Science.gov

Sample records for amphibia forms voltage-dependent

  1. Voltage-dependent gap junction channels are formed by connexin32, the major gap junction protein of rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, A P; de Carvalho, A C; Verselis, V; Eghbali, B; Spray, D C

    1991-01-01

    We report here experiments undertaken in pairs of hepatocytes that demonstrate a marked voltage sensivity of junctional conductance and, thus, contradict earlier findings reported by this laboratory (Spray, D.C., R.D.ginzberg, E.A., E. A. Morales, Z. Gatmaitan and I.M. Arias, 1986, J. Cell Biol. 101:135-144; Spray C.D. R.L. White, A.C. Campos de Carvalho, and M.V.L. Bennett. 1984. Biophys. J. 45:219-230) and by others (Dahl, G., T. Moller, D. Paul, R. Voellmy, and R. Werner. 1987. Science [Wash. DC] 236:1290-1293; Riverdin, E.C., and R. Weingart. 1988. Am. J. Physiol. 254:C226-C234). Expression in exogenous systems, lipid bilayers in which fragments of isolated gap junction membranes were incorporated (Young, J.D.-E., Z. Cohn, and N.B. Gilula. 1987. Cell. 48:733-743.) and noncommunicating cells transfected with connexin32 cDNA (Eghbali, B., J.A. Kessler, and D.C. Spray. 1990. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 87:1328-1331), support these findings and indicate that the voltage-dependent channel is composed of connexin32, the major gap junction protein of rat liver (Paul, D. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:123-134). PMID:1648416

  2. A closed-form DC model for long-channel thin-film transistors with gate voltage-dependent mobility characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, R. L.

    2005-04-01

    A model is derived for the drain current (under DC steady-state operating conditions) of a long-channel thin-film transistor (TFT) with gate voltage-dependent channel mobility. A closed-form expression is obtained for cases in which the average mobility ( μavg) can be reasonably approximated by an nth-order polynomial curve fit; a more generalized expression allows the substitution of an arbitrary parameterized equation for μavg, yielding a closed-form expression in cases where the form of the selected mobility expression is such that the requisite integration can be carried out analytically. The model is employed to replicate measured drain current versus drain voltage ( ID- VDS) curves for exemplary zinc oxide and zinc tin oxide channel TFTs with highly non-ideal (i.e., gate voltage-dependent) mobility characteristics; in each case, excellent correlation to measured ID- VDS data is obtained, thus validating the proposed model. This model comprises a valuable tool in the preliminary development of novel TFTs for which standard device models are not, in general, appropriate.

  3. Voltage Dependence of a Neuromodulator-Activated Ionic Current123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The neuromodulatory inward current (IMI) generated by crab Cancer borealis stomatogastric ganglion neurons is an inward current whose voltage dependence has been shown to be crucial in the activation of oscillatory activity of the pyloric network of this system. It has been previously shown that IMI loses its voltage dependence in conditions of low extracellular calcium, but that this effect appears to be regulated by intracellular calmodulin. Voltage dependence is only rarely regulated by intracellular signaling mechanisms. Here we address the hypothesis that the voltage dependence of IMI is mediated by intracellular signaling pathways activated by extracellular calcium. We demonstrate that calmodulin inhibitors and a ryanodine antagonist can reduce IMI voltage dependence in normal Ca2+, but that, in conditions of low Ca2+, calmodulin activators do not restore IMI voltage dependence. Further, we show evidence that CaMKII alters IMI voltage dependence. These results suggest that calmodulin is necessary but not sufficient for IMI voltage dependence. We therefore hypothesize that the Ca2+/calmodulin requirement for IMI voltage dependence is due to an active sensing of extracellular calcium by a GPCR family calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and that the reduction in IMI voltage dependence by a calmodulin inhibitor is due to CaSR endocytosis. Supporting this, preincubation with an endocytosis inhibitor prevented W7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride)-induced loss of IMI voltage dependence, and a CaSR antagonist reduced IMI voltage dependence. Additionally, myosin light chain kinase, which is known to act downstream of the CaSR, seems to play a role in regulating IMI voltage dependence. Finally, a Gβγ-subunit inhibitor also affects IMI voltage dependence, in support of the hypothesis that this process is regulated by a G-protein-coupled CaSR. PMID:27257619

  4. Voltage Dependence of a Neuromodulator-Activated Ionic Current.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael; Golowasch, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The neuromodulatory inward current (IMI) generated by crab Cancer borealis stomatogastric ganglion neurons is an inward current whose voltage dependence has been shown to be crucial in the activation of oscillatory activity of the pyloric network of this system. It has been previously shown that IMI loses its voltage dependence in conditions of low extracellular calcium, but that this effect appears to be regulated by intracellular calmodulin. Voltage dependence is only rarely regulated by intracellular signaling mechanisms. Here we address the hypothesis that the voltage dependence of IMI is mediated by intracellular signaling pathways activated by extracellular calcium. We demonstrate that calmodulin inhibitors and a ryanodine antagonist can reduce IMI voltage dependence in normal Ca(2+), but that, in conditions of low Ca(2+), calmodulin activators do not restore IMI voltage dependence. Further, we show evidence that CaMKII alters IMI voltage dependence. These results suggest that calmodulin is necessary but not sufficient for IMI voltage dependence. We therefore hypothesize that the Ca(2+)/calmodulin requirement for IMI voltage dependence is due to an active sensing of extracellular calcium by a GPCR family calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and that the reduction in IMI voltage dependence by a calmodulin inhibitor is due to CaSR endocytosis. Supporting this, preincubation with an endocytosis inhibitor prevented W7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride)-induced loss of IMI voltage dependence, and a CaSR antagonist reduced IMI voltage dependence. Additionally, myosin light chain kinase, which is known to act downstream of the CaSR, seems to play a role in regulating IMI voltage dependence. Finally, a Gβγ-subunit inhibitor also affects IMI voltage dependence, in support of the hypothesis that this process is regulated by a G-protein-coupled CaSR.

  5. Bio-inspired voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; He, Lin-Ling; Chen, Ming; Fang, Kun; Colecraft, Henry M

    2013-01-01

    Ca(2+) influx via voltage-dependent CaV1/CaV2 channels couples electrical signals to biological responses in excitable cells. CaV1/CaV2 channel blockers have broad biotechnological and therapeutic applications. Here we report a general method for developing novel genetically encoded calcium channel blockers inspired by Rem, a small G-protein that constitutively inhibits CaV1/CaV2 channels. We show that diverse cytosolic proteins (CaVβ, 14-3-3, calmodulin and CaMKII) that bind pore-forming α1-subunits can be converted into calcium channel blockers with tunable selectivity, kinetics and potency, simply by anchoring them to the plasma membrane. We term this method 'channel inactivation induced by membrane-tethering of an associated protein' (ChIMP). ChIMP is potentially extendable to small-molecule drug discovery, as engineering FK506-binding protein into intracellular sites within CaV1.2-α1C permits heterodimerization-initiated channel inhibition with rapamycin. The results reveal a universal method for developing novel calcium channel blockers that may be extended to develop probes for a broad cohort of unrelated ion channels.

  6. Elevations of intracellular calcium reflect normal voltage-dependent behavior, and not constitutive activity, of voltage-dependent calcium channels in gastrointestinal and vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    McCarron, John G; Olson, Marnie L; Currie, Susan; Wright, Amanda J; Anderson, Kurt I; Girkin, John M

    2009-04-01

    In smooth muscle, the gating of dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca(2+) channels may either be stochastic and voltage dependent or coordinated among channels and constitutively active. Each form of gating has been proposed to be largely responsible for Ca(2+) influx and determining the bulk average cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration. Here, the contribution of voltage-dependent and constitutively active channel behavior to Ca(2+) signaling has been studied in voltage-clamped single vascular and gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells using wide-field epifluorescence with near simultaneous total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Depolarization (-70 to +10 mV) activated a dihydropyridine-sensitive voltage-dependent Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) and evoked a rise in [Ca(2+)] in each of the subplasma membrane space and bulk cytoplasm. In various regions of the bulk cytoplasm the [Ca(2+)] increase ([Ca(2+)](c)) was approximately uniform, whereas that of the subplasma membrane space ([Ca(2+)](PM)) had a wide range of amplitudes and time courses. The variations that occurred in the subplasma membrane space presumably reflected an uneven distribution of active Ca(2+) channels (clusters) across the sarcolemma, and their activation appeared consistent with normal voltage-dependent behavior. Indeed, in the present study, dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca(2+) channels were not normally constitutively active. The repetitive localized [Ca(2+)](PM) rises ("persistent Ca(2+) sparklets") that characterize constitutively active channels were observed rarely (2 of 306 cells). Neither did dihydropyridine-sensitive constitutively active Ca(2+) channels regulate the bulk average [Ca(2+)](c). A dihydropyridine blocker of Ca(2+) channels, nimodipine, which blocked I(Ca) and accompanying [Ca(2+)](c) rise, reduced neither the resting bulk average [Ca(2+)](c) (at -70 mV) nor the rise in [Ca(2+)](c), which accompanied an increased electrochemical driving force on the ion by hyperpolarization (-130 m

  7. Osteological Variation among Extreme Morphological Forms in the Mexican Salamander Genus Chiropterotriton (Amphibia: Plethodontidae): Morphological Evolution And Homoplasy

    PubMed Central

    Darda, David M.; Wake, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Osteological variation is recorded among and within four of the most distinctive species of the Mexican salamander genus Chiropterotriton. Analysis of the data is consistent with the monophyletic status of the genus and documents previously unrecorded intraspecific and interspecific variation. Most of the recorded variation involves qualitative and quantitative proportional differences, but four fixed differences constitute autapomorphic states that affirm and diagnose some species (C. dimidiatus, C. magnipes). Osteological variation in 15 characters is analyzed with respect to predictions generated from four hypotheses: 1) phylogeny, 2) adaptation to specific habitats (the four species include cave-dwelling, terrestrial, and arboreal forms), 3) size-free shape, and 4) size. High levels of intraspecific variation suggest that the characters studied are not subject to rigid functional constraints in salamanders, regardless of size. The pattern predicted by the hypothesis based on size differences seen among these four Chiropterotriton species matches most closely the observed pattern of relative skull robustness. Since size change and heterochrony are often associated in plethodontid evolution, it is likely that changes in developmental timing play a role in the morphological transitions among these morphologically diverse taxa. Webbed feet, miniaturization, body shape, and an unusual tarsal arrangement are morphologies exhibited in species of Chiropterotrition that are shown to be homoplastic with other clades of tropical plethodontids. Although extensive homoplasy in salamanders might be seen as a roadblock to unraveling phylogenetic hypotheses, the homologous developmental systems that appear to underlie such homoplasy may reveal common and consistent evolutionary processes at work. PMID:26060996

  8. Osteological Variation among Extreme Morphological Forms in the Mexican Salamander Genus Chiropterotriton (Amphibia: Plethodontidae): Morphological Evolution And Homoplasy.

    PubMed

    Darda, David M; Wake, David B

    2015-01-01

    Osteological variation is recorded among and within four of the most distinctive species of the Mexican salamander genus Chiropterotriton. Analysis of the data is consistent with the monophyletic status of the genus and documents previously unrecorded intraspecific and interspecific variation. Most of the recorded variation involves qualitative and quantitative proportional differences, but four fixed differences constitute autapomorphic states that affirm and diagnose some species (C. dimidiatus, C. magnipes). Osteological variation in 15 characters is analyzed with respect to predictions generated from four hypotheses: 1) phylogeny, 2) adaptation to specific habitats (the four species include cave-dwelling, terrestrial, and arboreal forms), 3) size-free shape, and 4) size. High levels of intraspecific variation suggest that the characters studied are not subject to rigid functional constraints in salamanders, regardless of size. The pattern predicted by the hypothesis based on size differences seen among these four Chiropterotriton species matches most closely the observed pattern of relative skull robustness. Since size change and heterochrony are often associated in plethodontid evolution, it is likely that changes in developmental timing play a role in the morphological transitions among these morphologically diverse taxa. Webbed feet, miniaturization, body shape, and an unusual tarsal arrangement are morphologies exhibited in species of Chiropterotrition that are shown to be homoplastic with other clades of tropical plethodontids. Although extensive homoplasy in salamanders might be seen as a roadblock to unraveling phylogenetic hypotheses, the homologous developmental systems that appear to underlie such homoplasy may reveal common and consistent evolutionary processes at work.

  9. Voltage-dependent conformational changes in connexin channels✩

    PubMed Central

    Bargiello, Thaddeus A.; Tang, Qingxiu; Oh, Seunghoon; Kwon, Taekyung

    2011-01-01

    Channels formed by connexins display two distinct types of voltage-dependent gating, termed Vj- or fast-gating and loop- or slow-gating. Recent studies, using metal bridge formation and chemical cross-linking have identified a region within the channel pore that contributes to the formation of the loop-gate permeability barrier. The conformational changes are remarkably large, reducing the channel pore diameter from 15 to 20 Å to less than 4 Å. Surprisingly, the largest conformational change occurs in the most stable region of the channel pore, the 310 or parahelix formed by amino acids in the 42–51 segment. The data provide a set of positional constraints that can be used to model the structure of the loop-gate closed state. Less is known about the conformation of the Vj-gate closed state. There appear to be two different mechanisms; one in which conformational changes in channel structure are linked to a voltage sensor contained in the N-terminus of Cx26 and Cx32 and a second in which the C-terminus of Cx43 and Cx40 may act either as a gating particle to block the channel pore or alternatively to stabilize the closed state. The later mechanismutilizes the same domains as implicated in effecting pH gating of Cx43 channels. It is unclear if the two Vj-gating mechanisms are related or if they represent different gating mechanisms that operate separately in different subsets of connexin channels. A model of the Vj-closed state of Cx26 hemichannel that is based on the X-ray structure of Cx26 and electron crystallographic structures of a Cx26 mutation suggests that the permeability barrier for Vj-gating is formed exclusively by the N-terminus, but recent information suggests that this conformation may not represent a voltage-closed state. Closed state models are considered from a thermodynamic perspective based on information from the 3.5 Å Cx26 crystal structure and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The applications of computational and experimental methods to

  10. Helix O modulates voltage dependency of CLC-1.

    PubMed

    Seong, Ju Yong; Ha, Kotdaji; Hong, Chansik; Myeong, Jongyun; Lim, Hyun-Ho; Yang, Dongki; So, Insuk

    2017-02-01

    The chloride channel (CLC) family of proteins consists of channels and transporters that share similarities in architecture and play essential roles in physiological functions. Among the CLC family, CLC-1 channels have the representative homodimeric double-barreled structure carrying two gating processes. One is protopore gating that acts on each pore independently by glutamate residue (Eext). The other is common gating that closes both pores simultaneously in association with large conformational changes across each subunit. In skeletal muscle, CLC-1 is associated with maintaining normal sarcolemmal excitability, and a number of myotonic mutants were reported to modify the channel gating of CLC-1. In this study, we characterized highly conserved helix O as a key determinant of structural stability in CLC-1. Supporting this hypothesis, myotonic mutant (G523D) at N-terminal of helix O showed the activation at hyperpolarizing membrane potentials with a reversed voltage dependency. However, introducing glutamate at serine residue (S537) at the C-terminal of the helix O on G523D restored WT-like voltage dependency of the common gate and showed proton insensitive voltage dependency. To further validate this significant site, site-specific mutagenesis experiments was performed on V292 that is highly conserved as glutamate in antiporter and closely located to S537 and showed that this area is essential for channel function. Taken together, the results of our study suggest the importance of helix O as the main contributor for stable structure of evolutionary conserved CLC proteins and its key role in voltage dependency of the CLC-1. Furthermore, the C-terminal of the helix O can offer a clue for possible proton involvement in CLC-1 channel.

  11. Voltage-dependent absorbance change of carotenoids in halophilic archaebacteria.

    PubMed

    Seki, S I; Sasabe, H; Tomioka, H

    1996-10-02

    Membrane vesicles of wild-type Halobacterium sp. mex strain show a wavy absorbance change which has not been so far reported in halophilic archaebacteria. A white mutant strain lacking carotenoids did not show the wavy absorbance change. The wavy absorbance change in the range of 440-590 nm was induced by a red flash (600-640 nm), which photoexcited electrogenic ion pumps, mex bacteriorhodopsin and mex halorhodopsin but not carotenoids. The wavy change was also caused by K+ diffusion potentials without light. These results suggest that the wavy absorbance change in the membrane vesicles is the voltage-dependent absorbance change of the carotenoids.

  12. Cytoplasmic Domains and Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Francisco; Domínguez, Pedro; de la Peña, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    The basic architecture of the voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv channels) corresponds to a transmembrane protein core in which the permeation pore, the voltage-sensing components and the gating machinery (cytoplasmic facing gate and sensor–gate coupler) reside. Usually, large protein tails are attached to this core, hanging toward the inside of the cell. These cytoplasmic regions are essential for normal channel function and, due to their accessibility to the cytoplasmic environment, constitute obvious targets for cell-physiological control of channel behavior. Here we review the present knowledge about the molecular organization of these intracellular channel regions and their role in both setting and controlling Kv voltage-dependent gating properties. This includes the influence that they exert on Kv rapid/N-type inactivation and on activation/deactivation gating of Shaker-like and eag-type Kv channels. Some illustrative examples about the relevance of these cytoplasmic domains determining the possibilities for modulation of Kv channel gating by cellular components are also considered. PMID:22470342

  13. Voltage Dependent Charge Storage Modes and Capacity in Subnanometer Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Rui; Meunier, V.; Huang, Jingsong; Wu, Peng; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2012-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that charge storage in subnanometer pores follows a distinct voltage-dependent behavior. Specifically, at lower voltages, charge storage is achieved by swapping co-ions in the pore with counterions in the bulk electrolyte. As voltage increases, further charge storage is due mainly to the removal of co-ions from the pore, leading to a capacitance increase. The capacitance eventually reaches a maximum when all co-ions are expelled from the pore. At even higher electrode voltages, additional charge storage is realized by counterion insertion into the pore, accompanied by a reduction of capacitance. The molecular mechanisms of these observations are elucidated and provide useful insight for optimizing energy storage based on supercapacitors.

  14. Importance of the Voltage Dependence of Cardiac Na/K ATPase Isozymes.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Christopher M; Gagnon, Dominique G; Bernal, Adam; Meyer, Dylan J; Rosenthal, Joshua J; Artigas, Pablo

    2015-11-03

    Cardiac cells express more than one isoform of the Na, K-ATPase (NKA), the heteromeric enzyme that creates the Na(+) and K(+) gradients across the plasmalemma. Cardiac isozymes contain one catalytic α-subunit isoform (α1, α2, or α3) associated with an auxiliary β-subunit isoform (β1 or β2). Past studies using biochemical approaches have revealed minor kinetic differences between isozymes formed by different α-β isoform combinations; these results make it difficult to understand the physiological requirement for multiple isoforms. In intact cells, however, NKA enzymes operate in a more complex environment, which includes a substantial transmembrane potential. We evaluated the voltage dependence of human cardiac NKA isozymes expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and of native NKA isozymes in rat ventricular myocytes, using normal mammalian physiological concentrations of Na(+)o and K(+)o. We demonstrate that although α1 and α3 pumps are functional at all physiologically relevant voltages, α2β1 pumps and α2β2 pumps are inhibited by ∼75% and ∼95%, respectively, at resting membrane potentials, and only activate appreciably upon depolarization. Furthermore, phospholemman (FXYD1) inhibits pump function without significantly altering the pump's voltage dependence. Our observations provide a simple explanation for the physiological relevance of the α2 subunit (∼20% of total α subunits in rat ventricle): they act as a reserve and are recruited into action for extra pumping during the long-lasting cardiac action potential, where most of the Na(+) entry occurs. This strong voltage dependence of α2 pumps also helps explain how cardiotonic steroids, which block NKA pumps, can be a beneficial treatment for heart failure: by only inhibiting the α2 pumps, they selectively reduce NKA activity during the cardiac action potential, leading to an increase in systolic Ca(2+), due to reduced extrusion through the Na/Ca exchanger, without affecting resting Na(+) and Ca(2

  15. Importance of the Voltage Dependence of Cardiac Na/K ATPase Isozymes

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher M.; Gagnon, Dominique G.; Bernal, Adam; Meyer, Dylan J.; Rosenthal, Joshua J.; Artigas, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac cells express more than one isoform of the Na, K-ATPase (NKA), the heteromeric enzyme that creates the Na+ and K+ gradients across the plasmalemma. Cardiac isozymes contain one catalytic α-subunit isoform (α1, α2, or α3) associated with an auxiliary β-subunit isoform (β1 or β2). Past studies using biochemical approaches have revealed minor kinetic differences between isozymes formed by different α-β isoform combinations; these results make it difficult to understand the physiological requirement for multiple isoforms. In intact cells, however, NKA enzymes operate in a more complex environment, which includes a substantial transmembrane potential. We evaluated the voltage dependence of human cardiac NKA isozymes expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and of native NKA isozymes in rat ventricular myocytes, using normal mammalian physiological concentrations of Na+o and K+o. We demonstrate that although α1 and α3 pumps are functional at all physiologically relevant voltages, α2β1 pumps and α2β2 pumps are inhibited by ∼75% and ∼95%, respectively, at resting membrane potentials, and only activate appreciably upon depolarization. Furthermore, phospholemman (FXYD1) inhibits pump function without significantly altering the pump’s voltage dependence. Our observations provide a simple explanation for the physiological relevance of the α2 subunit (∼20% of total α subunits in rat ventricle): they act as a reserve and are recruited into action for extra pumping during the long-lasting cardiac action potential, where most of the Na+ entry occurs. This strong voltage dependence of α2 pumps also helps explain how cardiotonic steroids, which block NKA pumps, can be a beneficial treatment for heart failure: by only inhibiting the α2 pumps, they selectively reduce NKA activity during the cardiac action potential, leading to an increase in systolic Ca2+, due to reduced extrusion through the Na/Ca exchanger, without affecting resting Na+ and Ca2

  16. Calcium channel beta subunit promotes voltage-dependent modulation of alpha 1 B by G beta gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Meir, A; Bell, D C; Stephens, G J; Page, K M; Dolphin, A C

    2000-01-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) are heteromultimers composed of a pore-forming alpha1 subunit and auxiliary subunits, including the intracellular beta subunit, which has a strong influence on the channel properties. Voltage-dependent inhibitory modulation of neuronal VDCCs occurs primarily by activation of G-proteins and elevation of the free G beta gamma dimer concentration. Here we have examined the interaction between the regulation of N-type (alpha 1 B) channels by their beta subunits and by G beta gamma dimers, heterologously expressed in COS-7 cells. In contrast to previous studies suggesting antagonism of G protein inhibition by the VDCC beta subunit, we found a significantly larger G beta gamma-dependent inhibition of alpha 1 B channel activation when the VDCC alpha 1 B and beta subunits were coexpressed. In the absence of coexpressed VDCC beta subunit, the G beta gamma dimers, either expressed tonically or elevated via receptor activation, did not produce the expected features of voltage-dependent G protein modulation of N-type channels, including slowed activation and prepulse facilitation, while VDCC beta subunit coexpression restored all of the hallmarks of G beta gamma modulation. These results suggest that the VDCC beta subunit must be present for G beta gamma to induce voltage-dependent modulation of N-type calcium channels. PMID:10920007

  17. Conductance hysteresis in the voltage-dependent anion channel.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Shay M; Teijido, Oscar; Hoogerheide, David P; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2015-09-01

    Hysteresis in the conductance of voltage-sensitive ion channels is observed when the transmembrane voltage is periodically varied with time. Although this phenomenon has been used in studies of gating of the voltage-dependent anion channel, VDAC, from the outer mitochondrial membrane for nearly four decades, full hysteresis curves have never been reported, because the focus was solely on the channel opening branches of the hysteresis loops. We studied the hysteretic response of a multichannel VDAC system to a triangular voltage ramp the frequency of which was varied over three orders of magnitude, from 0.5 mHz to 0.2 Hz. We found that in this wide frequency range the area encircled by the hysteresis curves changes by less than a factor of three, suggesting broad distribution of the characteristic times and strongly non-equilibrium behavior. At the same time, quasi-equilibrium two-state behavior is observed for hysteresis branches corresponding to VDAC opening. This enables calculation of the usual equilibrium gating parameters, gating charge and voltage of equipartitioning, which were found to be almost insensitive to the ramp frequency. To rationalize this peculiarity, we hypothesize that during voltage-induced closure and opening the system explores different regions of the complex free energy landscape, and, in the opening branch, follows quasi-equilibrium paths.

  18. Voltage dependence of ATP secretion in mammalian taste cells.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Roman A; Rogachevskaja, Olga A; Khokhlov, Alexander A; Kolesnikov, Stanislav S

    2008-12-01

    Mammalian type II taste cells release the afferent neurotransmitter adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through ATP-permeable ion channels, most likely to be connexin (Cx) and/or pannexin hemichannels. Here, we show that ion channels responsible for voltage-gated (VG) outward currents in type II cells are ATP permeable and demonstrate a strong correlation between the magnitude of the VG current and the intensity of ATP release. These findings suggest that slowly deactivating ion channels transporting the VG outward currents can also mediate ATP secretion in type II cells. In line with this inference, we studied a dependence of ATP secretion on membrane voltage with a cellular ATP sensor using different pulse protocols. These were designed on the basis of predictions of a model of voltage-dependent transient ATP efflux. Consistently with curves that were simulated for ATP release mediated by ATP-permeable channels deactivating slowly, the bell-like and Langmuir isotherm-like potential dependencies were characteristic of ATP secretion obtained for prolonged and short electrical stimulations of taste cells, respectively. These observations strongly support the idea that ATP is primarily released via slowly deactivating channels. Depolarizing voltage pulses produced negligible Ca(2+) transients in the cytoplasm of cells releasing ATP, suggesting that ATP secretion is mainly governed by membrane voltage under our recording conditions. With the proviso that natural connexons and pannexons are kinetically similar to exogenously expressed hemichannels, our findings suggest that VG ATP release in type II cells is primarily mediated by Cx hemichannels.

  19. [Role of voltage-dependent ion channels in epileptogenesis].

    PubMed

    Ricard-Mousnier, B; Couraud, F

    1993-10-01

    The aim of this review is to gather information in favour of the involvement of voltage-dependent ion channels in epileptogenesis. Although, up to now, no study has shown that epilepsy is accompanied by a modification in the activity to these channels, the recently acquired knowledge of their physiology allows to presume would favor their involvement in epileptogenesis. The results from electrophysiological studies are as follows: a persistent sodium current increases neuronal excitability whereas potassium currents have an inhibitory role. In particular, calcium-dependent potassium current are involved in the post-hyperpolarization phases which follows PDS. Calcium currents are also involved in the genesis of the "bursting pacemaker" activity displayed by the neurons presumed to be inducers of the epileptic activity. Biochemical data has shown that as a consequence of epileptic activity, sodium and calcium channels are down regulated. This down-regulation could be a way to reduces neuronal hyperexcitability. Pharmacological data demonstrate the drugs which activate calcium channels or which inhibit potassium channels have a convusilvant effect. On the contrary, agents which block calcium or sodium channels or which properties. Among the latter ones, some antiepileptic drugs can be found. In summary situations which lead to increase in calcium and sodium currents and/or to an inhibition in potassium currents are potentially epileptogenic.

  20. AmphibiaChina: an online database of Chinese Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Che, Jing; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-18

    AmphibiaChina, an open-access, web-based database, is designed to provide comprehensive and up-to-date information on Chinese amphibians. It offers an integrated module with six major sections. Compared to other known databases including AmphibiaWeb and Amphibian Species of the World, AmphibiaChina has the following new functions: (1) online species identification based on DNA barcode sequences; (2) comparisons and discussions of different major taxonomic systems; and (3) phylogenetic progress on Chinese amphibians. This database offers a window for the world to access available information of Chinese amphibians. AmphibiaChina with its Chinese version can be accessed at http://www.amphibiachina.org.

  1. Voltage-dependent potassium channels in activated rat microglia.

    PubMed Central

    Nörenberg, W; Gebicke-Haerter, P J; Illes, P

    1994-01-01

    1. Voltage-dependent currents of untreated (proliferating) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated rat microglial cells in culture were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. 2. Membrane potentials showed prominent peaks at -35 mV and -70 mV. Membrane potentials of LPS-treated cells alternated between the two values. This may be due to a negative slope region of the I-V relation resulting in two zero current potentials. 3. From a holding potential of -70 mV, hyperpolarizing steps evoked an inwardly rectifying current both in proliferating and in LPS-treated cells, while depolarizing steps below -50 mV evoked an outwardly rectifying current only in LPS-treated microglia. The currents were K+ selective, as indicated by their reversal potential of approximately 0 mV in symmetric K+ concentrations (150 mM both intra- and extracellularly) and the reversal potential of the outward tail currents of approximately -90 mV at a normal extracellular K+ concentration (4.5 mM). 4. The activation of the outward current could be fitted by Hodgkin-Huxley-type n4 kinetics. The time constant of activation depended on voltage. 5. The inactivation of the inward and outward currents could be fitted by a single exponential. The time constant of the inward current inactivation was dependent on voltage, whereas the time constant of the outward current inactivation was virtually independent of voltage, except near the threshold of activation. Recovery of the outward from inactivation was slow and could be fitted by two exponentials. Responses to depolarizing steps were stable at 0.125 Hz, but greatly decreased from the first to the second pulse at 1 Hz. 6. The inactivation of the inward, but not of the outward, current disappeared in a low Na(+)-containing medium (5 mM). The inward current was selectively inhibited by extracellular Cs+ and Ba2+. The outward current was selectively inhibited by Cd2+, 4-aminopyridine and charybdotoxin. Replacement of intracellular K+ by an

  2. The Mechanism of Voltage Dependent Gating of the NaChBac Prokaryotic Sodium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaen, Paul G.

    Electrical signaling in cells depends on selective conductance of ions through membrane proteins called 'voltage gated ion channels'. These channels are characterized by their ability turn on and off the flow of ionic current by opening and closing their conductive pore in response to changes in membrane potential. The opening and closing of the pore is a mechanically linked to conformational movement of the positively charged fourth transmembrane segment (S4) in 'the voltage sensor' region. How the S4 moves in response to membrane potential is a controversial subject. In this thesis, we used the prokaryotic sodium channel NaChBac as our model sodium channel to study voltage dependent movement of the S4 in the voltage sensor. We use a disulfide-locking method where we introduced pairs of cysteines in the voltage sensor that crosslink and trap the S4 in its path after depolarization. We screened over one hundred mutations of the NaChBac channel in the whole cell patch clamp assay and demonstrated discrete and sequential voltage dependent ion pair interactions that occur in at least three states between the positively charged residues of the S4 segment and the acidic residues in the S1, S2 and S3 segments. In conjunction with structural modeling of the voltage sensor and our disulfide locking data, we propose that the S4 moves in and out of the plane of the membrane 8-13 A, forming distinct gating charge interactions with counter charges of the voltage sensor and adopts a 310 helix over a portion of its structure during activation. These findings are compatible with the sliding helix model and refine our understanding of the structural determinates of voltage sensor function in voltage gated ion channels.

  3. Voltage-dependent block by saxitoxin of sodium channels incorporated into planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    French, R J; Worley, J F; Krueger, B K

    1984-01-01

    We have previously studied single, voltage-dependent, saxitoxin-(STX) blockable sodium channels from rat brain in planar lipid bilayers, and found that channel block by STX was voltage-dependent. Here we describe the effect of voltage on the degree of block and on the kinetics of the blocking reaction. From their voltage dependence and kinetics, it was possible to distinguish single-channel current fluctuations due to blocking and unblocking of the channels by STX from those caused by intrinsic channel gating. The use of batrachotoxin (BTX) to inhibit sodium-channel inactivation allowed recordings of stationary fluctuations over extended periods of time. In a range of membrane potentials where the channels were open greater than 98% of the time, STX block was voltage-dependent, provided sufficient time was allowed to reach a steady state. Hyperpolarizing potentials favored block. Both association (blocking) and dissociation (unblocking) rate constants were voltage-dependent. The equilibrium dissociation constants computed from the association and dissociation rate constants for STX block were about the same as those determined from the steady-state fractional reduction in current. The steepness of the voltage dependence was consistent with the divalent toxin sensing 30-40% of the transmembrane potential. PMID:6324910

  4. Voltage-dependant anion channels: Novel insights into isoform function through genetic models☆

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Adithya; Sheiko, Tatiana; Graham, Brett H.; Craigen, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-dependant Anion Channels, also known as mitochondrial porins, are pore-forming proteins located in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) that, in addition to forming complexes with other proteins that localize to the MOM, also function as the main conduit for transporting metabolites between the cytoplasm and mitochondria. VDACs are encoded by a multi-member gene family, and the number of isoforms and specific functions of VDACs varies between species. Translating the well-described in vitro characteristics of the VDAC isoforms into in vivo functions has been a challenge, with the generation of animal models of VDAC deficiency providing much of the available information about isoform-specific roles in biology. Here, we review the approaches used to create these insect and mammalian animal models, and the conclusions reached by studying the consequences of loss of function mutations on the genetic, physiologic, and biochemical properties of the resulting models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: VDAC structure, function, and regulation of mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:22051019

  5. Voltage-dependent facilitation of Cx46 hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Yin, ShengYong; Altenberg, Guillermo A.; Reuss, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Gap junction channels are formed by two hemichannels in series (one from each neighboring cell), which are in turn connexin hexamers. Under normal conditions, hemichannels at the plasma membrane are mostly closed but can be opened by changes in membrane voltage, extracellular divalent ion concentration, phosphorylation, pH, and redox potential. Recently, interactions between channels have been found to modulate the activity of several ion channels, including gap junction channels. Here, we studied whether connexin46 (Cx46) hemichannels display such behavior. We studied the response of the Cx46 hemichannels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes to consecutive depolarization pulses. Hemichannels formed by wild-type Cx46 and a COOH-terminal domain truncation mutant (Cx46ΔCT) were activated by voltage pulses. When the hemichannels were depolarized repeatedly from −60 mV to +80 mV, the amplitude of the outward and tail currents increased progressively with successive pulses. This phenomenon (“current facilitation”) depended on the amplitude of the depolarization, reaching a maximum at approximately +60 mV in oocytes expressing Cx46, and on the interval between pulses, disappearing with intervals longer than about 20 s. The current facilitation was also present in oocytes expressing Cx46ΔCT, ruling out a primary role of this domain in the facilitation. Nominal removal of divalent cations from the extracellular side caused maximal current activation of Cx46 and Cx46ΔCT hemichannels and prevented facilitation. The results suggest that Cx46 hemichannels show a cooperative activation independent of their COOH-terminal domain. PMID:19889966

  6. Disulfide mapping the voltage-sensing mechanism of a voltage-dependent potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Ozawa, Shin-ichiro; Harada, Hitomi; Kimura, Tomomi; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels allow for the selective permeability of potassium ions in a membrane potential dependent manner, playing crucial roles in neurotransmission and muscle contraction. Kv channel is a tetramer, in which each subunit possesses a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) and a pore domain (PD). Although several lines of evidence indicated that membrane depolarization is sensed as the movement of helix S4 of the VSD, the detailed voltage-sensing mechanism remained elusive, due to the difficulty of structural analyses at resting potential. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive disulfide locking analysis of the VSD using 36 double Cys mutants, in order to identify the proximal residue pairs of the VSD in the presence or absence of a membrane potential. An intramolecular SS-bond was formed between 6 Cys pairs under both polarized and depolarized environment, and one pair only under depolarized environment. The multiple conformations captured by the SS-bond can be divided by two states, up and down, where S4 lies on the extracellular and intracellular sides of the membrane, respectively, with axial rotation of 180°. The transition between these two states is caused by the S4 translocation of 12 Å, enabling allosteric regulation of the gating at the PD. PMID:27853286

  7. Voltage-dependent switching of sensorimotor integration by a lobster central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Nargeot, Romuald

    2003-06-15

    Behavioral adaptations and the underlying neural plasticity may not simply result from peripheral information conveyed by sensory inputs. Central neuronal networks often spontaneously generate neuronal activity patterns that may also contribute to sensorimotor integration and behavioral adaptations. The present study explored a novel form of sensory-induced plasticity by which the resulting changes in motor output depend essentially on the preexisting functional state of an identified neuron of an endogenously active central network. In the isolated lobster stomatogastric nervous system, electrical stimulation of a mechanosensory nerve transiently inactivated rhythmic spike bursting in the lateral pyloric (LP) neuron of the pyloric motor pattern-generating network. Repeated sensory nerve stimulation gradually and long-lastingly strengthened the bursting of the LP neuron to the detriment of sensory-elicited inactivation. This strengthening of pyloric-timed rhythmic activity was enhanced by experimental depolarization of the neuron. Conversely, when the LP neuron was hyperpolarized, the same sensory stimulation paradigm now gradually increased the susceptibility of the pyloric-timed bursting of the network neuron to sensory-elicited inactivation. Modulation of depolarization-activated and hyperpolarization-activated ionic conductances that underlie the intrinsic bursting properties of the LP neuron may contribute via differential voltage-dependent recruitment and effects to the respective adaptive processes. These data therefore suggest a novel state-dependent mechanism by which an endogenously active central network can decrease or increase its responsiveness to the same sensory input.

  8. pH- and voltage-dependent conductances in toad skin.

    PubMed

    Lacaz-Vieira, F

    1995-11-01

    The present study focuses on two closely related topics on ion conductance in toad skins: (i) the interaction of apical protons with the apical voltage-dependent Cl(-)-activated channels of the mitochondria-rich cells, and (ii) the description and characterization of a novel subject, a voltage-dependent H(+)-activated conductance. The Cl- conductance (GCl) is activated by tissue hyperpolarization (which leads to apical membrane depolarization) and the presence of Cl- ions in the apical solution. Increasing apical proton concentration (from pH 8 to pH 4) impairs the process of activation of the Cl- conductive pathway, slowing the kinetics of It activation and reducing the steady-stage values of Gt and It. This effect is markedly voltage-dependent since no effect is seen at Vt = -100 mv and is fully present at -50 mV. The voltage-dependence of the pH effect suggests that the critical protonation sites of the apical Cl- channels are not freely exposed to the apical solution but dwell within the membrane electric field. An also coherent interpretation is that titration of apical proton binding sites affects the gating of the voltage-dependent Cl- channels, shifting the conductance-vs.-voltage curve to more negative clamping potentials. Tissue conductance in the absence of apical Cl- ions can be importantly affected by the pH of the apical solution (pHa), the effect being markedly dependent on the clamping potential. Generally speaking, the effect of rising apical proton concentration can be conspicuous at negative clamping potentials, while at positive potentials changes in tissue conductance were never observed. For a clamping potential of -100 mV, a turning point somewhere between pHa = 4 and pHa = 3 was observed. Apical acidification to pH 4 has no effect upon tissue conductance while apical acidification to pH 3 leads to a marked, slow and reversible increase of tissue conductance. A striking similitude exists between the voltage-dependent Cl(-)-gated conductance

  9. Voltage-dependent K(+) channels improve the energy efficiency of signalling in blowfly photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Heras, Francisco J H; Anderson, John; Laughlin, Simon B; Niven, Jeremy E

    2017-04-01

    Voltage-dependent conductances in many spiking neurons are tuned to reduce action potential energy consumption, so improving the energy efficiency of spike coding. However, the contribution of voltage-dependent conductances to the energy efficiency of analogue coding, by graded potentials in dendrites and non-spiking neurons, remains unclear. We investigate the contribution of voltage-dependent conductances to the energy efficiency of analogue coding by modelling blowfly R1-6 photoreceptor membrane. Two voltage-dependent delayed rectifier K(+) conductances (DRs) shape the membrane's voltage response and contribute to light adaptation. They make two types of energy saving. By reducing membrane resistance upon depolarization they convert the cheap, low bandwidth membrane needed in dim light to the expensive high bandwidth membrane needed in bright light. This investment of energy in bandwidth according to functional requirements can halve daily energy consumption. Second, DRs produce negative feedback that reduces membrane impedance and increases bandwidth. This negative feedback allows an active membrane with DRs to consume at least 30% less energy than a passive membrane with the same capacitance and bandwidth. Voltage-dependent conductances in other non-spiking neurons, and in dendrites, might be organized to make similar savings.

  10. Modification of the cell based assay for brevetoxins using human cardiac voltage dependent sodium channels expressed in HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed

    Fairey, E R; Bottein Dechraoui, M Y; Sheets, M F; Ramsdell, J S

    2001-09-01

    Assays using living cells provide an effective means to generate activity measurements of toxins, especially in situations where the toxins are part of a complex mixture or in an unfamiliar form such as natural or synthetic derivatives or bioactive metabolites. An important step in the refinement of cell based assays is to simplify the cellular reactions needed or required to generate the functional response of interest. Advances in the engineering of functional responses in cells provide a means to direct the response to given toxins. In this report, we describe the homogeneous high level expression of the initial target for brevetoxin, the voltage dependent sodium channel in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293). HEK cells stably transfected with a 6.208 kb cDNA of human heart voltage-dependent Na(+) channel (hH1a) were examined as an alternative to mouse neuroblastoma cells (N2A). The HEK-hH1a cells showed a reduced dependence on cofactors, increased sensitivity to brevetoxin and a useful means to assure absolute selectivity to the sodium channel. We next assessed the assay in a reporter gene format. Expression of a panel of minimal response elements as well as the c-fos promoter failed to provide a response to brevetoxin, indicating that the HEK cells lack a necessary intermediate signaling component. The expression of voltage dependent sodium channels in HEK cells is anticipated to provide enhanced performance for cell-based detection of toxins for drug and natural product discovery, biomonitoring and environmental monitoring.

  11. Voltage-Dependent K+-Channel in Protoplasmic Droplets of Chara corallina1

    PubMed Central

    Homblé, Fabrice; Ferrier, Jack M.; Dainty, Jack

    1987-01-01

    Passive transport of potassium through the plasma membrane of a protoplasmic droplet isolated from large internodal cells of Chara corallina Klein ex Willd., em, R.D.W. has been investigated using the patchclamp technique. When the membrane is hyperpolarized the conductance of a single K+-channel is of the order of magnitude of 100 picoSiemens and is reduced by tetraethylammonium chloride. Its open time is voltage dependent. This voltage-dependent K+-channel displays rectifying properties. The channel density is about 0.1 channel per square micrometer of membrane. When the membrane is depolarized the conductance of a single channel is of the order of magnitude of 30 picoSiemens and is insensitive to tetraethylammonium chloride. These results suggest that K+-channels are incorporated in the plasma membrane during membranogenesis of a protoplasmic droplet. They constitute further evidence for the existence of voltage-dependent K+-channels in plant cells. PMID:16665215

  12. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    SciTech Connect

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-05-07

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects.

  13. Nonequilibrium gating and voltage dependence of the ClC-0 Cl- channel

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The gating of ClC-0, the voltage-dependent Cl- channel from Torpedo electric organ, is strongly influenced by Cl- ions in the external solution. Raising external Cl- over the range 1-600 mM favors the fast- gating open state and disfavors the slow-gating inactivated state. Analysis of purified single ClC-0 channels reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers was used to identify the role of Cl- ions in the channel's fast voltage-dependent gating process. External, but not internal, Cl- had a major effect on the channel's opening rate constant. The closing rate was more sensitive to internal Cl- than to external Cl-. Both opening and closing rates varied with voltage. A model was derived that postulates (a) that in the channel's closed state, Cl- is accessible to a site located at the outer end of the conduction pore, where it binds in a voltage-independent fashion, (b) that this closed conformation can open, whether liganded by Cl- or not, in a weakly voltage-dependent fashion, (c) that the Cl(-)-liganded closed channel undergoes a conformational change to a different closed state, such that concomitant with this change, Cl- ion moves inward, conferring voltage-dependence to this step, and (d) that this new Cl(-)- liganded closed state opens with a very high rate. According to this picture, Cl- movement within the pre-open channel is the major source of voltage dependence, and charge movement intrinsic to the channel protein contributes very little to voltage-dependent gating of ClC-0. Moreover, since the Cl- activation site is probably located in the ion conduction pathway, the fast gating of ClC-0 is necessarily coupled to ion conduction, a nonequilibrium process. PMID:8894974

  14. Eugenol dilates rat cerebral arteries by inhibiting smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Leal-Cardoso, Jose Henrique; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2014-11-01

    Plants high in eugenol, a phenylpropanoid compound, are used as folk medicines to alleviate diseases including hypertension. Eugenol has been demonstrated to relax conduit and ear arteries and reduce systemic blood pressure, but mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we studied eugenol regulation of resistance-size cerebral arteries that control regional brain blood pressure and flow and investigated mechanisms involved. We demonstrate that eugenol dilates arteries constricted by either pressure or membrane depolarization (60 mM K) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology demonstrated that eugenol inhibited voltage-dependent calcium (Ca) currents, when using Ba as a charge carrier, in isolated cerebral artery smooth muscle cells. Eugenol inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca currents involved pore block, a hyperpolarizing shift (∼-10 mV) in voltage-dependent inactivation, an increase in the proportion of steady-state inactivating current, and acceleration of inactivation rate. In summary, our data indicate that eugenol dilates cerebral arteries by means of multimodal inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca channels.

  15. Voltage-dependent gating of NR1/2B NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Richard J; Johnson, Jon W

    2008-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels are activated by agonist binding, but may also be modulated by membrane voltage. N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) exhibit especially strong voltage dependence due to channel block by external Mg2+ (Mgo2+). Here we demonstrate that activity of NMDARs composed of NR1 and NR2B subunits (NR1/2B receptors) is enhanced by depolarization even in 0 Mgo2+, causing slow current relaxations in response to rapid voltage changes. We present a kinetic model of receptor activation that incorporates voltage-dependent gating-associated NR2B subunit conformational changes. The model accurately reproduces current relaxations during depolarizations and subsequent repolarizations in 0 Mgo2+. Model simulations in physiological Mgo2+ concentrations show that voltage-dependent receptor gating also underlies the slow component of Mgo2+ unblock, a phenomenon that previously was shown to influence Mgo2+ unblock kinetics during dendritic spikes. We propose that voltage-dependent gating of NR1/2B receptors confers enhanced voltage and time dependence on NMDAR-mediated signalling. PMID:18936081

  16. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Debanne, Dominique; Alcaraz, Gisele

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  17. Relaxation of Isolated Ventricular Cardiomyocytes by a Voltage-Dependent Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, John H. B.; Spitzer, Kenneth W.; Ershler, Philip R.

    1988-08-01

    Cell contraction and relaxation were measured in single voltage-clamped guinea pig cardiomyocytes to investigate the contribution of sarcolemmal Na+-Ca2+ exchange to mechanical relaxation. Cells clamped from -80 to 0 millivolts displayed initial phasic and subsequent tonic contractions; caffeine reduced or abolished the phasic and enlarged the tonic contraction. The rate of relaxation from tonic contractions was steeply voltage-dependent and was significantly slowed in the absence of a sarcolemmal Na+ gradient. Tonic contractions elicited in the absence of a Na+ gradient promptly relaxed when external Na+ was applied, reflecting activation of Na+-Ca2+ exchange. It appears that a voltage-dependent Na+-Ca2+ exchange can rapidly mechanically relax mammalian heart muscle.

  18. The voltage-dependent proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin is characterized by optoelectric behavior.

    PubMed

    Geibel, S; Friedrich, T; Ormos, P; Wood, P G; Nagel, G; Bamberg, E

    2001-10-01

    The light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) was functionally expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in HEK-293 cells. The latter expression system allowed high time resolution of light-induced current signals. A detailed voltage clamp and patch clamp study was performed to investigate the DeltapH versus Deltapsi dependence of the pump current. The following results were obtained. The current voltage behavior of bR is linear in the measurable range between -160 mV and +60 mV. The pH dependence is less than expected from thermodynamic principles, i.e., one DeltapH unit produces a shift of the apparent reversal potential of 34 mV (and not 58 mV). The M(2)-BR decay shows a significant voltage dependence with time constants changing from 20 ms at +60 mV to 80 ms at -160 mV. The linear I-V curve can be reconstructed by this behavior. However, the slope of the decay rate shows a weaker voltage dependence than the stationary photocurrent, indicating that an additional process must be involved in the voltage dependence of the pump. A slowly decaying M intermediate (decay time > 100 ms) could already be detected at zero voltage by electrical and spectroscopic means. In effect, bR shows optoelectric behavior. The long-lived M can be transferred into the active photocycle by depolarizing voltage pulses. This is experimentally demonstrated by a distinct charge displacement. From the results we conclude that the transport cycle of bR branches via a long-lived M(1)* in a voltage-dependent manner into a nontransporting cycle, where the proton release and uptake occur on the extracellular side.

  19. Voltage-dependent calcium-permeable channels in the plasma membrane of a higher plant cell.

    PubMed Central

    Thuleau, P; Ward, J M; Ranjeva, R; Schroeder, J I

    1994-01-01

    Numerous biological assays and pharmacological studies on various higher plant tissues have led to the suggestion that voltage-dependent plasma membrane Ca2+ channels play prominent roles in initiating signal transduction processes during plant growth and development. However, to date no direct evidence has been obtained for the existence of such depolarization-activated Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane of higher plant cells. Carrot suspension cells (Daucus carota L.) provide a well-suited system to determine whether voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels are present in the plasma membrane of higher plants and to characterize the properties of putative Ca2+ channels. It is known that both depolarization, caused by raising extracellular K+, and exposure to fungal toxins or oligogalacturonides induce Ca2+ influx into carrot cells. By direct application of patch-clamp techniques to isolated carrot protoplasts, we show here that depolarization of the plasma membrane positive to -135 mV activates Ca(2+)-permeable channels. These voltage-dependent ion channels were more permeable to Ca2+ than K+, while displaying large permeabilities to Ba2+ and Mg2+ ions. Ca(2+)-permeable channels showed slow and reversible inactivation. The single-channel conductance was 13 pS in 40 mM CaCl2. These data provide direct evidence for the existence of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane of a higher plant cell and point to physiological mechanisms for plant Ca2+ channel regulation. The depolarization-activated Ca(2+)-permeable channels identified here could constitute a regulated pathway for Ca2+ influx in response to physiologically occurring stimulus-induced depolarizations in higher plant cells. PMID:8039493

  20. A comparative study of the action of tolperisone on seven different voltage dependent sodium channel isoforms.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Doris; Lohberger, Birgit; Steinecker, Bibiane; Schmidt, Kurt; Quasthoff, Stefan; Schreibmayer, Wolfgang

    2006-05-24

    The specific, acute interaction of tolperisone, an agent used as a muscle relaxant and for the treatment of chronic pain conditions, with the Na(v1.2), Na(v1.3), Na(v1.4), Na(v1.5), Na(v1.6), Na(v1.7), and Na(v1.8) isoforms of voltage dependent sodium channels was investigated and compared to that of lidocaine. Voltage dependent sodium channels were expressed in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system and sodium currents were recorded with the two electrode voltage clamp technique. Cumulative dose response relations revealed marked differences in IC(50) values between the two drugs on identical isoforms, as well as between isoforms. A detailed kinetic analysis uncovered that tolperisone as well as lidocaine exhibited their blocking action not only via state dependent association/dissociation with voltage dependent sodium channels, but a considerable fraction of inhibition is tonic, i.e. permanent and basic in nature. Voltage dependent activation was affected to a minor extent only. A shift in steady-state inactivation to more negative potentials could be observed for most drug/isoform combinations. The contribution of this shift to overall block was, however, small at drug concentrations resulting in considerable overall block. Recovery from inactivation was affected notably by both drugs. Lidocaine application led to a pronounced prolongation of the time constant of the fast recovery process for the Na(v1.3), Na(v1.5), and Na(v1.7) isoforms, indicating common structural properties in the local anesthetic receptor site of these three proteins. Interestingly, this characteristic drug action was not observed for tolperisone.

  1. Hypotonicity activates a voltage-dependent membrane conductance in N2a neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Taruno, Akiyuki; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2017-03-04

    To maintain cellular and bodily homeostasis, cells respond to extracellular stimuli including osmotic stress by activating various ion channels, which have been implicated in many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. However, cellular osmosensory mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report a novel voltage-dependent current in N2a cells activated by exposure to hypotonic stress. After a hypotonic challenge, N2a cells sequentially develop two distinct currents. The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) current emerges first and, after a delay, activation of a previously uncharacterized strongly outwardly rectifying current follows. The latter, delayed current (Id) is insensitive to NPPB, a nonspecific blocker of Cl(-) channels, and intracellular Mg(2+), which inhibits VRAC and swelling-activated TRPM3 and TRPM7 channels. Replacement of extracellular Na(+) with NMDG(+) reduces inward tail currents, suggesting that Id is mediated by cations. Finally, Id shows voltage-dependent activation with slow activation kinetics and half-maximal activation at +76 mV. These pharmacological and biophysical characteristics of Id are distinct from those of known osmotic cell swelling-activated ion channels. In conclusion, our data identify and characterize a novel osmotically-activated, voltage-dependent ion channel in N2a cells.

  2. Endocytic regulation of voltage-dependent potassium channels in the heart.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kuniaki; Norota, Ikuo; Obara, Yutaro

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of cardiac ion channels is critical for the prevention of arrhythmia caused by abnormal excitability. Ion channels can be regulated by a change in function (qualitative) and a change in number (quantitative). Functional changes have been extensively investigated for many ion channels including cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels. By contrast, the regulation of ion channel numbers has not been widely examined, particularly with respect to acute modulation of ion channels. This article briefly summarizes stimulus-induced endocytic regulation of major voltage-dependent potassium channels in the heart. The stimuli known to cause their endocytosis include receptor activation, drugs, and low extracellular [K(+)], following which the potassium channels undergo either clathrin-mediated or caveolin-mediated endocytosis. Receptor-mediated endocytic regulation has been demonstrated for Kv1.2, Kv1.5, KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), and Kv4.3, while drug-induced endocytosis has been demonstrated for Kv1.5 and hERG. Low [K(+)](o)-induced endocytosis might be unique for hERG channels, whose electrophysiological characteristics are known to be under strong influence of [K(+)](o). Although the precise mechanisms have not been elucidated, it is obvious that major cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels are modulated by endocytosis, which leads to changes in cardiac excitability.

  3. Voltage dependence of Na translocation by the Na/K pump.

    PubMed

    Nakao, M; Gadsby, D C

    During each complete reaction cycle, the Na/K pump transports three Na ions out across the cell membrane and two K ions in. The resulting net extrusion of positive charge generates outward membrane current but, until now, it was unclear how that net charge movement occurs. Reasonable possibilities included a single positive charge moving outwards during Na translocation; or a single negative charge moving inwards during K translocation; or either positive or negative charges moving during both translocation steps, but in unequal quantities. Any step that involves net charge movement through the membrane must have voltage-dependent transition rates. Here we report measurements of transient, voltage-dependent, displacement currents generated by the pump when its normal Na/K transport cycle has been interrupted by removal of external K and it is thus constrained to carry out Na/Na exchange. The quantity and voltage sensitivity of the charge moved during these transient currents suggests that Na translocation includes a voltage-dependent transition involving movement of one positive charge across the membrane. This single step can thus fully account for the electrogenic nature of Na/K exchange. The result provides important new insight into the molecular mechanism of active cation transport.

  4. Voltage-dependent calcium channels from brain incorporated into planar lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark T.; French, Robert J.; Krueger, Bruce K.

    1984-03-01

    Many important physiological processes, including neurotransmitter release and muscle contraction1-3, are regulated by the concentration of Ca2+ ions in the cell. Levels of cytoplasmic Ca2+ can be elevated by the entry of Ca2+ ions through voltage-dependent channels which are selective for Ca2+, Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions4-14. We have measured currents through single, voltage-dependent calcium channels from rat brain that have been incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. Channel gating was voltage-dependent: membrane depolarization increased the channel open times and decreased the closed times. The channels were selective for divalent cations over monovalent ions. The well-known calcium channel blockers, lanthanum and cadmium, produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the apparent single-channel conductance. Contrary to expectations14, the nature of the divalent cation carrying current through the channel affected not only the single-channel conductance, but also the channel open times, with mean open times being shortest for barium.

  5. Development of voltage-dependent calcium, sodium, and potassium currents in Xenopus spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, D K; Ribera, A B; Spitzer, N C

    1988-03-01

    Action potentials of embryonic nerve and muscle cells often have a different ionic dependence and longer duration than those of mature cells. The action potential of spinal cord neurons from Xenopus laevis exhibits a prominent calcium component at early stages of development that diminishes with age as the impulse becomes principally sodium dependent. Whole-cell voltage-clamp analysis has been undertaken to characterize the changes in membrane currents during development of these neurons in culture. Four voltage-dependent currents of cells were identified and examined during the first day in vitro, when most of the change in the action potential occurs. There are no changes in the peak density of the calcium current (ICa), its voltage dependence, or time to half-maximal activation; a small increase in inactivation is apparent. The major change in sodium current (INa) is a 2-fold increase in its density. In addition, more subtle changes in the kinetics of the macroscopic sodium current were noted. The peak density of voltage-dependent potassium current (IKv) increases 3-fold, and this current becomes activated almost twice as fast. No changes were noted in the extent of its inactivation. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IKc) consists of an inactivating and a sustained component. The former increases 2-fold in peak current density, and the latter increases similarly at less depolarized voltages. The changes in these currents contribute to the decrease in duration and the change in ionic dependence of the impulse.

  6. Beta-scorpion toxin effects suggest electrostatic interactions in domain II of voltage-dependent sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Cestèle, Sandrine

    2005-10-01

    Beta-scorpion toxins specifically modulate the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by acting through a voltage-sensor trapping model. We used mutagenesis, functional analysis and the action of beta-toxin as tools to investigate the existence and role in channel activation of molecular interactions between the charged residues of the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II of sodium channels. Mutating to arginine the acidic residues of the S2 and S3 transmembrane segments in domain II, or making charge-reversal mutation of the two outermost gating charges of the IIS4 voltage sensor, shifts the voltage dependence of channel activation to more positive potentials and enhances the effect of beta-scorpion toxin. Thus, mutations of acidic residues in IIS2 and IIS3 segments are able to promote voltage-sensor trapping in a way that is similar to the mutations of the arginines in the IIS4 segment. In order to disclose the network of interactions among acidic and basic residues we performed functional analysis of charge-inversion double mutants: our data suggest that the first arginine of the voltage sensor S4 in domain II (R850) interacts specifically with E805, D814 and E821 in the S2 and S3 segments, whereas the second arginine (R853) only interacts with D827 in the S3 segment. Our results suggest that the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II form a voltage-sensing structure, and that molecular interactions between the charged residues of this structure modulate the availability of the IIS4 voltage sensor for trapping by beta-toxins. They also provide unique insights into the molecular events that occur during channel activation, as well as into the structure of the channel.

  7. β-Scorpion toxin effects suggest electrostatic interactions in domain II of voltage-dependent sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Cestèle, Sandrine

    2005-01-01

    β-Scorpion toxins specifically modulate the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by acting through a voltage-sensor trapping model. We used mutagenesis, functional analysis and the action of β-toxin as tools to investigate the existence and role in channel activation of molecular interactions between the charged residues of the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II of sodium channels. Mutating to arginine the acidic residues of the S2 and S3 transmembrane segments in domain II, or making charge-reversal mutation of the two outermost gating charges of the IIS4 voltage sensor, shifts the voltage dependence of channel activation to more positive potentials and enhances the effect of β-scorpion toxin. Thus, mutations of acidic residues in IIS2 and IIS3 segments are able to promote voltage-sensor trapping in a way that is similar to the mutations of the arginines in the IIS4 segment. In order to disclose the network of interactions among acidic and basic residues we performed functional analysis of charge-inversion double mutants: our data suggest that the first arginine of the voltage sensor S4 in domain II (R850) interacts specifically with E805, D814 and E821 in the S2 and S3 segments, whereas the second arginine (R853) only interacts with D827 in the S3 segment. Our results suggest that the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II form a voltage-sensing structure, and that molecular interactions between the charged residues of this structure modulate the availability of the IIS4 voltage sensor for trapping by β-toxins. They also provide unique insights into the molecular events that occur during channel activation, as well as into the structure of the channel. PMID:16020455

  8. Voltage dependence of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel K(Ca)3.1 in human erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Stoneking, Colin J; Shivakumar, Oshini; Thomas, David Nicholson; Colledge, William H; Mason, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    We have isolated a K(+)-selective, Ca(2+)-dependent whole cell current and single-channel correlate in the human erythroleukemia (HEL) cell line. The whole cell current was inhibited by the intermediate-conductance KCa3.1 inhibitors clotrimazole, TRAM-34, and charybdotoxin, unaffected by the small-conductance KCa2 family inhibitor apamin and the large-conductance KCa1.1 inhibitors paxilline and iberiotoxin, and augmented by NS309. The single-channel correlate of the whole cell current was blocked by TRAM-34 and clotrimazole, insensitive to paxilline, and augmented by NS309 and had a single-channel conductance in physiological K(+) gradients of ~9 pS. RT-PCR revealed that the KCa3.1 gene, but not the KCa1.1 gene, was expressed in HEL cells. The KCa3.1 current, isolated in HEL cells under whole cell patch-clamp conditions, displayed an activated current component during depolarizing voltage steps from hyperpolarized holding potentials and tail currents upon repolarization, consistent with voltage-dependent modulation. This activated current increased with increasing voltage steps above -40 mV and was sensitive to inhibition by clotrimazole, TRAM-34, and charybdotoxin and insensitive to apamin, paxilline, and iberiotoxin. In single-channel experiments, depolarization resulted in an increase in open channel probability (Po) of KCa3.1, with no increase in channel number. The voltage modulation of Po was an increasing monotonic function of voltage. In the absence of elevated Ca(2+), voltage was ineffective at inducing channel activity in whole cell and single-channel experiments. These data indicate that KCa3.1 in HEL cells displays a unique form of voltage dependence modulating Po.

  9. Voltage-dependent metabolic regulation of Kv2.1 channels in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masashi; Nakata, Masanori; Yamato, Shiho; Dezaki, Katsuya; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, San-e; Kawakami, Masanobu; Yada, Toshihiko; Kakei, Masafumi

    2010-05-28

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv channels) play a crucial role in formation of action potentials in response to glucose stimulation in pancreatic beta-ells. We previously reported that the Kv channel is regulated by glucose metabolism, particularly by MgATP. We examined whether the regulation of Kv channels is voltage-dependent and mechanistically related with phosphorylation of the channels. In rat pancreatic beta-cells, suppression of glucose metabolism with low glucose concentrations of 2.8mM or less or by metabolic inhibitors decreased the Kv2.1-channel activity at positive membrane potentials, while increased it at potentials negative to -10 mV, suggesting that modulation of Kv channels by glucose metabolism is voltage-dependent. Similarly, in HEK293 cells expressing the recombinant Kv2.1 channels, 0mM but not 10mM MgATP modulated the channel activity in a manner similar to that in beta-cells. Both steady-state activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel were shifted toward the negative potential in association with the voltage-dependent modulation of the channels by cytosolic dialysis of alkaline phosphatase in beta-cells. The modulation of Kv-channel current-voltage relations were also observed during and after glucose-stimulated electrical excitation. These results suggest that the cellular metabolism including MgATP production and/or channel phosphorylation/dephosphorylation underlie the physiological modulation of Kv2.1 channels during glucose-induced insulin secretion.

  10. Novel expression and regulation of voltage-dependent potassium channels in placentas from women with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Hiten D; McCallum, Laura A; Kurlak, Lesia O; Greenwood, Iain A; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona; Tribe, Rachel M

    2011-09-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with structural/functional alterations in placental and maternal vasculature. Voltage-dependant potassium channels encoded by KCNQ1-5 genes have been detected in several types of blood vessels where they promote vascular relaxation. Voltage-dependant potassium channel function can be modulated by KCNE1-5-encoded accessory proteins. The aim of this study was to determine whether KCNQ and KCNE genes are differentially expressed in placentas from women with preeclampsia compared with normotensive controls and to examine any differences in those who delivered preterm (<37 weeks) or term. Placental biopsies (from midway between the cord and periphery) were obtained, with consent, from white European control (n=24; term) and preeclamptic (n=22; of whom 8 delivered before 37 weeks' gestation) women. KCNQ/KCNE and GAPDH mRNA expressions were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Protein expression/localization was assessed using immunohistochemistry. KCNQ3 and KCNE5 mRNA expressions were significantly upregulated in preeclampsia (median [interquartile range]: 1.942 [0.905 to 3.379]) versus controls (0.159 [0.088 to 0.288]; P=0.001) and exhibited a strong positive correlation with each other (P<0.001), suggesting a novel heterodimer. Enhanced protein expression of KCNQ3 and KCNE5 in preeclampsia was confirmed with localization mainly restricted to the syncytiotrophoblast. KCNQ4 and KCNE1 isoforms were suppressed in placentas from term preeclamptic women versus controls (P≤0.05). KCNQ1 mRNA expression was increased and KCNQ5 decreased in the preterm preeclamptic group versus controls (P<0.05). In summary, voltage-dependant potassium channels are expressed and markedly modulated in placentas from preeclamptic women. Differential expression of isoforms may lead to altered cell proliferation. The correlation between KCNQ3 and KCNE5 expression is indicative of a novel channel complex and warrants further investigation.

  11. Effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium channel (Kv1.1)

    PubMed Central

    Tytgat, J; Maertens, Ch; Daenens, P

    1997-01-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac) is widely used as an antidepressant drug and is assumed to be a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Claims that its beneficial psychotropic effects extend beyond those in treatment of depression have drawn clinical and popular attention to this compound, raising the question of whether there is anything exceptional about the supposed selective actions.We have used the voltage clamp technique to study the effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium (K+) channel (RCK1; Kv1.1), expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. This channel subunit is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system and K+ channels containing this subunit are involved in the repolarization process of many types of neurones.Blockade of the K+ currents by fluoxetine was found to be use- and dose-dependent. Wash-out of this compound could not be achieved. Fluoxetine did not affect the ion selectivity of this K+ channel, as the reversal potential was unaltered.Slowing of both activation and deactivation kinetics of the channel by fluoxetine was observed, including tail current crossover upon repolarization.Hodgkin-Huxley type of models and more generalized Markov chain models were used to fit the kinetics of the data. Based upon a Markov kinetic scheme, our data can be interpreted to mean that blockade of fluoxetine consists of two components: a voltage-independent occurring in the last closed, but available state of the channel, and a voltage-dependent occurring in the open state.This study describes the first biophysical working model for the mechanism of action of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent K+ channel, RCK1. Although this channel is not very potently blocked by fluoxetine when expressed in oocytes, this study may help us to understand some of the clinical symptoms seen with elevated serum concentrations of this SSRI. PMID:9421290

  12. Admittance Spectroscopy in CZTSSe: Metastability Behavior and Voltage Dependent Defect Study

    SciTech Connect

    Koeper, Mark J.; Hages, Charles J.; Li, Jian V.; Levi, Dean; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2016-11-21

    Admittance spectroscopy has been performed on a CZTSSe device with a carrier injection pretreatment and under electronically relaxed conditions to demonstrate metastability behavior. We show that the measurements with the carrier injection pretreatment demonstrate two admittance signatures while the relaxed measurement demonstrates only one admittance signature with a different activation energy. Additionally, voltage dependent admittance spectroscopy was performed using the carrier injection pretreatment method at each of the applied voltage bias. The activation energies of the two admittance signatures were calculated and are shown to be independent of the voltage bias.

  13. Eag1 Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels: Structure, Electrophysiological Characteristics, and Function in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuzhao; Chen, Yafei; Zhang, Yuhong; Guo, Shuai; Mo, Li; An, Hailong; Zhan, Yong

    2017-02-03

    Eag1 (ether-à-go-go-1), a member of the voltage-dependent potassium channel family, is expressed mainly in the brain, and at low levels in placenta, testis, and adrenal gland, and only transiently in myoblasts. Recently, several studies have suggested that Eag1 is selectively expressed in various tumor tissues. Eag1 plays important roles in tumor proliferation, malignant transformation, invasion, metastasis, recurrence, and prognosis. Therefore, it has become a new molecular target for tumor diagnosis, prognosis evaluation, and tumor-targeted therapy. This review provides information about the current progress in understanding Eag1 structure, electrophysiological characteristics, and role in cancer.

  14. Voltage-dependent gating mechanism for single fast chloride channels from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, D S; Magleby, K L

    1992-01-01

    1. A voltage-dependent gating mechanism for the fast Cl- channel was developed from the analysis of single-channel current records obtained with the patch clamp technique from primary cultures of rat skeletal muscle. Up to 10(6) open and shut intervals were analysed from each of five different excised patches of membrane containing a single fast Cl- channel. 2. Rate constants for a kinetic scheme with six closed and two open states (scheme I) were estimated at a given voltage by maximum likelihood fitting of open and closed dwell-time distributions obtained at that voltage. This procedure was then repeated for data obtained at each of three to eight different membrane potentials for each channel. 3. Plots of the estimated rate constants against membrane potential typically appeared linear on semilogarithmic co-ordinates, consistent with rate constants that are exponentially dependent on voltage. 4. Regression analysis of these plots yielded two parameters for each rate constant: the value of the rate constant at -50 mV (B) and its voltage sensitivity (A). The dwell-time distributions predicted with these parameters and scheme I gave a good description of the experimental dwell-time distributions at all the studied voltages, lending further support for an exponential dependence of rate constants on membrane potential. 5. Estimates of A and B were also obtained by simultaneously fitting dwell-time distributions obtained at three to eight different voltages, in order to better define these parameters. Predicted dwell-time distributions obtained with these estimates and scheme I could approach the theoretical best description of the data for discrete-state Markov models. 6. Eight to twelve of the fourteen rate constants in scheme I appeared voltage sensitive, with effective gating charges ranging from about -1.5 to +1.0 units of electronic charge. 7. The estimated rate constants and their voltage sensitivities for the five analysed channels were generally similar, but

  15. Two Separate Interfaces between the Voltage Sensor and Pore Are Required for the Function of Voltage-Dependent K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, Roderick

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels gate open in response to the membrane voltage. To further our understanding of how cell membrane voltage regulates the opening of a Kv channel, we have studied the protein interfaces that attach the voltage-sensor domains to the pore. In the crystal structure, three physical interfaces exist. Only two of these consist of amino acids that are co-evolved across the interface between voltage sensor and pore according to statistical coupling analysis of 360 Kv channel sequences. A first co-evolved interface is formed by the S4-S5 linkers (one from each of four voltage sensors), which form a cuff surrounding the S6-lined pore opening at the intracellular surface. The crystal structure and published mutational studies support the hypothesis that the S4-S5 linkers convert voltage-sensor motions directly into gate opening and closing. A second co-evolved interface forms a small contact surface between S1 of the voltage sensor and the pore helix near the extracellular surface. We demonstrate through mutagenesis that this interface is necessary for the function and/or structure of two different Kv channels. This second interface is well positioned to act as a second anchor point between the voltage sensor and the pore, thus allowing efficient transmission of conformational changes to the pore's gate. PMID:19260762

  16. Characterization of a voltage-dependent conductance in the basolateral membrane of leech skin epithelium.

    PubMed

    Schnizler, M; Clauss, W

    1998-05-01

    Voltage clamp studies were performed on the dorsal integument of Hirudo medicinalis. Under apical calcium-free conditions an inward-directed component of transepithelial current was activated by changes of transepithelial voltage. Depolarization caused up to 50% increase of the transepithelial sodium current. Hyperpolarization had no comparable effects. With calcium (1.8 mM) or amiloride (100 microM) in the apical solution and in sodium-free solutions the inward-directed current failed to increase after depolarization. Activation also occurred under chloride-free conditions. Permeabilization of the apical membrane by nystatin (5 microM) increased the current activation significantly. After nystatin, calcium as well as amiloride lost their inhibitory effects. This indicates a basolateral localization of the voltage-dependent conductance. Vesicle insertion or cytoskeletal structures are probably not involved in regulation, as seen by the lack of effects of brefeldin A and the cytochalasins B and D. However, serosal hyposmolar solutions (170 mosmol.1(-1)) caused a reinforced activation of the current. Our results indicate a voltage-dependent conductance in a tight sodium-absorbing epithelium.

