsatility

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Johanna A. S.; Kerkhofs, Amber; Mikasova, Lenka; Karst, Henk; Groc, Laurent; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that corticosteroid hormones (such as corticosterone) are released in ultradian pulses as a natural consequence of pituitary-adrenal interactions. All organs, including the brain, are thus exposed to pulsatile changes in corticosteroid hormone level, important to ensure full genomic responsiveness to stress-induced surges. However, corticosterone also changes neuronal excitability through rapid non-genomic pathways, particularly in the hippocampus. Potentially, background excitability of hippocampal neurons could thus be changed by pulsatile exposure to corticosteroids. It is currently unknown, though, how neuronal activity alters during a sequence of corticosterone pulses. To test this, hippocampal cells were exposed in vitro to four consecutive corticosterone pulses with a 60 min inter-pulse interval. During the pulses we examined four features of hippocampal signal transfer by the main excitatory transmitter glutamate—i.e., postsynaptic responses to spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles, postsynaptic GluA2-AMPA receptor dynamics, basal (evoked) field responses, and synaptic plasticity, using a set of high resolution imaging and electrophysiological approaches. We show that the first pulse of corticosterone causes a transient increase in miniature EPSC frequency, AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity, while basal evoked field responses are unaffected. This pattern is not maintained during subsequent applications: responses become more variable, attenuate or even reverse over time, albeit with different kinetics for the various experimental endpoints. This may indicate that the beneficial effect of ultradian pulses on transcriptional regulation in the hippocampus is not consistently accompanied by short-term perturbations in background excitability. In general, this could be interpreted as a means to keep hippocampal neurons responsive to incoming signals related to environmental challenges. PMID:26741493

  4. Modern approaches to the design of memory and cognitive function stimulants based on AMPA receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, V. V.; Proshin, A. N.; Kinzirsky, A. S.; Bachurin, Sergey O.

    2009-05-01

    Data on the structure and properties of compounds acting on AMPA receptors, the key subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors of the mammalian central nervous system, are analyzed. Data on the role of these receptors in provision of memory and cognitive function formation and impairment processes are presented. The attention is focused on the modern views on the mechanisms of AMPA receptor desensitization and deactivation and action of substances affecting these processes. The structures of key positive modulators of AMPA receptors are given. The problems of application of these substances as therapeutic means for preventing and treating neurodegenerative and psychoneurological diseases are discussed. Bibliography — 121 references.

  5. AMPA RECEPTOR POTENTIATORS: FROM DRUG DESIGN TO COGNITIVE ENHANCEMENT

    PubMed Central

    PARTIN, KATHRYN M.

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of ionotropic glutamate receptors have emerged as a target for treating cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration, but also mental illnesses such as major depressive disorder. The possibility of creating a new class of pharmaceutical agent to treat refractive mental health issues has compelled researchers to redouble their efforts to develop a safe, effective treatment for memory and cognition impairments. Coupled with the more robust research methodologies that have emerged, including more sophisticated high-throughput-screens, higher resolution structural biology techniques, and more focused assessment on pharmacokinetics, the development of positive modulators of AMPA receptors holds great promise. We describe recent approaches that improve our understanding of the basic physiology underlying memory and cognition, and their application towards promoting human health. PMID:25462292

  6. AMPA receptor potentiators: from drug design to cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Partin, Kathryn M

    2015-02-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of ionotropic glutamate receptors have emerged as a target for treating cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration, but also mental illnesses such as major depressive disorder. The possibility of creating a new class of pharmaceutical agent to treat refractive mental health issues has compelled researchers to redouble their efforts to develop a safe, effective treatment for memory and cognition impairments. Coupled with the more robust research methodologies that have emerged, including more sophisticated high-throughput-screens, higher resolution structural biology techniques, and more focused assessment on pharmacokinetics, the development of positive modulators of AMPA receptors holds great promise. We describe recent approaches that improve our understanding of the basic physiology underlying memory and cognition, and their application toward promoting human health.

  7. Chemical labelling for visualizing native AMPA receptors in live neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Sho; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Arai, Itaru; Kakegawa, Wataru; Matsuda, Shinji; Ibata, Keiji; Nemoto, Yuri L.; Kusumi, Akihiro; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2017-04-01

    The location and number of neurotransmitter receptors are dynamically regulated at postsynaptic sites. However, currently available methods for visualizing receptor trafficking require the introduction of genetically engineered receptors into neurons, which can disrupt the normal functioning and processing of the original receptor. Here we report a powerful method for visualizing native α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) which are essential for cognitive functions without any genetic manipulation. This is based on a covalent chemical labelling strategy driven by selective ligand-protein recognition to tether small fluorophores to AMPARs using chemical AMPAR modification (CAM) reagents. The high penetrability of CAM reagents enables visualization of native AMPARs deep in brain tissues without affecting receptor function. Moreover, CAM reagents are used to characterize the diffusion dynamics of endogenous AMPARs in both cultured neurons and hippocampal slices. This method will help clarify the involvement of AMPAR trafficking in various neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  8. Direct imaging of lateral movements of AMPA receptors inside synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tardin, Catherine; Cognet, Laurent; Bats, Cécile; Lounis, Brahim; Choquet, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Trafficking of AMPA receptors in and out of synapses is crucial for synaptic plasticity. Previous studies have focused on the role of endo/exocytosis processes or that of lateral diffusion of extra-synaptic receptors. We have now directly imaged AMPAR movements inside and outside synapses of live neurons using single- molecule fluorescence microscopy. Inside individual synapses, we found immobile and mobile receptors, which display restricted diffusion. Extra-synaptic receptors display free diffusion. Receptors could also exchange between these membrane compartments through lateral diffusion. Glutamate application increased both receptor mobility inside synapses and the fraction of mobile receptors present in a juxtasynaptic region. Block of inhibitory transmission to favor excitatory synaptic activity induced a transient increase in the fraction of mobile receptors and a decrease in the proportion of juxtasynaptic receptors. Altogether, our data show that rapid exchange of receptors between a synaptic and extra-synaptic localization occurs through regulation of receptor diffusion inside synapses. PMID:12970178

  9. Chemical labelling for visualizing native AMPA receptors in live neurons.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Sho; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Arai, Itaru; Kakegawa, Wataru; Matsuda, Shinji; Ibata, Keiji; Nemoto, Yuri L; Kusumi, Akihiro; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2017-04-07

    The location and number of neurotransmitter receptors are dynamically regulated at postsynaptic sites. However, currently available methods for visualizing receptor trafficking require the introduction of genetically engineered receptors into neurons, which can disrupt the normal functioning and processing of the original receptor. Here we report a powerful method for visualizing native α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) which are essential for cognitive functions without any genetic manipulation. This is based on a covalent chemical labelling strategy driven by selective ligand-protein recognition to tether small fluorophores to AMPARs using chemical AMPAR modification (CAM) reagents. The high penetrability of CAM reagents enables visualization of native AMPARs deep in brain tissues without affecting receptor function. Moreover, CAM reagents are used to characterize the diffusion dynamics of endogenous AMPARs in both cultured neurons and hippocampal slices. This method will help clarify the involvement of AMPAR trafficking in various neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  10. Glutamatergic NMDA Receptor as Therapeutic Target for Depression.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Abelaira, Helena M; Tuon, Talita; Titus, Stephanie E; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) affects approximately 121 million individuals globally and poses a significant burden to the healthcare system. Around 50-60% of patients with MDD respond adequately to existing treatments that are primarily based on a monoaminergic system. However, the neurobiology of MDD has not been fully elucidated; therefore, it is possible that other biochemical alterations are involved. The glutamatergic system and its associated receptors have been implicated in the pathophysiology of MDD. In fact, the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, a glutamate receptor, is a binding or modulation site for both classical antidepressants and new fast-acting antidepressants. Thus, this review aims to present evidence describing the effect of antidepressants that modulate NMDA receptors and the mechanisms that contribute to the antidepressant response.

  11. Modulation of Synaptic Plasticity by Glutamatergic Gliotransmission: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    De Pittà, Maurizio; Brunel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Glutamatergic gliotransmission, that is, the release of glutamate from perisynaptic astrocyte processes in an activity-dependent manner, has emerged as a potentially crucial signaling pathway for regulation of synaptic plasticity, yet its modes of expression and function in vivo remain unclear. Here, we focus on two experimentally well-identified gliotransmitter pathways, (i) modulations of synaptic release and (ii) postsynaptic slow inward currents mediated by glutamate released from astrocytes, and investigate their possible functional relevance on synaptic plasticity in a biophysical model of an astrocyte-regulated synapse. Our model predicts that both pathways could profoundly affect both short- and long-term plasticity. In particular, activity-dependent glutamate release from astrocytes could dramatically change spike-timing-dependent plasticity, turning potentiation into depression (and vice versa) for the same induction protocol. PMID:27195153

  12. Dynamic imaging of AMPA receptor trafficking in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Roth, Richard H; Zhang, Yong; Huganir, Richard L

    2017-04-12

    Modulation of synaptic strength through trafficking of AMPA receptors is a fundamental mechanism underlying synaptic plasticity and has been shown to be an important process in higher brain functions such as learning and memory. Many studies have used live time-lapse imaging of fluorescently tagged AMPA receptors to directly monitor their membrane trafficking in the basal state as well as during synaptic plasticity. While most of these studies are performed in vitro using neuronal cell cultures, in the past years technological advances have enabled the imaging of synaptic proteins in vivo in intact organisms. This has allowed for visualization of synaptic plasticity on a molecular level in living and behaving animals. Here, we discuss key studies and approaches using dynamic imaging to visualize AMPA receptor trafficking in vitro as well as imaging synaptic proteins, including AMPA receptors, in vivo.

  13. Inflammatory and Glutamatergic Homeostasis Are Involved in Successful Aging.

    PubMed

    Hascup, Erin R; Wang, Feiya; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Whole body studies using long-lived growth hormone receptor gene disrupted or knock out (GHR-KO) mice report global GH resistance, increased insulin sensitivity, reduced insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and cognitive retention in old-age, however, little is known about the neurobiological status of these mice. The aim of this study was to determine if glutamatergic and inflammatory markers that are altered in aging and/or age-related diseases and disorders, are preserved in mice that experience increased healthspan. We examined messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels in the brain of 4- to 6-, 8- to 10-, and 20- to 22-month GHR-KO and normal aging control mice. In the hippocampus, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and anti-inflammatory nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB)-p50 were elevated in 8- to 10-month GHR-KO mice compared with age-matched controls. In the hypothalamus, NFκB-p50, NFκB-p65, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST), and 2-amino-3-(5-methyl-3-oxo 2,3-dihydro-1,2 oxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid receptor subunit 1 (GluA1) were elevated in 8- to 10- and/or 20- to 22-month GHR-KO mice when comparing genotypes. Finally, interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β) mRNA was reduced in 4- to 6- and/or 8- to 10-month GHR-KO mice compared with normal littermates in all brain areas examined. These data support the importance of decreased brain inflammation in early adulthood and maintained homeostasis of the glutamatergic and inflammatory systems in extended longevity.

  14. Prefrontal cortical GABAergic and NMDA glutamatergic regulation of delayed responding.

    PubMed

    Auger, Meagan L; Floresco, Stan B

    2017-02-01

    NMDA glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission have both been implicated in regulating working memory functions mediated by the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and perturbations in these neurotransmitter systems have been proposed to underlie deficits in these functions observed in schizophrenia. Here, we examined the consequence of disrupting GABAergic or NMDA glutamatergic transmission within the medial PFC of rats on a delayed-response paradigm with translational relevance to working memory tasks used with humans. The operant delayed non-match to position task consisted of a sample phase (one lever extended) and a choice phase wherein rats were required to choose the opposite lever, separated by a variable delay (1-24 s). In well-trained rats, inactivation of the PFC via infusions of GABA agonists baclofen/muscimol (100 ng each) induced delay-independent deficits. Reducing PFC GABA transmission with the GABA-A receptor antagonist bicuculline (12.5-50 ng) also caused delay-independent impairments and increased trial omissions and response latencies during the sample and end-of-delay phases. On the other hand, non-selective blockade of PFC NMDA receptors with MK-801 (3-6 μg) disrupted performance, but these effects more closely resembled delay-dependent impairments. However, selective blockade of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors with Ro-25-6981 (2.5 μg) did not affect any measures of performance. These results demonstrate that both intact PFC GABA and NMDA receptor signalling are integral for accurate delayed-responding, although they may differentially regulate encoding vs maintenance of information within working memory. Furthermore they suggest that perturbations of both of these neurochemical signals within the PFC may contribute differentially to impairments in working memory observed in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. ABNORMAL GLUTAMATERGIC NEUROTRANSMISSION AND NEURONALGLIAL INTERACTIONS IN ACUTE MANIA

    PubMed Central

    Öngür, Dost; Jensen, J. Eric; Prescot, Andrew P.; Stork, Caitlin; Lundy, Miriam; Cohen, Bruce M.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2008-01-01

    Background At excitatory synapses, glutamate released from neurons is taken up by glial cells and converted to glutamine, which is cycled back to neurons. Alterations in this system are believed to play a role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, but they have not been characterized in vivo. We examined the glutamine/glutamate ratio, and levels of other metabolites in acute mania and schizophrenia in this exploratory study. Methods Data were obtained from 2×2×2cm voxels in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and parieto-occipital cortex (POC) using 2-dimensional J-resolved proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 4 Tesla, and analyzed using LCModel. Fifteen bipolar disorder patients with acute mania and seventeen schizophrenia patients with acute psychosis were recruited from an inpatient unit; twenty one matched healthy controls were also studied. Glutamine/glutamate ratio and N-acetylaspartate, creatine, choline, and myo-inositol levels were evaluated in a repeated-measures design. Medication effects and relationship to demographic and clinical variables were analyzed. Results Glutamine/glutamate ratio was significantly higher in ACC and POC in bipolar disorder, but not schizophrenia, compared with healthy controls. N-acetylaspartate was significantly lower in the ACC in schizophrenia. Patients on and off lithium, anticonvulsants, or benzodiazepines had similar glutamine/glutamate ratios. Conclusions The elevated glutamine/glutamate ratio is consistent with glutamatergic overactivity and/or defective neuronal-glial coupling in acute mania, although medication effects cannot be ruled out. Abnormalities in glutamatergic neurotransmission and glial cell function in bipolar disorder may represent targets for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:18602089

  16. Rational Design of a Novel AMPA Receptor Modulator through a Hybridization Approach.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Nicola; Harms, Jonathan E; Partin, Kathryn M; Jamieson, Craig

    2015-04-09

    The α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a family of glutamate ion channels of considerable interest in excitatory neurotransmission and associated disease processes. Here, we demonstrate how exploitation of the available X-ray crystal structure of the receptor ligand binding domain enabled the development of a new class of AMPA receptor positive allosteric modulators (7) through hybridization of known ligands (5 and 6), leading to a novel chemotype with promising pharmacological properties.

  17. Rational Design of a Novel AMPA Receptor Modulator through a Hybridization Approach

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a family of glutamate ion channels of considerable interest in excitatory neurotransmission and associated disease processes. Here, we demonstrate how exploitation of the available X-ray crystal structure of the receptor ligand binding domain enabled the development of a new class of AMPA receptor positive allosteric modulators (7) through hybridization of known ligands (5 and 6), leading to a novel chemotype with promising pharmacological properties. PMID:25893038

  18. Differential effects of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) on photosynthesis and chlorophyll metabolism in willow plants.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Le Manac'h, Sarah Gingras; Maccario, Sophie; Labrecque, Michel; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    We used a willow species (Salix miyabeana cultivar SX64) to examine the differential secondary-effects of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), the principal glyphosate by-product, on chlorophyll metabolism and photosynthesis. Willow plants were treated with different concentrations of glyphosate (equivalent to 0, 1.4, 2.1 and 2.8kgha(-1)) and AMPA (equivalent to 0, 0.28, 1.4 and 2.8kgha(-1)) and evaluations of pigment contents, chlorophyll fluorescence, and oxidative stress markers (hydrogen peroxide content and antioxidant enzyme activities) in leaves were performed after 12h of exposure. We observed that AMPA and glyphosate trigger different mechanisms leading to decreases in chlorophyll content and photosynthesis rates in willow plants. Both chemicals induced ROS accumulation in willow leaves although only glyphosate-induced oxidative damage through lipid peroxidation. By disturbing chlorophyll biosynthesis, AMPA induced decreases in chlorophyll contents, with consequent effects on photosynthesis. With glyphosate, ROS increases were higher than the ROS-sensitive threshold, provoking chlorophyll degradation (as seen by pheophytin accumulation) and invariable decreases in photosynthesis. Peroxide accumulation in both AMPA and glyphosate-treated plants was due to the inhibition of antioxidant enzyme activities. The different effects of glyphosate on chlorophyll contents and photosynthesis as described in the literature may be due to various glyphosate:AMPA ratios in those plants.

  19. Toxicity of AMPA to the earthworm Eisenia andrei Bouché, 1972 in tropical artificial soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, Anahí; Brown, George Gardner; Sautter, Klaus Dieter; Ribas de Oliveira, Cintia Mara; de Vasconcelos, Eliane Carvalho; Niva, Cintia Carla; Bartz, Marie Luise Carolina; Bedano, José Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) - one of glyphosate’s main metabolites - has been classified as persistent in soils, raising concern regarding the widespread use of glyphosate in agriculture and forestry. Glyphosate may have negative or neutral effects on soil biota, but no information is available on the toxicity of AMPA to soil invertebrates. Therefore our aim was to study the effect of AMPA on mortality and reproduction of the earthworm species Eisenia andrei using standard soil ecotoxicological methods (ISO). Field-relevant concentrations of AMPA had no significant effects on mortality in acute or chronic assays. Except at the highest concentration tested, a significant biomass loss was observed compared to controls in the chronic assay. The number of juveniles and cocoons increased with higher concentrations of AMPA applied, but their mean weights decreased. This mass loss indicates higher sensitivity of juveniles than adults to AMPA. Our results suggest that earthworms coming from parents grown in contaminated soils may have reduced growth, limiting their beneficial roles in key soil ecosystem functions. Nevertheless, further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying the sublethal effects observed here.

  20. Mannose-specific lectins modulate ligand binding to AMPA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, K B; Kessler, M; Ta, J; Lam, L; Lynch, G

    1998-06-08

    Binding of [3H]AMPA was increased above control levels in rat brain membranes that had been incubated with concanavalin A (Con A) or a lectin from Lens culinaris (LC), both of which bind mannose residues. This did not occur with any of six lectins with other specificities. The magnitude of the increased binding varied from 15% in cortex to 70% in hippocampus and decreased significantly between 3 weeks and 6 months of age. Succinylated Con A was without effect and neither Con A nor LC increased binding to solubilized AMPA receptors. Increases in binding were not obtained in membranes purified from HEK293 cell lines expressing homomeric AMPA receptors. This indicates that mannose specific lectins may enhance binding by cross-linking AMPA receptors to each other or to proteins that are specific to brain. Con A has been reported to reduce glutamate receptor desensitization with higher efficacy at kainate than at AMPA receptors; the increase in binding reported here appears to be unrelated to such effects because (1) it was not affected by drugs that block desensitization and (2) [3H]kainate binding was reduced rather than increased by Con A. These observations suggest that AMPA receptor kinetic properties not involving desensitization are influenced by extracellular interactions between the receptors and other transmembrane proteins. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Toxicity of AMPA to the earthworm Eisenia andrei Bouché, 1972 in tropical artificial soil

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Anahí; Brown, George Gardner; Sautter, Klaus Dieter; Ribas de Oliveira, Cintia Mara; de Vasconcelos, Eliane Carvalho; Niva, Cintia Carla; Bartz, Marie Luise Carolina; Bedano, José Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) - one of glyphosate’s main metabolites - has been classified as persistent in soils, raising concern regarding the widespread use of glyphosate in agriculture and forestry. Glyphosate may have negative or neutral effects on soil biota, but no information is available on the toxicity of AMPA to soil invertebrates. Therefore our aim was to study the effect of AMPA on mortality and reproduction of the earthworm species Eisenia andrei using standard soil ecotoxicological methods (ISO). Field-relevant concentrations of AMPA had no significant effects on mortality in acute or chronic assays. Except at the highest concentration tested, a significant biomass loss was observed compared to controls in the chronic assay. The number of juveniles and cocoons increased with higher concentrations of AMPA applied, but their mean weights decreased. This mass loss indicates higher sensitivity of juveniles than adults to AMPA. Our results suggest that earthworms coming from parents grown in contaminated soils may have reduced growth, limiting their beneficial roles in key soil ecosystem functions. Nevertheless, further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying the sublethal effects observed here. PMID:26792548

  2. Glutamatergic approaches to the treatment of cognitive and behavioural symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Francis, Paul T

    2008-01-01

    The glutamatergic system has long been recognised for its role in learning and memory and recent studies indicate an early loss of glutamatergic synapses in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Efforts to produce drugs which address changes in the glutamatergic system in AD are well advanced (e.g. memantine and drugs in development such as ampakines). Much less is known about the possible role of glutamate in non-cognitive behavioural changes; however, recent data from clinical trials suggest that memantine reduces agitation and aggressive behaviour in AD patients. In this context, it is important to help identify new treatment approaches to replace the use of antipsychotics in this vulnerable population.

  3. Targeting the Glutamatergic System to Develop Novel, Improved Therapeutics for Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sanacora, Gerard; Zarate, Carlos A.; Krystal, John; Manji, Husseini K.

    2009-01-01

    PREFACE Mood disorders are common, chronic, recurrent mental illnesses that affect the lives of millions of individuals worldwide. To date, the monoaminergic systems (serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic) in the brain have received the greatest attention in neurobiological studies of mood disorders, and most therapeutics target these systems. However, there is growing evidence that the glutamatergic system is central to the neurobiology and treatment of these disorders. Here, we review data supporting the involvement of the glutamatergic system in mood disorder pathophysiology as well as the efficacy of glutamatergic agents in mood disorders. We also discuss exciting new prospects for the development of improved therapeutics for these devastating disorders. PMID:18425072

  4. Glyphosate-Resistant and Conventional Canola (Brassica napus L.) Responses to Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid (AMPA) Treatment.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Elza Alves; Dayan, Franck E; Owens, Daniel K; Rimando, Agnes M; Duke, Stephen O

    2016-05-11

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) canola contains two transgenes that impart resistance to the herbicide glyphosate: (1) the microbial glyphosate oxidase gene (gox) encoding the glyphosate oxidase enzyme (GOX) that metabolizes glyphosate to aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and (2) cp4 that encodes a GR form of the glyphosate target enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimic acid-3-phosphate synthase. The objectives of this research were to determine the phytotoxicity of AMPA to canola, the relative metabolism of glyphosate to AMPA in GR and conventional non-GR (NGR) canola, and AMPA pool sizes in glyphosate-treated GR canola. AMPA applied at 1.0 kg ha(-1) was not phytotoxic to GR or NGR. At this AMPA application rate, NGR canola accumulated a higher concentration of AMPA in its tissues than GR canola. At rates of 1 and 3.33 kg ae ha(-1) of glyphosate, GR canola growth was stimulated. This stimulatory effect is similar to that of much lower doses of glyphosate on NGR canola. Both shikimate and AMPA accumulated in tissues of these glyphosate-treated plants. In a separate experiment in which young GR and NGR canola plants were treated with non-phytotoxic levels of [(14)C]-glyphosate, very little glyphosate was metabolized in NGR plants, whereas most of the glyphosate was metabolized to AMPA in GR plants at 7 days after application. Untreated leaves of GR plants accumulated only metabolites (mostly AMPA) of glyphosate, indicating that GOX activity is very high in the youngest leaves. These data indicate that more glyphosate is transformed to AMPA rapidly in GR canola and that the accumulated AMPA is not toxic to the canola plant.

  5. Electrophysiological properties of AMPA receptors are differentially modulated depending on the associated member of the TARP family.

    PubMed

    Kott, Sabine; Werner, Markus; Körber, Christoph; Hollmann, Michael

    2007-04-04

    The family of AMPA receptors is encoded by four genes that are differentially spliced to result in the flip or flop versions of the four subunits GluR1 to GluR4. GluR2 is further modified at the so-called Q/R site by posttranscriptional RNA editing. Delivery of AMPA receptors to the plasma membrane and synaptic trafficking are controlled by transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs). Additionally, TARPs influence essential electrophysiological properties of AMPA receptor channels such as desensitization and agonist efficacies. Here, we compare the influence of all known TARPs (gamma2, gamma3, gamma4, and gamma8) on agonist-induced currents of the four AMPA receptor subunits, including flip and flop splice variants and editing variants. We show that, although agonist-induced currents of all homomeric AMPA receptor subunits as well as all heteromeric combinations tested are significantly potentiated when coexpressed with members of the TARP family in Xenopus laevis oocytes, the extent of TARP-mediated increase in agonist-induced responses is highly dependent on both the AMPA receptor subunit and the coexpressed TARP. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splice variant of the AMPA receptor plays a key role in determining the modulation of electrophysiological properties by associated TARPs. We furthermore present evidence that individual TARP-AMPA receptor interactions control the degree of desensitization of AMPA receptors. Consequently, because of their subunit-specific impact on the electrophysiological properties, TARPs play a major role as modulatory subunits of AMPA receptors and thus contribute to the functional diversity of AMPA receptors encountered in the CNS.