  17. Fast and slow activation of voltage-dependent ion channels in radish vacuoles.

    PubMed Central

    Gambale, F; Cantu, A M; Carpaneto, A; Keller, B U

    1993-01-01

    The molecular processes associated with voltage-dependent opening and closing (gating) of ion channels were investigated using a new preparation from plant cells, i.e., voltage and calcium-activated ion channels in radish root vacuoles. These channels display a main single channel conductance of approximately 90 pS and are characterized by long activation times lasting several hundreds of milliseconds. Here, we demonstrate that these channels have a second kinetically distinct activation mode which is characterized by even longer activation times. Different membrane potential protocols allowed to switch between the fast and the slow mode in a controlled and reversible manner. At transmembrane potentials of -100 mV, the ratio between the fast and slow activation time constant was around 1:5. Correspondingly, activation times lasting several seconds were observed in the slow mode. The molecular process controlling fast and slow activation may represent an effective modulator of voltage-dependent gating of ion channels in other plant and animal systems. PMID:7507716

  18. Cloning and functional expression of a plant voltage-dependent chloride channel.

    PubMed Central

    Lurin, C; Geelen, D; Barbier-Brygoo, H; Guern, J; Maurel, C

    1996-01-01

    Plant cell membrane anion channels participate in basic physiological functions, such as cell volume regulation and signal transduction. However, nothing is known about their molecular structure. Using a polymerase chain reaction strategy, we have cloned a tobacco cDNA (CIC-Nt1) encoding a 780-amino acid protein with several putative transmembrane domains. CIC-Nt1 displays 24 to 32% amino acid identity with members of the animal voltage-dependent chloride channel (CIC) family, whose archetype is CIC-0 from the Torpedo marmorata electric organ. Injection of CIC-Nt1 complementary RNA into Xenopus oocytes elicited slowly activating inward currents upon membrane hyperpolarization more negative than -120 mV. These currents were carried mainly by anions, modulated by extracellular anions, and totally blocked by 10 mM extracellular calcium. The identification of CIC-Nt1 extends the CIC family to higher plants and provides a molecular probe for the study of voltage-dependent anion channels in plants. PMID:8624442

  19. Do voltage-dependent K+ channels require Ca2+? A critical test employing a heterologous expression system.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, C M; Miller, C

    1990-01-01

    Removal of Ca2+ from the solution bathing neurons is known in many cases to alter the gating properties of voltage-dependent K+ channels and to induce a large, nonselective "leak" conductance. We used a heterologous expression system to test whether the leak conductance observed in neurons is mediated by voltage-dependent K+ channels in an altered, debased conformation. Voltage-dependent K+ channels were expressed in an insect cell line infected with a recombinant baculovirus carrying the cDNA for Drosophila Shaker "A-type" K+ channels. These expressed channels respond to low Ca2+ identically to voltage-dependent K+ channels in native neuronal membranes; upon removal of external Ca2+, Shaker K+ currents disappear and are replaced by a steady, nonselective leak conductance. However, control cells devoid of Shaker channels were free of any voltage-dependent conductances and did not generate a leak when external Ca2+ was removed. These results show that Ca2+ is essential for proper function of voltage-dependent K+ channels and is required to stabilize the native conformations of these membrane proteins. PMID:2217187

  20. Sodium channel from rat brain. Reconstitution of voltage-dependent scorpion toxin binding in vesicles of defined lipid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D.J.; Talvenheimo, J.A.; Catterall, W.A.

    1985-09-25

    Purified sodium channels incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles mediate neurotoxin-activated SSNa influx but do not bind the alpha-scorpion toxin from Leiurus quinquestriatus (LqTx) with high affinity. Addition of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or phosphatidylserine to the reconstitution mixture restores high affinity LqTx binding with KD = 1.9 nM for PC/PE vesicles at -90 mV and 36 degrees C in sucrose-substituted medium. Other lipids tested were markedly less effective. The binding of LqTx in vesicles of PC/PE (65:35) is sensitive to both the membrane potential formed by sodium gradients across the reconstituted vesicle membrane and the cation concentration in the extravesicular medium. Binding of LqTx is reduced 3- to 4-fold upon depolarization to 0 mV from -50 to -60 mV in experiments in which (Na+)out/(Na+)in is varied by changing (Na+)in or (Na+)out at constant extravesicular ionic strength. It is concluded that the purified sodium channel contains the receptor site for LqTx in functional form and that restoration of high affinity, voltage-dependent binding of LqTx by the purified sodium channel requires an appropriate ratio of PC to PE and/or phosphatidylserine in the vesicle membrane.

  1. The Eag Domain Regulates the Voltage-Dependent Inactivation of Rat Eag1 K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ting-Feng; Jow, Guey-Mei; Fang, Hsin-Yu; Fu, Ssu-Ju; Wu, Hao-Han; Chiu, Mei-Miao; Jeng, Chung-Jiuan

    2014-01-01

    Eag (Kv10) and Erg (Kv11) belong to two distinct subfamilies of the ether-à-go-go K+ channel family (KCNH). While Erg channels are characterized by an inward-rectifying current-voltage relationship that results from a C-type inactivation, mammalian Eag channels display little or no voltage-dependent inactivation. Although the amino (N)-terminal region such as the eag domain is not required for the C-type inactivation of Erg channels, an N-terminal deletion in mouse Eag1 has been shown to produce a voltage-dependent inactivation. To further discern the role of the eag domain in the inactivation of Eag1 channels, we generated N-terminal chimeras between rat Eag (rEag1) and human Erg (hERG1) channels that involved swapping the eag domain alone or the complete cytoplasmic N-terminal region. Functional analyses indicated that introduction of the homologous hERG1 eag domain led to both a fast phase and a slow phase of channel inactivation in the rEag1 chimeras. By contrast, the inactivation features were retained in the reverse hERG1 chimeras. Furthermore, an eag domain-lacking rEag1 deletion mutant also showed the fast phase of inactivation that was notably attenuated upon co-expression with the rEag1 eag domain fragment, but not with the hERG1 eag domain fragment. Additionally, we have identified a point mutation in the S4–S5 linker region of rEag1 that resulted in a similar inactivation phenotype. Biophysical analyses of these mutant constructs suggested that the inactivation gating of rEag1 was distinctly different from that of hERG1. Overall, our findings are consistent with the notion that the eag domain plays a critical role in regulating the inactivation gating of rEag1. We propose that the eag domain may destabilize or mask an inherent voltage-dependent inactivation of rEag1 K+ channels. PMID:25333352

  2. Voltage-dependent Dynamic FRET Signals from the Transverse Tubules in Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Capote, Joana; Quiñonez, Marbella; Vergara, Julio L.

    2007-01-01

    Two hybrid voltage-sensing systems based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) were used to record membrane potential changes in the transverse tubular system (TTS) and surface membranes of adult mice skeletal muscle fibers. Farnesylated EGFP or ECFP (EGFP-F and ECFP-F) were used as immobile FRET donors, and either non-fluorescent (dipicrylamine [DPA]) or fluorescent (oxonol dye DiBAC4(5)) lipophilic anions were used as mobile energy acceptors. Flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles were transfected by in vivo electroporation with pEGFP-F and pECFP-F. Farnesylated fluorescent proteins were efficiently expressed in the TTS and surface membranes. Voltage-dependent optical signals resulting from resonance energy transfer from fluorescent proteins to DPA were named QRET transients, to distinguish them from FRET transients recorded using DiBAC4(5). The peak ΔF/F of QRET transients elicited by action potential stimulation is twice larger in fibers expressing ECFP-F as those with EGFP-F (7.1% vs. 3.6%). These data provide a unique experimental demonstration of the importance of the spectral overlap in FRET. The voltage sensitivity of QRET and FRET signals was demonstrated to correspond to the voltage-dependent translocation of the charged acceptors, which manifest as nonlinear components in current records. For DPA, both electrical and QRET data were predicted by radial cable model simulations in which the maximal time constant of charge translocation was 0.6 ms. FRET signals recorded in response to action potentials in fibers stained with DiBAC4(5) exhibit ΔF/F amplitudes as large as 28%, but their rising phase was slower than those of QRET signals. Model simulations require a time constant for charge translocation of 1.6 ms in order to predict current and FRET data. Our results provide the basis for the potential use of lipophilic ions as tools to test for fast voltage-dependent conformational changes of membrane proteins in the TTS. PMID:18040060

  3. Identification of PN1, a Predominant Voltage-Dependent Sodium Channel Expressed Principally in Peripheral Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Aral, Juan J.; Moss, Brenda L.; He, Zhi-Jun; Koszowski, Adam G.; Whisenand, Teri; Levinson, Simon R.; Wolf, John J.; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Halegoua, Simon; Mandel, Gail

    1997-02-01

    Membrane excitability in different tissues is due, in large part, to the selective expression of distinct genes encoding the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Although the predominant sodium channels in brain, skeletal muscle, and cardiac muscle have been identified, the major sodium channel types responsible for excitability within the peripheral nervous system have remained elusive. We now describe the deduced primary structure of a sodium channel, peripheral nerve type 1 (PN1), which is expressed at high levels throughout the peripheral nervous system and is targeted to nerve terminals of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Studies using cultured PC12 cells indicate that both expression and targeting of PN1 is induced by treatment of the cells with nerve growth factor. The preferential localization suggests that the PN1 sodium channel plays a specific role in nerve excitability.

  4. A voltage-dependent chloride channel fine-tunes photosynthesis in plants

    PubMed Central

    Herdean, Andrei; Teardo, Enrico; Nilsson, Anders K.; Pfeil, Bernard E.; Johansson, Oskar N.; Ünnep, Renáta; Nagy, Gergely; Zsiros, Ottó; Dana, Somnath; Solymosi, Katalin; Garab, Győző; Szabó, Ildikó; Spetea, Cornelia; Lundin, Björn

    2016-01-01

    In natural habitats, plants frequently experience rapid changes in the intensity of sunlight. To cope with these changes and maximize growth, plants adjust photosynthetic light utilization in electron transport and photoprotective mechanisms. This involves a proton motive force (PMF) across the thylakoid membrane, postulated to be affected by unknown anion (Cl−) channels. Here we report that a bestrophin-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana functions as a voltage-dependent Cl− channel in electrophysiological experiments. AtVCCN1 localizes to the thylakoid membrane, and fine-tunes PMF by anion influx into the lumen during illumination, adjusting electron transport and the photoprotective mechanisms. The activity of AtVCCN1 accelerates the activation of photoprotective mechanisms on sudden shifts to high light. Our results reveal that AtVCCN1, a member of a conserved anion channel family, acts as an early component in the rapid adjustment of photosynthesis in variable light environments. PMID:27216227

  5. Presence of a voltage-dependent anion channel 1 in the rat postsynaptic density fraction.

    PubMed

    Moon, J I; Jung, Y W; Ko, B H; De Pinto, V; Jin, I; Moon, I S

    1999-02-25

    Little is known about the molecular organization and functions of the postsynaptic density (PSD), a cytoskeletal specialization on the postsynaptic membrane. In an attempt to elucidate the protein composition of PSD, we have sequenced a 35 kDa protein of the rat forebrain PSD fraction. Amino acid sequence information of the tryptic peptides and immunoblot analyses revealed that the protein is a voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1). VDAC1 was enriched in the PSD fraction and was partially soluble in 1% n-octyl glucoside (NOG) or Triton X-100. Our data indicate that VDAC1, which is originally found in the outer mitochondrial membrane, is also present in the central nervous system (CNS) synapses in association with the PSD 'core'.

  6. Time and voltage dependences of nanoscale dielectric constant modulation on indium tin oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Hao, Haoyue; Zhao, Hua

    2017-01-01

    The modulation of indium tin oxide (ITO) films through surface charge accumulation plays an important role in many different applications. In order to elaborately study the modulation, we measured the dielectric constant of the modulated layer through examining the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons. Charges were pumped on the surfaces of ITO films through applying high voltage in appropriate directions. Experiments unveiled that the dielectric constant of the modulated layer had large variation along with the nanoscale charge accumulation. Corresponding numerical results were worked out through combining Drude model and Mayadas-Shatzkes model. Based on the above results, we deduced the time and voltage dependences of accumulated charge density, which revealed a long-time charge accumulation process.

  7. A non-linear voltage dependent charge movement in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, W K; Rakowski, R F; Schneider, M F

    1976-01-01

    1. Voltage-clamp experiments were carried out using the three microelectrode technique. Using this method membrane current density at V1 is proportional to deltaV( = V2 - V1) where V1 and V2 are voltages at distances 1 and 21 from the end of a fibre. Voltage dependent sodium currents were blocked by tetrodotoxin, potassium by tetraethylammonium ions and rubidium. Contraction was blocked by adding sucrose, 467 mM. 2. The current deltaV (control) associated with a positive voltage step from a hyperpolarized conditioning voltage to the holding potential, -80 mV, showed two components, a capacitative transient which decayed rapidly and a maintained steady level... PMID:1082506

  8. Myosin light chain kinase controls voltage-dependent calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, A; Schakman, O; Yerna, X; Dessy, C; Morel, N

    2014-07-01

    The Ca(2+)-dependent kinase myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is the activator of smooth muscle contraction. In addition, it has been reported to be involved in Ca(2+) channel regulation in cultured cells, and we previously showed that the MLCK inhibitor ML-7 decreases arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat aorta. This study was designed to investigate whether MLCK is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in resistance artery smooth muscle cell, which plays a major role in the control of blood pressure. As ML compounds were shown to have off-target effects, MLCK was downregulated by transfection with a small interfering RNA targeting MLCK (MLCK-siRNA) in rat small resistance mesenteric artery (RMA) and in the rat embryonic aortic cell line A7r5. Noradrenaline-induced contraction and Ca(2+) signal were significantly depressed in MLCK-siRNA compared to scramble-siRNA-transfected RMA. Contraction and Ca(2+) signal induced by high KCl and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were also significantly decreased in MLCK-siRNA-transfected RMA, suggesting that MLCK depletion modifies voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. KCl- and AVP-induced Ca(2+) signals and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were decreased in MLCK-depleted A7r5 cells. Eventually, real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that in A7r5, MLCK controlled mRNA expression of CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV3.1 (T-type) voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Our results suggest that MLCK controls the transcription of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  9. Gating characteristics of a steeply voltage-dependent gap junction channel in rat Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The gating properties of macroscopic and microscopic gap junctional currents were compared by applying the dual whole cell patch clamp technique to pairs of neonatal rat Schwann cells. In response to transjunctional voltage pulses (Vj), macroscopic gap junctional currents decayed exponentially with time constants ranging from < 1 to < 10 s before reaching steady-state levels. The relationship between normalized steady-state junctional conductance (Gss) and (Vj) was well described by a Boltzmann relationship with e-fold decay per 10.4 mV, representing an equivalent gating charge of 2.4. At Vj > 60 mV, Gss was virtually zero, a property that is unique among the gap junctions characterized to date. Determination of opening and closing rate constants for this process indicated that the voltage dependence of macroscopic conductance was governed predominantly by the closing rate constant. In 78% of the experiments, a single population of unitary junctional currents was detected corresponding to an unitary channel conductance of approximately 40 pS. The presence of only a limited number of junctional channels with identical unitary conductances made it possible to analyze their kinetics at the single channel level. Gating at the single channel level was further studied using a stochastic model to determine the open probability (Po) of individual channels in a multiple channel preparation. Po decreased with increasing Vj following a Boltzmann relationship similar to that describing the macroscopic Gss voltage dependence. These results indicate that, for Vj of a single polarity, the gating of the 40 pS gap junction channels expressed by Schwann cells can be described by a first order kinetic model of channel transitions between open and closed states. PMID:8301264

  10. Voltage dependence and pH regulation of human polycystin-2-mediated cation channel activity.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Perrett, Silvia; Batelli, Marisa; Kim, Keetae; Essafi, Makram; Timpanaro, Gustavo; Moltabetti, Nicolas; Reisin, Ignacio L; Arnaout, M Amin; Cantiello, Horacio F

    2002-07-12

    Polycystin-2, the product of the human PKD2 gene, whose mutations cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, is a large conductance, Ca(2+)-permeable non-selective cation channel. Polycystin-2 is functionally expressed in the apical membrane of the human syncytiotrophoblast, where it may play a role in the control of fetal electrolyte homeostasis. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms that regulate polycystin-2 channel function. In this study, the role of pH in the regulation of polycystin-2 was assessed by ion channel reconstitution of both apical membranes of human syncytiotrophoblast and the purified FLAG-tagged protein from in vitro transcribed/translated material. A kinetic analysis of single channel currents, including dwell time histograms, confirmed two open and two close states for spontaneous channel behavior and a strong voltage dependence of the open probability of the channel (P(o)). A reduction of cis pH (pH(cis)) decreased P(o) and shifted the voltage dependence of channel function but had no effect on the single channel conductance. An increase in pH(cis), in contrast, increased NP(o) (channel number times P(o)). Elimination of the H(+) chemical gradient did not reverse the low pH(cis) inhibition of polycystin-2. Similar findings confirmed the pH effect on the in vitro translated, FLAG-tagged purified polycystin-2. The data indicate the presence of an H(+) ion regulatory site in the channel protein, which is accessible from the cytoplasmic side of the protein. This protonation site controls polycystin-2 cation-selective channel activity.

  11. Immunomodulation of voltage-dependent K+ channels in macrophages: molecular and biophysical consequences.

    PubMed

    Villalonga, Núria; David, Miren; Bielanska, Joanna; Vicente, Rubén; Comes, Núria; Valenzuela, Carmen; Felipe, Antonio

    2010-02-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (K(v)) channels play a pivotal role in the modulation of macrophage physiology. Macrophages are professional antigen-presenting cells and produce inflammatory and immunoactive substances that modulate the immune response. Blockage of K(v) channels by specific antagonists decreases macrophage cytokine production and inhibits proliferation. Numerous pharmacological agents exert their effects on specific target cells by modifying the activity of their plasma membrane ion channels. Investigation of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of potassium ion conduction is, therefore, essential to the understanding of potassium channel functions in the immune response to infection and inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that the biophysical properties of voltage-dependent K(+) currents are modified upon activation or immunosuppression in macrophages. This regulation is in accordance with changes in the molecular characteristics of the heterotetrameric K(v)1.3/K(v)1.5 channels, which generate the main K(v) in macrophages. An increase in K(+) current amplitude in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages is characterized by a faster C-type inactivation, a greater percentage of cumulative inactivation, and a more effective margatoxin (MgTx) inhibition than control cells. These biophysical parameters are related to an increase in K(v)1.3 subunits in the K(v)1.3/K(v)1.5 hybrid channel. In contrast, dexamethasone decreased the C-type inactivation, the cumulative inactivation, and the sensitivity to MgTx concomitantly with a decrease in K(v)1.3 expression. Neither of these treatments apparently altered the expression of K(v)1.5. Our results demonstrate that the immunomodulation of macrophages triggers molecular and biophysical consequences in K(v)1.3/K(v)1.5 hybrid channels by altering the subunit stoichiometry.

  12. PIP2 regulation of KCNQ channels: biophysical and molecular mechanisms for lipid modulation of voltage-dependent gating.

    PubMed

    Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels contain voltage-sensing (VSD) and pore-gate (PGD) structural domains. During voltage-dependent gating, conformational changes in the two domains are coupled giving rise to voltage-dependent opening of the channel. In addition to membrane voltage, KCNQ (Kv7) channel opening requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Recent studies suggest that PIP2 serves as a cofactor to mediate VSD-PGD coupling in KCNQ1 channels. In this review, we put these findings in the context of the current understanding of voltage-dependent gating, lipid modulation of Kv channel activation, and PIP2-regulation of KCNQ channels. We suggest that lipid-mediated coupling of functional domains is a common mechanism among KCNQ channels that may be applicable to other Kv channels and membrane proteins.

  13. PIP2 regulation of KCNQ channels: biophysical and molecular mechanisms for lipid modulation of voltage-dependent gating

    PubMed Central

    Zaydman, Mark A.; Cui, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels contain voltage-sensing (VSD) and pore-gate (PGD) structural domains. During voltage-dependent gating, conformational changes in the two domains are coupled giving rise to voltage-dependent opening of the channel. In addition to membrane voltage, KCNQ (Kv7) channel opening requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Recent studies suggest that PIP2 serves as a cofactor to mediate VSD-PGD coupling in KCNQ1 channels. In this review, we put these findings in the context of the current understanding of voltage-dependent gating, lipid modulation of Kv channel activation, and PIP2-regulation of KCNQ channels. We suggest that lipid-mediated coupling of functional domains is a common mechanism among KCNQ channels that may be applicable to other Kv channels and membrane proteins. PMID:24904429

  14. Voltage dependence of two inward currents carried by calcium and barium in the ciliate Stylonychia mytilus.

    PubMed Central

    Deitmer, J W

    1986-01-01

    Two voltage-dependent inward currents in the fresh-water hypotrichous ciliate Stylonychia mytilus have been investigated, using two intracellular micro-electrodes, when either Ca ions or Ba ions are the charge carriers. In cells bathed in Ca-free Ba solution the two inward currents, named current I and current II, could be identified and studied in the absence of outward currents. The two inward currents could also be separated by addition of the plant lectin concanavalin A (0.5 microgram/ml) to the external medium, which resulted in the selective inhibition of current I. When the holding potential was set at values between -45 and -65 mV (normal resting potential is -50 mV), current I was shifted parallel to the holding potential along the voltage axis. This shift was 7.6 mV per 10 mV change in holding potential. The amplitude and voltage relationship of current II was not affected by these changes in the holding potential. The amplitude of current I in Ba solution was maximal when the membrane potential was held at -55 mV; it decreased with higher and lower holding potentials. The rate of activation of current I remained virtually unaffected at holding potentials between -45 and -60 mV, and was somewhat reduced at a holding potential of -65 mV. When the extracellular Ca concentration was varied between 0.1 and 5.0 mM, or when the cells were loaded with EGTA to reduce the intracellular level of ionized Ca, the resting membrane potential and the voltage relationships of both current I and II and of the outward current were shifted along the voltage axis according to the expected changes in membrane surface potential. Double-pulse experiments with varying interval potentials suggested voltage-dependent inactivation of current I and Ca-dependent inactivation of current II. Pre-hyperpolarizing steps of only 1 mV amplitude and 30 ms duration could result in the activation of current I, indicating that the activation voltage of current I closely followed the actual

  15. Voltage Dependence of Proton Pumping by Bacteriorhodopsin Mutants with Altered Lifetime of the M Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Geibel, Sven; Lörinczi, Èva; Bamberg, Ernst; Friedrich, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) from Halobacterium salinarum is tightly regulated by the [H+] gradient and transmembrane potential. BR exhibits optoelectric properties, since spectral changes during the photocycle are kinetically controlled by voltage, which predestines BR for optical storage or processing devices. BR mutants with prolonged lifetime of the blue-shifted M intermediate would be advantageous, but the optoelectric properties of such mutants are still elusive. Using expression in Xenopus oocytes and two-electrode voltage-clamping, we analyzed photocurrents of BR mutants with kinetically destabilized (F171C, F219L) or stabilized (D96N, D96G) M intermediate in response to green light (to probe H+ pumping) and blue laser flashes (to probe accumulation/decay of M). These mutants have divergent M lifetimes. As for BR-WT, this strictly correlates with the voltage dependence of H+ pumping. BR-F171C and BR-F219L showed photocurrents similar to BR-WT. Yet, BR-F171C showed a weaker voltage dependence of proton pumping. For both mutants, blue laser flashes applied during and after green-light illumination showed reduced M accumulation and shorter M lifetime. In contrast, BR-D96G and BR-D96N exhibited small photocurrents, with nonlinear current-voltage curves, which increased strongly in the presence of azide. Blue laser flashes showed heavy M accumulation and prolonged M lifetime, which accounts for the strongly reduced H+ pumping rate. Hyperpolarizing potentials augmented these effects. The combination of M-stabilizing and -destabilizing mutations in BR-D96G/F171C/F219L (BR-tri) shows that disruption of the primary proton donor Asp-96 is fatal for BR as a proton pump. Mechanistically, M destabilizing mutations cannot compensate for the disruption of Asp-96. Accordingly, BR-tri and BR-D96G photocurrents were similar. However, BR-tri showed negative blue laser flash-induced currents even without actinic green light, indicating that Schiff base

  16. Voltage-dependent currents of vertebrate neurons and their role in membrane excitability.

    PubMed

    Adams, P R; Galvan, M

    1986-01-01

    This chapter reviews what is known of the voltage-dependent conductances of three classes of vertebrate nerve cell, as assessed by somatic voltage clamping. These classes are: (1) bullfrog paravertebral sympathetic ganglion cells; (2) rodent superior cervical sympathetic ganglion cells; and (3) rodent hippocampal pyramidal cells. Of these, bullfrog neurons are the most thoroughly characterized. They possess at least seven distinct voltage-activated conductances. Two of these, called GNa and GCa, carry inward, depolarizing current. They both activate rapidly, and can, under appropriate conditions, generate action potentials. The remaining five conductances are all potassium-mediated, and can thus in principle produce hyperpolarizations or repolarize the action potential. However, because each of these potassium conductances have different sizes, speeds, and voltage thresholds, they play a variety of hyperpolarizing, stabilizing, or braking roles. IC is large, fast, and voltage dependent. Action potentials trigger calcium influx, which rapidly turns on IC. This repolarizes the action potential and turns off IC. However another Ca-dependent current, IAHP, remains active even at negative potentials and leads to a prolonged hyperpolarization. If IC is blocked, spike repolarization slows somewhat, allowing the Hodgkin-Huxley delayed rectifier current IK to develop. This is also large enough to repolarize the spike rapidly, although it is normally preempted by IC. IA and IM are other small potassium currents that activate at more negative potentials than do IC, IK, and IAHP. IA is a transient outward current that mainly influences voltage trajectories following hyperpolarizing current pulses. IM activates progressively during prolonged depolarizing current pulses, and, together with IAHP, explains most of the adaptation seen in these cells. The harmonious counterpoint of this septet of currents explains most of the electrical excitability properties of these cells

  17. Signature and Pathophysiology of Non-canonical Pores in Voltage-Dependent Cation Channels.

    PubMed

    Held, Katharina; Voets, Thomas; Vriens, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Opening and closing of voltage-gated cation channels allows the regulated flow of cations such as Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) across cell membranes, which steers essential physiological processes including shaping of action potentials and triggering Ca(2+)-dependent processes. Classical textbooks describe the voltage-gated cation channels as membrane proteins with a single, central aqueous pore. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated for the existence of additional ion permeation pathways in this group of cation channels, distinct from the central pore, which here we collectively name non-canonical pores. Whereas the first non-canonical pores were unveiled only after making specific point mutations in the voltage-sensor region of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels, recent evidence indicates that they may also be functional in non-mutated channels. Moreover, several channelopathies have been linked to mutations that cause the appearance of a non-canonical ion permeation pathway as a new pathological mechanism. This review provides an integrated overview of the biophysical properties of non-canonical pores described in voltage-dependent cation channels (KV, NaV, Cav, Hv1, and TRPM3) and of the (patho)physiological impact of opening of such pores.

  18. Gate-voltage-dependent charge transport in multi-dispersed polymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ling; Bu, Laju; Li, Dongfan; Lu, Guanghao

    2017-02-01

    In semiconductor polymers, charge transport usually occurs via hopping between localized states, which are generally multi-dispersed due to multi-dispersed chemical structures, crystallinities, and phase segregations. We report a combined modeling and experimental study to investigate gate-voltage-dependent charge transport in field-effect transistors based on multi-dispersed polymers including semiconductor:semiconductor and semiconductor:insulator blends. Film-depth-dependent charge accumulation and transport are correlated with vertical composition profiles and film-depth-dependent energetic distribution of localized states. Even low gate-voltage could accumulate charges in any depth of the films, greatly increasing charge density in some (sub-) components for effective charge transport. Therefore, neither overall high crystallinity nor molecular ordering near the semiconductor-dielectric interface is necessarily required for high field-effect mobility (μFET). This study not only proposes a model for high effective μFET recently reported in some nearly amorphous polymer films and the "bislope feature" in their transfer characteristics but also helps improve transistor performances and exploit transistor operations via manipulating charge distribution in multi-dispersed films.

  19. Regulation of mitochondrial function by voltage dependent anion channels in ethanol metabolism and the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Lemasters, John J; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Czerny, Christoph; Zhong, Zhi; Maldonado, Eduardo N

    2012-06-01

    Voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC) are highly conserved proteins that are responsible for permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane to hydrophilic metabolites like ATP, ADP and respiratory substrates. Although previously assumed to remain open, VDAC closure is emerging as an important mechanism for regulation of global mitochondrial metabolism in apoptotic cells and also in cells that are not dying. During hepatic ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, VDAC closure suppresses exchange of mitochondrial metabolites, resulting in inhibition of ureagenesis. In vivo, VDAC closure after ethanol occurs coordinately with mitochondrial uncoupling. Since acetaldehyde passes through membranes independently of channels and transporters, VDAC closure and uncoupling together foster selective and more rapid oxidative metabolism of toxic acetaldehyde to nontoxic acetate by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. In single reconstituted VDAC, tubulin decreases VDAC conductance, and in HepG2 hepatoma cells, free tubulin negatively modulates mitochondrial membrane potential, an effect enhanced by protein kinase A. Tubulin-dependent closure of VDAC in cancer cells contributes to suppression of mitochondrial metabolism and may underlie the Warburg phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: VDAC structure, function, and regulation of mitochondrial metabolism.

  20. Fractal analysis of a voltage-dependent potassium channel from cultured mouse hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Liebovitch, L S; Sullivan, J M

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of ion channels have been widely modeled as a Markov process. In these models it is assumed that the channel protein has a small number of discrete conformational states and the kinetic rate constants connecting these states are constant. In the alternative fractal model the spontaneous fluctuations of the channel protein at many different time scales are represented by a kinetic rate constant k = At1-D, where A is the kinetic setpoint and D the fractal dimension. Single-channel currents were recorded at 146 mM external K+ from an inwardly rectifying, 120 pS, K+ selective, voltage-sensitive channel in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. The kinetics of these channels were found to be statistically self-similar at different time scales as predicted by the fractal model. The fractal dimensions were approximately 2 for the closed times and approximately 1 for the open times and did not depend on voltage. For both the open and closed times the logarithm of the kinetic setpoint was found to be proportional to the applied voltage, which indicates that the gating of this channel involves the net inward movement of approximately one negative charge when this channel opens. Thus, the open and closed times and the voltage dependence of the gating of this channel are well described by the fractal model. PMID:2447974

  1. Voltage-dependent calcium and chloride currents in S17 bone marrow stromal cell line.

    PubMed

    Silva, Henrique B; Medei, Emiliano; Rodrigues, Deivid C; Rondinelli, Edson; Almeida, Norma A S; Goldenberg, Regina C S; de Carvalho, Antonio C Campos; Nascimento, José H M

    2010-04-01

    The bone marrow stromal cell line S17 has been used to study hematopoiesis in vitro. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of calcium and chloride currents in cultured S17 cells. Calcium currents were of low amplitude or barely detectable (50-100 pA). Hence to amplify the currents, we have used barium as a charge carrier. Barium currents were identified based on their distinct voltage-dependence, and sensitivity to dihydropyridines. S17 cells also exhibited a slowly activating outward current without inactivation, most commonly seen when the sodium of the extracellular solution was replaced either by TEA (TEA/Cs saline) or NMDG (NMDG saline), or by addition of amiloride to the extracellular solution. This current was abolished either by 500 microM SITS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2-2'-disulfonic acid) or 500 microM DPC (diphenylamine-2-carboxylic acid) a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel blocker, identifying it as a Cl(-) current. RT-PCR identified the presence of ENaC and CFTR transcripts. CFTR blockade reduced cell proliferation, suggesting that this channel plays a physiological role in regulation of S17 cell proliferation.

  2. Applied voltage dependence of nano-oxidation of ferromagnetic thin films using atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Yasushi; Kidaka, Seiichi; Watanabe, Keizo; Nasu, Yasuaki; Yamada, Tsutomu; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi

    2003-05-01

    Nanodots of Ni, CoFe, and Cr oxide were fabricated by the nano-oxidation technique using atomic force microscope. The dot size was controlled from 40 to 200 nm by changing the pulse voltage applied to the cantilever from 2 to 10 V. In order to evaluate the size of the nanostructures quantitatively, the electric field emitted from the cantilever was calculated. The threshold electric field strength was defined as the minimum strength to promote the oxidation. The threshold field strength of the order of 107 V/m was derived by fitting the experimental results. The voltage dependence of the size of fabricated Cr-oxide dots was fitted well by the calculation. The dot size of the ferromagnet-based oxide was fluctuating and did not agree with the calculation. From the theoretical analysis, it was suggested that the size of the nanostructures did not depend on the distance between the cantilever and film surface, but significantly depended on the curvature radius of the cantilever.

  3. Stochastic diffusion model of multistep activation in a voltage-dependent K channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, S. R.

    2010-04-01

    The energy barrier to the activated state for the S4 voltage sensor of a K channel is dependent on the electrostatic force between positively charged S4 residues and negatively charged groups on neighboring segments, the potential difference across the membrane, and the dielectric boundary force on the charged residues near the interface between the solvent and the low dielectric region of the membrane gating pore. The variation of the potential function with transverse displacement and rotation of the S4 sensor across the membrane may be derived from a solution of Poisson's equation for the electrostatic potential. By approximating the energy of an S4 sensor along a path between stationary states by a piecewise linear function of the transverse displacement, the dynamics of slow activation, in the millisecond range, may be described by the lowest frequency component of an analytical solution of interacting diffusion equations of Fokker-Planck type for resting and barrier regions. The solution of the Smoluchowski equations for an S4 sensor in an energy landscape with several barriers is in accord with an empirical master equation for multistep activation in a voltage-dependent K channel.

  4. Pharmacological investigation of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in human ejaculatory sperm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Liu, Jihong; Li, Jiagui; Ye, Zhangqun

    2006-01-01

    The types of the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in human ejaculatory sperm and the effects of calcium channel blocker (CCB) on human sperm motility parameters in vitro were investigated. The human sperm motility parameters in vitro in response to the pharmacological agents nifedipine (NIF, inhibitor of L-type VDCC) and co-conotoxin (GVIA, inhibitor of N-type VDCC) were compared and analyzed statistically. The results showed that NIF (1, 5, 10 micromol/L) could not only significantly affect human sperm's shape but also spermatozoa motility after incubated at least 10 min in vitro (P<0.001). GVIA (0.1, 0.5 and 1 micromol/L) could just only significantly affect human sperm's progressive motility (a %+b %) after incubated for 20 min in vitro (P<0.01), but they both could not significantly affect spermic abnormality rate. It is suggested that L-type VDCC, non L-type VDCCs and isoform of L-type VDCC exist in the cell membrane of human sperm solely or together, and they participate in the spermic physiological processes especially the spermic motility.

  5. Complex voltage-dependent behavior of single unliganded calcium-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Talukder, G; Aldrich, R W

    2000-01-01

    study and characterization of unliganded openings is of central significance for the elucidation of gating mechanisms for allosteric ligand-gated ion channels. Unliganded openings have been reported for many channel types, but their low open probability can make it difficult to study their kinetics in detail. Because the large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel mSlo is sensitive to both intracellular calcium and to membrane potential, we have been able to obtain stable unliganded single-channel recordings of mSlo with relatively high opening probability. We have found that the single-channel gating behavior of mSlo is complex, with multiple open and closed states, even when no ligand is present. Our results rule out a Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric mechanism with a central voltage-dependent concerted step, and they support the existence of quaternary states with less than the full number of voltage sensors activated, as has been suggested by previous work involving measurements of gating currents. PMID:10653789

  6. Functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors on the voltage-dependent sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Angelides, K J; Nutter, T J; Elmer, L W; Kempner, E S

    1985-03-25

    Radiation inactivation was used in situ to determine the functional unit sizes of the neurotoxin receptors of the voltage-dependent sodium channel from rat brain. Frozen or lyophilized synaptosomes were irradiated with high energy electrons generated by a linear accelerator and assayed for [3H]saxitoxin, 125I-Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (alpha-scorpion toxin), 125I-Centruroides suffusus suffusus (beta-scorpion toxin), and batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-[3H]benzoate binding activity. The functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors determined in situ by target analysis are 220,000 for saxitoxin, 263,000 for alpha-scorpion toxin, and 45,000 for beta-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the inactivation curve for batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-benzoate binding to the channel yields two target sizes of Mr approximately 287,000 (50%) and approximately 51,000 (50%). The results are independent of the purity of the membrane preparation. Comparison of the radiation inactivation data with the protein composition of the rat brain sodium channel indicates that there are at least two functional components.

  7. Nortriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, inhibits voltage-dependent K+ channels in coronary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung Eun; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Han Sol; Kim, Hye Won; Seo, Mi Seon; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Han, Eun-Taek; Hong, Seok-Ho; Firth, Amy L.; Choi, Il-Whan; Bae, Young Min

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrated the effect of nortriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant drug and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using a whole-cell patch clamp technique. Nortriptyline inhibited Kv currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with an apparent IC50 value of 2.86±0.52 µM and a Hill coefficient of 0.77±0.1. Although application of nortriptyline did not change the activation curve, nortriptyline shifted the inactivation current toward a more negative potential. Application of train pulses (1 or 2 Hz) did not change the nortriptyline-induced Kv channel inhibition, suggesting that the effects of nortiprtyline were not use-dependent. Preincubation with the Kv1.5 and Kv2.1/2.2 inhibitors, DPO-1 and guangxitoxin did not affect nortriptyline inhibition of Kv channels. From these results, we concluded that nortriptyline inhibited Kv channels in a concentration-dependent and state-independent manner independently of serotonin reuptake. PMID:28280416

  8. Structure and expression of mouse mitochondrial voltage dependent anion channel genes

    SciTech Connect

    Craigen, W.J.; Lovell, R.S.; Sampson, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Voltage dependent anion channels (VDACs) are small abundant proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane that interact with the adenine nucleotide translocater and bind glycerol kinase and hexokinase. Kinase binding is developmentally regulated, tissue specific, and increased in various tumor cell lines. VDACs are also components of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor and GABA{sub A} receptor. Two human VDAC cDNAs have previously been reported, and expression of these isoforms appears ubiquitous. Genomic Southern analysis suggests the presence of other as yet uncharacterised VDAC genes. To study VDAC function in a mammal more amenable to experimental manipulation, we have isolated three mouse VDAC genes by cDNA cloning from a mouse brain cDNA library. DNA sequencing of the cDNAs shows that they share 65-75% amino acid identity. Northern analysis indicates that MVDAC1 is expressed most highly in kidney, heart, and brain. Using an MVDAC3 3{prime} untranslated exon as a probe, three distinct transcripts can be detected. The gene structure for MVDAC3 and MVDAC2 has been completed and suggests that the VDAC isoforms did not arise by gene duplication and divergence. The intron/exon boundaries are not conserved between MVDAC1 and MVDAC3, and MVDAC2 appears to be encoded by a single intronless gene.

  9. Involvement of voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) in dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Jitobaom, Kunlakanya; Tongluan, Natthida; Smith, Duncan R.

    2016-01-01

    During infection, dengue virus (DENV) proteins interact with host cellular constituents promoting the remodeling of the cell to facilitate virus production. While a number of interacting proteins have been identified for DENV non-structural proteins, far fewer interacting partners have been identified for the DENV structural proteins. One protein that has been identified as a DENV E protein interacting protein is the cellular chaperone GRP78. GRP78 has been shown to have a number of cellular interacting partners including the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). In this study we confirmed the interactions between GRP78 and DENV E protein and between GRP78 and VDAC. VDAC was shown to be re-localized during DENV infection, with no change in levels of protein expression. VDAC is predominantly located on the outer membrane of mitochondria and our result is consistent with movement of the mitochondria towards the ER during DENV infection. Down regulation of VDAC through siRNA significantly reduced DENV protein expression, as well as the percentage infection and output virus titer. Our results suggest that VDAC plays an important role in DENV infection. PMID:27779201

  10. Regulation of Mitochondrial Function by Voltage Dependent Anion Channels in Ethanol Metabolism and the Warburg Effect

    PubMed Central

    Lemasters, John J.; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L.; Czerny, Christoph; Zhong, Zhi; Maldonado, Eduardo N.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC) are highly conserved proteins that are responsible for permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane to hydrophilic metabolites like ATP, ADP and respiratory substrates. Although previously assumed to remain open, VDAC closure is emerging as an important mechanism for regulation of global mitochondrial metabolism in apoptotic cells and also in cells that are not dying. During hepatic ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, VDAC closure suppresses exchange of mitochondrial metabolites, resulting in inhibition of ureagenesis. In vivo, VDAC closure after ethanol occurs coordinately with mitochondrial uncoupling. Since acetaldehyde passes through membranes independently of channels and transporters, VDAC closure and uncoupling together foster selective and more rapid oxidative metabolism of toxic acetaldehyde to nontoxic acetate by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. In single reconstituted VDAC, tubulin decreases VDAC conductance, and in HepG2 hepatoma cells, free tubulin negatively modulates mitochondrial membrane potential, an effect enhanced by protein kinase A. Tubulin-dependent closure of VDAC in cancer cells contributes to suppression of mitochondrial metabolism and may underlie the Warburg phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis. PMID:22172804

  11. Balanced ionotropic receptor dynamics support signal estimation via voltage-dependent membrane noise.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Curtis M; Clarke, Stephen E; Nesse, William H; Longtin, Andre; Maler, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Encoding behaviorally relevant stimuli in a noisy background is critical for animals to survive in their natural environment. We identify core biophysical and synaptic mechanisms that permit the encoding of low-frequency signals in pyramidal neurons of the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus, an animal that can accurately encode even miniscule amplitude modulations of its self-generated electric field. We demonstrate that slow NMDA receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) are able to summate over many interspike intervals (ISIs) of the primary electrosensory afferents (EAs), effectively eliminating the baseline EA ISI correlations from the pyramidal cell input. Together with a dynamic balance of NMDA-R and GABA-A-R currents, this permits stimulus-evoked changes in EA spiking to be transmitted efficiently to target electrosensory lobe (ELL) pyramidal cells, for encoding low-frequency signals. Interestingly, AMPA-R activity is depressed and appears to play a negligible role in the generation of action potentials. Instead, we hypothesize that cell-intrinsic voltage-dependent membrane noise supports the encoding of perithreshold sensory input; this noise drives a significant proportion of pyramidal cell spikes. Together, these mechanisms may be sufficient for the ELL to encode signals near the threshold of behavioral detection.

  12. Charged residues distribution modulates selectivity of the open state of human isoforms of the voltage dependent anion-selective channel.

    PubMed

    Amodeo, Giuseppe Federico; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Messina, Angela; De Pinto, Vito; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Voltage Dependent Anion-selective Channels (VDACs) are pore-forming proteins located in the outer mitochondrial membrane. They are responsible for the access of ions and energetic metabolites into the inner membrane transport systems. Three VDAC isoforms exist in mammalian, but their specific role is unknown. In this work we have performed extensive (overall ∼5 µs) Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the human VDAC isoforms to detect structural and conformational variations among them, possibly related to specific functional roles of these proteins. Secondary structure analysis of the N-terminal domain shows a high similarity among the three human isoforms of VDAC but with a different plasticity. In particular, the N-terminal domain of the hVDAC1 is characterized by a higher plasticity, with a ∼20% occurrence for the 'unstructured' conformation throughout the folded segment, while hVDAC2, containing a peculiar extension of 11 amino acids at the N-terminal end, presents an additional 310-helical folded portion comprising residues 10' to 3, adhering to the barrel wall. The N-terminal sequences of hVDAC isoforms are predicted to have a low flexibility, with possible consequences in the dynamics of the human VDACs. Clear differences were found between hVDAC1 and hVDAC3 against hVDAC2: a significantly modified dynamics with possible important consequence on the voltage-gating mechanism. Charge distribution inside and at the mouth of the pore is responsible for a different preferential localization of ions with opposite charge and provide a valuable rationale for hVDAC1 and hVDAC3 having a Cl-/K+ selectivity ratio of 1.8, whereas hVDAC2 of 1.4. Our conclusion is that hVDAC isoforms, despite sharing a similar scaffold, have modified working features and a biological work is now requested to give evidence to the described dissimilarities.

  13. The Voltage-dependent Anion Channel 1 Mediates Amyloid β Toxicity and Represents a Potential Target for Alzheimer Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Smilansky, Angela; Dangoor, Liron; Nakdimon, Itay; Ben-Hail, Danya; Mizrachi, Dario; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), found in the mitochondrial outer membrane, forms the main interface between mitochondrial and cellular metabolisms, mediates the passage of a variety of molecules across the mitochondrial outer membrane, and is central to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. VDAC1 is overexpressed in post-mortem brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. The development and progress of AD are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from the cytotoxic effects of accumulated amyloid β (Aβ). In this study we demonstrate the involvement of VDAC1 and a VDAC1 N-terminal peptide (VDAC1-N-Ter) in Aβ cell penetration and cell death induction. Aβ directly interacted with VDAC1 and VDAC1-N-Ter, as monitored by VDAC1 channel conductance, surface plasmon resonance, and microscale thermophoresis. Preincubated Aβ interacted with bilayer-reconstituted VDAC1 and increased its conductance ∼ 2-fold. Incubation of cells with Aβ resulted in mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. However, the presence of non-cell-penetrating VDAC1-N-Ter peptide prevented Aβ cellular entry and Aβ-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Likewise, silencing VDAC1 expression by specific siRNA prevented Aβ entry into the cytosol as well as Aβ-induced toxicity. Finally, the mode of Aβ-mediated action involves detachment of mitochondria-bound hexokinase, induction of VDAC1 oligomerization, and cytochrome c release, a sequence of events leading to apoptosis. As such, we suggest that Aβ-mediated toxicity involves mitochondrial and plasma membrane VDAC1, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis induction. The VDAC1-N-Ter peptide targeting Aβ cytotoxicity is thus a potential new therapeutic strategy for AD treatment.

  14. Origin of the voltage dependence of G-protein regulation of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Chen, Yu-Hang; Bangaru, Saroja D; He, Linling; Abele, Kathryn; Tanabe, Shihori; Kozasa, Tohru; Yang, Jian

    2008-12-24

    G-protein (Gbetagamma)-mediated voltage-dependent inhibition of N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels contributes to presynaptic inhibition and short-term synaptic plasticity. The voltage dependence derives from the dissociation of Gbetagamma from the inhibited channels, but the underlying molecular and biophysical mechanisms remain largely unclear. In this study we investigated the role in this process of Ca(2+) channel beta subunit (Ca(v)beta) and a rigid alpha-helical structure between the alpha-interacting domain (AID), the primary Ca(v)beta docking site on the channel alpha(1) subunit, and the pore-lining IS6 segment. Gbetagamma inhibition of P/Q-type channels was reconstituted in giant inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes. Large populations of channels devoid of Ca(v)beta were produced by washing out a mutant Ca(v)beta with a reduced affinity for the AID. These beta-less channels were still inhibited by Gbetagamma, but without any voltage dependence, indicating that Ca(v)beta is indispensable for voltage-dependent Gbetagamma inhibition. A truncated Ca(v)beta containing only the AID-binding guanylate kinase (GK) domain could fully confer voltage dependence to Gbetagamma inhibition. Gbetagamma did not alter inactivation properties, and channels recovered from Gbetagamma inhibition exhibited the same activation property as un-inhibited channels, indicating that Gbetagamma does not dislodge Ca(v)beta from the inhibited channel. Furthermore, voltage-dependent Gbetagamma inhibition was abolished when the rigid alpha-helix between the AID and IS6 was disrupted by insertion of multiple glycines, which also eliminated Ca(v)beta regulation of channel gating, revealing a pivotal role of this rigid alpha-helix in both processes. These results suggest that depolarization-triggered movement of IS6, coupled to the subsequent conformational change of the Gbetagamma-binding pocket through a rigid alpha-helix induced partly by the Ca(v)beta GK domain, causes the

  15. Stoichiometry and voltage dependence of the sodium pump in voltage- clamped, internally dialyzed squid giant axon

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The stoichiometry and voltage dependence of the Na/K pump were studied in internally dialyzed, voltage-clamped squid giant axons by simultaneously measuring, at various membrane potentials, the changes in Na efflux (delta phi Na) and holding current (delta I) induced by dihydrodigitoxigenin (H2DTG). H2DTG stops the Na/K pump without directly affecting other current pathways: (a) it causes no delta I when the pump lacks Na, K, Mg, or ATP, and (b) ouabain causes no delta I or delta phi Na in the presence of saturating H2DTG. External K (Ko) activates Na efflux with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 0.45 +/- 0.06 mM [SEM]) in Na-free seawater (SW), but with sigmoid kinetics in approximately 400 mM Na SW (Hill coefficient = 1.53 +/- 0.08, K1/2 = 3.92 +/- 0.29 mM). H2DTG inhibits less strongly (Ki = 6.1 +/- 0.3 microM) in 1 or 10 mM K Na-free SW than in 10 mM K, 390 mM Na SW (1.8 +/- 0.2 microM). Dialysis with 5 mM each ATP, phosphoenolpyruvate, and phosphoarginine reduced Na/Na exchange to at most 2% of the H2DTG- sensitive Na efflux. H2DTG sensitive but nonpump current caused by periaxonal K accumulation upon stopping the pump, was minimized by the K channel blockers 3,4-diaminopyridine (1 mM), tetraethylammonium (approximately 200 mM), and phenylpropyltriethylammonium (20-25 mM) whose adequacy was tested by varying [K]o (0-10 mM) with H2DTG present. Two ancillary clamp circuits suppressed stray current from the axon ends. Current and flux measured from the center pool derive from the same membrane area since, over the voltage range -60 to +20 mV, tetrodotoxin-sensitive current and Na efflux into Na-free SW, under K- free conditions, were equal. The stoichiometry and voltage dependence of pump Na/K exchange were examined at near-saturating [ATP], [K]o and [Na]i in both Na-free and 390 mM Na SW. The H2DTG-sensitive F delta phi Na/delta I ratio (F is Faraday's constant) of paired measurements corrected for membrane area match, was 2.86 +/- 0.09 (n = 8) at 0 mV and 3

  16. A whole-cell and single-channel study of the voltage-dependent outward potassium current in avian hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Voltage-dependent membrane currents were studied in dissociated hepatocytes from chick, using the patch-clamp technique. All cells had voltage-dependent outward K+ currents; in 10% of the cells, a fast, transient, tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current was identified. None of the cells had voltage-dependent inward Ca2+ currents. The K+ current activated at a membrane potential of about -10 mV, had a sigmoidal time course, and did not inactivate in 500 ms. The maximum outward conductance was 6.6 +/- 2.4 nS in 18 cells. The reversal potential, estimated from tail current measurements, shifted by 50 mV per 10-fold increase in the external K+ concentration. The current traces were fitted by n2 kinetics with voltage-dependent time constants. Omitting Ca2+ from the external bath or buffering the internal Ca2+ with EGTA did not alter the outward current, which shows that Ca2+-activated K+ currents were not present. 1-5 mM 4-aminopyridine, 0.5-2 mM BaCl2, and 0.1-1 mM CdCl2 reversibly inhibited the current. The block caused by Ba was voltage dependent. Single-channel currents were recorded in cell- attached and outside-out patches. The mean unitary conductance was 7 pS, and the channels displayed bursting kinetics. Thus, avian hepatocytes have a single type of K+ channel belonging to the delayed rectifier class of K+ channels. PMID:2453605

  17. Pacemaking in dopaminergic ventral tegmental area neurons: depolarizing drive from background and voltage-dependent sodium conductances

    PubMed Central

    Khaliq, Zayd M.; Bean, Bruce P.

    2010-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) fire spontaneously in a pacemaker-like manner. We analyzed the ionic currents that drive pacemaking in dopaminergic VTA neurons, studied in mouse brain slices. Pacemaking was not inhibited by blocking hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) or blocking all calcium current by Mg2+ replacement of Ca2+. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) stopped spontaneous activity and usually resulted in stable resting potentials near −60 mV to −55 mV, 10–15 mV below the action potential threshold. When external sodium was replaced by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG) with TTX present, cells hyperpolarized by an average of −11 mV, suggesting a significant resting sodium conductance not sensitive to TTX. Voltage-clamp experiments using slow (10 mV/s) ramps showed a steady-state, steeply voltage-dependent current blocked by TTX that activates near −60 mV, as well as a sodium “background” current with little voltage-sensitivity, revealed by NMDG replacement for sodium with TTX present. We quantified these two components of sodium current during the pacemaking trajectory using action potential clamp. The initial phase of depolarization, up to about −55 mV, is driven mainly by non-voltage-dependent sodium background current. Above −55 mV, TTX-sensitive voltage-dependent “persistent” Na current helps drive the final phase of depolarization to the spike threshold. Voltage-dependent calcium current is small at all subthreshold voltages. The pacemaking mechanism in VTA neurons differs from that in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons, where subthreshold calcium current plays a dominant role. In addition, we found that non-voltage-dependent background sodium current is much smaller in SNc neurons than VTA neurons. PMID:20505107

  18. Voltage-dependent membrane potential oscillations of rat striatal fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Bracci, Enrico; Centonze, Diego; Bernardi, Giorgio; Calabresi, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    We used whole-cell recordings to investigate subthreshold membrane potential oscillations and their relationship with intermittent firing in striatal fast-spiking interneurons. During current injections (100–500 pA, 1 s), these cells displayed a highly variable pattern of spike bursts (comprising 1–30 action potentials) interspersed with membrane potential oscillations. The oscillation threshold was −42 ± 10 mV, and coincided with that for action potentials. The oscillation frequency was voltage dependent and ranged between 20 and 100 Hz. Oscillations were unaffected by the calcium channel blockers cadmium and nickel and by blockers of ionotropic glutamate and GABA receptors. Conversely, the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin fully abolished the oscillations and the spike bursts. The first spike of a burst appeared to be triggered by an oscillation, since the timing and rate of rise of the membrane potential in the subthreshold voltage region was similar for the two events. Conversely, the second spike (and the subsequent ones) displayed much faster depolarisations in the subthreshold voltage range, indicating that they were generated by a different mechanism. Consistent with these notions, a small pulse of intracellular current delivered during the oscillation was effective in triggering a burst of action potentials that largely outlasted the pulse. We conclude that fast-spiking interneuron oscillations are generated by an intrinsic membrane mechanism that does not require fast synaptic transmission, and which depends on sodium conductance but not calcium conductance, and that such oscillations are responsible for triggering the intermittent spike bursts that are typical of these neurons. PMID:12665602

  19. Lavender Oil-Potent Anxiolytic Properties via Modulating Voltage Dependent Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Schuwald, Anita M.; Nöldner, Michael; Wilmes, Thomas; Klugbauer, Norbert; Leuner, Kristina; Müller, Walter E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical data support the clinical use of oral lavender oil in patients suffering from subsyndromal anxiety. We identified the molecular mechanism of action that will alter the perception of lavender oil as a nonspecific ingredient of aromatherapy to a potent anxiolytic inhibiting voltage dependent calcium channels (VOCCs) as highly selective drug target. In contrast to previous publications where exorbitant high concentrations were used, the effects of lavender oil in behavioral, biochemical, and electrophysiological experiments were investigated in physiological concentrations in the nanomolar range, which correlate to a single dosage of 80 mg/d in humans that was used in clinical trials. We show for the first time that lavender oil bears some similarities with the established anxiolytic pregabalin. Lavender oil inhibits VOCCs in synaptosomes, primary hippocampal neurons and stably overexpressing cell lines in the same range such as pregabalin. Interestingly, Silexan does not primarily bind to P/Q type calcium channels such as pregabalin and does not interact with the binding site of pregabalin, the α2δ subunit of VOCCs. Lavender oil reduces non-selectively the calcium influx through several different types of VOCCs such as the N-type, P/Q-type and T-type VOCCs. In the hippocampus, one brain region important for anxiety disorders, we show that inhibition by lavender oil is mainly mediated via N-type and P/Q-type VOCCs. Taken together, we provide a pharmacological and molecular rationale for the clinical use of the oral application of lavender oil in patients suffering from anxiety. PMID:23637742

  20. Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents

    PubMed Central

    Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  1. Molecular basis of voltage-dependent potassium currents in porcine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, Diane E; Mitchell, Kathy E; Li, Yan; Finley, Melissa R; Freeman, Lisa C

    2002-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to elucidate the molecular bases for K(+) current diversity in porcine granulosa cells (GC). Two delayed rectifier K(+) currents with distinct electrophysiological and pharmacological properties were recorded from porcine GC by using whole-cell patch clamp: 1) a slowly activating, noninactivating current (I(Ks)) antagonized by clofilium, 293B, L-735,821, and L-768,673; and 2) an ultrarapidly activating, slowly inactivating current (I(Kur)) antagonized completely by clofilium and 4-aminopyridine and partially by tetraethylammonium, charybdotoxin, dendrotoxin, and kaliotoxin. The molecular identity of the K(+) channel genes underlying I(Ks) and I(Kur) was examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting to detect K(+) channel transcripts and proteins. We found that GC could express multiple voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channel subunits, including KCNQ1, KCNE1, Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv1.3, Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv1.6, Kvbeta1.3, and Kvbeta2. Coimmunoprecipitation was used to establish the hetero-oligomeric nature of granulosa cell Kv channels. KCNE1 and KCNQ1 were coassociated in GC, and their expression coincided with the expression of I(Ks). Extensive coassociation of the various Kv alpha- and beta-subunits was also documented, suggesting that the diverse electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of I(Kur) currents may reflect variation in the composition and stoichiometry of the channel assemblies, as well as differences in post-translational modification of contributing Kv channel subunits. Our findings provide an essential background for experimental definition of granulosa K(+) channel function(s). It will be critical to define the functional roles of specific GC K(+) channels, because these proteins may represent either novel targets for assisted reproduction or potential sites of drug toxicity.

  2. Hippocampal hypoglycaemia-activated K+ channels: single-channel analysis of glucose and voltage dependence.

    PubMed

    Tromba, C; Salvaggio, A; Racagni, G; Volterra, A

    1994-11-01

    The effect of glucose on kinetics and the voltage-dependent characteristics of glucose-sensitive channels in hippocampal neurons were examined with the cell-attached mode of the patch-clamp technique. Recordings of a 100-pS K+ channel in the presence or absence of glucose demonstrate that the increase in channel open state probability (Po) induced by glucose deprivation (40- to 400-times the control in high-glucose medium) was largely due to a decrease in the global amount of time spent by the channel in a long-lived closed state. The Po value of the same 100-pS channel was also found to increase (by approx. 80-times) following a depolarization of 40 mV from rest, the main factor responsible for this being a dramatic shortening of the long closed-times on depolarization. Another glucose-sensitive channel of smaller conductance (approx. 10 pS) showed a similar dependence of Po on glucose, but different dependence on voltage, with long openings at the same hyperpolarized potentials where the 100-pS channel was almost always closed. Our results indicate that the action of glucose on the kinetics of hippocampal channels closely resembles that of ATP-sensitive channels in pancreatic beta-cells. Furthermore, they indicate that the two types of glucose-sensitive channels found in hippocampal neurons, differing not only in their single-channel conductance but also in the dependence on voltage, could play different roles in the responses of these cells to modified energetic supply.

  3. Alpha 1-adrenergic agonists selectively suppress voltage-dependent K+ current in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Apkon, M; Nerbonne, J M

    1988-01-01

    The effects of alpha 1-adrenergic agonists on the waveforms of action potentials and voltage-gated ionic currents were examined in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes by the whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique. After "puffer" applications of either of two alpha 1 agonists, phenylephrine and methoxamine, action-potential durations were increased. In voltage-clamped cells, phenylephrine (5-20 microM) or methoxamine (5-10 microM) reduced the amplitudes of Ca2+-independent voltage-activated outward K+ currents (Iout); neither the kinetics nor the voltage-dependent properties of Iout were significantly affected. The effects of phenylephrine or methoxamine on Iout were larger and longer-lasting at higher concentrations and after prolonged or repeated exposures; in all experiments, however, Iout recovered completely when puffer applications were discontinued. The suppression of Iout is attributed to the activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, as neither beta- nor alpha 2-adrenergic agonists had measurable effects on Iout; in addition, the effect of phenylephrine was attenuated in the presence of the alpha antagonist phentolamine (10 microM), but not in the presence of the beta antagonist propranolol (10 microM). Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents, in contrast, were not altered measurably by phenylephrine or methoxamine and no currents were activated directly by these agents. Suppression of Iout was also observed during puffer applications of either of two protein kinase C activators, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (10 nM-1 microM) and 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (60 microM). We conclude that the activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in adult rat ventricular myocytes leads to action-potential prolongation as a result of the specific suppression of Iout and that this effect may be mediated by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:2903506

  4. Wnt signalling suppresses voltage-dependent Na⁺ channel expression in postnatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenbin; Cho, Hee Cheol; Marbán, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    Wnt signalling plays crucial roles in heart development, but is normally suppressed postnatally. In arrhythmogenic conditions, such as cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, Wnt signalling is reactivated. To explore the potential role of Wnt signalling in arrhythmogenic electrical remodelling, we examined voltage-dependent ion channels in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with either recombinant Wnt3a protein or CHIR-99021 (CHIR, a glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor) caused a dose-dependent increase in Wnt target gene expression (Axin2 and Lef1), indicating activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Cardiac Na(+) current (INa) density was reduced by Wnt3a (-20 ± 4 vs. control -59 ± 7 pA pF(-1) , at -30 mV) or CHIR (-22 ± 5 pA pF(-1) ), without changes in steady-state activation, inactivation or repriming kinetics. Wnt3a and CHIR also produced dose-dependent reductions in the mRNA level of Scn5a (the cardiac Na(+) channel α subunit gene), as well as a 56% reduction (by Wnt3a) in the Nav 1.5 protein level. Consistent with INa reduction, action potentials in Wnt3a-treated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes had a lower upstroke amplitude (91 ± 3 vs. control 137 ± 2 mV) and decreased maximum upstroke velocity (70 ± 10 vs. control 163 ± 15 V s(-1)). In contrast, inward rectifier K(+) current and L-type Ca(2+) channels were not affected by Wnt3a treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway suppresses INa in postnatal cardiomyocytes and may contribute to ion channel remodelling in heart disease.

  5. Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel-1, a Possible Ligand of Plasminogen Kringle 5

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yin-ku; Bian, Liu-jiao

    2016-01-01

    Kringle 5, the fifth fragment of plasminogen, is known to be important for inhibiting the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cell (VEC), while not having any effects on normal endothelial cells. Therefore, it may be a potential tumor therapy candidate. However, the ligand of the Kringle 5 in VEC has not yet been identified. In this study, the possible ligand of Kringle 5 in vitro was screened and validated using Ph.D.-7 phage display peptide library with molecular docking, along with surface plasma resonance (SPR). After four rounds of panning, the specific clones of Kringle 5 were confirmed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The gene sequence analysis showed that they expressed the common amino sequence IGNSNTL. Then, using a NCBI BLAST, 103 matching sequences were found. Following the molecular docking evaluation and considering the acting function and pathway of the plasminogen Kringle 5 in the human body, the most promising candidate was determined to be voltage-dependent anion channel-1 (VDAC-1), which was able to bind to Kringle 5 at -822.65 J·mol-1 of the binding energy at the residues of Lys12, Thr19, Ser57, Thr188, Arg139, Asn214, Ser240 and Lys274. A strong dose-dependent interaction occurred between the VDAC-1 and Kringle 5 (binding constant 2.43 × 103 L·mol-1) in SPR observation. Therefore, this study proposed that VDAC-1 was a potential ligand of plasminogen Kringle 5, and also demonstrated that the screening and validation of protein ligand using phage display peptide library with the molecular docking, along with SPR, was a practicable application. PMID:27749918

  6. Voltage dependent potassium channel remodeling in murine intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Hai; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xin; Meng, Xiang-Min; Wu, Yi-Song; Lu, Hong-Li; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Kim, Young-chul; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2014-01-01

    Partial obstruction of the small intestine causes obvious hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and motility disorder in the bowel proximate to the obstruction. To identify electric remodeling of hypertrophic smooth muscles in partially obstructed murine small intestine, the patch-clamp and intracellular microelectrode recording methods were used to identify the possible electric remodeling and Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation were utilized to examine the channel protein expression and phosphorylation level changes in this research. After 14 days of obstruction, partial obstruction caused obvious smooth muscle hypertrophy in the proximally located intestine. The slow waves of intestinal smooth muscles in the dilated region were significantly suppressed, their amplitude and frequency were reduced, whilst the resting membrane potentials were depolarized compared with normal and sham animals. The current density of voltage dependent potassium channel (KV) was significantly decreased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells and the voltage sensitivity of KV activation was altered. The sensitivity of KV currents (IKV) to TEA, a nonselective potassium channel blocker, increased significantly, but the sensitivity of IKv to 4-AP, a KV blocker, stays the same. The protein levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were up-regulated in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cell membrane. The serine and threonine phosphorylation levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were significantly increased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Thus this study represents the first identification of KV channel remodeling in murine small intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction. The enhanced phosphorylations of KV4.3 and KV2.2 may be involved in this process.

  7. Voltage-dependent inhibition of recombinant NMDA receptor-mediated currents by 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Kloda, Anna; Adams, David J

    2005-01-01

    The effect of 5-HT and related indolealkylamines on heteromeric recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes was investigated using the two-electrode voltage-clamp recording technique. In the absence of external Mg2+ ions, 5-HT inhibited NMDA receptor-mediated currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of 5-HT was independent of the NR1a and NR2 subunit combination. The inhibition of glutamate-evoked currents by 5-HT was use- and voltage-dependent. The voltage sensitivity of inhibition for NR1a+NR2 subunit combinations by 5-HT was similar, exhibiting an e-fold change per ∼20 mV, indicating that 5-HT binds to a site deep within the membrane electric field. The inhibition of the open NMDA receptor by external Mg2+ and 5-HT was not additive, suggesting competition between Mg2+ and 5-HT for a binding site in the NMDA receptor channel. The concentration-dependence curves for 5-HT and 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeOT) inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated currents are shifted to the right in the presence of external Mg2+. The related indolealkylamines inhibited glutamate-evoked currents with the following order of inhibitory potency: 5-MeOT=5-methyltryptamine>tryptamine>7-methyltryptamine>5-HT≫tryptophan=melatonin. Taken together, these data suggest that 5-HT and related compounds can attenuate glutamate-mediated excitatory synaptic responses and may provide a basis for drug treatment of excitoxic neurodegeneration. PMID:15655527

  8. Effective gating charges per channel in voltage-dependent K+ and Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In voltage-dependent ion channels, the gating of the channels is determined by the movement of the voltage sensor. This movement reflects the rearrangement of the protein in response to a voltage stimulus, and it can be thought of as a net displacement of elementary charges (e0) through the membrane (z: effective number of elementary charges). In this paper, we measured z in Shaker IR (inactivation removed) K+ channels, neuronal alpha 1E and alpha 1A, and cardiac alpha 1C Ca2+ channels using two methods: (a) limiting slope analysis of the conductance-voltage relationship and (b) variance analysis, to evaluate the number of active channels in a patch, combined with the measurement of charge movement in the same patch. We found that in Shaker IR K+ channels the two methods agreed with a z congruent to 13. This suggests that all the channels that gate can open and that all the measured charge is coupled to pore opening in a strictly sequential kinetic model. For all Ca2+ channels the limiting slope method gave consistent results regardless of the presence or type of beta subunit tested (z = 8.6). However, as seen with alpha 1E, the variance analysis gave different results depending on the beta subunit used. alpha 1E and alpha 1E beta 1a gave higher z values (z = 14.77 and z = 15.13 respectively) than alpha 1E beta 2a (z = 9.50, which is similar to the limiting slope results). Both the beta 1a and beta 2a subunits, coexpressed with alpha 1E Ca2+ channels facilitated channel opening by shifting the activation curve to more negative potentials, but only the beta 2a subunit increased the maximum open probability. The higher z using variance analysis in alpha 1E and alpha 1E beta 1a can be explained by a set of charges not coupled to pore opening. This set of charges moves in transitions leading to nulls thus not contributing to the ionic current fluctuations but eliciting gating currents. Coexpression of the beta 2a subunit would minimize the fraction of nulls leading to

  9. Functional and molecular analysis of transient voltage-dependent K+ currents in rat hippocampal granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Riazanski, Vladimir; Becker, Albert; Chen, Jian; Sochivko, Dmitry; Lie, Ailing; Wiestler, Otmar D; Elger, Christian E; Beck, Heinz

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated voltage-dependent outward K+ currents of dentate granule cells (DGCs) in acute brain slices from young and adult rats using nucleated and outside-out patch recordings. In adult DGCs, the outward current pattern was dominated by a transient K+ current component. One portion of this current (∼60 %) was blocked by micromolar concentrations of tetraethylammonium (TEA; IC50 42 μm) and BDS-I, a specific blocker of Kv3.4 subunits (2.5 μm). A second component was insensitive to tetraethylammonium (10 mm) and BDS-I. The transient outward current could be completely blocked by 4-aminopyridine (IC50 296 μm). The TEA- and BDS-I-sensitive and the TEA-resistant current components were isolated pharmacologically. The current component that was blocked by BDS-I and TEA showed a depolarized threshold of activation (∼-30 mV) reminiscent of Kv3.4 subunits, while the current component resistant to TEA activated at more hyperpolarized potentials (∼-60 mV). In nucleated patches obtained by placing the patch pipette adjacent to the apical dendrite, only small Na+ currents and small BDS-I-sensitive transient currents were detected. Nucleated patches obtained from either the cell soma (see above) or the axon hillock showed significantly larger amplitude Na+ currents as well as larger BDS-I-sensitive currents, indicating that this current was predominantly localized within the axosomatic compartment. This result was in good agreement with the distribution of Kv3.4 protein as determined by immunohistochemistry. Current-clamp as well as mock action potential-clamp experiments revealed that the BDS-sensitive current component contributes to action potential repolarization. A comparison of the two age groups (4-10 days and 60-100 days) revealed a marked developmental up-regulation of the BDS-I-sensitive component. These functional changes are paralleled by a developmental increase in Kv3.4 mRNA expression determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, as well as a

  10. The voltage-dependent gate in MthK potassium channels is located at the selectivity filter.

    PubMed

    Posson, David J; McCoy, Jason G; Nimigean, Crina M

    2013-02-01

    Understanding how ion channels open and close their pores is crucial for comprehending their physiological roles. We used intracellular quaternary ammonium blockers, electrophysiology and X-ray crystallography to locate the voltage-dependent gate in MthK potassium channels from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. Blockers bind in an aqueous cavity between two putative gates: an intracellular gate and the selectivity filter. Thus, these blockers directly probe gate location--an intracellular gate will prevent binding when closed, whereas a selectivity filter gate will always allow binding. Kinetic analysis of tetrabutylammonium block of single MthK channels combined with X-ray crystallographic analysis of the pore with tetrabutyl antimony unequivocally determined that the voltage-dependent gate, like the C-type inactivation gate in eukaryotic channels, is located at the selectivity filter. State-dependent binding kinetics suggest that MthK inactivation leads to conformational changes within the cavity and intracellular pore entrance.

  11. Voltage dependence of a stochastic model of activation of an alpha helical S4 sensor in a K channel membrane.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, S R

    2011-09-07

    The voltage dependence of the ionic and gating currents of a K channel is dependent on the activation barriers of a voltage sensor with a potential function which may be derived from the principal electrostatic forces on an S4 segment in an inhomogeneous dielectric medium. By variation of the parameters of a voltage-sensing domain model, consistent with x-ray structures and biophysical data, the lowest frequency of the survival probability of each stationary state derived from a solution of the Smoluchowski equation provides a good fit to the voltage dependence of the slowest time constant of the ionic current in a depolarized membrane, and the gating current exhibits a rising phase that precedes an exponential relaxation. For each depolarizing potential, the calculated time dependence of the survival probabilities of the closed states of an alpha helical S4 sensor are in accord with an empirical model of the ionic and gating currents recorded during the activation process.

  12. Sodium current in single cells from bullfrog atrium: voltage dependence and ion transfer properties.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R B; Giles, W

    1987-01-01

    1. Whole-cell and patch-clamp techniques (Hamill, Marty, Neher, Sakmann & Sigworth, 1981) have been used to make quantitative measurements of the transient inward sodium current (INa) in single cells from bullfrog atrium. This preparation is particularly suitable for the study of INa: (i) the current density is relatively low, (ii) the cells lack a transverse tubule system, (iii) isolated myocytes can be maintained at reduced temperatures (approximately 8-12 degrees C); therefore kinetics can be studied quantitatively. 2. INa was pharmacologically and kinetically isolated from other transmembrane currents by blocking ICa with CdCl2 (0.2-0.5 mM) or LaCl3 (5 x 10(-6) M), and by using only relatively short voltage-clamp depolarizations which did not activate IK (the delayed rectifier). 3. The voltage dependence of INa in bullfrog atrium is similar to that in amphibian node of Ranvier or fast skeletal muscle. The threshold for activation is approximately -50 mV. The peak of the INa vs. membrane potential relation is near -5 to -10 mV. The reversal potential in 'normal' (115 mM-Na+) Ringer solution is +59.0 mV (S.D. +/- 3.4, n = 10). Reduction of external Na+ concentration to one-third of normal resulted in an approximately -27 mV shift of the reversal potential, close to that expected for a highly Na+-selective conductance. 4. Steady-state inactivation of INa (h infinity), measured with a conventional two-pulse voltage-clamp protocol, spanned the membrane potential range from -90 to -50 mV. The potential dependence of h infinity was well described by a single Boltzmann function with half-inactivation at -71 mV and maximum slope of 6.0 mV. 5. Steady-state activation of INa (m infinity) was determined from fits of INa records to a Hodgkin-Huxley model. The potential dependence of m infinity was fitted to a Boltzmann function with half-activation at -33 mV and maximum slope of 9.5 mV. Thus at temperatures around 10 degrees C there was very little overlap of the m infinity

  13. Voltage-dependent and calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium channel current in identified snail neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Gutnick, M J; Lux, H D; Swandulla, D; Zucker, H

    1989-01-01

    inactivation was enhanced in neurones that had been injected with Ca2+ chelator. 6. We conclude that inactivation of Ca2+ channels in these neurones depends on both [Ca2+]i and membrane potential. The voltage-dependent process may serve as a mechanism to quickly recover inactivated Ca2+ channels during repetitive firing despite considerable Ca2+ influx. 7. The results are discussed in the framework of a model which is based on two states of inactivation, INV and INCA, which represent different conformations of the inactivating substrate, and which are both reached from a lumped state of activation (A). Inactivation leads to high occupancy of INV during depolarization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2557426

  14. Phosphoinositide 5- and 3-phosphatase activities of a voltage-sensing phosphatase in living cells show identical voltage dependence

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Dongil; Kim, Dong-Il; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-sensing phosphatases (VSPs) are homologs of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), a phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] 3-phosphatase. However, VSPs have a wider range of substrates, cleaving 3-phosphate from PI(3,4)P2 and probably PI(3,4,5)P3 as well as 5-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and PI(3,4,5)P3 in response to membrane depolarization. Recent proposals say these reactions have differing voltage dependence. Using Förster resonance energy transfer probes specific for different PIs in living cells with zebrafish VSP, we quantitate both voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions against endogenous substrates. These activities become apparent with different voltage thresholds, voltage sensitivities, and catalytic rates. As an analytical tool, we refine a kinetic model that includes the endogenous pools of phosphoinositides, endogenous phosphatase and kinase reactions connecting them, and four exogenous voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions of VSP. We show that apparent voltage threshold differences for seeing effects of the 5- and 3-phosphatase activities in cells are not due to different intrinsic voltage dependence of these reactions. Rather, the reactions have a common voltage dependence, and apparent differences arise only because each VSP subreaction has a different absolute catalytic rate that begins to surpass the respective endogenous enzyme activities at different voltages. For zebrafish VSP, our modeling revealed that 3-phosphatase activity against PI(3,4,5)P3 is 55-fold slower than 5-phosphatase activity against PI(4,5)P2; thus, PI(4,5)P2 generated more slowly from dephosphorylating PI(3,4,5)P3 might never accumulate. When 5-phosphatase activity was counteracted by coexpression of a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase, there was accumulation of PI(4,5)P2 in parallel to PI(3,4,5)P3 dephosphorylation

  15. Estimating the voltage-dependent free energy change of ion channels using the median voltage for activation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sandipan; Chanda, Baron

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are crucial for electrical activity and chemical signaling in a variety of cell types. Structure-activity studies involving electrophysiological characterization of mutants are widely used and allow us to quickly realize the energetic effects of a mutation by measuring macroscopic currents and fitting the observed voltage dependence of conductance to a Boltzmann equation. However, such an approach is somewhat limiting, principally because of the inherent assumption that the channel activation is a two-state process. In this analysis, we show that the area delineated by the gating charge displacement curve and its ordinate axis is related to the free energy of activation of a voltage-gated ion channel. We derive a parameter, the median voltage of charge transfer (V(m)), which is proportional to this area, and prove that the chemical component of free energy change of a system can be obtained from the knowledge of V(m) and the maximum number of charges transferred. Our method is not constrained by the number or connectivity of intermediate states and is applicable to instances in which the observed responses show a multiphasic behavior. We consider various models of ion channel gating with voltage-dependent steps, latent charge movement, inactivation, etc. and discuss the applicability of this approach in each case. Notably, our method estimates a net free energy change of approximately -14 kcal/mol associated with the full-scale activation of the Shaker potassium channel, in contrast to -2 to -3 kcal/mol estimated from a single Boltzmann fit. Our estimate of the net free energy change in the system is consistent with those derived from detailed kinetic models (Zagotta et al. 1994. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.103.2.321). The median voltage method can reliably quantify the magnitude of free energy change associated with activation of a voltage-dependent system from macroscopic equilibrium measurements. This will be particularly useful

  16. Voltage-Dependent Inactivation of MscS Occurs Independently of the Positively Charged Residues in the Transmembrane Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sokabe, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kenjiro

    2016-01-01

    MscS (mechanosensitive channel of small conductance) is ubiquitously found among bacteria and plays a major role in avoiding cell lysis upon rapid osmotic downshock. The gating of MscS is modulated by voltage, but little is known about how MscS senses membrane potential. Three arginine residues (Arg-46, Arg-54, and Arg-74) in the transmembrane (TM) domain are possible to respond to voltage judging from the MscS structure. To examine whether these residues are involved in the voltage dependence of MscS, we neutralized the charge of each residue by substituting with asparagine (R46N, R54N, and R74N). Mechanical threshold for the opening of the expressed wild-type MscS and asparagine mutants did not change with voltage in the range from −40 to +100 mV. By contrast, inactivation process of wild-type MscS was strongly affected by voltage. The wild-type MscS inactivated at +60 to +80 mV but not at −60 to +40 mV. The voltage dependence of the inactivation rate of all mutants tested, that is, R46N, R54N, R74N, and R46N/R74N MscS, was almost indistinguishable from that of the wild-type MscS. These findings indicate that the voltage dependence of the inactivation occurs independently of the positive charges of R46, R54, and R74. PMID:28101504

  17. Effect of angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension on the voltage-dependent contractions of mouse arteries.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Paul; Van Hove, Cor E; Leloup, Arthur J A; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; De Keulenaer, Gilles W

    2016-02-01

    Arterial hypertension (AHT) affects the voltage dependency of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes. We analyzed the effect of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AHT on L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated isometric contractions in conduit arteries. AHT was induced in C57Bl6 mice with AngII-filled osmotic mini-pumps (4 weeks). Normotensive mice treated with saline-filled osmotic mini-pumps were used for comparison. Voltage-dependent contractions mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels were studied in vaso-reactive studies in vitro in isolated aortic and femoral arteries by using extracellular K(+) concentration-response (KDR) experiments. In aortic segments, AngII-induced AHT significantly sensitized isometric contractions induced by elevated extracellular K(+) and depolarization. This sensitization was partly prevented by normalizing blood pressure with hydralazine, suggesting that it was caused by AHT rather than by direct AngII effects on aortic smooth muscle cells. The EC50 for extracellular K(+) obtained in vitro correlated significantly with the rise in arterial blood pressure induced by AngII in vivo. The AHT-induced sensitization persisted when aortic segments were exposed to levcromakalim or to inhibitors of basal nitric oxide release. Consistent with these observations, AngII-treatment also sensitized the vaso-relaxing effects of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker diltiazem during K(+)-induced contractions. Unlike aorta, AngII-treatment desensitized the isometric contractions to depolarization in femoral arteries pointing to vascular bed specific responses of arteries to hypertension. AHT affects the voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated contraction of conduit arteries. This effect may contribute to the decreased vascular compliance in AHT and explain the efficacy of Ca(2+) channel blockers to reduce vascular stiffness and central blood pressure in AHT.

  18. Interaction of anionic and cationic currents leads to a voltage dependence in the odor response of olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Firestein, S; Shepherd, G M

    1995-02-01

    1. We recorded odor-induced currents from isolated olfactory receptor neurons of the land phase tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) with the whole cell patch clamp. 2. In a subset of cells the current-voltage relation for the odor-induced current showed a strong rectification with, in some cells, a negative resistance slope between about -45 and -25 mV. In these cells there was little or no odor-induced current at -55 mV, the average resting potential of olfactory neurons. 3. Depolarizing the membrane to +20 mV revealed a large outward current, and on repolarizing the membrane to -55 mV we could observe a large inward current. This current was not observed in the absence of the depolarizing step or in the absence of odor stimuli. 4. This odor-induced tail current was dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and voltage, activating with increased depolarization. The reversal potential was sensitive to the chloride equilibrium potential and it could be significantly blocked by niflumic acid, a blocker of calcium-activated chloride currents. The voltage dependence could result from either the voltage-dependent block of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-gated cation channels known to be activated by odorants and permeable to Ca2+, or from an inherent voltage dependence in the chloride channel gating. 5. The current appears to function as a regenerative mechanism that might increase the amplitude and duration of the odor-induced current, especially to low concentrations of stimulus.

  19. Voltage-dependent gating rearrangements in the intracellular T1-T1 interface of a K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2006-04-01

    The intracellular tetramerization domain (T1) of most eukaryotic voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv channels) exists as a "hanging gondola" below the transmembrane regions that directly control activation gating via the electromechanical coupling between the S4 voltage sensor and the main S6 gate. However, much less is known about the putative contribution of the T1 domain to Kv channel gating. This possibility is mechanistically intriguing because the T1-S1 linker connects the T1 domain to the voltage-sensing domain. Previously, we demonstrated that thiol-specific reagents inhibit Kv4.1 channels by reacting in a state-dependent manner with native Zn(2+) site thiolate groups in the T1-T1 interface; therefore, we concluded that the T1-T1 interface is functionally active and not protected by Zn(2+) (Wang, G., M. Shahidullah, C.A. Rocha, C. Strang, P.J. Pfaffinger, and M. Covarrubias. 2005. J. Gen. Physiol. 126:55-69). Here, we co-expressed Kv4.1 channels and auxiliary subunits (KChIP-1 and DPPX-S) to investigate the state and voltage dependence of the accessibility of MTSET to the three interfacial cysteines in the T1 domain. The results showed that the average MTSET modification rate constant (k(MTSET)) is dramatically enhanced in the activated state relative to the resting and inactivated states (approximately 260- and approximately 47-fold, respectively). Crucially, under three separate conditions that produce distinct activation profiles, k(MTSET) is steeply voltage dependent in a manner that is precisely correlated with the peak conductance-voltage relations. These observations strongly suggest that Kv4 channel gating is tightly coupled to voltage-dependent accessibility changes of native T1 cysteines in the intersubunit Zn(2+) site. Furthermore, cross-linking of cysteine pairs across the T1-T1 interface induced substantial inhibition of the channel, which supports the functionally dynamic role of T1 in channel gating. Therefore, we conclude that the complex

  20. Faster voltage-dependent activation of Na+ channels in growth cones versus somata of neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Loew, L M; Davidson, R M

    1996-01-01

    Kinetics of voltage-gated ionic channels fundamentally reflect the response of the channels to local electric fields. In this report cell-attached patch-clamp studies reveal that the voltage-dependent activation rate of sodium channels residing in the growth cone membrane differs from that of soma sodium channels in differentiating N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. Because other electrophysiological properties of these channels do not differ, this finding may be a reflection of the difference in intramembrane electric field in these two regions of the cell. This represents a new mechanism for channels to attain a range of activities both within and between cells. PMID:8913589

  1. Chromosome banding in Amphibia. XVII. First demonstration of multiple sex chromosomes in amphibians: Eleutherodactylus maussi (Anura, leptodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Schmid, M; Steinlein, C; Feichtinger, W

    1992-03-01

    A cytogenetic study performed on a population of the South American leptodactylid frog Eleutherodactylus maussi revealed multiple sex chromosomes of the X1X1X2X2 female/X1X2Y male (= XXAA female/XXAY male) type. The diploid chromosome number is 2n = 36 in all females and 2n = 35 in most males. The multiple sex chromosomes originated by a centric fusion between the original Y chromosome and a large autosome. In male meiosis the X1X2Y (= XXAY) multiple sex chromosomes form a classical trivalent configuration. E. maussi is the first species discovered in the class Amphibia that is distinguished by a system of multiple sex chromosomes. Only one single male was found in the population with 2n = 36 chromosomes and lacking the Y-autosomal fusion. This karyotype (XYAA male) is interpreted as the ancestral condition, preceding the occurrence of the Y-autosome fusion.

  2. Inhibition of the voltage-dependent calcium currents in isolated frog sensory neurons by GABA-related agonistic compounds.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, T; Behrends, J C; Akaike, N

    1988-12-01

    Effects of GABAA-, barbiturate- and benzodiazepine receptor agonists and GABAB agonist, baclofen, on voltage-dependent Ca2+ current (ICa) were studied in isolated frog sensory neurons after suppression of Na+ and K+ currents using single-electrode voltage-clamp. GABA, muscimol, taurine and pentobarbital (PB) dose-dependently induced a transient Cl- current (ICl), while baclofen and diazepam (DZP) did not elicit any currents. With GABAA agonists such as GABA, muscimol and taurine, ICa was suppressed transiently, and the maximum inhibition of ICa occurred within 1 min. The suppression of ICa by all GABAA agonists was neither voltage dependent nor attenuated in the presence of either bicuculline or picrotoxin. In addition, there was no correlation between GABA- and baclofen-induced suppressions of ICa. The results suggest that the inhibition of ICa by GABAA receptor agonists is not due to either GABAA or GABAB receptor activation at least. The inhibition of ICa by baclofen, PB and DZP was persistent. PB suppressed the amplitude of ICa and also facilitated the inactivation process, suggesting that PB behaves as a Ca channel blocker. However, the mechanisms of ICa suppression by baclofen and DZP are the subject for a future study. The potency order of the drugs in reducing ICa was muscimol greater than GABA = DZP greater than baclofen greater than PB greater than taurine.

  3. Inhibition of the voltage-dependent chloride channel of Torpedo electric organ by diisopropylfluorophosphate and its reversal by oximes

    SciTech Connect

    Abalis, I.M.; Chiang, P.K.; Wirtz, R.A.; Andre, R.G.

    1986-05-01

    Diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), a potent organophosphate inhibitor of cholinesterases, was found to inhibit the specific binding of (/sup 35/S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS), specific chloride channels ligand, to the electric organ membranes of Torpedo, with a Ki of 21 +/- 3 ..mu..M. The binding sites of (/sup 35/S)TBPS in the Torpedo membranes were found not to be GABA receptors or nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as previously described. Interestingly, a stimulation of the binding of (/sup 35/S)TBPS was observed in the presence of atropine and three oximes, monopyridinium oxime 2-PAM, bispyridinium bis-oxime TMB-4 and H-oxime HI-6. The maximal stimulation was 300-500% of control, after which, the stimulation was reversed at higher concentrations. The three oximes protected by more than 95% the inhibition by 1 mM DFP of the binding of (/sup 35/S)TBPS to the voltage-dependent chloride channel. However, atropine protected only 20% of the inhibited channel. These results, thus, suggest that the protection against the toxic effects of DFP or other anticholinesterase agents by the tested oximes may not be solely a result of the reactivation of cholinesterases but also the protection of the voltage-dependent chloride channel.

  4. Sulfate Is Both a Substrate and an Activator of the Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel of Arabidopsis Hypocotyl Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Thomine, Sébastien; Colcombet, Jean; Guern, Jean; Barbier-Brygoo, Hélène

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the anion content of in vitro-cultured Arabidopsis plantlets, we explored the selectivity of the voltage-dependent anion channel of the plasma membrane of hypocotyl cells. In the whole-cell configuration, substitution of cytosolic Cl− by different anions led to the following sequence of relative permeabilities: NO3− (2.6) ≥ SO42− (2.0) > Cl− (1.0) > HCO3− (0.8) ≫ malate2− (0.03). Large whole-cell currents were measured for NO3− and SO42−, about five to six times higher than the equivalent Cl− currents. Since SO42− is usually considered to be a weakly permeant or non-permeant ion, the components of the large whole-cell current were explored in more detail. Aside from its permeation through the channel with a unitary conductance, about two-thirds that of Cl−, SO42− had a regulatory effect on channel activity by preventing the run-down of the anion current both in the whole-cell and the outside-out configuration, increasing markedly the whole-cell current. The fact that the voltage-dependent plasma membrane anion channel of hypocotyl cells can mediate large NO3− and SO42− currents and is regulated by nucleotides favors the idea that this anion channel can contribute to the cellular homeostasis of important metabolized anions. PMID:10482681

  5. Development of a voltage-dependent current noise algorithm for conductance-based stochastic modelling of auditory nerve fibres.

    PubMed

    Badenhorst, Werner; Hanekom, Tania; Hanekom, Johan J

    2016-12-01

    This study presents the development of an alternative noise current term and novel voltage-dependent current noise algorithm for conductance-based stochastic auditory nerve fibre (ANF) models. ANFs are known to have significant variance in threshold stimulus which affects temporal characteristics such as latency. This variance is primarily caused by the stochastic behaviour or microscopic fluctuations of the node of Ranvier's voltage-dependent sodium channels of which the intensity is a function of membrane voltage. Though easy to implement and low in computational cost, existing current noise models have two deficiencies: it is independent of membrane voltage, and it is unable to inherently determine the noise intensity required to produce in vivo measured discharge probability functions. The proposed algorithm overcomes these deficiencies while maintaining its low computational cost and ease of implementation compared to other conductance and Markovian-based stochastic models. The algorithm is applied to a Hodgkin-Huxley-based compartmental cat ANF model and validated via comparison of the threshold probability and latency distributions to measured cat ANF data. Simulation results show the algorithm's adherence to in vivo stochastic fibre characteristics such as an exponential relationship between the membrane noise and transmembrane voltage, a negative linear relationship between the log of the relative spread of the discharge probability and the log of the fibre diameter and a decrease in latency with an increase in stimulus intensity.

  6. Voltage-dependent calcium channels in skeletal muscle transverse tubules. Measurements of calcium efflux in membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.M. )

    1989-07-05

    Transverse tubule membranes isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle consist mainly of sealed vesicles that are oriented primarily inside out. These membranes contain a high density of binding sites for 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists. The presence of functional voltage-dependent calcium channels in these membranes has been demonstrated by their ability to mediate {sup 45}Ca2+ efflux in response to changes in membrane potential. Fluorescence changes of the voltage-sensitive dye, 3,3'-dipropyl-2,2'-thiadicarbocyanine, have shown that transverse tubule vesicles may generate and maintain membrane potentials in response to establishing potassium gradients across the membrane in the presence of valinomycin. A two-step procedure has been developed to measure voltage-dependent calcium fluxes. Vesicles loaded with {sup 45}Ca2+ are first diluted into a buffer designed to generate a membrane potential mimicking the resting state of the cell and to reduce the extravesicular Ca2+ to sub-micromolar levels. {sup 45}Ca2+ efflux is then measured upon subsequent depolarization. Flux responses are modulated with appropriate pharmacological specificity by 1,4-dihydropyridines and are inhibited by other calcium channel antagonists such as lanthanum and verapamil.

  7. [Role of calcineurin in down-regulation of left ventricular transmural voltage- dependent K(+) currents in mice with heart failure].

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen-Xia; Dong, Fang; Chang, Yan-Chao; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yan-Fang

    2015-08-25

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of calcineurin in the down-regulation of left ventricular transmural voltage-dependent K(+) currents in heart failure. Transverse aorta was banded by using microsurgical techniques to create mouse heart failure model. Sham-operated (Sham) or aorta banded (Band) mice were randomized to receive calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) or vehicle. The densities and kinetic properties of voltage-dependent K(+) currents, as well as action potential (AP), of left ventricular subendocardial (Endo) and subepicardial (Epi) myocytes were determined by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The results showed that calcineurin activity was significant higher in Endo myocytes than that in Epi ones in all the groups. Compared with Sham group, Band mice showed significantly increased calcineurin activity both in Endo and Epi myocytes. CsA significantly reduced calcineurin activity in Band mice. CsA treatment in Band mice partially reversed the down-regulation of Ito density, completely reversed the down-regulation of IK,slow density both in Endo and Epi myocytes, and Iss density in Endo myocytes. In addition, CsA treatment in Band mice partially antagonized the prolongation of action potential duration (APD), and APD at 50% (APD50) and 90% repolarization (APD90) were significantly reduced. Because of non-parallel shortening of APD in Endo and Epi myocytes, the ratio of Endo/Epi APD90 was reduced from 4.8:1 in Band mice to 2.6:1 in CsA-treated mice, which was close to that in Sham mice. The results suggest that non-parallel activation of calcineurin in Endo and Epi myocytes contributes to the down-regulation of transmural voltage-dependent K(+) currents and the amplification of transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) in left ventricular failure hearts. Inhibition of calcineurin may be a potential new therapeutic strategy to prevent and cure arrhythmias and sudden death in heart failure.

  8. Voltage-dependent calcium currents are enhanced in dorsal root ganglion neurones from the Bio Bred/Worchester diabetic rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, K E; Sima, A A; Wiley, J W

    1995-01-01

    1. Whole-cell, high-threshold, voltage-dependent calcium currents (ICa) were enhanced in acutely dissociated, capsaicin-sensitive dorsal root ganglion neurones from diabetic Bio Bred/Worchester (BB/W) rats, compared with those from age-matched, non-diabetic controls. The magnitude of the enhancement increased with the duration of diabetes, and reached significance at diabetic durations of 6 months (diabetic: 6.3 +/- 0.4 nA; current density (CD), 157 +/- 12 pA pF-1; means +/- S.E.M., n = 9, P < 0.01; control: 3.9 +/- 0.6 nA; CD, 116 +/- 11 pA pF-1; n = 18) and 8 months (diabetic: 7.6 +/- 0.4 nA; CD, 177 +/- 25 pA pF-1; n = 11, P < 0.005; control: 5.1 +/- 0.5 nA; CD, 111 +/- 26 pA pF-1; n = 15). Low-threshold, voltage-dependent ICa were also enhanced in neurones from animals diabetic for 8 months (diabetic: 2.5 +/- 0.7 nA, n = 4, P < 0.05; control: 0.7 +/- 0.5 nA, n = 6). 2. The ICa enhancement was prevented by long-term treatment of diabetic animals with an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI; peak ICa at 6 months: 4.41 +/- 0.48 nA, n = 2; at 8 months: 4.32 +/- 0.60 nA, n = 9). 3. The ICa enhancement was not due to a shift in the voltage dependence of either the current-voltage relationship or steady-state inactivation. 4. The L channel antagonist nifedipine and preferential N channel antagonist omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTX) caused a greater inhibition of high-threshold ICa in diabetic neurones compared with controls (nifedipine: control: 25 +/- 3%, n = 26; diabetic: 36 +/- 7%, n = 11; omega-CgTX: control: 40 +/- 4%, n = 21; diabetic: 50 +/- 7%, n = 7). Diabetic neurones also demonstrated a significantly greater residual current (2.44 +/- 0.34 nA, n = 7) in the presence of both antagonists vs. controls (1.28 +/- 0.30 nA, n = 8, P < 0.05), suggesting that N-, L- and additional non-N-, non-L-type high-threshold ICa were enhanced. Images Figure 2 PMID:7473199

  9. A theoretical model of slow wave regulation using voltage-dependent synthesis of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Mohammad S; Smith, David W; van Helden, Dirk F

    2002-01-01

    A qualitative mathematical model is presented that examines membrane potential feedback on synthesis of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)), and its role in generation and modulation of slow waves. Previous experimental studies indicate that slow waves show voltage dependence, and this is likely to result through membrane potential modulation of IP(3). It is proposed that the observed response of the tissue to current pulse, pulse train, and maintained current injection can be explained by changes in IP(3), modulated through a voltage-IP(3) feedback loop. Differences underlying the tissue responses to current injections of opposite polarities are shown to be due to the sequence of events following such currents. Results from this model are consistent with experimental findings and provide further understanding of these experimental observations. Specifically, we find that membrane potential can induce, abolish, and modulate slow wave frequency by altering the excitability of the tissue through the voltage-IP(3) feedback loop. PMID:12324409

  10. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline inhibits voltage-dependent K+ channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sol; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Hye Won; Shin, Sung Eun; Choi, Il-Whan; Firth, Amy L; Bang, Hyoweon; Bae, Young Min; Park, Won Sun

    2016-12-01

    We examined the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline on voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using the voltage-clamp technique. Sertraline decreased the Kv channel current in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 0.18 mu M and a slope value (Hill coefficient) of 0.61. Although the application of 1 mu M sertraline did not affect the steady-state activation curves, sertraline caused a significant, negative shift in the inactivation curves. Pretreatment with another SSRI, paroxetine, had no significant effect on Kv currents and did not alter the inhibitory effects of sertraline on Kv currents. From these results, we concluded that sertraline dose-dependently inhibited Kv currents independently of serotonin reuptake inhibition by shifting inactivation curves to a more negative potential.

  11. Functional coupling between sodium-activated potassium channels and voltage-dependent persistent sodium currents in cricket Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Izumi; Yoshino, Masami

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we examined the functional coupling between Na(+)-activated potassium (KNa) channels and Na(+) influx through voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Single-channel activity of KNa channels was recorded with the cell-attached patch configuration. The open probability (Po) of KNa channels increased with increasing Na(+) concentration in a bath solution, whereas it decreased by the substitution of Na(+) with an equimolar concentration of Li(+). The Po of KNa channels was also found to be reduced by bath application of a high concentration of TTX (1 μM) and riluzole (100 μM), which inhibits both fast (INaf) and persistent (INaP) Na(+) currents, whereas it was unaffected by a low concentration of TTX (10 nM), which selectively blocks INaf. Bath application of Cd(2+) at a low concentration (50 μM), as an inhibitor of INaP, also decreased the Po of KNa channels. Conversely, bath application of the inorganic Ca(2+)-channel blockers Co(2+) and Ni(2+) at high concentrations (500 μM) had little effect on the Po of KNa channels, although Cd(2+) (500 μM) reduced the Po of KNa channels. Perforated whole cell clamp analysis further indicated the presence of sustained outward currents for which amplitude was dependent on the amount of Na(+) influx. Taken together, these results indicate that KNa channels could be activated by Na(+) influx passing through voltage-dependent persistent Na(+) channels. The functional significance of this coupling mechanism was discussed in relation to the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells and its possible role in the formation of long-term memory.

  12. Voltage-dependent antagonist/agonist actions of taurine on Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels of rat skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, D; Barbieri, M; Conte Camerino, D

    2001-09-01

    Emerging evidence supports the idea that taurine exerts some of its actions through inhibition of inward rectifier K(+) channels, ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, and voltage-dependent K(+) channels. However, to date not much is known about the effects of this sulfonic amino acid on Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (K(Ca(2+))) channels, which are widely expressed in various tissues, including skeletal muscle. In the present work, the effects of taurine on K(Ca(2+)) channels of rat skeletal muscle fibers were investigated using the patch-clamp technique. The application of the amino acid to the internal side of the excised macropatches induced a dose-dependent decrease in the outward K(Ca(2+)) currents recorded at positive membrane potentials in the presence of 8 to 16 microM concentrations of free Ca(2+) ions in the bath with an IC(50) of 31.9. 10(-3) +/- 1 M (slope factor = 1.2) (n = 11 patches). In contrast, at negative membrane potentials taurine caused an enhancement of the muscular inward K(Ca(2+)) currents with a DE(50) (drug concentration needed to enhance the current by 50%) of 46.7. 10(-3) +/- 2 M (slope factor = 1.3) (n = 9 patches). Single channel analysis revealed that this effect was mediated by changes in the reversal potential of the K(Ca(2+)) channel for K(+) ions with no changes in the gating properties or in the sensitivity of the channel to Ca(2+) ions. Taurine also did not affect the single channel conductance. In conclusion, taurine shows a voltage-dependent dualistic action on K(Ca(2+)) channels, being an inhibitor of the channel at positive membrane potentials and an activator at negative membrane potentials.

  13. Properties of single voltage-dependent K+ channels in dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurones of rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xixi; Johnston, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ channels in the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurones play important roles in regulating dendritic excitability, synaptic integration, and synaptic plasticity. Using cell-attached, voltage-clamp recordings, we found a large variability in the waveforms of macroscopic K+ currents in the dendrites. With single-channel analysis, however, we were able to identify four types of voltage-dependent K+ channels and we categorized them as belonging to delayed-rectifier, M-, D-, or A-type K+ channels previously described from whole-cell recordings. Delayed-rectifier-type K+ channels had a single-channel conductance of 19 ± 0.5 pS, and made up the majority of the sustained K+ current uniformly distributed along the apical dendrites. The M-type K+ channels had a single-channel conductance of 11 ± 0.8 pS, did not inactivate with prolonged membrane depolarization, deactivated with slow kinetics (time constant 100 ± 6 ms at −40 mV), and were inhibited by bath-applied muscarinic agonist carbachol (10 μm). The D-type K+ channels had a single-channel conductance of around 18 pS, and inactivated with a time constant of 98 ± 4 ms at +54 mV. The A-type K+ channels had a single-channel conductance of 6 ± 0.6 pS, inactivated with a time constant of 23 ± 2 ms at +54 mV, and contributed to the majority of the transient K+ current previously described. These results suggest both functional and molecular complexity for K+ channels in dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurones. PMID:15218076

  14. Amine blockers of the cytoplasmic mouth of sodium channels: a small structural change can abolish voltage dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, G W; French, R J

    1994-01-01

    Many drugs block sodium channels from the cytoplasmic end (Moczydlowski, E., A. Uehara, X, Guo, and J. Heiny. 1986. Isochannels and blocking modes of voltage-dependent sodium channels. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 479:269-292.). Lidocaine, applied to either side of the membrane, induces two blocking modes, a rapid, voltage-dependent open-channel block, and a block of the inactivated channel that occurs on a 1000-fold slower timescale. Here we describe the actions of several lidocaine-related amines on batrachotoxin(BTX)-activated bovine cardiac sodium channels incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. We applied blocking amines from the intracellular side and examined the structural determinants of fast, open-channel block. Neither hydroxyl nor carbonyl groups, present in the aryl-amine link of lidocaine, were necessary, indicating that hydrogen bonding between structures in the aryl-amine link and the channel is not required. Block, however, was significantly enhanced by addition of an aromatic ring, or by the lengthening of aliphatic side chains, suggesting that a hydrophobic domain strengthens binding while the amine group blocks the pore. For most blockers, depolarizing potentials enhanced block, with the charged amine group apparently traversing 45-60% of the transmembrane voltage. By contrast, block by phenylhydrazine was essentially voltage-independent. The relatively rigid planar structure of phenylhydrazine may prevent the charged amino end from entering the electric field when the aromatic ring is bound. The relation between structural features of different blockers and their sensitivity to voltage suggests that the transmembrane voltage drops completely over less than 5 A. We raise the possibility that the proposed hydrophobic binding domain overlaps the endogenous receptor for the inactivation gate. If so, our data place limits on the distance between this receptor and the intrapore site at which charged amines bind. PMID:7811912

  15. Multiple calcium channels in synaptosomes: voltage dependence of 1,4-dihydropyridine binding and effects on function

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.M.J.

    1988-07-12

    The voltage dependence of binding of the calcium channel antagonist, (+)-(/sup 3/H)PN200-110, to rat brain synaptosomes and the effects of dihydropyridines on /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake have been investigated. Under nondepolarizing conditions (+)-(/sup 3/H)PN200-110 binds to a single class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 0.07 nM and a binding capacity of 182 fmol/mg of protein. When the synaptosomal membrane potential was dissipated either by osmotic lysis of the synaptosomes or by depolarization induced by raising the external K/sup +/ concentration, there was a decrease in affinity with no change in the number of sites. The effects of calcium channel ligands on /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake by synaptosomes have been measured as a function of external potassium concentration, i.e., membrane potential. Depolarization led to a rapid influx of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ whose magnitude was voltage-dependent. Verapamil almost completely inhibited calcium uptake at all potassium concentrations studies. In contrast, the effects of dihydropyridines (2 ..mu..M) appear to be voltage-sensitive. At relatively low levels of depolarization nitrendipine and PN200-110 completely inhibited /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx, whereas the agonist Bay K8644 slightly potentiated the response. At higher K/sup +/ concentrations an additional dihydropyridine-insensitive component of calcium uptake was observed. These results provide evidence for the presence of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in synaptosomes which may be activated under conditions of partial depolarization.

  16. Phosphorylation by Nek1 regulates opening and closing of voltage dependent anion channel 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yumay; Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel; Polci, Rosaria; Riley, Daniel J.

    2010-04-09

    VDAC1 is a key component of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. To initiate apoptosis and certain other forms of cell death, mitochondria become permeable such that cytochrome c and other pre-apoptotic molecules resident inside the mitochondria enter the cytosol and activate apoptotic cascades. We have shown recently that VDAC1 interacts directly with never-in-mitosis A related kinase 1 (Nek1), and that Nek1 phosphorylates VDAC1 on Ser193 to prevent excessive cell death after injury. How this phosphorylation regulates the activity of VDAC1, however, has not yet been reported. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cytochrome c conductance studies to examine the configuration of VDAC1 before and after phosphorylation by Nek1. Wild-type VDAC1 assumes an open configuration, but closes and prevents cytochrome c efflux when phosphorylated by Nek1. A VDAC1-Ser193Ala mutant, which cannot be phosphorylated by Nek1 under identical conditions, remains open and constitutively allows cytochrome c efflux. Conversely, a VDAC1-Ser193Glu mutant, which mimics constitutive phosphorylation by Nek1, remains closed by AFM and prevents cytochrome c leakage in the same liposome assays. Our data provide a mechanism to explain how Nek1 regulates cell death by affecting the opening and closing of VDAC1.

  17. Voltage-dependent insertion of alamethicin at phospholipid/water and octane/water interfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, D P; Berendsen, H J; Sansom, M S

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the binding and insertion of peptides in lipid bilayers is a prerequisite for understanding phenomena such as antimicrobial activity and membrane-protein folding. We describe molecular dynamics simulations of the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin in lipid/water and octane/water environments, taking into account an external electric field to mimic the membrane potential. At cis-positive potentials, alamethicin does not insert into a phospholipid bilayer in 10 ns of simulation, due to the slow dynamics of the peptide and lipids. However, in octane N-terminal insertion occurs at field strengths from 0.33 V/nm and higher, in simulations of up to 100 ns duration. Insertion of alamethicin occurs in two steps, corresponding to desolvation of the Gln7 side chain, and the backbone of Aib10 and Gly11. The proline induced helix kink angle does not change significantly during insertion. Polyalanine and alamethicin form stable helices both when inserted in octane and at the water/octane interface, where they partition in the same location. In water, both polyalanine and alamethicin partially unfold in multiple simulations. We present a detailed analysis of the insertion of alamethicin into the octane slab and the influence of the external field on the peptide structure. Our findings give new insight into the mechanism of channel formation by alamethicin and the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated helices. PMID:11159406

  18. Voltage-dependent dye coupling at a rectifying electrotonic synapse of the crayfish.

    PubMed Central

    Giaume, C; Korn, H

    1984-01-01

    At the crayfish giant motor synapse, the lateral giant axon (l.g.a.) and the giant motor fibre (g.m.f.) form an electrotonic junction which exhibits two states of ionic coupling (Furshpan & Potter, 1959a; Giaume & Korn, 1983). Junctional conductance is low at resting membrane potentials (i.e. with lateral axon more negative than the motor fibre) and high when the polarity of the voltage difference (delta V) across the synapse is reversed. For these two states of conductance, junctional permeability was investigated using the intercellular tracer Lucifer Yellow. The dye was ionophoretically injected into either the presynaptic (l.g.a.) or the post-synaptic (g.m.f.) cell. In the high conductance state (delta V greater than 0), fluorescence was detected in both neurones whether Lucifer Yellow had been injected pre- or post-synaptically. By contrast, at the resting junctional polarization (delta V less than 0) Lucifer Yellow spread from the giant axon to the g.m.f., but not from the g.m.f. to the giant axons. These data demonstrate that dye transfer at the giant motor synapse, like ionic coupling, is sensitive to junctional polarization and is more marked in the high conductance state. Possible explanations for the asymmetry observed in the low conductance state are discussed. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PLATE 3 PMID:6097668

  19. Mefloquine inhibits voltage dependent Nav1.4 channel by overlapping the local anaesthetic binding site.

    PubMed

    Paiz-Candia, Bertin; Islas, Angel A; Sánchez-Solano, Alfredo; Mancilla-Simbro, Claudia; Scior, Thomas; Millan-PerezPeña, Lourdes; Salinas-Stefanon, Eduardo M

    2017-02-05

    Mefloquine constitutes a multitarget antimalaric that inhibits cation currents. However, the effect and the binding site of this compound on Na(+) channels is unknown. To address the mechanism of action of mefloquine, we employed two-electrode voltage clamp recordings on Xenopus laevis oocytes, site-directed mutagenesis of the rat Na(+) channel, and a combined in silico approach using Molecular Dynamics and docking protocols. We found that mefloquine: i) inhibited Nav1.4 currents (IC50 =60μM), ii) significantly delayed fast inactivation but did not affect recovery from inactivation, iii) markedly the shifted steady-state inactivation curve to more hyperpolarized potentials. The presence of the β1 subunit significantly reduced mefloquine potency, but the drug induced a significant frequency-independent rundown upon repetitive depolarisations. Computational and experimental results indicate that mefloquine overlaps the local anaesthetic binding site by docking at a hydrophobic cavity between domains DIII and DIV that communicates the local anaesthetic binding site with the selectivity filter. This is supported by the fact that mefloquine potency significantly decreased on mutant Nav1.4 channel F1579A and significantly increased on K1237S channels. In silico this compound docked above F1579 forming stable π-π interactions with this residue. We provide structure-activity insights into how cationic amphiphilic compounds may exert inhibitory effects by docking between the local anaesthetic binding site and the selectivity filter of a mammalian Na(+) channel. Our proposed synergistic cycle of experimental and computational studies may be useful for elucidating binding sites of other drugs, thereby saving in vitro and in silico resources.

  20. Molecular characterization and functional expression of the Apis mellifera voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Cens, Thierry; Rousset, Matthieu; Collet, Claude; Charreton, Mercedes; Garnery, Lionel; Le Conte, Yves; Chahine, Mohamed; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Charnet, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels allow the influx of Ca(2+) ions from the extracellular space upon membrane depolarization and thus serve as a transducer between membrane potential and cellular events initiated by Ca(2+) transients. Most insects are predicted to possess three genes encoding Cavα, the main subunit of Ca(2+) channels, and several genes encoding the two auxiliary subunits, Cavβ and Cavα2δ; however very few of these genes have been cloned so far. Here, we cloned three full-length cDNAs encoding the three Cavα subunits (AmelCav1a, AmelCav2a and AmelCav3a), a cDNA encoding a novel variant of the Cavβ subunit (AmelCavβc), and three full-length cDNAs encoding three Cavα2δ subunits (AmelCavα2δ1 to 3) of the honeybee Apis mellifera. We identified several alternative or mutually exclusive exons in the sequence of the AmelCav2 and AmelCav3 genes. Moreover, we detected a stretch of glutamine residues in the C-terminus of the AmelCav1 subunit that is reminiscent of the motif found in the human Cav2.1 subunit of patients with Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6. All these subunits contain structural domains that have been identified as functionally important in their mammalian homologues. For the first time, we could express three insect Cavα subunits in Xenopus oocytes and we show that AmelCav1a, 2a and 3a form Ca(2+) channels with distinctive properties. Notably, the co-expression of AmelCav1a or AmelCav2a with AmelCavβc and AmCavα2δ1 produces High Voltage-Activated Ca(2+) channels. On the other hand, expression of AmelCav3a alone leads to Low Voltage-Activated Ca(2+) channels.

  1. Voltage-dependent gating of single gap junction channels in an insect cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Bukauskas, F F; Weingart, R

    1994-01-01

    De novo formation of cell pairs was used to examine the gating properties of single gap junction channels. Two separate cells of an insect cell line (clone C6/36, derived from the mosquito Aedes albopictus) were pushed against each other to provoke formation of gap junction channels. A dual voltage-clamp method was used to control the voltage gradient between the cells (Vj) and measure the intercellular current (Ij). The first sign of channel activity was apparent 4.7 min after cell contact. Steady-state coupling reached after 30 min revealed a conductance of 8.7 nS. Channel formation involved no leak between the intra- and extracellular space. The first opening of a newly formed channel was slow (25-28 ms). Each preparation passed through a phase with only one operational gap junction channel. This period was exploited to examine the single channel properties. We found that single channels exhibit several conductance states with different conductances gamma j; a fully open state (gamma j(main state)), several substates (gamma j(substates)), a residual state (gamma j(residual)) and a closed state (gamma j(closed)). The gamma j(main state) was 375 pS, and gamma j(residual) ranged from 30 to 90 pS. The transitions between adjacent substates were 1/7-1/4 of gamma j(main state). Vj had no effect on gamma j(main state), but slightly affected gamma j (residual). The lj transitions involving gamma j(closed) were slow (15-60 ms), whereas those not involving gamma j(closed) were fast (< 2 ms). An increase in Vj led to a decrease in open channel probability. Depolarization of the membrane potential (Vm) increased the incidence of slow transitions leading to gamma j(closed). We conclude that insect gap junctions possess two gates, a fast gate controlled by Vj and giving rise to gamma j(substates) and gamma j(residual), and a slow gate sensitive to Vm and able to close the channel completely. PMID:7524710

  2. The authorships and dates of the specific nomina Megophrys shuichengensis and Pseudohynobius shuichengensis (Amphibia).

    PubMed

    Ohler, Annemarie; Frétey, Thierry; Dubois, Alain

    2015-05-28

    Two amphibian species from China are designated by the specific nomen shuichengensis, which refers to the Shuicheng County (26°34'N, 104°51'E), south of the city of Liupanshui in the province of Guizhou: Megophrys shuichengensis (Amphibia, Anura) and Pseudohynobius shuichengensis (Amphibia, Urodela). The holotypes (holophoronts) of both species were deposited in Department of Biology of the Liupanshui Teachers Higher College (LTHC below). Both species share the particularity of having been described as new twice, at different dates, in different journals and with different authorships. Although this has been acknowledged for the salamander, it has not yet been so for the frog.

  3. Phylogenetic relationships linking Duttaphrynus (Amphibia: Anura: Bufonidae) species based on 12S and 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Pratihar, Suman; Bhattacharya, Manojit; Deuti, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    Genus Duttaphrynus (Amphibia: Anura: Bufonidae) is endemic to southwestern and southern China and throughout southern Asia. Duttaphrynus phylogeny was also under debate for many years. 12S and 16S rDNAs help us to elucidate Duttaphrynus phylogeny.

  4. Conducting and voltage-dependent behaviors of potassium ion channels reconstituted from diaphragm sarcoplasmic reticulum: comparison with the cardiac isoform.

    PubMed

    Picher, M; Decrouy, A; Rousseau, E

    1996-02-21

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) K+ channels from canine diaphragm were studied upon fusion of longitudinal and junctional membrane vesicles into planar lipid bilayers (PLB). The large-conductance cation selective channel (gamma(max) = 250 pS; Km = 33 mM) displays long-lasting open events which are much more frequent at positive than at negative voltages. A major subconducting state about 45% of the fully-open state current amplitude was occasionally observed at all voltages. The voltage-dependence of the open probability displays a sigmoid relationship that was fitted by the Boltzmann equation and expressed in terms of thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy (delta Gi) and the effective gating charge (Zs): delta Gi = 0.27 kcal/mol and Zs = -1.19 in 250 mM potassium gluconate (K-gluconate). Kinetic analyses also confirmed the voltage-dependent gating behavior of this channel, and indicate the implication of at least two open and three closed states. The diaphragm SR K+ channel shares several biophysical properties with the cardiac isoform: g = 180 pS, delta Gi = 0.75 kcal/mol, Zs = -1.45 in 150 mM K-gluconate, and a similar sigmoid P(o)/voltage relationship. Little is known about the regulation of the diaphragm and cardiac SR K+ channels. The conductance and gating of these channels were not influenced by physiological concentrations of Ca2+ (0.1 microM-1 mM) or Mg2+ (0.25-1 mM), as well as by cGMP (25-100 microM), lemakalim (1-100 microM), glyburide (up to 10 microM) or charybdotoxin (45-200 nM), added either to the cis or to the trans chamber. The apparent lack of biochemical or pharmacological modulation of these channels implies that they are not related to any of the well characterized surface membrane K+ channels. On the other hand, their voltage sensitivity strongly suggests that their activity could be modulated by putative changes in SR membrane potential that might occur during calcium fluxes.

  5. Reduced temperature and bias-voltage dependence of the magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions with Hf-inserted Al2O3 barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byong Guk; Lee, Taek Dong

    2002-09-01

    A modified tunnel barrier structure for the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) was fabricated by inserting a Hf layer in the middle of the Al2O3 tunnel barrier. MTJs with the Hf-inserted barrier show a higher tunnel mangnetoresistance (TMR) ratio and weaker temperature and bias-voltage dependence of TMR compared to the MTJs with a conventional Al2O3 barrier. The enhancement of the TMR ratio and the reduction of the temperature and bias-voltage dependence were attributed to the reduction of defects in the barrier.

  6. Photoaffinity labeling with cholesterol analogues precisely maps a cholesterol-binding site in voltage-dependent anion channel-1.

    PubMed

    Budelier, Melissa M; Cheng, Wayland Wl; Bergdoll, Lucie; Chen, Zi-Wei; Janetka, James W; Abramson, Jeff; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F; Whitelegge, Julian P; Evers, Alex S

    2017-04-10

    Voltage-dependent anion channel-1 (VDAC1) is a highly regulated β-barrel membrane protein that mediates transport of ions and metabolites between the mitochondria and cytosol of the cell. VDAC1 co-purifies with cholesterol and is functionally regulated by cholesterol, among other endogenous lipids. Molecular modeling studies based on NMR observations have suggested five cholesterol-binding sites in VDAC1, but direct experimental evidence for these sites is lacking. Here, to determine the sites of cholesterol binding, we photolabeled purified mouse VDAC1 (mVDAC1) with photoactivatable cholesterol analogues and analyzed the photolabeled sites with both top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and bottom-up MS paired with a clickable, stable isotope labeled tag, FLI-tag. Using cholesterol analogues with a diazirine in either the 7 position of the steroid ring (LKM38) or the aliphatic tail (KK174), we mapped a binding pocket in mVDAC1 localized to T83 and E73, respectively. When E73 was mutated to a glutamine, KK174 no longer photolabeled this residue, but instead labeled the nearby Y62 within this same binding pocket. The combination of analytical strategies employed in this work permits detailed molecular mapping of a cholesterol binding site in a protein, including an orientation of the sterol within the site. Our work raises the interesting possibility that cholesterol-mediated regulation of VDAC1 may be facilitated through a specific binding site at the functionally important E73 residue.

  7. Complex I generated, mitochondrial matrix-directed superoxide is released from the mitochondria through voltage dependent anion channels.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Michael S; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Muller, Florian L; Jang, Youngmok C; Shimizu, Takahiko; Shirasawa, Takuji; Richardson, Arlan; Van Remmen, Holly

    2012-06-08

    Mitochondrial complex I has previously been shown to release superoxide exclusively towards the mitochondrial matrix, whereas complex III releases superoxide to both the matrix and the cytosol. Superoxide produced at complex III has been shown to exit the mitochondria through voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC). To test whether complex I-derived, mitochondrial matrix-directed superoxide can be released to the cytosol, we measured superoxide generation in mitochondria isolated from wild type and from mice genetically altered to be deficient in MnSOD activity (TnIFastCreSod2(fl/fl)). Under experimental conditions that produce superoxide primarily by complex I (glutamate/malate plus rotenone, GM+R), MnSOD-deficient mitochondria release ∼4-fold more superoxide than mitochondria isolated from wild type mice. Exogenous CuZnSOD completely abolished the EPR-derived GM+R signal in mitochondria isolated from both genotypes, evidence that confirms mitochondrial superoxide release. Addition of the VDAC inhibitor DIDS significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide release (∼75%) in mitochondria from either genotype respiring on GM+R. Conversely, inhibition of potential inner membrane sites of superoxide exit, including the matrix face of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the inner membrane anion channel did not reduce mitochondrial superoxide release in the presence of GM+R in mitochondria isolated from either genotype. These data support the concept that complex I-derived mitochondrial superoxide release does indeed occur and that the majority of this release occurs through VDACs.

  8. Voltage-dependent anion channels modulate mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells: regulation by free tubulin and erastin.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Eduardo N; Sheldon, Kely L; DeHart, David N; Patnaik, Jyoti; Manevich, Yefim; Townsend, Danyelle M; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Lemasters, John J

    2013-04-26

    Respiratory substrates and adenine nucleotides cross the mitochondrial outer membrane through the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), comprising three isoforms--VDAC1, 2, and 3. We characterized the role of individual isoforms in mitochondrial metabolism by HepG2 human hepatoma cells using siRNA. With VDAC3 to the greatest extent, all VDAC isoforms contributed to the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, but only VDAC3 knockdown decreased ATP, ADP, NAD(P)H, and mitochondrial redox state. Cells expressing predominantly VDAC3 were least sensitive to depolarization induced by increased free tubulin. In planar lipid bilayers, free tubulin inhibited VDAC1 and VDAC2 but not VDAC3. Erastin, a compound that interacts with VDAC, blocked and reversed mitochondrial depolarization after microtubule destabilizers in intact cells and antagonized tubulin-induced VDAC blockage in planar bilayers. In conclusion, free tubulin inhibits VDAC1/2 and limits mitochondrial metabolism in HepG2 cells, contributing to the Warburg phenomenon. Reversal of tubulin-VDAC interaction by erastin antagonizes Warburg metabolism and restores oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

  9. The voltage-dependent K(+) channels Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Comes, Núria; Bielanska, Joanna; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Condom, Enric; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Ferreres, Joan C; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-10-10

    Voltage-dependent K(+) channels (Kv) are involved in a number of physiological processes, including immunomodulation, cell volume regulation, apoptosis as well as differentiation. Some Kv channels participate in the proliferation and migration of normal and tumor cells, contributing to metastasis. Altered expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels has been found in several types of tumors and cancer cells. In general, while the expression of Kv1.3 apparently exhibits no clear pattern, Kv1.5 is induced in many of the analyzed metastatic tissues. Interestingly, evidence indicates that Kv1.5 channel shows inversed correlation with malignancy in some gliomas and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. However, Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 are similarly remodeled in some cancers. For instance, expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 correlates with a certain grade of tumorigenicity in muscle sarcomas. Differential remodeling of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 expression in human cancers may indicate their role in tumor growth and their importance as potential tumor markers. However, despite of this increasing body of information, which considers Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 as emerging tumoral markers, further research must be performed to reach any conclusion. In this review, we summarize what it has been lately documented about Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels in human cancer.

  10. The voltage-dependent K+ channels Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Comes, Núria; Bielanska, Joanna; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Condom, Enric; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Ferreres, Joan C.; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv) are involved in a number of physiological processes, including immunomodulation, cell volume regulation, apoptosis as well as differentiation. Some Kv channels participate in the proliferation and migration of normal and tumor cells, contributing to metastasis. Altered expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels has been found in several types of tumors and cancer cells. In general, while the expression of Kv1.3 apparently exhibits no clear pattern, Kv1.5 is induced in many of the analyzed metastatic tissues. Interestingly, evidence indicates that Kv1.5 channel shows inversed correlation with malignancy in some gliomas and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. However, Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 are similarly remodeled in some cancers. For instance, expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 correlates with a certain grade of tumorigenicity in muscle sarcomas. Differential remodeling of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 expression in human cancers may indicate their role in tumor growth and their importance as potential tumor markers. However, despite of this increasing body of information, which considers Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 as emerging tumoral markers, further research must be performed to reach any conclusion. In this review, we summarize what it has been lately documented about Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels in human cancer. PMID:24133455

  11. Effects of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide on voltage-dependent sodium and calcium channels in rat ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Al Kury, Lina T; Voitychuk, Oleg I; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Thayyullathil, Faisal T; Doroshenko, Petro; Ramez, Ali M; Shuba, Yaroslav M; Galadari, Sehamuddin; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Oz, Murat

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The endocannabinoid anandamide (N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide; AEA) exerts negative inotropic and antiarrhythmic effects in ventricular myocytes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Whole-cell patch-clamp technique and radioligand-binding methods were used to analyse the effects of anandamide in rat ventricular myocytes. KEY RESULTS In the presence of 1–10 μM AEA, suppression of both Na+ and L-type Ca2+ channels was observed. Inhibition of Na+ channels was voltage and Pertussis toxin (PTX) – independent. Radioligand-binding studies indicated that specific binding of [3H] batrachotoxin (BTX) to ventricular muscle membranes was also inhibited significantly by 10 μM metAEA, a non-metabolized AEA analogue, with a marked decrease in Bmax values but no change in Kd. Further studies on L-type Ca2+ channels indicated that AEA potently inhibited these channels (IC50 0.1 μM) in a voltage- and PTX-independent manner. AEA inhibited maximal amplitudes without affecting the kinetics of Ba2+ currents. MetAEA also inhibited Na+ and L-type Ca2+ currents. Radioligand studies indicated that specific binding of [3H]isradipine, was inhibited significantly by metAEA. (10 μM), changing Bmax but not Kd. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Results indicate that AEA inhibited the function of voltage-dependent Na+ and L-type Ca2+ channels in rat ventricular myocytes, independent of CB1 and CB2 receptor activation. PMID:24758718

  12. Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 1(VDAC1) Participates the Apoptosis of the Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Desminopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yanqing; Gong, Qi; Jiang, Aihua; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Desminopathies caused by the mutation in the gene coding for desmin are genetically protein aggregation myopathies. Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of pathological changes in the desminopathies at the earliest stage. The molecular mechanisms of mitochondria dysfunction in desminopathies remain exclusive. VDAC1 regulates mitochondrial uptake across the outer membrane and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Relationships between desminopathies and Voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) remain unclear. Here we successfully constructed the desminopathy rat model, evaluated with conventional stains, containing hematoxylin and eosin (HE), Gomori Trichrome (MGT), (PAS), red oil (ORO), NADH-TR, SDH staining and immunohistochemistry. Immunofluorescence results showed that VDAC1 was accumulated in the desmin highly stained area of muscle fibers of desminopathy patients or desminopathy rat model compared to the normal ones. Meanwhile apoptosis related proteins bax and ATF2 were involved in desminopathy patients and desminopathy rat model, but not bcl-2, bcl-xl or HK2.VDAC1 and desmin are closely relevant in the tissue splices of deminopathies patients and rats with desminopathy at protein lever. Moreover, apoptotic proteins are also involved in the desminopathies, like bax, ATF2, but not bcl-2, bcl-xl or HK2. This pathological analysis presents the correlation between VDAC1 and desmin, and apoptosis related proteins are correlated in the desminopathy. Furthermore, we provide a rat model of desminopathy for the investigation of desmin related myopathy. PMID:27941998

  13. Effects of ethanol and other intoxicant-anesthetics on voltage-dependent sodium channels of brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Harris, R A; Bruno, P

    1985-02-01

    Ethanol, diethylether, halothane and enflurane inhibited the veratridine-dependent uptake of 24Na by synaptosomes isolated from rodent brain. The inhibitory action of ethanol was similar for uptake periods of 1 to 10 sec and also was observed with batrachotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake, demonstrating an inhibition of sodium influx through voltage-dependent channels. The inhibitory action of tetrodotoxin on sodium uptake was not altered by ethanol, indicating this site on the sodium channel was not altered by ethanol. The action of ethanol was selective for different brain regions and was more potent in inhibiting sodium uptake in cortex than in cerebellum. Investigation of the effects of temperature on veratridine-stimulated uptake and ethanol actions demonstrated that an increase in temperature (13 degrees-33 degrees C) decreased both the apparent KD of veratridine and the Vmax of the uptake. Ethanol decreased the apparent Vmax at all temperatures and decreased the apparent KD at low 13 degrees and 18 degrees C) but not at higher (30 degrees and 33 degrees C) temperatures. Thus, an increase in temperature mimicked some, but not all, of the effects of ethanol. These results, together with those from other studies, suggest that the disordering of membrane lipids by ethanol and other intoxicant-anesthetic drugs is an important factor in the inhibition of sodium channel function by these drugs.

  14. Local mitochondrial-endolysosomal microfusion cleaves voltage-dependent anion channel 1 to promote survival in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Brahimi-Horn, M Christiane; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Adaixo, Ricardo; Ilc, Karine; Rouleau, Matthieu; Notte, Annick; Dieu, Marc; Michiels, Carine; Voeltzel, Thibault; Maguer-Satta, Véronique; Pelletier, Joffrey; Ilie, Marius; Hofman, Paul; Manoury, Bénédicte; Schmidt, Alexander; Hiller, Sebastian; Pouysségur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie M

    2015-05-01

    The oxygen-limiting (hypoxic) microenvironment of tumors induces metabolic reprogramming and cell survival, but the underlying mechanisms involving mitochondria remain poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mediates the hyperfusion of mitochondria by inducing Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa interacting protein 3 and posttranslational truncation of the mitochondrial ATP transporter outer membrane voltage-dependent anion channel 1 in hypoxic cells. In addition, we showed that truncation is associated with increased resistance to drug-induced apoptosis and is indicative of increased patient chemoresistance. We now show that silencing of the tumor suppressor TP53 decreases truncation and increases drug-induced apoptosis. We also show that TP53 regulates truncation through induction of the mitochondrial protein Mieap. While we found that truncation was independent of mitophagy, we observed local microfusion between mitochondria and endolysosomes in hypoxic cells in culture and in patients' tumor tissues. Since we found that the endolysosomal asparagine endopeptidase was responsible for truncation, we propose that it is a readout of mitochondrial-endolysosomal microfusion in hypoxia. These novel findings provide the framework for a better understanding of hypoxic cell metabolism and cell survival through mitochondrial-endolysosomal microfusion regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and TP53.

  15. Spexin Enhances Bowel Movement through Activating L-type Voltage-dependent Calcium Channel via Galanin Receptor 2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-yuan; Zhang, Man; Huang, Tao; Yang, Li-ling; Fu, Hai-bo; Zhao, Ling; Zhong, Linda LD; Mu, Huai-xue; Shi, Xiao-ke; Leung, Christina FP; Fan, Bao-min; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Ai-ping; Zhu, Li-xin; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel neuropeptide spexin was found to be broadly expressed in various endocrine and nervous tissues while little is known about its functions. This study investigated the role of spexin in bowel movement and the underlying mechanisms. In functional constipation (FC) patients, serum spexin levels were significantly decreased. Consistently, in starved mice, the mRNA of spexin was significantly decreased in intestine and colon. Spexin injection increased the velocity of carbon powder propulsion in small intestine and decreased the glass beads expulsion time in distal colon in mice. Further, spexin dose-dependently stimulated the intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction. Galanin receptor 2 (GALR2) antagonist M871, but not Galanin receptor 3 (GALR3) antagonist SNAP37899, effectively suppressed the stimulatory effects of spexin on intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction, which could be eliminated by extracellular [Ca2+] removal and L-type voltage-dependentCa2+ channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine. Besides, spexin dramatically increased the [Ca2+]i in isolated colonic smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that spexin can act on GALR2 receptor to regulate bowel motility by activating L-type VDCC. Our findings provide evidence for important physiological roles of spexin in GI functions. Selective action on spexin pathway might have therapeutic effects on GI diseases with motility disorders. PMID:26160593

  16. Voltage-dependent motion of the catalytic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase monitored by a fluorescent amino acid

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Souhei; Jinno, Yuka; Kawanabe, Akira; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) derives the voltage dependence of its catalytic activity from coupling to a voltage sensor homologous to that of voltage-gated ion channels. To assess the conformational changes in the cytoplasmic region upon activation of the voltage sensor, we genetically incorporated a fluorescent unnatural amino acid, 3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap), into the catalytic region of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). Measurements of Anap fluorescence under voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the catalytic region assumes distinct conformations dependent on the degree of voltage-sensor activation. FRET analysis showed that the catalytic region remains situated beneath the plasma membrane, irrespective of the voltage level. Moreover, Anap fluorescence from a membrane-facing loop in the C2 domain showed a pattern reflecting substrate turnover. These results indicate that the voltage sensor regulates Ci-VSP catalytic activity by causing conformational changes in the entire catalytic region, without changing their distance from the plasma membrane. PMID:27330112

  17. Toward First Principles Prediction of Voltage Dependences of Electrolyte/Electrolyte Interfacial Processes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Tenney, Craig M.

    2013-11-21

    In lithium ion batteries, Li+ intercalation into electrodes is induced by applied voltages, which are in turn associated with free energy changes of Li+ transfer (ΔGt) between the solid and liquid phases. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and thermodynamic integration techniques, we compute ΔGt for the virtual transfer of a Li+ from a LiC6 anode slab, with pristine basal planes exposed, to liquid ethylene carbonate confined in a nanogap. The onset of delithiation, at ΔGt = 0, is found to occur on LiC6 anodes with negatively charged basal surfaces. These negative surface charges are evidently needed to retain Li+ inside the electrode and should affect passivation (“SEI”) film formation processes. Fast electrolyte decomposition is observed at even larger electron surface densities. By assigning the experimentally known voltage (0.1 V vs Li+/Li metal) to the predicted delithiation onset, an absolute potential scale is obtained. This enables voltage calibrations in simulation cells used in AIMD studies and paves the way for future prediction of voltage dependences in interfacial processes in batteries.

  18. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor dapoxetine inhibits voltage-dependent K(+) channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sol; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Hye Won; Shin, Sung Eun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Han, Eun-Taek; Hong, Seok-Ho; Firth, Amy L; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Won Sun

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effect of dapoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels using native smooth muscle cells from rabbit coronary arteries. Dapoxetine inhibited Kv channel currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 2.68±0.94 μmol/L and a slope value (Hill coefficient) of 0.63±0.11. Application of 10 μmol/L dapoxetine accelerated the rate of inactivation of Kv currents. Although dapoxetine did not modify current activation kinetics, it caused a significant negative shift in the inactivation curves. Application of train step (1 or 2 Hz) progressively increased the inhibitory effect of dapoxetine on Kv channels. In addition, the recovery time constant was extended in its presence, suggesting that the longer recovery time constant from inactivation underlies a use-dependent inhibition of the channel. From these results, we conclude that dapoxetine inhibits Kv channels in a dose-, time-, use-, and state (open)-dependent manner, independent of serotonin reuptake inhibition.

  19. Voltage-dependent potassium currents during fast spikes of rat cerebellar Purkinje neurons: inhibition by BDS-I toxin.

    PubMed

    Martina, Marco; Metz, Alexia E; Bean, Bruce P

    2007-01-01

    We characterized the kinetics and pharmacological properties of voltage-activated potassium currents in rat cerebellar Purkinje neurons using recordings from nucleated patches, which allowed high resolution of activation and deactivation kinetics. Activation was exceptionally rapid, with 10-90% activation in about 400 mus at +30 mV, near the peak of the spike. Deactivation was also extremely rapid, with a decay time constant of about 300 mus near -80 mV. These rapid activation and deactivation kinetics are consistent with mediation by Kv3-family channels but are even faster than reported for Kv3-family channels in other neurons. The peptide toxin BDS-I had very little blocking effect on potassium currents elicited by 100-ms depolarizing steps, but the potassium current evoked by action potential waveforms was inhibited nearly completely. The mechanism of inhibition by BDS-I involves slowing of activation rather than total channel block, consistent with the effects described in cloned Kv3-family channels and this explains the dramatically different effects on currents evoked by short spikes versus voltage steps. As predicted from this mechanism, the effects of toxin on spike width were relatively modest (broadening by roughly 25%). These results show that BDS-I-sensitive channels with ultrafast activation and deactivation kinetics carry virtually all of the voltage-dependent potassium current underlying repolarization during normal Purkinje cell spikes.

  20. Regulation by second messengers of the slowly activating, voltage-dependent potassium current expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Busch, A E; Kavanaugh, M P; Varnum, M D; Adelman, J P; North, R A

    1992-01-01

    1. Voltage-clamp recordings of membrane current were made from Xenopus oocytes that had been injected with RNA which had been transcribed in vitro from a cloned complementary DNA. 2. Depolarization from -80 mV evoked outward potassium currents that developed very slowly. At -20 mV the time constant for activation was about 50 s, and at +40 mV about 6 s. 3. The potassium current was increased by the calcium ionophore A23187 or by intracellular injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), each of which should increase the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). The current was decreased by injection of BAPTA (1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid). The current was also reduced by phorbol esters; this effect was blocked by staurosporine. 4. In oocytes that had also been injected with RNA encoding the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT2) receptor, 5-HT increased the potassium current. After caffeine pretreatment, to block the release of intracellular calcium, 5-HT decreased the current; this decrease was prevented by staurosporine. 5. It is concluded that the slowly activating, voltage-dependent potassium current expressed in Xenopus oocytes is increased by increases in [Ca2+]i and is decreased by activation of protein kinase C. Stimulation of 5-HT2 receptors can have both these effects, but the former normally predominates. Images Fig. 4 PMID:1432714

  1. ClC-3 is an intracellular chloride/proton exchanger with large voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Raul E; Grieschat, Matthias; Fahlke, Christoph; Alekov, Alexi K

    2013-06-19

    The chloride/proton exchangers ClC-3, ClC-4 and ClC-5 are localized in distinct intracellular compartments and regulate their luminal acidity. We used electrophysiology combined with fluorescence pH measurements to compare the functions of these three transporters. Since the expression of WT ClC-3 in the surface membrane was negligible, we removed an N-terminal retention signal for standard electrophysiological characterization of this isoform. This construct (ClC-313-19A) mediated outwardly rectifying coupled Cl(-)/H(+) antiport resembling the properties of ClC-4 and ClC-5. In addition, ClC-3 exhibited large electric capacitance, exceeding the nonlinear capacitances of ClC-4 and ClC-5. Mutations of the proton glutamate, a conserved residue at the internal side of the protein, decreased ion transport but increased nonlinear capacitances in all three isoforms. This suggests that nonlinear capacitances in mammalian ClC transporters are regulated in a similar manner. However, the voltage dependence and the amplitudes of these capacitances differed strongly between the investigated isoforms. Our results indicate that ClC-3 is specialized in mainly performing incomplete capacitive nontransporting cycles, that ClC-4 is an effective coupled transporter, and that ClC-5 displays an intermediate phenotype. Mathematical modeling showed that such functional differences would allow differential regulation of luminal acidification and chloride concentration in intracellular compartments.

  2. Propagation in the transverse tubular system and voltage dependence of calcium release in normal and mdx mouse muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Christopher E; Novo, David; DiFranco, Marino; Capote, Joana; Vergara, Julio L

    2005-01-01

    Using a two-microelectrode voltage clamp technique, we investigated possible mechanisms underlying the impaired excitation–contraction coupling in skeletal muscle fibres of the mdx mouse, a model of the human disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We evaluated the role of the transverse tubular system (T-system) by using the potentiometric indicator di-8 ANEPPS, and that of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release by measuring Ca2+ transients with a low affinity indicator in the presence of high EGTA concentrations under voltage clamp conditions. We observed minimal differences in the T-system structure and the T-system electrical propagation was not different between normal and mdx mice. Whereas the maximum Ca2+ release elicited by voltage pulses was reduced by ∼67% in mdx fibres, in agreement with previous results obtained using AP stimulation, the voltage dependence of SR Ca2+ release was identical to that seen in normal fibres. Taken together, our data suggest that the intrinsic ability of the sarcoplasmic reticulum to release Ca2+ may be altered in the mdx mouse. PMID:16123111

  3. Characterization of Oyster Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 2 (VDAC2) Suggests Its Involvement in Apoptosis and Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxiang; Zhang, Linlin; Qu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomic studies have revealed a sophisticated and powerful apoptosis regulation network in oyster, highlighting its adaptation to sessile life in a highly stressful intertidal environment. However, the functional molecular basis of apoptosis remains largely unexplored in oysters. In this study, we focused on a representative apoptotic gene encoding voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2), a porin that abounds at the mitochondrial outer membrane. This is the first report on the identification and characterization of a VDAC gene in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (CgVDAC2). The full length of CgVDAC2 was 1,738 bp with an open reading frame of 843 bp that encoded a protein of 281 amino acids. A four-element eukaryotic porin signature motif, a conserved ATP binding motif, and a VKAKV-like sequence were identified in the predicted CgVDAC2. Expression pattern analysis in different tissues and developmental stages as well as upon infection by ostreid herpesvirus 1 revealed the energy supply-related and immunity-related expression of CgVDAC2. CgVDAC2 was co-localized with mitochondria when it was transiently transfected into HeLa cells. Overexpression of CgVDAC2 in HEK293T cells suppressed the UV irradiation-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the pro-apoptotic function of CgBak. RNA interference induced reduction in CgVDAC2 expression showed a promoted apoptosis level upon UV light irradiation in hemocytes. The yeast two-hybrid system and co-immunoprecipitation assay indicated a direct interaction between CgVDAC2 and the pro-apoptotic protein CgBak. This study revealed the function of VDAC2 in oyster and provided new insights into its involvement in apoptosis modulation and host defense in mollusks.