  6. AMPA-Kainate Receptor Inhibition Promotes Neurologic Recovery in Premature Rabbits with Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dohare, Preeti; Zia, Muhammad T.; Ahmed, Ehsan; Ahmed, Asad; Yadala, Vivek; Schober, Alexandra L.; Ortega, Juan Alberto; Kayton, Robert; Ungvari, Zoltan; Mongin, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in preterm infants leads to cerebral inflammation, reduced myelination of the white matter, and neurological deficits. No therapeutic strategy exists against the IVH-induced white matter injury. AMPA-kainate receptor induced excitotoxicity contributes to oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) damage and hypomyelination in both neonatal and adult models of brain injury. Here, we hypothesized that IVH damages white matter via AMPA receptor activation, and that AMPA-kainate receptor inhibition suppresses inflammation and restores OPC maturation, myelination, and neurologic recovery in preterm newborns with IVH. We tested these hypotheses in a rabbit model of glycerol-induced IVH and evaluated the expression of AMPA receptors in autopsy samples from human preterm infants. GluR1-GluR4 expressions were comparable between preterm humans and rabbits with and without IVH. However, GluR1 and GluR2 levels were significantly lower in the embryonic white matter and germinal matrix relative to the neocortex in both infants with and without IVH. Pharmacological blockade of AMPA-kainate receptors with systemic NBQX, or selective AMPA receptor inhibition by intramuscular perampanel restored myelination and neurologic recovery in rabbits with IVH. NBQX administration also reduced the population of apoptotic OPCs, levels of several cytokines (TNFα, IL-β, IL-6, LIF), and the density of Iba1+ microglia in pups with IVH. Additionally, NBQX treatment inhibited STAT-3 phosphorylation, but not astrogliosis or transcription factors regulating gliosis. Our data suggest that AMPA-kainate receptor inhibition alleviates OPC loss and IVH-induced inflammation and restores myelination and neurologic recovery in preterm rabbits with IVH. Therapeutic use of FDA-approved perampanel treatment might enhance neurologic outcome in premature infants with IVH. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a major complication of prematurity and a large number

  7. AMPA-Kainate Receptor Inhibition Promotes Neurologic Recovery in Premature Rabbits with Intraventricular Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Dohare, Preeti; Zia, Muhammad T; Ahmed, Ehsan; Ahmed, Asad; Yadala, Vivek; Schober, Alexandra L; Ortega, Juan Alberto; Kayton, Robert; Ungvari, Zoltan; Mongin, Alexander A; Ballabh, Praveen

    2016-03-16

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in preterm infants leads to cerebral inflammation, reduced myelination of the white matter, and neurological deficits. No therapeutic strategy exists against the IVH-induced white matter injury. AMPA-kainate receptor induced excitotoxicity contributes to oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) damage and hypomyelination in both neonatal and adult models of brain injury. Here, we hypothesized that IVH damages white matter via AMPA receptor activation, and that AMPA-kainate receptor inhibition suppresses inflammation and restores OPC maturation, myelination, and neurologic recovery in preterm newborns with IVH. We tested these hypotheses in a rabbit model of glycerol-induced IVH and evaluated the expression of AMPA receptors in autopsy samples from human preterm infants. GluR1-GluR4 expressions were comparable between preterm humans and rabbits with and without IVH. However, GluR1 and GluR2 levels were significantly lower in the embryonic white matter and germinal matrix relative to the neocortex in both infants with and without IVH. Pharmacological blockade of AMPA-kainate receptors with systemic NBQX, or selective AMPA receptor inhibition by intramuscular perampanel restored myelination and neurologic recovery in rabbits with IVH. NBQX administration also reduced the population of apoptotic OPCs, levels of several cytokines (TNFα, IL-β, IL-6, LIF), and the density of Iba1(+) microglia in pups with IVH. Additionally, NBQX treatment inhibited STAT-3 phosphorylation, but not astrogliosis or transcription factors regulating gliosis. Our data suggest that AMPA-kainate receptor inhibition alleviates OPC loss and IVH-induced inflammation and restores myelination and neurologic recovery in preterm rabbits with IVH. Therapeutic use of FDA-approved perampanel treatment might enhance neurologic outcome in premature infants with IVH. Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a major complication of prematurity and a large number of survivors with

  8. Resilience dysregulation in major depressive disorder: focus on glutamatergic imbalance and microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; de Moura, Airam B; Silva, Ritele H; Resende, Wilson R; Quevedo, João

    2017-06-30

    Many studies have been shown an important role of glutamatergic system as well microglial activation in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Experimental and clinical data suggest that attenuation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor function exerts antidepressant effects. Glutamatergic system is involved with memory establishment and function, and it regulates plasticity in the brain. Microglial cells play pivotal role to the brain functions; however, under chronic inflammation status microglial could be turn activated and increase the pro-inflammatory cytokines. In humans most resistant to the development of psychiatric disorders, including MDD, are observed a greater degree of resilience resulting from stress. Less resilience is associated with neuroendocrine and neuroinflammatory markers, as well as with glutamatergic system dysregulation. Thus, this review we highlighted findings from literature identifying the function of glutamatergic system, microglial activation and inflammation in resilience. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Cholinergic modulation of primary afferent glutamatergic transmission in rat medullary dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seok-Gwon; Choi, In-Sun; Cho, Jin-Hwa; Jang, Il-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Although muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptors are expressed in trigeminal ganglia, it is still unknown whether mACh receptors modulate glutamatergic transmission from primary afferents onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. In this study, we have addressed the cholinergic modulation of primary afferent glutamatergic transmission using a conventional whole cell patch clamp technique. Glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were evoked from primary afferents by electrical stimulation of trigeminal tract and monosynaptic EPSCs were recorded from medullary dorsal horn neurons of rat horizontal brain stem slices. Muscarine and ACh reversibly and concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic EPSCs and increased the paired-pulse ratio. In addition, muscarine reduced the frequency of miniature EPSCs without affecting the current amplitude, suggesting that muscarine acts presynaptically to decrease the probability of glutamate release onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. The muscarine-induced decrease of glutamatergic EPSCs was significantly occluded by methoctramine or AF-DX116, M2 receptor antagonists, but not pirenzepine, J104129 and MT-3, selective M1, M3 and M4 receptor antagonists. The muscarine-induced decrease of glutamatergic EPSCs was highly dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration. Physostigmine and clinically available acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as rivastigmine and donepezil, significantly shifted the concentration-inhibition relationship of ACh for glutamatergic EPSCs. These results suggest that muscarine acts on presynaptic M2 receptors to inhibit glutamatergic transmission by reducing the Ca2+ influx into primary afferent terminals, and that M2 receptor agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors could be, at least, potential targets to reduce nociceptive transmission from orofacial tissues.

  10. Glyphosate and AMPA distribution in wind-eroded sediment derived from loess soil.

    PubMed

    Bento, Célia P M; Goossens, Dirk; Rezaei, Mahrooz; Riksen, Michel; Mol, Hans G J; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate is one of the most used herbicides in agricultural lands worldwide. Wind-eroded sediment and dust, as an environmental transport pathway of glyphosate and of its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), can result in environmental- and human exposure far beyond the agricultural areas where it has been applied. Therefore, special attention is required to the airborne transport of glyphosate and AMPA. In this study, we investigated the behavior of glyphosate and AMPA in wind-eroded sediment by measuring their content in different size fractions (median diameters between 715 and 8 μm) of a loess soil, during a period of 28 days after glyphosate application. Granulometrical extraction was done using a wind tunnel and a Soil Fine Particle Extractor. Extractions were conducted on days 0, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after glyphosate application. Results indicated that glyphosate and AMPA contents were significantly higher in the finest particle fractions (median diameters between 8 and 18 μm), and lowered significantly with the increase in particle size. However, their content remained constant when aggregates were present in the sample. Glyphosate and AMPA contents correlated positively with clay, organic matter, and silt content. The dissipation of glyphosate over time was very low, which was most probably due to the low soil moisture content of the sediment. Consequently, the formation of AMPA was also very low. The low dissipation of glyphosate in our study indicates that the risk of glyphosate transport in dry sediment to off-target areas by wind can be very high. The highest glyphosate and AMPA contents were found in the smallest soil fractions (PM10 and less), which are easily inhaled and, therefore, contribute to human exposure.

  11. Wind erosion as an environmental transport pathway of glyphosate and AMPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bento, Célia P. M.; Goossens, Dirk; Rezaei, Mahrooz; Riksen, Michel; Mol, Hans G. J.; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate is the active ingredient of many commercial formulations of herbicides extensively used worldwide for weed control. Because glyphosate and its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) are considered non-volatile, their loss to the atmosphere is considered negligible. Both compounds strongly adsorb to soil particles and wind-eroded sediment and dust are thus a possible environmental transport pathway. This can result in environmental and human exposure far beyond the agricultural areas where it has been applied. Therefore, special attention is required to the airborne transport of glyphosate and AMPA. In this study, we investigated the behavior of glyphosate and AMPA in wind-eroded sediment by measuring their content in different size fractions (median diameters between 715 and 8 µm) of a loess soil, during a period of 28 days after glyphosate application. Granulometrical extraction was done using a wind tunnel and a Soil Fine Particle Extractor. Extractions were conducted on days 0, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after glyphosate application. Results indicated that glyphosate and AMPA contents were significantly higher in the finest particle fractions (median diameters between 8 and 18 µm), and lowered significantly with the increase in particle size. Glyphosate and AMPA contents correlated positively with clay, organic matter, and silt content. The dissipation of glyphosate over time was very low, which was associated to the low soil moisture content of the sediment. Consequently, the formation of AMPA was also very low. The low dissipation of glyphosate in our study indicates that the risk of glyphosate transport in dry sediment to off-target areas by wind can be very high. The highest glyphosate and AMPA contents were found in the smallest soil fractions (PM10 and less), which are easily inhaled. This contributes to the risk of human and animal exposure and, therefore, more attention should be paid to this route of exposure in environmental and human

  12. Enhanced AMPA Receptor Activity Increases Operant Alcohol Self-administration and Cue-Induced Reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Cannady, Reginald; Fisher, Kristen R.; Durant, Brandon; Besheer, Joyce; Hodge, Clyde W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-term alcohol exposure produces neuroadaptations that contribute to the progression of alcohol abuse disorders. Chronic alcohol consumption results in strengthened excitatory neurotransmission and increased AMPA receptor signaling in animal models. However, the mechanistic role of enhanced AMPA receptor activity in alcohol reinforcement and alcohol-seeking behavior remains unclear. This study examined the role of enhanced AMPA receptor function using the selective positive allosteric modulator, aniracetam, in modulating operant alcohol self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement. Male alcohol-preferring (P-) rats, trained to self-administer alcohol (15%, v/v) versus water were pretreated with aniracetam to assess effects on maintenance of alcohol self-administration. To determine reinforcer specificity, P-rats were trained to self-administer sucrose (0.8%, w/v) versus water, and effects of aniracetam were tested. The role of aniracetam in modulating relapse of alcohol-seeking was assessed using a response-contingent cue-induced reinstatement procedure in P-rats trained to self-administer 15% alcohol. Aniracetam pretreatment significantly increased alcohol-reinforced responses relative to vehicle treatment. This increase was not attributed to aniracetam-induced hyperactivity as aniracetam pretreatment did not alter locomotor activity. AMPA receptor involvement was confirmed because DNQX (AMPA receptor antagonist) blocked the aniracetam-induced increase in alcohol self-administration. Aniracetam did not alter sucrose-reinforced responses in sucrose-trained P-rats, suggesting that enhanced AMPA receptor activity is selective in modulating the reinforcing function of alcohol. Finally, aniracetam pretreatment potentiated cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol-seeking behavior versus vehicle treated-P-rats. These data suggest that enhanced glutamate activity at AMPA receptors may be key in facilitating alcohol consumption and seeking behavior which could

  13. Anatomical recovery of the spinal glutamatergic system following a complete spinal cord injury in lampreys

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-López, Blanca; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2016-01-01

    Lampreys recover locomotion following a spinal cord injury (SCI). Glutamate is necessary to initiate and control locomotion and recent data suggest a crucial role for intraspinal neurons in functional recovery following SCI. We aimed to determine whether, in lampreys, axotomized spinal glutamatergic neurons, which lose glutamate immunoreactivity immediately after SCI, recover it later on and to study the long-term evolution and anatomical recovery of the spinal glutamatergic system after SCI. We used glutamate immunoreactivity to study changes in the glutamatergic system, tract-tracing to label axotomized neurons and TUNEL labelling to study cell death. Transections of the cord were made at the level of the fifth gill. TUNEL experiments indicated that cell death is a minor contributor to the initial loss of glutamate immunoreactivity. At least some of the axotomized neurons lose glutamate immunoreactivity, survive and recover glutamate immunoreactivity 1 week post-lesion (wpl). We observed a progressive increase in the number of glutamatergic neurons/processes until an almost complete anatomical recovery at 10 wpl. Among all the glutamatergic populations, the population of cerebrospinal fluid-contacting cells is the only one that never recovers. Our results indicate that full recovery of the glutamatergic system is not necessary for the restoration of function in lampreys. PMID:27886236

  14. Short-term repeated corticosterone administration enhances glutamatergic but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Kula, Joanna; Blasiak, Anna; Czerw, Anna; Tylko, Grzegorz; Sowa, Joanna; Hess, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that stress impairs performance of skilled reaching and walking tasks in rats due to the action of glucocorticoids involved in the stress response. Skilled reaching and walking are controlled by the primary motor cortex (M1); however, it is not known whether stress-related impairments in skilled motor tasks are related to functional and/or structural alterations within the M1. We studied the effects of single and repeated injections of corticosterone (twice daily for 7 days) on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) recorded from layer II/III pyramidal neurons in ex vivo slices of the M1, prepared 2 days after the last administration of the hormone. We also measured the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal cells and the protein levels of selected subunits of AMPA, NMDA, and GABAA receptors after repeated corticosterone administration. Repeatedly administered corticosterone induced an increase in the frequency but not in the amplitude of sEPSCs, while a single administration had no effect on the recorded excitatory currents. The frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs as well as the excitability of pyramidal cells were changed neither after single nor after repeated corticosterone administration. Treatment with corticosterone for 7 days did not modify the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal neurons. Corticosterone influenced neither the protein levels of GluA1, GluA2, GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B subunits of glutamate receptors nor those of α1, β2, and γ2 subunits of the GABAA receptor. The increase in sEPSCs frequency induced by repeated corticosterone administration faded out within 7 days. These data indicate that prolonged administration of exogenous corticosterone selectively and reversibly enhances glutamatergic, but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex. Our results suggest that corticosterone treatment results in an enhancement of spontaneous glutamate release from presynaptic

  15. Glutamatergic projection from the nucleus incertus to the septohippocampal system.

    PubMed

    Cervera-Ferri, Ana; Rahmani, Yasamin; Martínez-Bellver, Sergio; Teruel-Martí, Vicent; Martínez-Ricós, Joana

    2012-05-31

    Recent findings support a relevant role of the nucleus incertus in the control of the hippocampal activity through the modulation of theta rhythm. Previous studies from our group have shown that this nucleus is a critical relay between reticularis pontis oralis and the medial septum/diagonal band, regarded as the main activator and the pacemaker of the hippocampal oscillations, respectively. Besides, the nucleus incertus is highly linked to activated states related to the arousal response. The neurotransmission of the nucleus incertus, however, remains uncertain. Only GABA and the neuromodulator relaxin 3 are usually considered to be involved in its contribution to the septohippocampal system. In this work, we have analyzed the existence of an excitatory projection from the nucleus incertus to the medial septum. We have found a group of glutamatergic neurons in the nucleus incertus projecting to the medial septum. Moreover, we were able to describe a segregated distribution of calbindin and calretinin neurons. While calretinin expression was restricted to the nucleus incertus pars compacta, calbindin positive neurons where observed both in the pars dissipata and the pars compacta of the nucleus. The present work provides innovative data supporting an excitatory component in the pontoseptal pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Glutamatergic neurons are present in the rat ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Sheen, Whitney; Morales, Marisela

    2010-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is thought to play an important role in reward function. Two populations of neurons, containing either dopamine (DA) or γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), have been extensively characterized in this area. However, recent electrophysiological studies are consistent with the notion that neurons that utilize neurotransmitters other than DA or GABA are likely to be present in the VTA. Given the pronounced phenotypic diversity of neurons in this region, we have proposed that additional cell types, such as those that express the neurotransmitter glutamate may also be present in this area. Thus, by using in situ hybridization histochemistry we investigated whether transcripts encoded by genes for the two vesicular glutamate transporters, VGluT1 or VGluT2, were expressed in the VTA. We found that VGluT2 mRNA but not VGluT1 mRNA is expressed in the VTA. Neurons expressing VGluT2 mRNA were differentially distributed throughout the rostro-caudal and medio-lateral aspects of the VTA, with the highest concentration detected in rostro-medial areas. Phenotypic characterization with double in situ hybridization of these neurons indicated that they rarely co–expressed mRNAs for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, marker for DAergic neurons) or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD, marker for GABAergic neurons). Based on the results described here, we concluded that the VTA contains glutamatergic neurons that in their vast majority are clearly non-DAergic and non-GABAergic. PMID:17241272

  17. Evidence that the Tritonia diomedea Swim Afferent Neurons Are Glutamatergic

    PubMed Central

    Megalou, E.V.; Brandon, C.J.; Frost, W.N.

    2011-01-01

    The escape swim response of the marine mollusc Tritonia diomedea is a well-established model system for studies of the neural basis of behavior. While the swim neural network is reasonably well understood, little is known about the transmitters used by its constituent neurons. In the present study, we provide immunocytochemical and electrophysiological evidence that the S-cells, the afferent neurons that detect aversive skin stimuli and in turn trigger Tritonia’s escape swim response, use glutamate as their transmitter. First, immunolabeling revealed that S-cell somata contain elevated levels of glutamate compared to most other neurons in the Tritonia brain, consistent with findings from glutamatergic neurons in many species. Second, pressure-applied puffs of glutamate produced the same excitatory response in the target neurons of the S-cells as the naturally released S-cell transmitter itself. Third, the glutamate receptor antagonist CNQX completely blocked S-cell synaptic connections. These findings support glutamate as a transmitter used by the S-cells, and will facilitate studies using this model system to explore a variety of issues related to the neural basis of behavior. PMID:19366921

  18. AMPA receptor exchange underlies transient memory destabilization on retrieval.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ingie; Kim, Jeongyeon; Kim, Jihye; Lee, Sukwon; Ko, Hyoung-Gon; Nader, Karim; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Tsien, Richard W; Choi, Sukwoo

    2013-05-14

    A consolidated memory can be transiently destabilized by memory retrieval, after which memories are reconsolidated within a few hours; however, the molecular substrates underlying this destabilization process remain essentially unknown. Here we show that at lateral amygdala synapses, fear memory consolidation correlates with increased surface expression of calcium-impermeable AMPA receptors (CI-AMPARs), which are known to be more stable at the synapse, whereas memory retrieval induces an abrupt exchange of CI-AMPARs to calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs), which are known to be less stable at the synapse. We found that blockade of either CI-AMPAR endocytosis or NMDA receptor activity during memory retrieval, both of which blocked the exchange to CP-AMPARs, prevented memory destabilization, indicating that this transient exchange of AMPARs may underlie the transformation of a stable memory into an unstable memory. These newly inserted CP-AMPARs gradually exchanged back to CI-AMPARs within hours, which coincided with the course of reconsolidation. Furthermore, blocking the activity of these newly inserted CP-AMPARs after retrieval impaired reconsolidation, suggesting that they serve as synaptic "tags" that support synapse-specific reconsolidation. Taken together, our results reveal unexpected physiological roles of CI-AMPARs and CP-AMPARs in transforming a consolidated memory into an unstable memory and subsequently guiding reconsolidation.

  19. Characterization of the AMPA-activated receptors present on motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Greig, A; Donevan, S D; Mujtaba, T J; Parks, T N; Rao, M S

    2000-01-01

    Motoneurons have been shown to be particularly sensitive to Ca2+-dependent glutamate excitotoxicity, mediated via AMPA receptors (AMPARs). To determine the molecular basis for this susceptibility we have used immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and electrophysiology to profile AMPARs on embryonic day 14.5 rat motoneurons. Motoneurons show detectable AMPAR-mediated calcium permeability in vitro and in vivo as determined by cobalt uptake and electrophysiology. Motoneurons express all four AMPAR subunit mRNAs, with glutamate receptor (GluR) 2 being the most abundant (63.9+/-4.8%). GluR2 is present almost exclusively in the edited form, and electrophysiology confirms that most AMPARs present are calcium-impermeant. However, the kainate current in motoneurons was blocked an average of 32.0% by Joro spider toxin, indicating that a subset of the AM PARs is Ca2+-permeable. Therefore, heterogeneity of AMPARs, rather than the absence of GluR2 or the presence of unedited GluR2, explains AMPAR-mediated Ca2+ permeability. The relative levels of flip/flop isoforms of each subunit were also examined by semiquantitative PCR. Both isoforms were present, but the relative proportion varied for each subunit, and the flip isoform predominated. Thus, our data show that despite high levels of edited GluR2 mRNA, some AMPARs are Ca2+-permeable, and this subset of AMPARs can account for the AMPAR-mediated Ca2+ inflow inferred from cobalt uptake and electrophysiology studies.

  20. Contextual learning requires synaptic AMPA receptor delivery in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Mitsushima, Dai; Ishihara, Kouji; Sano, Akane; Kessels, Helmut W.; Takahashi, Takuya

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampus plays a central role in learning and memory. Although synaptic delivery of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) contributes to experience-dependent synaptic strengthening, its role in hippocampus-dependent learning remains elusive. By combining viral-mediated in vivo gene delivery with in vitro patch-clamp recordings, we found that the inhibitory avoidance task, a hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-learning paradigm, delivered GluR1-containing AMPARs into CA3-CA1 synapses of the dorsal hippocampus. To block the synaptic delivery of endogenous AMPARs, we expressed a fragment of the GluR1-cytoplasmic tail (the 14-aa GluR1 membrane-proximal region with two serines mutated to phospho-mimicking aspartates: MPR-DD). MPR-DD prevented learning-driven synaptic AMPAR delivery in CA1 neurons. Bilateral expression of MPR-DD in the CA1 region of the rat impaired inhibitory avoidance learning, indicating that synaptic GluR1 trafficking in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is required for encoding contextual fear memories. The fraction of CA1 neurons that underwent synaptic strengthening positively correlated with the performance in the inhibitory avoidance fear memory task. These data suggest that the robustness of a contextual memory depends on the number of hippocampal neurons that participate in the encoding of a memory trace. PMID:21746893

  1. Contextual learning requires synaptic AMPA receptor delivery in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mitsushima, Dai; Ishihara, Kouji; Sano, Akane; Kessels, Helmut W; Takahashi, Takuya

    2011-07-26

    The hippocampus plays a central role in learning and memory. Although synaptic delivery of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) contributes to experience-dependent synaptic strengthening, its role in hippocampus-dependent learning remains elusive. By combining viral-mediated in vivo gene delivery with in vitro patch-clamp recordings, we found that the inhibitory avoidance task, a hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-learning paradigm, delivered GluR1-containing AMPARs into CA3-CA1 synapses of the dorsal hippocampus. To block the synaptic delivery of endogenous AMPARs, we expressed a fragment of the GluR1-cytoplasmic tail (the 14-aa GluR1 membrane-proximal region with two serines mutated to phospho-mimicking aspartates: MPR-DD). MPR-DD prevented learning-driven synaptic AMPAR delivery in CA1 neurons. Bilateral expression of MPR-DD in the CA1 region of the rat impaired inhibitory avoidance learning, indicating that synaptic GluR1 trafficking in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is required for encoding contextual fear memories. The fraction of CA1 neurons that underwent synaptic strengthening positively correlated with the performance in the inhibitory avoidance fear memory task. These data suggest that the robustness of a contextual memory depends on the number of hippocampal neurons that participate in the encoding of a memory trace.

  2. PACSIN1 regulates the dynamics of AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Fang, Huaqiang; Jang, Se Eun; Anggono, Victor

    2016-08-04

    Dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. We previously reported that the protein kinase C and casein kinase II substrate in neurons (PACSIN) forms a complex with AMPARs through its interaction with the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) to regulate NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-induced AMPAR endocytosis and cerebellar long-term depression. However, the molecular mechanism by which PACSIN regulates the dynamics of AMPAR trafficking remains unclear. Using a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein, pHluorin, tagged to the extracellular domain of the GluA2 subunit of AMPARs, we demonstrate dual roles for PACSIN1 in controlling the internalization and recycling of GluA2 after NMDAR activation. Structure and function analysis reveals a requirement for the PACSIN1 F-BAR and SH3 domains in controlling these NMDAR-dependent processes. Interestingly, the variable region, which binds to PICK1, is not essential for NMDAR-dependent GluA2 internalization and is required only for the correct recycling of AMPARs. These results indicate that PACSIN is a versatile membrane deformation protein that links the endocytic and recycling machineries essential for dynamic AMPAR trafficking in neurons.

  3. PACSIN1 regulates the dynamics of AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Fang, Huaqiang; Jang, Se Eun; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. We previously reported that the protein kinase C and casein kinase II substrate in neurons (PACSIN) forms a complex with AMPARs through its interaction with the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) to regulate NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-induced AMPAR endocytosis and cerebellar long-term depression. However, the molecular mechanism by which PACSIN regulates the dynamics of AMPAR trafficking remains unclear. Using a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein, pHluorin, tagged to the extracellular domain of the GluA2 subunit of AMPARs, we demonstrate dual roles for PACSIN1 in controlling the internalization and recycling of GluA2 after NMDAR activation. Structure and function analysis reveals a requirement for the PACSIN1 F-BAR and SH3 domains in controlling these NMDAR-dependent processes. Interestingly, the variable region, which binds to PICK1, is not essential for NMDAR-dependent GluA2 internalization and is required only for the correct recycling of AMPARs. These results indicate that PACSIN is a versatile membrane deformation protein that links the endocytic and recycling machineries essential for dynamic AMPAR trafficking in neurons. PMID:27488904

  4. Unified quantitative model of AMPA receptor trafficking at synapses.

    PubMed

    Czöndör, Katalin; Mondin, Magali; Garcia, Mikael; Heine, Martin; Frischknecht, Renato; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Thoumine, Olivier R

    2012-02-28

    Trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) plays a key role in synaptic transmission. However, a general framework integrating the two major mechanisms regulating AMPAR delivery at postsynapses (i.e., surface diffusion and internal recycling) is lacking. To this aim, we built a model based on numerical trajectories of individual AMPARs, including free diffusion in the extrasynaptic space, confinement in the synapse, and trapping at the postsynaptic density (PSD) through reversible interactions with scaffold proteins. The AMPAR/scaffold kinetic rates were adjusted by comparing computer simulations to single-particle tracking and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments in primary neurons, in different conditions of synapse density and maturation. The model predicts that the steady-state AMPAR number at synapses is bidirectionally controlled by AMPAR/scaffold binding affinity and PSD size. To reveal the impact of recycling processes in basal conditions and upon synaptic potentiation or depression, spatially and temporally defined exocytic and endocytic events were introduced. The model predicts that local recycling of AMPARs close to the PSD, coupled to short-range surface diffusion, provides rapid control of AMPAR number at synapses. In contrast, because of long-range diffusion limitations, extrasynaptic recycling is intrinsically slower and less synapse-specific. Thus, by discriminating the relative contributions of AMPAR diffusion, trapping, and recycling events on spatial and temporal bases, this model provides unique insights on the dynamic regulation of synaptic strength.

  5. Cornichon proteins determine the subunit composition of synaptic AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Herring, Bruce E; Shi, Yun; Suh, Young Ho; Zheng, Chan-Ying; Blankenship, Sabine M; Roche, Katherine W; Nicoll, Roger A

    2013-03-20

    Cornichon-2 and cornichon-3 (CNIH-2/-3) are AMPA receptor (AMPAR) binding proteins that promote receptor trafficking and markedly slow AMPAR deactivation in heterologous cells, but their role in neurons is unclear. Using CNIH-2 and CNIH-3 conditional knockout mice, we find a profound reduction of AMPAR synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. This deficit is due to the selective loss of surface GluA1-containing AMPARs (GluA1A2 heteromers), leaving a small residual pool of synaptic GluA2A3 heteromers. The kinetics of AMPARs in neurons lacking CNIH-2/-3 are faster than those in WT neurons due to the fast kinetics of GluA2A3 heteromers. The remarkably selective effect of CNIHs on the GluA1 subunit is probably mediated by TARP γ-8, which prevents a functional association of CNIHs with non-GluA1 subunits. These results point to a sophisticated interplay between CNIHs and γ-8 that dictates subunit-specific AMPAR trafficking and the strength and kinetics of synaptic AMPAR-mediated transmission.

  6. Molecular Mechanism of AMPA Receptor Modulation by TARP/Stargazin.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yaacov, Anat; Gillor, Moshe; Haham, Tomer; Parsai, Alon; Qneibi, Mohammad; Stern-Bach, Yael

    2017-03-08

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) mediate the majority of fast excitatory transmission in the brain and critically contribute to synaptic plasticity and pathology. AMPAR trafficking and gating are tightly controlled by auxiliary transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). Here, using systematic domain swaps with the TARP-insensitive kainate receptor GluK2, we show that AMPAR interaction with the prototypical TARP stargazin/γ2 primarily involves the AMPAR membrane domains M1 and M4 of neighboring subunits, initiated or stabilized by the AMPAR C-tail, and that these interactions are sufficient to enable full receptor modulation. Moreover, employing TARP chimeras disclosed a key role in this process also for the TARP transmembrane domains TM3 and TM4 and extracellular loop 2. Mechanistically, our data support a two-step action in which binding of TARP to the AMPAR membrane domains destabilizes the channel closed state, thereby enabling an efficient opening upon agonist binding, which then stabilizes the open state via subsequent interactions.