  4. Adenosine inhibits voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx in cone photoreceptor terminals of the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Stella, Salvatore L; Hu, Wanda D; Vila, Alejandro; Brecha, Nicholas C

    2007-04-01

    Endogenous adenosine has already been shown to inhibit transmitter release from the rod synapse by suppressing Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. However, it is not clear how adenosine modulates the cone synapse. Cone photoreceptors, like rod photoreceptors, also possess L-type Ca(2+) channels that regulate the release of L-glutamate. To assess the impact of adenosine on Ca(2+) influx though voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in cone terminals, whole-cell perforated-patch clamp recording and Ca(2+) imaging with fluo-4 were used on isolated cones and salamander retinal slices. Synaptic markers (VAMP and piccolo) and activity-dependent dye labeling revealed that tiger salamander cone terminals contain a broad, vesicle-filled cytoplasmic extension at the base of the somatic compartment, which is unlike rod terminals that contain one or more thin axons, each terminating in a large bulbous synaptic terminal. The spatiotemporal Ca(2+) responses of the cone terminals do not differ significantly from the Ca(2+) responses of the soma or inner segment like that observed in rods. Whole-cell recording of cone I(Ca) and Ca(2+) imaging of synaptic terminals in cones demonstrate that adenosine inhibited both I(Ca) and the depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) increase in cone terminals in a dose-dependent manner from 1 to 50 muM. These results indicate that, as in rods, adenosine's ability to suppress voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels at the cone synapse will limit the amount of L-glutamate released. Therefore, adenosine has an inhibitory effect on L-glutamate release at the first synapse, which likely favors elevated adenosine levels in the dark or during dark-adapted conditions.

  5. Voltage-dependent modulation of single N-Type Ca2+ channel kinetics by receptor agonists in IMR32 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Carabelli, V; Lovallo, M; Magnelli, V; Zucker, H; Carbone, E

    1996-01-01

    The voltage-dependent inhibition of single N-type Ca(2+) channels by noradrenaline (NA) and the delta-opioid agonist D-Pen(2)-D-Pen (5)-enkephalin (DPDPE) was investigated in cell-attached patches of human neuroblastoma IMR32 cells with 100 mM Ba(2+) and 5 microM nifedipine to block L-type channels. In 70% of patches, addition of 20 microM NA + 1 microM DPDPE delayed markedly the first channel openings, causing a four- to fivefold increase of the first latency at +20 mV. The two agonists or NA alone decreased also by 35% the open probability (P(o)), prolonged partially the mean closed time, and increased the number of null sweeps. In contrast, NA + DPDPE had little action on the single-channel conductance (19 versus 19.2 pS) and minor effects on the mean open time. Similarly to macroscopic Ba(2+) currents, the ensemble currents were fast activating at control but slowly activating and depressed with the two agonists. Inhibition of single N-type channels was effectively removed (facilitated) by short and large depolarizations. Facilitatory pre-pulses increased P(o) significantly and decreased fourfold the first latency. Ensemble currents were small and slowly activating before pre-pulses and became threefold larger and fast decaying after facilitation. Our data suggest that slowdown of Ca(2+) channel activation by transmitters is mostly due to delayed transitions from a modified to a normal (facilitated) gating mode. This single-channel gating modulation could be well simulated by a Monte Carlo method using previously proposed kinetic models predicting marked prolongation of first channel openings. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 PMID:9172738

  6. Characterization of Oyster Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 2 (VDAC2) Suggests Its Involvement in Apoptosis and Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingxiang; Zhang, Linlin; Qu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomic studies have revealed a sophisticated and powerful apoptosis regulation network in oyster, highlighting its adaptation to sessile life in a highly stressful intertidal environment. However, the functional molecular basis of apoptosis remains largely unexplored in oysters. In this study, we focused on a representative apoptotic gene encoding voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2), a porin that abounds at the mitochondrial outer membrane. This is the first report on the identification and characterization of a VDAC gene in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (CgVDAC2). The full length of CgVDAC2 was 1,738 bp with an open reading frame of 843 bp that encoded a protein of 281 amino acids. A four-element eukaryotic porin signature motif, a conserved ATP binding motif, and a VKAKV-like sequence were identified in the predicted CgVDAC2. Expression pattern analysis in different tissues and developmental stages as well as upon infection by ostreid herpesvirus 1 revealed the energy supply-related and immunity-related expression of CgVDAC2. CgVDAC2 was co-localized with mitochondria when it was transiently transfected into HeLa cells. Overexpression of CgVDAC2 in HEK293T cells suppressed the UV irradiation-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the pro-apoptotic function of CgBak. RNA interference induced reduction in CgVDAC2 expression showed a promoted apoptosis level upon UV light irradiation in hemocytes. The yeast two-hybrid system and co-immunoprecipitation assay indicated a direct interaction between CgVDAC2 and the pro-apoptotic protein CgBak. This study revealed the function of VDAC2 in oyster and provided new insights into its involvement in apoptosis modulation and host defense in mollusks. PMID:26727366

  7. Biophysical and Pharmacological Characterization of Nav1.9 Voltage Dependent Sodium Channels Stably Expressed in HEK-293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Sonia; Padilla, Karen; Printzenhoff, David; Castle, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    The voltage dependent sodium channel Nav1.9, is expressed preferentially in peripheral sensory neurons and has been linked to human genetic pain disorders, which makes it target of interest for the development of new pain therapeutics. However, characterization of Nav1.9 pharmacology has been limited due in part to the historical difficulty of functionally expressing recombinant channels. Here we report the successful generation and characterization of human, mouse and rat Nav1.9 stably expressed in human HEK-293 cells. These cells exhibit slowly activating and inactivating inward sodium channel currents that have characteristics of native Nav1.9. Optimal functional expression was achieved by coexpression of Nav1.9 with β1/β2 subunits. While recombinantly expressed Nav1.9 was found to be sensitive to sodium channel inhibitors TC-N 1752 and tetracaine, potency was up to 100-fold less than reported for other Nav channel subtypes despite evidence to support an interaction with the canonical local anesthetic (LA) binding region on Domain 4 S6. Nav1.9 Domain 2 S6 pore domain contains a unique lysine residue (K799) which is predicted to be spatially near the local anesthetic interaction site. Mutation of this residue to the consensus asparagine (K799N) resulted in an increase in potency for tetracaine, but a decrease for TC-N 1752, suggesting that this residue can influence interaction of inhibitors with the Nav1.9 pore. In summary, we have shown that stable functional expression of Nav1.9 in the widely used HEK-293 cells is possible, which opens up opportunities to better understand channel properties and may potentially aid identification of novel Nav1.9 based pharmacotherapies. PMID:27556810

  8. Expression Profiling of Mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel-1 Associated Genes Predicts Recurrence-Free Survival in Human Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Inja; Zhou, Tong; Bang, Hyoweon

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) play a key role in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Both in vivo and in vitro evidences indicate that VDACs are actively involved in tumor progression. Specifically, VDAC-1, one member of the VDAC family, was thought to be a potential anti-cancer therapeutic target. Our previous study demonstrated that the human gene VDAC1 (encoding the VDAC-1 isoform) was significantly up-regulated in lung tumor tissue compared with normal tissue. Also, we found a significant positive correlation between the gene expression of VDAC1 and histological grade in breast cancer. However, the prognostic power of VDAC1 and its associated genes in human cancers is largely unknown. Methods We systematically analyzed the expression pattern of VDAC1 and its interacting genes in breast, colon, liver, lung, pancreatic, and thyroid cancers. The genes differentially expressed between normal and tumor tissues in human carcinomas were identified. Results The expression level of VDAC1 was uniformly up-regulated in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue in breast, colon, liver, lung, pancreatic, and thyroid cancers. Forty-four VDAC1 interacting genes were identified as being commonly differentially expressed between normal and tumor tissues in human carcinomas. We designated VDAC1 and the 44 dysregulated interacting genes as the VDAC1 associated gene signature (VAG). We demonstrate that the VAG signature is a robust prognostic biomarker to predict recurrence-free survival in breast, colon, and lung cancers, and is independent of standard clinical and pathological prognostic factors. Conclusions VAG represents a promising prognostic biomarker in human cancers, which may enhance prediction accuracy in identifying patients at higher risk for recurrence. Future therapies aimed specifically at VDAC1 associated genes may lead to novel agents in the treatment of cancer. PMID:25333947

  9. Mild Alkalization Acutely Triggers the Warburg Effect by Enhancing Hexokinase Activity via Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Won; Moon, Seung Hwan; Cho, Young Seok; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2016-01-01

    To fully understand the glycolytic behavior of cancer cells, it is important to recognize how it is linked to pH dynamics. Here, we evaluated the acute effects of mild acidification and alkalization on cancer cell glucose uptake and glycolytic flux and investigated the role of hexokinase (HK). Cancer cells exposed to buffers with graded pH were measured for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake, lactate production and HK activity. Subcellular localization of HK protein was assessed by western blots and confocal microscopy. The interior of T47D breast cancer cells was mildly alkalized to pH 7.5 by a buffer pH of 7.8, and this was accompanied by rapid increases of FDG uptake and lactate extrusion. This shift toward glycolytic flux led to the prompt recovery of a reversed pH gradient. In contrast, mild acidification rapidly reduced cellular FDG uptake and lactate production. Mild acidification decreased and mild alkalization increased mitochondrial HK translocation and enzyme activity. Cells transfected with specific siRNA against HK-1, HK-2 and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)1 displayed significant attenuation of pH-induced changes in FDG uptake. Confocal microscopy showed increased co-localization of HK-1 and HK-2 with VDAC1 by alkaline treatment. In isolated mitochondria, acidic pH increased and alkaline pH decreased release of free HK-1 and HK-2 from the mitochondrial pellet into the supernatant. Furthermore, experiments using purified proteins showed that alkaline pH promoted co-immunoprecipitation of HK with VDAC protein. These findings demonstrate that mild alkalization is sufficient to acutely trigger cancer cell glycolytic flux through enhanced activity of HK by promoting its mitochondrial translocation and VDAC binding. This process might serve as a mechanism through which cancer cells trigger the Warburg effect to maintain a dysregulated pH. PMID:27479079

  10. Guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) modifies kinetics of voltage-dependent calcium current in chick sensory neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, C; Robello, M

    1989-01-01

    Internal perfusion with the G-protein activator guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gamma S) mimics the effect of noradrenaline and dopamine on the voltage-dependent calcium current in chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. With 100 microM GTP-gamma S in the pipette, the current at +10 mV was depressed by approximately 50%, with a 10-fold increase of its time to peak. The activation time course of the control calcium current could be approximated with a single exponential curve, whereas with GTP-gamma S the activation time course was double exponential, with time constants tau 1 and tau 2. 2 mM Mg-ATP in the pipette prevented the GTP-gamma S-induced current decrease in 70% of the cells, but the time course of the current was always double exponential. From -50 mV, the current at +10 mV was best fitted with tau 1 = 1.7 +/- 0.5 and tau 2 = 25.6 +/- 5.5 in seven cells. Both time constants decreased with increasing depolarizations. In the first 2 min of recording, the current changed with time. However, both tau 1 and tau 2 were constant, whereas the relative contribution of the slow component increased from 10 to 70%. In addition, the effect was independent of the holding potential in the range from -100 to -30 mV. These results suggest that the activation of a G-protein causes a fraction of the high-threshold calcium channels to switch to a new closed state, with slower opening kinetics. PMID:2558735

  11. Alterations of voltage-dependent K(+) channels in the mesenteric artery during the early and chronic phases of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Da Hye; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Hye Won; Kim, Han Sol; Son, Youn Kyoung; Yang, Se-Ran; Park, Jeong-Ran; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Han, Eun-Taek; Hong, Seok-Ho; Firth, Amy L; Na, Sung Hun; Park, Won Sun

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the alteration of voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels in mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells from control (Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka [LETO]) and diabetic (Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty [OLETF]) rats during the early and chronic phases of diabetes. We demonstrated alterations in the mesenteric Kv channels during the early and chronic phase of diabetes using the patch-clamp technique, the arterial tone measurement system, and RT-PCR in Long-Evans Tokushima (LETO; for control) and Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF; for diabetes) type 2 diabetic model rats. In the early phase of diabetes, the amplitude of mesenteric Kv currents induced by depolarizing pulses was greater in OLETF rats than in LETO rats. The contractile response of the mesenteric artery induced by the Kv inhibitor, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), was also greater in OLETF rats. The expression of most Kv subtypes- including Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv1.6, Kv2.1, Kv3.2, Kv4.1, Kv4.3, Kv5.1, Kv6.2, Kv8.1, Kv9.3, and Kv10.1-were increased in mesenteric arterial smooth muscle from OLETF rats compared with LETO rats. However, in the chronic phase of diabetes, the Kv current amplitude did not differ between LETO and OLETF rats. In addition, the 4-AP-induced contractile response of the mesenteric artery and the expression of Kv subtypes did not differ between the two groups. The increased Kv current amplitude and Kv channel-related contractile response were attributable to the increase in Kv channel expression during the early phase of diabetes. The increased Kv current amplitude and Kv channel-related contractile response were reversed during the chronic phase of diabetes.

  12. In self-defence: hexokinase promotes voltage-dependent anion channel closure and prevents mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Zohar, Heftsi; Israelson, Adrian; Abu-Hamad, Salah; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2004-01-15

    In tumour cells, elevated levels of mitochondria-bound isoforms of hexokinase (HK-I and HK-II) result in the evasion of apoptosis, thereby allowing the cells to continue proliferating. The molecular mechanisms by which bound HK promotes cell survival are not yet fully understood. Our studies relying on the purified mitochondrial outer membrane protein VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel), isolated mitochondria or cells in culture suggested that the anti-apoptotic activity of HK-I occurs via modulation of the mitochondrial phase of apoptosis. In the present paper, a direct interaction of HK-I with bilayer-reconstituted purified VDAC, inducing channel closure, is demonstrated for the first time. Moreover, HK-I prevented the Ca(2+)-dependent opening of the mitochondrial PTP (permeability transition pore) and release of the pro-apoptotic protein cytochrome c. The effects of HK-I on VDAC activity and PTP opening were prevented by the HK reaction product glucose 6-phosphate, a metabolic intermediate in most biosynthetic pathways. Furthermore, glucose 6-phosphate re-opened both the VDAC and the PTP closed by HK-I. The HK-I-mediated effects on VDAC and PTP were not observed using either yeast HK or HK-I lacking the N-terminal hydrophobic peptide responsible for binding to mitochondria, or in the presence of an antibody specific for the N-terminus of HK-I. Finally, HK-I overexpression in leukaemia-derived U-937 or vascular smooth muscle cells protected against staurosporine-induced apoptosis, with a decrease of up to 70% in cell death. These results offer insight into the mechanisms by which bound HK promotes tumour cell survival, and suggests that its overexpression not only ensures supplies of energy and phosphometabolites, but also reflects an anti-apoptotic defence mechanism.

  13. The different meanings of the nomen Amphibia: a correction.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Alain

    2015-07-17

    I recently published a survey of the different meanings of the nomen Amphibia in taxonomic publications since 1758 (Dubois 2015). The 'meaning' of a nomen in zoological nomenclature depends on the system used for the allocation of nomina to taxa, and several such systems can be used (see e.g. Dubois 2006a-b). In the paper at stake, I used the 'orostensional nomenclatural system' (OONS) for class-series nomenclature. In this system, a class-series nomen-i.e., a nomen above the rank superfamily, therefore one whose taxonomic allocation is not regulated by the Code (Anonymous 1999)-applies, in a given classification, to the most inclusive class-series taxon that includes all its originally expressly included nominal genera (conucleogenera) and excludes all its originally expressly excluded nominal genera (alienogenera)-if such a taxon indeed exists in this classification. However, if one a least of the alienogenera is now part of the most inclusive taxon including all the conucleogenera, the nomen cannot be taxonomically allocated and qualifies as an anaptonym in the classification used as reference (Dubois 2006a-b, 2011), although it may not be so under another taxonomic frame.

  14. Mitochondrial evidence on the phylogenetic position of caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed Central

    Zardoya, R; Meyer, A

    2000-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence (17,005 bp) of the mitochondrial genome of the caecilian Typhlonectes natans (Gymnophiona, Amphibia) was determined. This molecule is characterized by two distinctive genomic features: there are seven large 109-bp tandem repeats in the control region, and the sequence for the putative origin of replication of the L strand can potentially fold into two alternative secondary structures (one including part of the tRNA(Cys)). The new sequence data were used to assess the phylogenetic position of caecilians and to gain insights into the origin of living amphibians (frogs, salamanders, and caecilians). Phylogenetic analyses of two data sets-one combining protein-coding genes and the other combining tRNA genes-strongly supported a caecilian + frog clade and, hence, monophyly of modern amphibians. These two data sets could not further resolve relationships among the coelacanth, lungfishes, and tetrapods, but strongly supported diapsid affinities of turtles. Phylogenetic relationships among a larger set of species of frogs, salamanders, and caecilians were estimated with a mitochondrial rRNA data set. Maximum parsimony analysis of this latter data set also recovered monophyly of living amphibians and favored a frog + salamander (Batrachia) relationship. However, bootstrap support was only moderate at these nodes. This is likely due to an extensive among-site rate heterogeneity in the rRNA data set and the narrow window of time in which the three main groups of living amphibians were originated. PMID:10835397

  15. Mitochondrial evidence on the phylogenetic position of caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Zardoya, R; Meyer, A

    2000-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence (17,005 bp) of the mitochondrial genome of the caecilian Typhlonectes natans (Gymnophiona, Amphibia) was determined. This molecule is characterized by two distinctive genomic features: there are seven large 109-bp tandem repeats in the control region, and the sequence for the putative origin of replication of the L strand can potentially fold into two alternative secondary structures (one including part of the tRNA(Cys)). The new sequence data were used to assess the phylogenetic position of caecilians and to gain insights into the origin of living amphibians (frogs, salamanders, and caecilians). Phylogenetic analyses of two data sets-one combining protein-coding genes and the other combining tRNA genes-strongly supported a caecilian + frog clade and, hence, monophyly of modern amphibians. These two data sets could not further resolve relationships among the coelacanth, lungfishes, and tetrapods, but strongly supported diapsid affinities of turtles. Phylogenetic relationships among a larger set of species of frogs, salamanders, and caecilians were estimated with a mitochondrial rRNA data set. Maximum parsimony analysis of this latter data set also recovered monophyly of living amphibians and favored a frog + salamander (Batrachia) relationship. However, bootstrap support was only moderate at these nodes. This is likely due to an extensive among-site rate heterogeneity in the rRNA data set and the narrow window of time in which the three main groups of living amphibians were originated.

  16. Ultrastructure of the mature spermatozoa of caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Scheltinga, David M; Wilkinson, Mark; Jamieson, Barrie G M; Oommen, Oommen V

    2003-11-01

    The spermatozoa of Gymnophiona show the following autapomorphies: 1) penetration of the distal centriole by the axial fiber; 2) presence of an acrosomal baseplate; 3) presence of an acrosome seat (flattened apical end of nucleus); and 4) absence of juxta-axonemal fibers. The wide separation of the plasma membrane bounding the undulating membrane is here also considered to be apomorphic. Three plesiomorphic spermatozoal characters are recognized that are not seen in other Amphibia but occur in basal amniotes: 1) presence of mitochondria with a delicate array of concentric cristae (concentric cristae of salamander spermatozoa differ in lacking the delicate array); 2) presence of peripheral dense fibers associated with the triplets of the distal centriole; and 3) presence of a simple annulus (a highly modified, elongate annulus is present in salamander sperm). The presence of an endonuclear canal containing a perforatorium is a plesiomorphic feature of caecilian spermatozoa that is shared with urodeles, some basal anurans, sarcopterygian fish, and some amniotes. Spermatozoal synapomorphies are identified for 1) the Uraeotyphlidae and Ichthyophiidae, and 2) the Caeciliidae and Typhlonectidae, suggesting that the members of each pair of families are more closely related to each other than to other caecilians. Although caecilian spermatozoa exhibit the clear amphibian synapomorphy of the unilateral location of the undulating membrane and its axial fiber, they have no apomorphic characters that suggest a closer relationship to either the Urodela or Anura.

  17. Histamine H3-receptor activation augments voltage-dependent Ca2+ current via GTP hydrolysis in rabbit saphenous artery.

    PubMed

    Oike, M; Kitamura, K; Kuriyama, H

    1992-03-01

    1. Actions of histamine on the voltage-dependent Ba2+(Ca2+) currents (IBa, ICa) were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on dispersed smooth muscle cells from the rabbit saphenous artery. 2. Histamine (half-maximal dose, EC50 = 530 nM) augmented the IBa evoked by a brief depolarizing pulse (100 ms duration; to +10 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV) in a concentration-dependent manner. The maximum augmentation was obtained with 30 microM-histamine (1.29 times control). This augmentation of IBa was inhibited by the H3-antagonist, thioperamide (Ki = 30 nM, slope of the Schild plot = 1.0), but not by H1- or H2-antagonists (mepyramine or diphenhydramine, or cimetidine, respectively). 3. An H3-agonist, R alpha-methylhistamine (EC50 = 93 nM), also augmented IBa in a concentration-dependent manner at a holding potential of -80 mV and the maximum augmentation (1.25 times control) was obtained with 10 microM. This augmentation was also inhibited by thioperamide, but not by the above H1- and H2- antagonists. 4. Intracellularly applied 500 microM-guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) enhanced, but 1 mM-guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) abolished, the histamine-induced augmentation of IBa. When one of the non-hydrolysable GTP analogues, guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S; greater than 5 microM), guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP; 200 microM) or guanylyl (beta, gamma-methylene)-diphosphonate (GMP-PCP; 1 mM) was intracellularly applied, the IBa amplitude evoked without the application of histamine was not affected, but the excitatory effect of histamine on IBa was reversed to an inhibition. Pre-treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX: 300 ng/ml and 3 micrograms/ml) did not modify the histamine-induced responses in the absence or presence of GTP gamma S. 5. 4 beta-Phorbol 12,13-dibutylate (PDBu) increased the amplitude of IBa. However, this action of PDBu was not enhanced by the application of GTP (500 microM) in the pipette, but

  18. Voltage-dependent block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel by two closely related arylaminobenzoates.

    PubMed

    McCarty, N A; McDonough, S; Cohen, B N; Riordan, J R; Davidson, N; Lester, H A

    1993-07-01

    The gene defective in cystic fibrosis encodes a Cl- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR is blocked by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC) when applied extracellularly at millimolar concentrations. We studied the block of CFTR expressed in Xenopus oocytes by DPC or by a closely related molecule, flufenamic acid (FFA). Block of whole-cell CFTR currents by bath-applied DPC or by FFA, both at 200 microM, requires several minutes to reach full effect. Blockade is voltage dependent, suggesting open-channel block: currents at positive potentials are not affected but currents at negative potentials are reduced. The binding site for both drugs senses approximately 40% of the electric field across the membrane, measured from the inside. In single-channel recordings from excised patches without blockers, the conductance was 8.0 +/- 0.4 pS in symmetric 150 mM Cl-. A subconductance state, measuring approximately 60% of the main conductance, was often observed. Bursts to the full open state lasting up to tens of seconds were uninterrupted at depolarizing membrane voltages. At hyperpolarizing voltages, bursts were interrupted by brief closures. Either DPC or FFA (50 microM) applied to the cytoplasmic or extracellular face of the channel led to an increase in flicker at Vm = -100 mV and not at Vm = +100 mV, in agreement with whole-cell experiments. DPC induced a higher frequency of flickers from the cytoplasmic side than the extracellular side. FFA produced longer closures than DPC; the FFA closed time was roughly equal (approximately 1.2 ms) at -100 mV with application from either side. In cell-attached patch recordings with DPC or FFA applied to the bath, there was flickery block at Vm = -100 mV, confirming that the drugs permeate through the membrane to reach the binding site. The data are consistent with the presence of a single binding site for both drugs, reached from either end of the channel. Open-channel block by DPC or FFA may

  19. Voltage-dependent block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel by two closely related arylaminobenzoates

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The gene defective in cystic fibrosis encodes a Cl- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR is blocked by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC) when applied extracellularly at millimolar concentrations. We studied the block of CFTR expressed in Xenopus oocytes by DPC or by a closely related molecule, flufenamic acid (FFA). Block of whole-cell CFTR currents by bath-applied DPC or by FFA, both at 200 microM, requires several minutes to reach full effect. Blockade is voltage dependent, suggesting open-channel block: currents at positive potentials are not affected but currents at negative potentials are reduced. The binding site for both drugs senses approximately 40% of the electric field across the membrane, measured from the inside. In single-channel recordings from excised patches without blockers, the conductance was 8.0 +/- 0.4 pS in symmetric 150 mM Cl-. A subconductance state, measuring approximately 60% of the main conductance, was often observed. Bursts to the full open state lasting up to tens of seconds were uninterrupted at depolarizing membrane voltages. At hyperpolarizing voltages, bursts were interrupted by brief closures. Either DPC or FFA (50 microM) applied to the cytoplasmic or extracellular face of the channel led to an increase in flicker at Vm = -100 mV and not at Vm = +100 mV, in agreement with whole-cell experiments. DPC induced a higher frequency of flickers from the cytoplasmic side than the extracellular side. FFA produced longer closures than DPC; the FFA closed time was roughly equal (approximately 1.2 ms) at -100 mV with application from either side. In cell-attached patch recordings with DPC or FFA applied to the bath, there was flickery block at Vm = -100 mV, confirming that the drugs permeate through the membrane to reach the binding site. The data are consistent with the presence of a single binding site for both drugs, reached from either end of the channel. Open-channel block by DPC or FFA may

  20. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements for determining voltage-dependent charge-separation efficiencies of subcells in triple-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tex, David M.; Ihara, Toshiyuki; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Imaizumi, Mitsuru

    2015-01-05

    Conventional external quantum-efficiency measurement of solar cells provides charge-collection efficiency for approximate short-circuit conditions. Because this differs from actual operating voltages, the optimization of high-quality tandem solar cells is especially complicated. Here, we propose a contactless method, which allows for the determination of the voltage dependence of charge-collection efficiency for each subcell independently. By investigating the power dependence of photoluminescence decays, charge-separation and recombination-loss time constants are obtained. The upper limit of the charge-collection efficiencies at the operating points is then obtained by applying the uniform field model. This technique may complement electrical characterization of the voltage dependence of charge collection, since subcells are directly accessible.

  1. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements for determining voltage-dependent charge-separation efficiencies of subcells in triple-junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tex, David M.; Ihara, Toshiyuki; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Conventional external quantum-efficiency measurement of solar cells provides charge-collection efficiency for approximate short-circuit conditions. Because this differs from actual operating voltages, the optimization of high-quality tandem solar cells is especially complicated. Here, we propose a contactless method, which allows for the determination of the voltage dependence of charge-collection efficiency for each subcell independently. By investigating the power dependence of photoluminescence decays, charge-separation and recombination-loss time constants are obtained. The upper limit of the charge-collection efficiencies at the operating points is then obtained by applying the uniform field model. This technique may complement electrical characterization of the voltage dependence of charge collection, since subcells are directly accessible.

  2. [Rhythmic bioelectrical activity of the cerebral cortex analyzed with allowance for the nonlinear voltage dependence of excitatory postsynaptic potentials induced by neocortical neurons].

    PubMed

    Bakharev, B V

    2008-01-01

    A nonlinear voltage dependence between the membrane and excitatory postsynaptic potentials coming via corticocortical connections was derived based on literature data. The existence of a region of stability of oscillations with increasing mean value of nonspecific afferent input was shown. As the afferent input strongly increases, a high-frequency component of oscillations (40-60 Hz), appeas which may result in the instability of oscillations and initiation of abnormal brain activity.

  3. Transcriptional upregulation of α2δ-1 elevates arterial smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel surface expression and cerebrovascular constriction in genetic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bannister, John P; Bulley, Simon; Narayanan, Damodaran; Thomas-Gatewood, Candice; Luzny, Patrik; Pachuau, Judith; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2012-10-01

    A hallmark of hypertension is an increase in arterial myocyte voltage-dependent Ca2+ (CaV1.2) currents that induces pathological vasoconstriction. CaV1.2 channels are heteromeric complexes composed of a pore-forming CaV1.2α1 with auxiliary α2δ and β subunits. Molecular mechanisms that elevate CaV1.2 currents during hypertension and the potential contribution of CaV1.2 auxiliary subunits are unclear. Here, we investigated the pathological significance of α2δ subunits in vasoconstriction associated with hypertension. Age-dependent development of hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats was associated with an unequal elevation in α2δ-1 and CaV1.2α1 mRNA and protein in cerebral artery myocytes, with α2δ-1 increasing more than CaV1.2α1. Other α2δ isoforms did not emerge in hypertension. Myocytes and arteries of hypertensive spontaneously hypertensive rats displayed higher surface-localized α2δ-1 and CaV1.2α1 proteins, surface α2δ-1:CaV1.2α1 ratio, CaV1.2 current density and noninactivating current, and pressure- and depolarization-induced vasoconstriction than those of Wistar-Kyoto controls. Pregabalin, an α2δ-1 ligand, did not alter α2δ-1 or CaV1.2α1 total protein but normalized α2δ-1 and CaV1.2α1 surface expression, surface α2δ-1:CaV1.2α1, CaV1.2 current density and inactivation, and vasoconstriction in myocytes and arteries of hypertensive rats to control levels. Genetic hypertension is associated with an elevation in α2δ-1 expression that promotes surface trafficking of CaV1.2 channels in cerebral artery myocytes. This leads to an increase in CaV1.2 current-density and a reduction in current inactivation that induces vasoconstriction. Data also suggest that α2δ-1 targeting is a novel strategy that may be used to reverse pathological CaV1.2 channel trafficking to induce cerebrovascular dilation in hypertension.

  4. Voltage-dependent regulation of CaV2.2 channels by Gq-coupled receptor is facilitated by membrane-localized β subunit.

    PubMed

    Keum, Dongil; Baek, Christina; Kim, Dong-Il; Kweon, Hae-Jin; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2014-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal through molecular messengers, such as Gβγ, Ca(2+), and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), to modulate N-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV2.2) channels, playing a crucial role in regulating synaptic transmission. However, the cellular pathways through which GqPCRs inhibit CaV2.2 channel current are not completely understood. Here, we report that the location of CaV β subunits is key to determining the voltage dependence of CaV2.2 channel modulation by GqPCRs. Application of the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-M to tsA-201 cells expressing M1 receptors, together with CaV N-type α1B, α2δ1, and membrane-localized β2a subunits, shifted the current-voltage relationship for CaV2.2 activation 5 mV to the right and slowed current activation. Muscarinic suppression of CaV2.2 activity was relieved by strong depolarizing prepulses. Moreover, when the C terminus of β-adrenergic receptor kinase (which binds Gβγ) was coexpressed with N-type channels, inhibition of CaV2.2 current after M1 receptor activation was markedly reduced and delayed, whereas the delay between PIP2 hydrolysis and inhibition of CaV2.2 current was decreased. When the Gβγ-insensitive CaV2.2 α1C-1B chimera was expressed, voltage-dependent inhibition of calcium current was virtually abolished, suggesting that M1 receptors act through Gβγ to inhibit CaV2.2 channels bearing membrane-localized CaV β2a subunits. Expression of cytosolic β subunits such as β2b and β3, as well as the palmitoylation-negative mutant β2a(C3,4S), reduced the voltage dependence of M1 muscarinic inhibition of CaV2.2 channels, whereas it increased inhibition mediated by PIP2 depletion. Together, our results indicate that, with membrane-localized CaV β subunits, CaV2.2 channels are subject to Gβγ-mediated voltage-dependent inhibition, whereas cytosol-localized β subunits confer more effective PIP2-mediated voltage-independent regulation. Thus, the voltage dependence of

  5. [Helminth fauna of amphibians (Vertebrata: Amphibia) in the Republic of Belarus].

    PubMed

    Shimalov, V V

    2009-01-01

    Historical review of the investigations of helminth fauna in amphibians from Belarus is presented. In 12 amphibian species examined by different authors 46 helminth species were found, including 29 Trematoda, 13 Nematoda, 1 Monogenea, 2 Cestoda, and 1 Acanthocephala. Original data on helminths parasitizing Amphibia in Byelorussian Polesie, by the results of long-term investigations in 1986-2004 are given. Distribution of 40 helminth species by hosts and respective infestation rates are reported.

  6. Species-specificity of amphibia carbohydrate chains: the Bufo viridis case study.

    PubMed

    Coppin, Alexandra; Maes, Emmanuel; Strecker, Gérard

    2002-02-05

    The jelly coat surrounding the eggs of amphibia is composed of oviducal mucins and plays an important role in the fertilization process. From a structural and chemical point of view, these jellies are very different from one species to another. Bufo viridis is the 13th amphibia species studied in term of carbohydrate structural analysis. The oligosaccharides have been released from the oviducal mucins by reductive beta elimination, purified by various chromatography procedures and analyzed by (1)H and (13)C 1D-2D NMR spectroscopy. Among the 15 compounds, ten have novel structures, although they possess some well-known structural patterns as blood group epitopes (Le(x), Le(y)) or other sequences already observed in other amphibia species. These results reinforce our hypothesis about the strict species-specificity of these carbohydrate chains. It must be noted that such species-specificity does not depend on one particular monosaccharide but it is rather due to a set of particular tri- or tetrasaccharide sequences. Hence, B. viridis species could be characterized by the simultaneous presence of a 2,3,6-trisubstituted galactosyl residue, the GlcNAc(beta 1-3)[Fuc(alpha 1-4)]GlcNAc beta sequence and the Le(x), Le(y) or Cad determinants. The anionic charge of the oligosaccharides is carried only by sialic acid alpha-(2-->6)-linked to GalNAc-ol residue as in Bufo bufo or in Bufo arenarum.

  7. Rab3 interacting molecule 3 mutations associated with autism alter regulation of voltage-dependent Ca²⁺ channels.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yoshinori; Hirano, Mitsuru; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Ueda, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Kazuma; Nakahara, Keiko; Mori, Masayuki X; Mori, Yasuo

    2015-09-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorder characterized by impaired reciprocal social interaction, disrupted communication, and restricted and stereotyped patterns of interests. Autism is known to have a strong genetic component. Although mutations in several genes account for only a small proportion of individuals with autism, they provide insight into potential biological mechanisms that underlie autism, such as dysfunction in Ca(2+) signaling, synaptic dysfunction, and abnormal brain connectivity. In autism patients, two mutations have been reported in the Rab3 interacting molecule 3 (RIM3) gene. We have previously demonstrated that RIM3 physically and functionally interacts with voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) expressed in neurons via the β subunits, and increases neurotransmitter release. Here, by introducing corresponding autism-associated mutations that replace glutamic acid residue 176 with alanine (E176A) and methionine residue 259 with valine (M259V) into the C2B domain of mouse RIM3, we demonstrate that both mutations partly cancel the suppressive RIM3 effect on voltage-dependent inactivation of Ba(2+) currents through P/Q-type CaV2.1 recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. In recombinant N-type CaV2.2 VDCCs, the attenuation of the suppressive RIM3 effect on voltage-dependent inactivation is conserved for M259V but not E176A. Slowing of activation speed of P/Q-type CaV2.1 currents by RIM3 is abolished in E176A, while the physical interaction between RIM3 and β subunits is significantly attenuated in M259V. Moreover, increases by RIM3 in depolarization-induced Ca(2+) influx and acetylcholine release are significantly attenuated by E176A in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Thus, our data raise the interesting possibility that autism phenotypes are elicited by synaptic dysfunction via altered regulation of presynaptic VDCC function and neurotransmitter release.

  8. The voltage dependence of the TMEM16B/anoctamin2 calcium-activated chloride channel is modified by mutations in the first putative intracellular loop

    PubMed Central

    Cenedese, Valentina; Betto, Giulia; Celsi, Fulvio; Cherian, O. Lijo; Pifferi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs) are involved in several physiological processes. Recently, TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 have been shown to function as CaCCs, but very little information is available on the structure–function relations of these channels. TMEM16B is expressed in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons, in microvilli of vomeronasal sensory neurons, and in the synaptic terminals of retinal photoreceptors. Here, we have performed the first site-directed mutagenesis study on TMEM16B to understand the molecular mechanisms of voltage and Ca2+ dependence. We have mutated amino acids in the first putative intracellular loop and measured the properties of the wild-type and mutant TMEM16B channels expressed in HEK 293T cells using the whole cell voltage-clamp technique in the presence of various intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. We mutated E367 into glutamine or deleted the five consecutive glutamates 386EEEEE390 and 399EYE401. The EYE deletion did not significantly modify the apparent Ca2+ dependence nor the voltage dependence of channel activation. E367Q and deletion of the five glutamates did not greatly affect the apparent Ca2+ affinity but modified the voltage dependence, shifting the conductance–voltage relations toward more positive voltages. These findings indicate that glutamates E367 and 386EEEEE390 in the first intracellular putative loop play an important role in the voltage dependence of TMEM16B, thus providing an initial structure–function study for this channel. PMID:22412191

  9. The voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ (CaV1.2) channel C-terminus fragment is a bi-modal vasodilator.

    PubMed

    Bannister, John P; Leo, Marie Dennis; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Nair, Anitha; Evanson, Kirk W; Pachuau, Judith; Gabrick, Kyle S; Boop, Frederick A; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2013-06-15

    Voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.2) are the primary Ca(2+) entry pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (myocytes). CaV1.2 channels control systemic blood pressure and organ blood flow and are pathologically altered in vascular diseases, which modifies vessel contractility. The CaV1.2 distal C-terminus is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage, which yields a truncated CaV1.2 subunit and a cleaved C-terminal fragment (CCt). Previous studies in cardiac myocytes and neurons have identified CCt as both a transcription factor and CaV1.2 channel inhibitor, with different signalling mechanisms proposed to underlie some of these effects. CCt existence and physiological functions in arterial myocytes are unclear, but important to study given the functional significance of CaV1.2 channels. Here, we show that CCt exists in myocytes of both rat and human resistance-size cerebral arteries, where it locates to both the nucleus and plasma membrane. Recombinant CCt expression in arterial myocytes inhibited CaV1.2 transcription and reduced CaV1.2 protein. CCt induced a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of both CaV1.2 current activation and inactivation, and reduced non-inactivating current in myocytes. Recombinant truncated CCt lacking a putative nuclear localization sequence (92CCt) did not locate to the nucleus and had no effect on arterial CaV1.2 transcription or protein. However, 92CCt shifted the voltage dependence of CaV1.2 activation and inactivation similarly to CCt. CCt and 92CCt both inhibited pressure- and depolarization-induced vasoconstriction, although CCt was a far more effective vasodilator. These data demonstrate that endogenous CCt exists and reduces both CaV1.2 channel expression and voltage sensitivity in arterial myocytes. Thus, CCt is a bi-modal vasodilator.

  10. ELF magnetic fields tuned to ion parametric resonance conditions do not affect TEA-sensitive voltage-dependent outward K(+) currents in a human neural cell line.

    PubMed

    Gavoçi, Entelë; Zironi, Isabella; Remondini, Daniel; Virelli, Angela; Castellani, Gastone; Del Re, Brunella; Giorgi, Gianfranco; Aicardi, Giorgio; Bersani, Ferdinando

    2013-12-01

    Despite the experimental evidence of significant biological effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MFs), the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Among the few mechanisms proposed, of particular interest is the so called "ion parametric resonance (IPR)" hypothesis, frequently referred to as theoretical support for medical applications. We studied the effect of different combinations of static (DC) and alternating (AC) ELF MFs tuned on resonance conditions for potassium (K(+)) on TEA-sensitive voltage-dependent outward K(+) currents in the human neuroblastoma BE(2)C cell line. Currents through the cell membrane were measured by whole-cell patch clamp before, during, and after exposure to MF. No significant changes in K(+) current density were found. This study does not confirm the IPR hypothesis at the level of TEA-sensitive voltage-dependent outward K(+) currents in our experimental conditions. However, this is not a direct disprove of the hypothesis, which should be investigated on other ion channels and at single channel levels also.

  11. Structural mapping of the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Distance between the tetrodotoxin and Centruroides suffusus suffusus II beta-scorpion toxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Darbon, H; Angelides, K J

    1984-05-25

    A 7- dimethylaminocoumarin -4-acetate fluorescent derivative of toxin II from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css II) has been prepared to study the structural, conformational, and cellular properties of the beta-neurotoxin receptor site on the voltage-dependent sodium channel. The derivative retains high affinity for its receptor site on the synaptosomal sodium channel with a KD of 7 nM and site capacity of 1.5 pmol/mg of synaptosomal protein. The fluorescent toxin is very environmentally sensitive and the fluorescence emission upon binding indicates that the Css II receptor is largely hydrophobic. Binding of tetrodotoxin or batrachotoxin does not alter the spectroscopic properties of bound Css II, whereas toxin V from Leiurus quinquestriatus effects a 10-nm blue shift to a more hydrophobic environment. This is the first direct indication of conformational coupling between these separate neurotoxin receptor sites. The distance between the tetrodotoxin and Css II scorpion toxin receptors on the sodium channel was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Efficiencies were measured by both donor quenching and acceptor-sensitized emission. The distance between these two neurotoxin sites is about 34 A. The implications of these receptor locations together with other known molecular distances are discussed in terms of a molecular structure of the voltage-dependent sodium channel.

  12. Unique Bell-shaped Voltage-dependent Modulation of Na+ Channel Gating by Novel Insect-selective Toxins from the Spider Agelena orientalis*

    PubMed Central

    Billen, Bert; Vassilevski, Alexander; Nikolsky, Anton; Debaveye, Sarah; Tytgat, Jan; Grishin, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    Spider venoms provide a highly valuable source of peptide toxins that act on a wide diversity of membrane-bound receptors and ion channels. In this work, we report isolation, biochemical analysis, and pharmacological characterization of a novel family of spider peptide toxins, designated β/δ-agatoxins. These toxins consist of 36–38 amino acid residues and originate from the venom of the agelenid funnel-web spider Agelena orientalis. The presented toxins show considerable amino acid sequence similarity to other known toxins such as μ-agatoxins, curtatoxins, and δ-palutoxins-IT from the related spiders Agelenopsis aperta, Hololena curta, and Paracoelotes luctuosus. β/δ-Agatoxins modulate the insect NaV channel (DmNaV1/tipE) in a unique manner, with both the activation and inactivation processes being affected. The voltage dependence of activation is shifted toward more hyperpolarized potentials (analogous to site 4 toxins) and a non-inactivating persistent Na+ current is induced (site 3-like action). Interestingly, both effects take place in a voltage-dependent manner, producing a bell-shaped curve between −80 and 0 mV, and they are absent in mammalian NaV channels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detailed report of peptide toxins with such a peculiar pharmacological behavior, clearly indicating that traditional classification of toxins according to their binding sites may not be as exclusive as previously assumed. PMID:20385552

  13. Effects of in vitro and in vivo lead exposure on voltage-dependent calcium channels in central neurons of Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G

    1987-01-01

    Currents through calcium channels of members of an identified cluster of neurons (B cells) in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis were studied under voltage clamp. The normal physiological saline was modified to maximize the visibility of voltage-dependent calcium currents and minimize contamination by other currents. Barium was used as the charge carrier for the calcium channels. Depolarizing voltage steps induce an inward current, the magnitude of which varies with the barium concentration. In brains taken from animals not exposed in vivo to lead, in vitro addition of lead acetate to the recording medium (0.25 to 14 microM) inhibits the barium current by 59 +/- 14% (mean +/- s.d.), in a manner that is independent of the lead concentration. The magnitude of the residual current still varies with the barium concentration. The voltage dependence of the current appears to be unaffected by lead. In contrast to some other calcium-channel blockers, such as cobalt, the inhibition of barium currents by in vitro lead exposure is irreversible, at least in short-term experiments. Contrary to expectations based on these in vitro results, barium currents in B cells of animals exposed to 5 microM lead for 6 to 12 weeks in vivo were approximately twice as large as barium currents in B cells from unexposed controls, when both were recorded in lead-free saline. It is possible that chronic in vivo lead exposure causes an increase in the number of calcium channels in these neurons.

  14. Unique bell-shaped voltage-dependent modulation of Na+ channel gating by novel insect-selective toxins from the spider Agelena orientalis.

    PubMed

    Billen, Bert; Vassilevski, Alexander; Nikolsky, Anton; Debaveye, Sarah; Tytgat, Jan; Grishin, Eugene

    2010-06-11

    Spider venoms provide a highly valuable source of peptide toxins that act on a wide diversity of membrane-bound receptors and ion channels. In this work, we report isolation, biochemical analysis, and pharmacological characterization of a novel family of spider peptide toxins, designated beta/delta-agatoxins. These toxins consist of 36-38 amino acid residues and originate from the venom of the agelenid funnel-web spider Agelena orientalis. The presented toxins show considerable amino acid sequence similarity to other known toxins such as mu-agatoxins, curtatoxins, and delta-palutoxins-IT from the related spiders Agelenopsis aperta, Hololena curta, and Paracoelotes luctuosus. beta/delta-Agatoxins modulate the insect Na(V) channel (DmNa(V)1/tipE) in a unique manner, with both the activation and inactivation processes being affected. The voltage dependence of activation is shifted toward more hyperpolarized potentials (analogous to site 4 toxins) and a non-inactivating persistent Na(+) current is induced (site 3-like action). Interestingly, both effects take place in a voltage-dependent manner, producing a bell-shaped curve between -80 and 0 mV, and they are absent in mammalian Na(V) channels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detailed report of peptide toxins with such a peculiar pharmacological behavior, clearly indicating that traditional classification of toxins according to their binding sites may not be as exclusive as previously assumed.

  15. Concentration-jump analysis of voltage-dependent conductances activated by glutamate and kainate in neurons of the avian cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Raman, I M; Trussell, L O

    1995-01-01

    We have examined the mechanisms underlying the voltage sensitivity of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors in voltage-clamped outside-out patches and whole cells taken from the nucleus magnocellularis of the chick. Responses to either glutamate or kainate had outwardly rectifying current-voltage relations. The rate and extent of desensitization during prolonged exposure to agonist, and the rate of deactivation after brief exposure to agonist, decreased at positive potentials, suggesting that a kinetic transition was sensitive to membrane potential. Voltage dependence of the peak conductance and of the deactivation kinetics persisted when desensitization was reduced with aniracetam or blocked with cyclothiazide. Furthermore, the rate of recovery from desensitization to glutamate was not voltage dependent. Upon reduction of extracellular divalent cation concentration, kainate-evoked currents increased but preserved rectifying current-voltage relations. Rectification was strongest at lower kainate concentrations. Surprisingly, nonstationary variance analysis of desensitizing responses to glutamate or of the current deactivation after kainate removal revealed an increase in the mean single-channel conductance with more positive membrane potentials. These data indicate that the rectification of the peak response to a high agonist concentration reflects an increase in channel conductance, whereas rectification of steady-state current is dominated by voltage-sensitive channel kinetics. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8580330

  16. The voltage-dependent Cl− channel ClC-5 and plasma membrane Cl− conductances of mouse renal collecting duct cells (mIMCD-3)

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, J A; Stewart, G S; Boese, S H; Gray, M A; Pearce, S H S; Goodship, T H J; Simmons, N L

    2001-01-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that the voltage-dependent Cl− channel, ClC-5 functions as a plasma membrane Cl− conductance in renal inner medullary collecting duct cells. Full-length mouse kidney ClC-5 (mClC-5) was cloned and transiently expressed in CHO-K1 cells. Fast whole-cell patch-clamp recordings confirmed that mClC-5 expression produces a voltage-dependent, strongly outwardly rectifying Cl− conductance that was unaffected by external DIDS. Slow whole-cell recordings, using nystatin-perforated patches from transfected CHO-K1 cells, also produced voltage-dependent Cl− currents consistent with ClC-5 expression. However, under this recording configuration an endogenous DIDS-sensitive Ca2+-activated Cl− conductance was also evident, which appeared to be activated by green fluorescent protein (GFP) transfection. A mClC-5-GFP fusion protein was transiently expressed in CHO-K1 cells; confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed localization at the plasma membrane, consistent with patch-clamp experiments. Endogenous expression of mClC-5 was demonstrated in mouse renal collecting duct cells (mIMCD-3) by RT-PCR and by immunocytochemistry. Using slow whole-cell current recordings, mIMCD-3 cells displayed three biophysically distinct Cl−-selective currents, which were all inhibited by DIDS. However, no cells exhibited whole-cell currents that had mClC-5 characteristics. Transient transfection of mIMCD-3 cells with antisense mClC-5 had no effect on the endogenous Cl− conductances. Transient transfection with sense mClC-5 failed to induce the Cl− conductance seen in CHO-K1 cells but stimulated levels of the endogenous Ca2+-activated Cl− conductance 24 h post-transfection. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of mIMCD-3 cells transfected with mClC-5-GFP showed that the protein was absent from the plasma membrane and was instead localized to acidic endosomal compartments. These data discount a major role for ClC-5 as a plasma membrane Cl− conductance in

  17. Rhabdias kongmongthaensis sp. n. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) from Polypedates leucomystax (Amphibia: Anura: Rhacophoridae) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Yuriy; Tkach, Vasyl V; Vaughan, Jefferson A

    2005-11-01

    Rhabdias kongmongthaensis sp. n. is described based on specimens found in the lungs of the tree frog Polypedates leucomystax (Gravenhorst) (Amphibia: Rhacophoridae) from Kanchanaburi Province, western Thailand. The new species is similar to two North-American species, Rhabdias ranae and R. americanus, by presence of two lateral pseudolabia, each with two inner submedian protuberances. R. kongmongthaensis differs from both species by relative length and shape of the tail, and by its distribution and host specificity. Presence of lateral pseudolabia distinguishes the new species from the geographically closest Rhabdias species as well as from those parasitizing other rhacophorid frogs.

  18. Cosmocercoides himalayanus sp. nov. (Nematoda, Cosmocercidae) in Duttaphrynus himalayanus (Amphibia, Anura) from Dehradun (Uttarakhand), India.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Anjum N; Bursey, Charles R

    2014-03-01

    Cosmocercoides himalayanus sp. nov. (Nematoda, Cosmocercidae) from the large intestine of Duttaphrynus himalayanus (Amphibia, Anura) from Dehradun, India is described and illustrated. Cosmocercoides himalayanus sp. nov. represents the 21st species assigned to the genus and the 9th species from the Oriental biogeographical region. Cosmocercoides himalayanus sp. nov. differs from the previously described Oriental species in number and position of rosette papillae; it is the only species possessing 24 or more rosette papillae to have 4 postcloacal papillae. In addition, a list of species assigned to Cosmocercoides is provided; however, C. fotedari Arya, 1992 is removed from the genus and until further study is considered a species inquirenda.

  19. A Tight-Seal Whole Cell Study of the Voltage-Dependent Gating Mechanism of K+-Channels of Protoplasmic Droplets of Chara corallina1

    PubMed Central

    Homblé, Fabrice

    1987-01-01

    The biophysical properties of voltage-dependent K+-channels of protoplasmic droplets of Chara corallina Klein ex Willd., em, R.D.W. were investigated using the tight-seal whole cell method. Two potassium currents were observed in voltage-clamp mode and they can be used to explain the transient membrane potential time course observed in current-clamp mode. The K+-channels are identified by the effect of tetraethylammonium chloride which blocks both currents. A two-state, constant dipole moment model is used to fit the voltage-conductance curve. From this model the minimum equivalent gating charge involved in the gating mechanism of K+-channels of Chara can be estimated. PMID:16665457

  20. Physics-Based Compact Model for CIGS and CdTe Solar Cells: From Voltage-Dependent Carrier Collection to Light-Enhanced Reverse Breakdown: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xingshu; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Raguse, John; Garris, Rebekah; Deline, Chris; Silverman, Timothy

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we develop a physics-based compact model for copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) heterojunction solar cells that attributes the failure of superposition to voltage-dependent carrier collection in the absorber layer, and interprets light-enhanced reverse breakdown as a consequence of tunneling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction. The temperature dependence of the model is validated against both simulation and experimental data for the entire range of bias conditions. The model can be used to characterize device parameters, optimize new designs, and most importantly, predict performance and reliability of solar panels including the effects of self-heating and reverse breakdown due to partial-shading degradation.

  1. Gate voltage dependent characteristics of p-n diodes and bipolar transistors based on multiwall CN(x)/carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W J; Zhang, Q F; Chai, Y; Shen, X; Wu, J L

    2007-10-03

    The electrical transport characteristics of multiwall CN(x)/carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions were studied. The junctions could be used as diodes. We found that the rectification resulted from p-n junctions, not from metal-semiconductor junctions. The gate effect was very weak when the diodes were reverse biased. At forward bias, however, some of the p-n diodes could be n-type transistors. Experimental results supported the opinion that the gate voltage dependent property is derived from the Schottky barrier between the CN(x) part and the electrode. Using p-n diodes, a bipolar transistor with nanoscale components was built, whose behavior was very similar to that of a conventional planar bipolar transistor.

  2. The Effects of the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Fluvoxamine on Voltage-Dependent K(+) Channels in Rabbit Coronary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Da Hye; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Han Sol; Kim, Hye Won; Shin, Sung Eun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Na, Sung Hun; Choi, Il-Whan; Firth, Amy Leanne; Park, Won Sun; Kim, Dae-Joong

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated the inhibitory effect of fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using a whole-cell patch clamp technique. Fluvoxamine reduced the amplitude of Kv currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 3.71±1.09 µM and a Hill coefficient of 0.62±0.14. Although fluvoxamine did not significantly affect the steady-state activation curve, it shifted the steady-state inactivation curve toward a more negative potential. Pretreatment with another SSRI, paroxetine, did not affect the basal Kv current and did not alter the inhibitory effect of fluvoxamine on Kv channels. We concluded that fluvoxamine inhibits the Kv current in a concentration-dependent manner and in a closed (inactivated) state of the Kv channels independent of serotonin reuptake inhibition.

  3. Voltage-Dependent Rhythmogenic Property of Respiratory Pre-Bötzinger Complex Glutamatergic, Dbx1-Derived, and Somatostatin-Expressing Neuron Populations Revealed by Graded Optogenetic Inhibition123

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Hidehiko; Mosher, Bryan; Tariq, Mohammad F.; Zhang, Ruli

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The rhythm of breathing in mammals, originating within the brainstem pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), is presumed to be generated by glutamatergic neurons, but this has not been directly demonstrated. Additionally, developmental expression of the transcription factor Dbx1 or expression of the neuropeptide somatostatin (Sst), has been proposed as a marker for the rhythmogenic pre-BötC glutamatergic neurons, but it is unknown whether these other two phenotypically defined neuronal populations are functionally equivalent to glutamatergic neurons with regard to rhythm generation. To address these problems, we comparatively investigated, by optogenetic approaches, the roles of pre-BötC glutamatergic, Dbx1-derived, and Sst-expressing neurons in respiratory rhythm generation in neonatal transgenic mouse medullary slices in vitro and also more intact adult perfused brainstem-spinal cord preparations in situ. We established three different triple-transgenic mouse lines with Cre-driven Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) expression selectively in glutamatergic, Dbx1-derived, or Sst-expressing neurons for targeted photoinhibition. In each line, we identified subpopulations of rhythmically active, Arch-expressing pre-BötC inspiratory neurons by whole-cell recordings in medullary slice preparations in vitro, and established that Arch-mediated hyperpolarization of these inspiratory neurons was laser power dependent with equal efficacy. By site- and population-specific graded photoinhibition, we then demonstrated that inspiratory frequency was reduced by each population with the same neuronal voltage-dependent frequency control mechanism in each state of the respiratory network examined. We infer that enough of the rhythmogenic pre-BötC glutamatergic neurons also have the Dbx1 and Sst expression phenotypes, and thus all three phenotypes share the same voltage-dependent frequency control property. PMID:27275007

  4. Involvement of presynaptic voltage-dependent Kv3 channel in endothelin-1-induced inhibition of noradrenaline release from rat gastric sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kumiko; Shimizu, Takahiro; Tanaka, Kenjiro; Taniuchi, Keisuke; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2012-11-05

    We previously reported that two types of K(+) channels, the BK type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel coupled with phospholipase C (PLC) and the voltage-dependent K(+) channel (Kv channel), are, respectively, involved in the prostanoid TP receptor- and muscarinic M(2) receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline (NA) release from rat gastric sympathetic nerves. In the present study, therefore, we examined whether these K(+) channels are involved in endothelin-1-induced inhibition of NA release, using an isolated, vascularly perfused rat stomach. The gastric sympathetic postganglionic nerves around the left gastric artery were electrically stimulated twice at 2.5 Hz for 1 min, and endothelin-1 was added during the second stimulation. Endothelin-1 (1, 2 and 10 nM) dose-dependently inhibited gastric NA release. Endothelin-1 (2 nM)-induced inhibition of NA release was neither attenuated by PLC inhibitors [U-73122 (3 μM) and ET-18-OCH(3) (3 μM)] nor by Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blockers [charybdotoxin (0.1 μM) (a blocker of BK type K(+) channel) and apamin (0.3 μM) (a blocker of SK type K(+) channel)]. The endothelin-1-induced inhibitory response was also not attenuated by α-dendrotoxin (0.1 μM) (a selective inhibitor of Kv1 channel), but abolished by 4-aminopyridine (20 μM) (a selectively inhibitory dose for Kv3 channel). These results suggest the involvement of a voltage-dependent Kv3 channel in the endothelin-1-induced inhibition of NA release from the gastric sympathetic nerves in rats.

  5. The effect of Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 on voltage-dependent calcium channels in PC12 cells varies according to channel type and cell differentiation state.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Kotaro; Asada, Akiko; Saito, Taro; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a Ser/Thr kinase that plays an important role in the release of neurotransmitter from pre-synaptic terminals triggered by Ca(2+) influx into the pre-synaptic cytoplasm through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs). It is reported that Cdk5 regulates L-, P/Q-, or N-type VDCC, but there is conflicting data as to the effect of Cdk5 on VDCC activity. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we examined the role of Cdk5 in regulating the Ca(2+) -channel property of VDCCs, using PC12 cells expressing endogenous, functional L-, P/Q-, and N-type VDCCs. The Ca(2+) influx, induced by membrane depolarization with high K(+) , was monitored with a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator protein in both undifferentiated and nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells. Overall, Ca(2+) influx was increased by expression of Cdk5-p35 in undifferentiated PC12 cells but suppressed in differentiated PC12 cells. Moreover, we found that different VDCCs are distinctly regulated by Cdk5-p35 depending on the differentiation states of PC12 cells. These results indicate that Cdk5-p35 regulates L-, P/Q-, or N-type VDCCs in a cellular context-dependent manner. Calcium (Ca(2+) ) influx through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) triggers neurotransmitter release from pre-synaptic terminal of neurons. The channel activity of VDCCs is regulated by Cdk5-p35, a neuronal Ser/Thr kinase. However, there have been debates about the regulation of VDCCs by Cdk5. Using PC12 cells, we show that Cdk5-p35 regulates VDCCs in a type (L, P/Q, and N) and differentiation-dependent manner. NGF = nerve growth factor.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of regulation of fast-inactivating voltage-dependent transient outward K+ current in mouse heart by cell volume changes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guan-Lei; Wang, Ge-Xin; Yamamoto, Shintaro; Ye, Linda; Baxter, Heather; Hume, Joseph R; Duan, Dayue

    2005-01-01

    The Kv4.2/4.3 channels are the primary subunits that contribute to the fast-inactivating, voltage-dependent transient outward K+ current (Ito,fast) in the heart. Ito,fast is the critical determinant of the early repolarization of the cardiac action potential and plays an important role in the adaptive remodelling of cardiac myocytes, which usually causes cell volume changes, during myocardial ischaemia, hypertrophy and heart failure. It is not known, however, whether Ito,fast is regulated by cell volume changes. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanism for cell volume regulation of Ito,fast in native mouse left ventricular myocytes. Hyposmotic cell swelling caused a marked increase in densities of the peak Ito,fast and a significant shortening in phase 1 repolarization of the action potential duration. The voltage-dependent gating properties of Ito,fast were, however, not altered by changes in cell volume. In the presence of either protein kinase C (PKC) activator (12,13-dibutyrate) or phosphatase inhibitors (calyculin A and okadaic acid), hyposmotic cell swelling failed to further up-regulate Ito,fast. When expressed in NIH/3T3 cells, both Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 channels were also strongly regulated by cell volume in the same voltage-independent but PKC- and phosphatase-dependent manner as seen in Ito,fast in the native cardiac myocytes. We conclude that Kv4.2/4.3 channels in the heart are regulated by cell volume through a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pathway mediated by PKC and serine/threonine phosphatase(s). These findings suggest a novel role of Kv4.2/4.3 channels in the adaptive electrical and structural remodelling of cardiac myocytes in response to myocardial hypertrophy, ischaemia and reperfusion. PMID:16081489

  7. Voltage-dependent and -independent titration of specific residues accounts for complex gating of a ClC chloride channel by extracellular protons

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; Cid, L Pablo; Yusef, Yamil R; Briones, Rodolfo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V

    2009-01-01

    The ClC transport protein family comprises both Cl− ion channel and H+/Cl− and H+/NO3− exchanger members. Structural studies on a bacterial ClC transporter reveal a pore obstructed at its external opening by a glutamate side-chain which acts as a gate for Cl− passage and in addition serves as a staging post for H+ exchange. This same conserved glutamate acts as a gate to regulate Cl− flow in ClC channels. The activity of ClC-2, a genuine Cl− channel, has a biphasic response to extracellular pH with activation by moderate acidification followed by abrupt channel closure at pH values lower than ∼7. We have now investigated the molecular basis of this complex gating behaviour. First, we identify a sensor that couples extracellular acidification to complete closure of the channel. This is extracellularly-facing histidine 532 at the N-terminus of transmembrane helix Q whose neutralisation leads to channel closure in a cooperative manner. We go on to show that acidification-dependent activation of ClC-2 is voltage dependent and probably mediated by protonation of pore gate glutamate 207. Intracellular Cl− acts as a voltage-independent modulator, as though regulating the pKa of the protonatable residue. Our results suggest that voltage dependence of ClC-2 is given by hyperpolarisation-dependent penetration of protons from the extracellular side to neutralise the glutamate gate deep within the channel, which allows Cl− efflux. This is reminiscent of a partial exchanger cycle, suggesting that the ClC-2 channel evolved from its transporter counterparts. PMID:19153159

  8. Differential effects of short and prolonged exposure to carvedilol on voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Koji; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Nakashima, Yasuhide; Wada, Akihiko; Izumi, Futoshi; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki

    2002-07-01

    We examined the effects of short and prolonged exposure to carvedilol, an antihypertensive and beta-adrenoceptor blocking drug, on voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. Carvedilol (1-100 microM) reduced (22)Na(+) influx induced by veratridine, an activator of voltage-dependent Na(+) channels. Carvedilol also suppressed veratridine-induced (45)Ca(2+) influx and catecholamine secretion in a concentration-dependent manner similar to that of (22)Na(+) influx. Prolonged exposure of the cells to 10 microM carvedilol increased [(3)H]saxitoxin ([(3)H]STX) binding, which reached a plateau at 12 h and was still observed at 48 to 72 h. Scatchard analysis of [(3)H]STX binding revealed that carvedilol increased the B(max) value (control, 14.9 +/- 0.9 fmol/10(6) cells; carvedilol, 23.8 +/- 1.2 fmol/10(6) cells) (n = 3, P < 0.05) without altering the K(d) value, suggesting a rise in the number of cell surface Na(+) channels. The increase in [(3)H]STX binding by carvedilol was prevented by cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, whereas carvedilol changed neither alpha- nor beta(1)-subunit mRNA levels of Na(+) channels. The carvedilol-induced increase of [(3)H]STX binding was abolished by brefeldin A and H-89, inhibitors of intracellular vesicular trafficking of proteins from the trans-Golgi network and of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A), respectively. The present findings suggest that short-term treatment with carvedilol reduces the activity of Na(+) channels, whereas prolonged exposure to carvedilol up-regulates cell surface Na(+) channels. This may add new pharmacological effects of carvedilol to our understanding in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension.

  9. Intramitochondrial accumulation of cationic Atto520-biotin proceeds via voltage-dependent slow permeation through lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Nechaeva, Natalya L; Baksheeva, Victoria E; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Plotnikov, Egor Y; Kotova, Elena A; Zorov, Dmitry B

    2015-06-01

    Conjugation to penetrating cations is a general approach for intramitochondrial delivery of physiologically active compounds, supported by a high membrane potential of mitochondria having negative sign on the matrix side. By using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we found here that Atto520-biotin, a conjugate of a fluorescent cationic rhodamine-based dye with the membrane-impermeable vitamin biotin, accumulated in energized mitochondria in contrast to biotin-rhodamine 110. The energy-dependent uptake of Atto520-biotin by mitochondria, being slower than that of the conventional mitochondrial dye tetramethyl-rhodamine ethyl ester, was enhanced by the hydrophobic anion tetraphenylborate (TPB). Atto520-biotin also exhibited accumulation in liposomes driven by membrane potential resulting from potassium ion gradient in the presence valinomycin. The induction of electrical current across planar bilayer lipid membrane by Atto520-biotin proved the ability of the compound to permeate through lipid membrane in a cationic form. Atto520-biotin stained mitochondria in a culture of L929 cells, and the staining was enhanced in the presence of TPB. Therefore, the fluorescent Atto520 moiety can serve as a vehicle for intramitochondrial delivery of hydrophilic drugs. Of importance for biotin-streptavidin technology, binding of Atto520-biotin to streptavidin was found to cause quenching of its fluorescence similar to the case of fluorescein-4-biotin.

  10. Multiple open channel states revealed by lidocaine and QX-314 on rat brain voltage-dependent sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have recently reported that brain sodium channels display periods with high (low-Kd) and low (high-Kd) levels of lidocaine-induced open channel block (Salazar, B.C., D.O. Flash, J.L. Walewski, and E. Recio- Pinto. 1995. Brain Res. 699:305-314). In the present study, we further characterize this phenomenon by studying the effects of the permanently charged lidocaine analogue, QX-314. We found that the detection of high- and low-Kd periods does not require the presence of the uncharged form of lidocaine. The level of block, for either period, at various QX-314 concentrations indicated the presence of a single local anesthetic binding site. Increasing the concentration of QX-314 decreased the lifetime of the high-Kd periods while it increased the lifetime of the low-Kd periods. These results could be best fitted to a model with two open channel conformations that display different local anesthetic Kd values (low and high Kd), and in which the channel area defining the local anesthetic Kd consists of multiple interacting regions. Amplitude distribution analysis showed that changes in the Kd values reflected changes in the kon rates, without changes in the koff rates. Both lidocaine and QX-314 were found to be incapable of blocking small- channel subconductance states (5-6 pS). Changes in the local anesthetic kon rates for blocking the fully open state and the lack of local anesthetic block of the small subconductance state are consistent with the presence of channel conformational changes involving the intracellular permeation pathway leading to the local anesthetic binding site. PMID:8783074

  11. Time course and voltage dependence of expressed HERG current compared with native "rapid" delayed rectifier K current during the cardiac ventricular action potential.

    PubMed

    Hancox, J C; Levi, A J; Witchel, H J

    1998-11-01

    It is widely believed that HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) encodes the major subunit of the cardiac "rapid" delayed rectifier K channel. The aims of the present study were threefold: (1) to record directly the time course and voltage dependence of expressed HERG current in a mammalian cell line, during an imposed ventricular action potential (AP); (2) to compare this with native rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) elicited by applying an AP command to isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes; (3) to provide mechanistic information regarding the profile of HERG/IKr during the AP. We used the AP clamp technique and conventional whole-cell patch-clamp recordings at 32-34 degreesC. HERG was transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. There was an outward current in transfected CHO cells, which developed progressively during the AP plateau and slow repolarisation phase. The instantaneous current-voltage (I-V) relation for both leak-subtracted HERG current (n=10) and E-4031-sensitive current (n=6) during AP repolarisation was maximal between -30 mV and -40 mV. The conductance-voltage (G-V) relation was maximal at potentials between -60 and -75 mV. A similar voltage dependence for HERG current was observed during a descending ramp from +60 to -80 mV (n=5), but not during either an ascending ramp (n=5), or a reversed AP waveform (n=8). These data suggest that instantaneous HERG current during the AP does not depend on the instantaneous command voltage alone, but upon the previous voltages during the applied waveform. The time course of activation of HERG current at potentials near the AP plateau was rapid. Tail currents recorded on premature repolarisation at different time points in the AP showed directly that HERG also activates rapidly during the AP. The I-V profiles of fully activated HERG and of current during the AP were very similar. IKr from guinea-pig ventricular myocytes was measured as E-4031-sensitive current during the AP clamp

  12. Involvement of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation in the voltage-dependent regulation of the Ca(2+) concentration in porcine coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Hisao; Ohya, Susumu; Muraki, Katsuhiko; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2012-08-01

    The involvement of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) formation in the voltage-dependent regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) was examined in smooth muscle cells of the porcine coronary artery. Slow ramp depolarization from -90 to 0 mV induced progressive [Ca(2+)](i) increase. The slope was reduced or increased in the presence of Cd(2+) or (±)-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-(2-[trifluoromethyl]-phenyl)pyridine-3-carboxlic acid methyl ester (Bay K 8644), respectively. The decrease in [Ca(2+)](i) via the membrane hyperpolarization induced by K(+) channel openers (levcromakalim and Evans blue) under current clamp was identical to that under voltage clamp. The step hyperpolarization from -40 to -80 mV reduced [Ca(2+)](i) uniformly over the whole-cell area with a time constant of ∼10 s. The [Ca(2+)](i) at either potential was unaffected by heparin, an inhibitor of IP(3) receptors. Alternatively, [Ca(2+)](i) rapidly increased in the peripheral regions by depolarization from -80 to 0 mV and stayed at that level (∼400 nM) during a 60-s pulse. When the pipette solution contained IP(3) pathway blockers [heparin, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborate, xestospongin C, or 1-[6-[((17β)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5[10]-trien-17-yl)amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)], the peak [Ca(2+)](i) was unchanged, but the sustained [Ca(2+)](i) was gradually reduced by ∼250 nM within 30 s. In the presence of Cd(2+), a long depolarization period slightly increased the [Ca(2+)](i), which was lower than that in the presence of heparin alone. In coronary arterial myocytes, the sustained increase in the [Ca(2+)](i) during depolarization was partly caused by the Ca(2+) release mediated by the enhanced formation of IP(3). The initial [Ca(2+)](i) elevation triggered by the Ca(2+) influx though voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels may be predominantly responsible for the activation of phospholipase C for IP(3) formation.

  13. Glucocorticoid receptor activation lowers the threshold for NMDA-receptor-dependent homosynaptic long-term depression in the hippocampus through activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Coussens, C M; Kerr, D S; Abraham, W C

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 on homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) were examined in hippocampal slices obtained from adrenal-intact adult male rats. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials were evoked by stimulation of the Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway and recorded in stratum radiatum of area CA1. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) was delivered at LTD threshold (2 bouts of 600 pulses, 1 Hz, at baseline stimulation intensity). LFS of the Schaffer collaterals did not produce significant homosynaptic LTD in control slices. However, identical conditioning in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 (10 microM) produced a robust LTD, which was blocked by the selective glucocorticoid antagonist RU-38486. The LTD induced by glucocorticoid receptor activation was dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity, because the specific NMDA receptor antagonist D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5) blocked the facilitation. However, the facilitation of LTD was not due to a potentiation of the isolated NMDA receptor potential by RU-28362. The facilitation of LTD by RU-28362 was also blocked by coincubation of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) antagonist nimodipine. Selective activation of the L-type VDCCs by the agonist Bay K 8644 also facilitated LTD induction. Both nimodipine and D-AP5 were effective in blocking the facilitation of LTD by Bay K 8644. These results indicate that L-type VDCCs can contribute to NMDA-receptor-dependent LTD induction.

  14. Modeling and measurement of vesicle pools at the cone ribbon synapse: changes in release probability are solely responsible for voltage-dependent changes in release

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Wallace B.; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Parmelee, Caitlyn; Curto, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Post-synaptic responses are a product of quantal amplitude (Q), size of the releasable vesicle pool (N), and release probability (P). Voltage-dependent changes in presynaptic Ca2+ entry alter post-synaptic responses primarily by changing P but have also been shown to influence N. With simultaneous whole cell recordings from cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells in tiger salamander retinal slices, we measured N and P at cone ribbon synapses by using a train of depolarizing pulses to stimulate release and deplete the pool. We developed an analytical model that calculates the total pool size contributing to release under different stimulus conditions by taking into account the prior history of release and empirically-determined properties of replenishment. The model provided a formula that calculates vesicle pool size from measurements of the initial post-synaptic response and limiting rate of release evoked by a train of pulses, the fraction of release sites available for replenishment, and the time constant for replenishment. Results of the model showed that weak and strong depolarizing stimuli evoked release with differing probabilities but the same size vesicle pool. Enhancing intraterminal Ca2+ spread by lowering Ca2+ buffering or applying BayK8644 did not increase PSCs evoked with strong test steps showing there is a fixed upper limit to pool size. Together, these results suggest that light-evoked changes in cone membrane potential alter synaptic release solely by changing release probability. PMID:26541100

  15. α-Synuclein Shows High Affinity Interaction with Voltage-dependent Anion Channel, Suggesting Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Regulation and Toxicity in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Gurnev, Philip A; Protchenko, Olga; Hoogerheide, David P; Yap, Thai Leong; Philpott, Caroline C; Lee, Jennifer C; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2015-07-24

    Participation of the small, intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein (α-syn) in Parkinson disease (PD) pathogenesis has been well documented. Although recent research demonstrates the involvement of α-syn in mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegeneration and suggests direct interaction of α-syn with mitochondria, the molecular mechanism(s) of α-syn toxicity and its effect on neuronal mitochondria remain vague. Here we report that at nanomolar concentrations, α-syn reversibly blocks the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), the major channel of the mitochondrial outer membrane that controls most of the metabolite fluxes in and out of the mitochondria. Detailed analysis of the blockage kinetics of VDAC reconstituted into planar lipid membranes suggests that α-syn is able to translocate through the channel and thus target complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Supporting our in vitro experiments, a yeast model of PD shows that α-syn toxicity in yeast depends on VDAC. The functional interactions between VDAC and α-syn, revealed by the present study, point toward the long sought after physiological and pathophysiological roles for monomeric α-syn in PD and in other α-synucleinopathies.

  16. A Single Talent Immunogenic Membrane Antigen and Novel Prognostic Predictor: voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weibin; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Wenjing; Xu, Lai; Yang, Yu; Liao, Quan; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic membrane antigens associated with multiple biological functions of human cancer cells, have significant value in molecule diagnosis and targeted therapy. Here we screened immunogenic membrane antigens in pancreatic cancer by immunobloting IgG purified from sera of 66 pancreatic cancer patients with membrane proteins separated from two-dimensional PAGE of human pancreatic cancer cell line SWl990, and identified voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) as one of the potential immunogenic membrane antigens. Further studies focusing on VDAC1 demonstrated that VDAC1 mRNA and protein were significantly expressed in the tested pancreatic cancer cell lines. VDAC1 silencing with RNAi significantly decreased cell growth, invasion and migration in the pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-1. Additionally, VDAC1 expression was upregulated in pancreatic cancer tissue compared with normal pancreas samples and patients with low VDAC1 expression had a significantly greater median survival compared to those with high expression (27.0 months vs. 17.8 months, P = 0.039). In multivariable analysis, VDAC1 staining was an independent prognostic factor for survival [(Hazard-Ratio) HR = 1.544, 95% CI = 0.794–3.0, P = 0.021]. These results demonstrated that VDAC1 may be a candidate immunogenic membrane antigen for pancreatic cancer, a potential independent prognostic marker, and an ideal drug target. PMID:27659305

  17. L-Type Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channel Currents of Cerebral Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells are Increased by 2-Week Hindlimb Unweighting in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hao; Xue, Jun-Hui; Bai, Yun-Gang; Xie, Man-Jiang; Bao, Jun-Xiang; Ma, Jin

    2008-06-01

    To investigate alterations of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (CaL) in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from rats subjected to a two-week simulated weightlessness, and influence of Bay K 8644 (an agonist of CaL) to the channel currents. Tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate the effects of microgravity. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record CaL currents before and after Bay K 8644 treatment, with intracellular Ca2+ concentration maintained physiological level. The corresponding parameters such as steady state activation and inactivation curves were also recorded. Whole-cell CaL current densities increased obviously, and sensitivity of CaL to Bay K 8644 also increased in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells from suspension group. But membrane capacitance (Cm), access resistance (Ra), and other parameters of CaL such as steady state activation / inactivation curves have no significant changes compared with those of control group. These results suggest that enhanced CaL function of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells induced by simulated microgravity may be one of the electrophysiological mechanisms that mediate enhanced vasoreactivity of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells during adaptation to simulated weightlessness in rats.

  18. Memory reconsolidation and its maintenance depend on L-voltage-dependent calcium channels and CaMKII functions regulating protein turnover in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Weber Cláudio; Cardoso, Gabriela; Bonini, Juliana Sartori; Benetti, Fernando; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2013-04-16

    Immediate postretrieval bilateral blockade of long-acting voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCCs), but not of glutamatergic NMDA receptors, in the dorsal CA1 region of the hippocampus hinders retention of long-term spatial memory in the Morris water maze. Immediate postretrieval bilateral inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II in dorsal CA1 does not affect retention of this task 24 h later but does hinder it 5 d later. These two distinct amnesic effects are abolished if protein degradation by proteasomes is inhibited concomitantly. These results indicate that spatial memory reconsolidation depends on the functionality of L-VDCC in dorsal CA1, that maintenance of subsequent reconsolidated memory trace depends on CaMKII, and these results also suggest that the role played by both L-VDCC and CaMKII is to promote the retrieval-dependent, synaptically localized enhancement of protein synthesis necessary to counteract a retrieval-dependent, synaptic-localized enhancement of protein degradation, which has been described as underlying the characteristic labilization of the memory trace triggered by retrieval. Thus, conceivably, L-VDCC and CaMKII would enhance activity-dependent localized protein renewal, which may account for the improvement of the long-term efficiency of the synapses responsible for the maintenance of reactivated long-term spatial memory.

  19. Forgetting of long-term memory requires activation of NMDA receptors, L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, and calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Sachser, Ricardo Marcelo; Santana, Fabiana; Crestani, Ana Paula; Lunardi, Paula; Pedraza, Lizeth Katherine; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto; Hardt, Oliver; Alvares, Lucas de Oliveira

    2016-03-07

    In the past decades, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying memory consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction have been well characterized. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of forgetting processes remain to be elucidated. Here we used behavioral, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches to explore mechanisms controlling forgetting. We found that post-acquisition chronic inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (LVDCC), and protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), maintains long-term object location memory that otherwise would have been forgotten. We further show that NMDAR activation is necessary to induce forgetting of object recognition memory. Studying the role of NMDAR activation in the decay of the early phase of long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in the hippocampus, we found that ifenprodil infused 30 min after LTP induction in vivo blocks the decay of CA1-evoked postsynaptic plasticity, suggesting that GluN2B-containing NMDARs activation are critical to promote LTP decay. Taken together, these findings indicate that a well-regulated forgetting process, initiated by Ca(2+) influx through LVDCCs and GluN2B-NMDARs followed by CaN activation, controls the maintenance of hippocampal LTP and long-term memories over time.

  20. Identification of mud crab reovirus VP12 and its interaction with the voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein of mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hai-Dong; Su, Hong-Jun; Zou, Wei-Bin; Liu, Shan-Shan; Yan, Wen-Rui; Wang, Qian-Qian; Yuan, Li-Li; Chan, Siuming Francis; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; He, Jian-Guo; Weng, Shao-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Mud crab reovirus (MCRV) is the causative agent of a severe disease in cultured mud crab (Scylla paramamosain), which has caused huge economic losses in China. MCRV is a double-stranded RNA virus with 12 genomic segments. In this paper, SDS-PAGE, mass spectrometry and Western blot analyses revealed that the VP12 protein encoded by S12 gene is a structural protein of MCRV. Immune electron microscopy assay indicated that MCRV VP12 is a component of MCRV outer shell capsid. Yeast two hybrid cDNA library of mud crab was constructed and mud crab voltage-dependent anion-selective channel (mcVDAC) was obtained by MCRV VP12 screening. The full length of mcVDAC was 1180 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 849 bp encoding a 282 amino acid protein. The mcVDAC had a constitutive expression pattern in different tissues of mud crab. The interaction between MCRV VP12 and mcVDAC was determined by co-immunoprecipitation assay. The results of this study have provided an insight on the mechanisms of MCRV infection and the interactions between the virus and mud crab.

  1. Frequency and voltage-dependent electrical and dielectric properties of Al/Co-doped PVA/p-Si structures at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Yücedağ; Ahmet, Kaya; Şemsettin, Altındal; Ibrahim, Uslu

    2014-04-01

    In order to investigate of cobalt-doped interfacial polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) layer and interface trap (Dit) effects, Al/p-Si Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) are fabricated, and their electrical and dielectric properties are investigated at room temperature. The forward and reverse admittance measurements are carried out in the frequency and voltage ranges of 30 kHz-300 kHz and -5 V-6 V, respectively. C-V or ɛ'-V plots exhibit two distinct peaks corresponding to inversion and accumulation regions. The first peak is attributed to the existence of Dit, the other to the series resistance (Rs), and interfacial layer. Both the real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant (ɛ' and ɛ″) and electric modulus (M' and M″), loss tangent (tan δ), and AC electrical conductivity (σac) are investigated, each as a function of frequency and applied bias voltage. Each of the M' versus V and M″ versus V plots shows a peak and the magnitude of peak increases with the increasing of frequency. Especially due to the Dit and interfacial PVA layer, both capacitance (C) and conductance (G/w) values are strongly affected, which consequently contributes to deviation from both the electrical and dielectric properties of Al/Co-doped PVA/p-Si (MPS) type SBD. In addition, the voltage-dependent profile of Dit is obtained from the low-high frequency capacitance (CLF-CHF) method.

  2. L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel is involved in the snake venom group IA secretory phospholipase A2-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Tatsurou; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Kohma, Hiromi; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Takasu, Nobuo; Okamura, Noboru

    2013-03-01

    Snake venom group IA secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IA) is known as a neurotoxin. Snake venom sPLA2s are neurotoxic in vivo and in vitro, causing synergistic neurotoxicity to cortical cultures when applied with toxic concentrations of glutamate. However, it has not yet been cleared sufficiently how sPLA2-IA exerts neurotoxicity. Here, we found sPLA2-IA induced neuronal cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. This death was a delayed response requiring a latent time for 6h. sPLA2-IA-induced neuronal cell death was accompanied with apoptotic blebbing, condensed chromatin, and fragmented DNA, exhibiting apoptotic features. NMDA receptor blockers suppressed the neurotoxicity of sPLA2-IA, but an AMPA receptor blocker did not. Interestingly, L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) blocker significantly protected neurons from the sPLA2-IA-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, neither N-VDCC blockers nor P/Q-VDCC blocker did. In conclusion, we demonstrated that sPLA2-IA induced neuronal cell death via apoptosis. Furthermore, the present study suggests that not only NMDA receptor but also L-VDCC contributed to the neurotoxicity of snake venom sPLA2-IA.

  3. Forgetting of long-term memory requires activation of NMDA receptors, L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, and calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Sachser, Ricardo Marcelo; Santana, Fabiana; Crestani, Ana Paula; Lunardi, Paula; Pedraza, Lizeth Katherine; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto; Hardt, Oliver; de Oliveira Alvares, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying memory consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction have been well characterized. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of forgetting processes remain to be elucidated. Here we used behavioral, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches to explore mechanisms controlling forgetting. We found that post-acquisition chronic inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (LVDCC), and protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), maintains long-term object location memory that otherwise would have been forgotten. We further show that NMDAR activation is necessary to induce forgetting of object recognition memory. Studying the role of NMDAR activation in the decay of the early phase of long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in the hippocampus, we found that ifenprodil infused 30 min after LTP induction in vivo blocks the decay of CA1-evoked postsynaptic plasticity, suggesting that GluN2B-containing NMDARs activation are critical to promote LTP decay. Taken together, these findings indicate that a well-regulated forgetting process, initiated by Ca2+ influx through LVDCCs and GluN2B-NMDARs followed by CaN activation, controls the maintenance of hippocampal LTP and long-term memories over time. PMID:26947131

  4. Direct modulation of the outer mitochondrial membrane channel, voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) by cannabidiol: a novel mechanism for cannabinoid-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Rimmerman, N; Ben-Hail, D; Porat, Z; Juknat, A; Kozela, E; Daniels, M P; Connelly, P S; Leishman, E; Bradshaw, H B; Shoshan-Barmatz, V; Vogel, Z

    2013-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive plant cannabinoid that inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell death of cancer cells and activated immune cells. It is not an agonist of the classical CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptors and the mechanism by which it functions is unknown. Here, we studied the effects of CBD on various mitochondrial functions in BV-2 microglial cells. Our findings indicate that CBD treatment leads to a biphasic increase in intracellular calcium levels and to changes in mitochondrial function and morphology leading to cell death. Density gradient fractionation analysis by mass spectrometry and western blotting showed colocalization of CBD with protein markers of mitochondria. Single-channel recordings of the outer-mitochondrial membrane protein, the voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) functioning in cell energy, metabolic homeostasis and apoptosis revealed that CBD markedly decreases channel conductance. Finally, using microscale thermophoresis, we showed a direct interaction between purified fluorescently labeled VDAC1 and CBD. Thus, VDAC1 seems to serve as a novel mitochondrial target for CBD. The inhibition of VDAC1 by CBD may be responsible for the immunosuppressive and anticancer effects of CBD. PMID:24309936

  5. Modeling and measurement of vesicle pools at the cone ribbon synapse: Changes in release probability are solely responsible for voltage-dependent changes in release.

    PubMed

    Thoreson, Wallace B; Van Hook, Matthew J; Parmelee, Caitlyn; Curto, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Postsynaptic responses are a product of quantal amplitude (Q), size of the releasable vesicle pool (N), and release probability (P). Voltage-dependent changes in presynaptic Ca(2+) entry alter postsynaptic responses primarily by changing P but have also been shown to influence N. With simultaneous whole cell recordings from cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells in tiger salamander retinal slices, we measured N and P at cone ribbon synapses by using a train of depolarizing pulses to stimulate release and deplete the pool. We developed an analytical model that calculates the total pool size contributing to release under different stimulus conditions by taking into account the prior history of release and empirically determined properties of replenishment. The model provided a formula that calculates vesicle pool size from measurements of the initial postsynaptic response and limiting rate of release evoked by a train of pulses, the fraction of release sites available for replenishment, and the time constant for replenishment. Results of the model showed that weak and strong depolarizing stimuli evoked release with differing probabilities but the same size vesicle pool. Enhancing intraterminal Ca(2+) spread by lowering Ca(2+) buffering or applying BayK8644 did not increase PSCs evoked with strong test steps, showing there is a fixed upper limit to pool size. Together, these results suggest that light-evoked changes in cone membrane potential alter synaptic release solely by changing release probability.

  6. Correlation between Barrier Width, Barrier Height, and DC Bias Voltage Dependences on the Magnetoresistance Ratio in Ir-Mn Exchange Biased Single and Double Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Amano, Minoru; Nakajima, Kentaro; Takahashi, Shigeki; Sagoi, Masayuki; Inomata, Koichiro

    2000-10-01

    Dual spin-valve-type double tunnel junctions (DTJs) of Ir-Mn/CoFe/AlOx/Co90Fe10/AlOx/CoFe/Ir-Mn and spin-valve-type single tunnel junctions (STJs) of Ir-Mn/CoFe/AlOx/CoFe/Ni-Fe were fabricated using an ultrahigh vacuum sputtering system, conventional photolithography and ion-beam milling. The STJs could be fabricated with various barrier heights by changing the oxidization conditions during deposition and changing the annealing temperature after deposition, while the AlOx layer thickness remained unchanged. There was a correlation between barrier width, height estimated using Simmons’ expressions, and dc bias voltage dependence on the MR ratio. The VB dependence on the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio was mainly related to the barrier width, and the decrease in the TMR ratio with increasing bias voltage is well explained, taking into account the spin-independent two-step tunneling via defect states in the barrier, as a main mechanism, at room temperature. Under optimized oxidization and annealing conditions, the maximum TMR ratio at a low bias voltage, and the dc bias voltage value at which the TMR ratio decreases in value by half (V1/2) were 42.4% and 952 mV in DTJs, and 49.0% and 425 mV in STJs, respectively.

  7. A slow voltage-dependent Na(+)-current induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine and the G-protein-coupled activation mechanism in the ganglion cells of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Kudo, A; Sasaki, K; Tamazawa, Y; Matsumoto, M

    1991-01-01

    Application of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) induces a slowly depolarizing response in the neurons of Aplysia abdominal ganglion. In voltage-clamped cells, 5HT induced a slow inward current that increased steeply with membrane depolarization from -85 mV showing a negative slope conductance, but never reversed into outward when hyperpolarized beyond the equilibrium potential for K+. The 5HT-induced response was markedly augmented in Ca(2+)-free media, but depressed in Na(+)-free media, and unaffected by a change in external potassium. Intracellular injection of guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) significantly depressed the 5HT response in a dose-dependent way. Injection of cholera toxin (CTX) selectively blocked the 5HT-induced response, the effect being irreversible. Neither 3'-deoxyadenosine, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor H-8, an inhibitor of protein kinase A, depressed the 5HT response. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) did not augment the 5HT response appreciably. The 5HT responses were not depressed at all during a saturated response to Br-cyclic AMP injected intracellularly. It was concluded that the 5HT response is produced by opening of the voltage-dependent Na(+)-channels with activation of CTX-sensitive G-protein but not necessarily with an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP.

  8. Chromosome banding in amphibia. XXIII. Giant W sex chromosomes and extremely small genomes in Eleutherodactylus euphronides and Eleutherodactylus shrevei (Anura, Leptodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Schmid, M; Feichtinger, W; Steinlein, C; Rupprecht, A; Haaf, T; Kaiser, H

    2002-01-01

    Highly differentiated, heteromorphic ZZ female symbol /ZW male symbol sex chromosomes were found in the karyotypes of the neotropical leptodactylid frogs Eleutherodactylus euphronides and E. shrevei. The W chromosomes are the largest heterochromatic, female-specific chromosomes so far discovered in the class Amphibia. The analyses of the banding patterns with AT- and GC base-pair specific fluorochromes show that the constitutive heterochromatin in the giant W chromosomes consists of various categories of repetitive DNA sequences. The W chromosomes of both species are similar in size, morphology and banding patterns, whereas their Z chromosomes exhibit conspicuous differences. In the cell nuclei of female animals, the W chromosomes form very prominent chromatin bodies (W chromatin). DNA flow cytometric measurements demonstrate clear differences in the DNA content of male and female erythrocytes caused by the giant W chromosome, and also shows that these Eleutherodactylus genomes are among the smallest of all amphibian genomes. The importance of the heteromorphic ZW sex chromosomes for the study of Z-linked genes, the similarities and differences of the two karyotypes, and the significance of the exceptionally small genomes are discussed.

  9. Reduced KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium channel activity underlies impaired β-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation of renal arteries in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Preet S; Zunke, Friederike; Zhu, Hai-Lei; Davis, Alison J; Jepps, Thomas A; Olesen, Søren P; Cole, William C; Moffatt, James D; Greenwood, Iain A

    2012-04-01

    KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium (Kv7.4) channels are important regulators of vascular tone that are severely compromised in models of hypertension. However, there is no information as to the role of these channels in responses to endogenous vasodilators. We used a molecular knockdown strategy, as well as pharmacological tools, to examine the hypothesis that Kv7.4 channels contribute to β-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and underlie the vascular deficit in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry confirmed gene and protein expression of KCNQ1, KCNQ3, KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and Kv7.1, Kv7.4, and Kv7.5 in rat renal artery. Isoproterenol produced concentration-dependent relaxation of precontracted renal arteries and increased Kv7 channel currents in isolated smooth muscle cells. Application of the Kv7 blocker linopirdine attenuated isoproterenol-induced relaxation and current. Isoproterenol-induced relaxations were also reduced in arteries incubated with small interference RNAs targeted to KCNQ4 that produced a ≈60% decrease in Kv7.4 protein level. Relaxation to isoproterenol and the Kv7 activator S-1 were abolished in arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats, which was associated with ≈60% decrease in Kv7.4 abundance. This study provides the first evidence that Kv7 channels contribute to β-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and that abrogation of Kv7.4 channels is strongly implicated in the impaired β-adrenoceptor pathway in spontaneously hypertensive rats. These findings may provide a novel pathogenic link between arterial dysfunction and hypertension.

  10. Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Gating in Two-Dimensional Lipid Crystalline Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminus of the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) has been proposed to contain the mechanistically important gating helices that modulate channel opening and closing. In this study, we utilize magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) to determine the location and structure of the N-terminus for functional channels in lipid bilayers by measuring long-range 13C–13C distances between residues in the N-terminus and other domains of VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers. Our structural studies show that the distance between A14 Cβ in the N-terminal helix and S193 Cβ is ∼4–6 Å. Furthermore, VDAC phosphorylation by a mitochondrial kinase at residue S193 has been claimed to delay mitochondrial cell death by causing a conformational change that closes the channel, and a VDAC-Ser193Glu mutant has been reported to show properties very similar to those of phosphorylated VDAC in a cellular context. We expressed VDAC-S193E and reconstituted it into DMPC lipid bilayers. Two-dimensional 13C–13C correlation experiments showed chemical shift perturbations for residues located in the N-terminus, indicating possible structural perturbations to that region. However, electrophysiological data recorded on VDAC-S193E showed that channel characteristics were identical to those of wild type samples, indicating that phosphorylation of S193 does not directly affect channel gating. The combination of NMR and electrophysiological results allows us to discuss the validity of proposed gating models. PMID:25545271

  11. Frequency and voltage dependence dielectric properties, ac electrical conductivity and electric modulus profiles in Al/Co3O4-PVA/p-Si structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilkan, Çiğdem; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar; Altındal, Şemsettin; Shokrani-Havigh, Roya

    2016-11-01

    In this research a simple microwave-assisted method have been used for preparation of cobalt oxide nanostructures. The as-prepared sample has been investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On the other hand, frequency and voltage dependence of both the real and imaginary parts of dielectric constants (ε‧, ε″) and electric modulus (M‧ and M″), loss tangent (tanδ), and ac electrical conductivity (σac) values of Al/Co3O4-PVA/p-Si structures were obtained in the wide range of frequency and voltage using capacitance (C) and conductance (G/ω) data at room temperature. The values of ε‧, ε″ and tanδ were found to decrease with increasing frequency almost for each applied bias voltage, but the changes in these parameters become more effective in the depletion region at low frequencies due to the charges at surface states and their relaxation time and polarization effect. While the value of σ is almost constant at low frequency, increases almost as exponentially at high frequency which are corresponding to σdc and σac, respectively. The M‧ and M″ have low values at low frequencies region and then an increase with frequency due to short-range mobility of charge carriers. While the value of M‧ increase with increasing frequency, the value of M″ shows two peak and the peaks positions shifts to higher frequency with increasing applied voltage due to the decrease of the polarization and Nss effects with increasing frequency.

  12. The N-Terminal Peptides of the Three Human Isoforms of the Mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Have Different Helical Propensities.

    PubMed

    Guardiani, Carlo; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Amodeo, Giuseppe Federico; Grdadolnik, Joze; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; De Pinto, Vito; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Casu, Mariano

    2015-09-15

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main mitochondrial porin allowing the exchange of ions and metabolites between the cytosol and the mitochondrion. In addition, VDAC was found to actively interact with proteins playing a fundamental role in the regulation of apoptosis and being of central interest in cancer research. VDAC is a large transmembrane β-barrel channel, whose N-terminal helical fragment adheres to the channel interior, partially closing the pore. This fragment is considered to play a key role in protein stability and function as well as in the interaction with apoptosis-related proteins. Three VDAC isoforms are differently expressed in higher eukaryotes, for which distinct and complementary roles are proposed. In this work, the folding propensity of their N-terminal fragments has been compared. By using multiple spectroscopic techniques, and complementing the experimental results with theoretical computer-assisted approaches, we have characterized their conformational equilibrium. Significant differences were found in the intrinsic helical propensity of the three peptides, decreasing in the following order: hVDAC2 > hVDAC3 > hVDAC1. In light of the models proposed in the literature to explain voltage gating, selectivity, and permeability, as well as interactions with functionally related proteins, our results suggest that the different chemicophysical properties of the N-terminal domain are possibly correlated to different functions for the three isoforms. The overall emerging picture is that a similar transmembrane water accessible conduit has been equipped with not identical domains, whose differences can modulate the functional roles of the three VDAC isoforms.

  13. Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) promote mitophagy to protect neuron from death in an early brain injury following a subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Lu, Jianfei; Mi, Yongjie; Shi, Zhao; Chen, Chunhua; Riley, John; Zhou, Changman

    2014-07-21

    The term mitophagy is coined to describe the selective removal of mitochondria by autophagy but the process itself is still contentious, especially in the early period following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In the present study, we investigated the role of mitophagy following 48h after SAH injury in rats. Specifically evaluating whether mitophagy, through voltage dependant anion channels (VDACs) interacting with microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, could orchestrate the induction of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in neurons, a VDAC1siRNA and an activitor Rapamycian (RAPA), were engaged. One hundred and twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Sham, SAH, SAH+VDAC1siRNA, and SAH+RAPA. Outcomes measured included mortality rate, brain edema, BBB disruption, and neurobehavioral testing. We also used western blotting techniques to analyze the expressions of key mitophagic/autophagic proteins and pro-apoptotic protein such as ROS, VDAC1, LC-3II and Caspase-3. Rapamycin treatment significantly improved the mortality rate, cerebral edema, and neurobehavioral deficits; apoptotic and necrotic cell death in neurons were reduced by Rapamycin following SAH injury. However, VDAC1siRNA worsened the brain injury following SAH. Immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis demonstrated a decreased expression of VDAC1, LC3II, and an increase of ROS and Caspase-3 followed by VDAC1siRNA administration. In conclusion, mitophagy induced by VDAC1 following SAH injury may in fact play a significant role in neuroprotection, the mechanism which may be through the attenuation of the apoptosic and necrosic molecular pathways. This translates a preservation of functional integrity and an improvement in mortality.

  14. The calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B inhibits voltage-dependent K{sup +} channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongliang; Hong, Da Hye; Kim, Han Sol; Kim, Hye Won; Jung, Won-Kyo; Na, Sung Hun; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Won Sun

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the effects of the calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B on voltage-dependent K{sup +} (Kv) channels using whole-cell patch clamp technique in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells. CGS 9343B inhibited Kv currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) value of 0.81 μM. The decay rate of Kv channel inactivation was accelerated by CGS 9343B. The rate constants of association and dissociation for CGS 9343B were 2.77 ± 0.04 μM{sup −1} s{sup −1} and 2.55 ± 1.50 s{sup −1}, respectively. CGS 9343B did not affect the steady-state activation curve, but shifted the inactivation curve toward to a more negative potential. Train pulses (1 or 2 Hz) application progressively increased the CGS 9343B-induced Kv channel inhibition. In addition, the inactivation recovery time constant was increased in the presence of CGS 9343B, suggesting that CGS 9343B-induced inhibition of Kv channel was use-dependent. Another calmodulin inhibitor, W-13, did not affect Kv currents, and did not change the inhibitory effect of CGS 9343B on Kv current. Our results demonstrated that CGS 9343B inhibited Kv currents in a state-, time-, and use-dependent manner, independent of calmodulin inhibition. - Highlights: • We investigated the effects of CGS 9394B on Kv channels. • CGS 9394B inhibited Kv current in a state-, time-, and use-dependent manner. • Caution is required when using CGS 9394B in vascular function studies.

  15. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) regulates steroidogenic activity via steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) interaction.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manoj; Kaur, Jasmeet; Pawlak, Kevin J; Bose, Mahuya; Whittal, Randy M; Bose, Himangshu S

    2015-01-30

    Steroid hormones are essential for carbohydrate metabolism, stress management, and reproduction and are synthesized from cholesterol in mitochondria of adrenal glands and gonads/ovaries. In acute stress or hormonal stimulation, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transports substrate cholesterol into the mitochondria for steroidogenesis by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report for the first time that StAR interacts with voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) at the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) prior to its translocation to the mitochondrial matrix. In the MAM, StAR interacts with mitochondrial proteins Tom22 and VDAC2. However, Tom22 knockdown by siRNA had no effect on pregnenolone synthesis. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR was expressed but not processed into the mitochondria as a mature 30-kDa protein. VDAC2 interacted with StAR via its C-terminal 20 amino acids and N-terminal amino acids 221-229, regulating the mitochondrial processing of StAR into the mature protein. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR could not enter the mitochondria or interact with MAM-associated proteins, and therefore steroidogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, the N terminus was not essential for StAR activity, and the N-terminal deletion mutant continued to interact with VDAC2. The endoplasmic reticulum-targeting prolactin signal sequence did not affect StAR association with the MAM and thus its mitochondrial targeting. Therefore, VDAC2 controls StAR processing and activity, and MAM is thus a central location for initiating mitochondrial steroidogenesis.

  16. IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody inhibits the voltage-dependent calcium channel currents in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yoshihiko; Nagaoka, Takumi; Hotta, Sayako; Utsunomiya, Iku; Yoshino, Hiide; Miyatake, Tadashi; Hoshi, Keiko; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the effects of IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies, produced by immunizing rabbits with GalNAc-GD1a, on the voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCCs) currents in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. VDCCs currents in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Immunized rabbit serum that had a high titer of anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies inhibited the VDCCs currents in the NGF-differentiated PC12 cells (36.0+/-9.6% reduction). The inhibitory effect of this serum was reversed to some degree within 3-4 min by washing with bath solution. Similarly, application of purified IgG from rabbit serum immunized with GalNAc-GD1a significantly inhibited the VDCCs currents in PC12 cells (30.6+/-2.5% reduction), and this inhibition was recovered by washing with bath solution. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect was also observed in the GalNAc-GD1a affinity column binding fraction (reduction of 31.1+/-9.85%), while the GalNAc-GD1a affinity column pass-through fraction attenuated the inhibitory effect on VDCCs currents. Normal rabbit serum and normal rabbit IgG did not affect the VDCCs currents in the PC12 cells. In an immunocytochemical study using fluorescence staining, the PC12 cells were stained using GalNAc-GD1a binding fraction. These results indicate that anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies inhibit the VDCCs currents in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells.

  17. Pumiliotoxin B binds to a site on the voltage-dependent sodium channel that is allosterically coupled to other binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Gusovsky, F; Rossignol, D P; McNeal, E T; Daly, J W

    1988-01-01

    Pumiliotoxin B (PTX-B), an alkaloid that has cardiotonic and myotonic activity, increases sodium influx in guinea pig cerebral cortical synaptoneurosomes. In the presence of scorpion venom (Leiurus) or purified alpha-scorpion toxin, the PTX-B-induced sodium influx is enhanced severalfold. PTX-B alone has no effect on sodium flux in N18 neuroblastoma cells but, in the presence of alpha-scorpion toxin, stimulation of sodium influx by PTX-B reaches levels comparable to that attained with the sodium channel activator veratridine. In neuroblastoma LV9 cells, a variant mutant that lacks sodium channels, neither veratridine nor PTX-B induces sodium fluxes in either the presence or absence of alpha-scorpion toxin. In synaptoneurosomes and in N18 cells, the sodium influx induced by the combination of PTX-B and alpha-scorpion toxin is inhibited by tetrodotoxin and local anesthetics. PTX-B does not interact with two of the known toxin sites on the sodium channel, as evidenced by a lack of effect on binding of [3H]saxitoxin or [3H]batrachotoxinin A benzoate to brain synaptoneurosomes. Synergistic effects on sodium influx with alpha-scorpion toxin, beta-scorpion toxin, and brevetoxin indicate that PTX-B does not interact directly with three other toxin sites on the sodium channel. Thus, PTX-B appears to activate sodium influx by interacting with yet another site on the voltage-dependent sodium channel, a site that is coupled allosterically to sites for alpha-scorpion toxin, beta-scorpion toxin, and brevetoxin. PMID:2448797

  18. The episodic ataxia type 1 mutation I262T alters voltage-dependent gating and disrupts protein biosynthesis of human Kv1.1 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Han; Fu, Ssu-Ju; Huang, Jing-Jia; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential for setting neuronal membrane excitability. Mutations in human Kv1.1 channels are linked to episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). The EA1-associated mutation I262T was identified from a patient with atypical phenotypes. Although a previous report has characterized its suppression effect, several key questions regarding the impact of the I262T mutation on Kv1.1 as well as other members of the Kv1 subfamily remain unanswered. Herein we show that the dominant-negative effect of I262T on Kv1.1 current expression is not reversed by co-expression with Kvβ1.1 or Kvβ2 subunits. Biochemical examinations indicate that I262T displays enhanced protein degradation and impedes membrane trafficking of Kv1.1 wild-type subunits. I262T appears to be the first EA1 mutation directly associated with impaired protein stability. Further functional analyses demonstrate that I262T changes the voltage-dependent activation and Kvβ1.1-mediated inactivation, uncouples inactivation from activation gating, and decelerates the kinetics of cumulative inactivation of Kv1.1 channels. I262T also exerts similar dominant effects on the gating of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 channels. Together our data suggest that I262T confers altered channel gating and reduced functional expression of Kv1 channels, which may account for some of the phenotypes of the EA1 patient. PMID:26778656

  19. Calcium-activated potassium channels in the luminal membrane of Amphiuma diluting segment: voltage-dependent block by intracellular Na+ upon depolarisation.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, K; Hunter, M; Giebisch, G

    1990-06-01

    Calcium-activated potassium channels in the luminal membrane of Amphiuma diluting segment were studied using the patch-clamp technique in both the cell-attached and inside-out configurations. The open probability (Po) of the channel is sensitive to both membrane potential and cytoplasmic calcium activity; depolarizing potentials and high calcium concentrations leading to an increased Po. In the cell-attached condition, channel openings were observed between pipette potentials of -100 and -240 mV. As the driving force for potassium exit from the cell into the pipette is increased the single channel currents show a biphasic response. First, the currents increase as expected; however, the single channel currents diminish in magnitude at pipette potentials more negative than -120 mV. We propose that this reduction is due to rapid blockade of the potassium channel by intracellular sodium. This proposal is supported by two facts: (a) using inside-out patches it was possible to reduce the single channel currents in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner, similar to that observed in the cell-attached condition, by raising the sodium concentration of the fluid bathing the cytoplasmic face of the patch; (b) pretreatment of tubules with the loop-acting diuretic furosemide (10(-5) M), an agent known to decrease the intracellular sodium activity, caused an attenuation of the reduction in single channel current seen under control conditions. Given the very low Po of the channels at the resting membrane potential and the sensitivity of the channels to intracellular sodium, it is unlikely that blockade of these channels by intracellular sodium would lead to a physiological regulation of the apical K conductance.

  20. The episodic ataxia type 1 mutation I262T alters voltage-dependent gating and disrupts protein biosynthesis of human Kv1.1 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Han; Fu, Ssu-Ju; Huang, Jing-Jia; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2016-01-18

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential for setting neuronal membrane excitability. Mutations in human Kv1.1 channels are linked to episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). The EA1-associated mutation I262T was identified from a patient with atypical phenotypes. Although a previous report has characterized its suppression effect, several key questions regarding the impact of the I262T mutation on Kv1.1 as well as other members of the Kv1 subfamily remain unanswered. Herein we show that the dominant-negative effect of I262T on Kv1.1 current expression is not reversed by co-expression with Kvβ1.1 or Kvβ2 subunits. Biochemical examinations indicate that I262T displays enhanced protein degradation and impedes membrane trafficking of Kv1.1 wild-type subunits. I262T appears to be the first EA1 mutation directly associated with impaired protein stability. Further functional analyses demonstrate that I262T changes the voltage-dependent activation and Kvβ1.1-mediated inactivation, uncouples inactivation from activation gating, and decelerates the kinetics of cumulative inactivation of Kv1.1 channels. I262T also exerts similar dominant effects on the gating of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 channels. Together our data suggest that I262T confers altered channel gating and reduced functional expression of Kv1 channels, which may account for some of the phenotypes of the EA1 patient.

  1. Mutations associated with Dent's disease affect gating and voltage dependence of the human anion/proton exchanger ClC-5.

    PubMed

    Alekov, Alexi K

    2015-01-01

    Dent's disease is associated with impaired renal endocytosis and endosomal acidification. It is linked to mutations in the membrane chloride/proton exchanger ClC-5; however, a direct link between localization in the protein and functional phenotype of the mutants has not been established until now. Here, two Dent's disease mutations, G212A and E267A, were investigated using heterologous expression in HEK293T cells, patch-clamp measurements and confocal imaging. WT and mutant ClC-5 exhibited mixed cell membrane and vesicular distribution. Reduced ion currents were measured for both mutants and both exhibited reduced capability to support endosomal acidification. Functionally, mutation G212A was capable of mediating anion/proton antiport but dramatically shifted the activation of ClC-5 toward more depolarized potentials. The shift can be explained by impeded movements of the neighboring gating glutamate Gluext, a residue that confers major part of the voltage dependence of ClC-5 and serves as a gate at the extracellular entrance of the anion transport pathway. Cell surface abundance of E267A was reduced by ~50% but also dramatically increased gating currents were detected for this mutant and accordingly reduced probability to undergoing cycles associated with electrogenic ion transport. Structurally, the gating alternations correlate to the proximity of E267A to the proton glutamate Gluin that serves as intracellular gate in the proton transport pathway and regulates the open probability of ClC-5. Remarkably, two other mammalian isoforms, ClC-3 and ClC-4, also differ from ClC-5 in gating characteristics affected by the here investigated disease-causing mutations. This evolutionary specialization, together with the functional defects arising from mutations G212A and E267A, demonstrate that the complex gating behavior exhibited by most of the mammalian CLC transporters is an important determinant of their cellular function.

  2. Chronic Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels enhance delayed rectifier K+ currents via activating Src family tyrosine kinase in rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yoon-Sil; Jeon, Sang-Chan; Kim, Dong-Kwan; Eun, Su-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Excessive influx and the subsequent rapid cytosolic elevation of Ca2+ in neurons is the major cause to induce hyperexcitability and irreversible cell damage although it is an essential ion for cellular signalings. Therefore, most neurons exhibit several cellular mechanisms to homeostatically regulate cytosolic Ca2+ level in normal as well as pathological conditions. Delayed rectifier K+ channels (IDR channels) play a role to suppress membrane excitability by inducing K+ outflow in various conditions, indicating their potential role in preventing pathogenic conditions and cell damage under Ca2+-mediated excitotoxic conditions. In the present study, we electrophysiologically evaluated the response of IDR channels to hyperexcitable conditions induced by high Ca2+ pretreatment (3.6 mM, for 24 hours) in cultured hippocampal neurons. In results, high Ca2+-treatment significantly increased the amplitude of IDR without changes of gating kinetics. Nimodipine but not APV blocked Ca2+-induced IDR enhancement, confirming that the change of IDR might be targeted by Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) rather than NMDA receptors (NMDARs). The VDCC-mediated IDR enhancement was not affected by either Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) or small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (SK channels). Furthermore, PP2 but not H89 completely abolished IDR enhancement under high Ca2+ condition, indicating that the activation of Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) is required for Ca2+-mediated IDR enhancement. Thus, SFKs may be sensitive to excessive Ca2+ influx through VDCCs and enhance IDR to activate a neuroprotective mechanism against Ca2+-mediated hyperexcitability in neurons. PMID:28280420

  3. R-phenibut binds to the α2-δ subunit of voltage-dependent calcium channels and exerts gabapentin-like anti-nociceptive effects.

    PubMed

    Zvejniece, Liga; Vavers, Edijs; Svalbe, Baiba; Veinberg, Grigory; Rizhanova, Kristina; Liepins, Vilnis; Kalvinsh, Ivars; Dambrova, Maija

    2015-10-01

    Phenibut is clinically used anxiolytic, mood elevator and nootropic drug. R-phenibut is responsible for the pharmacological activity of racemic phenibut, and this activity correlates with its binding affinity for GABAB receptors. In contrast, S-phenibut does not bind to GABAB receptors. In this study, we assessed the binding affinities of R-phenibut, S-phenibut, baclofen and gabapentin (GBP) for the α2-δ subunit of the voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) using a subunit-selective ligand, radiolabelled GBP. Binding experiments using rat brain membrane preparations revealed that the equilibrium dissociation constants (Kis) for R-phenibut, S-phenibut, baclofen and GBP were 23, 39, 156 and 0.05μM, respectively. In the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure test, we found that at doses up to 100mg/kg, R-phenibut did not affect PTZ-induced seizures. The anti-nociceptive effects of R-phenibut were assessed using the formalin-induced paw-licking test and the chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve model. Pre-treatment with R-phenibut dose-dependently decreased the nociceptive response during both phases of the test. The anti-nociceptive effects of R-phenibut in the formalin-induced paw-licking test were not blocked by the GABAB receptor-selective antagonist CGP35348. In addition, treatment with R- and S-phenibut alleviated the mechanical and thermal allodynia induced by CCI of the sciatic nerve. Our data suggest that the binding affinity of R-phenibut for the α2-δ subunit of the VDCC is 4 times higher than its affinity for the GABAB receptor. The anti-nociceptive effects of R-phenibut observed in the tests of formalin-induced paw licking and CCI of the sciatic nerve were associated with its effect on the α2-δ subunit of the VDCC rather than with its effects on GABAB receptors. In conclusion, our results provide experimental evidence for GBP-like, anti-nociceptive properties of R-phenibut, which might be used clinically to treat neuropathic pain

  4. Inflammatory cytokine signaling in insulin producing beta-cells enhances the colocalization correlation coefficient between L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel and calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Jai

    2008-08-01

    The immunological processes in type 1 diabetes and metabolic/inflammatory disorder in type 2 diabetes converge on common signaling pathway(s) leading to beta-cell death in these two diseases. The cytokine-mediated beta-cell death seems to be dependent on voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC)-mediated Ca2+ entry. The Ca2+ handling molecular networks control the homeostasis of [Ca2+]i in the beta-cell. The activity and membrane density of VDCC are regulated by several mechanisms including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). CaR is a 123-kDa seven transmembrane extracellular Ca2+ sensing protein that belongs to GPCR family C. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), is a cytokine widely known to activate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription in beta-cells. To obtain a better understanding of TNF-alpha-induced molecular interactions between CaR and VDCC, confocal fluorescence measurements were performed on insulin-producing beta-cells exposed to varying concentrations of TNF-alpha and the results are discussed in the light of increased colocalization correlation coefficient. The insulin producing beta-cells were exposed to 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 ng/ml TNF-alpha for 24 h at 37 degrees . The cells were then immunolabelled with antibodies directed against CaR, VDCC, and NF-kappaB. The confocal fluorescence imaging data showed enhancement in the colocalization correlation coefficient between CaR and VDCC in beta-cells exposed to TNF-alpha thereby indicating increased membrane delimited spatial interactions between these two membrane proteins. TNF-alpha-induced colocalization of VDCC with CaR was inhibited by nimodipine, an inhibitor of L-type VDCC thereby suggesting that VDCC activity is required for spatial interactions with CaR. The 3-D confocal fluorescence imaging data also demonstrated that addition of TNF-alpha to RIN cells led to the translocation of NF-kappaB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Such molecular interactions between CaR and VDCC in tissues

  5. Temperature and voltage dependence of barrier height and ideality factor in Au/0.07 graphene-doped PVA/n-Si structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altındal Yerişkin, S.; Balbaşı, M.; Demirezen, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Au/0.07 graphene-doped PVA/n-Si structures were fabricated and current conduction mechanism in these structures were investigated in the temperature range of 80-380 K through forward bias current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Main electrical parameters were extracted from I-V data. Zero-bias barrier height (overline{Φ}_{B0} ) and ideality factor (n) were found strong functions of temperature and their values ranged from 0.234 eV and 4.98 (at 80 K) to 0.882 eV and 1.15 (at 380 K), respectively. Φ ap versus q/2kT plot was drawn to obtain an evidence of a Gaussian distribution of the barrier heights (BHs) and it revealed two distinct linear regions with different slopes and intercepts. The mean values of BH (Φ Bo) and zero-bias standard deviation (σ s ) were obtained from the intercept and slope of the linear regions of this plot as 1.30 eV and 0.16 V for the first region (280-380 K) and 0.74 eV and 0.085 V for the second region (80-240 K), respectively. Thus, the values of overline{Φ}_{B0} and effective Richardson constant (A*) were also found from the intercept and slope of the modified Richardson plot [ln(I s /T 2) - q 2 σ {/o 2} /2k 2 T 2 vs q/kT] as 1.31 eV and 130 A/cm2 K2 for the first region and 0.76 eV and 922 A/cm2 K2 for the second region, respectively. The value of A* for the first region was very close to the theoretical value for n-Si (112 A/cm2 K2). The energy density distribution profile of surface states (Nss) was also extracted from the forward bias I-V data by taking into account voltage dependent effective BH (Φe) and n.

  6. Facilitation of T-type calcium current in bullfrog atrial cells: voltage-dependent relief of a G protein inhibitory tone.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, J L; Rubio, L S; Vassort, G

    1996-01-01

    1. The properties of the low-threshold calcium current, ICa,T, were investigated in bullfrog isolated atrial cardiomyocytes using the whole-cell, patch-clamp technique under control conditions and during beta-adrenergic stimulation. 2. The intracellular application of GTP gamma S or adenosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate (ATP gamma S), poorly hydrolysable analogues of GTP and ATP, respectively, barely affected ICa,T amplitude in control conditions. beta-Adrenergic stimulation effects were more marked in the presence of ATP gamma S. 3. The intracellular application of GDP beta S and ADP reduced ICa,T amplitude. In cells pretreated with pertussis toxin, ICa,T amplitude was significantly increased. In both conditions, the addition of isoprenaline was without effect. 4. Under both control and beta-adrenergic-stimulated conditions, a conditioning prepulse to +70 mV did not fully inactivate ICa,T; rather ICa,T facilitation often occurred after beta-adrenergic stimulation. 5. In GTP gamma S- and ATP gamma S-dialysed cells, ICa,T facilitation was generally observed after a prepulse; it was larger in the ATP gamma S dialysis. Facilitation was sustained but ended immediately upon cessation of conditioning prepulses. After beta-adrenergic stimulation, facilitation was more marked in GTP gamma S- than in ATP gamma S-dialysed cells. 6. ICa,T facilitation was prevented by the intracellular application of GDP beta S and by pertussis toxin pretreatment. 7. ICa,T facilitation developed markedly in the presence of intracellular cyclic AMP. This effect was prevented by pertussis toxin pretreatment of the cells. 8. It is thus proposed that ICa,T is under a double antagonistic control by both a Gs and a Gi protein. Furthermore, the double-pulse-induced facilitation of ICa,T results from a voltage-dependent relief of the Gi protein inhibitory tone. Such an effect is increased by protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation, presumably of the Gi protein. PMID:8866857

  7. Temperature and voltage dependence of barrier height and ideality factor in Au/0.07 graphene-doped PVA/n-Si structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altındal Yerişkin, S.; Balbaşı, M.; Demirezen, S.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, Au/0.07 graphene-doped PVA/n-Si structures were fabricated and current conduction mechanism in these structures were investigated in the temperature range of 80-380 K through forward bias current-voltage ( I- V) measurements. Main electrical parameters were extracted from I-V data. Zero-bias barrier height (\\overline{Φ}_{B0}) and ideality factor (n) were found strong functions of temperature and their values ranged from 0.234 eV and 4.98 (at 80 K) to 0.882 eV and 1.15 (at 380 K), respectively. Φ ap versus q/2k T plot was drawn to obtain an evidence of a Gaussian distribution of the barrier heights (BHs) and it revealed two distinct linear regions with different slopes and intercepts. The mean values of BH ( Φ Bo) and zero-bias standard deviation (σ s ) were obtained from the intercept and slope of the linear regions of this plot as 1.30 eV and 0.16 V for the first region (280-380 K) and 0.74 eV and 0.085 V for the second region (80-240 K), respectively. Thus, the values of \\overline{Φ}_{B0} and effective Richardson constant ( A*) were also found from the intercept and slope of the modified Richardson plot [ln( I s /T 2) - q 2 σ o 2 /2k 2 T 2 vs q/ kT] as 1.31 eV and 130 A/cm2 K2 for the first region and 0.76 eV and 922 A/cm2 K2 for the second region, respectively. The value of A* for the first region was very close to the theoretical value for n-Si (112 A/cm2 K2). The energy density distribution profile of surface states (Nss) was also extracted from the forward bias I-V data by taking into account voltage dependent effective BH (Φe) and n.

  8. Role of spinal voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha 2 delta-1 subunit in the expression of a neuropathic pain-like state in mice.

    PubMed

    Narita, Minoru; Nakajima, Mayumi; Miyoshi, Kan; Narita, Michiko; Nagumo, Yasuyuki; Miyatake, Mayumi; Yajima, Yoshinori; Yanagida, Kiyomi; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2007-05-08

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of spinal voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha(2)delta-1 subunit in the expression of a neuropathic pain-like state induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation in mice. In cultured spinal neurons, gabapentin (GBP), which displays the inhibitory effect of alpha(2)delta-1 subunit, suppressed the extracellular Ca(2+) influx induced by KCl, whereas it failed to inhibit the intracellular Ca(2+) release induced by inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate. Seven days after sciatic nerve ligation, the protein level of alpha(2)delta-1 subunit in the ipsilateral spinal cord was clearly increased compared to that observed in sham-operated mice. In addition, the mRNA level of alpha(2)delta-1 subunit was significantly increased in the dorsal root ganglion, but not in the spinal cord, of nerve-ligated mice. Under these conditions, a marked decrease in the latency of paw-withdrawal against a thermal stimulation and tactile stimulation, induced by sciatic nerve ligation was abolished by repeated intrathecal (i.t.) treatment with GBP. Additionally, the persistent reduction in the nociceptive threshold by i.t. treatment with GBP at the early stage of the neuropathic pain-like state was maintained for 7 days even after GBP withdrawal. It is of interest to note that a single i.t. post-injection of GBP showed a marked and transient inhibitory effect on the developed neuropathic pain-like state, whereas repeated i.t. post-treatment with GBP produced a persistent inhibitory effect during the treatment. In conclusion, we propose here that the neuropathic pain-like state with sciatic nerve ligation is associated with the increased level of the alpha(2)delta-1 subunit of Ca(2+) channels at the sensory nerve terminal in the spinal dorsal horn of mice. Furthermore, the present data provide evidence that the neuropathic pain may be effectively controlled by repeated treatment with GBP at the early stage.

  9. Splice-variant changes of the Ca(V)3.2 T-type calcium channel mediate voltage-dependent facilitation and associate with cardiac hypertrophy and development.

    PubMed

    David, Laurence S; Garcia, Esperanza; Cain, Stuart M; Thau, Elana; Tyson, John R; Snutch, Terrance P

    2010-01-01

    Low voltage-activated T-type calcium (Ca) channels contribute to the normal development of the heart and are also implicated in pathophysiological states such as cardiac hypertrophy. Functionally distinct T-type Ca channel isoforms can be generated by alternative splicing from each of three different T-type genes (Ca(V)3.1, Ca(V)3.2,Ca(V)3.3), although it remains to be described whether specific splice variants are associated with developmental states and pathological conditions. We aimed to identify and functionally characterize Ca(V)3.2 T-type Ca channel alternatively spliced variants from newborn animals and to compare with adult normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). DNA sequence analysis of full-length Ca(V)3.2 cDNA generated from newborn heart tissue identified ten major regions of alternative splicing, the more common variants of which were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and also subject to functional examination by whole-cell patch clamp. The main findings are that: (1) cardiac Ca(V)3.2 T-type Ca channels are subject to considerable alternative splicing, (2) there is preferential expression of Ca(V)3.2(-25) splice variant channels in newborn rat heart with a developmental shift in adult heart that results in approximately equal levels of expression of both (+25) and (-25) exon variants, (3) in the adult stage of hypertensive rats there is a both an increase in overall Ca(V)3.2 expression and a shift towards expression of Ca(V)3.2(+25) containing channels as the predominant form, and (4) alternative splicing confers a variant-specific voltage-dependent facilitation of Ca(V)3.2 channels. We conclude that Ca(V)3.2 alternative splicing generates significant T-type Ca channel structural and functional diversity with potential implications relevant to cardiac developmental and pathophysiological states.

  10. The biology of some intraerythrocytic parasites of fishes, amphibia and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Davies, A J; Johnston, M R

    2000-01-01

    Fishes, amphibia and reptiles, the ectothermic vertebrates, are hosts for a variety of intraerythrocytic parasites including protists, prokaryotes, viruses and structures of uncertain status. These parasites may experience host temperature fluctuations, host reproductive strategies, population genetics, host habitat and migratory behaviour quite unlike those of endothermic hosts. Few blood infections of fishes, amphibia and reptiles have proven pathogenicity, in contrast to the many intraerythrocytic parasites of mammals and some birds which harm their hosts. Although not given the attention afforded to intraerythrocytic parasites of endotherms, those of ectotherms have been studied for more than a century. This review reports on the diversity, general biology and phylogeny of intraerythrocytic parasites of ectotherms. The existence of taxonomic confusion is emphasized and the main taxonomic features of most of the 23 better characterized genera, particularly the kinetoplastid and apicomplexan protists, are summarized. Transmission of protistan infections of aquatic ectotherms is also discussed. Leeches can transfer sporozoties or merozoites to the vertebrate host during feeding. Dormant sporozoites of Lankesterella may permit transmission of species of this genus between vertebrates by predation. The fish haemogregarine, Haemogregarina bigemina, probably has gnathiid isopods, rather than leeches, as its definitive hosts. Hepatozoon spp. in aquatic hosts, and Progarnia of caiman, may also use invertebrate hosts other than leeches. Protistan infections of terrestrial or semi-terrestrial hosts are transmitted by a variety of arthropods, or, in some cases, leeches, contaminated paratenic hosts, or sporocysts free in water. Transfer of protists between vertebrates by predation and congenitally may also occur. The biology of the host cells of these infections, the red blood cells of ectotherm vertebrates, is summarized and compared with that of mammalian erythrocytes

  11. A new lungless caecilian (Amphibia: Gymnophiona) from Guyana

    PubMed Central

    Wake, Marvalee H.; Donnelly, Maureen A.

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of a single specimen of a small, terrestrial, lungless caecilian, the second known taxon of lungless caecilians. It differs from all other caecilians in lacking open external nares, and from the large aquatic lungless species described by Nussbaum & Wilkinson (Nussbaum, R. A. & Wilkinson, M. 1995 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 261, 331–335) in having no significant skull modifications. All modifications are of ‘soft morphology’ (covered external nares and choanae, lung and pulmonary vessel loss, etc.). A new genus and species are described to accommodate this form. Aspects of its skull and visceral morphology are described and considered in terms of the possible life history and evolution of the species, and compared with those of other lungless amphibians. PMID:19923127

  12. A new lungless caecilian (Amphibia: Gymnophiona) from Guyana.

    PubMed

    Wake, Marvalee H; Donnelly, Maureen A

    2010-03-22

    We report the discovery of a single specimen of a small, terrestrial, lungless caecilian, the second known taxon of lungless caecilians. It differs from all other caecilians in lacking open external nares, and from the large aquatic lungless species described by Nussbaum & Wilkinson (Nussbaum, R. A. & Wilkinson, M. 1995 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 261, 331-335) in having no significant skull modifications. All modifications are of 'soft morphology' (covered external nares and choanae, lung and pulmonary vessel loss, etc.). A new genus and species are described to accommodate this form. Aspects of its skull and visceral morphology are described and considered in terms of the possible life history and evolution of the species, and compared with those of other lungless amphibians.

  13. A new species of Odorrana (Amphibia: Anura: Ranidae) from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pham, Cuong The; Nguyen, Truong Quang; Le, Minh Duc; Bonkowski, Michael; Ziegler, Thomas

    2016-02-26

    A new species of Odorrana is described from the karst forests in northeastern Vietnam based on morphological differences and molecular divergence. Morphologically, the new species is distinguishable from its congeners on the basis of a combination of the following diagnostic characters: (1) size large (SVL 85.9-91.6 mm in males, 108.7-110.1 mm in females); (2) head longer than wide; (3) vomerine teeth present; (4) external vocal sacs absent; (5) snout short (SL/SVL 0.16-0.17); (6) tympanum large (TD/ED 0.70 in males, 0.68 in females); (7) dorsal surface of head and anterior part of body smooth, posterior part of body and flanks with small tubercles; (8) supratympanic fold present; (9) dorsolateral fold absent; (10) webbing formula I0-0II0-0III0-1/2IV1/2-0V; (11) in life, dorsum green with dark brown spots; (12) flanks greyish brown with dark brown spots; (13) throat and chest grey, underside of limbs with large dark brown spots, edged in white, forming a network. In the phylogenetic analyses, the new species is unambiguously nested within the O. andersonii group, and placed as the sister taxon to O. wuchuanensis.

  14. Co-localization of L-type voltage dependent calcium channel alpha 1D subunit (Ca(v)1.3) and calbindin (CB) in the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie Hua; Yang, Zhen Bang; Wang, Hui; Tang, Feng-Ru

    2014-02-21

    Previous study has shown that the co-localization of calbindin (CB) with L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (VDCC) alpha 1C subunit (Ca(v)1.2) in the rat insulinoma 1046-38 (RIN) beta cells may play an important regulatory role in Ca(2+) influx and exocytosis of insulin granules. In the present study, L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (VDCC) and calbindin (CB) were demonstrated in different regions of the mouse central nervous system (CNS). Double labeling immunofluorescence staining showed a co-localization of Ca(v)1.3 and CB. The co-localization of Ca(v)1.3 and CB in certain brain regions such as the hippocampus suggests their important roles in neuroplasticity. The relative high percentages of co-localization of Ca(v)1.3 with CB in the laminae II of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord indicate that the regulation mechanism of nociceptive transmission may be related with both VDCC and Ca(2+) binding protein.

  15. Montagnuphilones A-G, Azaphilones from Montagnulaceae sp. DM0194, a Fungal Endophyte of Submerged Roots of Persicaria amphibia.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Guang; Xu, Ya-Ming; Sandberg, Dustin C; Arnold, A Elizabeth; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2017-01-27

    Seven azaphilones, montagnuphilones A-G (1-7), together with previously known azaphilones 8-11, were encountered in Montagnulaceae sp. DM0194, an endophytic fungus isolated from submerged roots of Persicaria amphibia. The structures of 1-7 were elucidated on the basis of their MS and NMR spectroscopic analysis. Compounds 1-8 were evaluated for their cytotoxicity and ability to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Among these, none were found to be cytotoxic to RAW264.7 cells up to 100.0 μM, but 8, 5, and 2 showed NO inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 9.2 ± 0.9, 25.5 ± 1.1, and 39.6 ± 1.8 μM, respectively.

  16. Morphology, ultrastructure and molecular characterisation of Spiroxys japonica Morishita, 1926 (Spirurida: Gnathostomatidae) from Pelophylax nigromaculatus (Hallowell) (Amphibia: Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Hasegawa, Hideo; Roca, Vicente; Xu, Zhen; Guo, Yan-Ning; Sato, Akiko; Zhang, Lu-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Gnathostomatid nematodes identified morphologically as Spiroxys japonica Morishita, 1926 were collected from the dark-spotted frog Pelophylax nigromaculatus (Hallowell) (Amphibia: Ranidae) in China. Light and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the morphology of this species in detail. Previously unreported morphological features are revealed and others corrected. In addition, adult nematodes of S. japonica collected from P. nigromaculatus and Spiroxys hanzaki Hasegawa, Miyata & Doi, 1998 collected from Andrias japonicus (Temminck) (Caudata: Cryptobranchidae) in China and Japan, respectively, and the third-stage larva of S. japonica collected from Lithobates catesbeianus (Shaw) (Anura: Ranidae) in Japan, were characterised using molecular methods by sequencing and analysing ribosomal [large ribosomal DNA (18S) and internal transcribed space] and mitochondrial [cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1] target regions, respectively. The new morphological and genetic data contributes to a more accurate diagnosis of this hitherto little known nematode genus.

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Seoul frog Rana chosenica (Amphibia, Ranidae): comparison of R. chosenica and R. plancyi.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shi Hyun; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2011-06-01

    Here, we have sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the Seoul frog Rana chosenica (Amphibia, Ranidae), which is known as a Korean endemic species. It is listed as a vulnerable species by IUCN Red List and also an endangered species in South Korea. The complete mitochondrial genome of R. chosenica consists of 18,357 bp. Its gene arrangement pattern was identical with those of other Rana frogs. We compared the mitochondrial genome of R. chosenica with that of the Peking frog Rana plancyi that has been known closely related to R. chosenica. Nucleotide sequence similarity between the two whole mitochondrial genomes was 95.7%, and the relatively low similarity seems to indicate that the two species are distinctly separated on the species level. The information of mitochondrial genome comparison of the two species was discussed in detail.

  18. Immunohistochemical localization of insulin-like growth factor I and II in the endocrine pancreas of birds, reptiles, and amphibia.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, M; Broger, I; Brun, R; Zapf, J; Maake, C

    1995-12-01

    Immunoreactive insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I, IGF-II) were sought in the endocrine pancreas of representative birds, reptiles, and amphibia using antisera specific for mammalian IGF-I and IGF-II and the classical islet hormones insulin (INS), glucagon (GLUC), somatostatin (SOM), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) in double immunofluorescence. Both IGF-I and IGF-II immunoreactivities were present in the endocrine pancreas of all species. IGF-II immunoreactivity was exclusively found in INS-immunoreactive (-IR) cells, indicating evolutionary conservation of the islet IGF-II system. In contrast, IGF-I immunoreactivity was distributed differently among the species and never occurred in INS-IR cells. In the anuran Xenopus laevis, IGF-I immunoreactivity was present in islet cells showing coexistence of GLUC and PP immunoreactivities. In reptiles, the lizards (Lacerta viridis, Scincus officinalis) exhibited IGF-I immunoreactivity in PP-IR and SOM-IR cells and the snakes (Psamophis leniolatum, Coluber ravergieri) in SOM-IR and GLUC-IR cells. In birds, IGF-I immunoreactivity was located either in SOM-IR cells only (Gallus g. domesticus, Streptopelia roseogrisea) or in PP-IR and SOM-IR cells (Coturnix c. japonica). Thus, the distribution patterns of islet IGF-I immunoreactivities in birds, reptiles, and amphibia are equivalent to those in mammals and most bony fish. They differ, however, from those found in cartilaginous fish, cyclostomes, and protochordates, where a total or partial coexistence of IGF-I and INS immunoreactivities has been obtained. Therefore, the divergence of IGF-I and INS seems to have occurred early in vertebrate phylogeny. Furthermore, the existence of IGF-I immunoreactivity likely is common in the islets of all vertebrates. Finally, no phylogenetic trend to concentrate IGF-I immunoreactivity in a particular islet cell type is apparent.

  19. Effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on the development of Common toads (Bufo bufo L.; Amphibia) at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, Fabian; Gruber, Edith; Spangl, Bernhard; Zaller, Johann G.

    2016-04-01

    Herbicides based on the active ingredient glyphosate are frequently applied in agriculture, horticulture and private gardens all over the world. Recently, leaching of glyphosate or its metabolite (AMPA) into water bodies inhabited by amphibians has been reported. However, very little is known about non-target effects of these herbicides on amphibians and even less is known to what extent different temperatures might alter these effects. Using climate chambers, we investigated the effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup PowerFlex® (480 g L-1 glyphosate, formulated as 588 g L-1 potassium salt) on the larval development of Common toads (Bufo bufo L.; Amphibia: Anura) under different temperature regimes (15°C vs. 20°C). We established five herbicide concentrations: 0, 1.5, 3, 4 mg acid equivalent L-1 and a 4 mg a.e. L-1 pulse treatment (totally three applications of 1.5, 1.5 and another 1 mg a.e. L-1) at each temperature in a full-factorial design. Each treatment combination was replicated five times, the experiment ran for 24 days. Results showed a highly significant effect of temperature on body length and body width but no effect of herbicide concentration on these growth parameters. Moreover, highly significant interactions between herbicide and temperature on body length and body width were observed suggesting that herbicides had different effects on different temperatures. In conclusion, although Roundup PowerFlex® at the tested concentrations appeared to have no acute toxicity to larvae of Common toads, the observed effects on tadpole morphology will potentially affect competitive interactions in spawning ponds of amphibia. Our findings of herbicide x temperature interactions might become more prevalent when human-induced climate change will lead to more extreme temperatures.

  20. Localization of the gene encoding the [alpha][sub 2]/[delta] subunit (CACNL2A) of the human skeletal muscle voltage-dependent Ca[sup 2+] channel to chromosome 7q21-q22 by somatic cell hybrid analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, P.A.; Hogan, K.; Gregg, R.G. ); Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, L.C. Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario )

    1994-01-01

    Activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) by membrane depolarization triggers key cellular responses such as contraction, secretion, excitation, and electrical signaling. The skeletal muscle L-type VDCC is a heteromultimer complex containing four subunits, [alpha][sub 1],[alpha][sub 2]/[delta],[beta][sub 1], and [gamma]. The [alpha][sub 2]/[delta] subunit, an integral component of the VDCC, appears to modulate the channel kinetics. The [alpha][sub 2]/[delta] gene is expressed in many tissues, including skeletal muscle, brain, heart, and lung, and cDNAs representing the skeletal muscle and brain isoforms have been isolated. DNA sequence comparisons indicate that these cDNAs are encoding by a single gene. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Chromosomal localization of the human genes for {alpha}{sub 1A}, {alpha}{sub 1B}, and {alpha}{sub 1E} voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channel subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Diriong, S.; Lory, P.; Taviaux, S.

    1995-12-10

    The {alpha}{sub 1} subunit genes encoding voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channels are members of a gene family. We have used human brain cDNA probes to localize the neuronal isoform genes CACNL1A4 ({alpha}{sub 1A}), CACNL1A5 ({alpha}{sub 1B}), and CACNL1A6 ({alpha}{sub 1E}) to 19p13, 9q34, and 1q25-q31, respectively, using fluorescene in situ hybridization on human chromosomes. These genes are particularly interesting gene candidates in the pathogenesis of neuronal disorders. Although genetic disorders have been linked to loci 9q34 and 19p13, no genetic disease related to Ca{sup 2+} signaling defects has yet been linked to these loci. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Quantification of the Mg2+-induced potency shift of amantadine and memantine voltage-dependent block in human recombinant GluN1/GluN2A NMDARs.

    PubMed

    Otton, H J; Lawson McLean, A; Pannozzo, M A; Davies, C H; Wyllie, D J A

    2011-01-01

    Clinically, amantadine and memantine are drugs whose therapeutic utility is linked to their ability to block N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in a voltage-dependent manner. Nevertheless many studies that have characterized the pharmacological actions of amantadine and memantine have done so in the absence of physiological levels of Mg(2+) ions. This study quantifies the extent to which Mg(2+) alters the potency of the block produced by both amantadine and memantine at human recombinant GluN1/GluN2A NMDARs. Human recombinant GluN1/GluN2A NMDARs were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings were made at -80, -60 and -40 mV to quantify amantadine and memantine block in the absence and presence of Mg(2+). Amantadine and memantine blocked human GluN1/GluN2A NMDARs in a voltage-dependent manner with IC(50) values (at -80 mV) of 49 ± 6 μM (n = 7) and 1.0 ± 0.3 μM (n = 7), respectively. In the presence of Mg(2+) (1mM) the equivalent IC(50) values were 165 ± 10 μM (n=6) and 6.6 ± 0.3 μM (n = 5). Similarly in the presence of amantadine or memantine the potency of Mg(2+) in blocking GluN1/GluN2A NMDARs was reduced. The decrease in the potencies of both amantadine and memantine in the presence of physiological concentrations of Mg(2+) indicates that other targets (e.g. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and 5-HT(3) receptors) in addition to NMDARs may well be sites of the therapeutic action of these channel blockers.

  3. Common Gating of Both CLC Transporter Subunits Underlies Voltage-dependent Activation of the 2Cl−/1H+ Exchanger ClC-7/Ostm1*

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Carmen F.; Ullrich, Florian; Leisle, Lilia; Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    CLC anion transporters form dimers that function either as Cl− channels or as electrogenic Cl−/H+ exchangers. CLC channels display two different types of “gates,” “protopore” gates that open and close the two pores of a CLC dimer independently of each other and common gates that act on both pores simultaneously. ClC-7/Ostm1 is a lysosomal 2Cl−/1H+ exchanger that is slowly activated by depolarization. This gating process is drastically accelerated by many CLCN7 mutations underlying human osteopetrosis. Making use of some of these mutants, we now investigate whether slow voltage activation of plasma membrane-targeted ClC-7/Ostm1 involves protopore or common gates. Voltage activation of wild-type ClC-7 subunits was accelerated by co-expressing an excess of ClC-7 subunits carrying an accelerating mutation together with a point mutation rendering these subunits transport-deficient. Conversely, voltage activation of a fast ClC-7 mutant could be slowed by co-expressing an excess of a transport-deficient mutant. These effects did not depend on whether the accelerating mutation localized to the transmembrane part or to cytoplasmic cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) domains of ClC-7. Combining accelerating mutations in the same subunit did not speed up gating further. No currents were observed when ClC-7 was truncated after the last intramembrane helix. Currents and slow gating were restored when the C terminus was co-expressed by itself or fused to the C terminus of the β-subunit Ostm1. We conclude that common gating underlies the slow voltage activation of ClC-7. It depends on the CBS domain-containing C terminus that does not require covalent binding to the membrane domain of ClC-7. PMID:23983121

  4. Characterization of the Ca2+-Gated and Voltage-Dependent K+-Channel Slo-1 of Nematodes and Its Interaction with Emodepside

    PubMed Central

    Kulke, Daniel; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Miltsch, Sandra M.; Wolstenholme, Adrian J.; Jex, Aaron R.; Gasser, Robin B.; Ballesteros, Cristina; Geary, Timothy G.; Keiser, Jennifer; Townson, Simon; Harder, Achim; Krücken, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The cyclooctadepsipeptide emodepside and its parent compound PF1022A are broad-spectrum nematicidal drugs which are able to eliminate nematodes resistant to other anthelmintics. The mode of action of cyclooctadepsipeptides is only partially understood, but involves the latrophilin Lat-1 receptor and the voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channel Slo-1. Genetic evidence suggests that emodepside exerts its anthelmintic activity predominantly through Slo-1. Indeed, slo-1 deficient Caenorhabditis elegans strains are completely emodepside resistant. However, direct effects of emodepside on Slo-1 have not been reported and these channels have only been characterized for C. elegans and related Strongylida. Molecular and bioinformatic analyses identified full-length Slo-1 cDNAs of Ascaris suum, Parascaris equorum, Toxocara canis, Dirofilaria immitis, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca gutturosa and Strongyloides ratti. Two paralogs were identified in the trichocephalids Trichuris muris, Trichuris suis and Trichinella spiralis. Several splice variants encoding truncated channels were identified in Trichuris spp. Slo-1 channels of trichocephalids form a monophyletic group, showing that duplication occurred after the divergence of Enoplea and Chromadorea. To explore the function of a representative protein, C. elegans Slo-1a was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and studied in electrophysiological (voltage-clamp) experiments. Incubation of oocytes with 1-10 µM emodepside caused significantly increased currents over a wide range of step potentials in the absence of experimentally increased intracellular Ca2+, suggesting that emodepside directly opens C. elegans Slo-1a. Emodepside wash-out did not reverse the effect and the Slo-1 inhibitor verruculogen was only effective when applied before, but not after, emodepside. The identification of several splice variants and paralogs in some parasitic nematodes suggests that there are substantial differences in channel properties among

  5. Common gating of both CLC transporter subunits underlies voltage-dependent activation of the 2Cl-/1H+ exchanger ClC-7/Ostm1.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Carmen F; Ullrich, Florian; Leisle, Lilia; Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2013-10-04

    CLC anion transporters form dimers that function either as Cl(-) channels or as electrogenic Cl(-)/H(+) exchangers. CLC channels display two different types of "gates," "protopore" gates that open and close the two pores of a CLC dimer independently of each other and common gates that act on both pores simultaneously. ClC-7/Ostm1 is a lysosomal 2Cl(-)/1H(+) exchanger that is slowly activated by depolarization. This gating process is drastically accelerated by many CLCN7 mutations underlying human osteopetrosis. Making use of some of these mutants, we now investigate whether slow voltage activation of plasma membrane-targeted ClC-7/Ostm1 involves protopore or common gates. Voltage activation of wild-type ClC-7 subunits was accelerated by co-expressing an excess of ClC-7 subunits carrying an accelerating mutation together with a point mutation rendering these subunits transport-deficient. Conversely, voltage activation of a fast ClC-7 mutant could be slowed by co-expressing an excess of a transport-deficient mutant. These effects did not depend on whether the accelerating mutation localized to the transmembrane part or to cytoplasmic cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) domains of ClC-7. Combining accelerating mutations in the same subunit did not speed up gating further. No currents were observed when ClC-7 was truncated after the last intramembrane helix. Currents and slow gating were restored when the C terminus was co-expressed by itself or fused to the C terminus of the β-subunit Ostm1. We conclude that common gating underlies the slow voltage activation of ClC-7. It depends on the CBS domain-containing C terminus that does not require covalent binding to the membrane domain of ClC-7.