  7. AMPA receptor exchange underlies transient memory destabilization on retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ingie; Kim, Jeongyeon; Kim, Jihye; Lee, Sukwon; Ko, Hyoung-Gon; Nader, Karim; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Tsien, Richard W.; Choi, Sukwoo

    2013-01-01

    A consolidated memory can be transiently destabilized by memory retrieval, after which memories are reconsolidated within a few hours; however, the molecular substrates underlying this destabilization process remain essentially unknown. Here we show that at lateral amygdala synapses, fear memory consolidation correlates with increased surface expression of calcium-impermeable AMPA receptors (CI-AMPARs), which are known to be more stable at the synapse, whereas memory retrieval induces an abrupt exchange of CI-AMPARs to calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs), which are known to be less stable at the synapse. We found that blockade of either CI-AMPAR endocytosis or NMDA receptor activity during memory retrieval, both of which blocked the exchange to CP-AMPARs, prevented memory destabilization, indicating that this transient exchange of AMPARs may underlie the transformation of a stable memory into an unstable memory. These newly inserted CP-AMPARs gradually exchanged back to CI-AMPARs within hours, which coincided with the course of reconsolidation. Furthermore, blocking the activity of these newly inserted CP-AMPARs after retrieval impaired reconsolidation, suggesting that they serve as synaptic “tags” that support synapse-specific reconsolidation. Taken together, our results reveal unexpected physiological roles of CI-AMPARs and CP-AMPARs in transforming a consolidated memory into an unstable memory and subsequently guiding reconsolidation. PMID:23630279

  8. Pathogenic Mechanism of an Autism-Associated Neuroligin Mutation Involves Altered AMPA-Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Soham; Aoto, Jason; Lee, Sung-Jin; Wernig, Marius; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that bind to presynaptic neurexins. Although the general synaptic role of neuroligins is undisputed, their specific functions at a synapse remain unclear, even controversial. Moreover, many neuroligin gene mutations were associated with autism, but the pathophysiological relevance of these mutations is often unknown, and their mechanisms of action uninvestigated. Here, we examine the synaptic effects of an autism-associated neuroligin-4 substitution (called R704C) which mutates a cytoplasmic arginine residue that is conserved in all neuroligins. We show that the R704C mutation, when introduced into neuroligin-3, enhances the interaction between neuroligin-3 and AMPA-receptors, increases AMPA-receptor internalization, and decreases postsynaptic AMPA-receptor levels. When introduced into neuroligin-4, conversely, the R704C mutation unexpectedly elevated AMPA-receptor mediated synaptic responses. These results suggest a general functional link between neuroligins and AMPA-receptors, indicate that both neuroligin-3 and -4 act at excitatory synapses but perform surprisingly distinct functions, and demonstrate that the R704C mutation significantly impairs the normal function of neuroligin-4, thereby validating its pathogenicity. PMID:25778475

  9. Transfer of glyphosate and its degradate AMPA to surface waters through urban sewerage systems.

    PubMed

    Botta, Fabrizio; Lavison, Gwenaëlle; Couturier, Guillaume; Alliot, Fabrice; Moreau-Guigon, Elodie; Fauchon, Nils; Guery, Bénédicte; Chevreuil, Marc; Blanchoud, Hélène

    2009-09-01

    A study of glyphosate and aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA) transfer in the Orge watershed (France) was carried out during 2007 and 2008. Water samples were collected in surface water, wastewater sewer, storm sewer and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). These two molecules appeared to be the most frequently detected ones in the rivers and usually exceeded the European quality standard concentrations of 0.1microg L(-1) for drinking water. The annual glyphosate estimated load was 1.9 kg year(-1) upstream (agricultural zone) and 179.5 kg year(-1) at the catchment outlet (urban zone). This result suggests that the contamination of this basin by glyphosate is essentially from urban origin (road and railway applications). Glyphosate reached surface water prevalently through storm sewer during rainfall event. Maximum concentrations were detected in storm sewer just after a rainfall event (75-90 microg L(-1)). High concentrations of glyphosate in surface water during rainfall events reflected urban runoff impact. AMPA was always detected in the sewerage system. This molecule reached surface water mainly via WWTP effluent and also through storm sewer. Variations in concentrations of AMPA during hydrological episodes were minor compared to glyphosate variations. Our study highlights that AMPA and glyphosate origins in urban area are different. During dry period, detergent degradation seemed to be the major AMPA source in wastewater.

  10. DNQX-induced toxicity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons: an apparent AMPA receptor-independent effect?

    PubMed

    Martin, Alexandra; Récasens, Max; Guiramand, Janique

    2003-02-01

    To evaluate the involvement of AMPA receptor activation in neuronal cell death and survival, rat hippocampal neurons in culture were treated with AMPA receptor antagonists. A 46 h treatment with 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), added 2 h after cell plating, induces a dose-dependent neurotoxicity. Similar effects are also observed in more mature hippocampal neurons (treatment at 14 days in vitro). DNQX toxic effect is neuron-specific since cultured hippocampal glial cells are unaffected. Attempts to characterise the site of action of DNQX suggest that ionotropic glutamate receptors would not be implicated. Indeed, (i) other AMPA receptor antagonists are either ineffective or only moderately efficient in mimicking DNQX effects; (ii) AMPA alone or in the presence of cyclothiazide, as well as, other AMPA receptor agonists, do not reverse DNQX action; (iii) DNQX neurotoxicity is not likely to involve blockade of NMDA receptor glycine site, since this effect is neither mimicked by 7-chlorokynurenate nor reversed by D-serine. Thus, DNQX toxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons is apparently mediated through an ionotropic glutamate receptor-independent way. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  11. D-Serine and Serine Racemase Are Associated with PSD-95 and Glutamatergic Synapse Stability.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Jacobi, Ariel A; Anderson, Stewart A; Lynch, David R

    2016-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous coagonist at the glycine site of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), synthesized by serine racemase (SR) through conversion of L-serine. It is crucial for synaptic plasticity and is implicated in schizophrenia. Our previous studies demonstrated specific loss of SR, D-serine-responsive synaptic NMDARs, and glutamatergic synapses in cortical neurons lacking α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which promotes glutamatergic synapse formation and maturation during development. We thus hypothesize that D-serine and SR (D-serine/SR) are associated with glutamatergic synaptic development. Using morphological and molecular studies in cortical neuronal cultures, we demonstrate that D-serine/SR are associated with PSD-95 and NMDARs in postsynaptic neurons and with glutamatergic synapse stability during synaptic development. Endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95, but not presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), in glutamatergic synapses of cultured cortical neurons. Low-density astrocytes in cortical neuronal cultures lack SR expression but contain enriched D-serine in large vesicle-like structures, suggesting possible synthesis of D-serine in postsynaptic neurons and storage in astrocytes. More interestingly, endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95 in the postsynaptic terminals of glutamatergic synapses during early and late synaptic development, implicating involvement of D-serine/SR in glutamatergic synaptic development. Exogenous application of D-serine enhances the interactions of SR with PSD-95 and NR1, and increases the number of VGLUT1- and PSD-95-positive glutamatergic synapses, suggesting that exogenous D-serine enhances postsynaptic SR/PSD-95 signaling and stabilizes glutamatergic synapses during cortical synaptic development. This is blocked by NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-CK), a specific antagonist at the glycine site of NMDARs, demonstrating

  12. D-Serine and Serine Racemase Are Associated with PSD-95 and Glutamatergic Synapse Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; Jacobi, Ariel A.; Anderson, Stewart A.; Lynch, David R.

    2016-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous coagonist at the glycine site of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), synthesized by serine racemase (SR) through conversion of L-serine. It is crucial for synaptic plasticity and is implicated in schizophrenia. Our previous studies demonstrated specific loss of SR, D-serine-responsive synaptic NMDARs, and glutamatergic synapses in cortical neurons lacking α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which promotes glutamatergic synapse formation and maturation during development. We thus hypothesize that D-serine and SR (D-serine/SR) are associated with glutamatergic synaptic development. Using morphological and molecular studies in cortical neuronal cultures, we demonstrate that D-serine/SR are associated with PSD-95 and NMDARs in postsynaptic neurons and with glutamatergic synapse stability during synaptic development. Endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95, but not presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), in glutamatergic synapses of cultured cortical neurons. Low-density astrocytes in cortical neuronal cultures lack SR expression but contain enriched D-serine in large vesicle-like structures, suggesting possible synthesis of D-serine in postsynaptic neurons and storage in astrocytes. More interestingly, endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95 in the postsynaptic terminals of glutamatergic synapses during early and late synaptic development, implicating involvement of D-serine/SR in glutamatergic synaptic development. Exogenous application of D-serine enhances the interactions of SR with PSD-95 and NR1, and increases the number of VGLUT1- and PSD-95-positive glutamatergic synapses, suggesting that exogenous D-serine enhances postsynaptic SR/PSD-95 signaling and stabilizes glutamatergic synapses during cortical synaptic development. This is blocked by NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-CK), a specific antagonist at the glycine site of NMDARs, demonstrating

  13. GSG1L suppresses AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and uniquely modulates AMPA receptor kinetics in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinglong; Mao, Xia; Lussier, Marc P.; Hutchison, Mary Anne; Zhou, Liang; Hamra, F. Kent; Roche, Katherine W.; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated synaptic transmission is a key mechanism for synaptic plasticity. In the brain, AMPARs assemble with a number of auxiliary subunits, including TARPs, CNIHs and CKAMP44, which are important for AMPAR forward trafficking to synapses. Here we report that the membrane protein GSG1L negatively regulates AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission. Overexpression of GSG1L strongly suppresses, and GSG1L knockout (KO) enhances, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission. GSG1L-dependent regulation of AMPAR synaptic transmission relies on the first extracellular loop domain and its carboxyl-terminus. GSG1L also speeds up AMPAR deactivation and desensitization in hippocampal CA1 neurons, in contrast to the effects of TARPs and CNIHs. Furthermore, GSG1L association with AMPARs inhibits CNIH2-induced slowing of the receptors in heterologous cells. Finally, GSG1L KO rats have deficits in LTP and show behavioural abnormalities in object recognition tests. These data demonstrate that GSG1L represents a new class of auxiliary subunit with distinct functional properties for AMPARs. PMID:26932439

  14. Acute ethanol suppresses glutamatergic neurotransmission through endocannabinoids in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature post-synaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on pre-synaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of post-synaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities.

  15. Glutamatergic Neurotransmission Links Sensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics with Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Zimin, Pavel I; Woods, Christian B; Quintana, Albert; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Morgan, Philip G; Sedensky, Margaret M

    2016-08-22

    An enigma of modern medicine has persisted for over 150 years. The mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics (VAs) produce their effects (loss of consciousness, analgesia, amnesia, and immobility) remain an unsolved mystery. Many attractive putative molecular targets have failed to produce a significant effect when genetically tested in whole-animal models [1-3]. However, mitochondrial defects increase VA sensitivity in diverse organisms from nematodes to humans [4-6]. Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mice lack a subunit of mitochondrial complex I and are strikingly hypersensitive to VAs yet resistant to the intravenous anesthetic ketamine [7]. The change in VA sensitivity is the largest reported for a mammal. Limiting NDUFS4 loss to a subset of glutamatergic neurons recapitulates the VA hypersensitivity of Ndufs4(KO) mice, while loss in GABAergic or cholinergic neurons does not. Baseline electrophysiologic function of CA1 pyramidal neurons does not differ between Ndufs4(KO) and control mice. Isoflurane concentrations that anesthetize only Ndufs4(KO) mice (0.6%) decreased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) only in Ndufs4(KO) CA1 neurons, while concentrations effective in control mice (1.2%) decreased sEPSC frequencies in both control and Ndufs4(KO) CA1 pyramidal cells. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) were not differentially affected between genotypes. The effects of isoflurane were similar on evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and paired pulse facilitation (PPF) in KO and control hippocampal slices. We propose that CA1 presynaptic excitatory neurotransmission is hypersensitive to isoflurane in Ndufs4(KO) mice due to the inhibition of pre-existing reduced complex I function, reaching a critical reduction that can no longer meet metabolic demands.

  16. Mechanism-based design of 2,3-benzodiazepine inhibitors for AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li

    2015-01-01

    2,3-Benzodiazepine (2,3-BDZ) compounds represent a group of structurally diverse, small-molecule antagonists of (R, S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. Antagonists of AMPA receptors are drug candidates for potential treatment of a number of neurological disorders such as epilepsy, stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). How to make better inhibitors, such as 2,3-BDZs, has been an enduring quest in drug discovery. Among a few available tools to address this specific question for making better 2,3-BDZs, perhaps the best one is to use mechanistic clues from studies of the existing antagonists to design and discover more selective and more potent antagonists. Here I review recent work in this area, and propose some ideas in the continuing effort of developing newer 2,3-BDZs for tighter control of AMPA receptor activities in vivo. PMID:26713266

  17. Screening for AMPA receptor auxiliary subunit specific modulators

    PubMed Central

    Azumaya, Caleigh M.; Days, Emily L.; Vinson, Paige N.; Stauffer, Shaun; Sulikowski, Gary; Weaver, C. David; Nakagawa, Terunaga

    2017-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPAR) are ligand gated ion channels critical for synaptic transmission and plasticity. Their dysfunction is implicated in a variety of psychiatric and neurological diseases ranging from major depressive disorder to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Attempting to potentiate or depress AMPAR activity is an inherently difficult balancing act between effective treatments and debilitating side effects. A newly explored strategy to target subsets of AMPARs in the central nervous system is to identify compounds that affect specific AMPAR-auxiliary subunit complexes. This exploits diverse spatio-temporal expression patterns of known AMPAR auxiliary subunits, providing means for designing brain region-selective compounds. Here we report a high-throughput screening-based pipeline that can identify compounds that are selective for GluA2-CNIH3 and GluA2-stargazin complexes. These compounds will help us build upon the growing library of AMPAR-auxiliary subunit specific inhibitors, which have thus far all been targeted to TARP γ-8. We used a cell-based assay combined with a voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) to identify changes in glutamate-gated cation flow across the membranes of HEK cells co-expressing GluA2 and an auxiliary subunit. We then used a calcium flux assay to further validate hits picked from the VSD assay. VU0612951 and VU0627849 are candidate compounds from the initial screen that were identified as negative and positive allosteric modulators (NAM and PAM), respectively. They both have lower IC50/EC50s on complexes containing stargazin and CNIH3 than GSG1L or the AMPAR alone. We have also identified a candidate compound, VU0539491, that has NAM activity in GluA2(R)-CNIH3 and GluA2(Q) complexes and PAM activity in GluA2(Q)-GSG1L complexes. PMID:28358902

  18. Probing TARP modulation of AMPA receptor conductance with polyamine toxins.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alexander C; Milstein, Aaron D; Soto, David; Farrant, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G; Nicoll, Roger A

    2011-05-18

    The properties of synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) depend on their subunit composition and association with transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). Although both GluA2 incorporation and TARP association have been shown to influence AMPAR channel conductance, the manner in which different TARPs modulate the mean channel conductance of GluA2-containing AMPARs is unknown. Using ultrafast agonist application and nonstationary fluctuation analysis, we found that TARP subtypes differentially increase the mean channel conductance, but not the peak open probability, of recombinant GluA2-containing AMPARs. TARP γ-8, in particular, enhances mean channel conductance to a greater degree than γ-2, γ-3, or γ-4. We then examined the action of a use-dependent antagonist of GluA2-containing AMPARs, philanthotoxin-74 (PhTx-74), on recombinant AMPARs and on GluA2-containing AMPARs in cerebellar granule neurons from stargazer mice transfected with TARPs. We found that the rate and extent of channel block varies with TARP subtype, in a manner that correlates linearly with mean channel conductance. Furthermore, block of GluA2-containing AMPARs by polyamine toxins varied depending on whether channels were activated by the full agonist glutamate or the partial agonist kainate, consistent with conductance state-dependent block. Block of GluA2-lacking AMPARs by PhTx-433 is also modulated by TARP association and is a function of agonist efficacy. Our data indicate that channel block by polyamine toxins is sensitive to the mean channel conductance of AMPARs, which varies with TARP subtype and agonist efficacy. Furthermore, our results illustrate the utility of polyamine toxins as sensitive probes of AMPAR channel conductance and suggest the possibility that TARPs may influence their channel properties by selectively stabilizing specific channel conformations, rather than altering the pore structure.

  19. AMPA GluA1-flip targeted oligonucleotide therapy reduces neonatal seizures and hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Lykens, Nicole M.; Reddi, Jyoti M.

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate-activated α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPA-Rs) mediate the majority of excitatory neurotransmission in brain and thus are major drug targets for diseases associated with hyperexcitability or neurotoxicity. Due to the critical nature of AMPA-Rs in normal brain function, typical AMPA-R antagonists have deleterious effects on cognition and motor function, highlighting the need for more precise modulators. A dramatic increase in the flip isoform of alternatively spliced AMPA-R GluA1 subunits occurs post-seizure in humans and animal models. GluA1-flip produces higher gain AMPA channels than GluA1-flop, increasing network excitability and seizure susceptibility. Splice modulating oligonucleotides (SMOs) bind to pre-mRNA to influence alternative splicing, a strategy that can be exploited to develop more selective drugs across therapeutic areas. We developed a novel SMO, GR1, which potently and specifically decreased GluA1-flip expression throughout the brain of neonatal mice lasting at least 60 days after single intracerebroventricular injection. GR1 treatment reduced AMPA-R mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents at hippocampal CA1 synapses, without affecting long-term potentiation or long-term depression, cellular models of memory, or impairing GluA1-dependent cognition or motor function in mice. Importantly, GR1 demonstrated anti-seizure properties and reduced post-seizure hyperexcitability in neonatal mice, highlighting its drug candidate potential for treating epilepsies and other neurological diseases involving network hyperexcitability. PMID:28178321

  20. AMPA GluA1-flip targeted oligonucleotide therapy reduces neonatal seizures and hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Lykens, Nicole M; Coughlin, David J; Reddi, Jyoti M; Lutz, Gordon J; Tallent, Melanie K

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate-activated α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPA-Rs) mediate the majority of excitatory neurotransmission in brain and thus are major drug targets for diseases associated with hyperexcitability or neurotoxicity. Due to the critical nature of AMPA-Rs in normal brain function, typical AMPA-R antagonists have deleterious effects on cognition and motor function, highlighting the need for more precise modulators. A dramatic increase in the flip isoform of alternatively spliced AMPA-R GluA1 subunits occurs post-seizure in humans and animal models. GluA1-flip produces higher gain AMPA channels than GluA1-flop, increasing network excitability and seizure susceptibility. Splice modulating oligonucleotides (SMOs) bind to pre-mRNA to influence alternative splicing, a strategy that can be exploited to develop more selective drugs across therapeutic areas. We developed a novel SMO, GR1, which potently and specifically decreased GluA1-flip expression throughout the brain of neonatal mice lasting at least 60 days after single intracerebroventricular injection. GR1 treatment reduced AMPA-R mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents at hippocampal CA1 synapses, without affecting long-term potentiation or long-term depression, cellular models of memory, or impairing GluA1-dependent cognition or motor function in mice. Importantly, GR1 demonstrated anti-seizure properties and reduced post-seizure hyperexcitability in neonatal mice, highlighting its drug candidate potential for treating epilepsies and other neurological diseases involving network hyperexcitability.

  1. Exacerbation of NMDA, AMPA, and L-glutamate excitotoxicity by the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate.

    PubMed

    Greene, J G; Greenamyre, J T

    1995-05-01

    We report that a subtoxic dose of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) inhibitor malonate greatly enhances the neurotoxicity of three different excitatory amino acid agonists: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), S-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (S-AMPA), and L-glutamate. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, intrastriatal stereotaxic injection of malonate alone (0.6 mumol), NMDA alone (15 nmol), S-AMPA alone (1 nmol), or glutamate alone (0.6 mumol) produced negligible toxicity as assessed by measurement of lesion volume. Coinjection of subtoxic malonate with NMDA produced a large lesion (15.2 +/- 1.4 mm3), as did coinjection of malonate with S-AMPA (11.0 +/- 1.0 mm3) or glutamate (12.8 +/- 0.7 mm3). Administration of the noncompetitive NMDA antagonist MK-801 (5 mg/kg i.p.) completely blocked the toxicity of malonate plus NMDA (0.5 +/- 0.3 mm3). This dose of MK-801 had little effect on the lesion produced by malonate plus S-AMPA (9.0 +/- 0.7 mm3), but it attenuated the toxicity of malonate plus glutamate by approximately 40% (7.5 +/- 0.9 mm3). Coinjection of the AMPA antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo(f)-quinoxaline (NBQX; 2 nmol) had no effect on malonate plus NMDA or malonate plus glutamate toxicity (12.3 +/- 1.8 and 14.0 +/- 0.9 mm3, respectively) but greatly attenuated malonate plus S-AMPA toxicity (1.5 +/- 0.9 mm3). Combination of the two antagonists conferred no additional neuroprotection in any paradigm. These results indicate that metabolic inhibition exacerbates both NMDA receptor- and non-NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Glyphosate and AMPA passive sampling in freshwater using a microporous polyethylene diffusion sampler.

    PubMed

    Fauvelle, Vincent; Montero, Natalia; Mueller, Jochen F; Banks, Andrew; Mazzella, Nicolas; Kaserzon, Sarit L

    2017-12-01

    Glyphosate (PMG) is one of the most widely used herbicides with a reported 8.6 million tons applied globally in 2016. Due to widespread use and limited understanding of long-term environmental impacts, it is expected that future monitoring requirements for PMG and its primary metabolite aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA) in aquatic environments will increase, along with the need for low cost monitoring and risk assessment strategies. The aim of this study was to investigate a microporous polyethylene tube (MPT; 2-mm thickness, 17.6 cm(2) surface area, 35% porosity, 2.5 μm pore size) as a diffusive layer for the passive sampling of PMG and AMPA. Levels of PMG and AMPA sorbed to MPT were low (Kmw close to 1 mL g(-1)), validating MPT as a diffusive layer. Uptake experiments were conducted first under controlled laboratory conditions (pH = 6.8, 6 days), followed by an in situ freshwater lake system deployment (pH = 7.3, 11 days). PMG and AMPA accumulated linearly (slope relative standard deviation < 6%) under laboratory conditions with sampling rates (Rs) of 18 and 25 mL d(-1), respectively. PMG in situ Rs was 28 mL d(-1), and was not different from the one found in the laboratory. AMPA was below the limit of quantification (LOQ, 1 ng mL(-1)) in grab water samples, but was detected (>LOQ) in all passive samplers. Results illustrate the gain in sensitivity provided by the passive sampling technique, and the applicability of the device developed for the passive sampling of PMG and AMPA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Involvement of prefrontal AMPA receptors in encounter stimulation-induced hyperactivity in isolation-reared mice.

    PubMed

    Araki, Ryota; Ago, Yukio; Hasebe, Shigeru; Nishiyama, Saki; Tanaka, Tatsunori; Oka, Satoshi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2014-06-01

    We recently showed that social encounter stimulation induces hyperactivity in mice reared in social isolation from early life and this is associated with the transient activation of prefrontal dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. In the present study, we examined the effect of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist 2, 3-dioxo-6-nitro-1, 2, 3, 4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX) on encounter-induced behavioural and neurochemical changes to study the role of the receptor in abnormal behaviours in isolation-reared mice. The encounter to an intruder mouse induced hyperactivity with transient increases in prefrontal dopamine and serotonin levels in isolation-reared mice. NBQX attenuated the encounter-induced hyperactivity and the associated neurochemical changes in isolation-reared mice. In addition, NBQX reduced aggressive behaviour and cognitive impairment in isolation-reared mice, but did not affect depressive-like behaviour or spontaneous hyper-locomotion in these animals. The AMPA receptor agonist (S)-AMPA increased prefrontal dopamine and serotonin release, and this effect was higher in isolation-reared mice than in the group-reared mice, suggesting higher prefrontal AMPA receptor activity in isolation-reared mice. Furthermore, isolation rearing increased the expression of AMPA receptor subunits (GluR1, GluR2 and GluR3) and GluR1 Ser845 phosphorylation in the prefrontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus or nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results suggest that an increase in AMPA receptor activity in the prefrontal cortex contributes to some, but not all, abnormal behaviours in isolation-reared mice.

  4. The Fate and Transport of Glyphosate and its Degradation Product, Aminomethylphosphonic Acid (AMPA), in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scribner, E.; Meyer, M. T.

    2006-05-01

    Since 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has investigated the fate and transport of glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), in surface water, and more recently in tile-drain flow, soil, and wet deposition. According to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sources, glyphosate is among the world's most widely used herbicides. In 2004, glyphosate usage estimates indicated that between 103 and 113 million pounds were applied annually to crops in the United States. The use of glyphosate over a wide geographic area suggests that this herbicide might be a potential concern for air, water, and soil quality as well as measured in high concentrations in streams; therefore, it is important to monitor its fate and transport in ground-water/surface-water systems. National, regional, and field-scale studies conducted by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment and Toxic Substance Hydrology Programs have studied the fate and transport of glyphosate in overland flow, tile- drain flow, surface water, soil, and wet-deposition samples. The samples were analyzed for glyphosate and AMPA by using derivatization and online solid-phase extraction with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and LC/MS/MS methods developed by the USGS Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas. During spring, summer, and fall 2002 runoff periods in 50 Midwestern streams, glyphosate was detected at or above the 0.10 micrograms per liter detection limit in 35, 41, and 31 percent of samples, respectively. AMPA was detected in 53, 82, and 75 percent of samples, respectively. Results of 128 samples from a field study showed that glyphosate was transported as a narrow high- concentration pulse during the first period of runoff after application and that the concentration of glyphosate in runoff was greater than the concentration of AMPA. In tile-drain flow, glyphosate and AMPA were transported in a broad low-concentration pulse during these same

  5. Gephyrin expression and clustering affects the size of glutamatergic synaptic contacts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wendou; De Blas, Angel L.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that disrupting the expression and postsynaptic clustering of gephyrin in cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells, by either gephyrin RNAi (RNA interference) or overexpression of a dominant negative gephyrin-EGFP fusion protein, leads to decreased number of postsynaptic gephyrin and GABAA receptor clusters and to reduced GABAergic innervation of these cells. On the other hand, increasing gephyrin expression led to a small increase in the number of gephyrin and GABAA receptor clusters and to little or no effect on GABAergic innervation. We are now reporting that altering gephyrin expression and clustering affects the size but not the density of glutamatergic synaptic contacts. Knocking down gephyrin with gephyrin RNAi, or preventing gephyrin clustering by overexpression of the dominant negative gephyrin-EGFP fusion protein, leads to larger postsynaptic PSD-95 clusters and larger presynaptic glutamatergic terminals. On the other hand, overexpression of gephyrin leads to slightly smaller PSD-95 clusters and presynaptic glutamatergic terminals. The change in size of PSD-95 clusters were accompanied by a parallel change in the size of NR2-NMDA receptor clusters. It is concluded that the levels of expression and clustering of gephyrin, a protein that concentrates at the postsynaptic complex of the inhibitory synapses, not only has homotypic effects on GABAergic synaptic contacts, but also has heterotypic effects on glutamatergic synaptic contacts. We are proposing that gephyrin is a counterpart of the postsynaptic glutamatergic scaffold protein PSD-95 in regulating the number and/or size of the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic contacts. PMID:18199120

  6. Divergent Modulation of Nociception by Glutamatergic and GABAergic Neuronal Subpopulations in the Periaqueductal Gray

    PubMed Central

    Grajales-Reyes, Jose G.; Copits, Bryan A.; O’Brien, Daniel E.; Trigg, Sarah L.; Gomez, Adrian M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) constitutes a major descending pain modulatory system and is a crucial site for opioid-induced analgesia. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that glutamate and GABA play critical opposing roles in nociceptive processing in the vlPAG. It has been suggested that glutamatergic neurotransmission exerts antinociceptive effects, whereas GABAergic neurotransmission exert pronociceptive effects on pain transmission, through descending pathways. The inability to exclusively manipulate subpopulations of neurons in the PAG has prevented direct testing of this hypothesis. Here, we demonstrate the different contributions of genetically defined glutamatergic and GABAergic vlPAG neurons in nociceptive processing by employing cell type-specific chemogenetic approaches in mice. Global chemogenetic manipulation of vlPAG neuronal activity suggests that vlPAG neural circuits exert tonic suppression of nociception, consistent with previous pharmacological and electrophysiological studies. However, selective modulation of GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons demonstrates an inverse regulation of nociceptive behaviors by these cell populations. Selective chemogenetic activation of glutamatergic neurons, or inhibition of GABAergic neurons, in vlPAG suppresses nociception. In contrast, inhibition of glutamatergic neurons, or activation of GABAergic neurons, in vlPAG facilitates nociception. Our findings provide direct experimental support for a model in which excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the PAG bidirectionally modulate nociception. PMID:28374016

  7. Interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cognitive and motor impairment in minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Agusti, Ana; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gomez-Gimenez, Belen; Malaguarnera, Michele; Dadsetan, Sherry; Belghiti, Majedeline; Garcia-Garcia, Raquel; Balzano, Tiziano; Taoro, Lucas; Felipo, Vicente

    2015-09-01

    The cognitive and motor alterations in hepatic encephalopathy (HE) are the final result of altered neurotransmission and communication between neurons in neuronal networks and circuits. Different neurotransmitter systems cooperate to modulate cognitive and motor function, with a main role for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in different brain areas and neuronal circuits. There is an interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cognitive and motor impairment in HE. This interplay may occur: (a) in different brain areas involved in specific neuronal circuits; (b) in the same brain area through cross-modulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. We will summarize some examples of the (1) interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in different areas in the basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex circuit in the motor alterations in minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE); (2) interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cerebellum in the impairment of cognitive function in MHE through altered function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway. We will also comment the therapeutic implications of the above studies and the utility of modulators of glutamate and GABA receptors to restore cognitive and motor function in rats with hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy.