  6. Regulation of Voltage-Dependent Channel Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Tempeqrgature__effects on the elect rical proerie of I.. and._I We have done research on maricultured Aplygia during the last three summers. The reproducibility...obtained from mariculture alcohol and temperature upon lipid lateral diffusi- facilities at the Marine Biological Laboratory at bility in the plasma

  7. The activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is required at a posttranslational level for induction of voltage-dependent sodium channels by peptide growth factors in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and expression of voltage-dependent sodium (Na) channels is a crucial aspect of neuronal differentiation because of the central role these ion channels play in the generation of action potentials and the transfer of information in the nervous system. We have used rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell lines deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity to examine the role of PKA in the induction of Na channel expression by nerve growth factor (NGF) and basic FGF (bFGF). In the parental PC12 cell line both NGF and bFGF elicit an increase in the density of functional Na channels, as determined from whole-cell patch clamp recordings. This increase does not occur in two PC12 cell lines deficient in both isozymes of PKA (PKAI and PKAII), and is strongly reduced in a third line deficient in PKAII, but not PKAI. Despite the inability of the neurotrophic factors to induce functional Na channel expression in the PKA-deficient cells, Northern blot hybridization studies and saxitoxin binding assays of intact cells indicate that NGF and bFGF are still capable of eliciting increases in both Na channel mRNA and Na channel protein in the membrane. Thus, PKA activity appears to be necessary at a posttranslational step in the synthesis and expression of functional Na channels, and thereby plays an important role in determining neuronal excitability. PMID:1311713

  8. Airway Surface Dehydration by Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) in Cystic Fibrosis Is Due to Decreased Function of a Voltage-dependent Potassium Channel and Can Be Rescued by the Drug Pirfenidone*

    PubMed Central

    Manzanares, Dahis; Krick, Stefanie; Baumlin, Nathalie; Dennis, John S.; Tyrrell, Jean; Tarran, Robert; Salathe, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is not only elevated in airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, whose airways are characterized by abnormal ion transport and mucociliary clearance, but TGF-β1 is also associated with worse clinical outcomes. Effective mucociliary clearance depends on adequate airway hydration, governed by ion transport. Apically expressed, large-conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-dependent K+ (BK) channels play an important role in this process. In this study, TGF-β1 decreased airway surface liquid volume, ciliary beat frequency, and BK activity in fully differentiated CF bronchial epithelial cells by reducing mRNA expression of the BK γ subunit leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 26 (LRRC26) and its function. Although LRRC26 knockdown itself reduced BK activity, LRRC26 overexpression partially reversed TGF-β1-induced BK dysfunction. TGF-β1-induced airway surface liquid volume hyper-absorption was reversed by the BK opener mallotoxin and the clinically useful TGF-β signaling inhibitor pirfenidone. The latter increased BK activity via rescue of LRRC26. Therefore, we propose that TGF-β1-induced mucociliary dysfunction in CF airways is associated with BK inactivation related to a LRRC26 decrease and is amenable to treatment with clinically useful TGF-β1 inhibitors. PMID:26338706

  9. Cloning and expression of the translocator protein (18 kDa), voltage-dependent anion channel, and diazepam binding inhibitor in the gonad of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) across the reproductive cycle.

    PubMed

    Doperalski, Nicholas J; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Prucha, Melinda S; Kroll, Kevin J; Denslow, Nancy D; Barber, David S

    2011-08-01

    Cholesterol transport across the mitochondrial membrane is rate-limiting for steroidogenesis in vertebrates. Previous studies in fish have characterized expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, however the function and regulation of other genes and proteins involved in piscine cholesterol transport have not been evaluated. In the current study, mRNA sequences of the 18 kDa translocator protein (tspo; formerly peripheral benzodiazepine receptor), voltage-dependent anion channel (vdac), and diazepam binding inhibitor (dbi; also acyl-CoA binding protein) were cloned from largemouth bass. Gonadal expression was examined across reproductive stages to determine if expression is correlated with changes in steroid levels and with indicators of reproductive maturation. In testis, transcript abundance of tspo and dbi increased with reproductive maturation (6- and 23-fold maximal increase, respectively) and expression of tspo and dbi was positively correlated with reproductive stage, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and circulating levels of testosterone. Testis vdac expression was positively correlated with reproductive stage and GSI. In females, gonadal tspo and vdac expression was negatively correlated with GSI and levels of plasma testosterone and 17β-estradiol. Ovarian dbi expression was not correlated with indicators of reproductive maturation. These studies represent the first investigation of the steroidogenic role of tspo, vdac, and dbi in fish. Findings suggest that cholesterol transport in largemouth bass testis, but not in ovary, may be transcriptionally-regulated, however further investigation will be necessary to fully elucidate the role of these genes in largemouth bass steroidogenesis.

  10. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 activation by arachidonylcyclopropylamide in rat aortic rings causes vasorelaxation involving calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1 and calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, alpha 1C subunit.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pastor, E; Andrade, F; Sánchez-Pastor, J M; Elizalde, A; Huerta, M; Virgen-Ortiz, A; Trujillo, X; Rodríguez-Hernández, A

    2014-04-15

    Cannabinoids are key regulators of vascular tone, some of the mechanisms involved include the activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 (CB); the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1); and non-(CB(1))/non-CB2 receptors. Here, we used the potent, selective CB(1) agonist arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) to elucidate the mechanism underlying vascular tone regulation. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that CB(1) was expressed in smooth muscle and endothelial cells in rat aorta. We performed isometric tension recordings in aortic rings that had been pre-contracted with phenylephrine. In these conditions, ACPA caused vasorelaxation in an endothelium-independent manner. To confirm that the effect of ACPA was mediated by CB(1) receptor, we repeated the experiment after blocking these receptors with a selective antagonist, AM281. In these conditions, ACPA did not cause vasorelaxation. We explored the role of K(+) channels in the effect of ACPA by applying high-K(+) solution to induce contraction in aortic rings. In these conditions, the ACPA-induced vasorelaxation was about half that observed with phenylephrine-induced contraction. Thus, K(+) channels were involved in the ACPA effect. Furthermore, the vasorelaxation effect was similarly reduced when we specifically blocked calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1 (KCa1.1) (MaxiK; BKCa) prior to adding ACPA. Finally, ACPA-induced vasorelaxation was also diminished when we specifically blocked the calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, alpha 1C subunit (Ca(v)1.2). These results showed that ACPA activation of CB(1) in smooth muscle caused vasorelaxation of aortic rings through a mechanism involving the activation of K(Ca)1.1 and the inhibition of Ca(v)1.2.

  11. Quantitative Localization of Cav2.1 (P/Q-Type) Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels in Purkinje Cells: Somatodendritic Gradient and Distinct Somatic Coclustering with Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Indriati, Dwi Wahyu; Kamasawa, Naomi; Matsui, Ko; Meredith, Andrea L.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels play key roles in transmitter release, integration of dendritic signals, generation of dendritic spikes, and gene expression. High intracellular calcium concentration transient produced by these channels is restricted to tens to hundreds of nanometers from the channels. Therefore, precise localization of these channels along the plasma membrane was long sought to decipher how each neuronal cell function is controlled. Here, we analyzed the distribution of Cav2.1 subunit of the P/Q-type channel using highly sensitive SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labeling in the rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. The labeling efficiency was such that the number of immunogold particles in each parallel fiber active zone was comparable to that of functional channels calculated from previous reports. Two distinct patterns of Cav2.1 distribution, scattered and clustered, were found in Purkinje cells. The scattered Cav2.1 had a somatodendritic gradient with the density of immunogold particles increasing 2.5-fold from soma to distal dendrites. The other population with 74-fold higher density than the scattered particles was found within clusters of intramembrane particles on the P-face of soma and primary dendrites. Both populations of Cav2.1 were found as early as P3 and increased in the second postnatal week to a mature level. Using double immunogold labeling, we found that virtually all of the Cav2.1 clusters were colocalized with two types of calcium-activated potassium channels, BK and SK2, with the nearest neighbor distance of ~40 nm. Calcium nanodomain created by the opening of Cav2.1 channels likely activates the two channels that limit the extent of depolarization. PMID:23426693

  12. Blockade of T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels by benidipine, a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, inhibits aldosterone production in human adrenocortical cell line NCI-H295R.

    PubMed

    Akizuki, Osamu; Inayoshi, Atsushi; Kitayama, Tetsuya; Yao, Kozo; Shirakura, Shiro; Sasaki, Katsutoshi; Kusaka, Hideaki; Matsubara, Masahiro

    2008-04-28

    Benidipine, a long-lasting dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, is used for treatment of hypertension and angina. Benidipine exerts pleiotropic pharmacological features, such as renoprotective and cardioprotective effects. In pathophysiological conditions, the antidiuretic hormone aldosterone causes development of renal and cardiovascular diseases. In adrenal glomerulosa cells, aldosterone is produced in response to extracellular potassium, which is mainly mediated by T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. More recently, it has been demonstrated that benidipine inhibits T-type Ca2+ channels in addition to L-type Ca2+ channels. Therefore, effect of calcium channel blockers, including benidipine, on aldosterone production and T-type Ca2+ channels using human adrenocortical cell line NCI-H295R was investigated. Benidipine efficiently inhibited KCl-induced aldosterone production at low concentration (3 and 10 nM), with inhibitory activity more potent than other calcium channel blockers. Patch clamp analysis indicated that benidipine concentration-dependently inhibited T-type Ca2+ currents at 10, 100 and 1000 nM. As for examined calcium channel blockers, inhibitory activity for T-type Ca2+ currents was well correlated with aldosterone production. L-type specific calcium channel blockers calciseptine and nifedipine showed no effect in both assays. These results indicate that inhibition of T-type Ca2+ channels is responsible for inhibition of aldosterone production in NCI-H295R cells. Benidipine efficiently inhibited KCl-induced upregulation of 11-beta-hydroxylase mRNA and aldosterone synthase mRNA as well as KCl-induced Ca2+ influx, indicating it as the most likely inhibition mechanism. Benidipine partially inhibited angiotensin II-induced aldosterone production, plus showed additive effects when used in combination with the angiotensin II type I receptor blocker valsartan. Benidipine also partially inhibited angiotensin II-induced upregulation of the above m

  13. Static osteogenesis does not precede dynamic osteogenesis in periosteal ossification of Pleurodeles (Caudata, Amphibia) and Pogona (Squamata, Lepidosauria).

    PubMed

    Cubo, Jorge; Hui, Mylaine; Clarac, François; Quilhac, Alexandra

    2017-02-01

    Two successive mechanisms have been described in perichondral ossification: (1) in static osteogenesis, mesenchymal cells differentiate into stationary osteoblasts oriented randomly, which differentiate into osteocytes in the same site; (2) in dynamic osteogenesis, mesenchymal cells differentiate into osteoblasts that are all oriented in the same direction and move back as they secrete collagen fibers. This study is aimed at testing the hypothesis that the ontogenetic sequence static then dynamic osteogenesis observed in the chicken and in the rabbit is homologous and was acquired by the last common ancestor of amniotes or at a more inclusive node. For this we analyze the developmental patterns of Pleurodeles (Caudata, Amphibia) and those of the lizard Pogona (Squamata, Lepidosauria). We processed Pleurodeles larvae and Pogona embryos, prepared thin and ultrathin sections of appendicular bones, and analyzed them using light and transmission electron microscopy. We show that static osteogenesis does not precede dynamic osteogenesis in periosteal ossification of Pleurodeles and Pogona. Therefore, the null hypothesis is rejected and according to the parsimony method the ontogenetic sequence observed in the chicken and in the rabbit are convergent. In Pleurodeles and Pogona dynamic osteogenesis occur without a previous rigid mineralized framework, whereas in the chicken and in the rabbit dynamic osteogenesis seems to take place over a mineralized support whether bone (in perichondral ossification) or calcified cartilage (in endochondral ossification). Interestingly, in typical dynamic osteogenesis, osteoblasts show an axis (basal nucleus-distal endoplasmic reticulum) perpendicular to the front of secreted unmineralized bone matrix, whereas in Pleurodeles and Pogona this axis is parallel to the bone matrix.

  14. A new species of Rhabdias Stiles et Hassall, 1905 (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) from Blommersia domerguei (Guibé) (Amphibia: Mantellidae) in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Yuriy; Junker, Kerstin; du Preez, Louis; Bain, Odile

    2013-11-01

    Rhabdias blommersiae sp. n. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) is described from the lungs of Domergue's Madagascar frog, Blommersia domerguei (Guibé) (Amphibia: Mantellidae), in Madagascar. The new species differs from congeners parasitizing amphibians in having a smaller body and buccal capsule, six equal lips, large excretory glands of unequal length and a posteriorly inflated body vesicle. A combination of characters distinguishes it from Afromalagasy species of Rhabdias Stiles et Hassall, 1905. Rhabdias blommersiae is the third species of the genus described from amphibians in Madagascar. Close similarities in the number and shape of circumoral structures in two Rhabdias species described from mantellid hosts in Madagascar suggest a close relationship and common origin of the two species, with subsequent adaptation to separate hosts within the Mantellidae.

  15. Phylogenetic relationships of Oriental torrent frogs in the genus Amolops and its allies (Amphibia, Anura, Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Matsui, Masafumi; Shimada, Tomohiko; Liu, Wan-Zhao; Maryati, Mohamed; Khonsue, Wichase; Orlov, Nikolai

    2006-03-01

    We investigated the phylogenetic relationships among 20 species of Oriental torrent frogs in the genus Amolops and its allies from China and Southeast Asia based on 1346-bp sequences of the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA genes. Oriental species of the tribe Ranini form a monophyletic group containing 11 clades (Rana temporaria + Pseudoamolops, R. chalconota, four clades of Amolops, Meristogenys, three clades of Huia species, and Staurois) for which the phylogenetic relationships are unresolved. The genus Amolops consists of southern Chinese, southwestern Chinese, Thai, and Vietnamese-Malaysian lineages, but their relationships are also unresolved. The separation of southern and southwestern lineages within China conforms to previous morphological and karyological results. Species of Huia do not form a monophyletic group, whereas those of Meristogenys are monophyletic. Because P. sauteri is a sister species of R. temporaria, distinct generic status of Pseudoamolops is unwarranted.

  16. One hundred million years of skin feeding? Extended parental care in a Neotropical caecilian (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mark; Kupfer, Alexander; Marques-Porto, Rafael; Jeffkins, Hilary; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Jared, Carlos

    2008-08-23

    Maternal dermatophagy, the eating of maternal skin by offspring, is an unusual form of parental investment involving co-evolved specializations of both maternal skin and offspring dentition, which has been recently discovered in an African caecilian amphibian. Here we report the discovery of this form of parental care in a second, distantly related Neotropical species Siphonops annulatus, where it is characterized by the same syndrome of maternal and offspring specializations. The detailed similarities of skin feeding in different caecilian species provide strong evidence of its homology, implying its presence in the last common ancestor of these species. Biogeographic considerations, the separation of Africa and South American land masses and inferred timescales of amphibian diversification all suggest that skin feeding is an ancient form of parental care in caecilians, which has probably persisted in multiple lineages for more than 100 Myr. These inferences support the hypotheses that (i) maternal dermatophagy is widespread in oviparous direct-developing caecilians, and (ii) that viviparous caecilians that feed on the hypertrophied maternal oviduct evolved from skin-feeding ancestors. In addition to skin-feeding, young S. annulatus were observed to congregate around, and imbibe liquid exuded from, the maternal cloacal opening.

  17. Three new species of the salamander genus Hynobius (Amphibia, Urodela, Hynobiidae) from Kyushu, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Kanto; Matsui, Masafumi

    2014-08-14

    Three new species of lotic breeding Hynobius, formerly assigned to H. boulengeri, are described from the Kyushu region, southwestern Japan. They differ from all the known congeners by a unique combination of body size, character ratios, coloration, mtDNA, and allozymic characteristics. Together with H. stejnegeri they form a clade, which is not a sister group of H. boulengeri, and their speciation in Kyushu is surmised to have occurred at the end of Miocene, accompanied by differentiations in larval period and metamorphosing size. Measures of conservation of these new species are discussed briefly. 

  18. A new species of Microcaecilia Taylor, 1968 (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Siphonopidae) from Amazonian Brazil.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mark; Antoniazzi, Marta Maria; Jared, Carlos

    2015-01-13

    A new species of siphonopid caecilian, Microcaecilia butantan sp. nov., is described based on four specimens from Belterra, in the State of Pará, Brazil. The new species differs from all other Microcaecilia in having a combination of more than 135 primary annuli and long premaxillary-maxillary tooth series that extend posteriorly beyond the choanae. Some specimens were dug from soil in a cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum) plantation suggesting that this form of agriculture provides an environment suitable for at least some caecilians.

  19. Histology of the trachea and lung of Siphonops annulatus (Amphibia, Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Kuehne, B; Junqueira, L C

    2000-02-01

    The structure of the trachea and lung of Siphonops annulatus was studied in ten specimens of routinely fed animals. The trachea is constituted mainly by incomplete cartilage rings lined by a respiratory epithelium (ciliated and mucous cells) with variable morphology according to the region observed. A rich vascularization of this organ suggests its participation in blood-air gas exchange. The right lung in this species is developed and the left one is atrophied. This organ is constituted mainly by longitudinal septa formed by connective tissue, smooth muscle cells and blood capillaries. These structures are covered by pneumocytes of one type only, which present cytoplasmic particles that have been related with surfactant activity described in the lung of Gymnophiona.

  20. A New Basal Salamandroid (Amphibia, Urodela) from the Late Jurassic of Qinglong, Hebei Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Gao, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    A new salamandroid salamander, Qinglongtriton gangouensis (gen. et sp. nov.), is named and described based on 46 fossil specimens of juveniles and adults collected from the Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Tiaojishan Formation cropping out in Hebei Province, China. The new salamander displays several ontogenetically and taxonomically significant features, most prominently the presence of a toothed palatine, toothed coronoid, and a unique pattern of the hyobranchium in adults. Comparative study of the new salamander with previously known fossil and extant salamandroids sheds new light on the early evolution of the Salamandroidea, the most species-diverse clade in the Urodela. Cladistic analysis places the new salamander as the sister taxon to Beiyanerpeton, and the two taxa together form the basalmost clade within the Salamandroidea. Along with recently reported Beiyanerpeton from the same geological formation in the neighboring Liaoning Province, the discovery of Qinglongtriton indicates that morphological disparity had been underway for the salamandroid clade by early Late Jurassic (Oxfordian) time. PMID:27144770

  1. A new species of salamander of the genus Hynobius from Central Honshu, Japan (Amphibia, Urodela).

    PubMed

    Matsui, Masafumi; Kokuryo, Yasuhiro; Misawa, Yasuchika; Nishikawa, Kanto

    2004-06-01

    We describe a small salamander from south Central Honshu, Japan, as a new species, Hynobius katoi. The genetic distances between this species and several named species, including sympatric H. kimurae, derived from allozyme data from a starch gel electrophoresis, proved to be sufficiently large to differentiate it at a specific rank. Distribution of this species is confined to the montane regions of Shizuoka and Nagano Prefectures, on the Akaishi Mountains of the Chubu District, central Japan. It is regarded as a member of the naevius group of Hynobius, characterized by small number of large, pigmentless ova. The species differs from the other species of the naevius group by the combination of relatively small body size, nearly spotless body, relatively few vomerine teeth forming moderately shallow series, and unique electrophoretic pattern of isozymes.

  2. Oviduct modifications in foam-nesting frogs, with emphasis on the genus Leptodactylus (Amphibia, Leptodactylidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furness, Andrew I.; McDiarmid, Roy W.; Heyer, W. Ronald; Zug, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Various species of frogs produce foam nests that hold their eggs during development. We examined the external morphology and histology of structures associated with foam nest production in frogs of the genus Leptodactylus and a few other taxa. We found that the posterior convolutions of the oviducts in all mature female foam-nesting frogs that we examined were enlarged and compressed into globular structures. This organ-like portion of the oviduct has been called a "foam gland" and these structures almost certainly produce the secretion that is beaten by rhythmic limb movements into foam that forms the nest. However, the label "foam gland" is a misnomer because the structures are simply enlarged and tightly folded regions of the pars convoluta of the oviduct, rather than a separate structure; we suggest the name pars convoluta dilata (PCD) for this feature. Although all the foam-nesters we examined had a pars convoluta dilata, its size and shape showed considerable interspecific variation. Some of this variation likely reflects differences in the breeding behaviors among species and in the size, type, and placement of their foam nests. Other variation, particularly in size, may be associated with the physiological periodicity and reproductive state of the female, her age, and/or the number of times she has laid eggs.

  3. Cytonuclear discordance and historical demography of two brown frogs, Rana tagoi and R. sakuraii (Amphibia: Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Eto, Koshiro; Matsui, Masafumi

    2014-10-01

    Prior studies of mitochondrial genomic variation reveal that the Japanese brown frog Rana tagoi comprises a complex of cryptic species lineages, and that R. sakuraii arose from within this complex. Neither species forms a monophyletic group on the mitochondrial haplotype tree, precluding a simple explanation for the evolutionary origins of R. sakuraii. We present a more complete sampling of mitochondrial haplotypic variation (from the ND1 and 16S genes) plus DNA sequence variation for five nuclear loci (from the genes encoding NCX1, NFIA, POMC, SLC8A3, and TYR) to resolve the evolutionary histories of these species. We test hypotheses of population assignment (STRUCTURE) and isolation-with-migration (IM) using the more slowly evolving nuclear markers. These demographic analyses of nuclear genetic variation confirm species-level distinctness and integrity of R. sakuraii despite its apparent polyphyly on the mitochondrial haplotype tree. Divergence-time estimates from both the mitochondrial haplotypes and nuclear genomic markers suggest that R. sakuraii originated approximately one million years ago, and that incomplete sorting of mitochondrial haplotype lineages best explains non-monophyly of R. sakuraii mitochondrial haplotypes. Cytonuclear discordance elsewhere in R. tagoi reveals a case of mitochondrial introgression between two species lineages on Honshu. The earliest phylogenetic divergence within this species group occurred approximately four million years ago, followed by cladogenetic events in the Pliocene and early Pleistocene yielding 10-13 extant species lineages, including R. sakuraii as one of the youngest.

  4. Two new Salamanders of the genus Onychodactylus from Eastern Honshu, Japan (Amphibia, Caudata, Hynobiidae).

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Natsuhiko; Matsui, Masafumi

    2014-09-22

    We describe two new species of hynobiid salamanders in the genus Onychodactylus from eastern Honshu, Japan, based on the morphological and genetic evidence. Onychodactylus intermedius sp. nov. is distributed in southern part of Tohoku District and northern Ibaraki and Niigata Prefectures, and was previously reported as S-Tohoku group. Onychodactylus intermedius belongs to the O. japonicus species complex, and differs from the other congeners in having relatively long tail, narrow head, short snout, 18 presacral vertebrae, and distinctly curved vomerine tooth series without gap. Onychodactylus fuscus sp. nov. is known from only four localities in Fukushima and Niigata Prefectures of Tohoku and Hokuriku Districts. It also belongs to the O. japonicus complex, but lacks the dorsal stripe, which is a diagnostic character of the species complex. In other characteristics, O. fuscus differs from the other congeners in having comparatively long tail, wide head and internarial space, shallowly curved vomerine tooth series with gap, and relatively few vomerine teeth. Both species described here breed in winter. Phylogenetically, the two new species are closely related to each other, forming a well-supported clade with O. tsukubaensis as their sister species. Onychodactylus intermedius sp. nov. is known to be parapatric with O. japonicus and O. nipponoborealis without hybridization, whereas O. fuscus sp. nov. is sympatric with O. japonicus at least in a single known locality, and analysis of microsatellite loci indicates they are reproductively isolated.

  5. Helminth parasites of the leopard frog Lithobates sp. Colima (Amphibia: Ranidae) from Colima, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Guzmán, Elisa; Garrido-Olvera, Lorena; León-Règagnon, Virginia

    2010-08-01

    The helminth fauna inhabiting Lithobates sp. Colima from Ticuizitán, Colima, Mexico, comprises 10 species: 4 digeneans ( Clinostomum sp., Glypthelmins quieta , Haematoloechus sp., and Langeronia macrocirra ), 5 nematodes ( Aplectana itzocanensis , Cosmocerca podicipinus , Foleyellides striatus , Oswaldocruzia subauricularis , and Rhabdias sp.), and 1 cestode (Cyclophyllidea). Glypthelmins quieta , L. macrocirra , and A. itzocanensis represent new host records. These observations, added to previous records from Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico, indicate that the helminth fauna of Lithobates sp. from Colima comprises 25 taxa. Frogs are being parasitized by 3 infection routes: ingestion of intermediate host, skin penetration by larval forms, and transmission by vectors. Species of Aplectana , Cosmocerca , Foleyellides , and Oswaldocruzia occurred in high prevalence in Colima, similar to a previous study on the same frog species from Guerrero. In Colima, Glypthelmins , Haematoloechus , and Rhabdias also occurred in high prevalence. Haematoloechus species reached the highest mean intensity in both localities. The semiaquatic habits of this species of frog and the availability of particular feeding resources appear to determine the helminth composition and infection levels; however, co-speciation events also play an important role structuring these helminth communities.

  6. Molecular phylogeny and diversification of the genus Odorrana (Amphibia, Anura, Ranidae) inferred from two mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhuo; Jiang, Jianping; Qiao, Liang; Lu, Youqiang; Zhou, Kaiya; Zheng, Guangmei; Zhai, Xiaofei; Liu, Jianxin

    2013-12-01

    A diversity of hypotheses have been proposed for phylogenetic relationships and taxonomy within the genus Odorrana, and great progress has been made over the past several decades. However, there is still some controversy concerning relationships among Odorrana species. Here, we used many paratypes and topotypes and utilized 1.81 kb of mitochondrial sequence data to generate a phylogeny for approximately 4/5 of Odorrana species, and Odorrana haplotypes form a strongly supported monophyletic group relative to the other genera sampled. The deepest phylogenetic divergences within Odorrana separate 3 lineages whose interrelationships are not recovered with strong support. These lineages include the ancestral lineage of O. chapaensis, the ancestral lineage of a strongly supported clade comprising many western species, and the ancestral lineage of a strongly supported clade comprising all other Odorrana sampled. Within the latter clade, the first phylogenetic split separates O. ishikawae from a well-supported clade comprising its other species. These divergences likely occurred in the middle Miocene, approximately 12-15 million years ago. Separation of the ancestral lineage of Odorrana from its closest relative, Babina in our study, likely occurred in the early Miocene or possibly late Oligocene. Rates of lineage accumulation remained high from the middle Miocene through the Pleistocene.

  7. Patterns of peripheral innervation of the tongue and hyobranchial apparatus in caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Wake, M H

    1992-04-01

    The innervation of the musculature of the tongue and the hyobranchial apparatus of caecilians has long been assumed to be simple and to exhibit little interspecific variation. A study of 14 genera representing all six families of caecilians demonstrates that general patterns of innervation by the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerves are similar across taxa but that the composition of the "hypoglossal" nerve is highly variable. Probably in all caecilians, spinal nerves 1 and 2 contribute to the hypoglossal. In addition, in certain taxa, an "occipital," the vagus, and/or spinal 3 appear to contribute fibers to the composition of the hypoglossal nerve. These patterns, the lengths of fusion of the contributing elements, and the branching patterns of the hypoglossal are assessed according to the currently accepted hypothesis of phylogenetic relationships of caecilians, and of amphibians. An hypothesis is proposed that limblessness and a simple tongue, with concomitant reduced complexity of innervation of muscles associated with limbs and the tongue, has released a constraint on pattern of innervation. As a consequence, a greater diversity and, in several taxa, greater complexity of neuroanatomical associations of nerve roots to form the hypoglossal are expressed.

  8. Molecular systematics of caeciliid caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona) of the Western Ghats, India.

    PubMed

    Gower, David J; San Mauro, Diego; Giri, Varad; Bhatta, Gopalakrishna; Govindappa, Venu; Kotharambath, Ramachandran; Oommen, Oommen V; Fatih, Farrah A; Mackenzie-Dodds, Jacqueline A; Nussbaum, Ronald A; Biju, S D; Shouche, Yogesh S; Wilkinson, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Together, Indian plus Seychelles caeciliid caecilian amphibians (Gymnophiona) constitute approximately 10% of the extant species of this order. A molecular phylogenetic analysis of all but one (or two) nominal species (16, in five genera) is presented based on mitochondrial (12S, 16S, cytb, cox1) and nuclear (RAG1) sequence data. Results strongly support monophyly of both Seychelles and peninsular Indian caeciliids, and their sister-group status. Within the Indian caeciliids, Indotyphlus and Gegeneophis are monophyletic sister genera. The phylogenetic position of Gegeneophis ramaswamii, Gegeneophis seshachari, and Gegeneophis carnosus are not well resolved, but all lie outside a well-supported clade of most northern Western Ghats Gegeneophis (madhavai, mhadeiensis, goaensis, danieli/nadkarnii). Most nominal species of Indian caeciliid are diagnosed by robust haplotype clades, though the systematics of G. carnosus-like forms in northern Kerala and southern Karnataka requires substantial further investigation. For the most part, Indian caeciliid species comprise narrowly distributed, allopatric taxa with low genetic diversity. Much greater geographic genetic diversity exists among populations referred to G. seshachari, such that some populations likely represent undescribed species. This, the first phylogenetic analysis of Indian caeciliids, generally provides additional support for recent increases in described species (eight since 1999), and a framework for ongoing taxonomic revision.

  9. A molecular assessment of phylogenetic relationships and lineage accumulation rates within the family Salamandridae (Amphibia, Caudata).

    PubMed

    Weisrock, David W; Papenfuss, Theodore J; Macey, J Robert; Litvinchuk, Spartak N; Polymeni, Rosa; Ugurtas, Ismail H; Zhao, Ermi; Jowkar, Houman; Larson, Allan

    2006-11-01

    We examine phylogenetic relationships among salamanders of the family Salamandridae using approximately 2700 bases of new mtDNA sequence data (the tRNALeu, ND1, tRNAIle, tRNAGln, tRNAMet, ND2, tRNATrp, tRNAAla, tRNAAsn, tRNACys, tRNATyr, and COI genes and the origin for light-strand replication) collected from 96 individuals representing 61 of the 66 recognized salamandrid species and outgroups. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony and Bayesian analysis are performed on the new data alone and combined with previously reported sequences from other parts of the mitochondrial genome. The basal phylogenetic split is a polytomy of lineages ancestral to (1) the Italian newt Salamandrina terdigitata, (2) a strongly supported clade comprising the "true" salamanders (genera Chioglossa, Mertensiella, Lyciasalamandra, and Salamandra), and (3) a strongly supported clade comprising all newts except S. terdigitata. Strongly supported clades within the true salamanders include monophyly of each genus and grouping Chioglossa and Mertensiella as the sister taxon to a clade comprising Lyciasalamandra and Salamandra. Among newts, genera Echinotriton, Pleurodeles, and Tylototriton form a strongly supported clade whose sister taxon comprises the genera Calotriton, Cynops, Euproctus, Neurergus, Notophthalmus, Pachytriton, Paramesotriton, Taricha, and Triturus. Our results strongly support monophyly of all polytypic newt genera except Paramesotriton and Triturus, which appear paraphyletic, and Calotriton, for which only one of the two species is sampled. Other well-supported clades within newts include (1) Asian genera Cynops, Pachytriton, and Paramesotriton, (2) North American genera Notophthalmus and Taricha, (3) the Triturus vulgaris species group, and (4) the Triturus cristatus species group; some additional groupings appear strong in Bayesian but not parsimony analyses. Rates of lineage accumulation through time are evaluated using this nearly comprehensive sampling of

  10. Morphology of the kidney in the West African caecilian, Geotrypetes seraphini (Amphibia, Gymnophiona, Caeciliidae).

    PubMed

    Møbjerg, N; Jespersen, A; Wilkinson, M

    2004-11-01

    This study deals with the morphology and ultrastructure of the mesonephros in adult caecilians of the species Geotrypetes seraphini. Based on serial sections in paraffin and araldite, nephrons are reconstructed and the cellular characteristics of different nephron segments described. The long and slender mesonephric kidneys of G. seraphini are broadest caudally and taper toward the front, where the organs are divided into smaller segmental divisions. Two nephron types can be distinguished on the basis of their connections to the coelom and their position within the nephric tissue: ventral nephrons connect to the coelom via a ciliated peritoneal funnel, whereas medial nephrons lack this connection. Both nephron types are composed of a filtration unit, the Malpighian corpuscle, and a renal tubule, which can be divided into six morphologically distinct segments: neck segment, proximal tubule, intermediate segment, early distal tubule, late distal tubule, and collecting tubule. Collecting tubules merge and form a branch system that opens into collecting ducts. Collecting ducts empty into the Wolffian duct. Proximal tubules of nephrons in the frontal divisions are morphologically different from the proximal tubules of more caudal kidney regions. Distal tubule subdivision is only clearly recognizable at the electron microscopic level. The length of each nephron segment is calculated from a ventral nephron with a total length of approximately 3.8 mm, and the course of the segments within the nephric tissue is reported. The number of nephrons was estimated at 1,700 units in each kidney. The segmentation and ultrastructure of the mesonephric nephrons in G. seraphini are discussed in relation to nephron descriptions from other caecilians and we further discuss the evolutionary origin of the amphibian nephron.

  11. Autoradiographic localization of voltage-dependent sodium channels on the mouse neuromuscular junction using /sup 125/I-alpha scorpion toxin. I. Preferential labeling of glial cells on the presynaptic side

    SciTech Connect

    Boudier, J.L.; Jover, E.; Cau, P.

    1988-05-01

    Alpha-scorpion toxins bind specifically to the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in excitable membranes, and binding is potential-dependent. The radioiodinated toxin II from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector (alpha ScTx) was used to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels on the presynaptic side of mouse neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) by autoradiography using both light and electron microscopy. Silver grain localization was analyzed by the cross-fire method. At the light-microscopic level, grain density over NMJ appeared 6-8x higher than over nonjunctional muscle membrane. The specificity of labeling was verified by competition/displacement with an excess of native alpha ScTx. Labeling was also inhibited by incubation in depolarizing conditions, showing its potential-dependence. At the electron-microscopic level, analysis showed that voltage-sensitive sodium channels labeled with alpha ScTx were almost exclusively localized on membranes, as expected. Due to washout after incubation, appreciable numbers of binding sites were not found on the postsynaptic membranes. However, on the presynaptic side, alpha ScTx-labeled voltage-sensitive sodium channels were localized on the membrane of non-myelin-forming Schwann cells covering NMJ. The axonal presynaptic membrane was not labeled. These results show that voltage-sensitive sodium channels are present on glial cells in vivo, as already demonstrated in vitro. It is proposed that these glial channels could be indirectly involved in the ionic homeostasis of the axonal environment.

  12. Antagonism of 4-substituted 1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylates toward voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels Ca V 1.3 and Ca V 1.2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Che-Chien; Cao, Song; Kang, Soosung; Kai, Li; Tian, Xinyong; Pandey, Prativa; Dunne, Sara Fernandez; Luan, Chi-Hao; Surmeier, D James; Silverman, Richard B

    2010-05-01

    L-type Ca(2+) channels in mammalian brain neurons have either a Ca(V)1.2 or Ca(V)1.3 pore-forming subunit. Recently, it was shown that Ca(V)1.3 Ca(2+) channels underlie autonomous pacemaking in adult dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and this reliance renders them sensitive to toxins used to create animal models of Parkinson's disease. Antagonism of these channels with the dihydropyridine antihypertensive drug isradipine diminishes the reliance on Ca(2+) and the sensitivity of these neurons to toxins, pointing to a potential neuroprotective strategy. However, for neuroprotection without an antihypertensive side effect, selective Ca(V)1.3 channel antagonists are required. In an attempt to identify potent and selective antagonists of Ca(V)1.3 channels, 124 dihydropyridines (4-substituted-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylic diesters) were synthesized. The antagonism of heterologously expressed Ca(V)1.2 and Ca(V)1.3 channels was then tested using electrophysiological approaches and the FLIPR Calcium 4 assay. Despite the large diversity in substitution on the dihydropyridine scaffold, the most Ca(V)1.3 selectivity was only about twofold. These results support a highly similar dihydropyridine binding site at both Ca(V)1.2 and Ca(V)1.3 channels and suggests that other classes of compounds need to be identified for Ca(V)1.3 selectivity.

  13. β1a490-508, a 19-residue peptide from C-terminal tail of Cav1.1 β1a subunit, potentiates voltage-dependent calcium release in adult skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Olojo, Rotimi O; Rebbeck, Robyn T; Dulhunty, Angela F; Schneider, Martin F

    2014-02-04

    The α1 and β1a subunits of the skeletal muscle calcium channel, Cav1.1, as well as the Ca(2+) release channel, ryanodine receptor (RyR1), are essential for excitation-contraction coupling. RyR1 channel activity is modulated by the β1a subunit and this effect can be mimicked by a peptide (β1a490-524) corresponding to the 35-residue C-terminal tail of the β1a subunit. Protein-protein interaction assays confirmed a high-affinity interaction between the C-terminal tail of the β1a and RyR1. Based on previous results using overlapping peptides tested on isolated RyR1, we hypothesized that a 19-amino-acid residue peptide (β1a490-508) is sufficient to reproduce activating effects of β1a490-524. Here we examined the effects of β1a490-508 on Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) currents in adult skeletal muscle fibers subjected to voltage-clamp and on RyR1 channel activity after incorporating sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles into lipid bilayers. β1a490-508 (25 nM) increased the peak Ca(2+) release flux by 49% in muscle fibers. Considerably fewer activating effects were observed using 6.25, 100, and 400 nM of β1a490-508 in fibers. β1a490-508 also increased RyR1 channel activity in bilayers and Cav1.1 currents in fibers. A scrambled form of β1a490-508 peptide was used as negative control and produced negligible effects on Ca(2+) release flux and RyR1 activity. Our results show that the β1a490-508 peptide contains molecular components sufficient to modulate excitation-contraction coupling in adult muscle fibers.

  14. The evolution from asparagine or threonine to cysteine in position 146 contributes to generation of a more efficient and stable form of muscle creatine kinase in higher vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tong-Jin; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zhao; Yan, Yong-Bin; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2006-01-01

    Creatine kinase, a key enzyme in vertebrate excitable tissues that require large energy fluxes, catalyzes the reversible transfer of phosphate between adenosine triphosphate and creatine. Sequence alignment indicated that the 146th amino acid is cysteine in the muscle creatine kinase of higher vertebrates including Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves and Mammalia. In fishes, it is cysteine in Agnatha and Chondrichthyes, and asparagine or threonine in Osteichthyes, which is the ancestor of Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves and Mammalia. To explore the structural and functional role of this special residue, a series of site-directed mutants of rabbit muscle creatine kinase were constructed, including C146S, C146N, C146T, C146G, C146A, C146D and C146R. A detailed comparison was made between wild-type creatine kinase and the mutants in catalytic activity, physico-chemical properties and structural stability against thermal inactivation and guanidine hydrochloride denaturation. It was found that except for C146S, the mutants had relatively lower catalytic activity and structural stability than Wt-CK. Wt-CK and C146S were the most stable ones, followed by C146N and C146T, and then C146G and C146A, and C146D and C146R were the least stable mutants. These results suggested that the 146th residue plays a crucial role in maintaining the structural stability of creatine kinase, and that the evolution in this amino acid from asparagine or threonine to cysteine contributes to the generation of a more efficient and more stable form of creatine kinase in higher vertebrates.

  15. Voltage-Dependent Intrinsic Bursting in Olfactory Bulb Golgi Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressler, R. Todd; Rozman, Peter A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB), local synaptic circuits modulate the evolving pattern of activity in mitral and tufted cells following olfactory sensory stimulation. GABAergic granule cells, the most numerous interneuron subtype in this brain region, have been extensively studied. However, classic studies using Golgi staining methods…

  16. Voltage-Dependent Luminescence Properties of Molecularly Doped Polymer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingliang, Wang; Junxiang, Zhang; Juzheng, Liu; Chunxiang, Xu

    2001-05-01

    Single-layer light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are fabricated using a mixture of a blue-emitting polymer and green-emitting 9, 10-bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene as emitting layer. The blend device with these two components in the emitting layer exhibits voltage-induced evolution of the electroluminescence. But when polystyrene is also blended into the emitting layer, the EL spectra show emission bands from both ether-PPV and BPEA in proportion to concentrations of the two materials, and the spectra exhibit no change with applied voltage. This implies that doping inert polymer is helpful in suppressing voltage-induced evolution of electroluminescence in LED blends.

  17. Channels Formed by Botulinum, Tetanus, and Diphtheria Toxins in Planar Lipid Bilayers: Relevance to Translocation of Proteins across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, David H.; Romero-Mira, Miryam; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Finkelstein, Alan; Dasgupta, Bibhuti R.; Simpson, Lance L.

    1985-03-01

    The heavy chains of both botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin form channels in planar bilayer membranes. These channels have pH-dependent and voltage-dependent properties that are remarkably similar to those previously described for diphtheria toxin. Selectivity experiments with anions and cations show that the channels formed by the heavy chains of all three toxins are large; thus, these channels could serve as ``tunnel proteins'' for translocation of active peptide fragments. These findings support the hypothesis that the active fragments of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin, like that of diphtheria toxin, are translocated across the membranes of acidic vesicles.

  18. Non-target effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on Common toad larvae (Bufo bufo, Amphibia) and associated algae are altered by temperature

    PubMed Central

    Baier, Fabian; Gruber, Edith; Bondar-Kunze, Elisabeth; Ivanković, Marina; Mentler, Axel; Brühl, Carsten A.; Spangl, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background Glyphosate-based herbicides are the most widely used pesticides in agriculture, horticulture, municipalities and private gardens that can potentially contaminate nearby water bodies inhabited by amphibians and algae. Moreover, the development and diversity of these aquatic organisms could also be affected by human-induced climate change that might lead to more periods with extreme temperatures. However, to what extent non-target effects of these herbicides on amphibians or algae are altered by varying temperature is not well known. Methods We studied effects of five concentrations of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulation Roundup PowerFlex (0, 1.5, 3, 4 mg acid equivalent glyphosate L−1 as a one time addition and a pulse treatment of totally 4 mg a.e. glyphosate L−1) on larval development of Common toads (Bufo bufo, L.; Amphibia: Anura) and associated algae communities under two temperature regimes (15 vs. 20 °C). Results Herbicide contamination reduced tail growth (−8%), induced the occurrence of tail deformations (i.e. lacerated or crooked tails) and reduced algae diversity (−6%). Higher water temperature increased tadpole growth (tail and body length (tl/bl) +66%, length-to-width ratio +4%) and decreased algae diversity (−21%). No clear relation between herbicide concentrations and tadpole growth or algae density or diversity was observed. Interactive effects of herbicides and temperature affected growth parameters, tail deformation and tadpole mortality indicating that the herbicide effects are temperature-dependent. Remarkably, herbicide-temperature interactions resulted in deformed tails in 34% of all herbicide treated tadpoles at 15 °C whereas no tail deformations were observed for the herbicide-free control at 15 °C or any tadpole at 20 °C; herbicide-induced mortality was higher at 15 °C but lower at 20 °C. Discussion These herbicide- and temperature-induced changes may have decided effects on ecological interactions in

  19. Permission Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    The prevailing practice in public schools is to routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities that pose potential for liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered to be neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. The following case and the…

  20. Highly complex mitochondrial DNA genealogy in an endemic Japanese subterranean breeding brown frog Rana tagoi (Amphibia, Anura, Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Eto, Koshiro; Matsui, Masafumi; Sugahara, Takahiro; Tanaka-Ueno, Tomoko

    2012-10-01

    The endemic Japanese frog Rana tagoi is unique among Holarctic brown frogs in that it breeds in small subterranean streams. Using mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 genes, we investigated genealogical relationships among geographic samples of this species together with its relative R. sakuraii, which is also a unique stream breeder. These two species together form a monophyletic group, within which both are reciprocally paraphyletic. Rana tagoi is divided into two major clades (Clade A and B) that are composed of 14 genetic groups. Rana sakuraii is included in Clade A and split into two genetic groups, one of which forms a clade (Subclade A-2) with sympatric R. tagoi. This species-level paraphyly appears to be caused by incomplete taxonomy, in addition to introgressive hybridization and/or incomplete lineage sorting. Rana tagoi strongly differs from other Japanese anurans in its geographic pattern of genetic differentiation, most probably in relation to its unique reproductive habits. Taxonomically, R. tagoi surely includes many cryptic species.

  1. Long bone histology of the stem salamander Kokartus honorarius (Amphibia: Caudata) from the Middle Jurassic of Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Skutschas, Pavel; Stein, Koen

    2015-04-01

    Kokartus honorarius from the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) of Kyrgyzstan is one of the oldest salamanders in the fossil record, characterized by a mixture of plesiomorphic morphological features and characters shared with crown-group salamanders. Here we present a detailed histological analysis of its long bones. The analysis of a growth series demonstrates a significant histological maturation during ontogeny, expressed by the progressive appearance of longitudinally oriented primary vascular canals, primary osteons, growth marks, remodelling features in primary bone tissues, as well as progressive resorption of the calcified cartilage, formation of endochondral bone and development of cartilaginous to bony trabeculae in the epiphyses. Apart from the presence of secondary osteons, the long bone histology of Kokartus is very similar to that of miniaturized temnospondyls, other Jurassic stem salamanders, miniaturized seymouriamorphs and modern crown-group salamanders. We propose that the presence of secondary osteons in Kokartus honorarius is a plesiomorphic feature, and the loss of secondary osteons in the long bones of crown-group salamanders as well as in those of miniaturized temnospondyls is the result of miniaturization processes. Hitherto, all stem salamander long bong histology (Kokartus, Marmorerpeton and 'salamander A') has been generally described as having paedomorphic features (i.e. the presence of Katschenko's Line and a layer of calcified cartilage), these taxa were thus most likely neotenic forms. The absence of clear lines of arrested growth and annuli in long bones of Kokartus honorarius suggests that the animals lived in an environment with stable local conditions.

  2. Spermiogenesis in caecilians Ichthyophis tricolor and Uraeotyphlus cf. narayani (Amphibia: Gymnophiona): analysis by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smita, Mathew; George, Jancy M; Girija, R; Akbarsha, M A; Oommen, Oommen V

    2004-10-01

    Spermiogenesis, known as spermateleosis in lower vertebrates, is the transformation of the round spermatid into a highly specialized spermatozoon with a species-specific structure. Spermateleosis and sperm morphology of two species of caecilians, Ichthyophis tricolor and Uraeotyphlus cf. narayani, from the Western Ghats of Kerala, India, were studied using light and transmission electron microscopy. Spermateleosis is described in early, mid-, and late phases. During the early phase, the spermatid nucleus does not elongate, but the acrosome vesicle is Golgi-derived and its material is produced as a homogeneous substance rather than as discrete granules. In development of the acrosome, the centrioles shift in position to the lower half of the cell. The acrosomal vesicles take the full shape of the acrosome with the establishment of the perforatorium in midphase. An endonuclear canal develops and accommodates the perforatorium. The incipient flagellum is laid down when the proximal centriole attaches to the posterior side of the nucleus and the distal centriole connects to the proximal centriole, which forms the basal granule of the acrosome. The axial fiber also appears during midphase. The mitochondria shift in position to the posterior pole of the cell to commence establishment of the midphase. Late phase is characterized by nuclear condensation and elongation. Consequently, the final organization of the sperm is established with the head containing the nucleus and the acrosome. The undulating membrane separates the axoneme and axial fiber. Most of the cytoplasm is lost as residual bodies.

  3. Apoptosis, proliferation and presence of estradiol receptors in the testes and Bidder's organ of the toad Rhinella arenarum (Amphibia, Anura).

    PubMed

    Scaia, María Florencia; Czuchlej, Silvia Cristina; Cervino, Nadia; Ceballos, Nora Raquel

    2016-04-01

    The dynamic equilibrium between spermatogonial proliferation and testicular apoptosis determines the progression of spermatogenesis in amphibians. Estrogens and their receptors play a central role in regulating spermatogenesis in vertebrates, and in some species of anurans, estradiol (E2 ) is involved in the regulation of spermatogonial proliferation and apoptosis of germ cells. Bidder's organ (BO) is a structure characteristic of Bufonidae that has historically been compared to an undeveloped ovary. In adult Rhinella arenarum males, BO is one of the main sources of plasma E2 . The aim of this study was 1) to describe the seasonal variations in testicular apoptosis, spermatogonial proliferation, and cellular proliferation in BO; and 2) to analyze the presence and localization of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in the testes and BO of R. arenarum. Testicular fragments and BOs from animals collected during the year were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and BrdU incorporation was determined using immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis in testicular sections was detected using the TUNEL method, and ERβ localization was assessed using immunohistochemistry in testes and BOs. The results indicate that spermatogonial proliferation is highest during the reproductive season and that cysts of spermatocytes and spermatids undergo apoptosis during the postreproductive season. Furthermore, the proliferation of follicular cells is highest during the reproductive and postreproductive seasons. ERβ was primarily detected by immunolocalization in Sertoli cells, follicular cells, and oocytes. Taken together, these results suggest that cysts that do not form spermatozoa are removed from testes by apoptosis and that estrogens regulate both spermatogenesis and oogenesis in adult males of R. arenarum.

  4. Distribution of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the brain of the caecilian Dermophis mexicanus (Amphibia: Gymnophiona): comparative aspects in amphibians.

    PubMed

    López, Jesús M; Moreno, Nerea; Morona, Ruth; Muñoz, Margarita; Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín

    2007-03-20

    The organization of the somatostatin-like-immunoreactive (SOM-ir) structures in the brain of anuran and urodele amphibians has been well documented, and significant differences were noted between the two amphibian orders. However, comparable data are not available for the third order of amphibians, the gymnophionans (caecilians). In the present study, we analyzed the anatomical distribution of SOM-ir cells and fibers in the brain of the gymnophionan Dermophis mexicanus. In addition, because of its known relationship with catecholamines in other vertebrates, double immunostaining for SOM and tyrosine hydroxylase was used to investigate this situation in the gymnophionan. Abundant SOM-ir cell bodies and fibers were widely distributed throughout the brain. In the telencephalon, pallial and subpallial cells were labeled, being most numerous in the medial pallium and amygdaloid region. Most of the SOM-ir neurons were found in the preoptic area and hypothalamus and showed a clear projection to the median eminence. Less conspicuously, SOM-ir structures were found in the thalamus, tectum, tegmentum, and reticular formation. Both SOM-ir cells and fibers were demonstrated in the spinal cord. The double-immunohistofluorescence technique revealed that catecholaminergic neurons and SOM-ir cells are largely intermingled in many brain regions but form totally separated populations. Many differences were found between the distribution of SOM-ir structures in Dermophis and that in anurans or urodeles. Some features were shared only with anurans, such as the abundant pallial SOM-ir cells, whereas others were common only to urodeles, such as the organization of the hypothalamohypophysial SOM-ir system. In addition, some characteristics were found only in Dermophis, such as the localization of the SOM-ir spinal cells and the lack of colocalization of catecholamines and SOM throughout the brain. Therefore, any conclusions concerning the SOM system in amphibians are incomplete without

  5. Preparation and ultrastructure of spermatozoa from green poison frogs, Dendrobates auratus, following hormonal induced spermiation (Amphibia, Anura, Dendrobatidae).

    PubMed

    Lipke, Christian; Meinecke-Tillmann, Sabine; Meyer, Wilfried; Meinecke, Burkhard

    2009-07-01

    mitochondrial collar with a proximal and a distal centriole. The latter gives rise to the axoneme which alone forms the flagellum. The sperm ultrastructure of D. auratus differs from that of other Dendrobatidae because of the absence of a nuclear space and the absence of the undulating membrane associated with an axial fibre. This tail conformation is found in the Ranoidea but not in the Bufonoidea. These results show that the spermatozoa of D. auratus are the first within the Dendrobatidae without accessory tail structures. Methods of using sperm samples from hormonal treated frogs for ultrastructural studies is not only reasonable to examine e.g. amphibian phylogeny without killing frogs threatened with extinction but allows investigations in the field of assisted reproduction and male fertility for example in conservation programs for endangered amphibians.

  6. Densified waste form and method for forming

    DOEpatents

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    2016-05-17

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate the temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.

  7. Densified waste form and method for forming

    SciTech Connect

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    2015-08-25

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate the temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.

  8. Evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 peroxisomal and mitochondrial targeting. A survey of its subcellular distribution in the livers of various representatives of the classes Mammalia, Aves and Amphibia.

    PubMed

    Danpure, C J; Fryer, P; Jennings, P R; Allsop, J; Griffiths, S; Cunningham, A

    1994-08-01

    As part of a wider study on the molecular evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT1) intracellular compartmentalization, we have determined the subcellular distribution of immunoreactive AGT1, using postembedding protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopy, in the livers of various members of the classes Mammalia, Aves, and Amphibia. As far as organellar distribution is concerned, three categories could be distinguished. In members of the first category (type I), all, or nearly all, of the immunoreactive AGT1 was concentrated within the peroxisomes. In the second category (type II), AGT1 was found more evenly distributed in both peroxisomes and mitochondria. In the third category (type III), AGT1 was localized mainly within the mitochondria with much lower, but widely variable, amounts in the peroxisomes. Type I animals include the human, two great apes (gorilla, orangutan), two Old World monkeys (anubis baboon, Japanese macaque), a New World monkey (white-faced Saki monkey), a lago, morph (European rabbit), a bat (Seba's short-tailed fruit bat), two caviomorph rodents (guinea pig, orange-rumped agouti), and two Australian marsupials (koala, Bennett's wallaby). Type II animals include two New World monkeys (common marmoset, cotton-top tamarin), three prosimians (brown lemur, fat-tailed dwarf lemur, pygmy slow loris), five rodents (a hybrid crested porcupine, Colombian ground squirrel, laboratory rat, laboratory mouse, golden hamster), an American marsupial (grey short-tailed opossum), and a bird (raven). Type III animals include the large tree shrew, three insectivores (common Eurasian mole, European hedgehog, house shrew), four carnivores (domestic cat, ocelot, domestic dog, polecat ferret), and an amphibian (common frog). In addition to these categories, some animals (e.g. guinea pig, common frog) possessed significant amounts of cytosolic AGT1. Whereas the subcellular distribution of AGT1 in some orders (e.g. Insectivora and Carnivora) did not appear

  9. Careers (A Course of Study). Unit V: Forms, Forms, Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turley, Kay

    Designed to enable special needs students to understand and complete various job-related forms, this set of activities devoted to forms encountered before and after one obtains a job is the fifth in a nine-unit secondary level careers course intended to provide handicapped students with the knowledge and tools necessary to succeed in the world of…

  10. Elevated temperature envelope forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gane, David H. (Inventor); Starowski, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Elevated temperature envelope forming includes enclosing a part blank and form tool within an envelope sealed against the atmosphere, heat treating the combination while forming pressure holds the envelope and part against the form tool, and allowing part cool down to occur in an inert atmosphere with forming pressure removed. The forming pressure is provided by evacuating the envelope and may be aided by differential force applied between the envelope and the form tool.

  11. Mimicry of a host anion channel by a Helicobacter pylori pore-forming toxin.

    PubMed

    Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Iwamoto, Hideki; Szabo, Gabor; Cover, Timothy L; Shao, Zhifeng

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial pore-forming toxins have traditionally been thought to function either by causing an essentially unrestricted flux of ions and molecules across a membrane or by effecting the transmembrane transport of an enzymatically active bacterial peptide. However, the Helicobacter pylori pore-forming toxin, VacA, does not appear to function by either of these mechanisms, even though at least some of its effects in cells are dependent on its pore-forming ability. Here we show that the VacA channel exhibits two of the most characteristic electrophysiological properties of a specific family of cellular channels, the ClC channels: an open probability dependent on the molar ratio of permeable ions and single channel events resolvable as two independent, voltage-dependent transitions. The sharing of such peculiar properties by VacA and host ClC channels, together with their similar magnitudes of conductance, ion selectivities, and localization within eukaryotic cells, suggests a novel mechanism of toxin action in which the VacA pore largely mimics the electrophysiological behavior of a host channel, differing only in the membrane potential at which it closes. As a result, VacA can perturb, but not necessarily abolish, the homeostatic ionic imbalance across a membrane and so change cellular physiology without necessarily jeopardizing vitality.

  12. Anthrax toxin: channel-forming activity of protective antigen in planar phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Blaustein, R O; Koehler, T M; Collier, R J; Finkelstein, A

    1989-01-01

    The three separate proteins that make up anthrax toxin--protective antigen (PA), edema factor (EF), and lethal factor (LF)--act in binary combinations to produce two distinct reactions in experimental animals: edema (PA + EF) and death (PA + LF). PA is believed to interact with a membrane receptor, and after proteolytic processing, to mediate endocytosis and subsequent translocation of EF or LF into the cytosol. PA can be separated, after mild trypsinolysis, into two fragments, PA65 (65 kDa) and PA20 (20 kDa). We demonstrate that trypsin-cleaved PA is capable of forming cation-selective channels in planar phospholipid bilayer membranes and that this activity is confined to the PA65 fragment; PA20, LF, and EF are devoid of channel-forming activity. These PA65 channels exhibit pH-dependent and voltage-dependent activity--a property reminiscent of the channels formed by the two-chain proteins diphtheria, tetanus, and botulinum toxins. Images PMID:2467303

  13. Pxmp2 Is a Channel-Forming Protein in Mammalian Peroxisomal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Rokka, Aare; Soininen, Raija; Immonen, Hanna L.; Pirilä, Päivi L.; Bergmann, Ulrich; Sormunen, Raija T.; Weckström, Matti; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo

    2009-01-01

    Background Peroxisomal metabolic machinery requires a continuous flow of organic and inorganic solutes across peroxisomal membrane. Concerning small solutes, the molecular nature of their traffic has remained an enigma. Methods/Principal Findings In this study, we show that disruption in mice of the Pxmp2 gene encoding Pxmp2, which belongs to a family of integral membrane proteins with unknown function, leads to partial restriction of peroxisomal membrane permeability to solutes in vitro and in vivo. Multiple-channel recording of liver peroxisomal preparations reveals that the channel-forming components with a conductance of 1.3 nS in 1.0 M KCl were lost in Pxmp2−/− mice. The channel-forming properties of Pxmp2 were confirmed with recombinant protein expressed in insect cells and with native Pxmp2 purified from mouse liver. The Pxmp2 channel, with an estimated diameter of 1.4 nm, shows weak cation selectivity and no voltage dependence. The long-lasting open states of the channel indicate its functional role as a protein forming a general diffusion pore in the membrane. Conclusions/Significance Pxmp2 is the first peroxisomal channel identified, and its existence leads to prediction that the mammalian peroxisomal membrane is permeable to small solutes while transfer of “bulky” metabolites, e.g., cofactors (NAD/H, NADP/H, and CoA) and ATP, requires specific transporters. PMID:19352492

  14. Form 5-Mining venture agreement model form

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This text acts as a reference of the basic terms and conditions for a negotiated mining venture agreement. Alternative clauses and provisions, along with extensive commentary, are supplied. The model form contains many articles which define and detail the process.

  15. Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of caecilians from Southeast Asia (Amphibia, Gymnophiona, Ichthyophiidae), with special reference to high cryptic species diversity in Sundaland.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Kanto; Matsui, Masafumi; Yong, Hoi-Sen; Ahmad, Norhayati; Yambun, Paul; Belabut, Daicus M; Sudin, Ahmad; Hamidy, Amir; Orlov, Nikolai L; Ota, Hidetoshi; Yoshikawa, Natsuhiko; Tominaga, Atsushi; Shimada, Tomohiko

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the phylogenetic relationships and estimated the history of species diversification and character evolution in two ichthyophiid genera: Caudacaecilia and Ichthyophis. We estimated the phylogenetic relationships of 67 samples from 33 localities in Southeast Asia from 3840-bp sequences of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, and cyt b genes using Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony methods. The Southeast Asian samples formed a well-supported clade differentiated from a South Asian sample. The Southeast Asian clade was divided into two subclades, one containing samples from South China, Indochina, Malay Peninsula, and Java. The other consisted of samples from Borneo and the Philippines. Neither Caudacaecilia nor Ichthyophis was monophyletic, nor did samples with or without light stripes lateral to the body form clades. We found several distinct sympatric lineages and undescribed species, especially from Sundaland.

  16. Bacteria form tellurium nanocrystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    A team of researchers have found two bacterial species that produce tellurium oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors for growth, leaving elemental tellurium in the form of nanoparticles. The crystals from the two organisms exhibit distinctively different structures. Bacillus selenitireducens initially forms nanorods that cluster together to form rosettes. Sulfurospirillum barnesii forms irregularly-shaped nanospheres that coalesce into larger composite aggregates.

  17. Handbook of Poetic Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padgett, Ron, Ed.

    Intended for secondary teachers and student writers but useful for anyone interested in poetic forms, this book defines 74 basic poetic forms, summarizes their histories, quotes examples from noted poets, and offers professional tricks of the trade on how to use each form. The book covers the following poetic forms: abstract poem, acrostic,…

  18. Ion Concentration- and Voltage-Dependent Push and Pull Mechanisms of Potassium Channel Ion Conduction.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of ion conduction by potassium channels is one of the central issues in physiology. In particular, it is still unclear how the ion concentration and the membrane voltage drive ion conduction. We have investigated the dynamics of the ion conduction processes in the Kv1.2 pore domain, by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with several different voltages and ion concentrations. By focusing on the detailed ion movements through the pore including selectivity filter (SF) and cavity, we found two major conduction mechanisms, called the III-IV-III and III-II-III mechanisms, and the balance between the ion concentration and the voltage determines the mechanism preference. In the III-IV-III mechanism, the outermost ion in the pore is pushed out by a new ion coming from the intracellular fluid, and four-ion states were transiently observed. In the III-II-III mechanism, the outermost ion is pulled out first, without pushing by incoming ions. Increases in the ion concentration and voltage accelerated ion conductions, but their mechanisms were different. The increase in the ion concentrations facilitated the III-IV-III conductions, while the higher voltages increased the III-II-III conductions, indicating that the pore domain of potassium channels permeates ions by using two different driving forces: a push by intracellular ions and a pull by voltage.

  19. Reversible voltage dependent transition of abnormal and normal bipolar resistive switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangyu; Li, Chen; Chen, Yan; Xia, Yidong; Wu, Di; Xu, Qingyu

    2016-11-01

    Clear understanding the mechanism of resistive switching is the important prerequisite for the realization of high performance nonvolatile resistive random access memory. In this paper, binary metal oxide MoOx layer sandwiched by ITO and Pt electrodes was taken as a model system, reversible transition of abnormal and normal bipolar resistive switching (BRS) in dependence on the maximum voltage was observed. At room temperature, below a critical maximum voltage of 2.6 V, butterfly shaped I-V curves of abnormal BRS has been observed with low resistance state (LRS) to high resistance state (HRS) transition in both polarities and always LRS at zero field. Above 2.6 V, normal BRS was observed, and HRS to LRS transition happened with increasing negative voltage applied. Temperature dependent I-V measurements showed that the critical maximum voltage increased with decreasing temperature, suggesting the thermal activated motion of oxygen vacancies. Abnormal BRS has been explained by the partial compensation of electric field from the induced dipoles opposite to the applied voltage, which has been demonstrated by the clear amplitude-voltage and phase-voltage hysteresis loops observed by piezoelectric force microscopy. The normal BRS was due to the barrier modification at Pt/MoOx interface by the accumulation and depletion of oxygen vacancies.

  20. Bothriurus bonariensis scorpion venom activates voltage-dependent sodium channels in insect and mammalian nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Douglas Silva; Carvalho, Evelise Leis; de Lima, Jeferson Camargo; Breda, Ricardo Vaz; Oliveira, Raquel Soares; de Freitas, Thiago Carrazoni; Salamoni, Simone Denise; Domingues, Michelle Flores; Piovesan, Angela Regina; Boldo, Juliano Tomazzoni; de Assis, Dênis Reis; da Costa, Jaderson Costa; Dal Belo, Cháriston André; Pinto, Paulo Marcos

    2016-10-25

    Animal venoms have been widely recognized as a major source of biologically active molecules. Bothriurus bonariensis, popularly known as black scorpion, is the arthropod responsible for the highest number of accidents involving scorpion sting in Southern Brazil. Here we reported the first attempt to investigate the neurobiology of B. bonariensis venom (BBV) in the insect and mammalian nervous system. BBV (32 μg/g) induced a slow neuromuscular blockade in the in vivo cockroach nerve-muscle preparations (70 ± 4%, n = 6, p < 0.001), provoking repetitive twitches and significantly decreasing the frequency of spontaneous leg action potentials (SNCAPs) from 82 ± 3 min(-1) to 36 ± 1.3 min(-1) (n = 6, p < 0.05), without affecting the amplitude. When tested in primary cultures of rat hippocampal cells, BBV induced a massive increase of Ca(2+) influx (250 ± 1% peak increase, n = 3, p < 0.0001). The disturbance of calcium homeostasis induced by BBV on the mammalian central nervous system was not accompanied by cellular death and was prevented by the co-treatment of the hippocampal cells with tetrodotoxin, a selective sodium channel blocker. The results suggest that the biological activity of BBV is mostly related to a modulation of sodium channels function. Our biological activity survey suggests that BBV may have a promising insecticidal and therapeutic potential.

  1. Aspirin induces cell death by directly modulating mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Debanjan; Majumdar, Dhriti; Vallabhaneni, Sirisha; Bera, Amal Kanti

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin induces apoptotic cell death in various cancer cell lines. Here we showed that silencing of VDAC1 protected HeLa cells from aspirin-induced cell death. Compared to the wild type cells, VDAC1 knocked down cells showed lesser change of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), upon aspirin treatment. Aspirin augmented ATP and ionomycin-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake which was abolished in VDAC1 knocked down cells. Aspirin dissociated bound hexokinase II (HK-II) from mitochondria. Further, aspirin promoted the closure of recombinant human VDAC1, reconstituted in planar lipid bilayer. Taken together, these results imply that VDAC1 serves as a novel target for aspirin. Modulation of VDAC1 is possibly associated with the cell death and anticancer effects of aspirin. PMID:28327594

  2. NMR structure of inactivation gates from mammalian voltage-dependent potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Antz, C; Geyer, M; Fakler, B; Schott, M K; Guy, H R; Frank, R; Ruppersberg, J P; Kalbitzer, H R

    1997-01-16

    The electrical signalling properties of neurons originate largely from the gating properties of their ion channels. N-type inactivation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels is the best-understood gating transition in ion channels, and occurs by a 'ball-and-chain' type mechanism. In this mechanism an N-terminal domain (inactivation gate), which is tethered to the cytoplasmic side of the channel protein by a protease-cleavable chain, binds to its receptor at the inner vestibule of the channel, thereby physically blocking the pore. Even when synthesized as a peptide, ball domains restore inactivation in Kv channels whose inactivation domains have been deleted. Using high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we analysed the three-dimensional structure of the ball peptides from two rapidly inactivating mammalian K. channels (Raw3 (Kv3.4) and RCK4 (Kv1.4)). The inactivation peptide of Raw3 (Raw3-IP) has a compact structure that exposes two phosphorylation sites and allows the formation of an intramolecular disulphide bridge between two spatially close cysteine residues. Raw3-IP exhibits a characteristic surface charge pattern with a positively charged, a hydrophobic, and a negatively charged region. The RCK4 inactivation peptide (RCK4-IP) shows a similar spatial distribution of charged and uncharged regions, but is more flexible and less ordered in its amino-terminal part.

  3. Voltage-dependent K channels in protoplasts of trap-lobe cells of Dionaea muscipula.

    PubMed

    Iijima, T; Hagiwara, S

    1987-01-01

    The outward rectification of the K+ current in mesophyll cell protoplasts from trap-lobes of Dionaea muscipula was studied with the patch-clamp technique. The rectification had instantaneous and time-dependent components. Changes in [K+]i strongly affected the conductance voltage relation of the plasma membrane while changes in [K+]o had little effect on the relation. Thus, the outward rectification depends on the membrane voltage and the concentration of intracellular K+. Corresponding single-channel activities were observed both in the intact membrane (cell-attached recording) and in excised patches. The single-channel conductance was about 3.3 pS with symmetrical solutions containing 30 mM K+.

  4. Wavelength, temperature, and voltage dependent calibration of a nematic liquid crystal multispectral polarization generating device

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Boudreaux, Philip R

    2007-01-01

    Rapid calibration of liquid crystal variable retarder (LCVR) devices is critical for successful clinical implementation of a LC-based Mueller matrix imaging system being developed for noninvasisve skin cancer detection. For multispectral implementation of such a system, the effect of wavelength (), temperature (T), and voltage (V) on the retardance () required to generate each desired polarization state needs to be clearly understood. Calibration involves quantifying this interdependence such that for a given set of system input variables, T, the appropriate voltage is applied across a LC cell to generate a particular retardance. This paper presents findings that elucidate the dependence of voltage, for a set retardance, on the aforementioned variables for a nematic LC cell: 253 mv100 nm-dependence andd 10 mVC T-dependence. Additionally, an empirically derived model is presented that enables initial voltage calibration of retardance for any desired input wavelength within the calibration range of 460-905 nm. copyright 2007 Optical Society of America

  5. Molecular dissection of transjunctional voltage dependence in the connexin-32 and connexin-43 junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Revilla, A; Castro, C; Barrio, L C

    1999-01-01

    Most gap junction channels are sensitive to the voltage difference between the two cellular interiors, termed the transjunctional voltage (V(j)). In several junctions, the conductance transitions induced by V(j) show more than one kinetic component. To elucidate the structural basis of the fast and slow components that characterize the V(j )dependence of connexin-32 (Cx32) and connexin-43 (Cx43) junctions, we created deletions of both connexins, where most of the carboxy-terminal (CT) domain was removed. The wild-type and "tailless" mutants were expressed in paired Xenopus oocytes, and the macroscopic gating properties were analyzed using the dual voltage clamp technique. Truncation of the CT domain of Cx32 and Cx43 abolished the fast mechanism of conductance transitions and induced novel gating properties largely attributable to the slow mechanism of gating. The formation of hybrid junctions comprising wild-type and truncated hemichannels allowed us to infer that the fast and slow components of gating reside in each hemichannel and that both gates close at a negative V(j) on the cytoplasmic side. Thus we conclude that the two kinetic components of V(j)-sensitive conductance are a result of the action of two different gating mechanisms. They constitute separate structures in the Cx32 and Cx43 molecules, the CT domain being an integral part of fast V(j) gating. PMID:10465749

  6. Na+ current densities and voltage dependence in human intercostal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, R L; Whittlesey, D

    1992-01-01

    1. Voltage-clamp Na+ currents (INa) were studied in human intercostal muscle fibres using the loose-patch-clamp technique. 2. The fibres could be divided into two groups based upon the properties of INa. The two groups of fibres were called type 1 and type 2. 3. Both type 1 and type 2 fibres demonstrated fast and slow inactivation of INa. 4. Type 1 fibres had lower INa on the endplate border and extrajunctional membrane than type 2 fibres and required larger membrane depolarizations to inactivate Na+ channels by fast or slow inactivation of INa. 5. Type 2 fibres had a higher ratio of INa at the endplate border compared to extrajunctional membrane than Type 1 fibres. 6. Measurement of membrane capacitance suggested that the increase in INa at the endplate border was due to increased Na+ channel density. 7. Histochemical staining of some fibres suggested that type 1 fibres were slow twitch and type 2 fibres were fast twitch. 8. Differences in the properties of Na+ channels between fast- and slow-twitch fibres may contribute to the ability of fast-twitch fibres to operate at high firing frequencies and slow-twitch fibres to be tonically active. PMID:1338797

  7. Neuroprotective activity of stiripentol with a possible involvement of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Verleye, Marc; Buttigieg, Dorothée; Steinschneider, Rémy

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of data has shown that recurrent epileptic seizures may be caused by an excessive release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the brain. Glutamatergic overstimulation results in massive neuronal influxes of calcium and sodium through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and kainic acid glutamate subtype receptors and also through voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels. These persistent and abnormal sodium and calcium entry points have deleterious consequences (neurotoxicity) for neuronal function. The therapeutic value of an antiepileptic drug would include not only control of seizure activity but also protection of neuronal tissue. The present study examines the in vitro neuroprotective effects of stiripentol, an antiepileptic compound with γ-aminobutyric acidergic properties, on neuronal-astroglial cultures from rat cerebral cortex exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) or to glutamate (40 µM for 20 min), two in vitro models of brain injury. In addition, the affinity of stiripentol for the different glutamate receptor subtypes and the interaction with the cell influx of Na(+) and of Ca(2+) enhanced by veratridine and NMDA, respectively, are assessed. Stiripentol (10-100 µM) included in the culture medium during OGD or with glutamate significantly increased the number of surviving neurons relative to controls. Stiripentol displayed no binding affinity for different subtypes of glutamate receptors (IC50  >100 µM) but significantly blocked the entry of Na(+) and Ca(2+) activated by veratridine and NMDA, respectively. These results suggest that Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels could contribute to the neuroprotective properties of sitiripentol.

  8. Single voltage-dependent chloride-selective channels of large conductance in cultured rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Blatz, A L; Magleby, K L

    1983-01-01

    Single-channel currents of an anion-selective channel in the plasma membrane of cultured rat muscle cells (myotubes) were recorded with the patch-clamp technique (Hamill, O.P., A. Marty, E. Neher, B. Sakmann, and F.J. Sigworth, 1981. Pfluegers Arch. Eur. J. Physiol., 391:85-100). The channel is selective for Cl- over cations, and has an unusually large single-channel conductance of approximately 430 pS in symmetrical 143 mM KCl. The channel is often active at 0 mV, opening and closing spontaneously. When active, steps from 0 mV to either negative or positive membrane potentials close the channel to an apparent inactivated state. The mean effective time that a channel is open before it inactivates is approximately 1.19 s for steps to -30 mV and 0.48 s for steps to +30 mV. Returning the membrane potential to 0 mV results in recovery from inactivation. Calcium ions are not required for channel activity. PMID:6311302

  9. Reversible voltage dependent transition of abnormal and normal bipolar resistive switching

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu; Li, Chen; Chen, Yan; Xia, Yidong; Wu, Di; Xu, Qingyu

    2016-01-01

    Clear understanding the mechanism of resistive switching is the important prerequisite for the realization of high performance nonvolatile resistive random access memory. In this paper, binary metal oxide MoOx layer sandwiched by ITO and Pt electrodes was taken as a model system, reversible transition of abnormal and normal bipolar resistive switching (BRS) in dependence on the maximum voltage was observed. At room temperature, below a critical maximum voltage of 2.6 V, butterfly shaped I-V curves of abnormal BRS has been observed with low resistance state (LRS) to high resistance state (HRS) transition in both polarities and always LRS at zero field. Above 2.6 V, normal BRS was observed, and HRS to LRS transition happened with increasing negative voltage applied. Temperature dependent I-V measurements showed that the critical maximum voltage increased with decreasing temperature, suggesting the thermal activated motion of oxygen vacancies. Abnormal BRS has been explained by the partial compensation of electric field from the induced dipoles opposite to the applied voltage, which has been demonstrated by the clear amplitude-voltage and phase-voltage hysteresis loops observed by piezoelectric force microscopy. The normal BRS was due to the barrier modification at Pt/MoOx interface by the accumulation and depletion of oxygen vacancies. PMID:27841318

  10. Voltage dependence of subthreshold resonance frequency in layer II of medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Shay, Christopher F; Boardman, Ian S; James, Nicholas M; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2012-08-01

    The resonance properties of individual neurons in entorhinal cortex (EC) may contribute to their functional properties in awake, behaving rats. Models propose that entorhinal grid cells could arise from shifts in the intrinsic frequency of neurons caused by changes in membrane potential owing to depolarizing input from neurons coding velocity. To test for potential changes in intrinsic frequency, we measured the resonance properties of neurons at different membrane potentials in neurons in medial and lateral EC. In medial entorhinal neurons, the resonant frequency of individual neurons decreased in a linear manner as the membrane potential was depolarized between -70 and -55 mV. At more hyperpolarized membrane potentials, cells asymptotically approached a maximum resonance frequency. Consistent with the previous studies, near resting potential, the cells of the medial EC possessed a decreasing gradient of resonance frequency along the dorsal to ventral axis, and cells of the lateral EC lacked resonant properties, regardless of membrane potential or position along the medial to lateral axis within lateral EC. Application of 10 μM ZD7288, the H-channel blocker, abolished all resonant properties in MEC cells, and resulted in physiological properties very similar to lateral EC cells. These results on resonant properties show a clear change in frequency response with depolarization that could contribute to the generation of grid cell firing properties in the medial EC.

  11. Differential effects of sulfhydryl reagents on saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin block of voltage-dependent Na channels.

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, G E; Alam, M; Hartmann, H A

    1994-01-01

    We have probed a cysteine residue that confers resistance to tetrodotoxin (TTX) block in heart Na channels, with membrane-impermeant, cysteine-specific, methanethiosulfonate (MTS) analogs. Covalent addition of a positively charged group to the cysteinyl sulfhydryl reduced pore conductance by 87%. The effect was selectively prevented by treatment with TTX, but not saxitoxin (STX). Addition of a negatively charged group selectively inhibited STX block without affecting TTX block. These results agree with models that place an exposed cysteinyl sulfhydryl in the TTX site adjacent to the mouth of the pore, but do not support the contention that STX and TTX are interchangeable. The surprising differences between the two toxins are consistent with the hypothesis that the toxin-receptor complex can assume different conformations when STX or TTX bound. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:7696471

  12. Differential effects of sulfhydryl reagents on saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin block of voltage-dependent Na channels.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, G E; Alam, M; Hartmann, H A

    1994-12-01

    We have probed a cysteine residue that confers resistance to tetrodotoxin (TTX) block in heart Na channels, with membrane-impermeant, cysteine-specific, methanethiosulfonate (MTS) analogs. Covalent addition of a positively charged group to the cysteinyl sulfhydryl reduced pore conductance by 87%. The effect was selectively prevented by treatment with TTX, but not saxitoxin (STX). Addition of a negatively charged group selectively inhibited STX block without affecting TTX block. These results agree with models that place an exposed cysteinyl sulfhydryl in the TTX site adjacent to the mouth of the pore, but do not support the contention that STX and TTX are interchangeable. The surprising differences between the two toxins are consistent with the hypothesis that the toxin-receptor complex can assume different conformations when STX or TTX bound.

  13. Down-regulation of voltage-dependent sodium channels initiated by sodium influx in developing neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dargent, B.; Couraud, F. )

    1990-08-01

    To address the issue of whether regulatory feedback exists between the electrical activity of a neuron and ion-channel density, the authors investigated the effect of Na{sup +}-channel activators (scorpion {alpha} toxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) on the density of Na{sup +} channels in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. A partial but rapid (t{sub 1/2}, 15 min) disappearance of surface Na{sup +} channels was observed as measured by a decrease in the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)saxitoxin and {sup 125}I-labeled scorpion {beta} toxin and a decrease in specific {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake. Moreover, the increase in the number of Na{sup +} channels that normally occurs during neuronal maturation in vitro was inhibited by chronic channel activator treatment. The induced disappearance of Na{sup +} channels was abolished by tetrodotoxin, was found to be dependent on the external Na{sup +} concentration, and was prevented when either choline (a nonpermeant ion) or Li{sup +} (a permeant ion) was substituted for Na{sup +}. Amphotericin B, a Na{sup +} ionophore, and monensin were able to mimick the effect of Na{sup +}-channel activators, while a KCl depolarization failed to do this. This feedback regulation seems to be a neuronal property since Na{sup +}-channel density in cultured astrocytes was not affected by channel activator treatment or by amphotericin B. The present evidence suggests that an increase in intracellular Na{sup +} concentration, whether elicited by Na{sup +}-channel activators or mediated by a Na{sup +} ionophore, can induce a decrease in surface Na{sup +} channels and therefore is involved in down-regulation of Na{sup +}-channel density in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro.

  14. Quaternary Organic Amines Inhibit Na,K Pump Current in a Voltage-dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Peluffo, R. Daniel; Hara, Yukio; Berlin, Joshua R.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of organic quaternary amines, tetraethylammonium (TEA) chloride and benzyltriethylammonium (BTEA) chloride, on Na,K pump current were examined in rat cardiac myocytes superfused in extracellular Na+-free solutions and whole-cell voltage-clamped with patch electrodes containing a high Na+-salt solution. Extracellular application of these quaternary amines competitively inhibited extracellular K+ (K+o) activation of Na,K pump current; however, the concentration for half maximal inhibition of Na,K pump current at 0 mV (K0Q) by BTEA, 4.0 ± 0.3 mM, was much lower than the K0Q for TEA, 26.6 ± 0.7 mM. Even so, the fraction of the membrane electric field dissipated during K+o activation of Na,K pump current (λK), 39 ± 1%, was similar to λK determined in the presence of TEA (37 ± 2%) and BTEA (35 ± 2%), an indication that the membrane potential (VM) dependence for K+o activation of the Na,K pump current was unaffected by TEA and BTEA. TEA was found to inhibit the Na,K pump current in a VM-independent manner, i.e., inhibition of current dissipated 4 ± 2% of the membrane electric field. In contrast, BTEA dissipated 40 ± 5% of the membrane electric field during inhibition of Na,K pump current. Thus, BTEA inhibition of the Na,K-ATPase is VM-dependent. The competitive nature of inhibition as well as the similar fractions of the membrane electric field dissipated during K+o-dependent activation and BTEA-dependent inhibition of Na,K pump current suggest that BTEA inhibits the Na,K-ATPase at or very near the enzyme's K+o binding site(s) located in the membrane electric field. Given previous findings that organic quaternary amines are not occluded by the Na,K-ATPase, these data clearly demonstrate that an ion channel–like structure provides access to K+o binding sites in the enzyme. PMID:14981136

  15. Structural requirements for voltage-dependent block of muscle sodium channels by phenol derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Haeseler, G; Piepenbrink, A; Bufler, J; Dengler, R; Aronson, J K; Piepenbrock, S; Leuwer, M

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the effects of four different phenol derivatives, with methyl and halogen substituents, on heterologously expressed human skeletal muscle sodium channels, in order to find structural determinants of blocking potency.All compounds blocked skeletal muscle sodium channels in a concentration-dependent manner. The methylated phenol 3-methylphenol and the halogenated phenol 4-chlorophenol blocked sodium currents on depolarization from −100 mV to 0 mV with IC50 values of 2161 and 666 μM respectively. Methylation of the halogenated compound further increased potency, reducing the IC50 to 268 μM in 2-methyl-4-chlorophenol and to 150 μM in 3,5-dimethyl-4-chlorophenol.Membrane depolarization before the test depolarization increased sodium channel blockade. When depolarizations were started from −70 mV or when a 2.5 s prepulse was introduced before the test pulse inducing slow inactivation, the IC50 was reduced more than 3 fold in all compounds. The values of KD for the fast-inactivated state derived from drug-induced shifts in steady-state availability curves were 14 μM for 3,5-dimethyl-4-chlorophenol, 19 μM for 2-methyl-4-chlorophenol, 26 μM for 4-chlorophenol and 115 μM for 3-methylphenol.All compounds accelerated the current decay during depolarization and slowed recovery from fast inactivation. No relevant frequency-dependent block after depolarizing pulses applied at 10, 50 and 100 Hz was detected for any of the compounds.All the phenol derivatives that we examined are effective blockers of skeletal muscle sodium channels, especially in conditions that are associated with membrane depolarization. Blocking potency is increased by halogenation and by methylation with increasing numbers of methyl groups. PMID:11309264

  16. Contribution of voltage-dependent K+ channels to metabolic control of coronary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Zachary C.; Dick, Gregory M.; Moberly, Steven P.; Kohr, Meredith C.; Sturek, Michael; Tune, Johnathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that KV channels contribute to metabolic control of coronary blood flow and that decreases in KV channel function and/or expression significantly attenuate myocardial oxygen supply-demand balance in the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Experiments were conducted in conscious, chronically instrumented Ossabaw swine fed either a normal maintenance diet or an excess calorie atherogenic diet that produces the clinical phenotype of early MetS. Data were obtained under resting conditions and during graded treadmill exercise before and after inhibition of KV channels with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 0.3 mg/kg, i.v.). In lean-control swine, 4-AP reduced coronary blood flow ~15% at rest and ~20% during exercise. Inhibition of KV channels also increased aortic pressure (P < 0.01) while reducing coronary venous Po2 (P < 0.01) at a given level of myocardial oxygen consumption (MVo2). Administration of 4-AP had no effect on coronary blood flow, aortic pressure, or coronary venous Po2 in swine with MetS. The lack of response to 4-AP in MetS swine was associated with a ~20% reduction in coronary KV current (P < 0.01) and decreased expression of KV1.5 channels in coronary arteries (P < 0.01). Together, these data demonstrate that KV channels play an important role in balancing myocardial oxygen delivery with metabolism at rest and during exercise-induced increases in MVo2. Our findings also indicate that decreases in KV channel current and expression contribute to impaired control of coronary blood flow in the MetS. PMID:21771599

  17. Down-regulation of voltage-dependent sodium channels initiated by sodium influx in developing neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Dargent, B; Couraud, F

    1990-01-01

    To address the issue of whether regulatory feedback exists between the electrical activity of a neuron and ion-channel density, we investigated the effect of Na(+)-channel activators (scorpion alpha toxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) on the density of Na+ channels in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. A partial but rapid (t1/2, 15 min) disappearance of surface Na+ channels was observed as measured by a decrease in the specific binding of [3H]saxitoxin and 125I-labeled scorpion beta toxin and a decrease in specific 22Na+ uptake. Moreover, the increase in the number of Na+ channels that normally occurs during neuronal maturation in vitro was inhibited by chronic channel activator treatment. The induced disappearance of Na+ channels was abolished by tetrodotoxin, was found to be dependent on the external Na+ concentration, and was prevented when either choline (a nonpermeant ion) or Li+ (a permeant ion) was substituted for Na+. Amphotericin B, a Na+ ionophore, and monensin were able to mimick the effect of Na(+)-channel activators, while a KCl depolarization failed to do this. This feedback regulation seems to be a neuronal property since Na(+)-channel density in cultured astrocytes was not affected by channel activator treatment or by amphotericin B. The present evidence suggests that an increase in intracellular Na+ concentration, whether elicited by Na(+)-channel activators or mediated by a Na+ ionophore, can induce a decrease in surface Na+ channels and therefore is involved in down-regulation of Na(+)-channel density in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. PMID:2165609

  18. Unraveling the temperature and voltage dependence of magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Paul; Wouters, Steinar H. W.; Cox, Matthijs; Koopmans, Bert

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, it was discovered that the current through an organic semiconductor, sandwiched between two non-magnetic electrodes, can be changed significantly by applying a small magnetic field. This surprisingly large magnetoresistance effect, often dubbed as organic magnetoresistance (OMAR), has puzzled the young field of organic spintronics during the last decade. Here, we present a detailed study on the voltage and temperature dependence of OMAR, aiming to unravel the lineshapes of the magnetic field effects and thereby gain a deeper fundamental understanding of the underlying microscopic mechanism. Using a full quantitative analysis of the lineshapes, we are able to extract all linewidth parameters and the voltage and temperature dependencies are explained with a recently proposed trion mechanism. Moreover, explicit microscopic simulations show a qualitative agreement to the experimental results.

  19. The mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel 1 in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda; Ben-Hail, Danya; Admoni, Lee; Krelin, Yakov; Tripathi, Shambhoo Sharan

    2015-10-01

    VDAC1 is found at the crossroads of metabolic and survival pathways. VDAC1 controls metabolic cross-talk between mitochondria and the rest of the cell by allowing the influx and efflux of metabolites, ions, nucleotides, Ca2+ and more. The location of VDAC1 at the outer mitochondrial membrane also enables its interaction with proteins that mediate and regulate the integration of mitochondrial functions with cellular activities. As a transporter of metabolites, VDAC1 contributes to the metabolic phenotype of cancer cells. Indeed, this protein is over-expressed in many cancer types, and silencing of VDAC1 expression induces an inhibition of tumor development. At the same time, along with regulating cellular energy production and metabolism, VDAC1 is involved in the process of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis by mediating the release of apoptotic proteins and interacting with anti-apoptotic proteins. The engagement of VDAC1 in the release of apoptotic proteins located in the inter-membranal space involves VDAC1 oligomerization that mediates the release of cytochrome c and AIF to the cytosol, subsequently leading to apoptotic cell death. Apoptosis can also be regulated by VDAC1, serving as an anchor point for mitochondria-interacting proteins, such as hexokinase (HK), Bcl2 and Bcl-xL, some of which are also highly expressed in many cancers. By binding to VDAC1, HK provides both a metabolic benefit and apoptosis-suppressive capacity that offer the cell a proliferative advantage and increase its resistance to chemotherapy. Thus, these and other functions point to VDAC1 as an excellent target for impairing the re-programed metabolism of cancer cells and their ability to evade apoptosis. Here, we review current evidence pointing to the function of VDAC1 in cell life and death, and highlight these functions in relation to both cancer development and therapy. In addressing the recently solved 3D structures of VDAC1, this review will point to structure-function relationships of VDAC as critical for deciphering how this channel can perform such a variety of roles, all of which are important for cell life and death. Finally, this review will also provide insight into VDAC function in Ca2+ homeostasis, protection against oxidative stress, regulation of apoptosis and involvement in several diseases, as well as its role in the action of different drugs. We will discuss the use of VDAC1-based strategies to attack the altered metabolism and apoptosis of cancer cells. These strategies include specific siRNA able to impair energy and metabolic homeostasis, leading to arrested cancer cell growth and tumor development, as well VDAC1-based peptides that interact with anti-apoptotic proteins to induce apoptosis, thereby overcoming the resistance of cancer cell to chemotherapy. Finally, small molecules targeting VDAC1 can induce apoptosis. VDAC1 can thus be considered as standing at the crossroads between mitochondrial metabolite transport and apoptosis and hence represents an emerging cancer drug target. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  20. Differential oxidative modulation of voltage-dependent K+ currents in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Müller, Wolfgang; Bittner, Katrin

    2002-06-01

    Oxidative stress is enhanced by [Ca2+]i-dependent stimulation of phospholipases and mitochondria and has been implicated in immune defense, ischemia, and excitotoxicity. Using whole cell recording from hippocampal neurons, we show that arachidonic acid (AA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) both reduce the transient K+ current I(A) by -54 and -68%, respectively, and shift steady-state inactivation by -10 and -15 mV, respectively. While AA was effective at an extracellular concentration of 1 microM and an intracellular concentration of 1 pM, extracellular H2O2 was equally effective only at a concentration >800 microM (0.0027%). In contrast to AA, H2O2 decreased the slope of activation and increased the slope of inactivation of I(A) and reduced the sustained delayed rectifier current I(K(V)) by 22% and shifted its activation by -9 mV. Intracellular application of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH, 2-5 mM) blocked all effects of AA and the reduction of I(A) by H2O2. In contrast, intracellular GSH enhanced reduction of I(K(V)) by H2O2. Decrease of the slope of activation and increase of the slope of inactivation of I(A) by hydrogen peroxide was blocked and reversed to a decrease, respectively, by intracellular application of GSH. Intracellular GSH did not prevent H2O2 to shift inactivation and activation of I(A) and activation of I(K(V)) to more negative potentials. We conclude, that AA and H2O2 modulate voltage-activated K currents differentially by oxidation of GSH accessible intracellular and GSH inaccessible extracellular K+-channel domains, thereby presumably affecting neuronal information processing and oxidative damage.

  1. The voltage dependence of NADPH oxidase reveals why phagocytes need proton channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.

    2003-04-01

    The enzyme NADPH oxidase in phagocytes is important in the body's defence against microbes: it produces superoxide anions (O2-, precursors to bactericidal reactive oxygen species). Electrons move from intracellular NADPH, across a chain comprising FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide) and two haems, to reduce extracellular O2 to O2-. NADPH oxidase is electrogenic, generating electron current (Ie) that is measurable under voltage-clamp conditions. Here we report the complete current-voltage relationship of NADPH oxidase, the first such measurement of a plasma membrane electron transporter. We find that Ie is voltage-independent from -100mV to >0mV, but is steeply inhibited by further depolarization, and is abolished at about +190mV. It was proposed that H+ efflux mediated by voltage-gated proton channels compensates Ie, because Zn2+ and Cd2+ inhibit both H+ currents and O2- production. Here we show that COS-7 cells transfected with four NADPH oxidase components, but lacking H+ channels, produce O2- in the presence of Zn2+ concentrations that inhibit O2- production in neutrophils and eosinophils. Zn2+ does not inhibit NADPH oxidase directly, but through effects on H+ channels. H+ channels optimize NADPH oxidase function by preventing membrane depolarization to inhibitory voltages.

  2. Voltage-Dependent Regulation of Complex II Energized Mitochondrial Oxygen Flux

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fan; Fink, Brian D.; Yu, Liping; Sivitz, William I.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen consumption by isolated mitochondria is generally measured during state 4 respiration (no ATP production) or state 3 (maximal ATP production at high ADP availability). However, mitochondria in vivo do not function at either extreme. Here we used ADP recycling methodology to assess muscle mitochondrial function over intermediate clamped ADP concentrations. In so doing, we uncovered a previously unrecognized biphasic respiratory pattern wherein O2 flux on the complex II substrate, succinate, initially increased and peaked over low clamped ADP concentrations then decreased markedly at higher clamped concentrations. Mechanistic studies revealed no evidence that the observed changes in O2 flux were due to altered opening or function of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore or to changes in reactive oxygen. Based on metabolite and functional metabolic data, we propose a multifactorial mechanism that consists of coordinate changes that follow from reduced membrane potential (as the ADP concentration in increased). These changes include altered directional electron flow, altered NADH/NAD+ redox cycling, metabolite exit, and OAA inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. In summary, we report a previously unrecognized pattern for complex II energized O2 flux. Moreover, our findings suggest that the ADP recycling approach might be more widely adapted for mitochondrial studies. PMID:27153112

  3. Size and voltage dependence of effective anisotropy in sub-100-nm perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Stephan K.; Bapna, Mukund; Oberdick, Samuel D.; Majetich, Sara A.; Li, Mingen; Chien, C. L.; Ahmed, Rizvi; Victora, R. H.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are investigated using a conductive atomic force microscope. The 1.23 -nm Co40Fe40B20 recording layer coercivity exhibits a size dependence which suggests single-domain behavior for diameters ≤100 nm. Focusing on devices with diameters smaller than 100 nm, we determine the effect of voltage and size on the effective device anisotropy Keff using two different techniques. Keff is extracted both from distributions of the switching fields of the recording and reference layers and from measurement of thermal fluctuations of the recording layer magnetization when a field close to the switching field is applied. The results from both sets of measurements reveal that Keff increases monotonically with decreasing junction diameter, consistent with the size dependence of the demagnetization energy density. We demonstrate that Keff can be controlled with a voltage down to the smallest size measured, 64 nm.

  4. Reversible voltage dependent transition of abnormal and normal bipolar resistive switching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Li, Chen; Chen, Yan; Xia, Yidong; Wu, Di; Xu, Qingyu

    2016-11-14

    Clear understanding the mechanism of resistive switching is the important prerequisite for the realization of high performance nonvolatile resistive random access memory. In this paper, binary metal oxide MoOx layer sandwiched by ITO and Pt electrodes was taken as a model system, reversible transition of abnormal and normal bipolar resistive switching (BRS) in dependence on the maximum voltage was observed. At room temperature, below a critical maximum voltage of 2.6 V, butterfly shaped I-V curves of abnormal BRS has been observed with low resistance state (LRS) to high resistance state (HRS) transition in both polarities and always LRS at zero field. Above 2.6 V, normal BRS was observed, and HRS to LRS transition happened with increasing negative voltage applied. Temperature dependent I-V measurements showed that the critical maximum voltage increased with decreasing temperature, suggesting the thermal activated motion of oxygen vacancies. Abnormal BRS has been explained by the partial compensation of electric field from the induced dipoles opposite to the applied voltage, which has been demonstrated by the clear amplitude-voltage and phase-voltage hysteresis loops observed by piezoelectric force microscopy. The normal BRS was due to the barrier modification at Pt/MoOx interface by the accumulation and depletion of oxygen vacancies.

  5. Sensitive voltage-dependent diffraction of a liquid crystal Fresnel lens.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wen-Chi; Chen, Yu-Jen; Lin, Chia-Huey; Jiang, I-Min; Hsu, Tzu-Fang

    2009-04-10

    This investigation proposes a Fresnel liquid crystal (LC) lens with high diffraction efficiency and a low driving voltage. A Fresnel zone electrode was fabricated on a glass plate. A Fresnel zone-distributed electric field in the LC cell was induced by a proper driving voltage, yielding a concentric structure of LCs as a Fresnel phase lens. A remarkable diffraction efficiency of ~39%, close to the theoretical limit of 40.5%, was detected when the LC lens was probed using a polarized incident beam with a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The diffraction efficiency of the Fresnel LC lens was demonstrated to depend sensitively on the applied voltage. The most suitable driving voltage of the Fresnel LC lens was as low as 0.9 V. This study may support progress in the electrical modulation of the optical properties of various optical systems.

  6. Developmental changes in two voltage-dependent sodium currents in utricular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Wooltorton, Julian R A; Gaboyard, Sophie; Hurley, Karen M; Price, Steven D; Garcia, Jasmine L; Zhong, Meng; Lysakowski, Anna; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2007-02-01

    Two kinds of sodium current (I(Na)) have been separately reported in hair cells of the immature rodent utricle, a vestibular organ. We show that rat utricular hair cells express one or the other current depending on age (between postnatal days 0 and 22, P0-P22), hair cell type (I, II, or immature), and epithelial zone (striola vs. extrastriola). The properties of these two currents, or a mix, can account for descriptions of I(Na) in hair cells from other reports. The patterns of Na channel expression during development suggest a role in establishing the distinct synapses of vestibular hair cells of different type and epithelial zone. All type I hair cells expressed I(Na,1), a TTX-insensitive current with a very negative voltage range of inactivation (midpoint: -94 mV). I(Na,2) was TTX sensitive and had less negative voltage ranges of activation and inactivation (inactivation midpoint: -72 mV). I(Na,1) dominated in the striola at all ages, but current density fell by two-thirds after the first postnatal week. I(Na,2) was expressed by 60% of hair cells in the extrastriola in the first week, then disappeared. In the third week, all type I cells and about half of type II cells had I(Na,1); the remaining cells lacked sodium current. I(Na,1) is probably carried by Na(V)1.5 subunits based on biophysical and pharmacological properties, mRNA expression, and immunoreactivity. Na(V)1.5 was also localized to calyx endings on type I hair cells. Several TTX-sensitive subunits are candidates for I(Na,2).

  7. Multiple kinase pathways regulate voltage-dependent Ca++ influx and migration in oligodendrocyte precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Paez, PM; Fulton, DJ; Spreur, V; Handley, V; Campagnoni, AT

    2010-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that voltage-operated Ca++ channels (VOCCs) play a fundamental role in the development of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Since direct phosphorylation by different kinases is one of the most important mechanisms involved in VOCC modulation, the aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of serine-threonine (Ser/Thr) kinases and tyrosine kinases (TK) on Ca++ influx mediated by VOCCs in OPCs. Calcium imaging revealed that OPCs exhibited Ca++ influx following plasma membrane depolarization via L-type VOCCs. Furthermore, VOCC-mediated Ca++ influx declined with OPC differentiation, indicating that VOCCs are developmentally regulated in OPCs. PKC activation significantly increased VOCC activity in OPCs, while PKA activation produced the opposite effect. The results also indicated that OPC morphological changes induced by PKC activation were partially mediated by VOCCs. Our data clearly suggest that TKs exert an activating influence on VOCC function in OPCs. Furthermore, using the PDGF response as a model to probe the role of TK receptors (TKr) on OPCs Ca++ uptake, we found that TKr activation potentiated Ca++ influx after membrane depolarization. Interestingly, this TKr modulation of VOCCs appeared to be essential for the PDGF enhancement of OPC migration rate, since cell motility was completely blocked by TKr antagonists, as well as VOCC inhibitors, in migration assays. The present study strongly demonstrates that PKC and TKrs enhance Ca++ influx induced by depolarization in OPCs, while PKA has an inhibitory effect. These kinases modulate voltage-operated Ca++ uptake in OPCs and participate in the modulation of process extension and migration. PMID:20445068

  8. Voltage-dependent effects of barnidipine in rat vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wegener, J W; Korstanje, C; Nawrath, H

    2003-08-01

    The effects of the dihydropyridine nifedipine and its more lipophilic congener, barnidipine, were investigated in smooth muscle preparations from the rat in resting and depolarizing conditions. Both drugs relaxed precontracted aortic rings more potently in depolarizing conditions, barnidipine being more potent than nifedipine. Currents through Ca2+ channels in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (A7r5) and in isolated rat cardiomyocytes were reduced more potently by both drugs at a holding potential of -40 mV than at -80 mV. However, barnidipine and nifedipine were more effective in reducing the current in A7r5 cells than in cardiomyocytes. The IC(50) obtained in aortic rings and in A7r5 cells were similar for barnidipine but an order of magnitude different for nifedipine. The results show that, in depolarizing conditions, barnidipine was more effective than nifedipine. It is suggested that the higher potency of barnidipine acting in vascular smooth muscle is related to both a higher affinity to the inactivated state of vascular Ca2+ channels and to a more lipophilic property as compared with nifedipine.

  9. RY 2004 Reporting Forms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The TRI reporting forms on this page are for reference only. Do not submit these forms to EPA. All facilities are required to submit their TRI data electronically using the TRI-MEweb application, per the TRI Electronic Reporting Rule.

  10. RY 2009 Reporting Forms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The TRI reporting forms on this page are for reference only. Do not submit these forms to EPA. All facilities are required to submit their TRI data electronically using the TRI-MEweb application, per the TRI Electronic Reporting Rule.

  11. RY 2003 Reporting Forms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The TRI reporting forms on this page are for reference only. Do not submit these forms to EPA. All facilities are required to submit their TRI data electronically using the TRI-MEweb application, per the TRI Electronic Reporting Rule.

  12. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  13. Secretory and basal cells of the epithelium of the tubular glands in the male Mullerian gland of the caecilian Uraeotyphlus narayani (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    George, Jancy M; Smita, Matthew; Kadalmani, Balamuthu; Girija, Ramankutty; Oommen, Oommen V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A

    2004-12-01

    Caecilians are exceptional among the vertebrates in that males retain the Mullerian duct as a functional glandular structure. The Mullerian gland on each side is formed from a large number of tubular glands connecting to a central duct, which either connects to the urogenital duct or opens directly into the cloaca. The Mullerian gland is believed to secrete a substance to be added to the sperm during ejaculation. Thus, the Mullerian gland could function as a male accessory reproductive gland. Recently, we described the male Mullerian gland of Uraeotyphlus narayani using light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and histochemistry. The present TEM study reports that the secretory cells of both the tubular and basal portions of the tubular glands of the male Mullerian gland of this caecilian produce secretion granules in the same manner as do other glandular epithelial cells. The secretion granules are released in the form of structured granules into the lumen of the tubular glands, and such granules are traceable to the lumen of the central duct of the Mullerian gland. This is comparable to the situation prevailing in the epididymal epithelium of several reptiles. In the secretory cells of the basal portion of the tubular glands, mitochondria are intimately associated with fabrication of the secretion granules. The structural and functional organization of the epithelium of the basal portion of the tubular glands is complicated by the presence of basal cells. This study suggests the origin of the basal cells from peritubular tissue leukocytes. The study also indicates a role for the basal cells in acquiring secretion granules from the neighboring secretory cells and processing them into lipofuscin material in the context of regression of the Mullerian gland during the period of reproductive quiescence. In these respects the basal cells match those in the epithelial lining of the epididymis of amniotes.

  14. Method for forming ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Pink, Robert J.; Zuck, Larry D.

    2008-08-19

    A method for forming ammonia is disclosed and which includes the steps of forming a plasma; providing a source of metal particles, and supplying the metal particles to the plasma to form metal nitride particles; and providing a substance, and reacting the metal nitride particles with the substance to produce ammonia, and an oxide byproduct.

  15. Forms in Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Paula

    1998-01-01

    Uses the work of M. C. Escher to instruct upper elementary students in the transformation of flat shape into three-dimensional form. Outlines the lesson as a series of sections: (1) reviewing form drawing; (2) creating three-dimensional effects; (3) imagining the forms in an inhabited world; and (4) using color and shading. (DSK)

  16. Methods of forming steel

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Burch, Joseph V.

    2001-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of forming a steel. A metallic glass is formed and at least a portion of the glass is converted to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A molten alloy is formed and cooled the alloy at a rate which forms a metallic glass. The metallic glass is devitrified to convert the glass to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A first metallic glass steel substrate is provided, and a molten alloy is formed over the first metallic glass steel substrate to heat and devitrify at least some of the underlying metallic glass of the substrate.

  17. Chromosome banding in Amphibia. XXVI. Coexistence of homomorphic XY sex chromosomes and a derived Y-autosome translocation in Eleutherodactylus maussi (Anura, Leptodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Schmid, M; Feichtinger, W; Steinlein, C; Haaf, T; Schartl, M; Visbal García, R; Manzanilla Pupo, J; Fernández Badillo, A

    2002-01-01

    A 15-year cytogenetic survey on one population of the leaf litter frog Eleutherodactylus maussi in northern Venezuela confirmed the existence of multiple XXAA male symbol /XAA(Y) female symbol sex chromosomes which originated by a centric (Robertsonian) fusion between the original Y chromosome and an autosome. 95% of the male individuals in this population are carriers of this Y-autosome fusion. In male meiosis the XAA(Y) sex chromosomes pair in the expected trivalent configuration. In the same population, 5% of the male animals still possess the original, free XY sex chromosomes. In a second population of E. maussi analyzed, all male specimens are characterized by these ancestral XY chromosomes which form normal bivalents in meiosis. E. maussi apparently represents the first vertebrate species discovered in which a derived Y-autosome fusion still coexists with the ancestral free XY sex chromosomes. The free XY sex chromosomes, as well as the multiple XA(Y) sex chromosomes are still in a very primitive (homomorphic) stage of differentiation. With no banding technique applied it is possible to distinguish the Y from the X. DNA flow cytometric measurements show that the genome of E. maussi is among the largest in the anuran family Leptodactylidae. The present study also supplies further data on differential chromosome banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments in this amphibian species.

  18. Spermiogenesis and spermatozoon ultrastructure of Diplodiscus subclavatus (Pallas, 1760) (Paramphistomoidea, Diplodiscidae), an intestinal fluke of the pool frog Rana lessonae (Amphibia, Anura).

    PubMed

    Bakhoum, A J S; Torres, J; Shimalov, V V; Bâ, C T; Miquel, J

    2011-01-01

    Spermiogenesis in Diplodiscus subclavatus begins with the formation of the zone of differentiation presenting two centrioles associated with striated roots and an intercentriolar body. The latter presents seven electron-dense layers with a fine central plate and three plates on both sides. The external pair of these electron-dense layers is formed by a granular row. Each centriole develops into a free flagellum, both of them growing orthogonally in relation to the median cytoplasmic process. After the flagellar rotation and before the proximodistal fusion of both flagella with the median cytoplasmic process four attachment zones were already observed in several cross-sections indicating the area of fusion. Spinelike bodies are also observed in the differentiation zone before the fusion of flagella. Finally, the constriction of the ring of arched membranes gives rise to the young spermatozoon that detaches from the residual cytoplasm. The mature spermatozoon of D. subclavatus shows all the classical characters observed in Digenea spermatozoa such as two axonemes of different length of the 9+"1" trepaxonematan pattern, nucleus, mitochondrion, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules and granules of glycogen. However, some peculiarities such as a well-developed lateral expansion associated with external ornamentation of the plasma membrane and spinelike bodies combined with their area of appearance distinguish the ultrastructural organization of the sperm cells of D. subclavatus from those of other digeneans.

  19. Revision of the characters of Centrolenidae (Amphibia : Anura : Athesphatanura), with comments on its taxonomy and the description of new taxa of glassfrogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cisneros-Heredia, D.F.; McDiarmid, Roy W.

    2007-01-01

    Anurans of the family Centrolenidae are a diverse clade of arboreal frogs distributed across tropical America. Knowledge of their taxonomy, systematics, ecology, behavior, morphology, and other evolutionary aspects of their biology is deficient. Relationships among centrolenid species remain largely unresolved, with no satisfactory phylogenetic hypothesis, and none of the current genera has compelling evidence of monophyly. Further, understanding the phylogeny of glassfrogs is constrained by species-level taxonomic problems, including incorrect description of characters, incomplete analyses of intraspecific variation, and lack of appreciation of species diversity. Herein, we define and analyze the 23 characters that are useful, in combination, in diagnosing centrolenid species, and thereby provide a reference for the use of future workers. We propose revised classifications for the parietal and visceral peritoneal pigmentation, liver form and coloration of its associated hepatic peritoneum, nuptial excrescences, and hand ornamentation. We comment on the generic and species-level taxonomy of Centrolenidae, proposing the recognition of a new genus and describing a new species from Ecuador. We treat Hyla ocellifera Boulenger as a synonym of Centrolene prosoblepon (Boettger), Hyalinobatrachium cardiacalyptum McCranie & Wilson as a synonym of Hyalinobatrachium chirripoi (Taylor), and Hyalinobatrachium crybetes McCranie and Wilson as a synonym of Hyalinobatrachium colymbiphyllum (Taylor). We also present an annotated list of the species of glassfrogs from the Republic of Ecuador with some distributional remarks.

  20. Chloromyxum aegypticus n. sp. (Myxozoa: Chloromyxidae) infecting the testicular tissue of the Egyptian toad, Bufo regularis (Amphibia: Bufonidae), and its pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Reda, Enayat Salem Ahmed

    2010-11-01

    A new myxosporean, Chloromyxum aegypticus n. sp., is described from the testes of the Egyptian toad Bufo regularis, captured from El Mansoura locality. C. aegypticus is identified on the basis of cytology, electron microscopy and histopathology. It is distinguished from all previously reported Chloromyxum spp. by its shape, dimensions of the mature spore (9.1 ± 0.1 (9.0-9.2) μm in length  × 7.9 ± 0.1 (7.8-8.0) μm in width), polar capsules, external ridge, sporoplasm nuclei, undulating suture, locality and host. Accumulation of several hundreds of plasmodia (0.8 ± 0.3 (0.5-1.1) mm in length × 0.5 ± 0.3 (0.2-0.7) mm in width) in the testes causes their enlargement. Parasites cause destruction of the seminiferous tubule cells and complete loss of spermatozoa. Since spermatogenesis stops, this seems to be a form of "parasitic castration". This is the first known record of the genus Chloromyxum in amphibian testes.

  1. Phylogeny and Differentiation of Wide-Ranging Ryukyu Kajika Frog Buergeria japonica (Amphibia: Rhacophoridae): Geographic Genetic Pattern Not Simply Explained by Vicariance Through Strait Formation.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Atsushi; Matsui, Masafumi; Eto, Koshiro; Ota, Hidetoshi

    2015-06-01

    To investigate geographic genetic structures and taxonomic relationships among isolated populations of Buergeria japonica, occurring very widely in various habitats of the Ryukyu Archipelago and Taiwan, we conducted phylogenetic and demographic analyses among individuals from various localities, representing their entire distributional ranges. Buergeria japonica is genetically greatly differentiated and comprises three major clades (the Southern Taiwan [ST] clade, the Northern Taiwan + Southern Ryukyu [NT/SR] clade, and the Central + Northern Ryukyu [CR/NR] clade), each of which seems to represent independent species. The first divergence in the species is estimated to have occurred in the middle to late Miocene in areas of current Taiwan, then eastern periphery of the Asian continent. Split of the ST and the remaining clades, and subsequent divergence between the NT/SR and the CR/NR clades in the latter, indicate consecutive south to north vicariant diversifications. However, these vicariances are not always associated with formation of significant barriers such as deep straits. Less but still prominently diverged subclades (the Amami + Tokara [AM/TK] and the Okinawa [ON] subclades) in the CR/NR clade were recognized in spite of the absence of an intervening deep strait. Contrariwise, individuals from Amami and Tokara Groups formed the AM/TK subclade in spite of the presence of the intervening Tokara Gap (a long-standing deep tectonic strait). Furthermore, in the AM/TK subclade, low but definite genetic divergence was found between the Northern Amami + Tokara (NAM/TK) lineage and the Southern Amami (SAM) lineage. Estimated divergence time and gene flow rate within the NAM/TK lineage indicate that this species reached northern Tokara from the south by overseas dispersal over the Tokara Gap long after its formation, but not by more recent artificial transportation. This overseas dispersal would have been facilitated by its more frequent occurrence around coastal

  2. Crystal forms of naproxen.

    PubMed

    Song, Jung-Soon; Sohn, Young-Taek

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the existence of polymorphs and pseudopolymorphs of naproxen and the transformation of crystal forms. Four crystal forms of naproxen have been isolated by recrystallization and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffractometry and thermogravimetric analysis. The differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffractometry patterns of the four crystal forms were different respectively. In the dissolution studies in pH 6.8 ± 0.05 buffer equilibrated at 37 ± 0.5°C, the solubility of four crystal forms was similar (within the error range). After storage of 1 month at 0% RH (silica gel, 20°C), 52% RH (saturated solution of Na(2)Cr(2)O(7.2)H(2)O/20°C) and 95% RH (saturated solution of Na(2)HPO(4)/20°C), Form 2 and Form 4 were transformed to Form 1, but Form 3 and Form 1 were not transformed and they were shown to have a good physical stability at room temperature for 1 month.

  3. New mutation of the Na channel in the severe form of potassium-aggravated myotonia.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Masanobu; Sasaki, Ryogen; Aoike, Futoshi; Takahashi, Masanori P; Sakoda, Saburo; Hirose, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-01

    Myotonia manifests in several hereditary diseases, including hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP), paramyotonia congenita (PMC), and potassium-aggravated myotonia (PAM). These are allelic disorders originating from missense mutations in the gene that codes the skeletal muscle sodium channel, Nav1.4. Moreover, a severe form of PAM has been designated as myotonia permanens. A new mutation of Nav1.4, Q1633E, was identified in a Japanese family presenting with the PAM phenotype. The proband suffered from cyanotic attacks during infancy. The mutated amino acid residue is located on the EF-hand calcium-binding motif in the intracellular C-terminus. A functional analysis of the mutant channel using the voltage-clamp method revealed disruption of fast inactivation, a slower rate of current decay, and a depolarized shift in the voltage dependence of availability. This study has identified a new mutation of PAM with a severe phenotype and emphasizes the importance of the C-terminus for fast inactivation of the sodium channel. Muscle Nerve 39: 666-673, 2009.

  4. Method of forming nanodielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Tuncer, Enis [Knoxville, TN; Polyzos, Georgios [Oak Ridge, TN

    2014-01-07

    A method of making a nanoparticle filled dielectric material. The method includes mixing nanoparticle precursors with a polymer material and reacting the nanoparticle mixed with the polymer material to form nanoparticles dispersed within the polymer material to form a dielectric composite.

  5. The "Energy" of Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Jane; Sweeney, Barbara

    1980-01-01

    Examines three types of "energy" of form as form relates to content: "dynamos," potential energy; "energeia," that energy which sustains movement toward an end; and "ergon," that energy which is associated with perfected habit. Uses some examples from contemporary political rhetoric to illustrate this analysis. (JMF)

  6. Method for forming materials

    DOEpatents

    Tolle, Charles R.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.; Miller, Karen S.

    2009-10-06

    A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

  7. Spin forming development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.

    1982-05-01

    Bendix product applications require the capability of fabricating heavy gage, high strength materials. Five commercial sources have been identified that have the capability of spin forming metal thicknesses greater than 9.5 mm and four equiment manufacturers produce machines with this capability. Twelve assemblies selected as candidates for spin forming applications require spin forming of titanium, 250 maraging steel, 17-4 pH stainless steel, Nitronic 40 steel, 304 L stainless steel, and 6061 aluminum. Twelve parts have been cold spin formed from a 250 maraging steel 8.1 mm wall thickness machine preform, and six have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick flat plate. Thirty-three Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy parts and 26 17-4 pH stainless steel parts have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick plate. Hot spin forming directly from plate has demonstrated the feasibility and favorable economics of this fabrication technique for Bendix applications.

  8. Pore forming activity of the potent RTX-toxin produced by pediatric pathogen Kingella kingae: characterization and comparison to other RTX-family members*

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Benz, Roland; Winterhalter, Mathias; Zakharian, Eleonora; Balashova, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric septic arthritis in patients under age of four is frequently caused by the oral Gram-negative bacterium Kingella kingae. This organism may be responsible for a severe form of infective endocarditis in otherwise healthy children and adults. A major virulence factor of K. kingae is RtxA, a toxin that belongs to the RTX (Repeats-in-ToXin) group of secreted pore forming toxins. To understand the RtxA effects on host cell membranes, the toxin activity was studied using planar lipid bilayers. K. kingae strain PYKK081 and its isogenic RtxA-deficient strain, KKNB100, were tested for their ability to form pores in artificial membranes of asolectin/n-decane. RtxA, purified from PYKK081, was able to rapidly form pores with an apparent diameter of 1.9 nm as measured by the partition of nonelectrolytes in the pores. The RtxA channels are cation-selective and showed strong voltage-dependent gating. In contrast to supernatants of PYKK081, those of KKNB100 did not show any pore forming activity. We concluded that RtxA toxin is the only secreted protein from K. kingae forming large channels in host cell membranes where it induces cation flux leading to programmed cell death. Furthermore, our findings suggested that the planar lipid bilayer technique can effectively be used to test possible inhibitors of RTX toxin activity and to investigate the mechanism of the toxin binding to the membrane. PMID:25858109

  9. Pore forming activity of the potent RTX-toxin produced by pediatric pathogen Kingella kingae: Characterization and comparison to other RTX-family members.

    PubMed

    Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Benz, Roland; Winterhalter, Mathias; Zakharian, Eleonora; Balashova, Nataliya

    2015-07-01

    Pediatric septic arthritis in patients under age of four is frequently caused by the oral Gram-negative bacterium Kingella kingae. This organism may be responsible for a severe form of infective endocarditis in otherwise healthy children and adults. A major virulence factor of K. kingae is RtxA, a toxin that belongs to the RTX (Repeats-in-ToXin) group of secreted pore forming toxins. To understand the RtxA effects on host cell membranes, the toxin activity was studied using planar lipid bilayers. K. kingae strain PYKK081 and its isogenic RtxA-deficient strain, KKNB100, were tested for their ability to form pores in artificial membranes of asolectin/n-decane. RtxA, purified from PYKK081, was able to rapidly form pores with an apparent diameter of 1.9nm as measured by the partition of nonelectrolytes in the pores. The RtxA channels are cation-selective and showed strong voltage-dependent gating. In contrast to supernatants of PYKK081, those of KKNB100 did not show any pore forming activity. We concluded that RtxA toxin is the only secreted protein from K. kingae forming large channels in host cell membranes where it induces cation flux leading to programmed cell death. Furthermore, our findings suggested that the planar lipid bilayer technique can effectively be used to test possible inhibitors of RTX toxin activity and to investigate the mechanism of the toxin binding to the membrane.

  10. Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; McCloy, John S.; Matyas, Josef

    2011-12-01

    This is a brief description of PNNL's efforts in FY2011 towards developing advanced electrochemical waste forms. This is a short section that will become part of a larger document being put together by INL.

  11. Handprinted Forms and Characters

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Handprinted Forms and Characters (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 19 contains NIST's entire corpus of training materials for handprinted document and character recognition. It supersedes NIST Special Databases 3 and 7.

  12. Image forming apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Satoh, Hisao; Haneda, Satoshi; Ikeda, Tadayoshi; Morita, Shizuo; Fukuchi, Masakazu

    1996-01-01

    In an image forming apparatus having a detachable process cartridge in which an image carrier on which an electrostatic latent image is formed, and a developing unit which develops the electrostatic latent image so that a toner image can be formed, both integrally formed into one unit. There is provided a developer container including a discharge section which can be inserted into a supply opening of the developing unit, and a container in which a predetermined amount of developer is contained, wherein the developer container is provided to the toner supply opening of the developing unit and the developer is supplied into the developing unit housing when a toner stirring screw of the developing unit is rotated.

  13. Electromagnetic nucleon form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.; Roberts, C.D.; Frank, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger equation framework is employed to obtain expressions for the electromagnetic nucleon form factor. In generalized impulse approximation the form factor depends on the dressed quark propagator, the dressed quark-photon vertex, which is crucial to ensuring current conservation, and the nucleon Faddeev amplitude. The approach manifestly incorporates the large space-like-q{sup 2} renormalization group properties of QCD and allows a realistic extrapolation to small space-like-q{sup 2}. This extrapolation allows one to relate experimental data to the form of the quark-quark interaction at small space-like-q{sup 2}, which is presently unknown. The approach provides a means of unifying, within a single framework, the treatment of the perturbative and nonperturbative regimes of QCD. The wealth of experimental nucleon form factor data, over a large range of q{sup 2}, ensures that this application will provide an excellent environment to test, improve and extend our approach.

  14. Forming techniques and procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronde-Oustau, F.

    1980-09-01

    Several forming techniques are discussed including: (1) cooling stamping and swaging tools by the "Caloduc' methods; (2) non-burr stamping (stamping in a closed die); (3) continuous casting; (4) orbital forging; and (5) plastic deformation and spheroidal graphite iron. In addition, the subject of superplasticity is discussed in some detail, and brief consideration is given to precision forging, forging die castings, sintered forging, squeeze casting, ausforming, magnetoforming, and ultrasonic forming.

  15. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Hollow shells of high uniformity are formed by emitting liquid through an outer nozzle and gas through an inner nozzle, to form a hollow extrusion, by flowing the gas at a velocity between about 1.3 and 10 times the liquid velocity. The natural breakup rate of the extrusion can be increased to decrease shell size by applying periodic perturbations to one of the materials prior to exiting the nozzles, to a nozzle, or to the extrusion.

  16. Cranial kinesis in the amphibia: a review.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiĭ, N N

    2000-01-01

    All extant orders of amphibians are characterized by kinetic skulls. Main type of intracranial movability in amphibians is pleurokinetism, that is supplemented in different amphibian groups by various types of rhyncho- and prokinetism. The most primitive pattern of cranial kinesis is revealed in the stegocrotaphic gymnophions. More paedomorphic species retain general cranial flexibility that is characteristic of larval skull. That is unfavourable for evolution of well-regulated (adult) cranial kinesis and related feeding adaptations. Kinetism is also reduced in the species with heavily ossified skulls. Adaptive role and evolution of cranial kinesis in amphibians are discussed.

  17. UltraForm finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, E.; Schoen, J.; Bechtold, M.; Mohring, D.

    2005-05-01

    A new compliant sub-aperture optical finishing technique is being investigated for the removal of mid-spatial frequency artifacts and smoothing of hard polycrystalline infrared ceramics for aspheric applications and conformal shaped optics. The UltraForm concept was developed by OptiPro Systems, Ontario, NY, and is a joint process development effort with the Center for Optics manufacturing (COM). The UltraForm tool is a pressurized, elastomeric bladder in the shape of a toroid. Finishing pads are attached to the periphery, allowing the use of a wide variety of pad materials and abrasive selections. Experimentation has been conducted using both slurry mixes and fixed abrasive pads. The toroidal tool is rotated while the compliant tool is compressed into contact with the surface. Currently this process has specific interest for the finishing of conformal ALON Domes. Also to be discussed will be new versions of the UltraForm Tools which are currently be developed and tested.

  18. Microbicide dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Rohan, L C; Devlin, B; Yang, H

    2014-01-01

    Microbicides are topically applied, user controlled dosage forms that are being developed to prevent the transmission of HIV during coitus. Early candidates focused on coitally dependent dosage forms such as gels and creams. More recent development has focused on broadening the coitally dependent options through the introduction of films and fast dissolving tablets. Additionally, it has become important to have longer acting products to minimize the burden of user compliance and thus vaginal rings have been developed providing sustained delivery of antiretroviral drugs. This chapter discusses the history of microbicides along with a detailed description of coitally dependent products, gels, films, tablets diaphragms, as well as coitally independent dosage forms such as vaginal rings and the introduction of a new technology, electrospun fibers.

  19. Physical forms of MIPs.

    PubMed

    Biffis, Andrea; Dvorakova, Gita; Falcimaigne-Cordin, Aude

    2012-01-01

    The current state of the art in the development of methodologies for the preparation of MIPs in predetermined physical forms is critically reviewed, with particular attention being paid to the forms most widely employed in practical applications, such as spherical beads in the micro- to nanometer range, microgels, monoliths, membranes. Although applications of the various MIP physical forms are mentioned, the focus of the paper is mainly on the description of the various preparative methods. The aim is to provide the reader with an overview of the latest achievements in the field, as well as with a mean for critically evaluating the various proposed methodologies towards an envisaged application. The review covers the literature up to early 2010, with special emphasis on the developments of the last 10 years.

  20. Hydrogen forming reaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Marianowski, L.G.; Fleming, D.K.

    1989-03-07

    A hydrogen forming process is described, comprising: conducting in a hydrogen production zone a chemical reaction forming mixed gases comprising molecular hydrogen; contacting one side of a hydrogen ion porous and molecular gas nonporous metallic foil with the mixed gases in the hydrogen production zone; dissociating the molecular hydrogen to ionic hydrogen on the one side of the metallic foil; passing the ionic hydrogen through the metallic foil to its other side; and withdrawing hydrogen from the other side of the metallic foil, thereby removing hydrogen from the hydrogen production zone.

  1. Emotions: form follows function.

    PubMed

    Farb, Norman A S; Chapman, Hanah A; Anderson, Adam K

    2013-06-01

    Emotion research has been divided by debate as to whether emotions are universal in form or cognitively constructed. We review an emerging approach that focuses on function rather than form. Functional affective science suggests that the particular origin of an emotion is relatively unimportant; instead, emotions can be understood in terms of a rapidly deployed set of mechanisms that structure perception, cognition and behavior to facilitate goal fulfillment. Evidence from this approach suggests at least three major functions of emotion: sensory gating, embodying affect, and integrating knowledge toward goal resolution. These functions appear to be universal and automatically activated, yet also moderated by conscious representation and regulatory efforts.

  2. Sixth Form Examining Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schools Council, London (England).

    The methods of examining in the sixth form of secondary education in England and Wales is the basis for discussion by subject committees of the Schools Council. Special reference is made to internal examinations, oral assessments, teacher's assessments, the relaxing of the time limits for examination, and the use of aids during examinations. The…

  3. Many Forms of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Adam B.

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists interested in culture have focused primarily on East-West differences in individualism-collectivism, or independent-interdependent self-construal. As important as this dimension is, there are many other forms of culture with many dimensions of cultural variability. Selecting from among the many understudied cultures in psychology,…

  4. Geodiversity and land form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Murray

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's surface has a dynamic and topographically varied natural landscape. In some cases the resulting landforms are given generic names reflecting their form and/or origin, (e.g. sand dunes, eskers, ox-bow lakes) but in many cases the land surface has a more amorphous form and is less easily categorized other than at a landscape scale (e.g. dissected plateau, Chalk downland). Across much of Europe, while the natural vegetation has been removed or radically modified, the natural land form/topography remains in tact. In this context and in terms of geoconservation we ought to be: • allowing the dynamic natural processes that create, carve and modify landscapes to continue to operate; and • retaining natural topographic character and geomorphological authenticity in the face of human actions seeking to remodel the land surface. In this presentation examples of this approach to geoconservation of land form will be given from the UK and other parts of the world. This will include examples of both appropriate and inappropriate topographic modifications.

  5. Literature: Internal Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Curriculum Project, Atlanta, GA.

    This curriculum guide in literature, developed as part of a total English curriculum for pre-kindergarten through grade 10, suggests that students can best understand literature by recognizing its internal forms (i.e., characteristics that recur in settings, characters, and narrative patterns). Materials cover (1) an overview for teachers on the…

  6. Bristol Stool Form Scale

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stool Form Scale Type Description Type 1 Separate hard lumps, like nuts Image Type 2 Sausage-shaped but lumpy Type 3 Like a sausage or snake but with cracks on its surface Type 4 Like a sausage or snake, smooth and soft ...

  7. Forms of Soft Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Dorothy

    1978-01-01

    For the past several years, students at Madison Senior High School in San Diego have responded to the tactile texture and draping quality of soft materials. They experimented enthusiastically with three-dimensional forms made out of foam rubber. Here is the result of their efforts and experimentation. (Author/RK)

  8. Apparatus for forming targets

    DOEpatents

    Woerner, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus and method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  9. Method for forming targets

    DOEpatents

    Woerner, Robert L.

    1979-01-01

    Method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  10. High energy forming facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciurlionis, B.

    1967-01-01

    Watertight, high-explosive forming facility, 25 feet in diameter and 15 feet deep, withstands repeated explosions of 10 pounds of TNT equivalent. The shell is fabricated of high strength steel and allows various structural elements to deform or move elastically and independently while retaining structural integrity.

  11. Nucleon electromagnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2000-01-01

    A review of data on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region is presented. Recent results from experiments using polarized beams and polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the data obtained with the traditional Rosenbluth separation. Future plans for extended measurements are outlined.

  12. Nucleon Magnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2001-12-01

    A review of data on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region is presented. Recent results from experiments using polarized beams and polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the data obtained with the traditional Rosenbluth separation. Future plans for extended measurements are outlined.

  13. Nucleon Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2002-10-01

    A review of data on the nucleon electro-weak form factors in the space-like region is presented. Recent results from experiments using polarized beams and either polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the electromagnetic data obtained with the traditional Rosenbluth separation. An outlook is presented of planned experiments.

  14. Formed photovoltaic module busbars

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Douglas; Daroczi, Shan; Phu, Thomas

    2015-11-10

    A cell connection piece for a photovoltaic module is disclosed herein. The cell connection piece includes an interconnect bus, a plurality of bus tabs unitarily formed with the interconnect bus, and a terminal bus coupled with the interconnect bus. The plurality of bus tabs extend from the interconnect bus. The terminal bus includes a non-linear portion.

  15. Analytic pion form factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomon, Earle L.; Pacetti, Simone

    2016-09-01

    The pion electromagnetic form factor and two-pion production in electron-positron collisions are simultaneously fitted by a vector dominance model evolving to perturbative QCD at large momentum transfer. This model was previously successful in simultaneously fitting the nucleon electromagnetic form factors (spacelike region) and the electromagnetic production of nucleon-antinucleon pairs (timelike region). For this pion case dispersion relations are used to produce the analytic connection of the spacelike and timelike regions. The fit to all the data is good, especially for the newer sets of timelike data. The description of high-q2 data, in the timelike region, requires one more meson with ρ quantum numbers than listed in the 2014 Particle Data Group review.

  16. Waste-form development

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Colombo, P.

    1982-01-01

    Contemporary solidification agents are being investigated relative to their applications to major fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle low-level waste (LLW) streams. Work is being conducted to determine the range of conditions under which these solidification agents can be applied to specific LLW streams. These studies are directed primarily towards defining operating parameters for both improved solidification of problem wastes and solidification of new LLW streams generated from advanced volume reduction technologies. Work is being conducted to measure relevant waste form properties. These data will be compiled and evaluated to demonstrate compliance with waste form performance and shallow land burial acceptance criteria and transportation requirements (both as they exist and as they are modified with time).

  17. Formed HIP Can Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Kester Diederik

    2015-07-27

    The intent of this report is to document a procedure used at LANL for HIP bonding aluminum cladding to U-10Mo fuel foils using a formed HIP can for the Domestic Reactor Conversion program in the NNSA Office of Material, Management and Minimization, and provide some details that may not have been published elsewhere. The HIP process is based on the procedures that have been used to develop the formed HIP can process, including the baseline process developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The HIP bonding cladding process development is summarized in the listed references. Further iterations with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) to refine the process to meet production and facility requirements is expected.

  18. How Stars Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.

    2017-01-01

    Stars are the atoms of the universe. The process by which stars form is at the nexus of astrophysics since they are believed to be responsible for the re-ionization of the universe, they created the heavy elements, they play a central role in the formation and evolution of galaxies, and their formation naturally leads to the formation of planets. Whereas early work on star formation was based on the assumption that it is a quiescent process, it is now believed that turbulence plays a dominant role. In this overview, I shall discuss the evolution of our understanding of how stars form and current ideas about the stellar initial mass function and the rate of star formation.

  19. Tube-Forming Assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  20. Evoked Cultural Forms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    individual (1) pathological behaviors (such as those exhibited by Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) patients) and (2) non-pathological precautionary...McClelland, J., et al. (2001). Compulsive Checking Behavior of Quinpirole-Sensitized Rats as an Animal Model of Obsessive - Compulsive Disorder (OCD...Form and Control. BMC Neuroscience, 2(1), 4. Szechtman, H., & Woody, E. (2004). Obsessive - Compulsive disorder as a disturbance of security Motivation

  1. GlassForm

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-16

    GlassForm is a software tool for generating preliminary waste glass formulas for a given waste stream. The software is useful because it reduces the number of verification melts required to develop a suitable additive composition. The software includes property models that calculate glass properties of interest from the chemical composition of the waste glass. The software includes property models for glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature, and leach resistance as measured by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT).

  2. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2004-08-01

    Although nucleons account for nearly all the visible mass in the universe, they have a complicated structure that is still incompletely understood. The first indication that nucleons have an internal structure, was the measurement of the proton magnetic moment by Frisch and Stern (1933) which revealed a large deviation from the value expected for a point-like Dirac particle. The investigation of the spatial structure of the nucleon, resulting in the first quantitative measurement of the proton charge radius, was initiated by the HEPL (Stanford) experiments in the 1950s, for which Hofstadter was awarded the 1961 Nobel prize. The first indication of a non-zero neutron charge distribution was obtained by scattering thermal neutrons off atomic electrons. The recent revival of its experimental study through the operational implementation of novel instrumentation has instigated a strong theoretical interest. Nucleon electro-magnetic form factors (EMFFs) are optimally studied through the exchange of a virtual photon, in elastic electron-nucleon scattering. The momentum transferred to the nucleon by the virtual photon can be selected to probe different scales of the nucleon, from integral properties such as the charge radius to scaling properties of its internal constituents. Polarization instrumentation, polarized beams and targets, and the measurement of the polarization of the recoiling nucleon have been essential in the accurate separation of the charge and magnetic form factors and in studies of the elusive neutron charge form factor.

  3. Electromagnetic pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.

    1995-08-01

    A phenomenological Dyson-Schwinger/Bethe-Salpeter equation approach to QCD, formalized in terms of a QCD-based model field theory, the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), was used to calculate the generalized impulse approximation contribution to the electromagnetic pion form factor at space-like q{sup 2} on the domain [0,10] GeV{sup 2}. In effective field theories this form factor is sometimes understood as simply being due to Vector Meson Dominance (VMD) but this does not allow for a simple connection with QCD where the VMD contribution is of higher order than that of the quark core. In the GCM the pion is treated as a composite bound state of a confined quark and antiquark interacting via the exchange of colored vector-bosons. A direct study of the quark core contribution is made, using a quark propagator that manifests the large space-like-q{sup 2} properties of QCD, parameterizes the infrared behavior and incorporates confinement. It is shown that the few parameters which characterize the infrared form of the quark propagator may be chosen so as to yield excellent agreement with the available data. In doing this one directly relates experimental observables to properties of QCD at small space-like-q{sup 2}. The incorporation of confinement eliminates endpoint and pinch singularities in the calculation of F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}). With asymptotic freedom manifest in the dressed quark propagator the calculation yields q{sup 4}F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}) = constant, up to [q{sup 2}]- corrections, for space-like-q{sup 2} {approx_gt} 35 GeV{sup 2}, which indicates that soft, nonperturbative contributions dominate the form factor at presently accessible q{sup 2}. This means that the often-used factorization Ansatz fails in this exclusive process. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication. In addition, these results formed the basis for an invited presentation at a workshop on chiral dynamics and will be published in the proceedings.

  4. Bipolar pulse forming line

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    2008-10-21

    A bipolar pulse forming transmission line module for linear induction accelerators having first, second, third, fourth, and fifth planar conductors which form an interleaved stack with dielectric layers between the conductors. Each conductor has a first end, and a second end adjacent an acceleration axis. The first and second planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, the fourth and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, and the first and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the first ends via a shorting plate adjacent the first ends. The third planar conductor is electrically connectable to a high voltage source, and an internal switch functions to short a high voltage from the first end of the third planar conductor to the first end of the fourth planar conductor to produce a bipolar pulse at the acceleration axis with a zero net time integral. Improved access to the switch is enabled by an aperture through the shorting plate and the proximity of the aperture to the switch.

  5. Nucleon form factors '99

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager; B. Pire

    1999-06-01

    The authors review recent progress in the experimental knowledge of and theoretical speculations about nucleon form factors, with special emphasis on the large Q{sup 2} region. There is now a long history of continuous progress in the understanding of electromagnetic form factors at large momentum transfer. After the pioneering works leading to the celebrated quark counting rules, the understanding of hard scattering exclusive processes has been solidly founded. A perturbative QCD subprocess is factorized from a wave function-like distribution amplitude {var_phi}(x{sub i},Q{sup 2}) (x{sub i} being the light cone fractions of momentum carried by valence quarks), the Q{sup 2} dependence of which is analyzed in the renormalization group approach. Although an asymptotic expression emerges from this analysis for the x dependence of the distribution, it was quickly understood that the evolution to the asymptotic Q{sub 2} is very slow and that indeed some non perturbative input is required to get reliable estimates of this distribution amplitude at measurable Q{sup 2}.

  6. Pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryong Ji, C.; Pang, A.; Szczepaniak, A.

    1994-04-01

    It is pointed out that the correct criterion to define the legal PQCD contribution to the exclusive processes in the lightcone perturbative expansion should be based on the large off-shellness of the lightcone energy in the intermediate states. In the lightcone perturbative QCD calculation of the pion form factor, the authors find that the legal PQCD contribution defined by the lightcone energy cut saturates in the smaller Q{sup 2} region compared to that defined by the gluon four-momentum square cut. This is due to the contribution by the highly off-energy-shell gluons in the end point regions of the phase space, indicating that the gluon four-momentum-square cut may have cut too much to define the legal PQCD.

  7. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  8. Shell forming apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Granett, Dan (Inventor); Akutagawa, Wesley M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A nozzle assembly is described for use in a system that forms small gas-filled shells, which avoids the need for holding a miniature inner nozzle precisely concentric with a miniature outer nozzle. The outer nozzle has a diameter which is less than about 0.7 millimeter, which results in fluid passing through the nozzle having a progressively greater velocity at locations progressively further from the walls of the outer nozzle across most of the nozzle. This highly variable velocity profile automatically forces gas to the center of the outer nozzle. The end of the inner nozzle, which emits gas, is spaced upstream from the tip of the outer nozzle, to provide a distance along which to center the gas. This self-centering characteristic permits the inner nozzle to be positioned so its axis is not concentric with the axis of the outer nozzle.

  9. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for forming gas-filled spheres of metal, glass or other material, which produces spheres (12) of uniform size and wall thickness in a relatively simple system. The system includes concentric nozzles, including an inner nozzle (18) through which gas flows and and an outer nozzle (20), which jointly define an annular passageway (50) through which a liquid flows. The flow rates are adjusted so that the gas flows at greater velocity than does the liquid, out of their respective nozzles, e.g. three times as great, in order to produce an extrusion (30) which undergoes axisymmetric oscillations resulting in the pinch off into hollow spheres with very uniform spacing. The system is useful not only where gas-filled spheres are required, but also is useful to accurately control the dispensing of solid, liquid, or gaseous materials.

  10. 78 FR 58605 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8453-EMP, Form 8453-F, Form 8453-FE, Form 8879-F...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8453-EMP, Form 8453-F, Form 8453-FE, Form 8879-F, and 8879-EMP. AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request... comments concerning Form 8453-F, U.S. Estate of Trust Income Tax Declaration and Signature for...