  8. Modular control of glutamatergic neuronal identity in C.elegans by distinct homeodomain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Saiz, Esther; Poole, Richard J.; Felton, Terry; Zhang, Feifan; De La Cruz, Estanisla Daniel; Hobert, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The choice of using one of many possible neurotransmitter systems is a critical step in defining the identity of an individual neuron type. We show here that the key defining feature of glutamatergic neurons, the vesicular glutamate transporter EAT-4/VGLUT is expressed in 38 of the 118 anatomically defined neuron classes of the C.elegans nervous system. We show that eat-4/VGLUT expression is controlled in a modular manner, with distinct cis-regulatory modules driving expression in distinct glutamatergic neuron classes. We identify 13 different transcription factors, 11 of them homeodomain proteins, that act in specific combinations in 25 different glutamatergic neuron classes to initiate and maintain eat-4/VGLUT expression. We show that the adoption of a glutamatergic phenotype is linked to the adoption of other terminal identity features of a neuron, including cotransmitter phenotypes. Examination of mouse orthologs of these homeodomain proteins resulted in the identification of mouse LHX1 as a regulator of glutamatergic neurons in the brainstem. PMID:24243022

  9. Morphological changes of glutamatergic synapses in animal models of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Rosa M.; Mathai, Abraham; Smith, Yoland

    2015-01-01

    The striatum and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are the main entry doors for extrinsic inputs to reach the basal ganglia (BG) circuitry. The cerebral cortex, thalamus and brainstem are the key sources of glutamatergic inputs to these nuclei. There is anatomical, functional and neurochemical evidence that glutamatergic neurotransmission is altered in the striatum and STN of animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and that these changes may contribute to aberrant network neuronal activity in the BG-thalamocortical circuitry. Postmortem studies of animal models and PD patients have revealed significant pathology of glutamatergic synapses, dendritic spines and microcircuits in the striatum of parkinsonians. More recent findings have also demonstrated a significant breakdown of the glutamatergic corticosubthalamic system in parkinsonian monkeys. In this review, we will discuss evidence for synaptic glutamatergic dysfunction and pathology of cortical and thalamic inputs to the striatum and STN in models of PD. The potential functional implication of these alterations on synaptic integration, processing and transmission of extrinsic information through the BG circuits will be considered. Finally, the significance of these pathological changes in the pathophysiology of motor and non-motor symptoms in PD will be examined. PMID:26441550

  10. Autocrine glutamatergic transmission for the regulation of embryonal carcinoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fan; An, Shi-Min; Tang, Ya-Bin; Meng, Shuang; Wang, Cong-Hui; Shen, Ying; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Zhu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate behaves as the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system and recently demonstrates intercellular signaling activities in periphery cancer cells. How the glutamatergic transmission is organized and operated in cancer stem cells remains undefined. We have identified a glutamatergic transmission circuit in embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The circuit is organized and operated in an autocrine mechanism and suppresses the cell proliferation and motility. Biological analyses determined a repertoire of glutamatergic transmission components, glutaminase, vesicular glutamate transporter, glutamate NMDA receptor, and cell membrane excitatory amino-acid transporter, for glutamate biosynthesis, package for secretion, reaction, and reuptake in mouse and human embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The glutamatergic components were also identified in mouse transplanted teratocarcinoma and in human primary teratocarcinoma tissues. Released glutamate acting as the signal was directly quantified by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Genetic and pharmacological abolishment of the endogenously released glutamate-induced tonic activation of the NMDA receptors increased the cell proliferation and motility. The finding suggests that embryonal carcinoma stem cells can be actively regulated by establishing a glutamatergic autocrine/paracrine niche via releasing and responding to the transmitter. PMID:27322683

  11. Coordinated Plasticity between Barrel Cortical Glutamatergic and GABAergic Neurons during Associative Memory

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fenxia; Gao, Zilong; Chen, Pin; Huang, Li; Wang, Dangui; Chen, Na; Wu, Ruixiang; Feng, Jing; Cui, Shan; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Neural plasticity is associated with memory formation. The coordinated refinement and interaction between cortical glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons remain elusive in associative memory, which we examine in a mouse model of associative learning. In the mice that show odorant-induced whisker motion after pairing whisker and odor stimulations, the barrel cortical glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons are recruited to encode the newly learnt odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. These glutamatergic neurons are functionally upregulated, and GABAergic neurons are refined in a homeostatic manner. The mutual innervations between these glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons are upregulated. The analyses by high throughput sequencing show that certain microRNAs related to regulating synapses and neurons are involved in this cross-modal reflex. Thus, the coactivation of the sensory cortices through epigenetic processes recruits their glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons to be the associative memory cells as well as drive their coordinated refinements toward the optimal state for the storage of the associated signals. PMID:28070425

  12. Corticotropin releasing factor and catecholamines enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission in the lateral subdivision of the central amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2013-07-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) plays an important role in many behaviors including anxiety, memory consolidation and cardiovascular responses. While these behaviors can be modulated by corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and catecholamine signaling, the mechanism(s) by which these signals modify CeA glutamatergic neurotransmission remains unclear. Utilizing whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology recordings from neurons in the lateral subdivision of the CeA (CeAL), we show that CRF, dopamine (DA) and the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO) all enhance the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC) without altering sEPSC kinetics, suggesting they increase presynaptic glutamate release. The effect of CRF on sEPSCs was mediated by a combination of CRFR1 and CRFR2 receptors. While previous work from our lab suggests that CRFRs mediate the effect of catecholamines on excitatory transmission in other subregions of the extended amygdala, blockade of CRFRs in the CeAL failed to significantly alter effects of DA and ISO on glutamatergic transmission. These findings suggest that catecholamine and CRF enhancement of glutamatergic transmission onto CeAL neurons occurs via distinct mechanisms. While CRF increased spontaneous glutamate release in the CeAL, CRF caused no significant changes to optogenetically evoked glutamate release in this region. The dissociable effects of CRF on different types of glutamatergic neurotransmission suggest that CRF may specifically regulate spontaneous excitatory transmission.

  13. Pathological glutamatergic neurotransmission in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Ahmad Seif; Gerasch, Sarah; García-García, Isabel; Lampe, Leonie; Pampel, André; Anwander, Alfred; Near, Jamie; Möller, Harald E; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a hereditary, neuropsychiatric movement disorder with reported abnormalities in the neurotransmission of dopamine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Spatially focalized alterations in excitatory, inhibitory and modulatory neurochemical ratios within specific functional subdivisions of the basal ganglia, may lead to the expression of diverse motor and non-motor features as manifested in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Current treatment strategies are often unsatisfactory thus provoking the need for further elucidation of the underlying pathophysiology. In view of (i) the close spatio-temporal synergy exhibited between excitatory, inhibitory and modulatory neurotransmitter systems; (ii) the crucial role played by glutamate (Glu) in tonic/phasic dopaminergic signalling; and (iii) the interdependent metabolic relationship exhibited between Glu and GABA via glutamine (Gln); we postulated that glutamatergic signalling is related to the pathophysiology of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. As such, we examined the neurochemical profile of three cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical regions in 37 well-characterized, drug-free adult patients and 36 age/gender-matched healthy control subjects via magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T. To interrogate the influence of treatment on metabolite concentrations, spectral data were acquired from 15 patients undergoing a 4-week treatment with aripiprazole. Test-retest reliability measurements in 23 controls indicated high repeatability of voxel localization and metabolite quantitation. We report significant reductions in striatal concentrations of Gln, Glu + Gln (Glx) and the Gln:Glu ratio, and thalamic concentrations of Glx in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome in comparison to controls. ON-treatment patients exhibited no significant metabolite differences when compared to controls but significant increases in striatal Glu and Glx, and trends for increases in striatal Gln and thalamic Glx compared to baseline

  14. Glutamatergic plasticity and alcohol dependence-induced alterations in reward, affect and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Elizabeth J; Chandler, L Judson; Trantham-Davidson, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol dependence is characterized by a reduction in reward threshold, development of a negative affective state, and significant cognitive impairments. Dependence-induced glutamatergic neuroadaptations in the neurocircuitry mediating reward, affect and cognitive function are thought to underlie the neural mechanism for these alterations. These changes serve to promote increased craving for alcohol and facilitate the development of maladaptive behaviors that promote relapse to alcohol drinking during periods of abstinence. Objective To review the extant literature on the effects of chronic alcohol exposure on glutamatergic neurotransmission and its impact on reward, affect and cognition. Results Evidence from a diverse set of studies demonstrates significant enhancement of glutamatergic activity following chronic alcohol exposure and up-regulation of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptor expression and function is a commonly observed phenomenon that likely reflects activity-dependent adaptive homeostatic plasticity. However, changes in NMDA receptors and additional glutamatergic neuroadaptations are often circuit and cell-type specific. Discussion Dependence-induced alterations in glutamate signaling contribute to many of the symptoms experienced in addicted individuals and can persist well into abstinence. This suggests they play an important role in the development of behaviors that increase the probability for relapse. As our understanding of the complexity of the neurocircuitry involved in the addictive process has advanced, it has become increasingly clear that investigations of cell-type and circuit-specific effects are required to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the glutamatergic adaptations and their functional consequences in alcohol addiction. Conclusion While pharmacological treatments for alcohol dependence and relapse targeting the glutamatergic system have shown great promise in preclinical models, more research is needed to uncover

  15. Involvement of AMPA receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan in mice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linda; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2015-12-15

    Dextromethorphan (DM) is an antitussive with rapid acting antidepressant potential based on pharmacodynamic similarities to ketamine. Building upon our previous finding that DM produces antidepressant-like effects in the mouse forced swim test (FST), the present study aimed to establish the antidepressant-like actions of DM in the tail suspension test (TST), another well-established model predictive of antidepressant efficacy. Additionally, using the TST and FST, we investigated the role of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in the antidepressant-like properties of DM because accumulating evidence suggests that AMPA receptors play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression and may contribute to the efficacy of antidepressant medications, including that of ketamine. We found that DM displays antidepressant-like effects in the TST similar to the conventional and fast acting antidepressants characterized by imipramine and ketamine, respectively. Moreover, decreasing the first-pass metabolism of DM by concomitant administration of quinidine (CYP2D6 inhibitor) potentiated antidepressant-like actions, implying DM itself has antidepressant efficacy. Finally, in both the TST and FST, pretreatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide) significantly attenuated the antidepressant-like behavior elicited by DM. Together, the data show that DM exerts antidepressant-like actions through AMPA receptors, further suggesting DM may act as a safe and effective fast acting antidepressant drug.

  16. mTOR Is Essential for Corticosteroid Effects on Hippocampal AMPA Receptor Function and Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiong, Hui; Casse, Frédéric; Zhou, Yang; Zhou, Ming; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Joëls, Marian; Martin, Stéphane; Krugers, Harm J.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones, via activation of their receptors, promote memory consolidation, but the exact underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We examined how corticosterone regulates AMPA receptors (AMPARs), which are crucial for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Combining a live imaging fluorescent recovery after photobleaching approach…

  17. Structural Determinants of the γ-8 TARP Dependent AMPA Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew R; Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Schober, Douglas A; Wright, Rebecca A; Wang, He; Qian, Yuewei; Witkin, Jeffrey M; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Kato, Akihiko S

    2017-09-05

    The forebrain specific AMPA receptor antagonist, LY3130481/CERC-611, which selectively antagonizes the AMPA receptors associated with TARP γ-8, an auxiliary subunit enriched in the forebrain, has potent antiepileptic activities without motor side effects. We designated the compounds with such activities as γ-8 TARP dependent AMPA receptor antagonists (γ-8 TDAAs). In this work, we further investigated the mechanisms of action using a radiolabeled γ-8 TDAA and ternary structural modeling with mutational validations to characterize the LY3130481 binding to γ-8. The radioligand binding to the cells heterologously expressing GluA1 and/or γ-8 revealed that γ-8 TDAAs binds to γ-8 alone without AMPA receptors. Homology modeling of γ-8, based on the crystal structures of a distant TARP homologue, murine claudin 19, in conjunction with knowledge of two γ-8 residues previously identified as critical for the LY3130481 TARP-dependent selectivity provided the basis for a binding mode prediction. This allowed further rational mutational studies for characterization of the structural determinants in TARP γ-8 for LY3130481 activities, both thermodynamically as well as kinetically.

  18. Peripheral AMPA receptors contribute to muscle nociception and c-fos activation

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Yang-Hyun; Frank, Dorie; Lee, Jong-Seok; Zhang, Youping; Auh, Q-Schick; Ro, Jin Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, involvement of peripheral AMPA receptors in mediating craniofacial muscle pain was investigated. AMPA receptor subunits, GluR1 and GluR2, were predominantly expressed in small to medium size neurons but more GluR2 positive labeling were encountered in trigeminal ganglia (TG) of male Sprague Dawley rats. A greater prevalence of GluR2 is reflected by the significantly higher percentage of GluR2 than GluR1 positive masseter afferents. Nocifensive behavior and c-fos immunoreactivity were assessed from the same animals that received intramuscular mustard oil (MO) with or without NBQX, a potent AMPA/KA receptor antagonist. Masseteric MO produced nocifensive hindpaw shaking responses that peaked in the first 30 seconds and gradually diminished over a few minutes. There was a significant difference in both peak and overall MO-induced nocifensive responses between NBQX and vehicle pre-treated rats. Subsequent Fos studies also showed that peripheral NBQX pre-treatment effectively reduced the MO-induced neuronal activation in the subnucleus caudalis of the trigeminal nerve (Vc). These combined results provide compelling evidence that acute muscle nociception is mediated, in part, by peripherally located AMPA/KA receptors, and that blockade of multiple peripheral glutamate receptor subtypes may provide a more effective means of reducing muscular pain and central neuronal activation. PMID:18655811

  19. URBAN CONTRIBUTIONS OF GLYSPHOSATE AND ITS DEGRADATE AMPA TO STREAMS IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world, being routinely applied to control weeds in both agricultural and urban settings. Microbial degradation of glyphosate produces aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). The high polarity and water-solubility of glyphosate and A...

  20. A profile of the behavioral changes produced by facilitation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Davis, C M; Moskovitz, B; Nguyen, M A; Tran, B B; Arai, A; Lynch, G; Granger, R

    1997-09-01

    A newly developed group of benzoylpiperidine drugs that enhance AMPA-receptor-gated currents ("ampakines") has been shown to improve memory encoding in rats across a variety of experimental paradigms. The present experiments were intended to i) provide a partial profile of the behavioral changes produced by ampakines, ii) test if two ampakines (BDP-12 and BDP-20) that differ significantly in their effects on AMPA receptor kinetics produce similar behavioral profiles, and iii) determine if physiological potency is reflected in behavioral potency. BDP-20 reduced two measures of exploratory activity in aged rats but increased speed of performance in a radial maze; the drug also caused substantially improved retention of spatial information. These results are similar to those obtained with BDP-12, an analog that differs from BDP-20 in its effects on ligand binding to the AMPA receptor and on the physiological responses of the receptors to glutamate. BDP-20 was approximately ten-fold more potent in behavioral effects than BDP-12, which agrees with the relative potencies of the two drugs as assessed with excised patches and excitatory synaptic responses. These findings indicate that ampakines, though differing in their effects on AMPA-receptor-mediated responses, have similar effects at the behavioral level.

  1. Determination of glyphosate and AMPA on polyester-toner electrophoresis microchip with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Eduardo R; Segato, Thiago P; Coltro, Wendell K T; Lima, Renato S; Carrilho, Emanuel; Mazo, Luiz H

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports a method for rapid, simple, direct, and reproducible determination of glyphosate and its major metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA). The platform described herein uses polyester-toner microchips incorporating capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection and electrophoresis separation of the analytes. The polyester-toner microchip presented 150 μm-wide and 12 μm-deep microchannels, with injection and separation lengths of 10 and 40 mm long, respectively. The best results were obtained with 320 kHz frequency, 4.5 Vpp excitation voltage, 80 mmol/L CHES/Tris buffer at pH 8.8, injection in -1.0 kV for 7 s, and separation in -1.5 kV. RSD values related to the peak areas for glyphosate and AMPA were 1.5 and 3.3% and 10.1 and 8.6% for intra- and interchip assays, respectively. The detection limits were 45.1 and 70.5 μmol/L, respectively, without any attempt of preconcentration of the analytes. Finally, the method was applied to river water samples in which glyphosate and AMPA (1.0 mmol/L each) were added. The recovery results were 87.4 and 83.7% for glyphosate and AMPA, respectively. The recovery percentages and LOD values obtained here were similar to others reported in the literature.

  2. Glyphosate and AMPA adsorption in soils: laboratory experiments and pedotransfer rules.

    PubMed

    Sidoli, Pauline; Baran, Nicole; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of the herbicide glyphosate and its main metabolite AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid) was investigated on 17 different agricultural soils. Batch equilibration adsorption data are shown by Freundlich adsorption isotherms. Glyphosate adsorption is clearly affected by equilibration concentrations, but the nonlinear AMPA adsorption isotherms indicate saturation of the adsorption sites with increasing equilibrium concentrations. pHCaCl2 (i.e. experimental pH) is the major parameter governing glyphosate and AMPA adsorption in soils. However, considering pHCaCl2 values, available phosphate amount, and amorphous iron and aluminium oxide contents by using a nonlinear multiple regression equation, obtains the most accurate and powerful pedotransfer rule for predicting the adsorption constants for these two molecules. As amorphous iron and aluminium oxide contents in soil are not systematically determined, we also propose a pedotransfer rule with two variables-pHCaCl2 values and available phosphate amount-that remains acceptable for both molecules. Moreover, the use of the commonly measured pHwater or pHKCl values gives less accurate results compared to pHCaCl2 measurements. To our knowledge, this study is the first AMPA adsorption characterization for a significant number of temperate climate soils.

  3. Selective antagonism of AMPA receptors unmasks kainate receptor-mediated responses in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Paternain, A V; Morales, M; Lerma, J

    1995-01-01

    Although both protein and mRNAs for kainate receptor subunits are abundant in several brain regions, the responsiveness of AMPA receptors to kainate has made it difficult to demonstrate the presence of functional kainate-type receptors in native cells. Recently, however, we have shown that many hippocampal neurons in culture express glutamate receptors of the kainate type. The large nondesensitizing response that kainate induces at AMPA receptors precludes detection and analysis of smaller, rapidly desensitizing currents induced by kainate at kainate receptors. Consequently, the functional significance of these strongly desensitizing glutamate receptors remains enigmatic. We report here that the family of new noncompetitive antagonists of AMPA receptors (GYKI 52466 and 53655) minimally affects kainate-induced responses at kainate receptors while completely blocking AMPA receptor-mediated currents, making it possible to separate the responses mediated by each receptor. These compounds will allow determination of the role played by kainate receptors in synaptic transmission and plasticity in the mammalian brain, as well as evaluation of their involvement in neurotoxicity.

  4. URBAN CONTRIBUTIONS OF GLYSPHOSATE AND ITS DEGRADATE AMPA TO STREAMS IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world, being routinely applied to control weeds in both agricultural and urban settings. Microbial degradation of glyphosate produces aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). The high polarity and water-solubility of glyphosate and A...

  5. Disruption of the endocytic protein HIP1 results in neurological deficits and decreased AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Metzler, Martina; Li, Bo; Gan, Lu; Georgiou, John; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Wang, Yushan; Torre, Enrique; Devon, Rebecca S.; Oh, Rosemary; Legendre-Guillemin, Valerie; Rich, Mark; Alvarez, Christine; Gertsenstein, Marina; McPherson, Peter S.; Nagy, Andras; Wang, Yu Tian; Roder, John C.; Raymond, Lynn A.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Huntingtin interacting protein 1 (HIP1) is a recently identified component of clathrin-coated vesicles that plays a role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. To explore the normal function of HIP1 in vivo, we created mice with targeted mutation in the HIP1 gene (HIP1–/–). HIP1–/– mice develop a neurological phenotype by 3 months of age manifest with a failure to thrive, tremor and a gait ataxia secondary to a rigid thoracolumbar kyphosis accompanied by decreased assembly of endocytic protein complexes on liposomal membranes. In primary hippocampal neurons, HIP1 colocalizes with GluR1-containing AMPA receptors and becomes concentrated in cell bodies following AMPA stimulation. Moreover, a profound dose-dependent defect in clathrin-mediated internalization of GluR1-containing AMPA receptors was observed in neurons from HIP1–/– mice. Together, these data provide strong evidence that HIP1 regulates AMPA receptor trafficking in the central nervous system through its function in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. PMID:12839988

  6. AMPA Receptor Endocytosis in Rat Perirhinal Cortex Underlies Retrieval of Object Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cazakoff, Brittany N.; Howland, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms consistent with long-term depression in the perirhinal cortex (PRh) play a fundamental role in object recognition memory; however, whether AMPA receptor endocytosis is involved in distinct phases of recognition memory is not known. To address this question, we used local PRh infusions of the cell membrane-permeable Tat-GluA2[subscript…

  7. Blockade of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors protects hippocampal neurons against global ischemia-induced death

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Kyung-Min; Yokota, Hidenori; Mashiko, Toshihiro; Castillo, Pablo E.; Zukin, R. Suzanne; Bennett, Michael V. L.

    2005-01-01

    Transient global or forebrain ischemia induced experimentally in animals can cause selective, delayed neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. A striking feature is a delayed rise in intracellular free Zn2+ in CA1 neurons just before the onset of histologically detectable cell death. Here we show that α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) at Schaffer collateral to CA1 synapses in postischemic hippocampus exhibit properties of Ca2+/Zn2+-permeable, Glu receptor 2 (GluR2)-lacking AMPARs before the rise in Zn2+ and cell death. At 42 h after ischemia, AMPA excitatory postsynaptic currents exhibited pronounced inward rectification and marked sensitivity to 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (Naspm), a selective channel blocker of GluR2-lacking AMPARs. In control hippocampus, AMPA excitatory postsynaptic currents were electrically linear and relatively insensitive to Naspm. Naspm injected intrahippocampally at 9-40 h after insult greatly reduced the late rise in intracellular free Zn2+ in postischemic CA1 neurons and afforded partial protection against ischemia-induced cell death. These results implicate GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors in the ischemia-induced rise in free Zn2+ and death of CA1 neurons, although a direct action at the time of the rise in Zn2+ is unproven. This receptor subtype appears to be an important therapeutic target for intervention in ischemia-induced neuronal death in humans. PMID:16093311

  8. Enhanced AMPA Receptor Function Promotes Cerebellar Long-Term Depression Rather than Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Hansel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar…

  9. mTOR Is Essential for Corticosteroid Effects on Hippocampal AMPA Receptor Function and Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiong, Hui; Casse, Frédéric; Zhou, Yang; Zhou, Ming; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Joëls, Marian; Martin, Stéphane; Krugers, Harm J.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones, via activation of their receptors, promote memory consolidation, but the exact underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We examined how corticosterone regulates AMPA receptors (AMPARs), which are crucial for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Combining a live imaging fluorescent recovery after photobleaching approach…

  10. Topiramate antagonizes NMDA- and AMPA-induced seizure-like activity in planarians.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Thomas, Timmy; Adeola, Mobilaji; Patil, Tanvi; Raymondi, Natalie; Poles, Asha; Loo, Michael; Raffa, Robert B

    2009-10-01

    The mechanism of anticonvulsant action of topiramate includes inhibition of glutamate-activated ion channels. The evidence is most convincing for direct inhibitory action at the ionotropic AMPA (alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid) and kainate ((2S,3S,4S)-3-(Carboxymethyl)-4-prop-1-en-2-ylpyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid) glutamate receptor subtypes. Less direct connection has been made to the NMDA (N-Methyl-d-aspartate) subtype. In the present study, we demonstrate that NMDA and AMPA produce concentration-dependent seizure-like activity in planarians, a type of flatworm which possesses mammalian-like neurotransmitters. In contrast, planarians exposed to the inhibitory amino acid, glycine, did not display pSLA. For combination experiments, topiramate significantly reduced planarian seizure-like activity (pSLA) produced by NMDA or AMPA. Additionally, NMDA-induced pSLA was antagonized by either an NMDA receptor antagonist (MK-801) or AMPA receptor antagonist (DNQX), thus suggesting that NMDA-induced pSLA was mediated by NMDA and non-NMDA receptors. The present results provide pharmacologic evidence of a functional inhibitory action of topiramate on glutamate receptor activity in invertebrates and provide a sensitive, quantifiable end-point for studying anti-seizure pharmacology.

  11. Enhanced AMPA Receptor Function Promotes Cerebellar Long-Term Depression Rather than Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Hansel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar…

  12. AMPA Receptor Endocytosis in Rat Perirhinal Cortex Underlies Retrieval of Object Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cazakoff, Brittany N.; Howland, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms consistent with long-term depression in the perirhinal cortex (PRh) play a fundamental role in object recognition memory; however, whether AMPA receptor endocytosis is involved in distinct phases of recognition memory is not known. To address this question, we used local PRh infusions of the cell membrane-permeable Tat-GluA2[subscript…

  13. Glyphosate and AMPA in the estuaries of the Baltic Sea method optimization and field study.

    PubMed

    Skeff, Wael; Neumann, Christine; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E

    2015-11-15

    Water samples from ten German Baltic estuaries were collected in 2012 in order to study the presence of the herbicide glyphosate, its primary metabolite AMPA and their potential transport to the marine environment. For the analyses an LC-MS/MS based analytical method after derivatization with FMOC-Cl was optimized and validated for marine water samples. All investigated estuarine stations were contaminated with AMPA and nine of them also with glyphosate. Concentration ranges observed were 28 to 1690ng/L and 45 to 4156ng/L for glyphosate and AMPA, respectively with strong spatial and temporal fluctuations. Both contaminants were found at inbound sampling sites in the stream Muehlenfliess and concentrations decreased along the salinity gradient to the estuaries of the Baltic Sea. The data obtained in this study clearly depict the transport of glyphosate and AMPA to the Baltic Sea. Hence, detailed fate and risk assessment for both contaminants in marine environments are required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. AMPA Receptors Control Fear Extinction through an Arc-Dependent Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Simon; Barnes, Philip; Hall, Jeremy; Thomas, Kerrie L.

    2017-01-01

    Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) supports fear memory through synaptic plasticity events requiring actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. We have previously shown that reducing hippocampal Arc levels through antisense knockdown leads to the premature extinction of contextual fear. Here we show that the AMPA receptor antagonist…

  15. Glutamatergic hyperfunctioning during alcohol withdrawal syndrome: therapeutic perspective with zinc and magnesium.

    PubMed

    Prior, Pedro Luis; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes

    2011-09-01

    It is known that the glutamatergic pathways are hyperfunctioning during alcohol withdrawal syndrome. It has been demonstrated that hyperfunctioning of this system causes a great damage to the superior cortical activity, the ability to concentrate and the control of impulses. Recent studies show that the cations zinc and magnesium modulate the glutamatergic function, reducing it to non-toxic levels, yet not reducing it to the point of depriving this neurotransmitter of its normal activity. New perspectives of treatment focus on the modulation of this system, having, as a result, reestablishment of impulse control abilities, damage prevention to the hippocampus and the amygdala and prevention of future relapses.

  16. AmpA protein functions by different mechanisms to influence early cell type specification and to modulate cell adhesion and actin polymerization in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Cost, Hoa N; Noratel, Elizabeth F; Blumberg, Daphne D

    2013-01-01

    The Dictyostelium discoideum ampA gene encodes a multifunctional regulator protein that modulates cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions and actin polymerization during growth and is necessary for correct cell type specification and patterning during development. Insertional inactivation of the ampA gene results in defects that define two distinct roles for the ampA gene during development. AmpA is necessary in a non-cell autonomous manner to prevent premature expression of a prespore gene marker. It is also necessary in a cell autonomous manner for the anterior like cells, which express the ampA gene, to migrate to the upper cup during culmination. It is also necessary to prevent excessive cell-cell agglutination when cells are developed in a submerged suspension culture. Here, we demonstrate that a supernatant source of AmpA protein, added extracellularly, can prevent the premature mis-expression of the prespore marker. Synthetic oligopeptides are used to identify the domain of the AmpA protein that is important for preventing cells from mis-expressing the prespore gene. We further demonstrate that a factor capable of inducing additional cells to express the prespore gene marker accumulates extracellularly in the absence of AmpA protein. While the secreted AmpA acts extracellularly to suppress prespore gene expression, the effects of AmpA on cell agglutination and on actin polymerization in growing cells are not due to an extracellular role of secreted AmpA protein. Rather, these effects appear to reflect a distinct cell autonomous role of the ampA gene. Finally, we show that secretion of AmpA protein is brought about by elevating the levels of expression of ampA so that the protein accumulates to an excessive level.

  17. Mathematical modelling of non-stationary fluctuation analysis for studying channel properties of synaptic AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Benke, T A; Lüthi, A; Palmer, M J; Wikström, M A; Anderson, W W; Isaac, J T; Collingridge, G L

    2001-12-01

    1. The molecular properties of synaptic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors are an important factor determining excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. Changes in the number (N) or single-channel conductance (gamma) of functional AMPA receptors may underlie synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). These parameters have been estimated using non-stationary fluctuation analysis (NSFA). 2. The validity of NSFA for studying the channel properties of synaptic AMPA receptors was assessed using a cable model with dendritic spines and a microscopic kinetic description of AMPA receptors. Electrotonic, geometric and kinetic parameters were altered in order to determine their effects on estimates of the underlying gamma. 3. Estimates of gamma were very sensitive to the access resistance of the recording (R(A)) and the mean open time of AMPA channels. Estimates of gamma were less sensitive to the distance between the electrode and the synaptic site, the electrotonic properties of dendritic structures, recording electrode capacitance and background noise. Estimates of gamma were insensitive to changes in spine morphology, synaptic glutamate concentration and the peak open probability (P(o)) of AMPA receptors. 4. The results obtained using the model agree with biological data, obtained from 91 dendritic recordings from rat CA1 pyramidal cells. A correlation analysis showed that R(A) resulted in a slowing of the decay time constant of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) by approximately 150 %, from an estimated value of 3.1 ms. R(A) also greatly attenuated the absolute estimate of gamma by approximately 50-70 %. 5. When other parameters remain constant, the model demonstrates that NSFA of dendritic recordings can readily discriminate between changes in gamma vs. changes in N or P(o). Neither background noise nor asynchronous activation of multiple synapses prevented reliable

  18. Occurrence of glyphosate and AMPA in an agricultural watershed from the southeastern region of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Leonardo; Miglioranza, Karina S B; Aparicio, Virginia C; Marino, Damian; Bedmar, Francisco; Wunderlin, Daniel A

    2015-12-01

    Glyphosate (GLY) and AMPA concentrations were determined in sandy soil profiles, during pre- and post-application events in two agricultural soybean fields (S1 and S2). Streamwater and sediment samples were also analyzed. Post-application sampling was carried out one month later from the event. Concentrations of GLY+AMPA in surface soils (0-5 cm depth) during pre-application period showed values 20-fold higher (0.093-0.163 μg/g d.w.) than control area (0.005 μg/g d.w.). After application event soils showed markedly higher pesticide concentrations. A predominance of AMPA (80%) was observed in S1 (early application), while 34% in S2 for surface soils. GLY+AMPA concentrations decreased with depth and correlated strongly with organic carbon (r between 0.74 and 0.88, p<0.05) and pH (r between -0.81 and -0.76, p<0.001). The slight enrichment of pesticides observed from 25 cm depth to deeper layer, in addition to the alkaline pH along the profile, is of high concern about groundwater contamination. Sediments from pre-application period showed relatively lower pesticide levels (0.0053-0.0263 μg/g d.w.) than surface soil with a predominance of glyphosate, indicating a limited degradation. Levels of contaminants (mainly AMPA) in streamwater (ND-0.5 ng/mL) denote the low persistence of these compounds. However, a direct relationship in AMPA concentration was observed between sediment and streamwater. Despite the known relatively short half-life of glyphosate in soils, GLY+AMPA occurrence is registered in almost all matrices at different sampling times (pre- and post-application events). The physicochemical characteristics (organic carbon, texture, pH) and structure of soils and sediment in addition to the time elapsed from application determined the behavior of these contaminants in the environment. As a whole, the results warn us about vertical transport trough soil profile with the possibility of reaching groundwater.

  19. Developmental changes in AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated quantal transmission at thalamocortical synapses in the barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Neil J; Benke, Timothy A; Mellor, Jack; Scott, Helen; Gürdal, Esra; Crabtree, John W; Isaac, John T R

    2005-05-25

    During the first week of life, there is a shift from kainate to AMPA receptor-mediated thalamocortical transmission in layer IV barrel cortex. However, the mechanisms underlying this change and the differential properties of AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated transmission remain essentially unexplored. To investigate this, we studied the quantal properties of AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated transmission using strontium-evoked miniature EPSCs. AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated transmission exhibited very different quantal properties but were never coactivated by a single quantum of transmitter, indicating complete segregation to different synapses within the thalamocortical input. Nonstationary fluctuation analysis showed that synaptic AMPA receptors exhibited a range of single-channel conductance (gamma) and a strong negative correlation between gamma and functional channel number, indicating that these two parameters are reciprocally regulated at thalamocortical synapses. We obtained the first estimate of gamma for synaptic kainate receptors (<2 pS), and this primarily accounted for the small quantal size of kainate receptor-mediated transmission. Developmentally, the quantal contribution to transmission of AMPA receptors increased and that of kainate receptors decreased. No changes in AMPA or kainate quantal amplitude or in AMPA receptor gamma were observed, demonstrating that the developmental change was attributable to a decrease in the number of kainate synapses and an increase in the number of AMPA synapses contributing to transmission. Therefore, we demonstrate fundamental differences in the quantal properties for these two types of synapse. Thus, the developmental switch in transmission will dramatically alter information transfer at thalamocortical inputs to layer IV.

  20. Griflola frondosa (GF) produces significant antidepressant effects involving AMPA receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongkun; Ran, Pengzhan; Sun, Lijuan; Hu, Weihong; Li, Hongliang; Xiao, Chunjie; Zhu, Keming; Du, Jing

    2017-12-01

    Griflola frondosa (Fr) S.F. Gray (Meripilaceae) (GF) is a medical mushroom, and its regulation of the immune system is of interest for the treatment of mood disorders. α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors are the central mediator for the treatment of depression. This study examines the antidepressant effects of GF and the role of AMPA in these antidepressant effects. The CD-1 mice were fed with GF- or Pleurotus ostreatus [(Jacq.: Fr) Kumm (Pleurotaceae)] (PO)-containing food for 1 day or 5 days. The antidepressant effects was determined in the tail suspension test (TST), forced swim test (FST), and open field test (OFT). The involvement of AMPA receptors was determined by the application of the AMPA-specific blocker GYKI 52466. Treatments with 20%, 33% or 50% of GF-containing food significantly decreased the immobility time (63.6, 56.9, and 52.0% in TST; and 50.8, 43.2, and 38.2% in FST) after 1 day and (62.3, 51.8, and 52.8% in TST; and 49.5, 45.1, and 40.3% in FST) after 5 days. GF-containing food did not cause hyperactive effects in the OFT. The antidepressant effects of the 33% of GF-containing food (down-to 51.3% in 1-day TST and 46.8% in 5-day FST) were significantly stronger than that of the 33% of PO-containing food (down-to 85.5% in 1-day TST and 82.0% in 5-day FST). AMPA-specific blocker GYKI 52466 was able to block the antidepressant effects of the GF-containing food. GF demonstrated the potential as a safe medical food supplement for the patient with depression.

  1. Reduced Anterior Cingulate Glutamatergic Concentrations in Childhood Ocd and Major Depression Versus Healthy Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, David R.; Mirza, Yousha; Russell, Aileen; Tang, Jennifer; Smith, Janet M.; Banerjee, Preeya S.; Bhandari, Rashmi; Rose, Michelle; Ivey, Jennifer; Boyd, Courtney; Moore, Gregory J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine in vivo glutamatergic neurochemical alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex of pediatric patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) without major depressive disorder (MDD) versus pediatric patients with MDD without OCD and healthy controls. Method: Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic examinations…

  2. Reduced Anterior Cingulate Glutamatergic Concentrations in Childhood Ocd and Major Depression Versus Healthy Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, David R.; Mirza, Yousha; Russell, Aileen; Tang, Jennifer; Smith, Janet M.; Banerjee, Preeya S.; Bhandari, Rashmi; Rose, Michelle; Ivey, Jennifer; Boyd, Courtney; Moore, Gregory J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine in vivo glutamatergic neurochemical alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex of pediatric patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) without major depressive disorder (MDD) versus pediatric patients with MDD without OCD and healthy controls. Method: Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic examinations…

  3. Targeting the glutamatergic system to treat major depressive disorder: rationale and progress to date.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Daniel C; Henter, Ioline D; Zarate, Carlos A

    2012-07-09

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a severe, debilitating medical illness that affects millions of individuals worldwide. The young age of onset and chronicity of the disorder has a significant impact on the long-term disability that affected individuals face. Most existing treatments have focused on the 'monoamine hypothesis' for rational design of compounds. However, patients continue to experience low remission rates, residual subsyndromal symptoms, relapses and overall functional impairment. In this context, growing evidence suggests that the glutamatergic system is uniquely central to the neurobiology and treatment of MDD. Here, we review data supporting the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology of MDD, and discuss the efficacy of glutamatergic agents as novel therapeutics. Preliminary clinical evidence has been promising, particularly with regard to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist ketamine as a 'proof-of-concept' agent. The review also highlights potential molecular and inflammatory mechanisms that may contribute to the rapid antidepressant response seen with ketamine. Because existing pharmacological treatments for MDD are often insufficient for many patients, the next generation of treatments needs to be more effective, rapid acting and better tolerated than currently available medications. There is extant evidence that the glutamatergic system holds considerable promise for developing the next generation of novel and mechanistically distinct agents for the treatment of MDD.

  4. Glutamatergic Nonpyramidal Neurons From Neocortical Layer VI and Their Comparison With Pyramidal and Spiny Stellate Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Andjelic, Sofija; Gallopin, Thierry; Cauli, Bruno; Hill, Elisa L.; Roux, Lisa; Badr, Sammy; Hu, Emilie; Tamás, Gábor; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    The deeper part of neocortical layer VI is dominated by nonpyramidal neurons, which lack a prominent vertically ascending dendrite and predominantly establish corticocortical connections. These neurons were studied in rat neocortical slices using patch-clamp, single-cell reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and biocytin labeling. The majority of these neurons expressed the vesicular glutamate transporter but not glutamic acid decarboxylase, suggesting that a high proportion of layer VI nonpyramidal neurons are glutamatergic. Indeed, they exhibited numerous dendritic spines and established asymmetrical synapses. Our sample of glutamatergic nonpyramidal neurons displayed a wide variety of somatodendritic morphologies and a subset of these cells expressed the Nurr1 mRNA, a marker for ipsilateral, but not commissural corticocortical projection neurons in layer VI. Comparison with spiny stellate and pyramidal neurons from other layers showed that glutamatergic neurons consistently exhibited a low occurrence of GABAergic interneuron markers and regular spiking firing patterns. Analysis of electrophysiological diversity using unsupervised clustering disclosed three groups of cells. Layer V pyramidal neurons were segregated into a first group, whereas a second group consisted of a subpopulation of layer VI neurons exhibiting tonic firing. A third heterogeneous cluster comprised spiny stellate, layer II/III pyramidal, and layer VI neurons exhibiting adaptive firing. The segregation of layer VI neurons in two different clusters did not correlate either with their somatodendritic morphologies or with Nurr1 expression. Our results suggest that electrophysiological similarities between neocortical glutamatergic neurons extend beyond layer positioning, somatodendritic morphology, and projection specificity. PMID:19052106

  5. Glutamatergic nonpyramidal neurons from neocortical layer VI and their comparison with pyramidal and spiny stellate neurons.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, Sofija; Gallopin, Thierry; Cauli, Bruno; Hill, Elisa L; Roux, Lisa; Badr, Sammy; Hu, Emilie; Tamás, Gábor; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2009-02-01

    The deeper part of neocortical layer VI is dominated by nonpyramidal neurons, which lack a prominent vertically ascending dendrite and predominantly establish corticocortical connections. These neurons were studied in rat neocortical slices using patch-clamp, single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and biocytin labeling. The majority of these neurons expressed the vesicular glutamate transporter but not glutamic acid decarboxylase, suggesting that a high proportion of layer VI nonpyramidal neurons are glutamatergic. Indeed, they exhibited numerous dendritic spines and established asymmetrical synapses. Our sample of glutamatergic nonpyramidal neurons displayed a wide variety of somatodendritic morphologies and a subset of these cells expressed the Nurr1 mRNA, a marker for ipsilateral, but not commissural corticocortical projection neurons in layer VI. Comparison with spiny stellate and pyramidal neurons from other layers showed that glutamatergic neurons consistently exhibited a low occurrence of GABAergic interneuron markers and regular spiking firing patterns. Analysis of electrophysiological diversity using unsupervised clustering disclosed three groups of cells. Layer V pyramidal neurons were segregated into a first group, whereas a second group consisted of a subpopulation of layer VI neurons exhibiting tonic firing. A third heterogeneous cluster comprised spiny stellate, layer II/III pyramidal, and layer VI neurons exhibiting adaptive firing. The segregation of layer VI neurons in two different clusters did not correlate either with their somatodendritic morphologies or with Nurr1 expression. Our results suggest that electrophysiological similarities between neocortical glutamatergic neurons extend beyond layer positioning, somatodendritic morphology, and projection specificity.

  6. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  7. Kölliker-Fuse GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons project to distinct targets.

    PubMed

    Geerling, Joel C; Yokota, Shigefumi; Rukhadze, Irma; Roe, Dan; Chamberlin, Nancy L

    2017-06-01

    The Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) is known primarily for its respiratory function as the "pneumotaxic center" or "pontine respiratory group." Considered part of the parabrachial (PB) complex, KF contains glutamatergic neurons that project to respiratory-related targets in the medulla and spinal cord (Yokota, Oka, Tsumori, Nakamura, & Yasui, 2007). Here we describe an unexpected population of neurons in the caudal KF and adjacent lateral crescent subnucleus (PBlc), which are γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and have an entirely different pattern of projections than glutamatergic KF neurons. First, immunofluorescence, in situ hybridization, and Cre-reporter labeling revealed that many of these GABAergic neurons express FoxP2 in both rats and mice. Next, using Cre-dependent axonal tracing in Vgat-IRES-Cre and Vglut2-IRES-Cre mice, we identified different projection patterns from GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in this region. GABAergic neurons in KF and PBlc project heavily and almost exclusively to trigeminal sensory nuclei, with minimal projections to cardiorespiratory nuclei in the brainstem, and none to the spinal cord. In contrast, glutamatergic KF neurons project heavily to the autonomic, respiratory, and motor regions of the medulla and spinal cord previously identified as efferent targets mediating KF cardiorespiratory effects. These findings identify a novel, GABAergic subpopulation of KF/PB neurons with a distinct efferent projection pattern targeting the brainstem trigeminal sensory system. Rather than regulating breathing, we propose that these neurons influence vibrissal sensorimotor function. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Neuregulin links dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission to control hippocampal synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Neddens, Jörg; Vullhorst, Detlef; Paredes, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) and its receptor ErbB4 are genetically associated with schizophrenia, a complex developmental disorder of high heritability but unknown etiology that has been proposed to result from deficits in functional connectivity and synaptic plasticity. Based on pharmacological evidence, imbalances in dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission systems are believed to contribute to its pathophysiology, but genetic data supporting a causative role for either are sparse. Stimulation of NRG-1/ErbB4 signaling inhibits or reverts hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) at glutamatergic synapses between Schaeffer collateral afferents and CA1 pyramidal neurons (SC→CA1). We have recently demonstrated that NRG-1 regulates glutamatergic plasticity by rapidly increasing extracellular hippocampal dopamine levels and activation of D4 dopamine receptors.7 These new findings position the NRG-1/ErbB4 signaling pathway at the crossroads between dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission and offer novel ways to consolidate genetic, functional and pharmacological data toward a better understanding of the etiological processes underlying schizophrenia, and the role of NRG-1 for normal synaptic function and plasticity. The currently available data suggest that hippocampal interneurons might play a crucial role in mediating NRG-1 induced depotentiation. This interpretation is in line with other evidence pointing towards an involvement of GABAergic cells in the etiology of schizophrenia. PMID:19641746

  9. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  10. Variation in glyphosate and AMPA concentrations of surface water and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprile, Ana Clara; Aparicio, Virginia; Sasal, Carolina; Andriulo, Enrique

    2017-04-01

    The presence of pesticides in various environmental matrices indicate that the soil's ability to function as a bio-physical-chemical reactor is declining. As it operates as an interface between air and water, it causes a negative impact on these two vital resources. Currently, the pampa agriculture is simplified with a marked tendency towards spring-summer crops, where the main crops are RR soybean and corn. Herbicides are neither retained nor degraded in the soil, which results in polluted groundwater and surface waters. The objectives of this study were: a) to verify the presence of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in Pergamino stream (a typical representative of the most productive agricultural region of Argentina) under different land use and to detect if in the detections there was a space-time pattern, and b) to verify the detection of these molecules in groundwater of the upper same basin under exclusively rural land use. Surface stream was sampling in six sites (five under rural land use and one under urban-industrial land use) at a rate of one sample by spring, summer and winter seasons (2010-2013, 54 total samples). Groundwater glyphosate and AMPA concentrations were determined in 24 piezometers constructed at two positions of the landscape, across the groundwater flow direction, sampled at two sampling dates (2010 and 2012, 45 total samples). In surface water, glyphosate and AMPA were detected in 54 and 69% of the samples analyzed, respectively. The median concentrations were 0.9 and 0.8 µg L-1 for glyphosate and AMPA and maximal concentrations 258 and 5865 µg L-1, respectively. The sampling site under urban-industrial land use had abnormally high concentrations of glyphosate in the spring (attributed to point pollution), a fact that not allowed to see differences in the remaining sampling times under different land uses. AMPA concentrations under urban-industrial land use were high and higher than rural land use in 3 studied seasons

  11. Potent and Selective Inhibition of the Open-Channel Conformation of AMPA Receptors by an RNA Aptamer†

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhen; Han, Yan; Wang, Congzhou; Niu, Li

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitors of AMPA receptors are useful as biochemical probes for structure-function studies and as drug candidates for a number of neurological disorders and diseases. Here we report the identification of an RNA inhibitor or aptamer by an in vitro evolution approach. Using a laser-pulse photolysis technique, we further characterized the mechanism of inhibition of this aptamer on the AMPA receptor channel-opening rate process in the microsecond-to-millisecond time domain. Our results show that the aptamer we isolated is a noncompetitive inhibitor that selectively inhibits the open-channel conformation of AMPA receptors with nanomolar affinity. The potency and the selectivity of this noncompetitive aptamer rival those of small molecule inhibitors. Our results therefore demonstrate the utility of this approach to develop water-soluble, highly potent and conformation-selective noncompetitive inhibitors of AMPA receptors. PMID:20518485

  12. S-palmitoylation regulates AMPA receptors trafficking and function: a novel insight into synaptic regulation and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun; Wu, Pengfei; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate acting on AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptor (AMPAR) mediates the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. Dynamic regulation of AMPAR by post-translational modifications is one of the key elements that allow the nervous system to adapt to environment stimulations. S-palmitoylation, an important lipid modification by post-translational addition of a long-chain fatty acid to a cysteine residue, regulates AMPA receptor trafficking, which dynamically affects multiple fundamental brain functions, such as learning and memory. In vivo, S-palmitoylation is controlled by palmitoyl acyl transferases and palmitoyl thioesterases. In this review, we highlight advances in the mechanisms for dynamic AMPA receptors palmitoylation, and discuss how palmitoylation affects AMPA receptors function at synapses in recent years. Pharmacological regulation of S-palmitoylation may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for neurobiological diseases. PMID:26579419

  13. Multiple roles for mTOR signaling in both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Matthew C.; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in neurons integrates a variety of extracellular signals to produce appropriate translational responses. mTOR signaling is hyperactive in neurological syndromes in both humans and mouse models that are characterized by epilepsy, autism and cognitive disturbances. In addition, rapamycin, a clinically important immunosuppressant, is a specific and potent inhibitor of mTOR signaling. While mTOR is known to regulate growth and synaptic plasticity of glutamatergic neurons, its effects on basic parameters of synaptic transmission are less well studied, and its role in regulating GABAergic transmission is unexplored. We therefore performed an electrophysiological and morphological comparison of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in which mTOR signaling was either increased by loss of the repressor Pten or decreased by treatment with rapamycin. We found that hyperactive mTOR signaling increased evoked synaptic responses in both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons by approximately 50%, due to an increase in the number of synaptic vesicles available for release, the number of synapses formed and the miniature event size. Prolonged (72 hours) rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities and also decreased synaptic transmission in wild-type glutamatergic, but not GABAergic, neurons. Further analyses suggested that hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway also impairs presynaptic function, possibly by interfering with vesicle fusion. Despite this presynaptic impairment, the net effect of Pten loss is enhanced synaptic transmission in both GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, which has numerous implications – depending on where in the brain mutations of an mTOR suppressor gene takes place during development. PMID:22895726

  14. Activation of somatostatin receptor (sst 5) protects the rat retina from AMPA-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kiagiadaki, Foteini; Savvaki, Maria; Thermos, Kyriaki

    2010-01-01

    In a recent study, we employed an in vivo model of retinal excitotoxicity to investigate the neuroprotective effect of somatostatinergic agents. Intravitreal administration of somatostatin and sst(2) selective agonists protected the retina from (RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid hydrobromide (AMPA) induced excitotoxicity. The sst(1) and sst(4) selective ligands had no effect (Kiagiadaki and Thermos, 2008). The presence of sst(5) receptors in rat retina was only recently reported (Ke and Zhong, 2007). Synthetic agonists that activate sst(2) receptors also bind with high affinity to the sst(5) subtype. In the present study the putative neuroprotective effects of sst(5) receptor activation were investigated. Adult female and male Sprague-Dawley (250-350g) rats were employed. Groups of animals received intravitreally PBS (50mM) or AMPA (42 nmol/eye) alone or in combination with L-817,818 (sst(5), 10(-5), 10(-4)M). To exclude neuroprotective effects via the activation of sst(2) receptors, L-817,818 (10(-4)M) was coinjected with the sst(2) antagonist CYN-154806 (10(-4)M). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) studies using the anti-retinal marker choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and TUNEL staining were employed to examine retinal cell loss and protection. IHC and Western blot analysis were also employed to assess whether the sst(5) receptors are viable in the AMPA treated tissue as compared to control retina. sst(5) receptors were not affected by AMPA. L-817,818 protected the retina from the AMPA insult in the dose of 10(-4)M, while CYN-154806 (10(-4)M) had no effect on the sst(5) neuroprotection. TUNEL staining confirmed the AMPA-induced retinal toxicity and the L-817,818 neuroprotection. These results demonstrate for the first time that sst(5) receptors are functional in the retina, and that sst(5) analogs administered intravitreally protect the retina from excitotoxicity. Further studies are essential to ascertain the therapeutic relevance of these

  15. The essential role of AMPA receptor GluR2 subunit RNA editing in the normal and diseased brain

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Amanda; Vissel, Bryce

    2012-01-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are comprised of different combinations of GluA1–GluA4 (also known asGluR1–GluR4 and GluR-A to GluR-D) subunits. The GluA2 subunit is subject to RNA editing by the ADAR2 enzyme, which converts a codon for glutamine (Gln; Q), present in the GluA2 gene, to a codon for arginine (Arg; R) found in the mRNA. AMPA receptors are calcium (Ca2+)-permeable if they contain the unedited GluA2(Q) subunit or if they lack the GluA2 subunit. While most AMPA receptors in the brain contain the edited GluA2(R) subunit and are therefore Ca2+-impermeable, recent evidence suggests that Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors are important in synaptic plasticity, learning, and disease. Strong evidence supports the notion that Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors are usually GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors, with little evidence to date for a significant role of unedited GluA2 in normal brain function. However, recent detailed studies suggest that Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors containing unedited GluA2 do in fact occur in neurons and can contribute to excitotoxic cell loss, even where it was previously thought that there was no unedited GluA2.This review provides an update on the role of GluA2 RNA editing in the healthy and diseased brain and summarizes recent insights into the mechanisms that control this process. We suggest that further studies of the role of unedited GluA2 in normal brain function and disease are warranted, and that GluA2 editing should be considered as a possible contributing factor when Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors are observed. PMID:22514516

  16. Member of the Ampakine class of memory enhancers prolongs the single channel open time of reconstituted AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Suppiramaniam, V; Bahr, B A; Sinnarajah, S; Owens, K; Rogers, G; Yilma, S; Vodyanoy, V

    2001-05-01

    Ampakines are small benzamide compounds that allosterically produce the positive modulation of AMPA receptors and improve performance on a variety of behavioral tasks. To test if the native synaptic membrane is necessary for the effects of such positive modulators, the mechanism of action of the Ampakine 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-ylcarbonyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (CX509) was investigated in isolated rat brain AMPA receptors reconstituted in lipid bilayers. The drug increased the open time of AMPA-induced single channel current fluctuations with an EC(50) of 4 microM. The action of CX509 was highly selective since it had no effect on the amplitude or close time of channel events. The open time effect had a maximum enhancement of 70-fold and the modulated currents were blocked by CNQX. It is concluded that the synaptic membrane environment is not necessary for Ampakine effects. In fact, CX509 was about 100 times more potent on the reconstituted AMPA receptors than on receptors in their native membrane. These findings indicate that centrally active Ampakines modulate specific kinetic properties of AMPA currents. They also raise the possibility that AMPA receptors are regulated by factors present in situ, thus explaining the more efficient modulatory effects of CX509 when acting on receptors removed from their synaptic location.

  17. Role of AMPA and NMDA receptors and back-propagating action potentials in spike timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida, Marco; Fernández de Sevilla, David; Couve, Alejandro; Buño, Washington

    2010-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms that mediate spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) are largely unknown. We studied in vitro in CA1 pyramidal neurons the contribution of AMPA and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) components of Schaffer collateral (SC) excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs; EPSP(AMPA) and EPSP(NMDA)) and of the back-propagating action potential (BAP) to the long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by a STDP protocol that consisted in pairing an EPSP and a BAP. Transient blockade of EPSP(AMPA) with 7-nitro-2,3-dioxo-1,4-dihydroquinoxaline-6-carbonitrile (CNQX) during the STDP protocol prevented LTP. Contrastingly LTP was induced under transient inhibition of EPSP(AMPA) by combining SC stimulation, an imposed EPSP(AMPA)-like depolarization, and BAP or by coupling the EPSP(NMDA) evoked under sustained depolarization (approximately -40 mV) and BAP. In Mg(2+)-free solution EPSP(NMDA) and BAP also produced LTP. Suppression of EPSP(NMDA) or BAP always prevented LTP. Thus activation of NMDA receptors and BAPs are needed but not sufficient because AMPA receptor activation is also obligatory for STDP. However, a transient depolarization of another origin that unblocks NMDA receptors and a BAP may also trigger LTP.

  18. Abnormally increased surface expression of AMPA receptors in the cerebellum, cortex and striatum of Cln3(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Attila D; Hof, Caitlin; Pearce, David A

    2015-10-21

    Mutations in the CLN3 gene cause a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, juvenile CLN3 disease. Exploring the cause of the motor coordination deficit in the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of the disease we have previously found that attenuation of AMPA receptor activity in 1-month-old Cln3(-/-) mice significantly improves their motor coordination [20]. To elucidate the mechanism of the abnormally increased AMPA receptor function in Cln3(-/-) mice, we examined the surface expression of AMPA receptors using surface cross-linking in brain slices from 1-month-old wild type (WT) and Cln3(-/-) mice. In surface cross-linked brain samples, Western blotting for AMPA receptor subunits revealed significantly increased surface levels of GluA1 and GluA2 in the cerebellum, and of GluA2 in the cortex and striatum of Cln3(-/-) mice as compared to WT mice. Expression levels of the GluA4 subunit were similar in the cerebellum of WT and Cln3(-/-) mice. While intracellular GluA1 levels in the WT and Cln3(-/-) cerebellum or cortex were similar, the intracellular expression of GluA1 in the Cln3(-/-) striatum was decreased to 56% of the WT level. Our results show a prominent increase in AMPA receptor surface expression in the brain of Cln3(-/-) mice and suggest that CLN3 is involved in the regulation of AMPA receptor surface expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Age-dependent requirement of AKAP150-anchored PKA and GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors in LTP

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan; Allen, Margaret; Halt, Amy R; Weisenhaus, Michael; Dallapiazza, Robert F; Hall, Duane D; Usachev, Yuriy M; McKnight, G Stanley; Hell, Johannes W

    2007-01-01

    Association of PKA with the AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit via the A kinase anchor protein AKAP150 is crucial for GluR1 phosphorylation. Mutating the AKAP150 gene to specifically prevent PKA binding reduced PKA within postsynaptic densities (>70%). It abolished hippocampal LTP in 7–12 but not 4-week-old mice. Inhibitors of PKA and of GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors blocked single tetanus LTP in hippocampal slices of 8 but not 4-week-old WT mice. Inhibitors of GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors also prevented LTP in 2 but not 3-week-old mice. Other studies demonstrate that GluR1 homomeric AMPA receptors are the main GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors in adult hippocampus and require PKA for their functional postsynaptic expression during potentiation. AKAP150-anchored PKA might thus critically contribute to LTP in adult hippocampus in part by phosphorylating GluR1 to foster postsynaptic accumulation of homomeric GluR1 AMPA receptors during initial LTP in 8-week-old mice. PMID:17972919

  20. Innervation by a GABAergic neuron depresses spontaneous release in glutamatergic neurons and unveils the clamping phenotype of synaptotagmin-1.

    PubMed

    Wierda, Keimpe D B; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2014-02-05

    The role of spontaneously occurring release events in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and their regulation is intensely debated. To study the interdependence of glutamatergic and GABAergic spontaneous release, we compared reciprocally connected "mixed" glutamatergic/GABAergic neuronal pairs from mice cultured on astrocyte islands with "homotypic" glutamatergic or GABAergic pairs and autaptic neurons. We measured mEPSC and mIPSC frequencies simultaneously from both neurons. Neuronal pairs formed both interneuronal synaptic and autaptic connections indiscriminately. We find that whereas mEPSC and mIPSC frequencies did not deviate between autaptic and synaptic connections, the frequency of mEPSCs in mixed pairs was strongly depressed compared with either autaptic neurons or glutamatergic pairs. Simultaneous imaging of synapses, or comparison to evoked release amplitudes, showed that this decrease was not caused by fewer active synapses. The mEPSC frequency was negatively correlated with the mIPSC frequency, indicating interdependence. Moreover, the reduction in mEPSC frequency was abolished when established pairs were exposed to bicuculline for 3 d, but not by long-term incubation with tetrodotoxin, indicating that spontaneous GABA release downregulates mEPSC frequency. Further investigations showed that knockout of synaptotagmin-1 did not affect mEPSC frequencies in either glutamatergic autaptic neurons or in glutamatergic pairs. However, in mixed glutamatergic/GABAergic pairs, mEPSC frequencies were increased by a factor of four in the synaptotagmin-1-null neurons, which is in line with data obtained from mixed cultures. The effect persisted after incubation with BAPTA-AM. We conclude that spontaneous GABA release exerts control over mEPSC release, and GABAergic innervation of glutamatergic neurons unveils the unclamping phenotype of the synaptotagmin-1-null neurons.

  1. Myelin Proteolipid Protein Complexes with αv Integrin and AMPA Receptors In Vivo and Regulates AMPA-Dependent Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Migration through the Modulation of Cell-Surface GluR2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, Danielle E.; Saul, Katherine E.; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies, stimulation of ionotropic AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors on cultured oligodendrocyte cells induced the formation of a signaling complex that includes the AMPA receptor, integrins, calcium-binding proteins, and, surprisingly, the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP). AMPA stimulation of cultured oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) also caused an increase in OPC migration. The current studies focused primarily on the formation of the PLP–αv integrin–AMPA receptor complex in vivo and whether complex formation impacts OPC migration in the brain. We found that in wild-type cerebellum, PLP associates with αv integrin and the calcium-impermeable GluR2 subunit of the AMPA receptor, but in mice lacking PLP, αv integrin did not associate with GluR2. Live imaging studies of OPC migration in ex vivo cerebellar slices demonstrated altered OPC migratory responses to neurotransmitter stimulation in the absence of PLP and GluR2 or when αv integrin levels were reduced. Chemotaxis assays of purified OPCs revealed that AMPA stimulation was neither attractive nor repulsive but clearly increased the migration rate of wild-type but not PLP null OPCs. AMPA receptor stimulation of wild-type OPCs caused decreased cell-surface expression of the GluR2 AMPA receptor subunit and increased intracellular Ca2+ signaling, whereas PLP null OPCs did not reduce GluR2 at the cell surface or increase Ca2+ signaling in response to AMPA treatment. Together, these studies demonstrate that PLP is critical for OPC responses to glutamate signaling and has important implications for OPC responses when levels of glutamate are high in the extracellular space, such as following demyelination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT After demyelination, such as occurs in multiple sclerosis, remyelination of axons is often incomplete, leading to loss of neuronal function and clinical disability. Remyelination may fail because oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) do not completely migrate into

  2. Reconsolidation of Reminder-Induced Amnesia: Role of NMDA and AMPA Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, V P; Kozyrev, S A; Solntseva, S V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the role of glutamate receptors and reminder in the mechanisms of amnesia maintenance caused by disruption of conditioned food aversion reconsolidation with an antagonist of NMDA glutamate receptor in snails. At the early stage of amnesia (day 3 after induction), injection or NMDA of AMPA glutamate receptor antagonists prior to reminder (presentation of the conditioned food stimulus) led to memory recovery. Reminder alone or injection of antagonists without reminder or after reminder was ineffective. At the late stage of amnesia (day 10), antagonists/reminder had no effect on amnesia maintenance. It was hypothesized that reminder at the early stage of amnesia led to reactivation and reconsolidation of the molecular processes of amnesia including activation NMDA and AMPA glutamate receptors. Injection of antagonists of these receptors prior to reminder led to disruption of reactivation/reconsolidation of amnesia and recovery of the conditioned food aversion memory.

  3. Ionotropic AMPA-type glutamate and metabotropic GABAB receptors: determining cellular physiology by proteomes.

    PubMed

    Bettler, Bernhard; Fakler, Bernd

    2017-03-07

    Ionotropic AMPA-type glutamate receptors and G-protein-coupled metabotropic GABAB receptors are key elements of neurotransmission whose cellular functions are determined by their protein constituents. Over the past couple of years unbiased proteomic approaches identified comprehensive sets of protein building blocks of these two types of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain (termed receptor proteomes). This provided the opportunity to match receptor proteomes with receptor physiology and to study the structural organization, regulation and function of native receptor complexes in an unprecedented manner. In this review we discuss the principles of receptor architecture and regulation emerging from the functional characterization of the proteomes of AMPA and GABAB receptors. We also highlight progress in unraveling the role of unexpected protein components for receptor physiology.

  4. TARP modulation of synaptic AMPA receptor trafficking and gating depends on multiple intracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Aaron D; Nicoll, Roger A

    2009-07-07

    Previous work has established stargazin and its related family of transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) as auxiliary subunits of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) that control synaptic strength both by targeting AMPARs to synapses through an intracellular PDZ-binding motif and by modulating their gating through an extracellular domain. However, TARPs gamma-2 and gamma-8 differentially regulate the synaptic targeting of AMPARs, despite having identical PDZ-binding motifs. Here, we investigate the structural elements that contribute to this functional difference between TARP subtypes by using domain transplantation and truncation. We identify a component of synaptic AMPAR trafficking that is independent of the TARP C-terminal PDZ-binding motif, and we establish previously uncharacterized roles for the TARP intracellular N terminus, loop, and C terminus in modulating both the trafficking and gating of synaptic AMPARs.

  5. TARP subtypes differentially and dose-dependently control synaptic AMPA receptor gating.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Aaron D; Zhou, Wei; Karimzadegan, Siavash; Bredt, David S; Nicoll, Roger A

    2007-09-20

    A family of transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) profoundly affects the trafficking and gating of AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Although TARP subtypes are differentially expressed throughout the CNS, it is unclear whether this imparts functional diversity to AMPARs in distinct neuronal populations. Here, we examine the effects of each TARP subtype on the kinetics of AMPAR gating in heterologous cells and in neurons. We report a striking heterogeneity in the effects of TARP subtypes on AMPAR deactivation and desensitization, which we demonstrate controls the time course of synaptic transmission. In addition, we find that some TARP subtypes dramatically slow AMPAR activation kinetics. Synaptic AMPAR kinetics also depend on TARP expression level, suggesting a variable TARP/AMPAR stoichiometry. Analysis of quantal synaptic transmission in a TARP gamma-4 knockout (KO) mouse corroborates our expression data and demonstrates that TARP subtype-specific gating of AMPARs contributes to the kinetics of native AMPARs at central synapses.

  6. AMPA receptor subunits expression and phosphorylation in cingulate cortex in rats following esophageal acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    BANERJEE, B.; MEDDA, B. K.; POCHIRAJU, S.; KANNAMPALLI, P.; LANG, I. M.; SENGUPTA, J. N.; SHAKER, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently reported an increase in N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit expression and CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of NR2B in the rostral cingulate cortical (rCC) neurons following esophageal acid exposure in rats. As α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors mediate the fast excitatory transmission and play a critical role in synaptic plasticity, in this study, we investigated the effect of esophageal acid exposure in rats on the expression of AMPA receptor subunits and the involvement of these molecular alterations in acid-induced sensitization of neurons in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and midcingulate (MCC) cortices. Methods In molecular study, we examined GluA1 and GluA2 expression and phosphorylation in membrane preparations and in the isolated postsynaptic densities (PSDs) from rats receiving acute esophageal exposure of either saline (control group) or 0.1 NHCl (experimental group). In electrophysiological study, the effect of selective AMPA receptor (Ca2+ permeable) antagonist IEM-1460 and CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 was tested on responses of cortical neurons during acid infusion to address the underlying molecular mechanism of acid-induced sensitization. Key Results The acid exposure significantly increased expression of GluA1, pGluA1Ser831, and phosphorylated CaMKIIThr286, in the cortical membrane preparations. In isolated PSDs, a significant increase in pGluA1Ser831 was observed in acid-treated rats compared with controls. Microinjection of IEM-1460 or KN-93 near the recording site significantly attenuated acid-induced sensitization of cortical neurons. Conclusions & Inferences The underlying mechanism of acid-induced cortical sensitization involves upregulation and CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of GluA1. These molecular changes of AMPA receptors subunit GluA1 in the cortical neurons might play an important role in acid-induced esophageal hypersensitivity. PMID:24118589

  7. EM colocalization of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits at synapses in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Kharazia, V N; Phend, K D; Rustioni, A; Weinberg, R J

    1996-05-24

    Electrophysiology and light microscopy suggest that a single excitatory synapse may use both amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Using immunogold electron microscopy, we here provide direct evidence for colocalization at individual synapses in sensorimotor cortex of adult rats. Colocalization was most commonly observed on dendritic spines; subunits of the two classes of receptors seemed to be independently distributed within the synaptic active zone.

  8. Glutamate receptors on myelinated spinal cord axons: II)AMPA and GluR5 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ouardouz, M.; Coderre, E.; Zamponi, G. W.; Hameed, S.; Yin, X.; Trapp, B.D.; Stys, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Glutamate receptors, which play a major role in the physiology and pathology of CNS gray matter, are also involved in the pathophysiology of white matter. However the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for excitotoxic damage to white matter elements are not fully understood. We explored the roles of AMPA and GluR5 kainate receptors in axonal Ca2+ deregulation. Methods Dorsal column axons were loaded with a Ca2+ indicator and imaged in vitro using confocal microscopy. Results Both AMPA and a GluR5 kainate receptor agonists increased intra-axonal Ca2+ in myelinated rat dorsal column fibers. These responses were inhibited by selective antagonists of these glutamate receptors. The GluR5-mediated Ca2+ rise was mediated by both canonical (i.e. ionotropic) and non-canonical (metabotropic) signalling, dependent on a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein and a phospholipase C-dependent pathway, promoting Ca2+ release from IP3-dependent stores. Additionally, the GluR5 response was significantly reduced by intra-axonal NO scavengers. In contrast, GluR4 AMPA receptors operated via Ca2+ induced Ca2+ release, dependent on ryanodine receptors, and unaffected by NO scavengers. Neither pathway depended on L-type Ca2+ channels, in contrast to GlurR6 kainate receptor action 1. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of GluR4 and GluR5 clustered at the surface of myelinated axons; GluR5 co-immunoprecipitated with nNOS and often co-localized with nNOS clusters on the internodal axon. Interpretation Central myelinated axons express functional AMPA and GluR5 kainate receptors, and can directly respond to glutamate receptor agonists. These glutamate receptor-dependent signalling pathways promote an increase in intra-axonal Ca2+ levels potentially contributing to axonal degeneration. PMID:19224531

  9. Glyphosate and AMPA contents in sediments produced by wind erosion of agricultural soils in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Virginia; Aimar, Silvia; De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Buschiazzo, Daniel; Mendez, Mariano; Costa, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    Wind erosion of soils is an important event in arid and semiarid regions of Argentina. The magnitude of wind erosion occurring under different management practices is relatively well known in this region but less information is available on the quality of the eroded material. Considering that the intensification of agriculture may increase the concentrations of substances in the eroded material, producing potential negative effects on the environment, we analyzed the amount of glyphosate and AMPA in sediments produced by wind erosion of agricultural soils of Argentina. Wind eroded materials were collected by means of BSNE samplers in two loess sites of the semiarid region of Argentina: Chaco and La Pampa. Samples were collected from 1 ha square fields at 13.5, 50 and 150 cm height. Results showed that at higher heights the concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA were mostly higher. The glyphosate concentration was more variable and higher in Chaco (0.66 to 313 µg kg-1) than in La Pampa (4.17 to 114 µg kg-1). These results may be due to the higher use of herbicides in Chaco, where the predominant crops are soybeans and corn, produced under no-tillage. Under these conditions the use of glyphosate for weeds control is a common practice. Conversely, AMPA concentrations were higher in La Pampa (13.1 to 101.3 µg kg-1) than in Chaco (1.3 to 83 µg kg-1). These preliminary results show high concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA in wind eroded materials of agricultural soils of Argentina. More research is needed to confirm these high concentrations in other conditions in order to detect the temporal and spatial distribution patterns of the herbicide.

  10. Differential trafficking of AMPA receptors following activation of NMDA receptors and mGluRs.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Thomas M; Collingridge, Graham L; Fitzjohn, Stephen M

    2011-07-27

    The removal of AMPA receptors from synapses is a major component of long-term depression (LTD). How this occurs, however, is still only partially understood. To investigate the trafficking of AMPA receptors in real-time we previously tagged the GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors with ecliptic pHluorin and studied the effects of NMDA receptor activation. In the present study we have compared the effect of NMDA receptor and group I mGluR activation, using GluA2 tagged with super ecliptic pHluorin (SEP-GluA2) expressed in cultured hippocampal neurons. Surprisingly, agonists of the two receptors, which are both able to induce chemical forms of LTD, had clearly distinct effects on AMPA receptor trafficking. In agreement with our previous work we found that transient NMDA receptor activation results in an initial decrease in surface GluA2 from extrasynaptic sites followed by a delayed reduction in GluA2 from puncta (putative synapses). In contrast, transient activation of group I mGluRs, using DHPG, led to a pronounced but more delayed decrease in GluA2 from the dendritic shafts. Surprisingly, there was no average change in the fluorescence of the puncta. Examination of fluorescence at individual puncta, however, indicated that alterations did take place, with some puncta showing an increase and others a decrease in fluorescence. The effects of DHPG were, like DHPG-induced LTD, prevented by treatment with a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor. The electrophysiological correlate of the effects of DHPG in the SEP-GluA2 infected cultures was a reduction in mEPSC frequency with no change in amplitude. The implications of these findings for the initial mechanisms of expression of both NMDA receptor- and mGluR-induced LTD are discussed.

  11. Discovery and Characterization of AMPA Receptor Modulators Selective for TARP-γ8.

    PubMed

    Maher, Michael P; Wu, Nyantsz; Ravula, Suchitra; Ameriks, Michael K; Savall, Brad M; Liu, Changlu; Lord, Brian; Wyatt, Ryan M; Matta, Jose A; Dugovic, Christine; Yun, Sujin; Ver Donck, Luc; Steckler, Thomas; Wickenden, Alan D; Carruthers, Nicholas I; Lovenberg, Timothy W

    2016-05-01

    Members of the α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate the majority of fast synaptic transmission within the mammalian brain and spinal cord, representing attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we describe novel AMPA receptor modulators that require the presence of the accessory protein CACNG8, also known as transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein γ8 (TARP-γ8). Using calcium flux, radioligand binding, and electrophysiological assays of wild-type and mutant forms of TARP-γ8, we demonstrate that these compounds possess a novel mechanism of action consistent with a partial disruption of the interaction between the TARP and the pore-forming subunit of the channel. One of the molecules, 5-[2-chloro-6-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]-1,3-dihydrobenzimidazol-2-one (JNJ-55511118), had excellent pharmacokinetic properties and achieved high receptor occupancy following oral administration. This molecule showed strong, dose-dependent inhibition of neurotransmission within the hippocampus, and a strong anticonvulsant effect. At high levels of receptor occupancy in rodent in vivo models, JNJ-55511118 showed a strong reduction in certain bands on electroencephalogram, transient hyperlocomotion, no motor impairment on rotarod, and a mild impairment in learning and memory. JNJ-55511118 is a novel tool for reversible AMPA receptor inhibition, particularly within the hippocampus, with potential therapeutic utility as an anticonvulsant or neuroprotectant. The existence of a molecule with this mechanism of action demonstrates the possibility of pharmacological targeting of accessory proteins, increasing the potential number of druggable targets.

  12. Distribution of transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) isoforms in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Larsson, M; Agalave, N; Watanabe, M; Svensson, C I

    2013-09-17

    The transmembrane α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are a family of auxiliary AMPA receptor subunits that differentially modulate trafficking and many functional properties of the receptor. To investigate which TARP isoforms may be involved in AMPA receptor-mediated spinal synaptic transmission, we have mapped the localization of five of the known TARP isoforms, namely γ-2 (also known as stargazin), γ-3, γ-4, γ-7 and γ-8, in the rat spinal cord. Immunoblotting showed expression of all isoforms in the spinal cord to varying degrees. At the light microscopic level, immunoperoxidase labeling of γ-4, γ-7 and γ-8 was found throughout spinal gray matter. In white matter, γ-4 and γ-7 immunolabeling was observed in astrocytic processes and in mature oligodendrocytes. In pepsin-treated spinal cord, γ-7 often colocalized with GluA2 immunopositive puncta in the deep dorsal horn as well as in the ventral horn, but not in the superficial dorsal horn. Postembedding immunogold labeling was further used to assess the synaptic localization of γ-2, γ-7 and γ-8 in the dorsal horn. Synaptic immunogold labeling of γ-2 was sparse throughout the dorsal horn, with some primary afferent synapses weakly labeled, whereas relatively strong γ-7 immunogold labeling was found at deep dorsal horn synapses, including at synapses formed by low-threshold mechanosensitive primary afferent terminals. Prominent immunogold labeling of γ-8 was frequently detected at synapses established by primary afferent fibers. The spinal localization patterns of TARP isoforms reported here suggest that AMPA receptors at spinal synaptic populations and in glial cells may exhibit different functional characteristics owing to differences in auxiliary subunit composition.

  13. Xenon reduces glutamate-, AMPA-, and kainate-induced membrane currents in cortical neurones.

    PubMed

    Dinse, A; Föhr, K J; Georgieff, M; Beyer, C; Bulling, A; Weigt, H U

    2005-04-01

    The anaesthetic, analgesic, and neuroprotective effects of xenon (Xe) are believed to be mediated by a block of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor channel. Interestingly, the clinical profile of the noble gas differs markedly from that of specific NMDA receptor antagonists. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate whether Xe might be less specific, also inhibiting the two other subtypes of glutamate receptor channels, such as the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolole propionate (AMPA) and kainate receptors. The study was performed on voltage-clamped cortical neurones from embryonic mice and SH-SY5Y cells expressing GluR6 kainate receptors. Drugs were applied by a multi-barreled fast perfusion system. Xe, dissolved at approximately 3.45 mM in aqueous solution, diminished the peak and even more the plateau of AMPA and glutamate induced currents. At the control EC(50) value for AMPA (29 microM) these reductions were by about 40 and 56% and at 3 mM glutamate the reductions were by 45 and 66%, respectively. Currents activated at the control EC(50) value for kainate (57 microM) were inhibited by 42%. Likewise, Xe showed an inhibitory effect on kainate-induced membrane currents of SH-SY5Y cells transfected with the GluR6 subunit of the kainate receptor. Xe reduced kainate-induced currents by between 35 and 60%, depending on the kainate concentration. Xe blocks not only NMDA receptors, but also AMPA and kainate receptors in cortical neurones as well as GluR6-type receptors expressed in SH-SY5Y cells. Thus, Xe seems to be rather non-specific as a channel blocker and this may contribute to the analgesic and anaesthetic potency of Xe.

  14. Functional Connectome Analysis of Dopamine Neuron Glutamatergic Connections in Forebrain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Mingote, Susana; Chuhma, Nao; Kusnoor, Sheila V.; Field, Bianca; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2015-01-01

    In the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a subpopulation of dopamine neurons express vesicular glutamate transporter 2 and make glutamatergic connections to nucleus accumbens (NAc) and olfactory tubercle (OT) neurons. However, their glutamatergic connections across the forebrain have not been explored systematically. To visualize dopamine neuron forebrain projections and to enable photostimulation of their axons independent of transmitter status, we virally transfected VTA neurons with channelrhodopsin-2 fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (ChR2-EYFP) and used DATIREScre mice to restrict expression to dopamine neurons. ChR2-EYFP-expressing neurons almost invariably stained for tyrosine hydroxylase, identifying them as dopaminergic. Dopamine neuron axons visualized by ChR2-EYFP fluorescence projected most densely to the striatum, moderately to the amygdala and entorhinal cortex (ERC), sparsely to prefrontal and cingulate cortices, and rarely to the hippocampus. Guided by ChR2-EYFP fluorescence, we recorded systematically from putative principal neurons in target areas and determined the incidence and strength of glutamatergic connections by activating all dopamine neuron terminals impinging on recorded neurons with wide-field photostimulation. This revealed strong glutamatergic connections in the NAc, OT, and ERC; moderate strength connections in the central amygdala; and weak connections in the cingulate cortex. No glutamatergic connections were found in the dorsal striatum, hippocampus, basolateral amygdala, or prefrontal cortex. These results indicate that VTA dopamine neurons elicit widespread, but regionally distinct, glutamatergic signals in the forebrain and begin to define the dopamine neuron excitatory functional connectome. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dopamine neurons are important for the control of motivated behavior and are involved in the pathophysiology of several major neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent studies have shown that some ventral midbrain

  15. Precision therapy for a new disorder of AMPA receptor recycling due to mutations in ATAD1

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C.; Umanah, George K.E.; Sondheimer, Neal; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Wilkens, Alisha B.; Conlin, Laura K.; Santani, Avni B.; Nesbitt, Addie; Juulsola, Jane; Ma, Erica; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: ATAD1 encodes Thorase, a mediator of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA) receptor recycling; in this work, we characterized the phenotype resulting from ATAD1 mutations and developed a targeted therapy in both mice and humans. Methods: Using exome sequencing, we identified a novel ATAD1 mutation (p.E276X) as the etiology of a devastating neurologic disorder characterized by hypertonia, seizures, and death in a consanguineous family. We postulated that pathogenesis was a result of excessive AMPA receptor activity and designed a targeted therapeutic approach using perampanel, an AMPA-receptor antagonist. Results: Perampanel therapy in ATAD1 knockout mice reversed behavioral defects, normalized brain MRI abnormalities, prevented seizures, and prolonged survival. The ATAD1 patients treated with perampanel showed improvement in hypertonicity and resolution of seizures. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that identification of novel monogenic neurologic disorders and observation of response to targeted therapeutics can provide important insights into human nervous system functioning. PMID:28180185

  16. in Silico investigation of the structural requirements for the AMPA receptor antagonism by quinoxaline derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Faizul; Abugrain, Ismaiel Mohamed; Sanalla, Mohamed Hussin; Elnaas, Radwan Fatahalla; Rajab, Ibrahim Abdassalam Ibn

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate receptors have been implicated in various neurological disorders and their antagonism offers a suitable approach for the treatment of such disorders. The field of drug design and discovery aims to find best medicines to prevent, treat and cure diseases quickly and efficiently. In this regard, computational tools have helped medicinal chemists modify and optimize molecules to potent drug candidates with better pharmacokinetic profiles, and guiding biologists and pharmacologists to explore new disease genes as well as novel drug targets. In the present study, to understand the structural requirements for AMPA receptor antagonism, molecular docking study was performed on 41 structurally diverse antagonists based on quinoxaline nucleus. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking simulations using AutoDock 4.2 program. The results obtained signify that the molecular docking approach is reliable and produces a good correlation coefficient (r2 = 0.6) between experimental and docking predicted AMPA receptor antagonistic activity. The aromatic moiety of quinoxaline core has been proved to be vital for hydrophobic contacts exhibiting - interactions in docked conformations. However, polar moieties such as carboxylic group and 1,2,4-triazole moieties were noted to be sites for hydrophilic interactions in terms of hydrogen bonding with the receptor. These analyses can be exploited to design and develop novel AMPA receptor antagonists for the treatment of different neurological disorders. PMID:24250113

  17. Inhibition of the NMDA and AMPA receptor channels by antidepressants and antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Barygin, Oleg I; Nagaeva, Elina I; Tikhonov, Denis B; Belinskaya, Darya A; Vanchakova, Nina P; Shestakova, Natalia N

    2017-04-01

    It is known that some antidepressants and antipsychotics directly inhibit NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. In this study we systematically studied action of seven drugs (Fluoxetine, Citalopram, Desipramine, Amitriptyline, Atomoxetine, Chlorpromazine, and Clozapine) on NMDA receptors and Ca(2+)-permeable and -impermeable AMPA receptors in rat brain neurons by whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Except for weak effect of fluoxetine, all drugs were virtually inactive against Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptors. Fluoxetine and desipramine significantly inhibited Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (IC50=43±7 and 105±12µM, respectively). Desipramine, atomoxetine and chlorpromazine inhibited NMDA receptors in clinically relevant low micromolar concentrations, while citalopram had only weak effect. All tested medicines have been clustered into two groups by their action on NMDA receptors: desipramine, amitriptyline, chlorpromazine, and atomoxetine display voltage- and magnesium-dependent open channel blocking mechanism. Action of fluoxetine and clozapine was found to be voltage- and magnesium-independent. All voltage-dependent compounds could be trapped in closed NMDA receptor channels. Possible contribution of NMDA receptor inhibition by certain antidepressants and antipsychotics to their analgesic effects in neuropathic pain is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The AMPA modulator S 18986 improves declarative and working memory performances in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Marighetto, Aline; Valerio, Stephane; Jaffard, Robert; Mormede, Cecile; Muñoz, Carmen; Bernard, Katy; Morain, Philippe

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to further characterize the memory-enhancing profile of S 18986 a positive allosteric modulator of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors. S 18986 was studied in two mouse models of age-related memory deficits, using radial maze paradigms involving long-term/declarative memory and short-term/working memory. Aged mice exhibited severe deficits when compared with their younger counterparts in the two behavioural tests. S 18986 at the dose of 0.1 mg/kg selectively improved aged mouse performance in the test of long-term/declarative memory flexibility and exerted a beneficial effect on short-term retention of successive arm-visits in the short-term/working memory test. This study confirms the memory-enhancing properties of S 18986 and, in line with emerging data on multiple AMPA modulators, highlights the relevance of targeting AMPA receptors in the development of new memory enhancers.

  19. Synergy of AMPA and NMDA Receptor Currents in Dopaminergic Neurons: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakharov, Denis; Lapish, Christopher; Gutkin, Boris; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons display two modes of firing: low-frequency tonic and high-frequency bursts. The high frequency firing within the bursts is attributed to NMDA, but not AMPA receptor activation. In our models of the DA neuron, both biophysical and abstract, the NMDA receptor current can significantly increase their firing frequency, whereas the AMPA receptor current is not able to evoke high-frequency activity and usually suppresses firing. However, both currents are produced by glutamate receptors and, consequently, are often co-activated. Here we consider combined influence of AMPA and NMDA synaptic input in the models of the DA neuron. Different types of neuronal activity (resting state, low frequency, or high frequency firing) are observed depending on the conductance of the AMPAR and NMDAR currents. In two models, biophysical and reduced, we show that the firing frequency increases more effectively if both receptors are co-activated for certain parameter values. In particular, in the more quantitative biophysical model, the maximal frequency is 40% greater than that with NMDAR alone. The dynamical mechanism of such frequency growth is explained in the framework of phase space evolution using the reduced model. In short, both the AMPAR and NMDAR currents flatten the voltage nullcline, providing the frequency increase, whereas only NMDA prevents complete unfolding of the nullcline, providing robust firing. Thus, we confirm a major role of the NMDAR in generating high-frequency firing and conclude that AMPAR activation further significantly increases the frequency. PMID:27252643

  20. Memory retrieval requires ongoing protein synthesis and NMDA receptor activity-mediated AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Joëlle; Gamache, Karine; Schneider, Rilla; Nader, Karim

    2015-02-11

    Whereas consolidation and reconsolidation are considered dynamic processes requiring protein synthesis, memory retrieval has long been considered a passive readout of previously established plasticity. However, previous findings suggest that memory retrieval may be more dynamic than previously thought. This study therefore aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying memory retrieval in the rat. Infusion of protein synthesis inhibitors (rapamycin or anisomycin) in the amygdala 10 min before memory retrieval transiently impaired auditory fear memory expression, suggesting ongoing protein synthesis is required to enable memory retrieval. We then investigated the role of protein synthesis in NMDA receptor activity-mediated AMPA receptor trafficking. Coinfusion of an NMDA receptor antagonist (ifenprodil) or infusion of an AMPA receptor endocytosis inhibitor (GluA23Y) before rapamycin prevented this memory impairment. Furthermore, rapamycin transiently decreased GluA1 levels at the postsynaptic density (PSD), but did not affect extrasynaptic sites. This effect at the PSD was prevented by an infusion of GluA23Y before rapamycin. Together, these data show that ongoing protein synthesis is required before memory retrieval is engaged, and suggest that this protein synthesis may be involved in the NMDAR activity-mediated trafficking of AMPA receptors that takes place during memory retrieval.

  1. X-ray structures of AMPA receptor-cone snail toxin complexes illuminate activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Dürr, Katharina L; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-08-29

    AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors are crucial to the structural and dynamic properties of the brain, to the development and function of the central nervous system, and to the treatment of neurological conditions from depression to cognitive impairment. However, the molecular principles underlying AMPA receptor activation have remained elusive. We determined multiple x-ray crystal structures of the GluA2 AMPA receptor in complex with a Conus striatus cone snail toxin, a positive allosteric modulator, and orthosteric agonists, at 3.8 to 4.1 angstrom resolution. We show how the toxin acts like a straightjacket on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) "gating ring," restraining the domains via both intra- and interdimer cross-links such that agonist-induced closure of the LBD "clamshells" is transduced into an irislike expansion of the gating ring. By structural analysis of activation-enhancing mutants, we show how the expansion of the LBD gating ring results in pulling forces on the M3 helices that, in turn, are coupled to ion channel gating.

  2. The Influence of Synaptic Size on AMPA Receptor Activation: A Monte Carlo Model

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Jesus; Peña, Jose M.; DeFelipe, Javier; Herreras, Oscar; Merchan-Perez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Physiological and electron microscope studies have shown that synapses are functionally and morphologically heterogeneous and that variations in size of synaptic junctions are related to characteristics such as release probability and density of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. The present article focuses on how these morphological variations impact synaptic transmission. We based our study on Monte Carlo computational simulations of simplified model synapses whose morphological features have been extracted from hundreds of actual synaptic junctions reconstructed by three-dimensional electron microscopy. We have examined the effects that parameters such as synaptic size or density of AMPA receptors have on the number of receptors that open after release of a single synaptic vesicle. Our results indicate that the maximum number of receptors that will open after the release of a single synaptic vesicle may show a ten-fold variation in the whole population of synapses. When individual synapses are considered, there is also a stochastical variability that is maximal in small synapses with low numbers of receptors. The number of postsynaptic receptors and the size of the synaptic junction are the most influential parameters, while the packing density of receptors or the concentration of extrasynaptic transporters have little or no influence on the opening of AMPA receptors. PMID:26107874

  3. AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity require SQSTM1/p62.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Parameshwaran, Kodeeswaran; Seibenhener, M Lamar; Kang, Myoung-Goo; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Huganir, Richard L; Diaz-Meco, Maria T; Wooten, Marie W

    2009-04-01

    SQSTM1/p62 is a multidomain/scaffold for the atypical protein kinase Cs (aPKC). Phosphorylation of AMPA receptors by PKC has been shown to regulate their insertion in the postsynaptic membrane. Here, we directly tested whether p62 could interact with AMPA receptor subunits and influence their trafficking and phosphorylation. GluR1 receptor intracellular loop L2-3 and the ZZ-type zinc finger domain of p62 are essential for the interaction between these two proteins. In this context, both p62 and aPKC-mediated phosphorylation were necessary for surface delivery of the receptor. Our findings reveal that p62 is the first protein identified that interacts with a region of the GluR receptor other than the C-terminal tail. Furthermore, mice deficient in p62 displayed impaired hippocampal CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP), along with diminished surface expression of GluR1 and phosphorylation of S818. Lastly, we identify a conserved sequence (ISExSL) shared by all p62 interacting-aPKC substrates. These findings support a model where p62 interaction and aPKC phosphorylation act together to mediate AMPA receptor trafficking and long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  4. The influence of synaptic size on AMPA receptor activation: a Monte Carlo model.

    PubMed

    Montes, Jesus; Peña, Jose M; DeFelipe, Javier; Herreras, Oscar; Merchan-Perez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Physiological and electron microscope studies have shown that synapses are functionally and morphologically heterogeneous and that variations in size of synaptic junctions are related to characteristics such as release probability and density of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. The present article focuses on how these morphological variations impact synaptic transmission. We based our study on Monte Carlo computational simulations of simplified model synapses whose morphological features have been extracted from hundreds of actual synaptic junctions reconstructed by three-dimensional electron microscopy. We have examined the effects that parameters such as synaptic size or density of AMPA receptors have on the number of receptors that open after release of a single synaptic vesicle. Our results indicate that the maximum number of receptors that will open after the release of a single synaptic vesicle may show a ten-fold variation in the whole population of synapses. When individual synapses are considered, there is also a stochastical variability that is maximal in small synapses with low numbers of receptors. The number of postsynaptic receptors and the size of the synaptic junction are the most influential parameters, while the packing density of receptors or the concentration of extrasynaptic transporters have little or no influence on the opening of AMPA receptors.

  5. FUNCTIONAL INSIGHT INTO DEVELOPMENT OF POSITIVE ALLOSTERIC MODULATORS OF AMPA RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Autumn M.; Harms, Jonathan E.; Partin, Kathryn M.; Benveniste, Morris

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) ionotropic glutamate receptors facilitate synaptic plasticity and contribute essentially to learning and memory, properties which make AMPA receptors targets for drug discovery and development. One region at which several different classes of positive allosteric modulators bind lies at the dimer interface between the ligand-binding core of the second, membrane-proximal, extracellular domain of AMPA receptors. This solvent-accessible binding pocket has been the target of drug discovery efforts, leading to the recent delineation of five “subsites” which differentially allow access to modulator moieties, and for which distinct modulator affinities and apparent efficacies are attributed. Here we use the voltage-clamp technique in conjunction with rapid drug application to study the effects of mutants lining subsites “A” and “B” of the allosteric modulator pocket to assess affinity and efficacy of allosteric modulation by cyclothiazide, CX614, CMPDA and CMPDB. A novel analysis of the decay of current produced by the onset of desensitization has allowed us to estimate both affinity and efficacy from single concentrations of modulator. Such an approach may be useful for effective high throughput screening of new target compounds. PMID:24878241

  6. Functional insight into development of positive allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Autumn M; Harms, Jonathan E; Partin, Kathryn M; Benveniste, Morris

    2014-10-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) ionotropic glutamate receptors facilitate synaptic plasticity and contribute essentially to learning and memory, properties which make AMPA receptors targets for drug discovery and development. One region at which several different classes of positive allosteric modulators bind lies at the dimer interface between the ligand-binding core of the second, membrane-proximal, extracellular domain of AMPA receptors. This solvent-accessible binding pocket has been the target of drug discovery efforts, leading to the recent delineation of five "subsites" which differentially allow access to modulator moieties, and for which distinct modulator affinities and apparent efficacies are attributed. Here we use the voltage-clamp technique in conjunction with rapid drug application to study the effects of mutants lining subsites "A" and "B" of the allosteric modulator pocket to assess affinity and efficacy of allosteric modulation by cyclothiazide, CX614, CMPDA and CMPDB. A novel analysis of the decay of current produced by the onset of desensitization has allowed us to estimate both affinity and efficacy from single concentrations of modulator. Such an approach may be useful for effective high throughput screening of new target compounds.

  7. in Silico investigation of the structural requirements for the AMPA receptor antagonism by quinoxaline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Azam, Faizul; Abugrain, Ismaiel Mohamed; Sanalla, Mohamed Hussin; Elnaas, Radwan Fatahalla; Rajab, Ibrahim Abdassalam Ibn

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate receptors have been implicated in various neurological disorders and their antagonism offers a suitable approach for the treatment of such disorders. The field of drug design and discovery aims to find best medicines to prevent, treat and cure diseases quickly and efficiently. In this regard, computational tools have helped medicinal chemists modify and optimize molecules to potent drug candidates with better pharmacokinetic profiles, and guiding biologists and pharmacologists to explore new disease genes as well as novel drug targets. In the present study, to understand the structural requirements for AMPA receptor antagonism, molecular docking study was performed on 41 structurally diverse antagonists based on quinoxaline nucleus. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking simulations using AutoDock 4.2 program. The results obtained signify that the molecular docking approach is reliable and produces a good correlation coefficient (r(2) = 0.6) between experimental and docking predicted AMPA receptor antagonistic activity. The aromatic moiety of quinoxaline core has been proved to be vital for hydrophobic contacts exhibiting - interactions in docked conformations. However, polar moieties such as carboxylic group and 1,2,4-triazole moieties were noted to be sites for hydrophilic interactions in terms of hydrogen bonding with the receptor. These analyses can be exploited to design and develop novel AMPA receptor antagonists for the treatment of different neurological disorders.

  8. Ca(2+) -permeable AMPA receptors associated with epileptogenesis of hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Hiroki; Sonoda, Masaki; Teramoto, Sayaka; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kimura, Tadashi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Yosuke; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kwak, Shin; Kameyama, Shigeki; Kakita, Akiyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Hypothalamic hamartoma (HH), composed of neurons and glia without apparent cytologic abnormalities, is a rare developmental malformation in humans. Patients with HH often have characteristic medically refractory gelastic seizures, and intrinsic epileptogenesis within the lesions has been speculated. Herein we provide evidence to suggest that in HH neurons, Ca(2+) permeability through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors is aberrantly elevated. In needle biopsy specimens of HH tissue, field potential recordings demonstrated spontaneous epileptiform activities similar to those observed in other etiologically distinct epileptogenic tissues. In HH, however, these activities were clearly abolished by application of Joro Spider Toxin (JSTX), a specific inhibitor of the Ca(2+) -permeable AMPA receptor. Consistent with these physiologic findings, the neuronal nuclei showed disappearance of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2) immunoreactivity. Furthermore, examination of glutamate receptor 2 (GluA2) messenger RNA (mRNA) revealed that editing efficiency at the glutamine/arginine site was significantly low. These results suggest that neurons in HH may bear Ca(2+) -permeable AMPA receptors due to dislocation of ADAR2.

  9. Influence of AMPA/kainate receptors on extracellular 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat midbrain raphe and forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rui; Ma, Zhiyuan; Auerbach, Sidney B

    1997-01-01

    The regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release by excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors was examined by use of microdialysis in the CNS of freely behaving rats. Extracellular 5-HT was measured in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), median raphe nucleus (MRN), nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, frontal cortex, dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Local infusion of kainate produced increases in extracellular 5-HT in the DRN and MRN. Kainate infusion into forebrain sites had a less potent effect. In further studies of the DRN and nucleus accumbens, kainate-induced increases in extracellular 5-HT were blocked by the EAA receptor antagonists, kynurenate and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX). The effect of infusing kainate into the DRN or nucleus accumbens was attenuated or abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX), suggesting that the increase in extracellular 5-HT is dependent on 5-HT neuronal activity. In contrast, ibotenate-induced lesion of intrinsic neurones did not attenuate the effect of infusing kainate into the nucleus accumbens. Thus, the effect of kainate in the nucleus accumbens does not depend on intrinsic neurones. Infusion of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolaproprionate (AMPA) into the DRN and nucleus accumbens induced nonsignificant changes in extracellular 5-HT. Cyclothiazide and diazoxide, which attenuate receptor desensitization, greatly enhanced the effect of AMPA on 5-HT in the DRN, but not in the nucleus accumbens. In conclusion, AMPA/kainate receptors regulate 5-HT in the raphe and in forebrain sites. PMID:9283707

  10. Impaired motor learning attributed to altered AMPA receptor function in the cerebellum of rats with temporal lobe epilepsy: ameliorating effects of Withania somnifera and withanolide A.

    PubMed

    Soman, Smijin; Anju, T R; Jayanarayanan, S; Antony, Sherin; Paulose, C S

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Withania somnifera (WS) extract, withanolide A (WA), and carbamazepine (CBZ) on cerebellar AMPA receptor function in pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, motor learning deficit was studied by rotarod test, grid walk test, and narrow beam test. Motor learning was significantly impaired in rats with epilepsy. The treatment with WS and WA significantly reversed the motor learning deficit in rats with epilepsy when compared with control rats. There was an increase in glutamate content and IP3 content observed in rats with epilepsy which was reversed in WS- and WA-treated rats with epilepsy. alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor dysfunction was analyzed using radiolabeled AMPA receptor binding assay, AMPA receptor mRNA expression, and immunohistochemistry using anti-AMPA receptor antibody. Our results suggest that there was a decrease in Bmax, mRNA expression, and AMPA receptor expression indicating AMPA receptor dysfunction, which is suggested to have contributed to the motor learning deficit observed in rats with epilepsy. Moreover, treatment with WS and WA resulted in physiological expression of AMPA receptors. There was also alteration in GAD and GLAST expression which supplemented the increase in extracellular glutamate. The treatment with WS and WA reversed the GAD and GLAST expression. These findings suggest that WS and WA regulate AMPA receptor function in the cerebellum of rats with TLE, which has therapeutic application in epilepsy.

  11. Contrasting the Role of xCT and GLT-1 Upregulation in the Ability of Ceftriaxone to Attenuate the Cue-Induced Reinstatement of Cocaine Seeking and Normalize AMPA Receptor Subunit Expression.

    PubMed

    LaCrosse, Amber L; O'Donovan, Sinead M; Sepulveda-Orengo, Marian T; McCullumsmith, Robert E; Reissner, Kathryn J; Schwendt, Marek; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2017-06-14

    Long-term treatment with ceftriaxone attenuates the reinstatement of cocaine seeking while increasing the function of the glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and system xC- (Sxc) in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc). Sxc contributes the majority of nonsynaptic extracellular glutamate in the NAc, while GLT-1 is responsible for the majority of glutamate uptake. Here we used antisense to decrease the expression of GLT-1 and xCT (a catalytic subunit of Sxc) to determine the relative importance of both proteins in mediating the ability of ceftriaxone to prevent cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking and normalize glutamatergic proteins in the NAc of rats. Intra-NAc xCT knockdown prevented ceftriaxone from attenuating reinstatement and from upregulating GLT-1 and resulted in increased surface expression of AMPA receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2. Intra-NAc GLT-1 knockdown also prevented ceftriaxone from attenuating reinstatement and from upregulating xCT expression, without affecting GluA1 and GluA2 expression. In the absence of cocaine or ceftriaxone treatment, xCT knockdown in the NAc increased the expression of both GluA1 and GluA2 without affecting GLT-1 expression while GLT-1 knockdown had no effect. PCR and immunoprecipitation of GLT-1 revealed that ceftriaxone does not upregulate GLT-1 and xCT through a transcriptional mechanism, and their coregulation by ceftriaxone is not mediated by physical interaction. These data support important and distinct roles for xCT and GLT-1 in the actions of ceftriaxone and add to a body of literature finding evidence for coregulation of these transporters. Our results also point to xCT expression and subsequent basal glutamate levels as being a key mediator of AMPA receptor expression in the NAc.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Ceftriaxone attenuates the reinstatement of cocaine, alcohol, and heroin seeking. The mechanism of action of this behavioral effect has been attributed to glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and xCT (a catalytic subunit

  12. Pioneer glutamatergic cells develop into a morpho-functionally distinct population in the juvenile CA3 hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Marissal, Thomas; Bonifazi, Paolo; Picardo, Michel Aimé; Nardou, Romain; Petit, Ludovic Franck; Baude, Agnès; Fishell, Gordon James; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Cossart, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    The developing CA3 hippocampus is comprised by highly connected hub neurons that are particularly effective in achieving network synchronization. Functional hub neurons were shown to be exclusively GABAergic, suggesting that the contribution of glutamatergic neurons to physiological synchronization processes at early postnatal stages is minimal. However, without fast GABAergic transmission, a different situation may prevail. In the adult CA3, blocking fast GABAergic transmission induces the generation of network bursts that can be triggered by the stimulation of single pyramidal neurons. Here we revisit the network function of CA3 glutamatergic neurons from a developmental viewpoint, without fast GABAergic transmission. We uncover a sub-population of early-generated glutamatergic neurons that impacts network dynamics when stimulated in the juvenile hippocampus. Additionally, this population displays characteristic morpho-physiological features in the juvenile and adult hippocampus. Therefore, the apparently homogeneous glutamatergic cell population likely displays a morpho-functional diversity rooted in temporal embryonic origins. PMID:23271650

  13. Pioneer glutamatergic cells develop into a morpho-functionally distinct population in the juvenile CA3 hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Marissal, Thomas; Bonifazi, Paolo; Picardo, Michel Aimé; Nardou, Romain; Petit, Ludovic Franck; Baude, Agnès; Fishell, Gordon James; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Cossart, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    The developing CA3 hippocampus is comprised by highly connected hub neurons that are particularly effective in achieving network synchronization. Functional hub neurons were shown to be exclusively GABAergic, suggesting that the contribution of glutamatergic neurons to physiological synchronization processes at early postnatal stages is minimal. However, without fast GABAergic transmission, a different situation may prevail. In the adult CA3, blocking fast GABAergic transmission induces the generation of network bursts that can be triggered by the stimulation of single pyramidal neurons. Here we revisit the network function of CA3 glutamatergic neurons from a developmental viewpoint, without fast GABAergic transmission. We uncover a sub-population of early-generated glutamatergic neurons that impacts network dynamics when stimulated in the juvenile hippocampus. Additionally, this population displays characteristic morpho-physiological features in the juvenile and adult hippocampus. Therefore, the apparently homogeneous glutamatergic cell population likely displays a morpho-functional diversity rooted in temporal embryonic origins.

  14. Glutamatergic approaches in major depressive disorder: focus on ketamine, memantine and riluzole.

    PubMed

    Owen, R T

    2012-07-01

    The role of glutamate in modulating various mood states is being increasingly recognized and researched. Existing antidepressants have been shown to exert effects on various glutamatergic mechanisms, even if such agents are traditionally classified as working via other mechanisms, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine has been investigated in various mood disorders, especially major depressive disorder (MDD). It was found to produce a rapid, robust and persistent antidepressant effect. Although it can produce cognitive, dissociative and perceptual disturbances, these tend to be transient and do not outlast the antidepressant effect. Trials with memantine and riluzole, agents with actions broadly similar to and different from ketamine on the glutamatergic system, are also reviewed in MDD and prospects for future research in the area are discussed. Although preclinical studies are discussed, the main focus of the review is on clinical outcomes.

  15. Tangential migration of neuronal precursors of glutamatergic neurons in the adult mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Gerald J.; Zhou, Yi; Stadel, Ryan P.; Moss, Jonathan; Yong, Jing Hui A.; Ito, Shiori; Kawasaki, Nicholas K.; Phan, Alexander T.; Oh, Justin H.; Modak, Nikhil; Reed, Randall R.; Toni, Nicolas; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li

    2015-01-01

    In a classic model of mammalian brain formation, precursors of principal glutamatergic neurons migrate radially along radial glia fibers whereas GABAergic interneuron precursors migrate tangentially. These migration modes have significant implications for brain function. Here we used clonal lineage tracing of active radial glia-like neural stem cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus and made the surprising discovery that proliferating neuronal precursors of glutamatergic granule neurons exhibit significant tangential migration along blood vessels, followed by limited radial migration. Genetic birthdating and morphological and molecular analyses pinpointed the neuroblast stage as the main developmental window when tangential migration occurs. We also developed a partial “whole-mount” dentate gyrus preparation and observed a dense plexus of capillaries, with which only neuroblasts, among the entire population of progenitors, are directly associated. Together, these results provide insight into neuronal migration in the adult mammalian nervous system. PMID:26170290

  16. Brain glutamatergic characteristics of pediatric offspring of parents with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Spielman, Daniel; Adleman, Nancy; Alegria, Dylan; Howe, Meghan; Reiss, Allan; Chang, Kiki

    2010-05-30

    We wished to determine whether decreases in prefrontal glutamate concentrations occur in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder with and at high risk for mania. Sixty children and adolescents, 9-18 years old, of parents with bipolar I or II disorder (20 offspring with established history of mania, "BD", 20 offspring with symptoms subsyndromal to mania, "SS", and 20 healthy controls "HC") were examined using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3T to study glutamatergic metabolite concentrations in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). A signal for reductions in absolute glutamate concentrations in the ACC was seen in the BD compared with HC and SS groups. No other statistically significant differences among groups were found. Offspring of parents with BD with prior histories of mania may have disruptions in glutamatergic function compared with HC or children at risk for BD who have not yet developed mania. Longitudinal studies are necessary to confirm whether prefrontal glutamate decreases only after the onset of full mania.

  17. The neurobiological properties of tianeptine (Stablon): from monoamine hypothesis to glutamatergic modulation.

    PubMed

    McEwen, B S; Chattarji, S; Diamond, D M; Jay, T M; Reagan, L P; Svenningsson, P; Fuchs, E

    2010-03-01

    Tianeptine is a clinically used antidepressant that has drawn much attention, because this compound challenges traditional monoaminergic hypotheses of depression. It is now acknowledged that the antidepressant actions of tianeptine, together with its remarkable clinical tolerance, can be attributed to its particular neurobiological properties. The involvement of glutamate in the mechanism of action of the antidepressant tianeptine is consistent with a well-developed preclinical literature demonstrating the key function of glutamate in the mechanism of altered neuroplasticity that underlies the symptoms of depression. This article reviews the latest evidence on tianeptine's mechanism of action with a focus on the glutamatergic system, which could provide a key pathway for its antidepressant action. Converging lines of evidences demonstrate actions of tianeptine on the glutamatergic system, and therefore offer new insights into how tianeptine may be useful in the treatment of depressive disorders.

  18. Immunohistochemical Localization of AMPA Type Glutamate Receptor Subunits in the Striatum of Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yun-Ping; Shelby, Evan; Reiner, Anton J.

    2010-01-01

    Corticostriatal and thalamostriatal projections utilize glutamate as their neurotransmitter. Their influence on striatum is mediated, in part, by ionotropic AMPA-type glutamate receptors, which are heteromers composed of GluR1-4 subunits. While the cellular localization of AMPA-type subunits in the basal ganglia has been well characterized in rodents, the cellular localization of AMPA subunits in primate basal ganglia is not. We thus carried out immunohistochemical studies of GluR1-4 distribution in rhesus monkey basal ganglia in conjunction with characterization of each major neuron type. In striatum, about 65% of striatal neurons immunolabeled for GluR1, 75%-79% immunolabeled for GluR2 or GluR2/3, and only 2.5% possessed GluR4. All neurons the large size of cholinergic interneurons (mean diameter 26.1μm) were moderately labeled for GluR1, while all neurons in the size range of parvalbuminergic interneurons (mean diameter 13.8μm) were intensely rich in GluR1. Additionally, somewhat more than half of neurons in the size range of projection neurons (mean diameter 11.6μm) immunolabeled for GluR1, and about one third of these were very rich in GluR1. About half of neurons the size of cholinergic interneurons were immunolabeled for GluR2, and the remainder of the neurons that were immunolabeled for GluR2 coincided with projection neurons in size and shape (GluR2 diameter=10.7μm), indicating that the vast majority of striatal projection neurons possess immunodectible GluR2. Similar results were observed with GluR2/3 immunolabeling. Half of the neurons the size of cholinergic interneurons immunolabeled for GluR4 and seemingly all neurons in the size range of parvalbuminergic interneurons possessed GluR4. These results indicate that AMPA receptor subunit combinations for striatal projection neurons in rhesus monkey are similar to those for the corresponding neuron types in rodents, and thus their AMPA responses to glutamate likely to be similar to those demonstrated

  19. Soil concentration of glyphosate and AMPA under rice cultivation with contrasting levels of fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey Montoya, Tania; Micaela Biassoni, María; Graciela Herber, Luciana; De Geronimo, Eduardo; Aparicio, Virginia

    2017-04-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the world's most important crop species and occupies c. 150 mill ha. The province of Corrientes in Argentina leads the national production of rice cultivation. Glyphosate is a non-selective herbicide commonly used to control weeds. The molecule is inactivated once applied due to its adsorption in the soil, and once desorbed is degraded by soil microflora resulting in sarcosine and aminomethylphosphoric acid (AMPA) molecules. The objective of this investigation was to compare glyphosate and AMPA concentration in soil under different levels of fertilization along the growth season of the rice crop. A field experiment following a completely randomized design was carried out with four replicates. We evaluated four levels of fertilization (0-18-40): Control: 0 kg ha-1, Dose 1: 120 kg ha-1, Dose 2: 150 kg ha-1, Dose 3: 180 kg ha-1; and two levels of Glyphosate: with (Gly) or without (No) application. Four sampling moments were defined: pre-sowing (taken as reference), vegetative stage (V4, 30 days after application), in floral primordial differentiation-DPF (80 days post-application), and at physiological maturity-MF (125 days after application). Flooding was applied in V4 after sampling. The method used for determination and quantification was by ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to ESI UHPLC-MS / MS tandem mass spectrometer (+/-) (Acquit-Quattro Premier). We found that glyphosate and AMPA varied their concentration in soil according to the time of sampling. Detected levels of both molecules at pre-sowing indicate the persistence of this herbicide from earlier crop seasons. The highest concentration was measured in MF followed by V4. Interestingly, AMPA concentration showed higher values in V4 without application compared to the treatment with glyphosate application. On the other hand, in flooded soil both molecules presented a decrease in their concentration probably because of their dilution in water, increasing it again after

  20. Enhancement of AMPA currents and GluR1 membrane expression through PKA-coupled adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Dias, Raquel B; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M

    2012-02-01

    Phosphorylation of glutamate α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors by Protein Kinase A (PKA) is known to regulate AMPA receptor (AMPAR) trafficking and stabilization at the postsynaptic membrane, which in turn is one of the key mechanisms by which synaptic transmission and plasticity are tuned. However, not much is known as to how Gs-coupled receptors contribute to endogenous PKA-mediated regulation of AMPA receptor function. Here we report that activation of the excitatory A(2A) adenosine receptor by 2-[4-(2-p-carboxyethyl)phenylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680, 1-30 nM) facilitates AMPA-evoked currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons, by a mechanism dependent on PKA activation, but not on protein synthesis. This modulation of AMPA currents was mimicked by forskolin (1 μM) and did not occur in stratum radiatum interneurons. Superfusion of the A(2A) receptor agonist also caused an increase in the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), as well as in the membrane levels of GluR1 subunits phosphorylated at the PKA site (Ser845). The impact of this increase on GluR1-containing AMPA receptor expression was evidenced by the potentiation of LTP at the CA3-CA1 synapse that followed brief activation of A(2A) receptors. We thus propose that in conditions of increased adenosine availability, A(2A) receptor activation is responsible for setting part of the endogenous GluR1 Ser-845 phosphorylation tonus and hence, the availability of the GluR1-containing AMPA receptor extrasynaptic pool for synaptic insertion and reinforcement of synaptic strength.

  1. Actin/alpha-actinin-dependent transport of AMPA receptors in dendritic spines: role of the PDZ-LIM protein RIL.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Torsten W; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Licznerski, Pawel; Pawlak, Verena; Kolleker, Alexander; Rozov, Andrei; Kim, Jinhyun; Dittgen, Tanjew; Köhr, Georg; Sheng, Morgan; Seeburg, Peter H; Osten, Pavel

    2004-09-29

    The efficacy of excitatory transmission in the brain depends to a large extent on synaptic AMPA receptors, hence the importance of understanding the delivery and recycling of the receptors at the synaptic sites. Here we report a novel regulation of the AMPA receptor transport by a PDZ (postsynaptic density-95/Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor zona occludens 1) and LIM (Lin11/rat Isl-1/Mec3) domain-containing protein, RIL (reversion-induced LIM protein). We show that RIL binds to the AMPA glutamate receptor subunit GluR-A C-terminal peptide via its LIM domain and to alpha-actinin via its PDZ domain. RIL is enriched in the postsynaptic density fraction isolated from rat forebrain, strongly localizes to dendritic spines in cultured neurons, and coprecipitates, together with alpha-actinin, in a protein complex isolated by immunoprecipitation of AMPA receptors from forebrain synaptosomes. Functionally, in heterologous cells, RIL links AMPA receptors to the alpha-actinin/actin cytoskeleton, an effect that appears to apply selectively to the endosomal surface-internalized population of the receptors. In cultured neurons, an overexpression of recombinant RIL increases the accumulation of AMPA receptors in dendritic spines, both at the total level, as assessed by immunodetection of endogenous GluR-A-containing receptors, and at the synaptic surface, as assessed by recording of miniature EPSCs. Our results thus indicate that RIL directs the transport of GluR-A-containing AMPA receptors to and/or within dendritic spines, in an alpha-actinin/actin-dependent manner, and that such trafficking function promotes the synaptic accumulation of the receptors.

  2. Differential Control of Cocaine Self-Administration by GABAergic and Glutamatergic CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Martín-García, Elena; Bourgoin, Lucie; Cathala, Adeline; Kasanetz, Fernando; Mondesir, Miguel; Gutiérrez-Rodriguez, Ana; Reguero, Leire; Fiancette, Jean- François; Grandes, Pedro; Spampinato, Umberto; Maldonado, Rafael; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Deroche-Gamonet, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) modulates numerous neurobehavioral processes and is therefore explored as a target for the treatment of several mental and neurological diseases. However, previous studies have investigated CB1 by targeting it globally, regardless of its two main neuronal localizations on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. In the context of cocaine addiction this lack of selectivity is critical since glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal transmission is involved in different aspects of the disease. To determine whether CB1 exerts different control on cocaine seeking according to its two main neuronal localizations, we used mutant mice with deleted CB1 in cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1) or in forebrain GABAergic neurons (GABA-CB1). In Glu-CB1, gene deletion concerns the dorsal telencephalon, including neocortex, paleocortex, archicortex, hippocampal formation and the cortical portions of the amygdala. In GABA-CB1, it concerns several cortical and non-cortical areas including the dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, thalamic, and hypothalamic nuclei. We tested complementary components of cocaine self-administration, separating the influence of primary and conditioned effects. Mechanisms underlying each phenotype were explored using in vivo microdialysis and ex vivo electrophysiology. We show that CB1 expression in forebrain GABAergic neurons controls mouse sensitivity to cocaine, while CB1 expression in cortical glutamatergic neurons controls associative learning processes. In accordance, in the nucleus accumbens, GABA-CB1 receptors control cocaine-induced dopamine release and Glu-CB1 receptors control AMPAR/NMDAR ratio; a marker of synaptic plasticity. Our findings demonstrate a critical distinction of the altered balance of Glu-CB1 and GABA-CB1 activity that could participate in the vulnerability to cocaine abuse and addiction. Moreover, these novel insights advance our understanding of CB1 neuropathophysiology. PMID:26612422

  3. Prenatal betamethasone does not affect glutamatergic or GABAergic neurogenesis in preterm newborns.

    PubMed

    Vose, L R; Vinukonda, G; Diamond, D; Korumilli, R; Hu, F; Zia, M T K; Hevner, R; Ballabh, P

    2014-06-13

    Prenatal glucocorticoids (GCs) are routinely used for pregnant women in preterm labor to prevent respiratory distress syndrome and intraventricular hemorrhage in premature infants. However, the effect of antenatal GCs on neurogenesis in preterm neonates remains elusive. Herein, we hypothesized that prenatal GCs might suppress both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurogenesis in preterm rabbits and that this treatment would induce distinct changes in the expression of transcription factors regulating these developmental events. To test our hypotheses, we treated pregnant rabbits with betamethasone at E27 and E28, delivered the pups at E29 (term=32d), and assessed neurogenesis at birth and postnatal day 3. We quantified radial glia (Sox2(+)) and intermediate progenitor cells (Tbr2(+)) in the dorsal cortical subventricular zone to assess glutamatergic neuronal progenitors, and counted Nkx2.1(+) and Dlx2(+) cells in the ganglionic eminence to evaluate GABAergic neurogenesis. In addition, we assayed transcription factors regulating neurogenesis. We found that prenatal GCs did not affect the densities of radial glia and intermediate progenitors of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. The number of GABA(+) interneurons in the ganglionic eminence was similar between the prenatal GC-treated pups compared to untreated controls. Moreover, the mRNA expression of transcription factors, including Pax6, Ngn1/2, Emx1/2, Insm1, Dlx1, Nkx2.1, and Gsh2, were comparable between the two groups. However, there was a transient elevation in Mash1 protein in betamethasone-treated pups relative to controls at birth. These data suggest that prenatal GC treatment does not significantly impact the balance of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurogenesis in premature infants.

  4. Water deprivation activates a glutamatergic projection from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus to the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Sean D; Simmons, Johnny R; Stornetta, Ruth L; Toney, Glenn M; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2006-02-01

    Elevated sympathetic outflow contributes to the maintenance of blood pressure in water-deprived rats. The neural circuitry underlying this response may involve activation of a pathway from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). We sought to determine whether the PVH-RVLM projection activated by water deprivation is glutamatergic and/or contains vasopressin- or oxytocin-neurophysins. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in the majority of PVH neurons retrogradely labeled from the ipsilateral RVLM with cholera toxin subunit B (CTB; 85% on average, with regional differences). Very few RVLM-projecting PVH neurons were immunoreactive for oxytocin- or vasopressin-associated neurophysin. Injection of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into the PVH produced clusters of BDA-positive nerve terminals within the ipsilateral RVLM that were immunoreactive (ir) for the VGLUT2 protein. Some of these terminals made close appositions with tyrosine-hydroxylase-ir dendrites (presumptive C1 cells). In water-deprived rats (n=4), numerous VGLUT2 mRNA-positive PVH neurons retrogradely labeled from the ipsilateral RVLM with CTB were c-Fos-ir (16-40%, depending on PVH region). In marked contrast, few glutamatergic, RVLM-projecting PVH neurons were c-Fos-ir in control rats (n=3; 0-3%, depending on PVH region). Most (94% +/- 4%) RVLM-projecting PVH neurons activated by water deprivation contained VGLUT2 mRNA. In summary, most PVH neurons that innervate the RVLM are glutamatergic, and this population includes the neurons that are activated by water deprivation. One mechanism by which water deprivation may increase the sympathetic outflow is activation of a glutamatergic pathway from the PVH to the RVLM.

  5. Prenatal betamethasone does not affect glutamatergic or GABAergic neurogenesis in preterm newborns

    PubMed Central

    Vose, Linnea R.; Vinukonda, Govindaiah; Diamond, Daniel; Korumilli, Ritesh; Hu, Furong; Zia, Muhammad TK; Hevner, Robert; Ballabh, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal glucocorticoids (GCs) are routinely used for pregnant women in preterm labor to prevent respiratory distress syndrome and intraventricular hemorrhage in premature infants. However, the effect of antenatal GCs on neurogenesis in preterm neonates remains elusive. Herein, we hypothesized that prenatal GCs might suppress both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurogenesis in preterm rabbits and that this treatment would induce distinct changes in the expression of transcription factors regulating these developmental events. To test our hypotheses, we treated pregnant rabbits with betamethasone at E27 and E28, delivered the pups at E29 (term=32d), and assessed neurogenesis at birth and postnatal day 3. We quantified radial glia (Sox2+) and intermediate progenitor cells (Tbr2+) in the dorsal cortical subventricular zone to assess glutamatergic neuronal progenitors, and counted Nkx2.1+ and Dlx2+ cells in the ganglionic eminence to evaluate GABAergic neurogenesis. In addition, we assayed transcription factors regulating neurogenesis. We found that prenatal GCs did not affect the densities of radial glia and intermediate progenitors of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. The number of GABA+ interneurons in the ganglionic eminence was similar between the prenatal GC treated pups compared to untreated controls. Moreover, the mRNA expression of transcription factors, including Pax6, Ngn1/2, Emx1/2, Insm1, Dlx1, Nkx2.1, and Gsh2, were comparable between the two groups. However, there was a transient elevation in Mash1 protein in betamethasone treated pups relative to controls at birth. This data suggests that prenatal GC treatment does not significantly impact the balance of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurogenesis in premature infants. PMID:24735821

  6. Water deprivation activates a glutamatergic projection from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus to the rostral ventrolateral medulla

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, Sean D.; Simmons, Johnny R.; Toney, Glenn M.; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated sympathetic outflow contributes to the maintenance of blood pressure in water-deprived rats. The neural circuitry underlying this response may involve activation of a pathway from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). We sought to determine whether the PVH-RVLM projection activated by water deprivation is glutamatergic and/or contains vasopressin- or oxytocin-neurophysins. Vesicular glutamate transporter2 (VGLUT2) mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in the majority of PVH neurons retrogradely labeled from the ipsilateral RVLM with cholera-toxin subunit B (CTB; 85% on average with regional differences). Very few RVLM-projecting PVH neurons were immunoreactive for oxytocin- or vasopressin-associated neurophysin. Injection of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into the PVH produced clusters of BDA-positive nerve terminals within the ipsilateral RVLM that were immunoreactive (ir) for the VGLUT2 protein. Some of these terminals made close appositions with tyrosine-hydroxylase-ir dendrites (presumptive C1 cells). In water-deprived rats (n=4), numerous VGLUT2 mRNA-positive PVH neurons retrogradely labeled from the ipsilateral RVLM with CTB were c-Fos-ir (16–40% depending on PVH region). In marked contrast, few glutamatergic, RVLM-projecting PVH neurons were c-Fos-ir in control rats (n=3; 0–3% depending on PVH region). Most (94 ± 4%) RVLM-projecting PVH neurons activated by water deprivation contained VGLUT2 mRNA. In summary, the majority of PVH neurons that innervate the RVLM are glutamatergic and this population includes the neurons that are activated by water deprivation. One mechanism by which water deprivation may increase the sympathetic outflow is the activation of a glutamatergic pathway from the PVH to the RVLM. PMID:16374796

  7. Salsolinol Facilitates Glutamatergic Transmission to Dopamine Neurons in the Posterior Ventral Tegmental Area of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guiqin; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Although in vivo evidence indicates that salsolinol, the condensation product of acetaldehyde and dopamine, has properties that may contribute to alcohol abuse, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We have reported previously that salsolinol stimulates dopamine neurons in the posterior ventral tegmental area (p-VTA) partly by reducing inhibitory GABAergic transmission, and that ethanol increases glutamatergic transmission to VTA-dopamine neurons via the activation of dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that salsolinol stimulates dopamine neurons involving activation of D1Rs. By using whole-cell recordings on p-VTA-dopamine neurons in acute brain slices of rats, we found that salsolinol-induced increase in spike frequency of dopamine neurons was substantially attenuated by DL-2-amino-5-phosphono-valeric acid and 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione, the antagonists of glutamatergic N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors. Moreover, salsolinol increased the amplitude of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs. Additionally, SKF83566, a D1R antagonist attenuated the salsolinol-induced facilitation of EPSCs and of spontaneous firing of dopamine neurons. Our data reveal that salsolinol enhances glutamatergic transmission onto dopamine neurons via activation of D1Rs at the glutamatergic afferents in dopamine neurons, which contributes to salsolinol's stimulating effect on p-VTA dopamine neurons. This appears to be a novel mechanism which contributes toward rewarding properties of salsolinol. PMID:22590592

  8. Sources and Input Pathways of Glyphosate and its Degradation Product AMPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischofberger, S.; Hanke, I.; Wittmer, I.; Singer, H.; Stamm, C.

    2009-04-01

    Despite being the pesticide used in the largest quantities worldwide, the environmental relevance of glyphosate has been considered low for many years. Reasons for this assessment were the observations that glyphosate degrades quickly into its degradation product AMPA and that it sorbs strongly to soil particles. Hence, little losses to water bodies had been expected. Research during the last few years however contradicts this expectation. Although glyphosate is a dominant pesticide used in agriculture, recent studies on other pesticides revealed that urban sources may play a significant role for water quality. Therefore this study compares glyphosate input into streams from agricultural and urban sources. For that purpose, a catchment of an area of 25 km2 was selected. It has by about 12'000 inhabitants and about 15 % of the area is used as arable land. Four sampling sites were selected in the river system in order to reflect different urban and agricultural sources. Additionally, we sampled a combined sewer overflow, a rain sewer and the outflow of a waste water treatment plant. At each site discharge was measured continuously from March to November 2007. During 16 rain events samples were taken by automatic devices at a high temporal resolution. To analyze the concentration of glyphosate and its degradation product AMPA, the samples were derivatized with FMOC-Cl at low pH conditions and then filtrated. The solid phase extraction was conducted with Strata-X sorbent cartridge. Glyphosate and AMPA were detected with API 4000 after the chromatography with X bridge column C18. To assure the data quality, interne standards of Glyphosate and AMPA were added to every sample. The limit of detection and quantification for glyphosate and AMPA are bellow 1ng/l. We analyzed two rain events at a high resolution for all stations and several events at the outlet of the catchment. We measured high glyphosate concentration in urban and agriculture dominated catchments with up to

  9. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood.

  10. Apoptosis of glutamatergic neurons fails to trigger a neurogenic response in the adult neocortex.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Frank; McKeehan, Nicholas; Kang, Wenfei; Hébert, Jean M

    2013-04-10

    Adult neurogenesis is actively studied in part because of the potential to manipulate endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells for tissue repair. Although constitutive generation of neurons in the adult rodent olfactory bulb and hippocampal dentate gyrus is widely accepted and stroke-induced generation of striatal inhibitory neurons consistently observed, evidence supporting the generation of neurons in the neocortex after neuronal loss remains slim. Nevertheless, a few studies suggested that targeted apoptosis of neocortical glutamatergic neurons could trigger the generation of new ones in the adult brain. In light of such studies, we tested whether apoptosis of glutamatergic cortical neurons using two novel transgenic approaches in mice, an inducible Caspase-8 protein and an inducible diphtheria toxin gene, results in new neurons. After a thorough analysis, no new neurons were detected in the neocortex. Interestingly, an increase in the expression of the neuroblast marker DCX was observed in both models, in some cases in cells with morphologies previously associated with poststroke neuroblasts, but DCX(+) cells coexpressed the oligodendrocyte precursor marker Olig2, suggesting caution when using DCX as a marker for neuroblasts after injury. Given that the adult neocortex lacks an innate potential to regenerate lost glutamatergic neurons, future strategies should concentrate on manipulating the differentiation potential of endogenous or exogenous precursor cells.

  11. Effect of L-theanine on glutamatergic function in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ota, Miho; Wakabayashi, Chisato; Sato, Noriko; Hori, Hiroaki; Hattori, Kotaro; Teraishi, Toshiya; Ozawa, Hayato; Okubo, Tsutomu; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Glutamatergic dysfunction in the brain has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Previous studies suggested that L-theanine affects the glutamatergic neurotransmission and ameliorates symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. The aims of the present study were twofold: to examine the possible effects of L-theanine on symptoms in chronic schizophrenia patients and to evaluate the changes in chemical mediators, including glutamate + glutamine (Glx), in the brain by using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). The subjects were 17 patients with schizophrenia and 22 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. L-theanine (250 mg/day) was added to the patients' ongoing antipsychotic treatment for 8 weeks. The outcome measures were the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores and MRS results. There were significant improvements in the PANSS positive scale and sleep quality after the L-theanine treatment. As for MRS, we found no significant differences in Glx levels before and after the 8 week L-theanine treatment. However, significant correlations were observed between baseline density of Glx and change in Glx density by l-theanine. Our results suggest that L-theanine is effective in ameliorating positive symptoms and sleep quality in schizophrenia. The MRS findings suggest that L-theanine stabilises the glutamatergic concentration in the brain, which is a possible mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect.

  12. Interaction of Acetylcholinesterase with Neurexin-1β regulates Glutamatergic Synaptic stability in Hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Excess expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the cortex and hippocampus causes a decrease in the number of glutamatergic synapses and alters the expression of neurexin and neuroligin, trans-synaptic proteins that control synaptic stability. The molecular sequence and three-dimensional structure of AChE are homologous to the corresponding aspects of the ectodomain of neuroligin. This study investigated whether excess AChE interacts physically with neurexin to destabilize glutamatergic synapses. Results The results showed that AChE clusters colocalized with neurexin assemblies in the neurites of hippocampal neurons and that AChE co-immunoprecipitated with neurexin from the lysate of these neurons. Moreover, when expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, N-glycosylated AChE co-immunoprecipitated with non-O–glycosylated neurexin-1β, with N-glycosylation of the AChE being required for this co-precipitation to occur. Increasing extracellular AChE decreased the association of neurexin with neuroligin and inhibited neuroligin-induced synaptogenesis. The number and activity of excitatory synapses in cultured hippocampal neurons were reduced by extracellular catalytically inactive AChE. Conclusions Excessive glycosylated AChE could competitively disrupt a subset of the neurexin–neuroligin junctions consequently impairing the integrity of glutamatergic synapses. This might serve a molecular mechanism of excessive AChE induced neurodegeneration. PMID:24594013

  13. Elucidating the role of AII amacrine cells in glutamatergic retinal waves.

    PubMed

    Firl, Alana; Ke, Jiang-Bin; Zhang, Lei; Fuerst, Peter G; Singer, Joshua H; Feller, Marla B

    2015-01-28

    Spontaneous retinal activity mediated by glutamatergic neurotransmission-so-called "Stage 3" retinal waves-drives anti-correlated spiking in ON and OFF RGCs during the second week of postnatal development of the mouse. In the mature retina, the activity of a retinal interneuron called the AII amacrine cell is responsible for anti-correlated spiking in ON and OFF α-RGCs. In mature AIIs, membrane hyperpolarization elicits bursting behavior. Here, we postulated that bursting in AIIs underlies the initiation of glutamatergic retinal waves. We tested this hypothesis by using two-photon calcium imaging of spontaneous activity in populations of retinal neurons and by making whole-cell recordings from individual AIIs and α-RGCs in in vitro preparations of mouse retina. We found that AIIs participated in retinal waves, and that their activity was correlated with that of ON α-RGCs and anti-correlated with that of OFF α-RGCs. Though immature AIIs lacked the complement of membrane conductances necessary to generate bursting, pharmacological activation of the M-current, a conductance that modulates bursting in mature AIIs, blocked retinal wave generation. Interestingly, blockade of the pacemaker conductance Ih, a conductance absent in AIIs but present in both ON and OFF cone bipolar cells, caused a dramatic loss of spatial coherence of spontaneous activity. We conclude that during glutamatergic waves, AIIs act to coordinate and propagate activity generated by BCs rather than to initiate spontaneous activity.

  14. Evidence that Neurons of the Sublaterodorsal Tegmental Nucleus Triggering Paradoxical (REM) Sleep Are Glutamatergic

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Olivier; Sapin, Emilie; Bérod, Anne; Fort, Patrice; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus (SLD) neurons triggering paradoxical (REM) sleep (PS) are glutamatergic. Design: Three groups of rats were used: controls, rats deprived of PS for 72 h, and rats allowed to recover for 3 h after deprivation. Brain sections were processed for double labeling combining Fos immunohistochemistry and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGLUT2) in situ hybridization. Measurements and Results: The number of single Fos+ and Fos/vGLUT2+ double-labeled neurons was counted for each experimental condition. A very large number of Fos+ neurons expressing vGLUT2 mRNA specifically after PS hypersomnia was counted in the SLD. These double-labeled cells accounted for 84% of the total number of Fos+ cells. Conclusions: This finding adds further evidence to the concept that PS-on neurons of the SLD generating PS are of small size and glutamatergic in nature. By means of their descending projections to medullary and/or spinal glycinergic/GABAergic premotoneurons, they may be especially important for the induction of muscle atonia during PS, a disturbed phenomenon in narcolepsy and REM sleep behavior disorder. Citation: Clément O; Sapin E; Bérod A; Fort P; Luppi PH. Evidence that neurons of the sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus triggering paradoxical (REM) sleep are glutamatergic. SLEEP 2011;34(4):419-423. PMID:21461384

  15. Enhanced ability of TRPV1 channels in regulating glutamatergic transmission after repeated morphine exposure in the nucleus accumbens of rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Jia, Dong; Wang, Yuan; Qu, Liang; Wang, Xuelian; Song, Jian; Heng, Lijun; Gao, Guodong

    2017-04-01

    Glutamatergic projections to nucleus accumbens (NAc) drive drug-seeking behaviors during opioids withdrawal. Modulating glutamatergic neurotransmission provides a novel pharmacotherapeutic avenue for treatment of opioids dependence. Great deals of researches have verified that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels alters synaptic transmitter release and regulate neural plasticity. In the present study, whole-cell patch clamp recordings were adopted to examine the activity of TRPV1 Channels in regulating glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in NAc of rat during morphine withdrawal for 3days and 3weeks. The data showed that the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and the amplitudes of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) were increased during morphine withdrawal after applied with capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist). Capsaicin decreased the paired pulse ratio (PPR) and increased sEPSCs frequency but not their amplitudes suggesting a presynaptic locus of action during morphine withdrawal. All these effects were fully blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist Capsazepine. Additionally, In the presence of AM251 (CB1 receptor antagonist), depolarization-induced release of endogenous cannabinoids activated TRPV1 channels to enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission during morphine withdrawal. The functional enhancement of TRPV1 Channels in facilitating glutamatergic transmission was not recorded in dorsal striatum. Our findings demonstrate the ability of TRPV1 in regulating excitatory glutamatergic transmission is enhanced during morphine withdrawal in NAc, which would deepen our understanding of glutamatergic modulation during opioids withdrawal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Protein kinase C is essential for kainate-induced anxiety-related behavior and glutamatergic synapse upregulation in prelimbic cortex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei; Feng, Jing; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2014-11-01

    Anxiety is one of common mood disorders, in which the deficit of serotonergic and GABAergic synaptic functions in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex is believed to be involved. The pathological changes at the glutamatergic synapses and neurons in these brain regions as well as their underlying mechanisms remain elusive, which we aim to investigate. An agonist of kainate-type glutamate receptors, kainic acid, was applied to induce anxiety-related behaviors. The morphology and functions of glutamatergic synapses in the prelimbic region of mouse prefrontal cortex were analyzed using cellular imaging and electrophysiology. After kainate-induced anxiety is onset, the signal transmission at the glutamatergic synapses is upregulated, and the dendritic spine heads are enlarged. In terms of the molecular mechanisms, the upregulated synaptic plasticity is associated with the expression of more protein kinase C (PKC) in the dendritic spines. Chelerythrine, a PKC inhibitor, reverses kainate-induced anxiety and anxiety-related glutamatergic synapse upregulation. The activation of glutamatergic kainate-type receptors leads to anxiety-related behaviors and glutamatergic synapse upregulation through protein kinase C in the prelimbic region of the mouse prefrontal cortex. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Efficient derivation of cortical glutamatergic neurons from human pluripotent stem cells: a model system to study neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vazin, Tandis; Ball, K Aurelia; Lu, Hui; Park, Hyungju; Ataeijannati, Yasaman; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Poo, Mu-ming; Schaffer, David V

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is among the most prevalent forms of dementia affecting the aging population, and pharmacological therapies to date have not been successful in preventing disease progression. Future therapeutic efforts may benefit from the development of models that enable basic investigation of early disease pathology. In particular, disease-relevant models based on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) may be promising approaches to assess the impact of neurotoxic agents in AD on specific neuronal populations and thereby facilitate the development of novel interventions to avert early disease mechanisms. We implemented an efficient paradigm to convert hPSCs into enriched populations of cortical glutamatergic neurons emerging from dorsal forebrain neural progenitors, aided by modulating Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Since AD is generally known to be toxic to glutamatergic circuits, we exposed glutamatergic neurons derived from hESCs to an oligomeric pre-fibrillar forms of Aβ known as "globulomers", which have shown strong correlation with the level of cognitive deficits in AD. Administration of such Aβ oligomers yielded signs of the disease, including cell culture age-dependent binding of Aβ and cell death in the glutamatergic populations. Furthermore, consistent with previous findings in postmortem human AD brain, Aβ-induced toxicity was selective for glutamatergic rather than GABAeric neurons present in our cultures. This in vitro model of cortical glutamatergic neurons thus offers a system for future mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development for AD pathology using human cell types specifically affected by this disease. © 2013.

  18. Evidence for the involvement of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems and protein kinase A pathway in the antinociceptive effect caused by p-methoxy-diphenyl diselenide in mice.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Larissa Garcia; Jesse, Cristiano Ricardo; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Savegnago, Lucielli

    2008-02-01

    The present study investigated the antinociceptive effect of p-methoxy-diphenyl diselenide (MeOPhSe)(2), a simple organochalcogenide, in chemical and thermal behavioural models of nociception in mice, without accompanying changes in ambulation when assessed in an open field. This compound given by or