  11. Forming Spirals From Shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    What causes the large-scale spiral structures found in some protoplanetary disks? Most models assume theyre created by newly-forming planets, but a new study suggests that planets might have nothing to do with it.Perturbations from Planets?In some transition disks protoplanetary disks with gaps in their inner regions weve directly imaged large-scale spiral arms. Many theories currently attribute the formation of these structures to young planets: either the direct perturbations of a planet embedded in the disk cause the spirals, or theyre indirectly caused by the orbit of a planetary body outside of the arms.Another example of spiral arms detected in a protoplanetary disk, MWC 758. [NASA/ESA/ESO/M. Benisty et al.]But what if you could get spirals without any planets? A team of scientists led by Matas Montesinos (University of Chile) have recently published a study in which they examine what happens to a shadowed protoplanetary disk.Casting Shadows with WarpsIn the teams setup, they envision a protoplanetary disk that is warped: the inner region is slightly tilted relative to the outer region. As the central star casts light out over its protoplanetary disk, this disk warping would cause some regions of the disk to be shaded in a way that isnt axially symmetric with potentially interesting implications.Montesinos and collaborators ran 2D hydrodynamics simulations to determine what happens to the motion of particles within the disk when they pass in and out of the shadowed regions. Since the shadowed regions are significantly colder than the illuminated disk, the pressure in these regions is much lower. Particles are therefore accelerated and decelerated as they pass through these regions, and the lack of axial symmetry causes spiral density waves to form in the disk as a result.Initial profile for the stellar heating rate per unit area for one of the authors simulations. The regions shadowed as a result of the disk warp subtend 0.5 radians each (shown on the left

  12. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2016-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  13. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2014-05-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  14. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2015-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  15. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2013-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  16. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  17. Waste form product characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy has operated nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to support national interests for several decades. Since 1953, it has supported the development of technologies for the storage and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) and the resultant wastes. However, the 1992 decision to discontinue reprocessing of SNF has left nearly 768 MT of SNF in storage at the INEL with unspecified plans for future dispositioning. Past reprocessing of these fuels for uranium and other resource recovery has resulted in the production of 3800 M{sup 3} calcine and a total inventory of 7600 M{sup 3} of radioactive liquids (1900 M{sup 3} destined for immediate calcination and the remaining sodium-bearing waste requiring further treatment before calcination). These issues, along with increased environmental compliance within DOE and its contractors, mandate operation of current and future facilities in an environmentally responsible manner. This will require satisfactory resolution of spent fuel and waste disposal issues resulting from the past activities. A national policy which identifies requirements for the disposal of SNF and high level wastes (HLW) has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) Sec.8,(b) para(3)) [1982]. The materials have to be conditioned or treated, then packaged for disposal while meeting US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The spent fuel and HLW located at the INEL will have to be put into a form and package that meets these regulatory criteria. The emphasis of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) future operations has shifted toward investigating, testing, and selecting technologies to prepare current and future spent fuels and waste for final disposal. This preparation for disposal may include mechanical, physical and/or chemical processes, and may differ for each of the various fuels and wastes.

  18. Science Grade 7, Long Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The Grade 7 Science course of study was prepared in two parallel forms. A short form designed for students who had achieved a high measure of success in previous science courses; the long form for those who have not been able to maintain the pace. Both forms contain similar content. The Grade 7 guide is the first in a three-year sequence for…

  19. 10. VIEW SHOWING THE ARCH FORMS. THE INTRADOS FORM IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW SHOWING THE ARCH FORMS. THE INTRADOS FORM IS COMMONLY LIFTED 3 TO 4 DAYS AFTER POURING. REINFORCING STEEL IS THEN PLACED AND THE EXTRADOS FORM RAISED TO POSITION. THE OPERATING OF MOVING FORMS, PLACING STEEL AND CONCRETE FOR EACH ARCH LIFT REQUIRES, ON AVERAGE, EIGHT DAYS. NOTE THE TWO LINES OF WATER PIPE ON THE EXTRADOS FORM. THESE PIPES ARE FILLED WITH SPRAY NOZZLES WHICH ARE IN PRACTICALLY CONTINUOUS OPERATION EXCEPT WHEN WORK IS BEING DONE ON THE FORMS. August 9, 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. Electrochemical form grinding. Fnal report

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, R.W.

    1980-06-01

    Electrochemical form grinding cutting tests were performed on 25 17-4 PH stainless steel bars by a copper resin aluminum oxide wheel formed from a diamond form block. Tests investigated methods of dressing a form into a grinding wheel, nozzle design, optimum machine settings, and tolerance capabilities. The electrolyte was distributed evenly onto the wheel by a form-fitting nozzle, and a minimum of two passes, rough and finish, were made because of current density variations throughout the cut. Tolerance held on the form test samples was +- 0.12 mm on the contour, with an average 0.12 mm overcut.

  1. Heated die facilitates tungsten forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattin, J. H.; Haystrick, J. E.; Laughlin, J. C.; Leidy, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Tungsten forming in a press brake employs a bottom die assembly with a heating manifold between two water-cooled die sections. The manifold has hydrogen-oxygen burners spaced along its length for even heat during forming.

  2. Superplastic Forming of Titanium Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    configurations. These configurations included rectangular and circular pan sections, stepped side walls, beads, joggles , and multiple parts formed at one...capability of being formed to a complex configuration with well-formed beads and Joggles , tight bend radii, and 90-degree return flanges. Since titanium...Coming operation. The configuration consists of joggles and steps positioned into the basic forming box to produce a four-cavity tool symmetrical about

  3. Warm Forming of Mg Sheets: From Incremental to Electromagnetic Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulacia, Ibai; Galdos, Lander; Esnaola, Jon Ander; Larrañaga, Jon; Arruebarrena, Gurutze; de Argandoña, Eneko Saenz; Hurtado, Iñaki

    2014-07-01

    Magnesium alloys are generating interest in the automotive and aeronautic industries due to their low density and potential to reduce gross vehicular weight. However, the formability of these alloys is poor and they are very difficult to be formed at room temperature due to their strong basal texture in rolled form. In this paper, the potential of magnesium alloy sheets to be processed at warm conditions is studied for four different forming technologies: incremental forming (IF), deep drawing (DD), hydroforming (HF), and electromagnetic forming (EMF). Forming mechanisms and process window are experimentally characterized by monitoring different process parameters. Special focus is made on the influence of the forming temperature and the strain rate. Thus, experiments at temperatures from room to 523 K (250 °C) and a wide range of strain rates, between 10-3 up to 103 s-1 according to each process nature and scope, are conducted. It is observed that, even the inherent forming rate range of each process vary considerably, increasing forming temperature increases formability for all of these forming processes. In the other hand, an opposing effect of the strain rate is observed between the quasi-static processes (IF, DD, and HF) and the high speed process (EMF). Thus, a detrimental effect on formability is observed when increasing strain rate for quasi-static processes, while a mild increase is observed for EMF.

  4. Index of NASA prefixed forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This Handbook sets forth information for the guidance of all users of the NASA Forms Management Program System. It is issued in accordance with the Federal Information Resources Management Regulation (FIRMR), Subpart 201-9.1. This Handbook sets forth an alpha-functional index of NASA-prefixed forms by title, identifying number, and unit of issue. The automated processing two-letter code (NF) has been substituted for the spelling out of the NASA form-prefix preceding the form number. To indicate a description in lieu of a distinct title, the entire reference under the Form Title/Description column has been enclosed in parentheses. A list of current forms, shown by number and page, is included for cross-reference and to preclude the ordering of those forms which have been deleted from the system. This Handbook will be updated, as appropriate. NHB 1420.2H dated July 1986, is cancelled.

  5. Frequency and Voltage Dependence of the Dielectrophoretic Trapping of Short Lengths of DNA and dCTP in a Nanopipette

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Liming; White, Samuel S.; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Meadows, Lisa; Korchev, Yuri E.; Klenerman, David

    2004-01-01

    The study of the properties of DNA under high electric fields is of both fundamental and practical interest. We have exploited the high electric fields produced locally in the tip of a nanopipette to probe the motion of double- and single-stranded 40-mer DNA, a 1-kb single-stranded DNA, and a single-nucleotide triphosphate (dCTP) just inside and outside the pipette tip at different frequencies and amplitudes of applied voltages. We used dual laser excitation and dual color detection to simultaneously follow two fluorophore-labeled DNA sequences with millisecond time resolution, significantly faster than studies to date. A strong trapping effect was observed during the negative half cycle for all DNA samples and also the dCTP. This effect was maximum below 1 Hz and decreased with higher frequency. We assign this trapping to strong dielectrophoresis due to the high electric field and electric field gradient in the pipette tip. Dielectrophoresis in electrodeless tapered nanostructures has potential applications for controlled mixing and manipulation of short lengths of DNA and other biomolecules, opening new possibilities in miniaturized biological analysis. PMID:14747337

  6. Dopamine Induces LTP Differentially in Apical and Basal Dendrites through BDNF and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The dopaminergic modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied well, but the mechanism by which dopamine induces LTP (DA-LTP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons is unknown. Here, we report that DA-LTP in basal dendrites is dependent while in apical dendrites it is independent of activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VDCC).…

  7. Serotonin regulates voltage-dependent currents in type I(e(A)) and I(i) interneurons of Hermissenda.

    PubMed

    Jin, Nan Ge; Crow, Terry

    2011-11-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has both direct and modulatory actions on central neurons contributing to behavioral arousal and cellular-synaptic plasticity in diverse species. In Hermissenda, 5-HT produces changes in intrinsic excitability of different types of identified interneurons in the circumesophageal nervous system. Using whole cell patch-clamp techniques we have examined membrane conductance changes produced by 5-HT that contribute to intrinsic excitability in two identified classes of interneurons, types I(i) and I(eA). Whole cell currents were examined before and after 5-HT application to the isolated nervous system. A 4-aminopyridine-sensitive transient outward K(+) current [I(K(A))], a tetraethylammonium-sensitive delayed rectifier K(+) current [I(K(V))], an inward rectifier K(+) current [I(K(IR))], and a hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) were characterized. 5-HT decreased the amplitude of I(K(A)) and I(K(V)) in both type I(i) and I(eA) interneurons. However, differences in 5-HT's effects on the activation-inactivation kinetics were observed in different types of interneurons. 5-HT produced a depolarizing shift in the activation curve of I(K(V)) and a hyperpolarizing shift in the inactivation curve of I(K(A)) in type I(i) interneurons. In contrast, 5-HT produced a depolarizing shift in the activation curve and a hyperpolarizing shift in the inactivation curve of both I(K(V)) and I(K(A)) in type I(eA) interneurons. In addition, 5-HT decreased the amplitude of I(K(IR)) in type I(i) interneurons and increased the amplitude of I(h) in type I(eA) interneurons. These results indicate that 5-HT-dependent changes in I(K(A)), I(K(V)), I(K(IR)), and I(h) contribute to multiple mechanisms that synergistically support modulation of increased intrinsic excitability associated with different functional classes of identified type I interneurons.

  8. (+)-isradipine but not (-)-Bay-K-8644 exhibits voltage-dependent effects on cat adrenal catecholamine release.

    PubMed Central

    López, M. G.; Michelena, P.; Gandía, L.; García, A. G.

    1991-01-01

    1. Catecholamine release from cat adrenal glands perfused at a high rate (4 ml min-1) at 37 degrees C with polarizing (1.2 or 5.9 mM K+) or depolarizing (17.7, 35, 59 or 118 mM K+) solutions, was triggered by 5 or 10 s pulses of Ca2+ (0.5 or 2.5 mM) in the presence of various concentrations of K+. 2. In polarized glands, secretion was greater the higher the K+ concentration present during the secretory K+/Ca2+ test pulse. Thus, in 17.7 mM K+, catecholamine released was 162 +/- 27 ng per pulse, while in 118 mM K+ secretion rose to 1839 +/- 98 ng per pulse. In depolarized glands, secretion reached a peak of around 1000 ng per pulse in 35-59 mM K+; in 118 mM K+, secretion did not increase further, suggesting that voltage changes are implicated in the control of the secretory process. 3. Blockade of secretion by increased concentrations of (+)-isradipine was much more manifest in polarized glands. The higher the degree of depolarization was (35, 59 or 118 mM K+), the lower the IC50 s were. So, the ratios between the IC50 s in polarized and depolarized glands rose from 3.92 in 35 mM K+ to 26.7 in 118 mM K+. 4. In contrast, the Ca2+ channel activator (-)-Bay K 8644 potentiated catecholamine release evoked by K+/Ca2+ pulses equally well in polarized or depolarized glands. The ratios between EC50 s in polarized or depolarized glands were, respectively, 0.30, 0.59 and 0.69 for 17.7, 35 and 118 mM K+. 5. In simultaneous experiments, the two enantiomers of Bay K 8644 exhibited opposite effects on secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1707711

  9. Voltage-dependent gating of KCNH potassium channels lacking a covalent link between voltage-sensing and pore domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lörinczi, Éva; Gómez-Posada, Juan Camilo; de La Peña, Pilar; Tomczak, Adam P.; Fernández-Trillo, Jorge; Leipscher, Ulrike; Stühmer, Walter; Barros, Francisco; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-03-01

    Voltage-gated channels open paths for ion permeation upon changes in membrane potential, but how voltage changes are coupled to gating is not entirely understood. Two modules can be recognized in voltage-gated potassium channels, one responsible for voltage sensing (transmembrane segments S1 to S4), the other for permeation (S5 and S6). It is generally assumed that the conversion of a conformational change in the voltage sensor into channel gating occurs through the intracellular S4-S5 linker that provides physical continuity between the two regions. Using the pathophysiologically relevant KCNH family, we show that truncated proteins interrupted at, or lacking the S4-S5 linker produce voltage-gated channels in a heterologous model that recapitulate both the voltage-sensing and permeation properties of the complete protein. These observations indicate that voltage sensing by the S4 segment is transduced to the channel gate in the absence of physical continuity between the modules.

  10. Voltage-dependent facilitation of Ca2+ entry in voltage-clamped, aequorin-injected molluscan neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, R; Tillotson, D; Ridgway, E B

    1977-01-01

    Voltage-clamp experiments were performed on giant neurons of the nudibranch Anisodoris nobilis injected with the Ca-sensitive photoprotein, aequorin. Depolarization beyond -10 to +5 m V produced an aequorin signal, the amplitude of which depended on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration, the amplitude of the depolarization, and its duration. In paired pulse experiments, the amplitude of the aequorin signal produced in response to the second of two identical depolarizing pulses was larger than that produced during the first, resulting from an increased entry of Ca2+ during the second pulse. The increment in Ca conductance inferred from the augmented signal during the second pulse was independent of Ca2+ influx during the first pulse but, instead, was related to the amplitude and duration of the first pulse. PMID:266215

  11. Bias voltage-dependent low field spin transport properties of Fe3O4-PEG with different particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunlong; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lei; Shi, Gang; Hou, Zhaoyang; Xi, Li

    2016-08-01

    Spin-dependent transport properties of Fe3O4 spheres with diameters from 200 nm to 900 nm have been investigated and polyethylene glycol (PEG) exists on the surface of Fe3O4 particles. The nonlinear I-V curve became obvious with the increase of Fe3O4 diameter, which indicated the tunneling barrier height decreases with the increasing diameter. The magnetoresistance (MR) can reach -13% with an applied low field of 0.2 T at room temperature. With the diameter increase, the MR decreases and the required applied field increases. Moreover, the decrease of MR with the bias voltage increase can be attributed to the spin-dependent tunneling effect through the insulating surface layer of Fe3O4 and PEG.

  12. Evaluation of voltage-dependent calcium channel γ gene families identified several novel potential susceptible genes to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Fanglin; Zhang, Tianxiao; Liu, Xinshe; Han, Wei; Lin, Huali; Li, Lu; Chen, Gang; Li, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (VLCC) are distributed widely throughout the brain. Among the genes involved in schizophrenia (SCZ), genes encoding VLCC subunits have attracted widespread attention. Among the four subunits comprising the VLCC (α − 1, α −2/δ, β, and γ), the γ subunit that comprises an eight-member protein family is the least well understood. In our study, to further investigate the risk susceptibility by the γ subunit gene family to SCZ, we conducted a large-scale association study in Han Chinese individuals. The SNP rs17645023 located in the intergenic region of CACNG4 and CACNG5 was identified to be significantly associated with SCZ (OR = 0.856, P = 5.43 × 10−5). Similar results were obtained in the meta-analysis with the current SCZ PGC data (OR = 0.8853). We also identified a two-SNP haplotype (rs10420331-rs11084307, P = 1.4 × 10−6) covering the intronic region of CACNG8 to be significantly associated with SCZ. Epistasis analyses were conducted, and significant statistical interaction (OR = 0.622, P = 2.93 × 10−6, Pperm < 0.001) was observed between rs192808 (CACNG6) and rs2048137 (CACNG5). Our results indicate that CACNG4, CACNG5, CACNG6 and CACNG8 may contribute to the risk of SCZ. The statistical epistasis identified between CACNG5 and CACNG6 suggests that there may be an underlying biological interaction between the two genes. PMID:27102562

  13. Voltage-dependent ion channel currents in putative neuroendocrine cells dissociated from the ventral prostate of rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Hee; Shin, Sun Young; Yun, Sang Soon; Kim, Tae Jin; Oh, Seung-June; Kim, Kwang Myung; Chung, Young-Shin; Hong, Eun-Kyoung; Uhm, Dae-Yong; Kim, Sung Joon

    2003-04-01

    Prostate neuroendocrine (NE) cells play important roles in the growth and differentiation of the prostate. Following enzymatic digestion of rat ventral prostate, the whole-cell patch-clamp technique was applied to dark, round cells that exhibited chromogranin-A immunoreactivity, a representative marker of NE cells. Under zero current-clamp conditions, putative NE cells showed hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials of some -70 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were induced by an increase in external [K+] or by the injection of current. Using a CsCl pipette solution, step-like depolarization activated high-voltage-activated Ca2+ current (HVA I(Ca)) and tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-activated Na+ current. The HVA I(Ca) was blocked by nifedipine and omega-conotoxin GVIA, L-type and N-type Ca2+ channel blockers, respectively. Using a KCl pipette solution, the transient outward K+ current (I(to)), Ca2+ -activated K+ currents (I(K,Ca)), the non-inactivating outward current and an inwardly rectifying K+ current (I(Kir)) were identified. I(K,Ca) was suppressed by charybdotoxin (50 nM), iberiotoxin (10 nM) or clotrimazol (1 microM), but not by apamine (100 nM). I(to) was inhibited by 4-aminopyridine (5 mM). I(Kir) was identified as a Ba2+ -sensitive inwardly rectifying current in the presence of a high-K+ bath solution. The voltage- and Ca2+ -activated ion channels could play significant roles in the regulation of neurohormonal secretion in the prostate.

  14. Temperature- and voltage-dependent trap generation model in high-k metal gate MOS device with percolation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Yang, Hong; Wang, Yan-Rong; Wang, Wen-Wu; Luo, Wei-Chun; Qi, Lu-Wei; Li, Jun-Feng; Zhao, Chao; Chen, Da-Peng; Ye, Tian-Chun

    2016-08-01

    High-k metal gate stacks are being used to suppress the gate leakage due to tunneling for sub-45 nm technology nodes. The reliability of thin dielectric films becomes a limitation to device manufacturing, especially to the breakdown characteristic. In this work, a breakdown simulator based on a percolation model and the kinetic Monte Carlo method is set up, and the intrinsic relation between time to breakdown and trap generation rate R is studied by TDDB simulation. It is found that all degradation factors, such as trap generation rate time exponent m, Weibull slope β and percolation factor s, each could be expressed as a function of trap density time exponent α. Based on the percolation relation and power law lifetime projection, a temperature related trap generation model is proposed. The validity of this model is confirmed by comparing with experiment results. For other device and material conditions, the percolation relation provides a new way to study the relationship between trap generation and lifetime projection. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. SS2015AA010601), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176091 and 61306129), and the Opening Project of Key Laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of MicroElectronics of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Tuning the voltage dependence of tetraethylammonium block with permeant ions in an inward-rectifier K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Spassova, M; Lu, Z

    1999-09-01

    To understand the role of permeating ions in determining blocking ion-induced rectification, we examined block of the ROMK1 inward-rectifier K+ channel by intracellular tetraethylammonium in the presence of various alkali metal ions in both the extra- and intracellular solutions. We found that the channel exhibits different degrees of rectification when different alkali metal ions (all at 100 mM) are present in the extra- and intracellular solution. A quantitative analysis shows that an external ion site in the ROMK1 pore binds various alkali metal ions (Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+) with different affinities, which can in turn be altered by the binding of different permeating ions at an internal site through a nonelectrostatic mechanism. Consequently, the external site is saturated to a different level under the various ionic conditions. Since rectification is determined by the movement of all energetically coupled ions in the transmembrane electrical field along the pore, different degrees of rectification are observed in various combinations of extra- and intracellular permeant ions. Furthermore, the external and internal ion-binding sites in the ROMK1 pore appear to have different ion selectivity: the external site selects strongly against the smaller Na+, but only modestly among the three larger ions, whereas the internal site interacts quite differently with the larger K+ and Rb+ ions.

  16. Adenine nucleotides and intracellular Ca2+ regulate a voltage-dependent and glucose-sensitive potassium channel in neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Onetti, C G; Lara, J; García, E

    1996-05-01

    Effects of membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ and adenine nucleotides on glucose-sensitive channels from X organ (XO) neurons of the crayfish were studied in excised inside-out patches. Glucose- sensitive channels were selective to K+ ions; the unitary conductance was 112 pS in symmetrical K+, and the K+ permeability (PK) was 1.3 x 10(-13) cm x s(-1). An inward rectification was observed when intracellular K+ was reduced. Using a quasi-physiological K+ gradient, a non-linear K+ current/voltage relationship was found showing an outward rectification and a slope conductance of 51 pS. The open-state probability (Po) increased with membrane depolarization as a result of an enhancement of the mean open time and a shortening of the longer period of closures. In quasi-physio- logical K+ concentrations, the channel was activated from a threshold of about -60 mV, and the activation midpoint was -2 mV. Po decreased noticeably at 50 microM internal adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), and single-channel activity was totally abolished at 1 mM ATP. Hill analysis shows that this inhibition was the result of simultaneous binding of two ATP molecules to the channel, and the half-blocking concentration of ATP was 174 microM. Internal application of 5'-adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) as well as glibenclamide also decreased Po. By contrast, the application of internal ADP (0.1 to 2 mM) activated this channel. An optimal range of internal free Ca2+ ions (0.1 to 10 microM) was required for the activation of this channel. The glucose--sensitive K+ channel of XO neurons could be considered as a subtype of ATP-sensitive K+ channel, contributing substantially to macroscopic outward current.

  17. Temperature and voltage dependent current-voltage behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ze-Chen; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Wang, Yan; Yang, Hai-Jie; Da, Shi-Xun; Ding, Er-Xiong; Liu, Juncheng; Yu, Ping; Fu, Yun-Qiao; Li, Xu; Pan, Hui

    2015-11-01

    High purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were dispersed in water and transparent conducting films (TCFs) were fabricated by a spray coating. The produced uniform SWCNT-TCFs treated by nitric acid have a relatively low sheet resistance and high transmittance. The current-voltage (I-V) behaviors of the TCFs were measured at room to higher temperature during the heating or cooling process. It was found that the I-V behavior of TCFs strongly dependent on the temperature and applied voltage. The sheet resistance showed semiconductor behavior at low temperature and low voltage, while it showed metallic behavior at high temperature and high voltage.

  18. Hair cells use active zones with different voltage dependence of Ca2+ influx to decompose sounds into complementary neural codes

    PubMed Central

    Ohn, Tzu-Lun; Rutherford, Mark A.; Jing, Zhizi; Jung, Sangyong; Duque-Afonso, Carlos J.; Hoch, Gerhard; Picher, Maria Magdalena; Scharinger, Anja; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    For sounds of a given frequency, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) with different thresholds and dynamic ranges collectively encode the wide range of audible sound pressures. Heterogeneity of synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and SGNs is an attractive candidate mechanism for generating complementary neural codes covering the entire dynamic range. Here, we quantified active zone (AZ) properties as a function of AZ position within mouse IHCs by combining patch clamp and imaging of presynaptic Ca2+ influx and by immunohistochemistry. We report substantial AZ heterogeneity whereby the voltage of half-maximal activation of Ca2+ influx ranged over ∼20 mV. Ca2+ influx at AZs facing away from the ganglion activated at weaker depolarizations. Estimates of AZ size and Ca2+ channel number were correlated and larger when AZs faced the ganglion. Disruption of the deafness gene GIPC3 in mice shifted the activation of presynaptic Ca2+ influx to more hyperpolarized potentials and increased the spontaneous SGN discharge. Moreover, Gipc3 disruption enhanced Ca2+ influx and exocytosis in IHCs, reversed the spatial gradient of maximal Ca2+ influx in IHCs, and increased the maximal firing rate of SGNs at sound onset. We propose that IHCs diversify Ca2+ channel properties among AZs and thereby contribute to decomposing auditory information into complementary representations in SGNs. PMID:27462107

  19. Modeling the Voltage Dependence of Electrochemical Reactions at Solid-Solid and Solid-Liquid Interfaces in Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Electrochemical reactions at electrode/electrolyte interfaces are critically dependent on the total electrochemical potential or voltage. In this presentation, we briefly review ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD)-based estimate of voltages on graphite basal and edge planes, and then apply similar concepts to solid-solid interfaces relevant to lithium ion and Li-air batteries. Thin solid films on electrode surfaces, whether naturally occuring during power cycling (e.g., undesirable lithium carbonate on Li-air cathodes) or are artificially introduced, can undergo electrochemical reactions as the applied voltage varies. Here the onset of oxidation of lithium carbonate and other oxide thin films on model gold electrode surfaces is correlated with the electronic structure in the presence/absence of solvent molecules. Our predictions help determine whether oxidation first occurs at the electrode-thin film or electrolyte-thin film interface. Finally, we will critically compare the voltage estimate methodology used in the fuel cell community with the lithium cohesive energy calibration method broadly applied in the battery community, and discuss why they may yield different predictions. This work was supported by Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES), an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DESC0001160. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Deparment of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. [Slow activated voltage-dependent sodium current contribution in fast depolarization in the rabbit heart true pacemaker sinoatrial node].

    PubMed

    Golovko, V A

    2009-04-01

    The functional role of INa in initiation and conduction of cardiac true pacemaker activity remains uncertain. Therefore the goal of this work was to study the effects of Na+ substitution of action potentials parameters of the sinoatrial area cells. Transmembrane action potentials were recorded with 15 to 40 MOmega glass microelectrodes filled with 2.5 M KCl. The final preparations was about 5 x 3 mm in size, contained a portion sinoatrial node and the adjacent fragment of tissue of the right branch of the sinoatrial ring bundle and crista terminalis. All strips were allowed to beat spontaneously. We have registered that Na+ replacement of 50% in external solution causes an almost two-fold monotonous decrease of dV/dtmax and overshoot values of primary (3.2 V/s, n = 15), latent pacemaker (17 V/s, n = 16) and "conducting"-like cells (130 V/s, n = 16, control, 35 C) as compared with the control. Finally (at 30 min exposure) action potential frequency is slowed dowb by 20-30%. True pacemaker cells decreased action potential amplitude from 65 to 9 mV for 20-30 min 50% Na solution exposure. It should be noted that the cells of the "conducting"-like type demonstrated the generation block of action potential 30% Na exposure. At the same time dV/dtmax monotonously decreased from 3.1 to 1.5 V/s (true pacemaker) 16 vs 7 V/s (latent) and from 130 to 1.8 v/s ("conducting"). In our opinion, these facts deserve particular attention because it has been reported earlier that tetrodotoxin (20 mcM) addition in to the control solution caused the decrease of dV/dt from 100 to 4 V/s in latent pacemaker, whereas action potential amplitude is decreased by only some mV and the rate of beating by 1.5 times. As for true pacemaker cells, the TTX does not influence them.

  1. Neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels encoded by mRNA from the adult corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Matute, C; Miledi, R

    1993-01-01

    The presence of mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-gated channels in the adult human and bovine corpus callosum was investigated using Xenopus oocytes. Oocytes injected with mRNA extracted from the corpus callosum expressed functional receptors to glutamate, acetylcholine, and serotonin, and also voltage-operated Ca2+ channels, all with similar properties in the two species studied. Acetylcholine and serotonin elicited oscillatory Cl- currents due to activation of the inositol phosphate-Ca2+ receptor-channel coupling system. Glutamate and its analogs N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainate, quisqualate, and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) induced smooth currents. The non-NMDA responses showed a strong inward rectification at positive potentials and were potently blocked by 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, as observed for the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors GLUR1 and GLUR3. Furthermore, in situ hybridization experiments showed that GLUR1 and GLUR3 mRNAs are present in corpus callosum cells that were labeled with antiserum to glial fibrillary acid protein and that, in primary cell cultures, had the morphology of type 2 astrocytes. These results indicate that glial cells in the adult corpus callosum possess mRNA encoding functional neurotransmitter receptors and Ca2+ channels. These molecules may provide a mechanism for glial-neuronal interactions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7682696

  2. Critical roles of voltage-dependent sodium channels in the process of synaptogenesis during the postnatal cortical development of rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Cui, Jihong; Cai, Yijun; Wang, Fang; Li, Yi; Tao, Wucheng; Xiang, Hui

    2009-12-01

    The developmental changes of the sodium channel and construction of synapse connection were studied in cerebral cortical pyramidal neurons of rats at different age groups. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to characterize electrophysiological properties of cortical neurons at different age stages, including the sodium currents, APs evoked by depolarizing current and short-term plasticity of the eEPSCs. The result shows that the sodium currents undergo a hyperpolarizing shift in activation process and acceleration of activation and inactivation with age. The maximal sodium current also increased with maturation, and the evident difference appeared from P7-P11 (with the day of birth as P0) to P12-P15 group. The tendency of the sodium current density changes which exhibited the same properties as that of sodium current, showed the significant increases from P19-P21 to P >or= 22 group. The APs' parameters exhibited the age-dependent changes except the threshold, including the increase of the peak amplitude from P or= 22 group, the 2nd response showed the tendency of facilitation compared with the younger age groups. Our results indicated that the cerebral cortical pyramidal neurons of rats are undergoing marked changes in the characteristics of their sodium channels with maturation, which play a critical role in synaptogenesis and construction of the neuronal network.

  3. Cardiovascular Action of Insulin in Health and Disease: Endothelial L-Arginine Transport and Cardiac Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Dubó, Sebastián; Gallegos, David; Cabrera, Lissette; Sobrevia, Luis; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of insulin signaling on diabetes mellitus has been related to cardiovascular dysfunction, heart failure, and sudden death. In human endothelium, cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1) is related to the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and insulin has a vascular effect in endothelial cells through a signaling pathway that involves increases in hCAT-1 expression and L-arginine transport. This mechanism is disrupted in diabetes, a phenomenon potentiated by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to lower availability of NO and endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, electrical remodeling in cardiomyocytes is considered a key factor in heart failure progression associated to diabetes mellitus. This generates a challenge to understand the specific role of insulin and the pathways involved in cardiac function. Studies on isolated mammalian cardiomyocytes have shown prolongated action potential in ventricular repolarization phase that produces a long QT interval, which is well explained by attenuation in the repolarizing potassium currents in cardiac ventricles. Impaired insulin signaling causes specific changes in these currents, such a decrease amplitude of the transient outward K+ (Ito) and the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier (IKur) currents where, together, a reduction of mRNA and protein expression levels of α-subunits (Ito, fast; Kv 4.2 and IKs; Kv 1.5) or β-subunits (KChIP2 and MiRP) of K+ channels involved in these currents in a MAPK mediated pathway process have been described. These results support the hypothesis that lack of insulin signaling can produce an abnormal repolarization in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the arrhythmogenic potential due to reduced Ito current can contribute to an increase in the incidence of sudden death in heart failure. This review aims to show, based on pathophysiological models, the regulatory function that would have insulin in vascular system and in cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:27014078

  4. Hypoxia induces voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry and quantal dopamine secretion in carotid body glomus cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ureña, J; Fernández-Chacón, R; Benot, A R; Alvarez de Toledo, G A; López-Barneo, J

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the changes of cytosolic [Ca2+] and the secretory activity in single glomus cells dispersed from rabbit carotid bodies during exposure to solutions with variable O2 tension (Po2). In normoxic conditions (Po2 = 145 mmHg; 1 mmHg = 133 Pa), intracellular [Ca2+] was 58 +/- 29 nM, and switching to low Po2 (between 10 and 60 mmHg) led to a reversible increase of [Ca2+] up to 800 nM. The response to hypoxia completely disappeared after removal of external Ca2+ or with the addition of 0.2 mM Cd2+ to the external solution. These same solutions also abolished both the Ca2+ current of the cells and the increase of internal [Ca2+] elicited by high external K+. Elevations of cytosolic [Ca2+] in response to hypoxia or to direct membrane depolarization elicited the release of dopamine, which was detected by amperometric techniques. Dopamine secretion occurred in episodes of spike-like activity that appear to represent the release from single secretory vesicles. From the mean charge of well-resolved secretory events, we estimated the average number of dopamine molecules per vesicle to be approximately 140,000, a value about 15 times smaller than a previous estimate in chromaffin granules of adrenomedullary cells. These results directly demonstrate in a single-cell preparation the secretory response of glomus cells to hypoxia. The data indicate that the enhancement of cellular excitability upon exposure to low Po2 results in Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated channels, which leads to an increase in intracellular [Ca2+] and exocytotic transmitter release. PMID:7937863

  5. Voltage-dependent magnesium block of adenosine-triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel in guinea-pig ventricular cells.

    PubMed Central

    Horie, M; Irisawa, H; Noma, A

    1987-01-01

    1. The adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K+ channel of guinea-pig ventricular cells was examined in the presence and absence of internal Mg2+ or Na+ using an open cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique. 2. Millimolar concentrations of internal Mg2+ ([Mg2+]i) produced marked fluctuations in the outward current, and the amplitude of the open-channel current was reduced with increasing [Mg2+]i. Millimolar Na+ applied internally also decreased the mean amplitude of the outward current, but the increase in current noise was not obvious. These effects became larger when the membrane potential was shifted to be more positive from the K+ equilibrium potential (EK). At potentials negative to EK the inward current was affected by neither internal Mg2+ nor Na+. 3. The external application of Na+, Mg2+ or Ca2+, however, failed to affect the single-channel current. 4. After removal of both internal Mg2+ and Na+, the mean open-channel current-voltage relationship became virtually linear. Referring to these unblocked values, relative amplitudes were determined at different levels of [Mg2+]i or [Na+]i. The dose-response relations gave a Hill coefficient of approximately 1 for Mg2+ block and approximately 2 for Na+ block. The half-maximum concentrations (Kh) for both Mg2+ and Na+ block were shifted to lower values with increasing positive potentials. 5. The power-density spectrum of the open-channel current noise induced by internal Mg2+ showed a Lorentzian function with a corner frequency above 1 kHz, suggesting that the current noise is due to rapid fluctuations of open-channel current between blocked and unblocked states. The corner frequencies gave Mg2+ block and unblock rate constants which were of the order of 10(7) M-1 s-1 and 10(4) s-1, respectively. 6. With increasing external K+ concentration ([K+]o) from 0 to 140 mM the current fluctuations became less prominent, and Kh for Mg2+ block was shifted to higher values. Raising [K+]o enhanced the unblock rate derived from the noise analysis while the block rate was not significantly altered. 7. The above findings could be explained by assuming a binding site for one Mg2+ or two Na+ located 30-35% of the electrical drop across the membrane from the inner mouth of the channel, thereby resulting in the ionic block of K+ passage. An apparent inward rectification observed in the single-channel current-voltage relation is attributable to the blockade of the channel by intracellular Mg2+ and/or Na+. PMID:2443681

  6. Local magnetoresistance through Si and its bias voltage dependence in ferromagnet/MgO/silicon-on-insulator lateral spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Y. Tanamoto, T.; Ishikawa, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Inokuchi, T.; Hamaya, K.; Tezuka, N.

    2014-05-07

    Local magnetoresistance (MR) through silicon (Si) and its bias voltage (V{sub bias}) (bias current (I{sub bias})) dependence in ferromagnet (FM)/MgO/silicon-on-insulator lateral spin valves are investigated. From the experimental measurements, we find that the local-MR through Si increases with increasing V{sub bias}. This anomalous increase of local-MR as a function of V{sub bias} can be understood by considering the standard drift-diffusion theory improved by taking into account the difference in the interface resistances and first order quantum effect between FM/MgO/Si (source) and Si/MgO/FM (drain) interfaces. The interface resistance dependence on experimentally obtained local-MR ratios also agrees with the improved standard spin diffusion theory. These results indicate that experimentally observed local-MR is certainly related to the spin signal through the Si bulk band.

  7. Aspartic Acid Residue D3 Critically Determines Cx50 Gap Junction Channel Transjunctional Voltage-Dependent Gating and Unitary Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Li; Nakagawa, So; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Bai, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the aspartic acid residue (D) at the third position is critical in determining the voltage polarity of fast Vj-gating of Cx50 channels. To test whether another negatively charged residue (a glutamic acid residue, E) could fulfill the role of the D3 residue, we generated the mutant Cx50D3E. Vj-dependent gating properties of this mutant channel were characterized by double-patch-clamp recordings in N2A cells. Macroscopically, the D3E substitution reduced the residual conductance (Gmin) to near zero and outwardly shifted the half-inactivation voltage (V0), which is a result of both a reduced aggregate gating charge (z) and a reduced free-energy difference between the open and closed states. Single Cx50D3E gap junction channels showed reduced unitary conductance (γj) of the main open state, reduced open dwell time at ±40 mV, and absence of a long-lived substate. In contrast, a G8E substitution tested to compare the effects of the E residue at the third and eighth positions did not modify the Vj-dependent gating profile or γj. In summary, this study is the first that we know of to suggest that the D3 residue plays an essential role, in addition to serving as a negative-charge provider, as a critical determinant of the Vj-dependent gating sensitivity, open-closed stability, and unitary conductance of Cx50 gap junction channels. PMID:22404924

  8. Importance of voltage-dependent inactivation in N-type calcium channel regulation by G-proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Norbert; Tadmouri, Abir; Mikati, Mohamad; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Direct regulation of N-type calcium channels by G-proteins is essential to control neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release. Binding of the Gβγ dimer directly onto the channel is characterized by a marked current inhibition (“ON” effect), whereas the pore opening- and time-dependent dissociation of this complex from the channel produce a characteristic set of biophysical modifications (“OFF” effects). Although G-protein dissociation is linked to channel opening, the contribution of channel inactivation to G-protein regulation has been poorly studied. Here, the role of channel inactivation was assessed by examining time-dependent G-protein de-inhibition of Cav2.2 channels in the presence of various inactivation-altering β subunit constructs. G-protein activation was produced via μ-opioid receptor activation using the DAMGO agonist. Whereas the “ON” effect of G-protein regulation is independent of the type of β subunit, the “OFF” effects were critically affected by channel inactivation. Channel inactivation acts as a synergistic factor to channel activation for the speed of G-protein dissociation. However, fast inactivating channels also reduce the temporal window of opportunity for G-protein dissociation, resulting in a reduced extent of current recovery, whereas slow inactivating channels undergo a far more complete recovery from inhibition. Taken together, these results provide novel insights on the role of channel inactivation in N-type channel regulation by G-proteins and contribute to the understanding of the physiological consequence of channel inactivation in the modulation of synaptic activity by G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:17171365

  9. The Apparent Voltage Dependence of GABAA Receptor Activation and Modulation Is Inversely Related to Channel Open Probability

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, Kate K.

    2012-01-01

    The GABA type A receptor (GABAAR) is expressed ubiquitously throughout the brain and is a target for many therapeutic agents, including general anesthetics and benzodiazepines, which enhance receptor function by increasing the open probability (Po) of the ion channel. It is commonplace for in vitro studies of receptor pharmacological characteristics to use negative membrane holding potentials to mimic the resting potential of neurons and symmetrical chloride to eliminate Goldman rectification, which results in chloride flow in the opposite direction, compared with in vivo conditions. This critical difference is usually overlooked because the GABAAR has been reported to behave as an ohmic pore, but our results show that the current-voltage relationship is nonlinear with respect to Po. Specifically, we found that currents were outwardly rectifying at low Po and linear at high Po. We confirmed the correlation between Po and rectification with a partial agonist, piperidine-4-sulfonic acid, and a gating-impaired mutation, α1(L277A); both exhibited enhanced outward rectification. Furthermore, this correlation was independent of Goldman rectification and persisted under altered chloride gradient conditions, which suggests that rectification is linked to the direction of chloride flux. Finally, our results showed that the degree of potentiation by general anesthetics (etomidate, propofol, and isoflurane) was greater at negative membrane potentials. Traditional in vitro experiments thus overestimate the action of positive allosteric modulators of the GABAAR. Our results show that the direction of the driving force on the permeant ion, as well as Po, must be considered together for a complete understanding of drug actions on ligand-gated ion channels. PMID:22042665

  10. Temperature and bias-voltage dependence of atomic-layer-deposited HfO{sub 2}-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Fabretti, Savio; Zierold, Robert; Nielsch, Kornelius; Voigt, Carmen; Ronning, Carsten; Peretzki, Patrick; Seibt, Michael; Thomas, Andy

    2014-09-29

    Magnetic tunnel junctions with HfO{sub 2} tunnel barriers were prepared through a combination of magnetron sputtering and atomic layer deposition. We investigated the tunneling transport behavior, including the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio and the current-voltage characteristics between room temperature and 2 K. Here, we achieved a tunneling magneto resistance ratio of 10.3% at room temperature and 19.3% at 2 K. Furthermore, we studied the bias-voltage and temperature dependencies and compared the results with those of commonly used alumina- and magnesia-based magnetic tunnel junctions. We observed a polycrystalline/amorphous electrode-barrier system via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Permeant anions contribute to voltage dependence of ClC-2 chloride channel by interacting with the protopore gate

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E; De Santiago-Castillo, José A; Arreola, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that the voltage (Vm) dependence of ClC Cl− channels is conferred by interaction of the protopore gate with H+ ions. However, in this paper we present evidence which indicates that permeant Cl− ions contribute to Vm-dependent gating of the broadly distributed ClC-2 Cl− channel. The apparent open probability (PA) of ClC-2 was enhanced either by changing the [Cl−]i from 10 to 200 mm or by keeping the [Cl−]i low (10 mm) and then raising [Cl−]o from 10 to 140 mm. Additionally, these changes in [Cl−] slowed down channel closing at positive Vm suggesting that high [Cl−] increased pore occupancy thus hindering closing of the protopore gate. The identity of the permeant anion was also important since the PA(Vm) curves were nearly identical with Cl− or Br− but shifted to negative voltages in the presence of SCN− ions. In addition, gating, closing rate and reversal potential displayed anomalous mole fraction behaviour in a SCN−/Cl− mixture in agreement with the idea that pore occupancy by different permeant anions modifies the Vm dependence ClC-2 gating. Based on the ec1-ClC anion pathway, we hypothesized that opening of the protopore gate is facilitated when Cl− ions dwell in the central binding site. In contrast, when Cl− ions dwell in the external binding site they prevent the gate from closing. Finally, this Cl−-dependent gating in ClC-2 channels is of physiological relevance since an increase in [Cl−]o enhances channel opening when the [Cl−]i is in the physiological range. PMID:20498235

  12. 76 FR 61725 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form; (Form DHS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form; (Form DHS... CIS Ombudsman to identify the issue such as: (1) A case problem which is a request for information.... SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security, Office of the Citizenship and Immigration Service...

  13. Undercuts by Laser Shock Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Wielage, Hanna; Vollertsen, Frank

    2011-05-04

    In laser shock forming TEA-CO{sub 2}-laser induced shock waves are used to form metal foils, such as aluminum or copper. The process utilizes an initiated plasma shock wave on the target surface, which leads to a forming of the foil. A challenge in forming technologies is the manufacturing of undercuts. By conventional forming methods these special forms are not feasible. In this article, it is presented that undercuts in the micro range can be produced by laser shock deep drawing. Different drawing die diameters, drawing die depths and the material aluminum in the thicknesses 20 and 50 {mu}m were investigated. It will be presented that smaller die diameters facilitate undercuts compared to bigger die diameters. The phenomena can be explained by Barlow's formula. Furthermore, it is shown which maximum undercut depth at different die diameters can be reached. To this end, cross-sections of the different parameter combinations are displayed.

  14. Seal for fluid forming tools

    DOEpatents

    Golovashchenko, Sergey Fedorovich [Beverly Hills, MI; Bonnen, John Joseph Francis [Milford, MI

    2012-03-20

    An electro-hydraulic forming tool for forming a sheet metal blank in a one-sided die has first and second rigid rings that engage opposite sides of a sheet metal blank. The rigid rings are contained within slots on a die portion and a hydraulic force applicator portion of the forming tool. The seals are either resiliently biased by an elastomeric member or inherently resiliently biased into contact with the blank.

  15. Metallurgical Characterization of Superplastic Forming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    PANEL J (GRAIN SIZE - 4.4 pm, VOLUME % PRIMARY ALPHA - 47). Alpha pain size Beta Wain size Final alpha Forming cycle Total stmain, at forming at forming...12.2 j ro, (b) groi %= size -7.7 /jm, and Wc grain size SA gm.8 ro 248 6 /NJ • " ’••• - , • •,• • , • "• •’ W " l! •r ,p • P

  16. Solid form additives and method of forming same

    SciTech Connect

    Schuettenberg, A.D.; Gragson, J.T.

    1987-01-27

    This patent describes a solid form additive comprising: a normally liquid fuel additive selected from carburetor detergent additives, antiknock additives, deposit-control additives, and mixtures thereof, suitable for use in fuel comprising gasoline for internal combustion engines; and a structural agent for containing the fuel additive and for providing dimensional stability to the solid form additive, the structural agent being soluble and dispersible in the fuel; wherein the fuel additive comprises between about 25% and about 75% by weight of the solid form additive; and wherein the solid form additive is a pellet having structural agent and fuel additive essentially homogeneously dispersed throughout the solid form additive; and wherein the pellet is coated with a sealing agent.

  17. Improving the forming capability of laser dynamic forming by using rubber as a forming medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zongbao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Cuntang

    2016-04-01

    Laser dynamic forming (LDF) is a novel high velocity forming technique, which employs laser-generated shock wave to load the sample. The forming velocity induced by the high energy laser pulse may exceed the critical forming velocity, resulting in the occurrence of premature fracture. To avoid the above premature fracture, rubber is introduced in LDF as a forming medium to prolong the loading duration in this paper. Laser induced shock wave energy is transferred to the sample in different forming stages, so the forming velocity can be kept below the critical forming velocity when the initial laser energy is high for fracture. Bulge forming experiments with and without rubber were performed to study the effect of rubber on loading duration. The experimental results show that, the shock wave energy attenuates during the propagation through the rubber layer, the rubber can avoid the premature fracture. So the plastic deformation can continue, the forming capability of LDF is improved. Due to the severe plastic deformation under rubber compression, adiabatic shear bands (ASB) occur in LDF with rubber. The material softening in ASB leads to the irregular fracture, which is different from the premature fracture pattern (regular fracture) in LDF without rubber. To better understand this deformation behavior, Johnson-Cook model is used to simulate the dynamic response and the evolution of ASB of copper sample. The simulation results also indicate the rubber can prolong the loading duration.

  18. Transient Potential Gradients and Impedance Measures of Tethered Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Pore-Forming Peptide Insertion and the Effect of Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Cranfield, Charles G.; Cornell, Bruce A.; Grage, Stephan L.; Duckworth, Paul; Carne, Sonia; Ulrich, Anne S.; Martinac, Boris

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present experimental data, supported by a quantitative model, on the generation and effect of potential gradients across a tethered bilayer lipid membrane (tBLM) with, to the best of our knowledge, novel architecture. A challenge to generating potential gradients across tBLMs arises from the tethering coordination chemistry requiring an inert metal such as gold, resulting in any externally applied voltage source being capacitively coupled to the tBLM. This in turn causes any potential across the tBLM assembly to decay to zero in milliseconds to seconds, depending on the level of membrane conductance. Transient voltages applied to tBLMs by pulsed or ramped direct-current amperometry can, however, provide current-voltage (I/V) data that may be used to measure the voltage dependency of the membrane conductance. We show that potential gradients >∼150 mV induce membrane defects that permit the insertion of pore-forming peptides. Further, we report here the novel (to our knowledge) use of real-time modeling of conventional low-voltage alternating-current impedance spectroscopy to identify whether the conduction arising from the insertion of a polypeptide is uniform or heterogeneous on scales of nanometers to micrometers across the membrane. The utility of this tBLM architecture and these techniques is demonstrated by characterizing the resulting conduction properties of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa. PMID:24411250

  19. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, Roger B.; Claar, Terry D.; Silkowski, Peter

    1988-09-06

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  20. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, R.B.; Claar, T.D.; Silkowski, P.

    1987-04-22

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  1. The Using Evaluation Data Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roecks, Alan L.; Casper, Paul

    The Using Evaluation Data Form (UEDF) represents a psychological lever for getting a program's decision maker to consider major evaluation findings. The form may be used at any point of the evaluation process when sufficient data exist to support a finding deserving of action or reaction by the project staff. By local policy, it is required for…

  2. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, Roger B.; Claar, Terry D.; Silkowski, Peter

    1988-01-01

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  3. When Permission Forms Work Best

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    Public schools routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities of potential liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. This article presents a case involving a student who sustained bicycle injuries…

  4. Benchmark 3 - Incremental sheet forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elford, Michael; Saha, Pradip; Seong, Daeyong; Haque, MD Ziaul; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2013-12-01

    Benchmark-3 is designed to predict strains, punch load and deformed profile after spring-back during single tool incremental sheet forming. AA 7075-O material has been selected. A corn shape is formed to 45 mm depth with an angle of 45°. Problem description, material properties, and simulation reports with experimental data are summarized.

  5. Multiplicative form of the Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawuttinack, K.; Yoo-Kong, S.; Tanasittikosol, M.

    2016-12-01

    We obtain an alternative class of Lagrangians in the so-called the multiplicative form for a system with one degree of freedom in the nonrelativistic and the relativistic cases. This new form of the Lagrangian can be regarded as a one-parameter class with the parameter λ obtained using an extension of the standard additive form of the Lagrangian because both forms yield the same equation of motion. We note that the multiplicative form of the Lagrangian can be regarded as a generating function for obtaining an infinite hierarchy of Lagrangians that yield the same equation of motion. This nontrivial set of Lagrangians confirms that the Lagrange function is in fact nonunique.

  6. Quantum modular forms, mock modular forms, and partial theta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimport, Susanna

    Defined by Zagier in 2010, quantum modular forms have been the subject of an explosion of recent research. Many of these results are aimed at discovering examples of these functions, which are defined on the rational numbers and have "nice" modularity properties. Though the subject is in its early stages, numerous results (including Zagier's original examples) show these objects naturally arising from many areas of mathematics as limits of other modular-like functions. One such family of examples is due to Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades, who connected these new objects to partial theta functions (introduced by Rogers in 1917) and mock modular forms (about which there is a rich theory, whose origins date back to Ramanujan in 1920). In this thesis, we build off of the work of Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades by providing an infinite family of quantum modular forms of arbitrary positive half-integral weight. Further, this family of quantum modular forms "glues" mock modular forms to partial theta functions and is constructed from a so-called "universal" mock theta function by extending a method of Eichler and Zagier (originally defined for holomorphic Jacobi forms) into a non-holomorphic setting. In addition to the infinite family, we explore the weight 1/2 and 3/2 functions in more depth. For both of these weights, we are able to explicitly write down the quantum modular form, as well as the corresponding "errors to modularity," which can be shown to be Mordell integrals of specific theta functions and, as a consequence, are real-analytic functions. Finally, we turn our attention to the partial theta functions associated with these low weight examples. Berndt and Kim provide asymptotic expansions for a certain class of partial theta functions as q approaches 1 radially within the unit disk. Here, we extend this work to not only obtain asymptotic expansions for this class of functions as q approaches any root of unity, but also for a certain class of derivatives of these functions

  7. The Fusobacterium nucleatum major outer-membrane protein (FomA) forms trimeric, water-filled channels in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Kleivdal, H; Benz, R; Jensen, H B

    1995-10-01

    The pore-forming activity of the major outer-membrane protein FomA of the anaerobic Fusobacterium nucleatum was studied in artificial lipid bilayer membranes. FomA was isolated from F. nucleatum strains Fev1, ATCC 10953, and ATCC 25586 by extraction with lithium dodecyl sulfate and lithium chloride and had an apparent molecular mass of about 40 kDa. When solubilized at low temperatures, the protein ran with an apparent molecular mass of about 62 kDa on SDS/PAGE. Cross-linking experiments and two-dimensional SDS/PAGE gave evidence that the 62-kDa protein band represented the trimeric form of FomA. The protein trimers were susceptible to SDS and temperature. The stability of the porin trimers varied among the strains. The properties of the FomA channels were studied in reconstitution experiments with black lipid bilayer membranes. The F. nucleatum porins formed channels with single-channel conductances in the range 0.66-1.30 nS in M KCl. The single-channel conductance was a function of the mobilities of the ions present in the aqueous solution bathing the bilayer membrane. This means that FomA forms general diffusion channels since (a) the conductance showed a linear dependence on the salt concentration, (b) the ion selectivity was small and varied for the three strains, and (c) the channels did not exhibit any binding site for maltotriose or triglycine. The water-filled channel was voltage dependent, and conductance decrements were observed at transmembrane potentials of +/- 50 mV. The conductance decrement steps were about one-third of the total conductance of a functional unit in its fully 'open' state. This strongly suggests that the trimer is the functional unit of the porin.

  8. Supergravity actions with integral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, L.; Catenacci, R.; Grassi, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Integral forms provide a natural and powerful tool for the construction of supergravity actions. They are generalizations of usual differential forms and are needed for a consistent theory of integration on supermanifolds. The group geometrical approach to supergravity and its variational principle are reformulated and clarified in this language. Central in our analysis is the Poincaré dual of a bosonic manifold embedded into a supermanifold. Finally, using integral forms we provide a proof of Gates' so-called "Ectoplasmic Integration Theorem", relating superfield actions to component actions.

  9. Process to form mesostructured films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C.J.; Anderson, M.T.; Ganguli, R.; Lu, Y.F.

    1999-01-12

    This invention comprises a method to form a family of supported films with pore size in the approximate range 0.8-20 nm exhibiting highly ordered microstructures and porosity derived from an ordered micellar or liquid-crystalline organic-inorganic precursor structure that forms during film deposition. Optically transparent, 100-500-nm thick films exhibiting a unique range of microstructures and uni-modal pore sizes are formed in seconds in a continuous coating operation. Applications of these films include sensors, membranes, low dielectric constant interlayers, anti-reflective coatings, and optical hosts. 12 figs.

  10. Process to form mesostructured films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Anderson, Mark T.; Ganguli, Rahul; Lu, Yunfeng

    1999-01-01

    This invention comprises a method to form a family of supported films film with pore size in the approximate range 0.8-20 nm exhibiting highly ordered microstructures and porosity derived from an ordered micellar or liquid-crystalline organic-inorganic precursor structure that forms during film deposition. Optically transparent, 100-500-nm thick films exhibiting a unique range of microstructures and uni-modal pore sizes are formed in seconds in a continuous coating operation. Applications of these films include sensors, membranes, low dielectric constant interlayers, anti-reflective coatings, and optical hosts.

  11. Multiple forming tools in incremental forming - Influence of the forming strategies on sheet contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, T.; Tebaay, L. M.; Gies, S.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    Single point incremental forming (SPIF) is a well known process which is used for rapid prototyping or for small-quantity production. The feature of this process is the flexible manufacturing of complex hollow shapes with the use of basic equipments. However, this forming process takes very long time. To speed up the process time, multiple forming tools can be used simultaneously. This paper presents the influence of the multiple tools in SPIF on the formed shape. The conventional SPIF with a single tool is taken into account for a comparative analysis. The results in this study showed that the tool arrangements and its distance have a significant effect on the geometrical accuracy. Moreover, it is shown the influence between the vertical step size of the tool and the strain distributions. This knowledge can be used for generation of new forming strategies.

  12. Wind-formed gravel bed forms, Wright Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John A.; Nickling, William G.; Tilson, Michael; Furtak-Cole, Eden

    2012-12-01

    Bed forms composed of gravel size particles (≈50% of particles >4 mm) are observed in the Wright Valley of the McMurdo Dry Valley system in Antarctica. These bed forms are characterized by a very asymmetrical shape with a mean aspect ratio of 0.025 (standard deviation 0.005), mean wavelength of 2.7 m (±0.49 m), and a mean height of 0.06 m (±0.01 m). Particle size analysis of the bed form sediments shows bimodality with a peak near 9 mm and another between 0.5 mm and 0.25 mm. Time-integrated sediment trap samples of horizontal saltation and creep flux indicate the flux of particles ≥4 mm during the two-year monitoring period was extremely low. Measurements of the horizontal displacement of tracer particles (14 mm, 12 mm, 10 mm, 8 mm, and 6 mm diameter) placed onto the bed forms corroborate the low particle flux measurements and limited movement of particles. The bed forms share form and grain size characteristics with both ripples and mega-ripples, showing poor sorting of particles across a single wavelength except for a slight coarsening at the crest similar to ripples, but their sinuosity suggest that transverse instabilities affect their formation similar to mega-ripples. Based on the data for the prevailing environmental conditions it can be argued that the Wright Valley form is an expression of gravel particles moved solely by highly intermittent creep processes. This also argues for the need for a very long period of time for their evolution, on the order of centuries.

  13. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, Hagan; Walker, Barbara J.; Chang, Chung-yu; Niblack, Brett; Panchal, Rekha

    1998-01-01

    An inactive pore-forming agent which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell.

  14. [Aspergillosis. Clinical forms and treatment].

    PubMed

    Fortún, Jesús; Meije, Yolanda; Fresco, Gema; Moreno, Santiago

    2012-04-01

    Invasive aspergillosis, chronic pulmonary aspergillosis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis are the clinical forms of aspergillosis. Although there is a great number of Aspergillus species, Aspergillus fumigatus-complex is the more frequent aetiological agent, regardless of clinical form or baseline condition. The increase in immunosuppressive agents and the higher use of corticosteroids in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have led to aspergillosis becoming more prominent in recent years. Galactomannan detection and radiological diagnostic images complement the limitations of microbiology cultures in these patients. Voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B are the gold standard in patients requiring therapy, and posaconazole, itraconazole, caspofungin and other echinocandins are effective alternatives. The prognosis depends of clinical forms and characteristics of the host, but it is particularly poor in the disseminated invasive forms.

  15. INDIPAY Financial Data Request Forms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The INDIPAY financial data request form requires the individual to provide financial information to support its claim of inability to pay the civil penalty. Both an English and Spanish version are provided.

  16. Method for forming metal contacts

    DOEpatents

    Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2013-09-17

    Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

  17. Method of forming pointed structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Diane E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of forming an array of pointed structures comprises depositing a ferrofluid on a substrate, applying a magnetic field to the ferrofluid to generate an array of surface protrusions, and solidifying the surface protrusions to form the array of pointed structures. The pointed structures may have a tip radius ranging from approximately 10 nm to approximately 25 micron. Solidifying the surface protrusions may be carried out at a temperature ranging from approximately 10 degrees C. to approximately 30 degrees C.

  18. Roll formed pan solar module

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, T.L.; Bottenberg, W.R.; Gay, C.F.; Yerkes, J.W.

    1984-02-21

    A solar module comprising a solar cell string laminated between layers of pottant material and a transparent superstrate and a steel substrate. The steel substrate is roll formed to provide stiffening flanges on its edges while simultaneously forming a pan-shaped structure to hold other portions of the laminate in position during the laminating process. An improved terminal provides high voltage protection and improved mechanical strength. A conduit element provides protected raceways for external wires connected to module terminals.

  19. Star-forming Filament Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2017-03-01

    New models of star-forming filamentary clouds are presented in order to quantify their properties and to predict their evolution. These 2D axisymmetric models describe filaments that have no core, one low-mass core, and one cluster-forming core. They are based on Plummer-like cylinders and spheroids that are bounded by a constant-density surface of finite extent. In contrast to 1D Plummer-like models, they have specific values of length and mass, they approximate observed column density maps, and their distributions of column density (N-pdfs) are pole-free. Each model can estimate the star-forming potential of a core-filament system by identifying the zone of gas dense enough to form low-mass stars and by counting the number of enclosed thermal Jeans masses. This analysis suggests that the Musca central filament may be near the start of its star-forming life, with enough dense gas to make its first ∼3 protostars, while the Coronet filament is near the midpoint of its star formation, with enough dense gas to add ∼8 protostars to its ∼20 known stars. In contrast, L43 appears to be near the end of its star-forming life, since it lacks enough dense gas to add any new protostars to the two young stellar objectsalready known.

  20. Superplastic forming of ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieh, T. G.; Wittenauer, J. P.; Wadsworth, J.

    1992-01-01

    Superplasticity has been demonstrated in many fine-grained structural ceramics and ceramic composites, including yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (YTZP), alumina, and Al2O3-reinforced zirconia (Al2O3/YTZ) duplex composites and SiC-reinforced Si3N4. These superplastic ceramics obviously offer the potential benefit of forming net shape or near net shape parts. This could be particularly useful for forming complicated shapes that are difficult to achieve using conventional forming techniques, or require elaborate, subsequent machining. In the present study, we successfully demonstrated the following: (1) superplastic 3Y-TXP and 20 percent Al2O3/YTZ composite have for the first time been successfully deformed into hemispherical caps via a biaxial gas-pressure forming technique; (2) no experimental difficulty was encountered in applying the required gas pressures and temperatures to achieve the results, thus, it is certain that higher rates of deformation than those presented in this study will be possible by using the current test apparatus at higher temperatures and pressures; and (3) an analytical model incorporating material parameters, such as variations during forming in the strain rate sensitivity exponent and grain growth-induced strain hardening, is needed to model accurately and therefore precisely control the biaxial gas-pressure forming of superplastic ceramics. Based on the results of this study, we propose to fabricate zirconia insulation tubes by superplastic extrusion of zirconia polycrystal. This would not only reduce the cost, but also improve the reliability of the tube products.

  1. INEL Spray-forming Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, Kevin M.; Key, James F.

    1993-01-01

    Spray forming is a near-net-shape fabrication technology in which a spray of finely atomized liquid droplets is deposited onto a suitably shaped substrate or mold to produce a coherent solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing without sacrificing, and oftentimes substantially improving, product quality. Spray forming can be performed with a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offers property improvements resulting from rapid solidification (e.g., refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing spray-forming technology for producing near-net-shape solids and coatings of a variety of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Results from several spray forming programs are presented to illustrate the range of capabilities of the technique as well as the accompanying technical and economic benefits. Low-carbon steel strip greater than 0.75 mm thick and polymer membranes for gas/gas and liquid/liquid separations that were spray formed are discussed; recent advances in spray forming molds, dies, and other tooling using low-melting-point metals are described.

  2. Form 6 - gas balancing agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In 1988, a special Committee of the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation undertook a project to draft a model from gas balancing agreement. This project was initiated at the request of a number of Foundation members who felt that a model form gas balancing agreement would facilitate the negotiation of operating agreement, since gas balancing issues had become sticking points in the process. The Committee was composed of attorneys representing a wide cross-section of the oil and gas industry including both major and independent oil companies, production companies with interstate pipeline affiliates, and private practitioners. The Committee attempted to address the more controversial issues in gas balancing with optional provisions in the Form. To facilitate the negotiation process, the number of optional provisions was minimized. This form may be used as an Appendix to the new A.A.P.L. Form 610-1989 Model Form Operating Agreement. This book includes provision of this Form which are: Ownership of gas production; Balancing of production accounts; Cash balancing upon depletion; Deliverability tests; Nominations; Statements; Payment of taxes; Operating expenses; Overproducing allowable; Payment of leasehold burdens; Operator's liability; Successors and assigns; Audits; Arbitration; and Operator's fees.

  3. Conjoint Forming - Technologies for Simultaneous Forming and Joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groche, P.; Wohletz, S.; Mann, A.; Krech, M.; Monnerjahn, V.

    2016-03-01

    The market demand for new products optimized for e. g. lightweight applications or smart components leads to new challenges in production engineering. Hybrid structures represent one promising approach. They aim at higher product performance by using a suitable combination of different materials. The developments of hybrid structures stimulate the research on joining of dissimilar materials. Since they allow for joining dissimilar materials without external heating technologies based on joining by plastic deformation seem to be of special attractiveness. The paper at hand discusses the conjoint forming approach. This approach combines forming and joining in one process. Two or more workpieces are joined while at least one workpiece is plastically deformed. After presenting the fundamental joining mechanisms, the conjoint forming approach is discussed comprehensively. Examples of conjoint processes demonstrate the effectiveness and reveal the underlying phenomena.

  4. Electromagnetic nucleon form factors in instant and point form

    SciTech Connect

    Melde, T.; Berger, K.; Plessas, W.; Wagenbrunn, R. F.; Canton, L.

    2007-10-01

    We present a study of the electromagnetic structure of the nucleons with constituent quark models in the framework of relativistic quantum mechanics. In particular, we address the construction of spectator-model currents in the instant and point forms. Corresponding results for the elastic nucleon electromagnetic form factors as well as charge radii and magnetic moments are presented. We also compare results obtained by different realistic nucleon wave functions stemming from alternative constituent quark models. Finally, we discuss the theoretical uncertainties that reside in the construction of spectator-model transition operators.

  5. Characterization of polymorphic ampicillin forms.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, C; Tinti, A; Ottani, S; Gamberini, M C

    2014-11-01

    In this work polymorphs of α-aminobenzylpenicillin (ampicillin), a β-lactamic antibiotic, were prepared and investigated by several experimental and theoretical methods. Amorphous monohydrate and three crystalline forms, the trihydrate, the crystal form I and the crystal form II, were investigated by FT-IR and micro-Raman. Also data obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and hot-stage Raman spectroscopy are reported. Finally, quantum mechanical calculations were performed by density functional theory (DFT) to assist the assignment of spectroscopic experimental bands. For the first time, the ampicillin molecule in its zwitterionic form was studied at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level and the corresponding theoretical vibrational spectra were computed. In fact, ampicillin in the crystal is in zwitterionic form and concentrations of this same form are quite relevant in solutions at physiological pH. Experimental and theoretical results allowed identification of specific features for polymorph characterization. Bands typical of the different polymorphs are identified both in IR and Raman spectra: in particular in the NH stretching region (IR), in the amide I+δNH region (both techniques), in the 1520-1490cm(-1) region (IR), in the 1320-1300cm(-1) and 1280-1220cm(-1) (IR), in the 1200-1170cm(-1) (Raman), in the amide V region (IR), and, finally, in the 715-640cm(-1) and 220-200cm(-1) (Raman). Interconversion among different polymorphs was investigated by hot-stage Raman spectroscopy and thermal analysis, clarifying the complex pattern of transformations undergone as a function of temperature and heating rate. In particular, DSC scans show how the trihydrate crystals transform into anhydrous forms on heating. Finally, stability tests demonstrated, after a two years period, that no transformation or degradation of the polymorphs occurred.

  6. The discovery of structural form

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Charles; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2008-01-01

    Algorithms for finding structure in data have become increasingly important both as tools for scientific data analysis and as models of human learning, yet they suffer from a critical limitation. Scientists discover qualitatively new forms of structure in observed data: For instance, Linnaeus recognized the hierarchical organization of biological species, and Mendeleev recognized the periodic structure of the chemical elements. Analogous insights play a pivotal role in cognitive development: Children discover that object category labels can be organized into hierarchies, friendship networks are organized into cliques, and comparative relations (e.g., “bigger than” or “better than”) respect a transitive order. Standard algorithms, however, can only learn structures of a single form that must be specified in advance: For instance, algorithms for hierarchical clustering create tree structures, whereas algorithms for dimensionality-reduction create low-dimensional spaces. Here, we present a computational model that learns structures of many different forms and that discovers which form is best for a given dataset. The model makes probabilistic inferences over a space of graph grammars representing trees, linear orders, multidimensional spaces, rings, dominance hierarchies, cliques, and other forms and successfully discovers the underlying structure of a variety of physical, biological, and social domains. Our approach brings structure learning methods closer to human abilities and may lead to a deeper computational understanding of cognitive development. PMID:18669663

  7. The discovery of structural form.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Charles; Tenenbaum, Joshua B

    2008-08-05

    Algorithms for finding structure in data have become increasingly important both as tools for scientific data analysis and as models of human learning, yet they suffer from a critical limitation. Scientists discover qualitatively new forms of structure in observed data: For instance, Linnaeus recognized the hierarchical organization of biological species, and Mendeleev recognized the periodic structure of the chemical elements. Analogous insights play a pivotal role in cognitive development: Children discover that object category labels can be organized into hierarchies, friendship networks are organized into cliques, and comparative relations (e.g., "bigger than" or "better than") respect a transitive order. Standard algorithms, however, can only learn structures of a single form that must be specified in advance: For instance, algorithms for hierarchical clustering create tree structures, whereas algorithms for dimensionality-reduction create low-dimensional spaces. Here, we present a computational model that learns structures of many different forms and that discovers which form is best for a given dataset. The model makes probabilistic inferences over a space of graph grammars representing trees, linear orders, multidimensional spaces, rings, dominance hierarchies, cliques, and other forms and successfully discovers the underlying structure of a variety of physical, biological, and social domains. Our approach brings structure learning methods closer to human abilities and may lead to a deeper computational understanding of cognitive development.

  8. Form und Sinn: Sprachwissenschaftliche Betrachtungen (Form and Meaning: Linguistic Observations).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobson, Roman

    This collection of 14 papers and articles by Roman Jakobson contains works written and published between 1931 and 1970 which deal either with global aspects of language or with specific grammatical issues. The collection emphasizes Jakobson's concern for finding the links between form and meaning in language. The text is entirely in German with…

  9. A Notional Matrix for Grammatical Forms: Teaching Question Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Carolyn L.

    This paper proposes a matrix of notional categories for classifying grammatical structures. The use of the matrix is illustrated through question forms. Communicative competence in a language presupposes mastery of the grammatical system of that language. Therefore, in adopting a communicatively appropriate syllabus, containing varieties of…

  10. Sixth-Form Colleges: An Endangered Organisational Form?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoten, David William

    2014-01-01

    The sixth-form college sector is often marginalised in policy and academic discourse, where the much larger school and further education sectors dominate. This paper sets out to describe the sector's key features, assess its position within the wider education system and consider its future in an increasingly competitive education market. The…

  11. Two forms of reactive arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Toivanen, P.; Toivanen, A.

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritides developing after a distant infection have so far been called reactive or postinfectious, quite often depending on the microbial trigger and/or HLA-B27 status of the patient. For clarity, it is proposed that they all should be called reactive arthritis, which, according to the trigger, occurs as an HLA-B27 associated or non-associated form. In addition to the causative agents and HLA-B27, these two categories are also distinguished by other characteristics. Most important, HLA-B27 associated arthritis may occur identical to the Reiter's syndrome with accompanying uretheritis and/or conjunctivitis, whereas in the B27 non-associated form this has not been clearly described. Likewise, only the B27 associated form belongs to the group of spondyloarthropathies.

 PMID:10577958

  12. Method of forming structural heliostat

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Alfred J.

    1984-06-26

    In forming a heliostat having a main support structure and pivoting and tilting motors and gears and a mirror module for reflecting solar energy onto a collector, the improvement characterized by a method of forming the mirror module in which the mirror is laid upon a solid rigid supporting bed in one or more sections, with or without focusing; a mirror backing sheet is applied by first applying respective thin layers of silicone grease and, thereafter, progressively rolling application to eliminate air bubbles; followed by affixing of a substrate assembly to the mirror backing sheet to form a mirror module that does not curve because of thermally induced stresses and differential thermal expansion or contraction effects. The silicone grease also serves to dampen fluttering of the mirror and protect the mirror backside against adverse effects of the weather. Also disclosed are specific details of preferred embodiments.

  13. PROCESS OF FORMING POWDERED MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Glatter, J.; Schaner, B.E.

    1961-07-14

    A process of forming high-density compacts of a powdered ceramic material is described by agglomerating the powdered ceramic material with a heat- decompossble binder, adding a heat-decompossble lubricant to the agglomerated material, placing a quantity of the material into a die cavity, pressing the material to form a compact, pretreating the compacts in a nonoxidizing atmosphere to remove the binder and lubricant, and sintering the compacts. When this process is used for making nuclear reactor fuel elements, the ceramic material is an oxide powder of a fissionsble material and after forming, the compacts are placed in a cladding tube which is closed at its ends by vapor tight end caps, so that the sintered compacts are held in close contact with each other and with the interior wall of the cladding tube.

  14. Methods of forming boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  15. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  16. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2000-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray form