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Sample records for amphotropic pseudotyped retroviral

  1. Small synthetic ligands for the enrichment of viral particles pseudotyped with amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Castro, Rute; Coroadinha, Ana Sofia; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-03-18

    Retroviral vectors gained popularity toward other viral vectors as they integrate their genome into hosts' genome, a characteristic required for the modification of stem cells. However, the production of viable particles for gene therapy is hampered by the low ratio of infectious to non-infectious viral particles after purification, low titers and limited number of competent viral receptors. We have developed de novo two fully synthetic triazine-based ligands that can selectively bind retroviral particles pseudotyped with amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelope (AMPHO4070A). A 78-membered library of triazine-based ligands was designed in silico and was virtually screened against the modeled structure of the AMPHO4070A protein. Ligands displaying the highest energy of binding were synthesized on cross-linked agarose and experimentally tested. Adsorbents containing ligands A5A10 and A10A11 showed selectivity toward viral particles containing the target protein (VLP-AMPHO), binding 19 ± 5 μg/g support and 47 ± 13 μg/g support, respectively. The elution conditions for both ligands were mild and with high recovery yields (80-100%), in comparison with common purification practices. These results were based on a lab-scale experimental setting with VLP integrity being confirmed through TEM. In particular, the elution buffer containing 12 mM imidazole allowed the recovery of intact amphotropic viral particles.

  2. An amphotropic retroviral vector expressing a mutant gsp oncogene: effects on human thyroid cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ivan, M; Ludgate, M; Gire, V; Bond, J A; Wynford-Thomas, D

    1997-08-01

    Point mutations of the gsp protooncogene (encoding the alpha-subunit of the Gs protein) that constitutively activate the cAMP signaling pathway are a common feature of and a plausible causative mechanism for thyroid hyperfunctioning adenomas (hot nodules). To investigate the extent to which mutant gsp acting alone can induce proliferation of thyroid follicular cells, we generated an amphotropic retroviral vector (based on the pBABE-neo plasmid and psi-CRIP packaging line) to permit stable introduction of a hemagglutinin-tagged Gln227-->Leu mutant gsp gene into normal human thyrocytes in vitro. The biological activity of the vector was confirmed by detection of HA-tagged Gsp protein expression and induction of cAMP synthesis in selected target cells. Normal human thyroid follicular cells in primary monolayer culture were infected with the gsp retroviral vector or with corresponding vectors expressing mutant H-ras or neo only as positive and negative controls, respectively. Although, as before, mutant ras generated 10-20 well differentiated epithelial colonies/dish of 10(5) infected cells, with an average lifespan of 15-20 population doublings, only small groups of no more than 15-50 differentiated thyrocytes were observed with the gsp vector. In addition to standard conditions (10% FCS), infections were performed in reduced serum (1% FCS, TSH, and insulin), in the presence of isobutylylmethylxanthine, or in the presence of agents capable of closing gap junctions, with no significant difference in outcome. Although little or no proliferative response was observed regardless of the conditions, there was clear evidence of morphological response (rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton and increased cell size). The results suggest that gsp mutation may not be a sufficient proliferogenic stimulus by itself to account for hot nodule formation.

  3. Stability of Retroviral Vectors Against Ultracentrifugation Is Determined by the Viral Internal Core and Envelope Proteins Used for Pseudotyping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Lim, Kwang-Il

    2017-05-31

    Retroviral and lentiviral vectors are mostly pseudotyped and often purified and concentrated via ultracentrifugation. In this study, we quantified and compared the stabilities of retroviral [murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based] and lentiviral [human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-based] vectors pseudotyped with relatively mechanically stable envelope proteins, vesicular stomatitis virus glycoproteins (VSVGs), and the influenza virus WSN strain envelope proteins against ultracentrifugation. Lentiviral genomic and functional particles were more stable than the corresponding retroviral particles against ultracentrifugation when pseudotyped with VSVGs. However, both retroviral and lentiviral particles were unstable when pseudotyped with the influenza virus WSN strain envelope proteins. Therefore, the stabilities of pseudotyped retroviral and lentiviral vectors against ultracentrifugation process are a function of not only the type of envelope proteins, but also the type of viral internal core (MLV or HIV-1 core). In addition, the fraction of functional viral particles among genomic viral particles greatly varied at times during packaging, depending on the type of envelope proteins used for pseudotyping and the viral internal core.

  4. A sensitive retroviral pseudotype assay for influenza H5N1‐neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Temperton, Nigel J.; Hoschler, Katja; Major, Diane; Nicolson, Carolyn; Manvell, Ruth; Hien, Vo Minh; Ha, Do Quang; De Jong, Menno; Zambon, Maria; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Weiss, Robin A.

    2007-01-01

    Background  The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended the development of simple, safe, sensitive and specific neutralization assays for avian influenza antibodies. We have used retroviral pseudotypes bearing influenza H5 hemagglutinin (HA) as safe, surrogate viruses for influenza neutralization assays which can be carried out at Biosafety Level 2. Results  Using our assay, sera from patients who had recovered from infection with influenza H5N1, and sera from animals experimentally immunized or infected with H5 tested positive for the presence of neutralizing antibodies to H5N1. Pseudotype neutralizing antibody titers were compared with titers obtained by hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) assays and microneutralization (MN) assays using live virus, and showed a high degree of correlation, sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions  The pseudotype neutralization assay is as sensitive as horse erythrocyte HI and MN for the detection of antibodies to H5N1. It is safer, and can be applied in a high‐throughput format for human and animal surveillance and for the evaluation of vaccines. PMID:19453415

  5. Transduction of Human Primitive Repopulating Hematopoietic Cells With Lentiviral Vectors Pseudotyped With Various Envelope Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon-Sang; Wielgosz, Matthew M; Hargrove, Phillip; Kepes, Steven; Gray, John; Persons, Derek A; Nienhuis, Arthur W

    2010-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are useful for transducing primitive hematopoietic cells. We examined four envelope proteins for their ability to mediate lentiviral transduction of mobilized human CD34+ peripheral blood cells. Lentiviral particles encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G), the amphotropic (AMPHO) murine leukemia virus envelope protein, the endogenous feline leukemia viral envelope protein or the feline leukemia virus type C envelope protein. Because the relative amount of genome RNA per ml was similar for each pseudotype, we transduced CD34+ cells with a fixed volume of each vector preparation. Following an overnight transduction, CD34+ cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice which were sacrificed 12 weeks later. The average percentages of engrafted human CD45+ cells in total bone marrow were comparable to that of the control, mock-transduced group (37–45%). Lenti-particles pseudotyped with the VSV-G envelope protein transduced engrafting cells two- to tenfold better than particles pseudotyped with any of the γ-retroviral envelope proteins. There was no correlation between receptor mRNA levels for the γ-retroviral vectors and transduction efficiency of primitive hematopoietic cells. These results support the use of the VSV-G envelope protein for the development of lentiviral producer cell lines for manufacture of clinical-grade vector. PMID:20372106

  6. Transduction of human primitive repopulating hematopoietic cells with lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with various envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Sang; Wielgosz, Matthew M; Hargrove, Phillip; Kepes, Steven; Gray, John; Persons, Derek A; Nienhuis, Arthur W

    2010-07-01

    Lentiviral vectors are useful for transducing primitive hematopoietic cells. We examined four envelope proteins for their ability to mediate lentiviral transduction of mobilized human CD34(+) peripheral blood cells. Lentiviral particles encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G), the amphotropic (AMPHO) murine leukemia virus envelope protein, the endogenous feline leukemia viral envelope protein or the feline leukemia virus type C envelope protein. Because the relative amount of genome RNA per ml was similar for each pseudotype, we transduced CD34(+) cells with a fixed volume of each vector preparation. Following an overnight transduction, CD34(+) cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice which were sacrificed 12 weeks later. The average percentages of engrafted human CD45(+) cells in total bone marrow were comparable to that of the control, mock-transduced group (37-45%). Lenti-particles pseudotyped with the VSV-G envelope protein transduced engrafting cells two- to tenfold better than particles pseudotyped with any of the gamma-retroviral envelope proteins. There was no correlation between receptor mRNA levels for the gamma-retroviral vectors and transduction efficiency of primitive hematopoietic cells. These results support the use of the VSV-G envelope protein for the development of lentiviral producer cell lines for manufacture of clinical-grade vector.

  7. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with a modified RD114 envelope glycoprotein show increased stability in sera and augmented transduction of primary lymphocytes and CD34+ cells derived from human and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Virginie; Boson, Bertrand; Salmon, Patrick; Gay, Wilfried; Nègre, Didier; Le Grand, Roger; Trono, Didier; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2002-08-01

    Generating lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with different viral glycoproteins (GPs) may modulate the physicochemical properties of the vectors, their interaction with the host immune system, and their host range. We have investigated the capacity of a panel of GPs of both retroviral (amphotropic murine leukemia virus [MLV-A]; gibbon ape leukemia virus [GALV]; RD114, feline endogenous virus) and nonretroviral (fowl plague virus [FPV]; Ebola virus [EboV]; vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV]; lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV]) origins to pseudotype lentiviral vectors derived from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac251). SIV vectors were efficiently pseudotyped with the FPV hemagglutinin, VSV-G, LCMV, and MLV-A GPs. In contrast, the GALV and RD114 GPs conferred much lower infectivity to the vectors. Capitalizing on the conservation of some structural features in the transmembrane domains and cytoplasmic tails of the incorporation-competent MLV-A GP and in RD114 and GALV GPs, we generated chimeric GPs encoding the extracellular and transmembrane domains of GALV or RD114 GPs fused to the cytoplasmic tail (designated TR) of MLV-A GP. Importantly, SIV-derived vectors pseudotyped with these GALV/TR and RD114/TR GP chimeras had significantly higher titers than vectors coated with the parental GPs. Additionally, RD114/TR-pseudotyped vectors were efficiently concentrated and were resistant to inactivation induced by the complement of both human and macaque sera, indicating that modified RD114 GP-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors may be of particular interest for in vivo gene transfer applications. Furthermore, as compared to vectors pseudotyped with other retroviral GPs or with VSV-G, RD114/TR-pseudotyped vectors showed augmented transduction of human and macaque primary blood lymphocytes and CD34+ cells.

  8. Optimization of gene transfer into primitive human hematopoietic cells of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood using low-dose cytokines and comparison of a gibbon ape leukemia virus versus an RD114-pseudotyped retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    van der Loo, Johannes C M; Liu, B L; Goldman, A I; Buckley, S M; Chrudimsky, K S

    2002-07-20

    Primitive human hematopoietic cells in granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood (MPB) are more difficult to transduce compared to cells from umbilical cord blood. Based on the hypothesis that MPB cells may require different stimulation for efficient retroviral infection, we compared several culture conditions known to induce cycling of primitive hematopoietic cells. MPB-derived CD34(+) cells were stimulated in the presence or absence of the murine fetal liver cell line AFT024 in trans-wells with G-CSF, stem cell factor (SCF), and thrombopoietin (TPO) (G/S/T; 100 ng/ml) or Flt3-L, SCF, interleukin (IL)-7, and TPO (F/S/7/T; 10-20 ng/ml), and transduced using a GaLV-pseudotyped retroviral vector expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP). Compared to cultures without stroma, the presence of AFT024 increased the number of transduced colony-forming cells (CFC) by 3.5-fold (with G/S/T), long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC) by 4.6-fold (with F/S/7/T), and nonobese diabetic/severe immunodeficiency disease (NOD/SCID)-repopulating cells (SRC) by 6.8-fold (with F/S/7/T). Similar numbers of long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC) and SRC could be transduced using AFT024-conditioned medium (AFT-CM) or a defined medium that had been supplemented with factors identified in AFT-CM. Finally, using our best condition based on transduction with the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV)-pseudotyped vector, we demonstrate a 33-fold higher level of gene transfer (p < 0.001) in SRC using an RD114-pseudotyped vector. In summary, using an optimized protocol with low doses of cytokines, and transduction with an RD114 compared to a GaLV-pseudotyped retroviral vector, the overall number of transduced cells in NOD/SCID mice could be improved 144-fold, with a gene-transfer efficiency in SRC of 16.3% (13.3-19.9; n = 6).

  9. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Münk, Carsten; Löhler, Jürgen; Prassolov, Vladimir; Just, Ursula; Stockschläder, Marcus; Stocking, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed. PMID:9159161

  10. A stable human-derived packaging cell line for production of high titer retrovirus/vesicular stomatitis virus G pseudotypes.

    PubMed

    Ory, D S; Neugeboren, B A; Mulligan, R C

    1996-10-15

    We have generated a human 293-derived retroviral packaging cell line (293GPG) capable of producing high titers of recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus particles that have incorporated the vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) protein. To achieve expression of the retroviral gag-pol polyprotein, the precise coding sequences for gag-pol were introduced into a vector which utilizes totally nonretroviral signals for gene expression. Because constitutive expression of the VSV-G protein is toxic in 293 cells, we used the tetR/VP 16 transactivator and teto minimal promoter system for inducible, tetracycline-regulatable expression of VSV-G. After stable transfection of the 293GPG packaging cell line with the MFG.SnlsLacZ retroviral vector construct, it was possible to readily isolate stable virus-producing cell lines with titers approaching 10(7) colony-forming units/ml. Transient transfection of 293GPG cells using a modified version of MFG.SnlsLacZ, in which the cytomegalovirus IE promoter was used to drive transcription of the proviral genome, led to titers of approximately 10(6) colony-forming units/ml. The retroviral/VSV-G pseudotypes generated using 293GPG cells were significantly more resistant to human complement than commonly used amphotropic vectors and could be highly concentrated (> 1000-fold). This new packaging cell line may prove to be particularly useful for assessing the potential use of retroviral vectors for direct in vivo gene transfer. The design of the cell line also provides at least theoretical advantages over existing cell lines with regard to the possible release of replication-competent virus.

  11. Five recombinant simian immunodeficiency virus pseudotypes lead to exclusive transduction of retinal pigmented epithelium in rat.

    PubMed

    Duisit, Ghislaine; Conrath, Hervé; Saleun, Sylvie; Folliot, Sebastien; Provost, Nathalie; Cosset, François-Loïc; Sandrin, Virginie; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate lentiviral vector-mediated rat retinal transduction using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) pseudotyped with envelope proteins from vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G), Mokola virus G protein (MK-G), amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelope (4070A-Env), influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA), lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus G protein (LCMV-G), and RD114 retrovirus envelope (RD114-Env). The six pseudotyped lentivirus vectors carried CMV-driven green fluorescent protein (GFP) or beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) reporter genes. Intravitreal and subretinal injections of each pseudotyped recombinant SIV were performed in cohorts of Wistar rats. Our results showed that no transgene expression was detected after intravitreal injection of each pseudotyped SIV vector. Also, no transduction could be detected following subretinal injection of RD114 pseudotyped SIV vectors. However, selective transduction of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells was repeatedly obtained after subretinal delivery of VSV-G, MK-G, 4070A-Env, HA, and LCMV-G pseudotyped SIV. GFP expression was maximum as soon as 4 days postadministration for VSV-G, MK-G, 4070A-Env, and HA pseudotypes, with no evidence of pseudotransduction for VSV-G. Maximum transgene expression was observed 3 weeks postinjection for LCMV-6. Importantly, HA and VSV-G pseudotyped SIV lead to such a high level of transgene expression that GFP-related toxicity occurred. Therefore, when a high level of GFP synthesis is achieved, replacement of enhanced GFP (egfp, Aequorea victoria) by a low-toxicity GFP (Renilla reniformis) cDNA is necessary to allow long-term expression.

  12. Targeting retroviral and lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, V; Russell, S J; Cosset, F L

    2003-01-01

    Retroviral vectors capable of efficient in vivo gene delivery to specific target cell types or to specific locations of disease pathology would greatly facilitate many gene therapy applications. The surface glycoproteins of membrane-enveloped viruses stand among the choice candidates to control the target cell receptor recognition and host range of retroviral vectors onto which they are incorporated. This can be achieved in many ways, such as the exchange of glycoprotein by pseudotyping, their biochemical modifications, their conjugation with virus-cell bridging agents or their structural modifications. Understanding the fundamental properties of the viral glycoproteins and the molecular mechanism of virus entry into cells has been instrumental in the functional alteration of their tropism. Here we briefly review the current state of our understanding of the structure and function of viral envelope glycoproteins and we discuss the emerging targeting strategies based on retroviral and lentiviral vector systems.

  13. A Small-molecule-controlled System for Efficient Pseudotyping of Prototype Foamy Virus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Ping; Schnabel, Viktor; Swiersy, Anka; Stirnnagel, Kristin; Lindemann, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Foamy virus (FV) vector systems have recently demonstrated their power as efficient gene transfer tools for different target tissues. Unfortunately, FVs cannot be naturally pseudotyped by heterologous viral glycoproteins due to an unusual particle morphogenesis involving a FV Env-dependent particle release process. Therefore, current FV vector systems are constrained to the broad host cell range provided by the cognate viral glycoprotein. We evaluated different approaches for pseudotyping of FV vectors, in which the specific FV Gag–Env interaction, essential for particle egress, is substituted by a small-molecule controlled heterodimerization (HD) system. In one system developed, one HD-domain (HDD) is fused to a membrane-targeting domain (MTD), such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag matrix (MA) subunit, with a second fused to the FV capsid protein. Coexpression of both components with different heterologous viral glycoproteins allowed an efficient, dimerizer-dependent pseudotyping of FV capsids. With this system FV vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotype titers greater than 1 × 106 IU/ml were obtained, at levels comparable to authentic FV vector particles. As a proof-of-principle we demonstrate that Pac2 cells, naturally resistant to FV vectors, become permissive to FV VSV-G pseudotypes. Similar to other retroviral vectors, this FV pseudotyping system now enables adaptation of cell-specific targeting approaches for FVs. PMID:22472951

  14. Intracellular trafficking of Gag and Env proteins and their interactions modulate pseudotyping of retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Virginie; Muriaux, Delphine; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2004-07-01

    Glycoproteins derived from most retroviruses and from several families of enveloped viruses can form infectious pseudotypes with murine leukemia virus (MLV) and lentiviral core particles, like the MLV envelope glycoproteins (Env) that are incorporated on either virus type. However, coexpression of a given glycoprotein with heterologous core proteins does not always give rise to highly infectious viral particles, and restrictions on pseudotype formation have been reported. To understand the mechanisms that control the recruitment of viral surface glycoproteins on lentiviral and retroviral cores, we exploited the fact that the feline endogenous retrovirus RD114 glycoprotein does not efficiently pseudotype lentiviral cores derived from simian immunodeficiency virus, whereas it is readily incorporated onto MLV particles. Our results indicate that recruitment of glycoproteins by the MLV and lentiviral core proteins occurs in intracellular compartments and not at the cell surface. We found that Env and core protein colocalization in intracytoplasmic vesicles is required for pseudotype formation. By investigating MLV/RD114 Env chimeras, we show that signals in the cytoplasmic tail of either glycoprotein differentially influenced their intracellular localization; that of MLV allows endosomal localization and hence recruitment by both lentiviral and MLV cores. Furthermore, we found that upon membrane binding, MLV core proteins could relocalize Env glycoproteins in late endosomes and allow their incorporation on viral particles. Thus, intracellular colocalization, as well as interactions between Env and core proteins, may influence the recruitment of the glycoprotein onto viral particles and generate infectious pseudotyped viruses.

  15. Susceptibility of domestic animals to a pseudotype virus bearing RD-114 virus envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Miyaho, Rie Nakaoka; Nakagawa, So; Hashimoto-Gotoh, Akira; Nakaya, Yuki; Shimode, Sayumi; Sakaguchi, Shoichi; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Takahashi, Mahoko Ueda; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-08-10

    Retroviral vectors are used for gene transduction into cells and have been applied to gene therapy. Retroviral vectors using envelope protein (Env) of RD-114 virus, a feline endogenous retrovirus, have been used for gene transduction. In this study, we investigated the susceptibility to RD-114 Env-pseudotyped virus in twelve domestic animals including cattle, sheep, horse, pig, dog, cat, ferret, mink, rabbit, rat, mouse, and quail. Comparison of nucleotide sequences of ASCT2 (SLC1A5), a receptor of RD-114 virus, in 10 mammalian and 2 avian species revealed that insertion and deletion events at the region C of ASCT2 where RD-114 viral Env interacts occurred independently in the mouse and rat lineage and in the chicken and quail lineage. By the pseudotype virus infection assay, we found that RD-114 Env-pseudotyped virus could efficiently infect all cell lines except those from mouse and rat. Furthermore, we confirmed that bovine ASCT2 (bASCT2) functions as a receptor for RD-114 virus infection. We also investigated bASCT2 mRNA expression in cattle tissues and found that it is expressed in various tissues including lung, spleen and kidney. These results indicate that retrovirus vectors with RD-114 virus Env can be used for gene therapy in large domestic animals in addition to companion animals such as cat and dog.

  16. Effects of vector backbone and pseudotype on lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer: studies in infant ADA-deficient mice and rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Carbonaro Sarracino, Denise; Tarantal, Alice F; Lee, C Chang I; Martinez, Michele; Jin, Xiangyang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Hardee, Cinnamon L; Geiger, Sabine; Kahl, Christoph A; Kohn, Donald B

    2014-10-01

    Systemic delivery of a lentiviral vector carrying a therapeutic gene represents a new treatment for monogenic disease. Previously, we have shown that transfer of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) cDNA in vivo rescues the lethal phenotype and reconstitutes immune function in ADA-deficient mice. In order to translate this approach to ADA-deficient severe combined immune deficiency patients, neonatal ADA-deficient mice and newborn rhesus monkeys were treated with species-matched and mismatched vectors and pseudotypes. We compared gene delivery by the HIV-1-based vector to murine γ-retroviral vectors pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein or murine retroviral envelopes in ADA-deficient mice. The vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors had the highest titer and resulted in the highest vector copy number in multiple tissues, particularly liver and lung. In monkeys, HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus vectors resulted in similar biodistribution in most tissues including bone marrow, spleen, liver, and lung. Simian immunodeficiency virus pseudotyped with the gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope produced 10- to 30-fold lower titers than the vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein pseudotype, but had a similar tissue biodistribution and similar copy number in blood cells. The relative copy numbers achieved in mice and monkeys were similar when adjusted to the administered dose per kg. These results suggest that this approach can be scaled-up to clinical levels for treatment of ADA-deficient severe combined immune deficiency subjects with suboptimal hematopoietic stem cell transplantation options.

  17. Introduction of new genetic material into human myeloid leukemic blast stem cells by retroviral infection

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.J.; Benchimol, S.

    1988-02-01

    An amphotropic retroviral vector containing the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase gene (neo) was used to infect blast cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. The infected cells acquired a G418-resistant phenotype that was stable as measured in a clonogenic assay and in long-term suspension culture. Thus, gene transfer into stem cells was accomplished by this procedure. This approach for manipulating gene expression in blast stem cells provides a means to assess the roles of a variety of genes in self-renewal, differentiation, and leukemogenesis.

  18. Adaptation of chimeric retroviruses in vitro and in vivo: isolation of avian retroviral vectors with extended host range.

    PubMed

    Barsov, E V; Payne, W S; Hughes, S H

    2001-06-01

    We have designed and characterized two new replication-competent avian sarcoma/leukosis virus-based retroviral vectors with amphotropic and ecotropic host ranges. The amphotropic vector RCASBP-M2C(797-8), was obtained by passaging the chimeric retroviral vector RCASBP-M2C(4070A) (6) in chicken embryos. The ecotropic vector, RCASBP(Eco), was created by replacing the env-coding region in the retroviral vector RCASBP(A) with the env region from an ecotropic murine leukemia virus. It replicates efficiently in avian DFJ8 cells that express murine ecotropic receptor. For both vectors, permanent cell lines that produce viral stocks with titers of about 5 x 10(6) CFU/ml on mammalian cells can be easily established by passaging transfected avian cells. Some chimeric viruses, for example, RCASBP(Eco), replicate efficiently without modifications. For those chimeric viruses that do require modification, adaptation by passage in vitro or in vivo is a general strategy. This strategy has been used to prepare vectors with altered host range and could potentially be used to develop vectors that would be useful for targeted gene delivery.

  19. Adaptation of Chimeric Retroviruses In Vitro and In Vivo: Isolation of Avian Retroviral Vectors with Extended Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Barsov, Eugene V.; Payne, William S.; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2001-01-01

    We have designed and characterized two new replication-competent avian sarcoma/leukosis virus-based retroviral vectors with amphotropic and ecotropic host ranges. The amphotropic vector RCASBP-M2C(797-8), was obtained by passaging the chimeric retroviral vector RCASBP-M2C(4070A) (6) in chicken embryos. The ecotropic vector, RCASBP(Eco), was created by replacing the env-coding region in the retroviral vector RCASBP(A) with the env region from an ecotropic murine leukemia virus. It replicates efficiently in avian DFJ8 cells that express murine ecotropic receptor. For both vectors, permanent cell lines that produce viral stocks with titers of about 5 × 106 CFU/ml on mammalian cells can be easily established by passaging transfected avian cells. Some chimeric viruses, for example, RCASBP(Eco), replicate efficiently without modifications. For those chimeric viruses that do require modification, adaptation by passage in vitro or in vivo is a general strategy. This strategy has been used to prepare vectors with altered host range and could potentially be used to develop vectors that would be useful for targeted gene delivery. PMID:11333876

  20. Cellular and species resistance to murine amphotropic, gibbon ape, and feline subgroup C leukemia viruses is strongly influenced by receptor expression levels and by receptor masking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tailor, C S; Nouri, A; Kabat, D

    2000-10-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are resistant to infections by gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV) unless they are pretreated with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation. These viruses use the related sodium-phosphate symporters Pit1 and Pit2, respectively, as receptors in nonhamster cells, and evidence has suggested that the corresponding transporters of CHO cells may be masked by tunicamycin-sensitive secreted inhibitors. Although the E36 line of Chinese hamster cells was reported to secrete the putative Pit2 inhibitor and to be sensitive to the inhibitory CHO factors, E36 cells are highly susceptible to both GALV and A-MLV in the absence of tunicamycin. Moreover, expression of E36 Pit2 in CHO cells conferred tunicamycin-independent susceptibilities to both viruses. Based on the latter results, it was suggested that E36 Pit2 must functionally differ from the endogenous Pit2 of CHO cells. To test these ideas, we analyzed the receptor properties of CHO Pit1 and Pit2 in CHO cells. Surprisingly, and counterintuitively, transfection of a CHO Pit2 expression vector into CHO cells conferred strong susceptibility to both GALV and A-MLV, and similar overexpression of CHO Pit1 conferred susceptibility to GALV. Thus, CHO Pit2 is a promiscuous functional receptor for both viruses, and CHO Pit1 is a functional receptor for GALV. Similarly, we found that the natural resistance of Mus dunni tail fibroblasts to subgroup C feline leukemia viruses (FeLV-C) was eliminated simply by overexpression of the endogenous FeLV-C receptor homologue. These results demonstrate a novel and simple method to unmask latent retroviral receptor activities that occur in some cells. Specifically, resistances to retroviruses that are caused by subthreshold levels of receptor expression or by stoichiometrically limited masking or interference mechanisms can be efficiently overcome simply by overexpressing the endogenous receptors in the same

  1. Retroviral DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  2. Disclosing the parameters leading to high productivity of retroviral producer cells lines: evaluating random vs. targeted integration.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Vanessa Sofia; Tomás, Hélio A; Alici, Evren; Carrondo, Manuel J C T; Coroadinha, Ana Sofia

    2017-03-16

    Gammaretrovirus and lentivirus are the preferred viral vectors to genetically modify T- and NK- cells to be used in immune-cell therapies. The transduction efficiency of hematopoietic and T cells is more efficient using Gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) pseudotyping. In this context gammaretroviral vector producer cells offer competitive higher titers than transient lentiviral vectors productions. The main aim of this work was to identify the key parameters governing GalV pseudotyped gammaretroviral vector productivity in stable producer cells using a retroviral vector expression cassette enabling positive (facilitating cell enrichment) and negative cell selection (allowing cell elimination). The retroviral vector contains a thymidine kinase suicide gene fused with an Ouabain-resistant Na+K+-ATPase gene, a potential safer and faster marker. The establishment of retroviral vector producer cells is traditionally performed by randomly integrating the retroviral vector expression cassette codifying the transgene. More recently recombinase mediated cassette exchange methodologies have been introduced to achieve targeted integration. Herein we compared random and targeted integration of the retroviral vector transgene construct. Two retroviral producer cell lines, 293 OuaS and 293 FlexOuaS, were generated using random and targeted integration, respectively, producing high titers (in the order of 107 IP.mL-1). Results showed that the retroviral vector transgene cassette is the key retroviral vector component determining the viral titers notwithstanding, single copy integration is sufficient to provide high titers. The expression levels of the three retroviral constructs (gag-pol, GaLV env and retroviral vector transgene) were analyzed. Although gag-pol and GaLV env gene expression levels should surpass a minimal threshold, we found that relatively modest expression levels of these two expression cassettes are required. Their levels of expression should not be maximized. We

  3. Retroviral-mediated transfer of genomic globin genes leads to regulated production of RNA and protein

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, S.; Papayannopoulou, T.; Schweiger, S.G.; Stamatoyannopoulos, G.; Nienhuis, A.W.

    1987-04-01

    A high-titer amphotropic retroviral vector containing the neomycin resistance gene and a hybrid ..gamma..-..beta.. genomic human globin gene has been constructed. Mouse erythroleukemia cells infected with this virus were found to contain the full transcriptional unit of the transferred human globin gene by Southern blot analysis. These cells contain normally initiated, spliced, and terminated human globin mRNA. The human globin mRNA level increased 5- to 10-fold upon induction of the mouse erythroleukemia cells. Human globin chains were produced but only in a fraction of the cells as detected by immunofluorescent staining. A similar retrovirus containing a human ..beta..-globin gene was used to transduce mouse erythroleukemia cells resulting in much higher levels of human globin synthesis than detected in mouse erythroleukemia cells transduced with the ..gamma..-..beta.. globin virus.

  4. Induction of methotrexate resistance by retroviral-mediated transfer of a mutant dihydrofolate reductase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardone, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), a folate analog which inhibits the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), is an effective antineoplastic drug. However, MTX-induced myelosuppression limits the effectiveness of this agent. Selective induction of MTX resistance in bone marrow stem cells, prior to treatment with MTX, might prevent this toxicity and improve the therapeutic index of the drug. In these studies drug resistance was transferred to mouse and human bone marrow stem cells by retroviral expression vectors containing coding sequences of a mutant DHFR with a decreased affinity for MTX. Three retroviral expression vectors were analyzed. The CIS DR vector contained the mutant DHFR gene inserted into the replication-defective amphotropic 4070 virus, Cistor. The other vectors contained the mutant DHFR inserted into either the env region (SDHT1) or gag-pol region (SDHT2) of a replication-defective spleen focus-forming virus. All three constructs induced approximately a 200-fold resistance to MTX when transfected into NIH3T3 cells. Amphotropic infectious retroviruses were obtained by transfecting the mutant DHFR vectors into a packaging cell line, which supplied the gag, pol, and env proteins for virus production. Virus titers of 4.5 x 10/sup 3/ colony-forming units (CFU)/ml (CIS DR), 1.5 x 10/sup 4/ CFU/ml (SDHT2), and 5 x 10/sup 5/ CFU/ml (SDHT1) were measured by the transfer of MTX resistance to NIH3T3 cells. The amphotropic SDHT1 virus efficiently induced MTX resistance in cells of several species, including mouse NIH3T3 cells (5 x 10/sup 5/ CFU/ml), monkey CV1 cells (4 x 10/sup 3/ CFU/ml), and human MCF-7 cells (6 x 10/sup 4/ CFU/ml). When cocultured with SDHT1 virus-producing cells, both mouse and human bone marrow cells could be infected and rendered resistant to MTX. Mouse cytotoxic T lymphocytes and mouse helper T lymphocytes can also be made resistant to MTX.

  5. Overexpression of gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) receptor (GLVR1) on human CD34(+) cells increases gene transfer mediated by GALV pseudotyped vectors.

    PubMed

    Relander, Thomas; Brun, Ann C M; Olsson, Karin; Pedersen, Lene; Richter, Johan

    2002-09-01

    Retroviral transduction of CD34(+) cells on Retronectin using gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) pseudotyped vectors is inhibited by high concentrations of vector containing medium (VCM). Furthermore, this inhibitory activity is stable for at least 48 hours at 37 degrees C and partially blocks a second hit with a GALV pseudotyped vector. We hypothesized that this inhibition was due to interference at the receptor level between infectious and noninfectious vector particles and that it might be possible to overcome it by increasing receptor expression on target cells. Activation of protein kinase C in CD34(+) cells with the phorbol ester PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) increased the mRNA level of the GALV receptor (GLVR1) and the transduction efficiency (TE), and fully reversed the inhibition of transduction seen with high-titer GALV VCM. A murine stem cell virus (MSCV) vector with the GLVR1 receptor and green fluorescent protein cDNAs (MGLIG) was used to transduce fibroblasts, and clones expressing different levels of GLVR1 were isolated. The TE of these cells using a GALV vector correlated with the level of GLVR1 expression. When CD34(+) cells or K562 cells were first transduced with MGLIG and then with high-titer GALV VCM, no inhibition of transduction was seen. The low level of GLVR1 expression limits gene transfer to K562 and CD34(+) cells using GALV pseudotyped vectors, especially in the presence of high-titer VCMs.

  6. Structural modeling of carbonaceous mesophase amphotropic mixtures under uniaxial extensional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmohammadi, Mojdeh; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2010-07-01

    The extended Maier-Saupe model for binary mixtures of model carbonaceous mesophases (uniaxial discotic nematogens) under externally imposed flow, formulated in previous studies [M. Golmohammadi and A. D. Rey, Liquid Crystals 36, 75 (2009); M. Golmohammadi and A. D. Rey, Entropy 10, 183 (2008)], is used to characterize the effect of uniaxial extensional flow and concentration on phase behavior and structure of these mesogenic blends. The generic thermorheological phase diagram of the single-phase binary mixture, given in terms of temperature (T) and Deborah (De) number, shows the existence of four T-De transition lines that define regions that correspond to the following quadrupolar tensor order parameter structures: (i) oblate (⊥,∥), (ii) prolate (⊥,∥), (iii) scalene O(⊥,∥), and (iv) scalene P(⊥,∥), where the symbols (⊥,∥) indicate alignment of the tensor order ellipsoid with respect to the extension axis. It is found that with increasing T the dominant component of the mixture exhibits weak deviations from the well-known pure species response to uniaxial extensional flow (uniaxial ⊥nematic→biaxial nematic→uniaxial∥paranematic). In contrast, the slaved component shows a strong deviation from the pure species response. This deviation is dictated by the asymmetric viscoelastic coupling effects emanating from the dominant component. Changes in conformation (oblate⇄prolate) and orientation (⊥⇄∥) are effected through changes in pairs of eigenvalues of the quadrupolar tensor order parameter. The complexity of the structural sensitivity to temperature and extensional flow is a reflection of the dual lyotropic/thermotropic nature (amphotropic nature) of the mixture and their cooperation/competition. The analysis demonstrates that the simple structures (biaxial nematic and uniaxial paranematic) observed in pure discotic mesogens under uniaxial extensional flow are significantly enriched by the interaction of the lyotropic

  7. [Construction of recombinant retroviral vector carrying Lab gene of foot-and-mouth disease virus and its expression in bovine kidney (MDBK) cells].

    PubMed

    Cong, Guozheng; Zhou, Jianhua; Gao, Shandian; Du, Junzheng; Shao, Junjun; Lin, Tong; Chang, Huiyun; Xie, Qingge

    2008-05-01

    In this study, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) strain OA/58 RNAs were used as templates for RT-PCR. By the molecular cloning, the Lab gene encoding leader protease called Lpro were cloned in retroviral vector pBPSTR1 to obtain reconstruction retroviral vector termed pBPSTR1-Lab. At different concentrations of puromycin and tetracycline respectively in the cell culture mediums, the growth of bovine kidney cells (MDBK) showed that the optimal puromycin resistant selection concentration was 3 microg/mL and tetracycline regulatory concentration was 1 microg/mL. Pseudotyped retroviral virus particles were produced by transiently co-tansfecting GP2-293 cells with a retroviral vector DNA and VSV-G plasmid. Then MDBK cells were infected by pseudotyped retroviral virus and were continually seeded in the medium at the optimal tetracycline regulatory concentration and puromycin selection concentration for 12 days to obtain puromycin resistant colonies whose genomes contained the Lab gene. After tetracycline removal, synthesis of Lpro induced severe morphological changes in the puromycin resistant MDBK cells. PCR and Western blotting proved that a stable MDBK cell line inducibly expressing the Lab gene under the control of tetracycline was obtained. The experiment might provide a basis for studying that Lpro of FMDV plays an important role in MDBK cell pathogenesis.

  8. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. )

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  9. The use of equine influenza pseudotypes for serological screening.

    PubMed

    Scott, Simon; Molesti, Eleonora; Temperton, Nigel; Ferrara, Francesca; Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Daly, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Standard assays used for influenza serology present certain practical issues, such as inter-laboratory variability, complex protocols and the necessity for handling certain virus strains in high biological containment facilities. In an attempt to address this, avian and human influenza HA pseudotyped retroviruses have been successfully employed in antibody neutralization assays. In this study we generated an equine influenza pseudotyped lentivirus for serological screening. This was achieved by co-transfection of HEK293T cells with plasmids expressing the haemagglutinin (HA) protein of an H3N8 subtype equine influenza virus strain, HIV gag-pol and firefly luciferase reporter genes and harvesting virus from supernatant. In order to produce infective pseudotype particles it was necessary to additionally co-transfect a plasmid encoding the TMPRSS2 endoprotease to cleave the HA. High titre pseudotype virus (PV) was then used in PV antibody neutralization assays (PVNAs) to successfully distinguish between vaccinated and non-vaccinated equines. The sera were also screened by single radial haemolysis (SRH) assay. There was a 65% correlation between the results of the two assays, with the PVNA assay appearing slightly more sensitive. Future work will extend the testing of the PVNA with a larger number of serum samples to assess sensitivity/specificity, inter/intra-laboratory variability and to define a protective titre.

  10. Envelope proteins of spleen necrosis virus form infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 pseudotype vector particles, but fail to incorporate upon substitution of the cytoplasmic domain with that of Gibbon ape leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Stitz, Jörn; Wolfrum, Nina; Buchholz, Christian J; Cichutek, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    The wild-type (wt) envelope (Env) proteins of spleen necrosis virus (SNV), together with the transmembrane (TM) protein fused to antibody domains (scFv), have been used for the generation of stable packaging cell lines releasing pseudotyped cell targeting vectors derived from SNV and Murine leukemia virus (MLV). As a first step towards assessing whether HIV-1(SNV/TM-scFv) packaging cells could be established for the production of lentiviral cell targeting vectors, it is reported here that infectious HIV-1-derived particles pseudotyped with wt SNV Env proteins could be generated. Using novel chimeric SNV-derived Env proteins encompassing wt and engineered cytoplasmic domains (C-tail) of the Gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) TM protein, it was further shown that the wt C-tail not only excludes the GaLV TM protein from incorporation into HIV-1 particles, but confers this phenotype to other retroviral envelopes upon C-terminal fusion.

  11. Retroviral-mediated transfer of the human glucocerebrosidase gene into cultured Gaucher bone marrow.

    PubMed Central

    Nolta, J A; Yu, X J; Bahner, I; Kohn, D B

    1992-01-01

    Gaucher disease, a lysosomal glycolipid storage disorder, results from the genetic deficiency of an acidic glucosidase, glucocerebrosidase (GC). The beneficial effects of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for Gaucher disease suggest that GC gene transduction and the transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem cells (gene therapy) may similarly alleviate symptoms. We have constructed a retroviral vector, L-GC, produced by a clone of the amphotropic packaging cell line PA317, which transduces the normal human GC cDNA with high efficiency. Whole-marrow mononuclear cells and CD34-enriched cells from a 4-yr-old female with type 3 Gaucher disease were transduced by the L-GC vector and studied in long-term bone marrow culture (LTBMC). Prestimulation of marrow with IL-3 and IL-6, followed by co-cultivation with vector-producing fibroblasts, produced gene transfer into 40-45% of the hematopoietic progenitor cells. The levels of GC expression in progeny cells (primarily mature myelomonocytic) produced by the LTBMC were quantitatively analyzed by Northern blot, Western blot, and glucocerebrosidase enzyme assay. Normal levels of GC RNA, immunoreactive protein, and enzymatic activity were detected throughout the duration of culture. These studies demonstrate that retroviral vectors can efficiently transfer the GC gene into long-lived hematopoietic progenitor cells from the bone marrow of patients with Gaucher disease and express physiologically relevant levels of GC enzyme activity. Images PMID:1379609

  12. Ping-pong amplification of a retroviral vector achieves high-level gene expression: human growth hormone production.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, S L; Kabat, D

    1990-01-01

    Retroviral vectors offer major advantages for gene transfer studies but have not been useful for producing proteins in large quantities. This deficiency has resulted in part from interference to superinfection, which limits the numbers of active proviruses in cells. Recently, we found that these vectors amplify when they are added as calcium phosphate precipitates to cocultures of cells that package retroviruses into ecotropic and amphotropic host range envelopes. Helper-free virions from either cell type can infect the other without interference, resulting in theoretically limitless back-and-forth (ping-pong) vector replication. In initial studies, however, amplifications of a vector that contained the human growth hormone gene ceased when the hormone produced was 0.3% or less of cellular protein synthesis. This limit was caused by two factors. First, recombinant shutoff viruses that are replication defective and encode envelope glycoproteins form at a low probability during any round of the vector replication cycle and these spread in cocultures, thereby establishing interference. Single cells in shutoff cocultures therefore synthesize both ecotropic and amphotropic envelope glycoproteins, and they release promiscuous (presumably hybrid) virions. The probability of forming shutoff viruses before the vector had amplified to a high multiplicity was reduced by using small cocultures. Second, cells with large numbers of proviruses are unhealthy and their proviral expression can be unstable. Stable expresser cell clones were obtained by selection. Thereby, cell lines were readily obtained that stably produce human growth hormone as 4 to 6% of the total protein synthesis. A ping-pong retroviral vector can be used for high-level protein production in vertebrate cells. Images PMID:2352330

  13. Retroviral integration: Site matters

    PubMed Central

    Demeulemeester, Jonas; De Rijck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Here, we review genomic target site selection during retroviral integration as a multistep process in which specific biases are introduced at each level. The first asymmetries are introduced when the virus takes a specific route into the nucleus. Next, by co‐opting distinct host cofactors, the integration machinery is guided to particular chromatin contexts. As the viral integrase captures a local target nucleosome, specific contacts introduce fine‐grained biases in the integration site distribution. In vivo, the established population of proviruses is subject to both positive and negative selection, thereby continuously reshaping the integration site distribution. By affecting stochastic proviral expression as well as the mutagenic potential of the virus, integration site choice may be an inherent part of the evolutionary strategies used by different retroviruses to maximise reproductive success. PMID:26293289

  14. Chimeric influenza haemagglutinins: Generation and use in pseudotype neutralization assays.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Francesca; Temperton, Nigel

    2017-01-01

    Recently chimeric influenza haemagglutinins (cHAs) have been generated as potential 'universal' vaccination antigens and as tools to identify HA stalk-directed antibodies via their use as antigens in ELISA, and virus or pseudotype-based neutralization assays. The original methods [1], [2] used for their generation require the amplification of regions of interest (head and stalk) using primers containing SapI sites and subsequent cloning into pDZ plasmid. This requires precise primer design, checking for the absence of SapI sites in the sequence of interest, and multi-segment ligation. As an alternative strategy we have developed and optimized a new protocol for assembling the cHA by exploiting Gibson Assembly. •This method also requires precise primer design, but it is rapid and methodologically simple to perform. We have evaluated that using this method it is possible to construct a cHA encoding DNA in less than a week.•Additional weeks are however necessary to optimize the production of pseudotyped lentiviral particles and to perform neutralization assays using them as surrogate antigens.•In comparison to the original protocols, we have also observed that performing parallel neutralization assays using pseudotypes harbouring the two parental HAs, permits effective delineation between stalk and head antibody responses in the samples tested.

  15. Pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Gert; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Halbherr, Stefan J

    2014-08-01

    Pseudotype viruses are useful for studying the envelope proteins of harmful viruses. This work describes the pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. VSV lacking the homotypic glycoprotein (G) gene (VSVΔG) was used to express haemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) or the combination of both. Propagation-competent pseudotype viruses were only obtained when HA and NA were expressed from the same vector genome. Pseudotype viruses containing HA from different H5 clades were neutralized specifically by immune sera directed against the corresponding clade. Fast and sensitive reading of test results was achieved by vector-mediated expression of GFP. Pseudotype viruses expressing a mutant VSV matrix protein showed restricted spread in IFN-competent cells. This pseudotype system will facilitate the detection of neutralizing antibodies against virulent influenza viruses, circumventing the need for high-level biosafety containment. © 2014 The Authors.

  16. Gibbon ape leukemia virus poorly replicates in primary human T lymphocytes: implications for safety testing of primary human T lymphocytes transduced with GALV-pseudotyped vectors.

    PubMed

    Lamers, Cor H J; Willemsen, Ralph A; van Elzakker, Pascal M M L; Gratama, Jan Willem; Debets, Reno

    2009-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration/Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research has defined that for retroviral gene therapy, the vector-producing cell, the vector preparation, and the ex vivo gene-transduced cells have to be tested for absence of replication-competent retrovirus (RCR) if the transduced cells are cultured for >4 days. We assessed the sensitivity of the "extended PG4(S+L-) assay" to detect gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) RCR, and applied this assay to measure GALV RCR spread in retrovirally transduced T cells. To this end, T cells were expanded for 12 days after transduction with a GALV-envelope pseudotyped retroviral vector expressing single chain variable fragment (anticarbonic anhydrase IX) in presence or absence of GALV RCR. Results showed that: (1) the "extended PG4(S+L-) assay" detects 1 focus-forming unit (ffu) GALV RCR and thus is applicable and sufficiently sensitive to screen human T-cell cultures for absence of infectious GALV RCR; (2) although GALV RCR infect human T cells, it very poorly replicate in T cells; (3) GALV RCR, when present at low levels immediately upon gene transduction (ie, 100 ffu/20x10 T cells in 100 mL), did not spread during a 12-day T-cell culture at clinical scale. Our observation that GALV RCR poorly spreads in primary human T-cell cultures questions the relevance of testing T-cell transductants for RCR on top of testing the vector-producing cells and the clinical vector batch for RCR and warrants evaluation of the current policy for safety testing of ex vivo retrovirally transduced T lymphocytes for GALV RCR.

  17. Development and characterization of an equine infectious anemia virus Env-pseudotyped reporter virus.

    PubMed

    Tallmadge, R L; Brindley, M A; Salmans, J; Mealey, R H; Maury, W; Carpenter, S

    2008-07-01

    We developed a replication-defective reporter virus pseudotyped with the envelope glycoprotein of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). The in vitro host range and neutralization phenotype of EIAV Env-pseudotyped virus were similar to those of replication-competent virus. An EIAV Env pseudovirus will improve antigenic characterization of viral variants and evaluation of lentivirus vaccines.

  18. Retroviral superinfection resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nethe, Micha; Berkhout, Ben; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C

    2005-01-01

    The retroviral phenomenon of superinfection resistance (SIR) defines an interference mechanism that is established after primary infection, preventing the infected cell from being superinfected by a similar type of virus. This review describes our present understanding of the underlying mechanisms of SIR established by three characteristic retroviruses: Murine Leukaemia Virus (MuLV), Foamy Virus (FV), and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). In addition, SIR is discussed with respect to HIV superinfection of humans. MuLV resistant mice exhibit two genetic resistance traits related to SIR. The cellular Fv4 gene expresses an Env related protein that establishes resistance against MuLV infection. Another mouse gene (Fv1) mediates MuLV resistance by expression of a sequence that is distantly related to Gag and that blocks the viral infection after the reverse transcription step. FVs induce two distinct mechanisms of superinfection resistance. First, expression of the Env protein results in SIR, probably by occupancy of the cellular receptors for FV entry. Second, an increase in the concentration of the viral Bet (Between-env-and-LTR-1-and-2) protein reduces proviral FV gene expression by inhibition of the transcriptional activator protein Tas (Transactivator of spumaviruses). In contrast to SIR in FV and MuLV infection, the underlying mechanism of SIR in HIV-infected cells is poorly understood. CD4 receptor down-modulation, a major characteristic of HIV-infected cells, has been proposed to be the main mechanism of SIR against HIV, but data have been contradictory. Several recent studies report the occurrence of HIV superinfection in humans; an event associated with the generation of recombinant HIV strains and possibly with increased disease progression. The role of SIR in protecting patients from HIV superinfection has not been studied so far. The phenomenon of SIR may also be important in the protection of primates that are vaccinated with live attenuated simian

  19. Retroviral infections of small animals.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Stephen P; Graham, Elizabeth

    2008-07-01

    Retroviral infections are particularly important in cats, which are commonly infected with feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus. This article describes the biology of these viruses and explores current issues regarding vaccination and diagnosis. The seeming lack of a recognized retrovirus infection in dogs is speculated on, and current and potential future therapies are discussed.

  20. Variable stability of a selectable provirus after retroviral vector gene transfer into human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, D J; Willis, R C; Friedmann, T

    1986-01-01

    Human lymphoblasts deficient in the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were infected with an amphotropic helper-free retroviral vector expressing human HPRT cDNA. The stability and expression of the HPRT provirus in five cell lines with different proviral integration sites were examined by determining HPRT mutation and reversion frequencies and by blot hybridization studies. Mutation to the HPRT-negative phenotype occurred at frequencies of approximately 4 X 10(-5) to 3 X 10(-6) per generation. Most mutations in each of the five cell lines were associated with partial or complete deletions or rearrangements of the provirus. Several mutants retained a grossly intact HPRT provirus, and in one such mutant HPRT shutdown resulted from a revertible epigenetic mechanism that was not associated with global changes in proviral methylation. Therefore, mutation and shutdown of the HPRT provirus in human lymphoblasts result from mechanisms similar to those reported for several other avian and mammalian replication-competent retroviruses. Images PMID:3023873

  1. The use of pseudotypes to study viruses, virus sero-epidemiology and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Emma M; Mather, Stuart T; Temperton, Nigel J

    2015-06-12

    The globalization of the world's economies, accompanied by increasing international travel, changing climates, altered human behaviour and demographics is leading to the emergence of different viral diseases, many of which are highly pathogenic and hence are considered of great public and animal health importance. To undertake basic research and therapeutic development, many of these viruses require handling by highly trained staff in BSL-3/4 facilities not readily available to the majority of the global R&D community. In order to circumvent the enhanced biosafety requirement, the development of non-pathogenic, replication-defective pseudotyped viruses is an effective and established solution to permit the study of many aspects of virus biology in a low containment biosafety level (BSL)-1/2 laboratory. Under the spectre of the unfolding Ebola crisis, this timely conference (the second to be organised by the Viral Pseudotype Unit, www.viralpseudotypeunit.info*) discusses the recent advances in pseudotype technology and how it is revolutionizing the study of important human and animal pathogens (human and avian influenza viruses, rabies/lyssaviruses, HIV, Marburg and Ebola viruses). Key topics addressed in this conference include the exploitation of pseudotypes for serology and serosurveillance, immunogenicity testing of current and next-generation vaccines and new pseudotype assay formats (multiplexing, kit development). The first pseudotype-focused Euroscicon conference organised by the Viral Pseudotype Unit was recently reviewed [1]. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Pseudotype-Based Neutralization Assays for Influenza: A Systematic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carnell, George William; Ferrara, Francesca; Grehan, Keith; Thompson, Craig Peter; Temperton, Nigel James

    2015-01-01

    The use of vaccination against the influenza virus remains the most effective method of mitigating the significant morbidity and mortality caused by this virus. Antibodies elicited by currently licensed influenza vaccines are predominantly hemagglutination-inhibition (HI)-competent antibodies that target the globular head of hemagglutinin (HA) thus inhibiting influenza virus entry into target cells. These antibodies predominantly confer homosubtypic/strain specific protection and only rarely confer heterosubtypic protection. However, recent academia or pharma-led R&D toward the production of a “universal vaccine” has centered on the elicitation of antibodies directed against the stalk of the influenza HA that has been shown to confer broad protection across a range of different subtypes (H1–H16). The accurate and sensitive measurement of antibody responses elicited by these “next-generation” influenza vaccines is, however, hampered by the lack of sensitivity of the traditional influenza serological assays HI, single radial hemolysis, and microneutralization. Assays utilizing pseudotypes, chimeric viruses bearing influenza glycoproteins, have been shown to be highly efficient for the measurement of homosubtypic and heterosubtypic broadly neutralizing antibodies, making them ideal serological tools for the study of cross-protective responses against multiple influenza subtypes with pandemic potential. In this review, we will analyze and compare literature involving the production of influenza pseudotypes with particular emphasis on their use in serum antibody neutralization assays. This will enable us to establish the parameters required for optimization and propose a consensus protocol to be employed for the further deployment of these assays in influenza vaccine immunogenicity studies. PMID:25972865

  3. Role of Murine Leukemia Virus Reverse Transcriptase Deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphate-Binding Site in Retroviral Replication and In Vivo Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Halvas, Elias K.; Svarovskaia, Evguenia S.; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral populations exhibit a high evolutionary potential, giving rise to extensive genetic variation. Error-prone DNA synthesis catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT) generates variation in retroviral populations. Structural features within RTs are likely to contribute to the high rate of errors that occur during reverse transcription. We sought to determine whether amino acids within murine leukemia virus (MLV) RT that contact the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate are important for in vivo fidelity of reverse transcription. We utilized the previously described ANGIE P encapsidating cell line, which expresses the amphotropic MLV envelope and a retroviral vector (pGA-1). pGA-1 expresses the bacterial β-galactosidase gene (lacZ), which serves as a reporter of mutations. Extensive mutagenesis was performed on residues likely to interact with the dNTP substrate, and the effects of these mutations on the fidelity of reverse transcription were determined. As expected, most substitution mutations of amino acids that directly interact with the dNTP substrate significantly reduced viral titers (>10,000-fold), indicating that these residues played a critical role in catalysis and viral replication. However, the D153A and A154S substitutions, which are predicted to affect the interactions with the triphosphate, resulted in statistically significant increases in the mutation rate. In addition, the conservative substitution F155W, which may affect interactions with the base and the ribose, increased the mutation rate 2.8-fold. Substitutions of residues in the vicinity of the dNTP-binding site also resulted in statistically significant decreases in fidelity (1.3- to 2.4-fold). These results suggest that mutations of residues that contact the substrate dNTP can affect viral replication as well as alter the fidelity of reverse transcription. PMID:11044079

  4. RETROVIRAL INTEGRASE: THEN AND NOW

    PubMed Central

    Andrake, Mark D.; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    The retroviral integrases are virally encoded, specialized recombinases that catalyze the insertion of viral DNA into the host cell’s DNA, a process that is essential for virus propagation. We have learned a great deal since the existence of an integrated form of retroviral DNA (the provirus) was first proposed by Howard Temin in 1964. Initial studies focused on the genetics and biochemistry of avian and murine virus DNA integration, but the pace of discovery increased substantially with advances in technology, and an influx of investigators focused on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We begin with a brief account of the scientific landscape in which some of the earliest discoveries were made, and summarize research that led to our current understanding of the biochemistry of integration. A more detailed account of recent analyses of integrase structure follows, as they have provided valuable insights into enzyme function and raised important new questions. PMID:26958915

  5. Extensive retroviral diversity in shark.

    PubMed

    Han, Guan-Zhu

    2015-04-28

    Retroviruses infect a wide range of vertebrates. However, little is known about the diversity of retroviruses in basal vertebrates. Endogenous retrovirus (ERV) provides a valuable resource to study the ecology and evolution of retrovirus. I performed a genome-scale screening for ERVs in the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii) and identified three complete or nearly complete ERVs and many short ERV fragments. I designate these retroviral elements "C. milli ERVs" (CmiERVs). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the CmiERVs form three distinct lineages. The genome invasions by these retroviruses are estimated to take place more than 50 million years ago. My results reveal the extensive retroviral diversity in the elephant shark. Diverse retroviruses appear to have been associated with cartilaginous fishes for millions of years. These findings have important implications in understanding the diversity and evolution of retroviruses.

  6. Differential diagnosis of feline leukemia virus subgroups using pseudotype viruses expressing green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Megumi; Sato, Eiji; Miura, Tomoyuki; Baba, Kenji; Shimoda, Tetsuya; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2010-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is classified into three receptor interference subgroups, A, B and C. In this study, to differentiate FeLV subgroups, we developed a simple assay system using pseudotype viruses expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). We prepared gfp pseudotype viruses, named gfp(FeLV-A), gfp(FeLV-B) and gfp(FeLV-C) harboring envelopes of FeLV-A, B and C, respectively. The gfp pseudotype viruses completely interfered with the same subgroups of FeLV reference strains on FEA cells (a feline embryonic fibroblast cell line). We also confirmed that the pseudotype viruses could differentiate FeLV subgroups in field isolates. The assay will be useful for differential diagnosis of FeLV subgroups in veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the future.

  7. Retroviral Oncogenes: A Historical Primer

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    Retroviruses are the original source of oncogenes. The discovery and characterization of these genes were made possible by the introduction of quantitative cell biological and molecular techniques for the study of tumor viruses. Key features of all retroviral oncogenes were first identified in src, the oncogene of Rous sarcoma virus. These include non-involvement in viral replication, coding for a single protein, and cellular origin. The myc, ras and erbB oncogenes quickly followed src, and these together with pi3k are now recognized as critical driving forces in human cancer. PMID:22898541

  8. Continuum Theory of Retroviral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Bruinsma, R. F.; Gelbart, W. M.

    2006-02-01

    We present a self-assembly phase diagram for the shape of retroviral capsids, based on continuum elasticity theory. The spontaneous curvature of the capsid proteins drives a weakly first-order transition from spherical to spherocylindrical shapes. The conical capsid shape which characterizes the HIV-1 retrovirus is never stable under unconstrained energy minimization. Only under conditions of fixed volume and/or fixed spanning length can the conical shape be a minimum energy structure. Our results indicate that, unlike the capsids of small viruses, retrovirus capsids are not uniquely determined by the molecular structure of the constituent proteins but depend in an essential way on physical constraints present during assembly.

  9. Selective transduction of astrocytic and neuronal CNS subpopulations by lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with Chikungunya virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Dieringer, Michael; Poh, Xuan Ying; Sanchez-Garrido, Julia; Gao, Yunan; Sgourou, Argyro; Simmons, Laura E; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2017-04-01

    Lentiviral vectors are gene delivery vehicles that integrate into the host genome of dividing and non-dividing mammalian cells facilitating long-term transgene expression. Lentiviral vector versatility is greatly increased by incorporating heterologous viral envelope proteins onto the vector particles instead of the native envelope, conferring on these pseudotyped vectors a modified tropism and host range specificity. We investigated the pseudotyping efficiency of HIV-1 based lentiviral vectors with alphaviral envelope proteins from the Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV-G) and Sindbis Virus (SINV-G). Following vector production optimisation, titres for the CHIKV-G pseudotype were comparable to the VSV-G pseudotype but those for the SINV-G pseudotype were significantly lower. High titre CHIKV-G pseudotyped vector efficiently transduced various human and mouse neural cell lines and normal human astrocytes (NHA) in vitro. Although transduction was broad, tropism for NHAs was observed. In vivo stereotaxic delivery in striatum, thalamus and hippocampus respectively in the adult rat brain revealed localised transduction restricted to striatal astrocytes and hippocampal dentate granule neurons. Transduction of different subtypes of granule neurons from precursor to post-mitotic stages of differentiation was evident in the sub-granular zone and dentate granule cell layer. No significant inflammatory response was observed, but comparable to that of VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vectors. Robust long-term expression followed for three months post-transduction along with absence of neuroinflammation, coupled to the selective and unique neuron/glial tropism indicates that these vectors could be useful for modelling and gene therapy studies in the CNS.

  10. A scalable method to concentrate lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with measles virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Marino, M P; Panigaj, M; Ou, W; Manirarora, J; Wei, C-H; Reiser, J

    2015-03-01

    Lentiviral (LV) vectors have emerged as powerful tools for basic research and clinical applications because of their ability to stably transduce both dividing and nondividing cells. A wide range of viral envelope (Env) glycoproteins have the ability to associate with the membrane of LV vectors, a process that is referred to as pseudotyping. Pseudotyped vectors have the capacity to transduce specific cell types for specific applications. For example, LV vectors pseudotyped with the measles virus (MV)-derived hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins have the ability to transduce quiescent lymphocytes. In addition, the MV H glycoprotein can be engineered allowing cell-specific targeting of LV vectors. One problem with MV glycoprotein-pseudotyped LV vectors is low titer during vector production. This results in the need to manufacture large volumes of the vectors and to concentrate them to appropriate titers. The commonly used centrifugation-based concentration techniques for LV vectors are not practical for large-scale vector manufacturing. Thus, there is a need for improved methods to concentrate LV vectors. In this study, we adapted an anion-exchange membrane chromatography method that we previously used in the context of LV vectors pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein to concentate MV glycoprotein-pseudotyped LV vectors. Up to 60% of the input vectors with an up to 5300-fold reduction in volume was achieved using this anion-exchange chromatography method in conjunction with a desalting/concentration step involving centrifugal filter units. This technique provides a rapid and scalable approach for concentrating MV-pseudotyped LV vectors that does not require an elaborate setup.

  11. Feasibility of retroviral vector-mediated in utero gene transfer to the fetal rabbit.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Rafael; Rosal, Marta; Cabero, Lluis; Gratacós, Eduard; Aran, Josep M

    2005-01-01

    Successful treatment or prevention of severe hereditary diseases could conceivably be achieved by genetic intervention early in development. Viral vector-mediated fetal gene transfer is proving a valuable tool to test the above concept in relevant animal models. Although the pregnant rabbit is a well-recognized model for fetal therapy, few preclinical assays have used it to validate fetal gene transfer approaches. In this preliminary study we assessed for the first time the feasibility of retroviral vector-mediated in utero gene transfer in the fetal rabbit. Different amounts of the vesicular stomatitis virus G pseudotyped MFG(nls)LacZ retroviral vector, expressing a nuclear-localized beta-galactosidase reporter protein were injected intraperitoneally and -hepatically into 20- to 22-day-old fetuses. At 8-9 days post-treatment, the pups were sacrificed and the tissues harvested for analysis. Evidence of gene transfer was obtained by PCR amplification of proviral sequences within genomic DNA isolated from the treated samples. Transgenic beta-galactosidase expression was assessed by X-gal histochemical staining. By intraperitoneal injection 43% of the viable fetuses treated (3/7) showed evidence of successful LacZ gene transfer and low-level beta-galactosidase expression into liver and heart, whereas by intrahepatic injection roughly 38% (3/8) of the livers were positive for LacZ gene transfer and expression. The success rate for the viable fetuses rose to 67% positive livers (4/6) when a near double amount of recombinant virus was injected using a 10-fold concentrated virus stock. In terms of short-term safety, fetal and maternal survival rates approached 80% of treated fetuses, and 100% of treated does. The pregnant rabbit is a useful and reliable model allowing the design of further studies to optimize the conditions for effective, safer, and persistent retroviral vector-mediated fetal gene transfer. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The prM-independent packaging of pseudotyped Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Jung; Min, Kyung-Il; Lee, Jungeun; Kang, Sin-Hyung; Jeon, Wonkyung; Nam, Jae Hwan; Ju, Young Ran; Kim, Young Bong

    2009-07-30

    As noted in other flaviviruses, the envelope (E) protein of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) interacts with a cellular receptor and mediates membrane fusion to allow viral entry into target cells, thus eliciting neutralizing antibody response. The formation of the flavivirus prM/E complex is followed by the cleavage of precursor membrane (prM) and membrane (M) protein by a cellular signalase. To test the effect of prM in JEV biology, we constructed JEV-MuLV pseudotyped viruses that express the prM/E protein or E only. The infectivity and titers of JEV pseudotyped viruses were examined in several cell lines. We also analyzed the neutralizing capacities with anti-JEV sera from JEV-immunized mice. Even though prM is crucial for multiple stages of JEV biology, the JEV-pseudotyped viruses produced with prM/E or with E only showed similar infectivity and titers in several cell lines and similar neutralizing sensitivity. These results showed that JEV-MuLV pseudotyped viruses did not require prM for production of infectious pseudotyped viruses.

  13. High-throughput screening of viral entry inhibitors using pseudotyped virus.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arnab; Mills, Debra M; Bowlin, Terry L

    2010-12-01

    Virus entry into a host cell is an attractive target for therapy because propagation of virus can be blocked at an early stage, minimizing chances for the virus to acquire drug resistance. Anti-infective drug discovery for BSL-4 viruses like Ebola or Lassa hemorrhagic fever virus presents challenges due to the requirement for a BSL-4 laboratory containment facility. Pseudotyped viruses provide a surrogate model in which the native envelope glycoprotein of a BSL-2 level virus (e.g., vesicular stomatitis virus) is replaced with envelope glycoprotein of a foreign BSL-4 virus (e.g., Ebola virus). Because the envelope glycoprotein determines interaction of virus with its cellular receptors, pseudotyped viruses can mimic the viral entry process of the original virus. Moreover, they are competent for only a single cycle of infection, and therefore can be used in BSL-2 facilities. Pseudotyped viruses have been used in high-throughput screening of entry inhibitors for a number of BSL-4 level viruses. This unit includes protocols for preparing pseudotyped viruses using lentiviral vectors and use of pseudotyped viruses for high-throughput screening of viral entry inhibitors.

  14. Non-Retroviral Fossils in Vertebrate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Masayuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2011-01-01

    Although no physical fossils of viruses have been found, retroviruses are known to leave their molecular fossils in the genomes of their hosts, the so-called endogenous retroviral elements. These have provided us with important information about retroviruses in the past and their co-evolution with their hosts. On the other hand, because non-retroviral viruses were considered not to leave such fossils, even the existence of prehistoric non-retroviral viruses has been enigmatic. Recently, we discovered that elements derived from ancient bornaviruses, non-segmented, negative strand RNA viruses, are found in the genomes of several mammalian species, including humans. In addition, at approximately the same time, several endogenous elements of RNA viruses, DNA viruses and reverse-transcribing DNA viruses have been independently reported, which revealed that non-retroviral viruses have played significant roles in the evolution of their hosts and provided novel insights into virology and cell biology. Here we review non-retroviral virus-like elements in vertebrate genomes, non-retroviral integration and the knowledge obtained from these endogenous non-retroviral virus-like elements. PMID:22069518

  15. Retroviral Replicating Vectors Deliver Cytosine Deaminase Leading to Targeted 5-Fluorouracil-Mediated Cytotoxicity in Multiple Human Cancer Types.

    PubMed

    Twitty, Chris G; Diago, Oscar R; Hogan, Daniel J; Burrascano, Cindy; Ibanez, Carlos E; Jolly, Douglas J; Ostertag, Derek

    2016-02-01

    Toca 511 is a modified retroviral replicating vector based on Moloney γ-retrovirus with an amphotropic envelope. As an investigational cancer treatment, Toca 511 preferentially infects cancer cells without direct cell lysis and encodes an enhanced yeast cytosine deaminase that converts the antifungal drug 5-fluorocytosine to the anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil. A panel of established human cancer cell lines, derived from glioblastoma, colon, and breast cancer tissue, was used to evaluate parameters critical for effective anticancer activity. Gene transfer, cytosine deaminase production, conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil, and subsequent cell killing occurred in all lines tested. We observed >50% infection within 25 days in all lines and 5-fluorocytosine LD50 values between 0.02 and 6 μg/ml. Although we did not identify a small number of key criteria, these studies do provide a straightforward approach to rapidly gauge the probability of a Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine treatment effect in various cancer indications: a single MTS assay of maximally infected cancer cell lines to determine 5-fluorocytosine LD50. The data suggest that, although there can be variation in susceptibility to Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine because of multiple mechanistic factors, this therapy may be applicable to a broad range of cancer types and individuals.

  16. Retroviral Replicating Vectors Deliver Cytosine Deaminase Leading to Targeted 5-Fluorouracil-Mediated Cytotoxicity in Multiple Human Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Twitty, Chris G.; Diago, Oscar R.; Hogan, Daniel J.; Burrascano, Cindy; Ibanez, Carlos E.; Jolly, Douglas J.; Ostertag, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Toca 511 is a modified retroviral replicating vector based on Moloney γ-retrovirus with an amphotropic envelope. As an investigational cancer treatment, Toca 511 preferentially infects cancer cells without direct cell lysis and encodes an enhanced yeast cytosine deaminase that converts the antifungal drug 5-fluorocytosine to the anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil. A panel of established human cancer cell lines, derived from glioblastoma, colon, and breast cancer tissue, was used to evaluate parameters critical for effective anticancer activity. Gene transfer, cytosine deaminase production, conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil, and subsequent cell killing occurred in all lines tested. We observed >50% infection within 25 days in all lines and 5-fluorocytosine LD50 values between 0.02 and 6 μg/ml. Although we did not identify a small number of key criteria, these studies do provide a straightforward approach to rapidly gauge the probability of a Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine treatment effect in various cancer indications: a single MTS assay of maximally infected cancer cell lines to determine 5-fluorocytosine LD50. The data suggest that, although there can be variation in susceptibility to Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine because of multiple mechanistic factors, this therapy may be applicable to a broad range of cancer types and individuals. PMID:26467507

  17. Comparison of lentiviruses pseudotyped with S proteins from coronaviruses and cell tropisms of porcine coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Deng, Feng; Ye, Gang; Dong, Wanyu; Zheng, Anjun; He, Qigai; Peng, Guiqing

    2016-02-01

    The surface glycoproteins of coronaviruses play an important role in receptor binding and cell entry. Different coronaviruses interact with their specific receptors to enter host cells. Lentiviruses pseudotyped with their spike proteins (S) were compared to analyze the entry efficiency of various coronaviruses. Our results indicated that S proteins from different coronaviruses displayed varied abilities to mediate pseudotyped virus infection. Furthermore, the cell tropisms of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) have been characterized by live and pseudotyped viruses. Both live and pseudoviruses could infected Vero- CCL-81 (monkey kidney), Huh-7 (human liver), and PK-15 (pig kidney) cells efficiently. CCL94 (cat kidney) cells could be infected efficiently by TGEV but not PEDV. Overall, our study provides new insights into the mechanisms of viral entry and forms a basis for antiviral drug screening.

  18. Use of influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF for generation of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes.

    PubMed

    Hanika, Andrea; Larisch, Birthe; Steinmann, Eike; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Herrler, Georg; Zimmer, Gert

    2005-05-01

    Influenza C virus contains two envelope glycoproteins: CM2, a putative ion channel protein; and HEF, a unique multifunctional protein that performs receptor-binding, receptor-destroying and fusion activities. Here, it is demonstrated that expression of HEF is sufficient to pseudotype replication-incompetent vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) that lacks the VSV glycoprotein (G) gene. The pseudotyped virus showed characteristic features of influenza C virus with respect to proteolytic activation, receptor usage and cell tropism. Chimeric glycoproteins composed of HEF ectodomain and VSV-G C-terminal domains were efficiently incorporated into VSV particles and showed receptor-binding and receptor-destroying activities but, unlike authentic HEF, did not mediate efficient infection, probably because of impaired fusion activity. HEF-pseudotyped VSV efficiently infected polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells via the apical plasma membrane, whereas entry of VSV-G-complemented virus was restricted to the basolateral membrane. These findings suggest that pseudotyping of viral vectors with HEF might be useful for efficient apical gene transfer into polarized epithelial cells and for targeting cells that express 9-O-acetylated sialic acids.

  19. Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV)-based Coronavirus Spike-pseudotyped Particle Production and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Jean Kaoru; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2016-01-01

    Viral pseudotyped particles (pp) are enveloped virus particles, typically derived from retroviruses or rhabdoviruses, that harbor heterologous envelope glycoproteins on their surface and a genome lacking essential genes. These synthetic viral particles are safer surrogates of native viruses and acquire the tropism and host entry pathway characteristics governed by the heterologous envelope glycoprotein used. They have proven to be very useful tools used in research with many applications, such as enabling the study of entry pathways of enveloped viruses and to generate effective gene-delivery vectors. The basis for their generation lies in the capacity of some viruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), to incorporate envelope glycoproteins of other viruses into a pseudotyped virus particle. These can be engineered to contain reporter genes such as luciferase, enabling quantification of virus entry events upon pseudotyped particle infection with susceptible cells. Here, we detail a protocol enabling generation of MLV-based pseudotyped particles, using the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) spike (S) as an example of a heterologous envelope glycoprotein to be incorporated. We also describe how these particles are used to infect susceptible cells and to perform a quantitative infectivity readout by a luciferase assay. PMID:28018942

  20. Pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus for analysis of virus entry mediated by SARS coronavirus spike proteins.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Shuetsu; Watanabe, Rie; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2008-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) contains a spike (S) protein that binds to a receptor molecule (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2; ACE2), induces membrane fusion, and serves as a neutralizing epitope. To study the functions of the S protein, we describe here the generation of SARS-CoV S protein-bearing vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotype using a VSVdeltaG*/GFP system in which the G gene is replaced by the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene (VSV-SARS-CoV-St19/GFP). Partial deletion of the cytoplasmic domain of SARS-CoV S protein (SARS-CoV-St19) allowed efficient incorporation into the VSV particle that enabled the generation of a high titer of pseudotype virus. Neutralization assay with anti-SARS-CoV antibody revealed that VSV-SARS-St19/GFP pseudotype infection is mediated by SARS-CoV S protein. The VSVdeltaaG*/SEAP system, which secretes alkaline phosphatase instead of GFP, was also generated as a VSV pseudotype having SARS-CoV S protein (VSV-SARS-CoV-St19/SEAP). This system enabled high-throughput analysis of SARS-CoV S protein-mediated cell entry by measuring alkaline phosphatase activity. Thus, VSV pseudotyped with SARS-CoV S protein is useful for developing a rapid detection system for neutralizing antibody specific for SARS-CoV infection as well as studying the S-mediated cell entry of SARS-CoV.

  1. Introducing a cleavable signal peptide enhances the packaging efficiency of lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with Japanese encephalitis virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanyang; Wu, Rui; Yuan, Lei; Tian, Geng; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Ma, Xiaoping; Huang, Yong; Yan, Qigui; Zhao, Qin; Cao, Sanjie; Wen, Xintian

    2017-02-02

    Research into the properties of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) has been facilitated by use of pseudotyped viruses. The signal peptide is a key determinant for membrane targeting and membrane insertion, which could affect packaging of pseudotyped viruses. In this study, we generated three lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with JEV envelope proteins that co-express either a strong signal peptide from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G (VSVMEpv) or a weak signal peptide of JEV (SPMEpv), or a virus without a signal peptide in front of the JEV prM/E (MEpv). Western blot demonstrated that JEV E protein and HIV p24 were present in the same particles of the three pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors. Electron microscopy revealed that the three pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors were 120-180nm in diameter. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that the titer of VSVMEpv was 17-fold higher than that of MEpv, while the titer of SPMEpv was six-fold higher than that of MEpv. Inclusion of a signal peptide enhanced packaging efficiency of pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors. With a strong signal peptide helping they generate a higher number of viral particles. Green fluorescent protein and luciferase expression showed that the transduction titer or relative fluorescence units of VSVMEpv, SPMEpv and MEpv were not significantly different. We suggest that the signal peptide does not influence the infectivity of pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors. In addition, our findings indicated that pseudotyped JEVs show preferential tropism for BHK-21 cells, supporting the mimic function displayed by parental JEV. Therefore, our study provided a cost-effective method to generate pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors, which may represent a valid model to investigate some of the infectious properties of JEV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Retroviral Diversity and Distribution in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Herniou, Elisabeth; Martin, Joanne; Miller, Karen; Cook, James; Wilkinson, Mark; Tristem, Michael

    1998-01-01

    We used the PCR to screen for the presence of endogenous retroviruses within the genomes of 18 vertebrate orders across eight classes, concentrating on reptilian, amphibian, and piscine hosts. Thirty novel retroviral sequences were isolated and characterized by sequencing approximately 1 kb of their encoded protease and reverse transcriptase genes. Isolation of novel viruses from so many disparate hosts suggests that retroviruses are likely to be ubiquitous within all but the most basal vertebrate classes and, furthermore, gives a good indication of the overall retroviral diversity within vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that viruses clustering with (but not necessarily closely related to) the spumaviruses and murine leukemia viruses are widespread and abundant in vertebrate genomes. In contrast, we were unable to identify any viruses from hosts outside of mammals and birds which grouped with the other five currently recognized retroviral genera: the lentiviruses, human T-cell leukemia-related viruses, avian leukemia virus-related retroviruses, type D retroviruses, and mammalian type B retroviruses. There was also some indication that viruses isolated from individual vertebrate classes tended to cluster together in phylogenetic reconstructions. This implies that the horizontal transmission of at least some retroviruses, between some vertebrate classes, occurs relatively infrequently. It is likely that many of the retroviral sequences described here are distinct enough from those of previously characterized viruses to represent novel retroviral genera. PMID:9621058

  3. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-11-09

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general.

  4. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  5. Pseudotyped adeno-associated viral vector tropism and transduction efficiencies in murine wound healing.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Sundeep G; Balaji, Swathi; Le, Louis; Leung, Alice; Lim, Foong-Yen; Habli, Mounira; Jones, Helen N; Wilson, James M; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2012-01-01

    Cell specific gene transfer and sustained transgene expression are goals of cutaneous gene therapy for tissue repair and regeneration. Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2/2) mediated gene transfer to the skin results in stable transgene expression in the muscle fascicles of the panniculus carnosus in mice, with minimal gene transfer to the dermal or epidermal elements. We hypothesized that pseudotyped AAV vectors may have a unique and characteristic tropism and transduction efficiency profile for specific cells in the cutaneous wounds. We compared transduction efficiencies of cells in the epidermis, cells in the dermis, and the fascicles of the panniculus carnosus by AAV2/2 and three pseudotyped AAV vectors, AAV2/5, AAV2/7, and AAV2/8 in a murine excisional wound model. AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 result in significantly enhanced transduction of cells both in the epidermis and the dermis compared to AAV2/2. AAV2/5 transduces both the basilar and supra-basilar keratinocytes. In contrast, AAV2/8 transduces mainly supra-basilar keratinocytes. Both AAV2/7 and AAV2/8 result in more efficient gene transfer to the muscular panniculus carnosus compared to AAV2/2. The capsid of the different pseudotyped AAV vectors produces distinct tropism and efficiency profiles in the murine wound healing model. Both AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 administration result in significantly enhanced gene transfer. To further characterize cell specific transduction and tropism profiles of the AAV pseudotyped vectors, we performed in vitro experiments using human and mouse primary dermal fibroblasts. Our data demonstrate that pseudotyping strategy confers a differential transduction of dermal fibroblasts, with higher transduction of both human and murine cells by AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 at early and later time points. At later time points, AAV2/2 demonstrates increased transduction. Interestingly, AAV2/8 appears to be more efficacious in transducing human cells as compared to AAV2/5. The pseudotype-specific pattern of

  6. A Replication-Competent Retrovirus Arising from a Split-Function Packaging Cell Line Was Generated by Recombination Events between the Vector, One of the Packaging Constructs, and Endogenous Retroviral Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Heung; Starkey, William; Vile, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    Previously we reported the presence of a replication-competent retrovirus in supernatant from a vector-producing line derived from a widely used split-function amphotropic packaging cell line. Rigorous routine screening of all retroviral stocks produced in our laboratory has not, previously or since, indicated the presence of such a virus. Replication-competent retroviruses have never previously been used in our laboratory, and stringent screening of all routinely used cell lines has not revealed the presence of any helper viruses. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that this virus represents an adventitious cross-contaminant or had been imported unknowingly with our cell line stocks. PCR studies with DNA from infected cell lines and Northern blot analysis and reverse transcriptase PCR with RNA from infected cells suggest that the helper virus arose by recombination events, at sites of partial homology, between sequences in the vector, one of the packaging constructs, and endogenous retroviral elements. These recombinations were not present in stocks of the packaging cell line or in an initial stock of the vector-producing line, indicating that these events occurred while the vector-producing line was being passaged for harvest of supernatant stocks. PMID:9525583

  7. Package of NDV-pseudotyped HIV-Luc virus and its application in the neutralization assay for NDV infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Bin; Liu, Peixin; Li, Tao; Si, Wei; Xiu, Jinsheng; Liu, Henggui

    2014-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is a member of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily and can infect most species of birds. It has been a great threat for the poultry industry all around the world. In this report, we successfully produced infectious pseudotyped pNL4-3-Luc-R(-)E(-) (HIV-Luc) viruses with the HN and F envelope proteins of NDV. Further investigation revealed the cytoplasmic domains of HN and F, especially HN, plays a significant role in the infection efficiency of these pseudotyped HIV-Luc viruses. Replacement of, or direct fusion to the cytoplasmic domain of the HN protein by that of vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) could greatly enhance or destroy the infective potential of HN and F-pseudotyped (NDV-pseudotyped) HIV-Luc virus. We further established a novel neutralization assay to evaluate neutralizing antibodies against NDV with the NDV-pseudotyped HIV-Luc viruses. Comparative neutralization data indicate that the results determined by using the NDV-pseudotyped HIV-Luc viruses are as reliable as those by the conventional virus-neutralization assay (VN test) with native NDV. Moreover, the results show that the novel neutralization assay is more sensitive than the VN test.

  8. Preparation of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotype with Chikungunya virus envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Tong, W; Yin, X-X; Lee, B-J; Li, Y-G

    2015-06-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes Chikungunya fever (CHIKF) in millions of people mainly in developing countries. CHIKF is characterized by high fever, fatigue, headache, nausea, vomiting, rash, myalgia and severe arthralgia. To date, there is no specific treatment and no licensed vaccine against CHIKV infection. In this study, we developed a safe, efficient and easy neutralization assay of CHIKV based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotype with CHIKV envelope protein and the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or luciferase as reporter gene, which could be used under a reduced safety level. The VSV pseudotype can be applied to the epidemic survey by measuring the expression of GFP or luciferase activity in infected cells. This system can also be used to study the mechanisms of virus entry.

  9. Complement inhibition enables tumor delivery of LCMV glycoprotein pseudotyped viruses in the presence of antiviral antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Evgin, Laura; Ilkow, Carolina S; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; de Souza, Christiano Tanese; Stubbert, Lawton; Huh, Michael S; Jennings, Victoria A; Marguerie, Monique; Acuna, Sergio A; Keller, Brian A; Lefebvre, Charles; Falls, Theresa; Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Auer, Rebecca A; Lambris, John D; McCart, J Andrea; Stojdl, David F; Bell, John C

    2016-01-01

    The systemic delivery of therapeutic viruses, such as oncolytic viruses or vaccines, is limited by the generation of neutralizing antibodies. While pseudotyping of rhabdoviruses with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein has previously allowed for multiple rounds of delivery in mice, this strategy has not translated to other animal models. For the first time, we provide experimental evidence that antibodies generated against the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein mediate robust complement-dependent viral neutralization via activation of the classical pathway. We show that this phenotype can be capitalized upon to deliver maraba virus pseudotyped with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein in a Fischer rat model in the face of neutralizing antibody through the use of complement modulators. This finding changes the understanding of the humoral immune response to arenaviruses, and also describes methodology to deliver viral vectors to their therapeutic sites of action without the interference of neutralizing antibody. PMID:27909702

  10. Intrapulmonary Versus Nasal Transduction of Murine Airways With GP64-pseudotyped Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Mayumi; Maury, Wendy; McCray, Paul B; Sinn, Patrick L

    2013-01-01

    Persistent viral vector-mediated transgene expression in the airways requires delivery to cells with progenitor capacity and avoidance of immune responses. Previously, we observed that GP64-pseudotyped feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-mediated gene transfer was more efficient in the nasal airways than the large airways of the murine lung. We hypothesized that in vivo gene transfer was limited by immunological and physiological barriers in the murine intrapulmonary airways. Here, we systematically investigate multiple potential barriers to lentiviral gene transfer in the airways of mice. We show that GP64-FIV vector transduced primary cultures of well-differentiated murine nasal epithelia with greater efficiency than primary cultures of murine tracheal epithelia. We further demonstrate that neutrophils, type I interferon (IFN) responses, as well as T and B lymphocytes are not the major factors limiting the transduction of murine conducting airways. In addition, we observed better transduction of GP64-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in the nasal epithelia compared with the intrapulmonary airways in mice. VSVG glycoprotein pseudotyped VSV transduced intrapulmonary epithelia with similar efficiency as nasal epithelia. Our results suggest that the differential transduction efficiency of nasal versus intrapulmonary airways by FIV vector is not a result of immunological barriers or surface area, but rather differential expression of cellular factors specific for FIV vector transduction. PMID:23360952

  11. A recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus expressing the envelope glycoprotein of Hantaan virus induced protective immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hantaviruses cause acute hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Currently, several types of inactivated HFRS vaccines are widely used, however the limited ability of these immunogen to elicit neutralizing antibodies restricts vaccine efficacy. Development of an effective vaccine to overcome this weakness is must. Methods In the present study, a recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus bearing the hantaan virus (HTNV) envelope glycoproteins (GP), rLV-M, was constructed. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the rLV-M and a series of immunological assays were conducted to determine the immunogenicity of the recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus. The humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by rLV-M were compared with those of the inactivated HFRS vaccine. Results Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) showed the rLV-M expressed target proteins in HEK-293cells. In mice, the rLV-M efficiently induced GP-specific humoral responses and protection against HTNV infection. Furthermore, the rLV-M induced higher neutralizing antibody titers than the inactivated HFRS vaccine control. Conclusions The results indicated the potential of using a pseudotyped lentivirus as a delivery vector for a hantavirus vaccine immunogen. PMID:24093752

  12. Influenza M2 envelope protein augments avian influenza hemagglutinin pseudotyping of lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    McKay, T; Patel, M; Pickles, R J; Johnson, L G; Olsen, J C

    2006-04-01

    Lentivirus-based gene transfer has the potential to efficiently deliver DNA-based therapies into non-dividing epithelial cells of the airway for the treatment of lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. However, significant barriers both to lung-specific gene transfer and to production of lentivirus vectors must be overcome before these vectors can be routinely used for applications to the lung. In this study, we investigated whether the ability to produce lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with fowl plague virus hemagglutinin (HA) could be improved by co-expression of influenza virus M2 in vector-producing cells. We found that M2 expression led to a 10-30-fold increase in production of HA-pseudotyped lentivirus vectors based upon equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Experiments using the M2 inhibitor amantadine and a drug-resistant mutant of M2 established that the ion channel activity of M2 was important for M2-dependent augmentation of vector production. Furthermore, the neuraminidase activity necessary for particle release from producer cells could also be incorporated into producer cells by co-expression of influenza NA cDNA. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with influenza envelope proteins were able to efficiently transduce via the apical membrane of polarized mouse tracheal cultures in vitro as well as mouse tracheal epithelia in vivo.

  13. Quantification of Lyssavirus-Neutralizing Antibodies Using Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotype Particles

    PubMed Central

    Moeschler, Sarah; Locher, Samira; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Krämer, Beate; Zimmer, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a highly fatal zoonotic disease which is primarily caused by rabies virus (RABV) although other members of the genus Lyssavirus can cause rabies as well. As yet, 14 serologically and genetically diverse lyssaviruses have been identified, mostly in bats. To assess the quality of rabies vaccines and immunoglobulin preparations, virus neutralization tests with live RABV are performed in accordance with enhanced biosafety standards. In the present work, a novel neutralization test is presented which takes advantage of a modified vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) from which the glycoprotein G gene has been deleted and replaced by reporter genes. This single-cycle virus was trans-complemented with RABV envelope glycoprotein. Neutralization of this pseudotype virus with RABV reference serum or immune sera from vaccinated mice showed a strong correlation with the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Importantly, pseudotype viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of other lyssaviruses were neutralized by reference serum to a significantly lesser extent or were not neutralized at all. Taken together, a pseudotype virus system has been successfully developed which allows the safe, fast, and sensitive detection of neutralizing antibodies directed against different lyssaviruses. PMID:27649230

  14. Quantification of Lyssavirus-Neutralizing Antibodies Using Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotype Particles.

    PubMed

    Moeschler, Sarah; Locher, Samira; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Krämer, Beate; Zimmer, Gert

    2016-09-16

    Rabies is a highly fatal zoonotic disease which is primarily caused by rabies virus (RABV) although other members of the genus Lyssavirus can cause rabies as well. As yet, 14 serologically and genetically diverse lyssaviruses have been identified, mostly in bats. To assess the quality of rabies vaccines and immunoglobulin preparations, virus neutralization tests with live RABV are performed in accordance with enhanced biosafety standards. In the present work, a novel neutralization test is presented which takes advantage of a modified vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) from which the glycoprotein G gene has been deleted and replaced by reporter genes. This single-cycle virus was trans-complemented with RABV envelope glycoprotein. Neutralization of this pseudotype virus with RABV reference serum or immune sera from vaccinated mice showed a strong correlation with the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Importantly, pseudotype viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of other lyssaviruses were neutralized by reference serum to a significantly lesser extent or were not neutralized at all. Taken together, a pseudotype virus system has been successfully developed which allows the safe, fast, and sensitive detection of neutralizing antibodies directed against different lyssaviruses.

  15. Intravenous administration of retroviral replicating vector, Toca 511, demonstrates therapeutic efficacy in orthotopic immune-competent mouse glioma model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tiffany T; Parab, Shraddha; Burnett, Ryan; Diago, Oscar; Ostertag, Derek; Hofman, Florence M; Espinoza, Fernando Lopez; Martin, Bryan; Ibañez, Carlos E; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Gruber, Harry E; Pertschuk, Daniel; Jolly, Douglas J; Robbins, Joan M

    2015-02-01

    Toca 511 (vocimagene amiretrorepvec), a nonlytic, amphotropic retroviral replicating vector (RRV), encodes and delivers a functionally optimized yeast cytosine deaminase (CD) gene to tumors. In orthotopic glioma models treated with Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) the CD enzyme within infected cells converts 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), resulting in tumor killing. Toca 511, delivered locally either by intratumoral injection or by injection into the resection bed, in combination with subsequent oral extended-release 5-FC (Toca FC), is under clinical investigation in patients with recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG). If feasible, intravenous administration of vectors is less invasive, can easily be repeated if desired, and may be applicable to other tumor types. Here, we present preclinical data that support the development of an intravenous administration protocol. First we show that intravenous administration of Toca 511 in a preclinical model did not lead to widespread or uncontrolled replication of the RVV. No, or low, viral DNA was found in the blood and most of the tissues examined 180 days after Toca 511 administration. We also show that RRV administered intravenously leads to efficient infection and spread of the vector carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-encoding gene (Toca GFP) through tumors in both immune-competent and immune-compromised animal models. However, initial vector localization within the tumor appeared to depend on the mode of administration. Long-term survival was observed in immune-competent mice when Toca 511 was administered intravenously or intracranially in combination with 5-FC treatment, and this combination was well tolerated in the preclinical models. Enhanced survival could also be achieved in animals with preexisting immune response to vector, supporting the potential for repeated administration. On the basis of these and other supporting data, a clinical trial investigating intravenous administration of Toca 511 in

  16. Comparative features of retroviral infections of livestock.

    PubMed

    Evermann, J F

    1990-01-01

    Retroviral infections of livestock have become of increasing importance due to their usefulness as comparative models for human retroviral infections and their effects upon animal health and marketability of animals and animal products nationally and internationally. This paper presents a perspective on the retroviruses of economic concern in veterinary medicine with emphasis on the importance of understanding the modes of virus transmission and the species specificity of the viruses. The retroviruses reviewed include the oncovirus, bovine leukosis virus, and the lentiviruses, equine infectious anemia virus; maedi/visna virus, caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus and bovine visna-like virus. The comparative features amongst these animal retroviruses and those of humans must be recognized by the veterinary and medical professions since the similarities in virus replication and spread by blood transfer can provide important clues in controlling and perhaps preventing human retroviruses infections, such as the human immunodeficiency virus.

  17. Characterization of a third generation lentiviral vector pseudotyped with Nipah virus envelope proteins for endothelial cell transduction.

    PubMed

    Witting, S R; Vallanda, P; Gamble, A L

    2013-10-01

    Lentiviruses are becoming progressively more popular as gene therapy vectors due to their ability to integrate into quiescent cells and recent clinical trial successes. Directing these vectors to specific cell types and limiting off-target transduction in vivo remains a challenge. Replacing the viral envelope proteins responsible for cellular binding, or pseudotyping, remains a common method to improve lentiviral targeting. Here, we describe the development of a high titer, third generation lentiviral vector pseudotyped with Nipah virus fusion protein (NiV-F) and attachment protein (NiV-G). Critical to high titers was truncation of the cytoplasmic domains of both NiV-F and NiV-G. As known targets of wild-type Nipah virus, primary endothelial cells are shown to be effectively transduced by the Nipah pseudotype. In contrast, human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors were not significantly transduced. Additionally, the Nipah pseudotype has increased stability in human serum compared with vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped lentivirus. These findings suggest that the use of Nipah virus envelope proteins in third generation lentiviral vectors would be a valuable tool for gene delivery targeted to endothelial cells.

  18. Immunogenicity and efficacy of immunodeficiency virus-like particles pseudotyped with the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kuate, Seraphin; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Stoiber, Heribert; Nchinda, Godwin; Floto, Anja; Franz, Monika; Sauermann, Ulrike; Bredl, Simon; Deml, Ludwig; Ignatius, Ralf; Norley, Steve; Racz, Paul; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Steinman, Ralph M.; Wagner, Ralf; Uberla, Klaus . E-mail: klaus.ueberla@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

    2006-07-20

    Vaccination with exogenous antigens such as recombinant viral proteins, immunodeficiency virus-derived whole inactivated virus particles, or virus-like particles (VLP) has generally failed to provide sufficient protection in animal models for AIDS. Pseudotyping VLPs with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G), which is known to mediate entry into dendritic cells, might allow more efficient stimulation of immune responses. Therefore, we pseudotyped noninfectious immunodeficiency virus-like particles with VSV-G and carried out a preliminary screen of their immunogenicity and vaccination efficacy. Incorporation of VSV-G into HIV-1 VLPs led to hundred-fold higher antibody titers to HIV-1 Gag and enhancement of T cell responses in mice. Repeated vaccination of rhesus monkeys for 65 weeks with VSV-G pseudotyped simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-like particles (VLP[G]) provided initial evidence for efficient suppression of viral load after mucosal challenge with the SIVmac239 virus. Challenge of monkeys after a 28 week vaccination regimen with VLP[G] led to a reduction in peak viremia, but persistent suppression of viral load was not achieved. Due to limitations in the number of animals available for this study, improved efficacy of VSV-G pseudotyped VLPs in nonhuman primates could not be demonstrated. However, mouse experiments revealed that pseudotyping of VLPs with fusion-competent VSV-G clearly improves their immunogenicity. Additional strategies, particularly adjuvants, should be considered to provide greater protection against a challenge with pathogenic immunodeficiency virus.

  19. Cocal-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors resist inactivation by human serum and efficiently transduce primate hematopoietic repopulating cells.

    PubMed

    Trobridge, Grant D; Wu, Robert A; Hansen, Michael; Ironside, Christina; Watts, Korashon L; Olsen, Philip; Beard, Brian C; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2010-04-01

    Lentiviral vectors are established as efficient and convenient vehicles for gene transfer. They are almost always pseudotyped with the envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) due to the high titers that can be achieved, their stability, and broad tropism. We generated a novel cocal vesiculovirus envelope glycoprotein plasmid and compared the properties of lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with cocal, VSV-G, and a modified feline endogenous retrovirus envelope glycoprotein (RD114/TR). Cocal-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors can be produced at titers as high as with VSV-G, have a broad tropism, and are stable, allowing for efficient concentration by centrifugation. Additionally, cocal vectors are more resistant to inactivation by human serum than VSV-G-pseudotyped vectors, and efficiently transduce human CD34(+) nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mouse-repopulating cells (SRCs), and long-term primate hematopoietic repopulating cells. These studies establish the potential of cocal-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors for a variety of scientific and therapeutic gene transfer applications, including in vivo gene delivery and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy.

  20. RTCGD: retroviral tagged cancer gene database

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, Keiko; Suzuki, Takeshi; Stephens, Robert M.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    2004-01-01

    Retroviral insertional mutagenesis in mouse hematopoietic tumors provides a potent cancer gene discovery tool in the post-genome-sequence era. To manage multiple high-throughput insertional mutagenesis screening projects, we developed the Retroviral Tagged Cancer Gene Database (RTCGD; http://RTCGD.ncifcrf.gov). A sequence analysis pipeline determines the genomic position of each retroviral integration site cloned from a mouse tumor, the distance between it and the nearest candidate disease gene(s) and its orientation with respect to the candidate gene(s). The pipeline also identifies genomic regions that are targets of retroviral integration in more than one tumor (common integration sites, CISs) and are thus likely to encode a disease gene. Users can search the database using a specified gene symbol, chromosome number or tumor model to identify both CIS genes and unique viral integration sites or compare the integration sites cloned by different laboratories using different models. As a default setting, users first review the CIS Lists and then Clone Lists. CIS Lists describe CISs and their candidate disease genes along with links to other public databases and clone lists. Clone Lists describe the viral integration site clones along with the tumor model and tumor type from which they were cloned, candidate disease gene(s), genomic position and orientation of the integrated provirus with respect to the candidate gene(s). It also provides a pictorial view of the genomic location of each integration site relative to neighboring genes and markers. Researchers can identify integrations of interest and compare their results with those for multiple tumor models and tumor types using RTCGD. PMID:14681473

  1. Retroviral DNA Transposition: Themes and Variations

    PubMed Central

    Skalka, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons are transposable elements that encapsidate the RNAs that are intermediates in the transposition of DNA copies of their genomes (proviruses), from one cell (or one locus) to another. Mechanistic similarities in DNA transposase enzymes and retroviral/retrotransposon integrases underscore the close evolutionary relationship among these elements. The retroviruses are very ancient infectious agents, presumed to have evolved from Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons (1), and DNA copies of their sequences can be found embedded in the genomes of most, if not all, members of the tree of life. All retroviruses share a specific gene arrangement and similar replication strategies. However, given their ancestries and occupation of diverse evolutionary niches, it should not be surprising that unique sequences have been acquired in some retroviral genomes and that the details of the mechanism by which their transposition is accomplished can vary. While every step in the retrovirus lifecycle is, in some sense, relevant to transposition, this Chapter focuses mainly on the early phase of retroviral replication, during which viral DNA is synthesized and integrated into its host genome. Some of the initial studies that set the stage for current understanding are highlighted, as well as more recent findings obtained through use of an ever-expanding technological toolbox including genomics, proteomics, and siRNA screening. Persistence in the area of structural biology has provided new insight into conserved mechanisms as well as variations in detail among retroviruses, which can also be instructive. PMID:25844274

  2. Molecular mechanisms of retroviral integration site selection

    PubMed Central

    Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Sharma, Amit; Larue, Ross C.; Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral replication proceeds through an obligate integrated DNA provirus, making retroviral vectors attractive vehicles for human gene-therapy. Though most of the host cell genome is available for integration, the process of integration site selection is not random. Retroviruses differ in their choice of chromatin-associated features and also prefer particular nucleotide sequences at the point of insertion. Lentiviruses including HIV-1 preferentially integrate within the bodies of active genes, whereas the prototypical gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) favors strong enhancers and active gene promoter regions. Integration is catalyzed by the viral integrase protein, and recent research has demonstrated that HIV-1 and MoMLV targeting preferences are in large part guided by integrase-interacting host factors (LEDGF/p75 for HIV-1 and BET proteins for MoMLV) that tether viral intasomes to chromatin. In each case, the selectivity of epigenetic marks on histones recognized by the protein tether helps to determine the integration distribution. In contrast, nucleotide preferences at integration sites seem to be governed by the ability for the integrase protein to locally bend the DNA duplex for pairwise insertion of the viral DNA ends. We discuss approaches to alter integration site selection that could potentially improve the safety of retroviral vectors in the clinic. PMID:25147212

  3. The design of artificial retroviral restriction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Melvyn W.; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Taylor, Ian A.; Stoye, Jonathan P.

    2007-09-01

    In addition to the ability to bind the retroviral capsid protein, the retroviral restriction factors Fv1, Trim5{alpha} and Trim5-CypA share the common property of containing sequences that promote self-association. Otherwise Fv1 and Trim5{alpha} appear unrelated. Mutational analyses showed that restriction was invariably lost when changes designed to disrupt the sequences responsible for multimerization were introduced. A novel restriction protein could be obtained by substituting sequences from the self-associating domain of Fv1 for the Trim5 sequences in Trim5-CypA. Similarly, a fusion protein containing cyclophilin A joined to arfaptin2, a protein known to form extended dimers, was also shown to restrict HIV-1. Hence, multimerization of a capsid-binding domain could be the common minimum design feature for capsid-dependent retroviral restriction factors. However, not all domains that promote multimerization can substitute for the N-terminal domains of Fv1 and Trim5{alpha}. Moreover, only CypA can provide a capsid-binding site with different N-terminal domains. It is suggested that the spatial relationship between the multiple target binding sites may be important for restriction.

  4. High Efficiency Gene Transfer to Airways of Mice Using Influenza Hemagglutinin Pseudotyped Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manij; Giddings, Angela M.; Sechelski, John; Olsen, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Background A limitation to efficient lentivirus-mediated airway gene transfer is the lack of receptors to commonly used viral envelopes on the luminal surface of airway epithelia. The use of viral envelopes with natural tropism to the airway could be useful for overcoming this limitation. Methods We investigated influenza hemagglutinin (HA) pseudotyped EIAV-derived lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer to the airway epithelium of adult and newborn mice. For these studies high-titer vectors were delivered by intranasal administration. In addition, we tested the feasibility of vector re-dosing to the nasal airway. Results Delivery of high-titer HA pseudotyped lentiviral vectors by nasal administration to newborn mouse pups or adult mice results in efficient transduction of airway epithelial cells in the nose, trachea, and lungs. In the nose vector expression was predominant in the respiratory epithelium and was not observed in the olfactory epithelium. In the trachea and large airways of the lung approximately 46% and 40%, respectively, of surface epithelial cells could be transduced. The efficiency of re-dosing to the nasal airway of mice was found to be dependent upon the age of the animal when the first dose is administered and the length of time between doses. Conclusions A single intranasal dose of concentrated influenza HA-pseudotyped lentiviral vector is sufficient for efficient gene transfer to the airways of mice. This is a promising result that could lead to the development of effective gene transfer reagents for the treatment of cystic fibrosis and other human lung diseases. PMID:23319179

  5. Pseudotyping incompatibility between HIV-1 and gibbon ape leukemia virus Env is modulated by Vpu.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tiffany M; Lyddon, Terri D; Cannon, Paula M; Johnson, Marc C

    2010-03-01

    The Env protein from gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) has been shown to be incompatible with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the production of infectious pseudotyped particles. This incompatibility has been mapped to the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of GaLV Env. Surprisingly, we found that the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu modulates this incompatibility. The infectivity of HIV-1 pseudotyped with murine leukemia virus (MLV) Env was not affected by Vpu. However, the infectivity of HIV-1 pseudotyped with an MLV Env with the cytoplasmic tail from GaLV Env (MLV/GaLV Env) was restricted 50- to 100-fold by Vpu. A Vpu mutant containing a scrambled membrane-spanning domain, Vpu(RD), was still able to restrict MLV/GaLV Env, but mutation of the serine residues at positions 52 and 56 completely alleviated the restriction. Loss of infectivity appeared to be caused by reduced MLV/GaLV Env incorporation into viral particles. The mechanism of this downmodulation appears to be distinct from Vpu-mediated CD4 downmodulation because Vpu-expressing cells that failed to produce infectious HIV-1 particles nonetheless continued to display robust surface MLV/GaLV Env expression. In addition, if MLV and HIV-1 were simultaneously introduced into the same cells, only the HIV-1 particle infectivity was restricted by Vpu. Collectively, these data suggest that Vpu modulates the cellular distribution of MLV/GaLV Env, preventing its recruitment to HIV-1 budding sites.

  6. Analysis of Lujo Virus Cell Entry using Pseudotype Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Hideki; Iha, Koichiro; Shimojima, Masayuki; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Nakasone, Naoe; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several arenaviruses are known to cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in sub-Saharan Africa and South America, where VHF is a major public health and medical concern. The biosafety level 4 categorization of these arenaviruses restricts their use and has impeded biological studies, including therapeutic drug and/or vaccine development. Due to difficulties associated with handling live viruses, pseudotype viruses, which transiently bear arenavirus envelope proteins based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) or retrovirus, have been developed as surrogate virus systems. Here, we report the development of a pseudotype VSV bearing each envelope protein of various species of arenaviruses (AREpv), including the newly identified Lujo virus (LUJV) and Chapare virus. Pseudotype arenaviruses generated in 293T cells exhibited high infectivity in various mammalian cell lines. The infections by New World and Old World AREpv were dependent on their receptors (human transferrin receptor 1 [hTfR1] and α-dystroglycan [αDG], respectively). However, infection by pseudotype VSV bearing the LUJV envelope protein (LUJpv) occurred independently of hTfR1 and αDG, indicating that LUJpv utilizes an unidentified receptor. The pH-dependent endocytosis of AREpv was confirmed by the use of lysosomotropic agents. The fusion of cells expressing these envelope proteins, except for those expressing the LUJV envelope protein, was induced by transient treatment at low pH values. LUJpv infectivity was inhibited by U18666A, a cholesterol transport inhibitor. Furthermore, the infectivity of LUJpv was significantly decreased in the Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1)-deficient cell line, suggesting the necessity for NPC1 activity for efficient LUJpv infection. IMPORTANCE LUJV is a newly identified arenavirus associated with a VHF outbreak in southern Africa. Although cell entry for many arenaviruses has been studied, cell entry for LUJV has not been characterized. In this study, we found that LUJpv utilizes

  7. Ancestral capture of syncytin-Car1, a fusogenic endogenous retroviral envelope gene involved in placentation and conserved in Carnivora.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Heidmann, Odile; Bernard-Stoecklin, Sibylle; Reynaud, Karine; Véron, Géraldine; Mulot, Baptiste; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2012-02-14

    Syncytins are envelope protein genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Two such genes have already been identified in simians, two distinct, unrelated genes have been identified in Muridae, and a fifth gene has been identified in the rabbit. Here, we searched for similar genes in the Laurasiatheria clade, which diverged from Euarchontoglires--primates, rodents, and lagomorphs--shortly after mammalian radiation (100 Mya). In silico search for envelope protein genes with full-coding capacity within the dog and cat genomes identified several candidate genes, with one common to both species that displayed placenta-specific expression, which was revealed by RT-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with precise proviral integration at a site common to dog and cat. Cloning of the gene for an ex vivo pseudotype assay showed fusogenicity on both dog and cat cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections from both species showed specific expression at the level of the invasive fetal villi within the placental junctional zone, where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast layer to form the maternofetal interface. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among a series of 26 Carnivora representatives, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. The gene is not found in the Pholidota order and, therefore, it was captured before Carnivora radiation, between 60 and 85 Mya. This gene is the oldest syncytin gene identified to date, and it is the first in a new major clade of eutherian mammals.

  8. Retroviral integration profiles: their determinants and implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang-il

    2012-04-01

    Retroviruses have often been used for gene therapy because of their capacity for the long-term expression of transgenes via stable integration into the host genome. However, retroviral integration can also result in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells, as demonstrated by the incidence of leukemia in a recent retroviral gene therapy trial in Europe. This unfortunate outcome has led to the rapid initiation of studies examining various biological and pathological aspects of retroviral integration. This review summarizes recent findings from these studies, including the global integration patterns of various types of retroviruses, viral and cellular determinants of integration, implications of integration for gene therapy and retrovirus-mediated infectious diseases, and strategies to shift integration to safe host genomic loci. A more comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of retroviral integration processes will eventually make it possible to generate safer retroviral vector platforms in the near future.

  9. Analysis of the entry mechanism of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, using a vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyping system.

    PubMed

    Suda, Yuto; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Tani, Hideki; Murakami, Shin; Saijo, Masayuki; Horimoto, Taisuke; Shimojima, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne disease causing severe hemorrhagic symptoms with a nearly 30 % case-fatality rate in humans. The experimental use of CCHF virus (CCHFV), which causes CCHF, requires high-biosafety-level (BSL) containment. In contrast, pseudotyping of various viral glycoproteins (GPs) onto vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) can be used in facilities with lower BSL containment, and this has facilitated studies on the viral entry mechanism and the measurement of neutralizing activity, especially for highly pathogenic viruses. In the present study, we generated high titers of pseudotyped VSV bearing the CCHFV envelope GP and analyzed the mechanisms involved in CCHFV infection. A partial deletion of the CCHFV GP cytoplasmic domain increased the titer of the pseudotyped VSV, the entry mechanism of which was dependent on the CCHFV envelope GP. Using the pseudotype virus, DC-SIGN (a calcium-dependent [C-type] lectin cell-surface molecule) was revealed to enhance viral infection and act as an entry factor for CCHFV.

  10. Retargeting vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors with enhanced stability by in situ synthesized polymer shell.

    PubMed

    Liang, Min; Yan, Ming; Lu, Yunfeng; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2013-02-01

    The ability to introduce transgenes with precise specificity to the desired target cells or tissues is key to a more facile application of genetic therapy. Here, we describe a novel method using nanotechnology to generate lentiviral vectors with altered recognition of host cell receptor specificity. Briefly, the infectivity of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyped lentiviral vectors was shielded by a thin polymer shell synthesized in situ onto the viral envelope, and new binding ability was conferred to the shielded virus by introducing acrylamide-tailored cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide to the polymer shell. We termed the resulting virus "targeting nanovirus." The targeting nanovirus had similar titer with VSV-G pseudotypes and specifically transduced Hela cells with high transduction efficiency. In addition, the encapsulation of the VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus by the polymer shell did not change the pathway that VSV-G pseudotypes enter and fuse with cells, as well as later events such as reverse transcription and gene expression. Furthermore, the targeting nanovirus possessed enhanced stability in the presence of human serum, indicating protection of the virus by the polymer shell from human serum complement inactivation. This novel use of nanotechnology demonstrates proof of concept for an approach that could be more generally applied for redirecting viral vectors for laboratory and clinical purposes.

  11. Comparison of serum sensitivities of pseudotype retroviruses produced from newly established packaging cell lines of human and feline origins.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rie; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2004-01-01

    To apply retrovirus vectors for in vivo gene therapy in cats, it is necessary to develop vector systems that are not inactivated by cat serum. In this study, the retrovirus packaging cell lines 2SC-1 and AHCeB7 were newly established from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 and feline fibroblastic AH927 cells, respectively. Then the sensitivities of pseudotype viruses released from these cell lines to fresh sera from humans and cats were compared. Pseudotype viruses from the 2SC-1 cells were inactivated efficiently by cat serum but not by human serum. Pseudotype viruses from the AHCeB7 cells were also inactivated efficiently by human serum, however they were rather resistant to cat serum. When the xenoantigenicity of the cell lines was examined by flow cytometry, AH927 cells reacted with human serum, however, HEK293 cells did not react with cat serum. These results suggested that pseudotype viruses from 2SC-1 cells were inactivated by the fresh cat serum in an antibody-independent manner. Chelating experiments revealed that certain temperature-sensitive factor(s) other than complements might be involved in the inactivation. The usage of feline cells as packaging cells is suitable for in vivo gene therapy in cats.

  12. Retargeting Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein Pseudotyped Lentiviral Vectors with Enhanced Stability by In Situ Synthesized Polymer Shell

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Min; Yan, Ming; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The ability to introduce transgenes with precise specificity to the desired target cells or tissues is key to a more facile application of genetic therapy. Here, we describe a novel method using nanotechnology to generate lentiviral vectors with altered recognition of host cell receptor specificity. Briefly, the infectivity of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyped lentiviral vectors was shielded by a thin polymer shell synthesized in situ onto the viral envelope, and new binding ability was conferred to the shielded virus by introducing acrylamide-tailored cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide to the polymer shell. We termed the resulting virus “targeting nanovirus.” The targeting nanovirus had similar titer with VSV-G pseudotypes and specifically transduced Hela cells with high transduction efficiency. In addition, the encapsulation of the VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus by the polymer shell did not change the pathway that VSV-G pseudotypes enter and fuse with cells, as well as later events such as reverse transcription and gene expression. Furthermore, the targeting nanovirus possessed enhanced stability in the presence of human serum, indicating protection of the virus by the polymer shell from human serum complement inactivation. This novel use of nanotechnology demonstrates proof of concept for an approach that could be more generally applied for redirecting viral vectors for laboratory and clinical purposes. PMID:23327104

  13. Retroviral Integrase Structure and DNA Recombination Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Due to the importance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase as a drug target, the biochemistry and structural aspects of retroviral DNA integration have been the focus of intensive research during the past three decades. The retroviral integrase enzyme acts on the linear double-stranded viral DNA product of reverse transcription. Integrase cleaves specific phosphodiester bonds near the viral DNA ends during the 3′ processing reaction. The enzyme then uses the resulting viral DNA 3′-OH groups during strand transfer to cut chromosomal target DNA, which simultaneously joins both viral DNA ends to target DNA 5′-phosphates. Both reactions proceed via direct transesterification of scissile phosphodiester bonds by attacking nucleophiles: a water molecule for 3′ processing, and the viral DNA 3′-OH for strand transfer. X-ray crystal structures of prototype foamy virus integrase-DNA complexes revealed the architectures of the key nucleoprotein complexes that form sequentially during the integration process and explained the roles of active site metal ions in catalysis. X-ray crystallography furthermore elucidated the mechanism of action of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors, which are currently used to treat AIDS patients, and provided valuable insights into the mechanisms of viral drug resistance. PMID:25705574

  14. Retroviral Integrations in Gene Therapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Biasco, Luca; Baricordi, Cristina; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    γ-Retroviral and lentiviral vectors allow the permanent integration of a therapeutic transgene in target cells and have provided in the last decade a delivery platform for several successful gene therapy (GT) clinical approaches. However, the occurrence of adverse events due to insertional mutagenesis in GT treated patients poses a strong challenge to the scientific community to identify the mechanisms at the basis of vector-driven genotoxicity. Along the last decade, the study of retroviral integration sites became a fundamental tool to monitor vector–host interaction in patients overtime. This review is aimed at critically revising the data derived from insertional profiling, with a particular focus on the evidences collected from GT clinical trials. We discuss the controversies and open issues associated to the interpretation of integration site analysis during patient's follow up, with an update on the latest results derived from the use of high-throughput technologies. Finally, we provide a perspective on the future technical development and on the application of these studies to address broader biological questions, from basic virology to human hematopoiesis. PMID:22252453

  15. Comparison of JEV neutralization assay using pseudotyped JEV with the conventional plaque-reduction neutralization test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Min, Kyung-Il; Park, Ki Hoon; Choi, Hyo Jung; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Ahn, Chi-Young; Hong, Young-Jin; Kim, Young Bong

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported the development of a neutralization assay system for evaluating Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) neutralizing antibody (NAb) using pseudotyped-JEV (JEV-PV). JEV-PV-based neutralization assay offers several advantages compared with the current standard plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT), including simplicity, safety, and speed. To evaluate the suitability of the JEV-PV assay as new replacement neutralization assay, we compared its repeatability, reproducibility, specificity, and correlated its results with those obtained using the PRNT. These analyses showed a close correlation between the results obtained with the JEV-PV assay and the PRNT, using the 50% plaque reduction method as a standard for measuring NAb titers to JEV. The validation results met all analytical acceptance criteria. These results suggest that the JEV-PV assay could serve as a safe and simple method for measuring NAb titer against JEV and could be used as an alternative approach for assaying the potency of JEV neutralization.

  16. Enhanced immunosurveillance for animal morbilliviruses using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotypes.

    PubMed

    Logan, Nicola; Dundon, William G; Diallo, Adama; Baron, Michael D; James Nyarobi, M; Cleaveland, Sarah; Keyyu, Julius; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-11-11

    The measurement of virus-specific neutralising antibodies represents the "gold-standard" for diagnostic serology. For animal morbilliviruses, such as peste des petits ruminants (PPRV) or rinderpest virus (RPV), live virus-based neutralisation tests require high-level biocontainment to prevent the accidental escape of the infectious agents. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of neutralising antibodies against animal morbilliviruses. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of PPRV on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Serological responses against the four distinct lineages of PPRV could be measured simultaneously and cross-neutralising responses against other morbilliviruses compared. Using this approach, we observed that titres of neutralising antibodies induced by vaccination with live attenuated PPRV were lower than those induced by wild type virus infection and the level of cross-lineage neutralisation varied between vaccinates. By comparing neutralising responses from animals infected with either PPRV or RPV, we found that responses were highest against the homologous virus, indicating that retrospective analyses of serum samples could be used to confirm the nature of the original pathogen to which an animal had been exposed. Accordingly, when screening sera from domestic livestock and wild ruminants in Tanzania, we detected evidence of cross-species infection with PPRV, canine distemper virus (CDV) and a RPV-related bovine morbillivirus, suggesting that exposure to animal morbilliviruses may be more widespread than indicated previously using existing diagnostic techniques.

  17. Biochemical Characterization of Novel Retroviral Integrase Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ballandras-Colas, Allison; Naraharisetty, Hema; Li, Xiang; Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrase is an essential retroviral enzyme, catalyzing the stable integration of reverse transcribed DNA into cellular DNA. Several aspects of the integration mechanism, including the length of host DNA sequence duplication flanking the integrated provirus, which can be from 4 to 6 bp, and the nucleotide preferences at the site of integration, are thought to cluster among the different retroviral genera. To date only the spumavirus prototype foamy virus integrase has provided diffractable crystals of integrase-DNA complexes, revealing unprecedented details on the molecular mechanisms of DNA integration. Here, we characterize five previously unstudied integrase proteins, including those derived from the alpharetrovirus lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV), betaretroviruses Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), and mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), epsilonretrovirus walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV), and gammaretrovirus reticuloendotheliosis virus strain A (Rev-A) to identify potential novel structural biology candidates. Integrase expressed in bacterial cells was analyzed for solubility, stability during purification, and, once purified, 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer activities in vitro. We show that while we were unable to extract or purify accountable amounts of WDSV, JRSV, or LPDV integrase, purified MMTV and Rev-A integrase each preferentially support the concerted integration of two viral DNA ends into target DNA. The sequencing of concerted Rev-A integration products indicates high fidelity cleavage of target DNA strands separated by 5 bp during integration, which contrasts with the 4 bp duplication generated by a separate gammaretrovirus, the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV). By comparing Rev-A in vitro integration sites to those generated by MLV in cells, we concordantly conclude that the spacing of target DNA cleavage is more evolutionarily flexible than are the target DNA base contacts made by integrase during integration. Given their

  18. Extensive Replication of a Retroviral Replicating Vector Can Expand the A Bulge in the Encephalomyocarditis Virus Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Change Translation Efficiency of the Downstream Transgene.

    PubMed

    Lin, Amy H; Liu, Yanzheng; Burrascano, Cynthia; Cunanan, Kathrina; Logg, Christopher R; Robbins, Joan M; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Gruber, Harry; Ibañez, Carlos; Jolly, Douglas J

    2016-04-01

    We have developed retroviral replicating vectors (RRV) derived from Moloney murine gammaretrovirus with an amphotropic envelope and an encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-transgene cassette downstream of the env gene. During long-term (180 days) replication of the vector in animals, a bulge of 7 adenosine residues (A's) in the J-K bifurcation domain sometimes serially added A's. Therefore, vectors with 4-12 A's in the A bulge in the J-K bifurcation domain were generated, and the impact of the variants on transgene protein expression, vector stability, and IRES sequence upon multiple infection cycles was assessed in RRV encoding yeast-derived cytosine deaminase and green fluorescent protein in vitro. For transgene protein expression, after multiple infection cycles, RRV-IRES with 5-7 A's gave roughly comparable levels, 4 and 8 A's were within about 4-5-fold of the 6 A's, whereas 10 and 12 A's were marked lower. In terms of stability, after 10 infection cycles, expansion of A's appeared to be a more frequent event affecting transgene protein expression than viral genome deletions or rearrangement: 4 and 5 A's appeared completely stable; 6, 7, and particularly 8 A's showed some level of expansion in the A bulge; 10 and 12 A's underwent both expansion and transgene deletion. The strong relative translational activity of the 5 A's in the EMCV IRES has not been reported previously. The 5A RRV-IRES may have utility for preclinical and clinical applications where extended replication is required.

  19. Mutations of a residue within the polyproline-rich region of Env alter the replication rate and level of cytopathic effects in chimeric avian retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kevin W; Barsov, Eugene V; Ferris, Andrea L; Hughes, Stephen H

    2005-08-01

    Previous attempts to extend the host range of the avian sarcoma/leukosis virus (ASLV)-based RCASBP vectors produced two viral vectors, RCASBP M2C (4070A) and RCASBP M2C (797-8), which replicate using the amphotropic murine leukemia virus 4070A Env protein (2). Both viruses were adapted to replicate efficiently in the avian cell line DF-1, but RCASBP M2C (4070A) caused extensive cytopathic effects (CPE) in DF-1 cells whereas RCASBP M2C (797-8) induced low levels of CPE. The two viruses differed only at amino acid 242 of the polyproline-rich region in the surface (SU) subunit of the Env protein. In RCASBP M2C (4070A), an isoleucine replaced the wild-type proline residue, whereas a threonine residue was found in RCASBP M2C (797-8). In the present study, we show that other amino acid substitutions at position 242 strongly influence the CPE and replication rate of the chimeric viruses. There was a correlation between the amount of unintegrated linear retroviral DNA present in infected DF-1 cells and the level of CPE. This suggests that there may be a role for superinfection in the CPE. The treatment of RCASBP M2C (4070A)-infected cells with dantrolene, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), reduced the amount of CPE seen during infection with the highly cytotoxic virus. Dantrolene treatment did not appear to affect virus production, suggesting that Ca2+ release from the ER had a role in the CPE caused by these viruses.

  20. Down-regulation of CD81 tetraspanin in human cells producing retroviral-based particles: tailoring vector composition.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A F; Guerreiro, M R; Santiago, V M; Dalba, C; Klatzmann, D; Alves, P M; Carrondo, M J T; Coroadinha, A S

    2011-11-01

    Retroviral-derived biopharmaceuticals (RV) target numerous therapeutic applications, from gene therapy to virus-like particle (rVLP)-based vaccines. During particle formation, beside the pseudotyped envelope proteins, RV can incorporate proteins derived from the virus producer cells (VPC). This may be detrimental by reducing the amounts of the pseudotyped envelope and/or by incorporating protein capable of inducing immune responses when non-human VPC are used. Manipulating the repertoire of VPC proteins integrated onto the vector structure is an underexplored territory and should provide valuable insights on potential targets to improve vector pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. In this work, human HEK 293 cells producing retrovirus-like particles (rVLPs) and infectious RV vectors were used to prove the concept of customizing RV composition by manipulating cellular protein content. The tetraspanin CD81 was chosen since it is significantly incorporated in the RV membrane, conferring to the vector significant immunogenicity when used in mice. RNA interference-mediated by shRNA lentiviral vector transduction was efficiently used to silence CD81 expression (up to 99%) and the rVLPs produced by knocked-down cells lack CD81. Silenced clones were analyzed for cell proliferation, morphological changes, susceptibility to oxidative stress conditions, and rVLP productivities. The results showed that the down-regulation of VPC proteins requires close monitoring for possible side effects on cellular production performance. Yet, they confirm that it is possible to change the composition of host-derived immunogens in RV by altering cellular protein content with no detriment for vector productivity and titers. This constitutes an important manipulation tool in vaccinology--by exploiting the potential adjuvant effect of VPC proteins or using them as fusion agents to other proteins of interest to be exposed on the vector membrane--and in gene therapy, by reducing the

  1. The Use of Recombinant Pseudotype Virus-Like Particles Harbouring Inserted Target Antigen to Generate Antibodies against Cellular Marker p16INK4A

    PubMed Central

    Lasickienė, Rita; Gedvilaite, Alma; Norkiene, Milda; Simanaviciene, Vaida; Sezaite, Indre; Dekaminaviciute, Dovile; Shikova, Evelina; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2012-01-01

    Protein engineering provides an opportunity to generate new immunogens with desired features. Previously, we have demonstrated that hamster polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) are highly immunogenic and can be employed for the insertion of foreign epitopes at certain surface-exposed positions. In the current study, we have designed pseudotype VLPs consisting of an intact VP1 protein and VP2 protein fused with the target antigen—cellular marker p16INK4A—at its N terminus. Both proteins coexpressed in yeast were self-assembled to pseudotype VLPs harbouring the inserted antigen on the surface. The pseudotype VLPs were used for generation of antibodies against p16INK4A that represents a potential biomarker for cells transformed by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). The pseudotype VLPs induced in immunized mice a strong immune response against the target antigen. The antisera raised against pseudotype VLPs showed specific immunostaining of p16INK4A protein in malignant cervical tissue. Spleen cells of the immunized mice were used to generate monoclonal antibodies against p16INK4A protein. The specificity of antibodies was proven by the immunostaining of HPV-transformed cells. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates the potential of pseudotype VLPs with inserted target antigen as a new type of immunogens to generate antibodies of high diagnostic value. PMID:22629125

  2. Hepatitis C virus quasispecies and pseudotype analysis from acute infection to chronicity in HIV-1 co-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Ferns, R Bridget; Tarr, Alexander W; Hue, Stephane; Urbanowicz, Richard A; McClure, C Patrick; Gilson, Richard; Ball, Jonathan K; Nastouli, Eleni; Garson, Jeremy A; Pillay, Deenan

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infected patients who acquire HCV infection have higher rates of chronicity and liver disease progression than patients with HCV mono-infection. Understanding early events in this pathogenic process is important. We applied single genome sequencing of the E1 to NS3 regions and viral pseudotype neutralization assays to explore the consequences of viral quasispecies evolution from pre-seroconversion to chronicity in four co-infected individuals (mean follow up 566 days). We observed that one to three founder viruses were transmitted. Relatively low viral sequence diversity, possibly related to an impaired immune response, due to HIV infection was observed in three patients. However, the fourth patient, after an early purifying selection displayed increasing E2 sequence evolution, possibly related to being on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Viral pseudotypes generated from HCV variants showed relative resistance to neutralization by autologous plasma but not to plasma collected from later time points, confirming ongoing virus escape from antibody neutralization.

  3. Reciprocal functional pseudotyping of HIV-1 and HTLV-1 viral genomes by the heterologous counterpart envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Klase, Zachary; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2013-08-15

    HIV-1 and HTLV-1 can infect CD4+ T cells and can co-infect the same individual. In principle, it is possible that both viruses can infect the same CD4+ T cells in dually infected persons. Currently, how efficiently HTLV-1 and HIV-1 co-infects the same cell and the full extent of their biological interactions are not well-understood. Here, we report evidence confirming that both viruses can infect the same cells and that HTLV-1 envelope (Env) can pseudotype HIV-1 viral particles and HIV-1 envelope (Env) can pseudotype HTLV-1 virions to mediate subsequent infections of substrate cells. We also show that the construction of a chimeric HTLV-1 molecular clone carrying the HIV-1 Env in place of its HTLV-1 counterpart results in a replication competent moiety. These findings raise new implications of viral complementation and assortment between HIV-1 and HTLV-1 in dually infected persons.

  4. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Bii, Victor M.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types. PMID:27792127

  5. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Bii, Victor M; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-10-25

    Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  6. Capture of syncytin-Mar1, a Fusogenic Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene Involved in Placentation in the Rodentia Squirrel-Related Clade

    PubMed Central

    Redelsperger, François; Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Tennant, Bud C.; Catzeflis, François; Mulot, Baptiste; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope protein (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes have previously been identified in the mouse-related clade, allowing a demonstration of their essential role via knockout mice. Here, we searched for similar genes in a second major clade of the Rodentia order, the squirrel-related clade, taking advantage of the complete sequencing of the ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus genome. In silico search for env genes with full coding capacity identified several candidate genes with one displaying placenta-specific expression, as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with recognizable hallmarks of an integrated provirus. Cloning of the gene in an expression vector for ex vivo cell-cell fusion and pseudotype assays demonstrated fusogenicity on a large panel of mammalian cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections showed specific expression in domains where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast at the fetomaternal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among the tribe Marmotini, thus dating its capture back to about at least 25 million years ago, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. This gene that we named syncytin-Mar1 is distinct from all seven Syncytin genes identified to date in eutherian mammals and is likely to be a major effector of placentation in its related clade. IMPORTANCE Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope genes of retroviral origin, ancestrally captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes had been previously identified in the mouse-related clade. Here, in the squirrel-related rodent clade, we identified the envelope gene of an endogenous retrovirus with all the

  7. Capture of syncytin-Mar1, a fusogenic endogenous retroviral envelope gene involved in placentation in the Rodentia squirrel-related clade.

    PubMed

    Redelsperger, François; Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Tennant, Bud C; Catzeflis, François; Mulot, Baptiste; Heidmann, Odile; Heidmann, Thierry; Dupressoir, Anne

    2014-07-01

    Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope protein (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes have previously been identified in the mouse-related clade, allowing a demonstration of their essential role via knockout mice. Here, we searched for similar genes in a second major clade of the Rodentia order, the squirrel-related clade, taking advantage of the complete sequencing of the ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus genome. In silico search for env genes with full coding capacity identified several candidate genes with one displaying placenta-specific expression, as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with recognizable hallmarks of an integrated provirus. Cloning of the gene in an expression vector for ex vivo cell-cell fusion and pseudotype assays demonstrated fusogenicity on a large panel of mammalian cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections showed specific expression in domains where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast at the fetomaternal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among the tribe Marmotini, thus dating its capture back to about at least 25 million years ago, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. This gene that we named syncytin-Mar1 is distinct from all seven Syncytin genes identified to date in eutherian mammals and is likely to be a major effector of placentation in its related clade. Importance: Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope genes of retroviral origin, ancestrally captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes had been previously identified in the mouse-related clade. Here, in the squirrel-related rodent clade, we identified the envelope gene of an endogenous retrovirus with all the features of a

  8. Membrane-mediated interaction between retroviral capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2012-02-01

    A retrovirus is an RNA virus that is replicated through a unique strategy of reverse transcription. Unlike regular enveloped viruses which are assembled inside the host cells, the assembly of retroviral capsids happens right on the cell membrane. During the assembly process, the partially formed capsids deform the membrane, giving rise to an elastic energy. When two such partial capsids approach each other, this elastic energy changes. Or in other words, the two partial capsids interact with each other via the membrane. This membrane mediated interaction between partial capsids plays an important role in the kinetics of the assembly process. In this work, this membrane mediated interaction is calculated both analytically and numerically. It is worth noting that the diferential equation determining the membrane shape in general nonlinear and cannot be solved analytically,except in the linear region of small deformations. And it is exactly the nonlinear regime that is important for the assembly kinetics of retroviruses as it provides a large energy barrier. The theory developed here is applicable to more generic cases of membrane mediated interactions between two membrane-embedded proteins.

  9. Structural basis for retroviral integration into nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Daniel P; Renault, Ludovic; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Matadeen, Rishi; Hare, Stephen; Lindemann, Dirk; Engelman, Alan N; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-07-16

    Retroviral integration is catalysed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location ±3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration.

  10. The Optimisation of Pseudotyped Viruses for the Characterisation of Immune Responses to Equine Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Simon D.; Kinsley, Rebecca; Temperton, Nigel; Daly, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotyped viruses (PVs) produced by co-transfecting cells with plasmids expressing lentiviral core proteins and viral envelope proteins are potentially powerful tools for studying various aspects of equine influenza virus (EIV) biology. The aim of this study was to optimise production of equine influenza PVs. Co-transfection of the HAT protease to activate the haemagglutinin (HA) yielded a higher titre PV than TMPRSS2 with the HA from A/equine/Richmond/1/2007 (H3N8), whereas for A/equine/Newmarket/79 (H3N8), both proteases resulted in equivalent titres. TMPRSS4 was ineffective with the HA of either strain. There was also an inverse relationship between the amount of protease-expression plasmids and the PV titre obtained.  Interestingly, the PV titre obtained by co-transfection of a plasmid encoding the cognate N8 NA was not as high as that generated by the addition of exogenous neuraminidase (NA) from Clostridium perfringens to allow the release of nascent PV particles. Finally, initial characterisation of the reliability of PV neutralisation tests (PVNTs) demonstrated good intra-laboratory repeatability. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that equine influenza PV production can be readily optimised to provide a flexible tool for studying EIV. PMID:27983716

  11. [Cell lineage tracing of regenerating cells after partial pancreatectomy using pseudo-type retrovirus].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixin; Ju, Xiaofang; Wang, Fa; Guo, Zhiwei; Piao, Shanhua; Teng, Chunbo

    2008-04-01

    Pancreas is an important mixed gland having both endocrine and exocrine functions, and has been proven regeneration after injury. To explore the cell lineage tracing methods in pancreas in vivo and the regenerate cells source, we used pseudo-type retrovirus to transfect adult mouse pancreas which had been partially pancreatectomized by rubbing the kerf using a cotton stick saturated with retrovirus suspension then injecting 100 microL retrovirus suspension into pancreas, injecting 100 microL retrovirus by caudal vein, or interperitoneally injecting retrovirus respectively. The results showed that the method of rubbing the kerf then injection of retrovirus suspension into pancreas could more effectively mark the pancreatic cells than the caudal vein injection and the intraperitoneal injection did in vivo. Furthermore, this study also found that some acinus cells could accept injury stimulus signals to regenerate through resuming mitosis after pancreatic injury. This study establishes a cell lineage tracing method in pancreas in vivo using retrovirus and offers a clue for gene therapy of pancreatic diseases using retrovirus vectors.

  12. Efficacy of an adeno-associated virus 8-pseudotyped vector in glycogen storage disease type II.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Franco, Luis M; Young, Sarah P; Schneider, Ayn; Bird, Andrew; Amalfitano, Andrea; Chen, Y-T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2005-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease) causes death in infancy from cardiorespiratory failure. The underlying deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase) can be corrected by liver-targeted gene therapy in GSD-II, if secretion of GAA is accompanied by receptor-mediated uptake in cardiac and skeletal muscle. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding human (h) GAA was pseudotyped as AAV8 (AAV2/8) and injected intravenously into immunodeficient GSD-II mice. High levels of hGAA were maintained in plasma for 24 weeks following AAV2/8 vector administration. A marked increase in vector copy number in the liver was demonstrated for the AAV2/8 vector compared to the analogous AAV2/2 vector. GAA deficiency in the heart and skeletal muscle was corrected with the AAV2/8 vector in male GSD-II mice, consistent with receptor-mediated uptake of hGAA. Male GSD-II mice demonstrated complete correction of glycogen storage in heart and diaphragm with the AAV2/8 vector, while female GSD-II mice had correction only in the heart. A biomarker for GSD-II was reduced in both sexes following AAV2/8 vector administration. Therefore, GAA production with an AAV2/8 vector in a depot organ, the liver, generated evidence for efficacious gene therapy in a mouse model for GSD-II.

  13. Integrated strategy for the production of therapeutic retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Carrondo, Manuel; Panet, Amos; Wirth, Dagmar; Coroadinha, Ana Sofia; Cruz, Pedro; Falk, Haya; Schucht, Roland; Dupont, Francis; Geny-Fiamma, Cécile; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Hauser, Hansjörg

    2011-03-01

    The broad application of retroviral vectors for gene delivery is still hampered by the difficulty to reproducibly establish high vector producer cell lines generating sufficient amounts of highly concentrated virus vector preparations of high quality. To enhance the process for producing clinically relevant retroviral vector preparations for therapeutic applications, we have integrated novel and state-of-the-art technologies in a process that allows rapid access to high-efficiency vector-producing cells and consistent production, purification, and storage of retroviral vectors. The process has been designed for various types of retroviral vectors for clinical application and to support a high-throughput process. New modular helper cell lines that permit rapid insertion of DNA encoding the therapeutic vector of interest at predetermined, optimal chromosomal loci were developed to facilitate stable and high vector production levels. Packaging cell lines, cultivation methods, and improved medium composition were coupled with vector purification and storage process strategies that yield maximal vector infectivity and stability. To facilitate GMP-grade vector production, standard of operation protocols were established. These processes were validated by production of retroviral vector lots that drive the expression of type VII collagen (Col7) for the treatment of a skin genetic disease, dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. The potential efficacy of the Col7-expressing vectors was finally proven with newly developed systems, in particular in target primary keratinocyte cultures and three-dimensional skin tissues in organ culture.

  14. Deciphering the impact of parameters influencing transgene expression kinetics after repeated cell transduction with integration-deficient retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schott, Juliane W; Jaeschke, Nico M; Hoffmann, Dirk; Maetzig, Tobias; Ballmaier, Matthias; Godinho, Tamaryin; Cathomen, Toni; Schambach, Axel

    2015-05-01

    Lentiviral and gammaretroviral vectors are state-of-the-art tools for transgene expression within target cells. The integration of these vectors can be deliberately suppressed to derive a transient gene expression system based on extrachromosomal circular episomes with intact coding regions. These episomes can be used to deliver DNA templates and to express RNA or protein. Importantly, transient gene transfer avoids the genotoxic side effects of integrating vectors. Restricting their applicability, episomes are rapidly lost upon dilution in dividing target cells. Addressing this limitation, we could establish comparably stable percentages of transgene-positive cells over prolonged time periods in proliferating cells by repeated transductions. Flow cytometry was applied for kinetic analyses to decipher the impact of individual parameters on the kinetics of fluoroprotein expression after episomal retransduction and to visualize sequential and simultaneous transfer of heterologous fluoroproteins. Expression windows could be exactly timed by the number of transduction steps. The kinetics of signal loss was affected by the cell proliferation rate. The transfer of genes encoding fluoroproteins with different half-lives revealed a major impact of protein stability on temporal signal distribution and accumulation, determining optimal retransduction intervals. In addition, sequential transductions proved broad applicability in different cell types and using different envelope pseudotypes without receptor overload. Stable percentages of cells coexpressing multiple transgenes could be generated upon repeated coadministration of different episomal vectors. Alternatively, defined patterns of transgene expression could be recapitulated by sequential transductions. Altogether, we established a methodology to control and adjust a temporally defined window of transgene expression using retroviral episomal vectors. Combined with the highly efficient cell entry of these vectors while

  15. Use of human MAR elements to improve retroviral vector production.

    PubMed

    Buceta, M; Galbete, J L; Kostic, C; Arsenijevic, Y; Mermod, N

    2011-01-01

    Retroviral vectors have many favorable properties for gene therapies, but their use remains limited by safety concerns and/or by relatively lower titers for some of the safer self-inactivating (SIN) derivatives. In this study, we evaluated whether increased production of SIN retroviral vectors can be achieved from the use of matrix attachment region (MAR) epigenetic regulators. Two MAR elements of human origin were found to increase and to stabilize the expression of the green fluorescent protein transgene in stably transfected HEK-293 packaging cells. Introduction of one of these MAR elements in retroviral vector-producing plasmids yielded higher expression of the viral vector RNA. Consistently, viral titers obtained from transient transfection of MAR-containing plasmids were increased up to sixfold as compared with the parental construct, when evaluated in different packaging cell systems and transfection conditions. Thus, use of MAR elements opens new perspectives for the efficient generation of gene therapy vectors.

  16. Retroviral Restriction Factors and Infectious Risk in Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meije, Yolanda; Tönjes, Ralf R.; Fishman, Jay A.

    2010-01-01

    The clinical application of xenotransplantation poses immunologic, ethical, and microbiologic challenges. Significant progress has been made in the investigation of each of these areas. Among concerns regarding infectious risks for human xenograft recipients is the identification in swine of infectious agents including porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) that are capable of replication in some human cell lines. PERV replication has, however, been difficult to demonstrate in primate-derived cell lines and in preclinical studies of non-human primates receiving porcine xenografts. Endogenous “retroviral restriction factors” are intracellular proteins and components of the innate immune system that act at various steps in retroviral replication. Recent studies suggest that some of these factors may have applications in the management of endogenous retroviruses in xenotransplantation. The risks of PERV infection and the potential role of retroviral restriction factors in xenotransplantation are reviewed in detail. PMID:20642677

  17. Retroviral env glycoprotein trafficking and incorporation into virions.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Together with the Gag protein, the Env glycoprotein is a major retroviral structural protein and is essential for forming infectious virus particles. Env is synthesized, processed, and transported to certain microdomains at the plasma membrane and takes advantage of the same host machinery for its trafficking as that used by cellular glycoproteins. Incorporation of Env into progeny virions is probably mediated by the interaction between Env and Gag, in some cases with the additional involvement of certain host factors. Although several general models have been proposed to explain the incorporation of retroviral Env glycoproteins into virions, the actual mechanism for this process is still unclear, partly because structural data on the Env protein cytoplasmic tail is lacking. This paper presents the current understanding of the synthesis, trafficking, and virion incorporation of retroviral Env proteins.

  18. In vitro generation and type-specific neutralization of a human papillomavirus type 16 virion pseudotype.

    PubMed Central

    Roden, R B; Greenstone, H L; Kirnbauer, R; Booy, F P; Jessie, J; Lowy, D R; Schiller, J T

    1996-01-01

    We report a system for generating infectious papillomaviruses in vitro that facilitates the analysis of papillomavirus assembly, infectivity, and serologic relatedness. Cultured hamster BPHE-1 cells harboring autonomously replicating bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) genomes were infected with recombinant Semliki Forest viruses that express the structural proteins of BPV1. When plated on C127 cells, extracts from cells expressing L1 and L2 together induced numerous transformed foci that could be specifically prevented by BPV neutralizing antibodies, demonstrating that BPV infection was responsible for the focal transformation. Extracts from BPHE-1 cells expressing L1 or L2 separately were not infectious. Although Semliki Forest virus-expressed L1 self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs), viral DNA was detected in particles only when L2 was coexpressed with L1, indicating that genome encapsidation requires L2. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L1 and L2 together in BPHE-1 cells also yielded infectious virus. These pseudotyped virions were neutralized by antiserum to HPV16 VLPs derived from European (114/K) or African (Z-1194) HPV16 variants but not by antisera to BPV VLPs, to a poorly assembling mutant HPV16 L1 protein, or to VLPs of closely related genital HPV types. Extracts from BPHE-1 cells coexpressing BPV L1 and HPV16 L2 or HPV16 L1 and BPV L2 were not infectious. We conclude that (i) mouse C127 cells express the cell surface receptor for HPV16 and are able to uncoat HPV16 capsids; (ii) if a papillomavirus DNA packaging signal exists, then it is conserved between the BPV and HPV16 genomes; (iii) functional L1-L2 interaction exhibits type specificity; and (iv) protection by HPV virus-like particle vaccines is likely to be type specific. PMID:8709207

  19. Retroviral integration: Site matters: Mechanisms and consequences of retroviral integration site selection.

    PubMed

    Demeulemeester, Jonas; De Rijck, Jan; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2015-11-01

    Here, we review genomic target site selection during retroviral integration as a multistep process in which specific biases are introduced at each level. The first asymmetries are introduced when the virus takes a specific route into the nucleus. Next, by co-opting distinct host cofactors, the integration machinery is guided to particular chromatin contexts. As the viral integrase captures a local target nucleosome, specific contacts introduce fine-grained biases in the integration site distribution. In vivo, the established population of proviruses is subject to both positive and negative selection, thereby continuously reshaping the integration site distribution. By affecting stochastic proviral expression as well as the mutagenic potential of the virus, integration site choice may be an inherent part of the evolutionary strategies used by different retroviruses to maximise reproductive success. © 2015 The Authors. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Direct demonstration of retroviral recombination in a rhesus monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Wooley, D P; Smith, R A; Czajak, S; Desrosiers, R C

    1997-01-01

    Recombination may be an important mechanism for increasing variation in retroviral populations. Retroviral recombination has been demonstrated in tissue culture systems by artificially creating doubly infected cells. Evidence for retroviral recombination in vivo is indirect and is based principally on the identification of apparently mosaic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genomes from phylogenetic analyses of viral sequences. We infected a rhesus monkey with two different molecularly cloned strains of simian immunodeficiency virus. One strain of virus had a deletion in vpx and vpr, and the other strain had a deletion in nef. Each strain on its own induced low virus loads and was nonpathogenic in rhesus monkeys. When injected simultaneously into separate legs of the same monkey, persistent high virus loads and declines in CD4+ lymphocyte concentrations were observed. Analysis of proviral DNA isolated directly from peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed that full-length, nondeleted SIVmac239 predominated by 2 weeks after infection. These results provide direct experimental evidence for genetic recombination between two different retroviral strains in an infected host. The results illustrate the ease and rapidity with which recombination can occur in an infected animal and the selection that can occur for variants generated by genetic recombination. PMID:9371629

  1. Efficient generation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotypes bearing morbilliviral glycoproteins and their use in quantifying virus neutralising antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Drew, Angharad A.; Takahashi, Emi; McDonald, Michael; Baron, Michael D.; Gilbert, Martin; Cleaveland, Sarah; Haydon, Daniel T.; Hosie, Margaret J.; Willett, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Morbillivirus neutralising antibodies are traditionally measured using either plaque reduction neutralisation tests (PRNTs) or live virus microneutralisation tests (micro-NTs). While both test formats provide a reliable assessment of the strength and specificity of the humoral response, they are restricted by the limited number of viral strains that can be studied and often present significant biological safety concerns to the operator. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of morbillivirus neutralising antibodies. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of canine distemper virus (CDV) on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Further, by exchanging the glycoprotein expression construct, responses against distinct viral strains or species may be measured. Using this technique, we demonstrate cross neutralisation between CDV and peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). As an example of the value of the technique, we demonstrate that UK dogs vary in the breadth of immunity induced by CDV vaccination; in some dogs the neutralising response is CDV-specific while, in others, the neutralising response extends to the ruminant morbillivirus PPRV. This technique will facilitate a comprehensive comparison of cross-neutralisation to be conducted across the morbilliviruses. PMID:26706278

  2. Digital sensing and sizing of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes in complex media: a model for Ebola and Marburg detection.

    PubMed

    Daaboul, George G; Lopez, Carlos A; Chinnala, Jyothsna; Goldberg, Bennett B; Connor, John H; Unlü, M Selim

    2014-06-24

    Rapid, sensitive, and direct label-free capture and characterization of nanoparticles from complex media such as blood or serum will broadly impact medicine and the life sciences. We demonstrate identification of virus particles in complex samples for replication-competent wild-type vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), defective VSV, and Ebola- and Marburg-pseudotyped VSV with high sensitivity and specificity. Size discrimination of the imaged nanoparticles (virions) allows differentiation between modified viruses having different genome lengths and facilitates a reduction in the counting of nonspecifically bound particles to achieve a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 5 × 10(3) pfu/mL for the Ebola and Marburg VSV pseudotypes. We demonstrate the simultaneous detection of multiple viruses in a single sample (composed of serum or whole blood) for screening applications and uncompromised detection capabilities in samples contaminated with high levels of bacteria. By employing affinity-based capture, size discrimination, and a "digital" detection scheme to count single virus particles, we show that a robust and sensitive virus/nanoparticle sensing assay can be established for targets in complex samples. The nanoparticle microscopy system is termed the Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS) and is capable of high-throughput and rapid sizing of large numbers of biological nanoparticles on an antibody microarray for research and diagnostic applications.

  3. Efficient generation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotypes bearing morbilliviral glycoproteins and their use in quantifying virus neutralising antibodies.

    PubMed

    Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Drew, Angharad A; Takahashi, Emi; McDonald, Michael; Baron, Michael D; Gilbert, Martin; Cleaveland, Sarah; Haydon, Daniel T; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-02-03

    Morbillivirus neutralising antibodies are traditionally measured using either plaque reduction neutralisation tests (PRNTs) or live virus microneutralisation tests (micro-NTs). While both test formats provide a reliable assessment of the strength and specificity of the humoral response, they are restricted by the limited number of viral strains that can be studied and often present significant biological safety concerns to the operator. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of morbillivirus neutralising antibodies. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of canine distemper virus (CDV) on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Further, by exchanging the glycoprotein expression construct, responses against distinct viral strains or species may be measured. Using this technique, we demonstrate cross neutralisation between CDV and peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). As an example of the value of the technique, we demonstrate that UK dogs vary in the breadth of immunity induced by CDV vaccination; in some dogs the neutralising response is CDV-specific while, in others, the neutralising response extends to the ruminant morbillivirus PPRV. This technique will facilitate a comprehensive comparison of cross-neutralisation to be conducted across the morbilliviruses.

  4. Digital Sensing and Sizing of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotypes in Complex Media; A Model for Ebola and Marburg Detection

    PubMed Central

    Chinnala, Jyothsna; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Connor, John H.; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2015-01-01

    Rapid, sensitive, and direct label-free capture and characterization of nanoparticles from complex media such as blood or serum will broadly impact medicine and the life sciences. We demonstrate identification of virus particles in complex samples for replication-competent wild-type vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), defective VSV, and Ebola- and Marburg-pseudotyped VSV with high sensitivity and specificity. Size discrimination of the imaged nanoparticles (virions) allows differentiation between modified viruses having different genome lengths and facilitates a reduction in the counting of non-specifically bound particles to achieve a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 5×103 pfu/mL for the Ebola and Marburg VSV pseudotypes. We demonstrate the simultaneous detection of multiple viruses in a single sample (composed of serum or whole blood) for screening applications and uncompromised detection capabilities in samples contaminated with high levels of bacteria. By employing affinity-based capture, size discrimination, and a “digital” detection scheme to count single virus particles, we show that a robust and sensitive virus/nanoparticle sensing assay can been established for targets in complex samples. The nanoparticle microscopy system is termed the Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS) and is capable of high-throughput and rapid sizing of large numbers of biological nanoparticles on an antibody microarray for research and diagnostic applications. PMID:24840765

  5. The emergence of drug resistant HIV variants and novel anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Paydary, Koosha; Khaghani, Parisa; Emamzadeh-Fard, Sahra; Alinaghi, Seyed Ahmad Seyed; Baesi, Kazem

    2013-01-01

    After its identification in 1980s, HIV has infected more than 30 million people worldwide. In the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, anti-retroviral drug resistance results from insufficient anti-retroviral pressure, which may lead to treatment failure. Preliminary studies support the idea that anti-retroviral drug resistance has evolved largely as a result of low-adherence of patients to therapy and extensive use of anti-retroviral drugs in the developed world; however, a highly heterogeneous horde of viral quasi-species are currently circulating in developing nations. Thus, the prioritizing of strategies adopted in such two worlds should be quite different considering the varying anti-retroviral drug resistance prevalence. In this article, we explore differences in anti-retroviral drug resistance patterns between developed and developing countries, as they represent two distinct ecological niches of HIV from an evolutionary standpoint. PMID:23835806

  6. Transduction of motor neurons and muscle fibers by intramuscular injection of HIV-1-based vectors pseudotyped with select rabies virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Mentis, George Z; Gravell, Maneth; Hamilton, Rebecca; Shneider, Neil A; O'Donovan, Michael J; Schubert, Manfred

    2006-10-30

    For studies of motor neuron function or for therapeutic purposes, novel pseudotype HIV-1-based vectors were developed that are capable of expressing transgenes in motor neurons following injection into mouse hind limb muscles. To specifically target motor neurons, glycoproteins from two rabies virus (RV) isolates, the mouse-brain adapted challenge virus 24 (CVS-24) variants, CVS-N2c and CVS-B2c were evaluated for pseudotype formation with an HIV-1-based vector. Both RV glycoproteins incorporated into vector envelopes, and both pseudotypes yielded high titers with Hek293T and cortical plate neuron cultures. Increased neuronotropism by the CVS-N2c pseudotype was not observed, suggesting that vector tropism is not solely determined by the fusogenic viral glycoprotein. Vector injection into hind limb muscles resulted in EYFP reporter gene expression in the injected muscle fibers and in spinal cord motor neurons innervating the same muscle, indicating retrograde vector transport. Intramuscular vector injections into the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles transduced 26% and 16% of all motor neurons in each motor nucleus, respectively. These transduction efficiencies may allow novel approaches to functional studies of the motor system and the treatment of neuromuscular disease.

  7. Characterization of retrovirus-based reporter viruses pseudotyped with the precursor membrane and envelope glycoproteins of four serotypes of dengue viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.-P.; Hsieh, S.-C.; King, C.-C.; Wang, W.-K.

    2007-11-25

    In this study, we successfully established retrovirus-based reporter viruses pseudotyped with the precursor membrane and envelope (PrM/E) proteins of each of the four serotypes of dengue viruses, which caused the most important arboviral diseases in this century. Co-sedimentation of the dengue E protein and HIV-1 core proteins by sucrose gradient analysis of the pseudotype reporter virus of dengue virus type 2, D2(HIVluc), and detection of HIV-1 core proteins by immunoprecipitation with anti-E monoclonal antibody suggested that dengue viral proteins were incorporated into the pseudotype viral particles. The infectivity in target cells, as assessed by the luciferase activity, can be inhibited by the lysosomotropic agents, suggesting a pH-dependent mechanism of entry. Amino acid substitutions of the leucine at position 107, a critical residue at the fusion loop of E protein, with lysine resulted in severe impairment in infectivity, suggesting that entry of the pseudotype reporter virus is mediated through the fusogenic properties of E protein. With more and more dengue viral sequences available from different outbreaks worldwide, this sensitive and convenient tool has the potential to facilitate molecular characterization of the PrM/E proteins of dengue field isolates.

  8. Production in yeast of pseudotype virus-like particles harboring functionally active antibody fragments neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin.

    PubMed

    Pleckaityte, Milda; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Sezaite, Indre; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2011-12-15

    Recombinant antibodies can be produced in different formats and different expression systems. Single chain variable fragments (scFvs) represent an attractive alternative to full-length antibodies and they can be easily produced in bacteria or yeast. However, the scFvs exhibit monovalent antigen-binding properties and short serum half-lives. The stability and avidity of the scFvs can be improved by their multimerization or fusion with IgG Fc domain. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibilities to produce in yeast high-affinity scFv-Fc proteins neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin (VLY), the main virulence factor of Gardnerella vaginalis. The scFv protein derived from hybridoma cell line producing high-affinity neutralizing antibodies against VLY was fused with human IgG1 Fc domain. Four different variants of anti-VLY scFv-Fc fusion proteins were constructed and produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The non-tagged scFv-Fc and hexahistidine-tagged scFv-Fc proteins were found predominantly as insoluble aggregates and therefore were not suitable for further purification and activity testing. The addition of yeast α-factor signal sequence did not support secretion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc but increased the amount of its intracellular soluble form. However, the purified protein showed a weak VLY-neutralizing capability. In contrast, the fusion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc molecules with hamster polyomavirus-derived VP2 protein and its co-expression with VP1 protein resulted in an effective production of pseudotype virus-like particles (VLPs) that exhibited strong VLY-binding activity. Recombinant scFv-Fc molecules displayed on the surface of VLPs neutralized VLY-mediated lysis of human erythrocytes and HeLa cells with high potency comparable to that of full-length antibody. Recombinant scFv-Fc proteins were expressed in yeast with low efficiency. New approach to display the scFv-Fc molecules on the surface of pseudotype VLPs was successful and

  9. Retroviral restriction and dependency factors in primates and carnivores

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Hind J.; Poeschla, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have extended the rapidly developing retroviral restriction factor field to cells of carnivore species. Carnivoran genomes, and the domestic cat genome in particular, are revealing intriguing properties vis-à;-vis the primate and feline lentiviruses, not only with respect to their repertoires of virus-blocking restriction factors but also replication-enabling dependency factors. Therapeutic application of restriction factors is envisioned for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model has promise for testing important hypotheses at the basic and translational level. Feline cell-tropic HIV-1 clones have also been generated by a strategy of restriction factor evasion. We review progress in this area in the context of what is known about retroviral restriction factors such as TRIM5alpha, TRIMCyp, APOBEC3 proteins and BST-2/Tetherin. PMID:21715018

  10. Retroviral restriction and dependency factors in primates and carnivores.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Hind J; Poeschla, Eric M

    2011-10-15

    Recent studies have extended the rapidly developing retroviral restriction factor field to cells of carnivore species. Carnivoran genomes, and the domestic cat genome in particular, are revealing intriguing properties vis-à-vis the primate and feline lentiviruses, not only with respect to their repertoires of virus-blocking restriction factors but also replication-enabling dependency factors. Therapeutic application of restriction factors is envisioned for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model has promise for testing important hypotheses at the basic and translational level. Feline cell-tropic HIV-1 clones have also been generated by a strategy of restriction factor evasion. We review progress in this area in the context of what is known about retroviral restriction factors such as TRIM5α, TRIMCyp, APOBEC3 proteins and BST-2/Tetherin.

  11. Convergent capture of retroviral superantigens by mammalian herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Aswad, Amr; Katzourakis, Aris

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer from retroviruses to mammals is well documented and extensive, but is rare between unrelated viruses with distinct genome types. Three herpesviruses encode a gene with similarity to a retroviral superantigen gene (sag) of the unrelated mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV). We uncover ancient retroviral sags in over 20 mammals to reconstruct their shared history with herpesviral sags, revealing that the acquisition is a convergent evolutionary event. A retrovirus circulating in South American primates over 10 million years ago was the source of sag in two monkey herpesviruses, and a different retrovirus was the source of sag in a Peruvian rodent herpesvirus. We further show through a timescaled phylogenetic analysis that a cross-species transmission of monkey herpesviruses occurred after the acquisition of sag. These results reveal that a diverse range of ancient sag-containing retroviruses independently donated sag twice from two separate lineages that are distinct from MMTV. PMID:26400439

  12. Intrinsic retroviral reactivation in human preimplantation embryos and pluripotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Grow, Edward J.; Flynn, Ryan A.; Chavez, Shawn L.; Bayless, Nicholas L.; Wossidlo, Mark; Wesche, Daniel; Martin, Lance; Ware, Carol; Blish, Catherine A.; Chang, Howard Y.; Reijo Pera, Renee A.; Wysocka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Summary Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections, which comprise nearly 8% of the human genome1. The most recently acquired human ERV is HERV-K (HML-2), which repeatedly infected the primate lineage both before and after the divergence of humans and chimpanzees2,3. Unlike most other human ERVs, HERV-K retained multiple copies of intact open reading frames (ORFs) encoding retroviral proteins4. However, HERV-K is transcriptionally silenced by the host with exception of certain pathological contexts, such as germ cell tumors, melanoma, or HIV infection5–7. Here we demonstrate that DNA hypomethylation at LTR elements representing the most recent genomic integrations, together with transactivation by OCT4, synergistically facilitate HERV-K expression. Consequently, HERV-K is transcribed during normal human embryogenesis beginning with embryonic genome activation (EGA) at the 8-cell stage, continuing through the emergence of epiblast cells in pre-implantation blastocysts, and ceasing during hESC derivation from blastocyst outgrowths. Remarkably, HERV-K viral-like particles and Gag proteins are detected in human blastocysts, indicating that early human development proceeds in the presence of retroviral products. We further show that overexpression of one such product, HERV-K accessory protein Rec, in a pluripotent cell line is sufficient to increase IFITM1 levels on the cell surface and inhibit viral infection, suggesting at least one mechanism through which HERV-K can induce viral restriction pathways in early embryonic cells. Moreover, Rec directly binds a subset of cellular RNAs and modulates their ribosome occupancy, arguing that complex interactions between retroviral proteins and host factors can fine-tune regulatory properties of early human development. PMID:25896322

  13. Retroviral vector production under serum deprivation: The role of lipids.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A F; Carmo, M; Alves, P M; Coroadinha, A S

    2009-12-15

    The use of retroviral vectors for gene therapy applications demands high titer preparations and stringent quality standards. However, the manufacturing of these vectors still represents a highly challenging task due to the low productivity of the cell lines and reduced stability of the vector infectivity, particularly under serum-free conditions. With the objective of understanding the major limitations of retroviral vector production under serum deprivation, a thorough study of viral production kinetics, vector characterization and cell growth and metabolic behavior was conducted, for 293 FLEX 18 and Te Fly Ga 18 producer cell lines using different serum concentrations. The reduction of serum supplementation in the culture medium resulted in pronounced decreases in cell productivity of infectious vector, up to ninefold in 293 FLEX 18 cells and sevenfold in Te Fly Ga 18 cells. Total particles productivity was maintained, as assessed by measuring viral RNA; therefore, the decrease in infectious vector production could be attributed to higher defective particles output. The absence of the serum lipid fraction was found to be the major cause for this decrease in cell viral productivity. The use of delipidated serum confirmed the requirement of serum lipids, particularly cholesterol, as its supplementation not only allowed the total recovery of viral titers as well as additional production increments in both cell lines when comparing with the standard 10% (v/v) FBS supplementation. This work identified lower production ratios of infectious particles/total particles as the main restraint of retroviral vector production under serum deprivation; this is of the utmost importance concerning the clinical efficacy of the viral preparations. Lipids were confirmed as the key serum component correlated with the production of infective retroviral vectors and this knowledge can be used to efficiently design medium supplementation strategies for serum-free production. Biotechnol

  14. Genetic reshuffling reconstitutes functional expression cassettes in retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Tabotta, W; Klein, D; Hohenadl, C; Salmons, B; Günzburg, W H

    2001-01-01

    A major prerequisite for the design of retroviral vectors encoding cell toxic or harmful genes is the possibility to tightly control gene expression, thus limiting activity to the relevant target cells and protecting the packaging cell used for production of recombinant viral particles. In the present study a system was developed in which genetic reshuffling during the retroviral life cycle is exploited, allowing reconstitution of functional expression cassettes from separate elements exclusively in transduced target cells. For construction of these murine leukaemia virus (MLV)-based reconstituting viral vectors (ReCon), a promoterless inverted enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene cassette was inserted in place of the U3 region of the 3' LTR. Subsequently, the human ubiquitin promoter was inserted in the inverse orientation into the R/U5 border of the 5' LTR of the vector. PA317 packaging cells stably transfected with ReCon vectors were established and EGFP expression was analysed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). After detection of low-level background expression, an additional polyadenylation signal was introduced in antisense orientation into the 3' LTR at the R/U5 border to prevent accidental read-through transcription from neighbouring cellular promoters. Virus-containing cell culture supernatants were then used to infect NIH3T3 target cells. EGFP expression, recloning and sequencing of integrated proviruses demonstrated the correct reassembly of the transduced ubiquitin/EGFP transcription unit in these infected cells. This facile and convenient system should allow production of retroviral vectors encoding potentially toxic proteins, cell cycle inhibitors or inducers of apoptosis, all of which would interfere with vector production if expressed in the retroviral packaging cell.

  15. Retroviral Infections in Peruvian Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Alberto M.; Zunt, Joseph R.; Peinado, Jesus; Lama, Javier R.; Ton, Thanh G.N.; Suarez, Luis; Pun, Monica; Cabezas, Cesar; Sanchez, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    We tested 2,655 Peruvian MSM for retroviral infection: HTLV-1 was detected in 48 (1.8%), HTLV-2 in 28 (1.1%), and HTLV-1 and -2 in 5 (0.2%); HIV infection was detected in 329 (12.4 %); 24 (7.3%) were coinfected with HTLV. Risk factors for HTLV-1 and -2 varied with sexual role. PMID:19480577

  16. Deciphering the Code for Retroviral Integration Target Site Selection

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Federico Andrea; Hartley, Oliver; Luban, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Upon cell invasion, retroviruses generate a DNA copy of their RNA genome and integrate retroviral cDNA within host chromosomal DNA. Integration occurs throughout the host cell genome, but target site selection is not random. Each subgroup of retrovirus is distinguished from the others by attraction to particular features on chromosomes. Despite extensive efforts to identify host factors that interact with retrovirion components or chromosome features predictive of integration, little is known about how integration sites are selected. We attempted to identify markers predictive of retroviral integration by exploiting Precision-Recall methods for extracting information from highly skewed datasets to derive robust and discriminating measures of association. ChIPSeq datasets for more than 60 factors were compared with 14 retroviral integration datasets. When compared with MLV, PERV or XMRV integration sites, strong association was observed with STAT1, acetylation of H3 and H4 at several positions, and methylation of H2AZ, H3K4, and K9. By combining peaks from ChIPSeq datasets, a supermarker was identified that localized within 2 kB of 75% of MLV proviruses and detected differences in integration preferences among different cell types. The supermarker predicted the likelihood of integration within specific chromosomal regions in a cell-type specific manner, yielding probabilities for integration into proto-oncogene LMO2 identical to experimentally determined values. The supermarker thus identifies chromosomal features highly favored for retroviral integration, provides clues to the mechanism by which retrovirus integration sites are selected, and offers a tool for predicting cell-type specific proto-oncogene activation by retroviruses. PMID:21124862

  17. Retroviral integrase protein and intasome nucleoprotein complex structures

    PubMed Central

    Grawenhoff, Julia; Engelman, Alan N

    2017-01-01

    Retroviral replication proceeds through the integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into the host cellular genome, a process that is mediated by the viral integrase (IN) protein. IN catalyzes two distinct chemical reactions: 3’-processing, whereby the viral DNA is recessed by a di- or trinucleotide at its 3’-ends, and strand transfer, in which the processed viral DNA ends are inserted into host chromosomal DNA. Although IN has been studied as a recombinant protein since the 1980s, detailed structural understanding of its catalytic functions awaited high resolution structures of functional IN-DNA complexes or intasomes, initially obtained in 2010 for the spumavirus prototype foamy virus (PFV). Since then, two additional retroviral intasome structures, from the α-retrovirus Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and β-retrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), have emerged. Here, we briefly review the history of IN structural biology prior to the intasome era, and then compare the intasome structures of PFV, MMTV and RSV in detail. Whereas the PFV intasome is characterized by a tetrameric assembly of IN around the viral DNA ends, the newer structures harbor octameric IN assemblies. Although the higher order architectures of MMTV and RSV intasomes differ from that of the PFV intasome, they possess remarkably similar intasomal core structures. Thus, retroviral integration machineries have adapted evolutionarily to utilize disparate IN elements to construct convergent intasome core structures for catalytic function. PMID:28289517

  18. Retroviral Vectors: Post Entry Events and Genomic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Nowrouzi, Ali; Glimm, Hanno; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    The curative potential of retroviral vectors for somatic gene therapy has been demonstrated impressively in several clinical trials leading to sustained long-term correction of the underlying genetic defect. Preclinical studies and clinical monitoring of gene modified hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in patients have shown that biologically relevant vector induced side effects, ranging from in vitro immortalization to clonal dominance and oncogenesis in vivo, accompany therapeutic efficiency of integrating retroviral gene transfer systems. Most importantly, it has been demonstrated that the genotoxic potential is not identical among all retroviral vector systems designed for clinical application. Large scale viral integration site determination has uncovered significant differences in the target site selection of retrovirus subfamilies influencing the propensity for inducing genetic alterations in the host genome. In this review we will summarize recent insights gained on the mechanisms of insertional mutagenesis based on intrinsic target site selection of different retrovirus families. We will also discuss examples of side effects occurring in ongoing human gene therapy trials and future prospectives in the field. PMID:21994741

  19. The Use of Hyperimmune Chicken Reference Sera Is Not Appropriate for the Validation of Influenza Pseudotype Neutralization Assays.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Francesca; Molesti, Eleonora; Scott, Simon; Cattoli, Giovanni; Temperton, Nigel

    2017-09-25

    The pseudotype particle neutralization test (pp-NT) is a next-generation serological assay employed for the sensitive study of influenza antibody responses against hemagglutinin (HA), including stalk-directed antibodies. However, a validation of this assay has yet to be performed, and this limits its use to primarily research laboratories. To identify possible serological standards to be used in optimization and validation of the pp-NT, we have evaluated the cross-reactivity of hyperimmune chicken reference antisera in this assay. Our findings show that the cross-reactivity detected by the pp-NT is only partly explained by phylogenetic relationships and protein homology between the HA subtypes analysed; further studies are necessary to understand the origin of the cross-reactivity detected, and reference standards with higher specificity should be evaluated or generated de novo for future use in pp-NT.

  20. Adenovirus Vector Pseudotyping in Fiber-Expressing Cell Lines: Improved Transduction of Epstein-Barr Virus-Transformed B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Von Seggern, Dan J.; Huang, Shuang; Fleck, Shonna Kaye; Stevenson, Susan C.; Nemerow, Glen R.

    2000-01-01

    While adenovirus (Ad) gene delivery vectors are useful in many gene therapy applications, their broad tropism means that they cannot be directed to a specific target cell. There are also a number of cell types involved in human disease which are not transducible with standard Ad vectors, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B lymphocytes. Adenovirus binds to host cells via the viral fiber protein, and Ad vectors have previously been retargeted by modifying the fiber gene on the viral chromosome. This requires that the modified fiber be able to bind to the cell in which the vector is grown, which prevents truly specific vector targeting. We previously reported a gene delivery system based on a fiber gene-deleted Ad type 5 (Ad5) vector (Ad5.βgal.ΔF) and packaging cells that express the viral fiber protein. Expression of different fibers in packaging cells will allow Ad retargeting without modifying the viral chromosome. Importantly, fiber proteins which can no longer bind to the producer cells can also be used. Using this approach, we generated for the first time pseudotyped Ad5.βgal.ΔF particles containing either the wild-type Ad5 fiber protein or a chimeric fiber with the receptor-binding knob domain of the Ad3 fiber. Particles equipped with the chimeric fiber bound to the Ad3 receptor rather than the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor protein used by Ad5. EBV-transformed B lymphocytes were infected efficiently by the Ad3-pseudotyped particles but poorly by virus containing the Ad5 fiber protein. The strategy described here represents a broadly applicable method for targeting gene delivery to specific cell types. PMID:10590124

  1. Proteochemometrics mapping of the interaction space for retroviral proteases and their substrates.

    PubMed

    Kontijevskis, Aleksejs; Petrovska, Ramona; Yahorava, Sviatlana; Komorowski, Jan; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2009-07-15

    Understanding the complex interactions of retroviral proteases with their ligands is an important scientific challenge in efforts to achieve control of retroviral infections. Development of drug resistance because of high mutation rates and extensive polymorphisms causes major problems in treating the deadly diseases these viruses cause, and prompts efforts to identify new strategies. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of the interaction of 63 retroviral proteases from nine different viral species with their substrates and inhibitors based on publicly available data from the past 17years of retroviral research. By correlating physico-chemical descriptions of retroviral proteases and substrates to their biological activities we constructed a highly statistically valid 'proteochemometric' model for the interactome of retroviral proteases. Analysis of the model indicated amino acid positions in retroviral proteases with the highest influence on ligand activity and revealed general physicochemical properties essential for tight binding of substrates across multiple retroviral proteases. Hexapeptide inhibitors developed based on the discovered general properties effectively inhibited HIV-1 proteases in vitro, and some exhibited uniformly high inhibitory activity against all HIV-1 proteases mutants evaluated. A generalized proteochemometric model for retroviral proteases interactome has been created and analysed in this study. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using the developed general strategy in the design of inhibitory peptides that can potentially serve as templates for drug resistance-improved HIV retardants.

  2. Efficient conditional gene expression following transplantation of retrovirally transduced bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jie-Yu; Mackay, Fabienne; Alderuccio, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral gene therapy combined with bone marrow stem cell transplantation can be used to generate mice with ectopic gene expression in the bone marrow compartment in a quick and cost effective manner when compared to generating and maintaining transgenic mouse lines. However a limitation of this procedure is the lack of cell specificity in gene expression that is associated with the use of endogenous retroviral promoters. Restricting gene expression to specific cell subsets utilising tissue-specific promoter driven retroviral vectors is a challenge. Here we describe the generation of conditional expression of retrovirally encoded genes in specific bone marrow derived cell lineages utilising a Cre-dependent retroviral vector. By utilising Lck and CD19 restricted Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells, we generate chimeric animals with T or B lymphocyte restricted gene expression respectively. The design of the Cre-dependent retroviral vector enables expression of encoded MOG and GFP genes only in association with Cre mediated DNA inversion. Importantly this strategy does not significantly increase the size of the retroviral vector; as such we are able to generate bone marrow chimeric animals with significantly higher chimerism levels than previous studies utilising Cre-dependent retroviral vectors and Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells. This demonstrates that the use of Cre-dependent retroviral vectors is able to yield high chimerism levels for experimental use and represent a viable alternative to generating transgenic animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Critical variables affecting clinical-grade production of the self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vector for the treatment of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    van der Loo, J C M; Swaney, W P; Grassman, E; Terwilliger, A; Higashimoto, T; Schambach, A; Hacein-Bey-Abina, S; Nordling, D L; Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Thrasher, A J; Williams, D A; Reeves, L; Malik, P

    2012-08-01

    Patients with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) were successfully cured following gene therapy with a gamma-retroviral vector (gRV) expressing the common gamma chain of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL2RG). However, 5 of 20 patients developed leukemia from activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by viral enhancers in the long-terminal repeats (LTR) of the integrated vector. These events prompted the design of a gRV vector with self-inactivating (SIN) LTRs to enhance vector safety. Herein we report on the production of a clinical-grade SIN IL2RG gRV pseudotyped with the Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus envelope for a new gene therapy trial for SCID-X1, and highlight variables that were found to be critical for transfection-based large-scale SIN gRV production. Successful clinical production required careful selection of culture medium without pre-added glutamine, reduced exposure of packaging cells to cell-dissociation enzyme, and presence of cations in wash buffer. The clinical vector was high titer; transduced 68-70% normal human CD34(+) cells, as determined by colony-forming unit assays and by xenotransplantation in immunodeficient NOD.CB17-Prkdc(scid)/J (nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID)) and NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ (NOD/SCID gamma (NSG))) mice; and resulted in the production of T cells in vitro from human SCID-X1 CD34(+) cells. The vector was certified and released for the treatment of SCID-X1 in a multi-center international phase I/II trial.

  4. Critical Variables affecting clinical-grade production of the self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vector for the treatment of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    van der Loo, JCM; Swaney, WP; Grassman, E; Terwilliger, A; Higashimoto, T; Schambach, A; Hacein-Bey-Abina, S; Nordling, DL; Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Thrasher, AJ; Williams, DA; Reeves, L; Malik, P

    2014-01-01

    Patients with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) were successfully cured following gene therapy with a gamma-retroviral vector (gRV) expressing the common gamma chain of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL2RG). However, 5 of 20 patients developed leukemia from activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by viral enhancers in the long-terminal repeats (LTR) of the integrated vector. These events prompted the design of a gRV vector with self-inactivating (SIN) LTRs to enhance vector safety. Herein we report on the production of a clinical-grade SIN IL2RG gRV pseudotyped with the Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus envelope for a new gene therapy trial for SCID-X1, and highlight variables that were found to be critical for transfection-based large-scale SIN gRV production. Successful clinical production required careful selection of culture medium without pre-added glutamine, reduced exposure of packaging cells to cell-dissociation enzyme, and presence of cations in wash buffer. The clinical vector was high titer; transduced 68–70% normal human CD34 + cells, as determined by colony-forming unit assays and by xenotransplantation in immunodeficient NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J (nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID)) and NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NOD/SCID gamma (NSG))) mice; and resulted in the production of T cells in vitro from human SCID-X1 CD34 + cells. The vector was certified and released for the treatment of SCID-X1 in a multi-center international phase I/II trial. PMID:22551777

  5. Susceptibility of porcine endogenous retrovirus to anti-retroviral inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Argaw, Takele; Colon-Moran, Winston; Wilson, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) is an endogenous retrovirus that poses a risk of iatrogenic transmission in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. The lack of a means to control PERV infection in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation is a major concern in the field. In this study, we set out to evaluate the ability of currently licensed anti-HIV drugs, and other types of anti-retroviral compounds, to inhibit PERV infection in vitro. Methods We used target cells stably expressing one of the known PERV viral receptors, an infectious molecular clone, PERV-A 14/220, and at least one drug from each class of anti-retroviral inhibitors as well as off-label drugs shown to have anti-viral activities. The susceptibility of PERV-A 14/220 LacZ to the anti-retroviral drugs was determined from infected cells by histochemical staining. Results We extend the results of previous studies by showing that, in addition to raltegravir, dolutegravir is found to have a potent inhibitory activity against PERV replication (IC50 8.634 ±0.336 and IC50 3.06 ± 0.844 nm, respectively). The anti-HIV drug zidovudine (AZT) showed considerable anti-PERV activity with IC50 of 1.923 ±0.691 μm as well. Conclusions The study results indicate that some of the licensed antiretroviral drugs may be useful for controlling PERV infection. However, the efficacy at nanomolar concentrations put forward integrase inhibitors as a drug that has the potential to be useful in the event that xenotransplantation recipients have evidence of PERV transmission and replication. PMID:27028725

  6. Most Retroviral Recombinations Occur during Minus-Strand DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiayou; Tang, Ling-Yun; Li, Ting; Ma, Yan; Sapp, Christy M.

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral RNA molecules are plus, or sense in polarity, equivalent to mRNA. During reverse transcription, the first strand of the DNA molecule synthesized is minus-strand DNA. After the minus strand is polymerized, the plus-strand DNA is synthesized using the minus-strand DNA as the template. In this study, a helper cell line that contains two proviruses with two different mutated gfp genes was constructed. Recombination between the two frameshift mutant genes resulted in a functional gfp. If recombination occurs during minus-strand DNA synthesis, the plus-strand DNA will also contain the functional sequence. After the cell divides, all of its offspring will be green. However, if recombination occurs during plus-strand DNA synthesis, then only the plus-strand DNA will contain the wild-type gfp sequence and the minus-strand DNA will still carry the frameshift mutation. The double-stranded DNA containing this mismatch was subsequently integrated into the host chromosomal DNA of D17 cells, which were unable to repair the majority of mismatches within the retroviral double-strand DNA. After the cell divided, one daughter cell contained the wild-type gfp sequence and the other daughter cell contained the frameshift mutation in the gfp sequence. Under fluorescence microscopy, half the cells in the offspring were green and the other half of the cells were colorless or clear. Thus, we demonstrated that more than 98%, if not all, retroviral recombinations occurred during minus-strand DNA synthesis. PMID:10666262

  7. Microbead-assisted retroviral transduction for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Bianca; Jorritsma, Annelies; Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Toebes, Mireille; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2010-10-01

    Retroviral transduction is the most commonly used strategy to obtain long-term expression of therapeutic genes. To efficiently transduce mammalian cells, a recombinant fibronectin molecule, RetroNectin, is generally used to juxtapose viral particles and cells, and thereby enhance viral uptake. Although this strategy has become widely adopted, in particular for the genetic modification of hematopoietic cells, several limitations apply. For example, it requires the use of culture systems that allow protein coating, something that is not possible for many of the closed cell culture systems that are used in clinical trials. Furthermore, efficient transduction is obtained only when culture systems can be exposed to centrifugation, an approach termed spin transduction. Here, we describe a novel and more potent strategy for the transduction of T cells that can be applied on a clinical scale. We show that RetroNectin can efficiently be coated onto epoxy-modified paramagnetic beads. After a blocking step, these beads can subsequently bind retroviral particles from viral supernatants, rendering such supernatants largely devoid of functional viral particles. Addition of these virus-loaded beads to activated T cells results in efficient retroviral infection. Importantly, transduction does not require the use of culture systems that are compatible with protein coating, nor is it dependent on centrifugation of either the viral supernatant or the cells. Finally, cell growth, phenotype, and function of spin-transduced versus bead-transduced cells are comparable. Viral coating of microbeads should facilitate the production of genetically modified cells, in particular for use in clinical trials.

  8. Release testing of retroviral vectors and gene-modified cells.

    PubMed

    Nordling, Diana; Kaiser, Anne; Reeves, Lilith

    2009-01-01

    This chapter will review the design and execution of release testing requirements for retroviral vectors and gene-modified cells consistent with ensuring the success of the clinical trial on the basis of current US regulatory requirements. It is the ethical and legal responsibility of the clinical trial sponsor(s) to ensure safety of the patients through proper evaluation of the drug products prior to use. Any clinical trial drug product used in human subjects must be produced and evaluated for safety, quality, purity, and effectiveness according to Current Good Manufacturing Practices appropriate for the stage of clinical development.

  9. Retroviral infection in Peruvian men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Alberto M; Zunt, Joseph R; Peinado, Jesus; Lama, Javier R; Ton, Thanh G N; Suarez, Luis; Pun, Monica; Cabezas, Cesar; Sanchez, Jorge

    2009-07-01

    We tested 2655 Peruvian men who have sex with men for the presence of retroviral infection. Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was detected in 48 (1.8%) of the patients, HTLV-2 was detected in 28 (1.1%), and HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 were both detected in 5 (0.2%). Human immunodeficiency virus infection was detected in 329 (12.4%) of the patients; 24 (7.3%) had HTLV coinfection. Risk factors for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infection varied with sexual role.

  10. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotyped with Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Serves as a Highly Protective, Non-infectious Vaccine Against Ebola Virus Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    1 Vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with Ebola virus glycoprotein serves as 1 a highly protective, non-infectious vaccine against Ebola virus...Iowa City, IA 52242 USA 16 1 319 335 8021 17 wendy-maury@uiowa.edu 18 19 Running title: Pseudovirion vaccine against Ebola virus 20...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED 2 Abstract 21 An epidemic caused by Ebola virus (EBOV

  11. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein- and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-derived glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentivirus vectors differentially transduce corneal endothelium, trabecular meshwork, and human photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Barnard, Alun R; Charbel Issa, Peter; Singh, Mandeep S; De Silva, Samantha R; Trabalza, Antonio; Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Ellison, Stuart M; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; MacLaren, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    The ability to deliver a large transgene efficiently to photoreceptors using viral vectors remains problematic and yet is critical for the future therapy of inherited retinal diseases such as Stargardt's and Usher's 1B. Herein, we examine the ocular tropism of a HIV-1-based lentivirus vector pseudotyped with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-derived glycoprotein (VEEV-G) after intraocular delivery to the posterior and anterior chambers of C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Reporter gene (EGFP) expression was evaluated using in vivo fluorescence imaging followed by postmortem immunohistochemistry and retinal function assessed by electroretinography. Intracameral administration of VEEV-G and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G)-pseudotyped vectors resulted in robust transgene expression in the corneal endothelium and trabecular meshwork. After subretinal administration, onset of transgene expression was observed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) 1 day postinjection with both VEEV-G and control VSV-G pseudotypes, but no significant photoreceptor transduction was apparent. Substantial degeneration of the outer nuclear layer was observed with VEEV-G-pseudotyped vector, which corresponded to ablation of retinal function. Subretinal administration of VSV-G was observed to result in significant suppression of electrophysiological function compared with buffer-injected and uninjected control eyes. Suppression of the c-wave amplitude, in addition to reduced RPE65 expression, indicated potential RPE dysfunction. Ex vivo tropism of VSV-G was assessed using organotypic culture of explanted retina harvested from wild-type mice and human patients undergoing retinal detachment surgery to examine the prevention of transduction by physical barriers and species differences in tropism.

  12. Comparison of Adeno-Associated Virus Pseudotype 1, 2, and 8 Vectors Administered by Intramuscular Injection in the Treatment of Murine Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Rebuffat, Alexandre; Harding, Cary O.; Ding, Zhaobing

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Phenylketonuria (PKU) is caused by hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) deficiency and is associated with systemic accumulation of phenylalanine (Phe). Previously we demonstrated correction of murine PKU after intravenous injection of a recombinant type 2 adeno-associated viral vector pseudotyped with type 8 capsid (rAAV2/8), which successfully directed hepatic transduction and Pah gene expression. Here, we report that liver PAH activity and phenylalanine clearance were also restored in PAH-deficient mice after simple intramuscular injection of either AAV2 pseudotype 1 (rAAV2/1) or rAAV2/8 vectors. Serotype 2 AAV vector (rAAV2/2) was also investigated, but long-term phenylalanine clearance has been observed only for pseudotypes 1 and 8. Therapeutic correction was shown in both male and female mice, albeit more effectively in males, in which correction lasted for the entire period of the experiment (>1 year). Although phenylalanine levels began to rise in female mice at about 8–10 months after rAAV2/8 injection they remained only mildly hyperphenylalaninemic thereafter and subsequent supplementation with synthetic tetrahydrobiopterin resulted in a transient decrease in blood phenylalanine. Alternatively, subsequent administration of a second vector with a different AAV pseudotype to avoid immunity against the previously administrated vector was also successful for long-term treatment of female PKU mice. Overall, this relatively less invasive gene transfer approach completes our previous studies and allows comparison of complementary strategies in the development of efficient PKU gene therapy protocols. PMID:19916803

  13. A pseudotype baculovirus expressing the capsid protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus and a T-Cell immunogen shows enhanced immunogenicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of livestock which causes severe economic loss in cloven-hoofed animals. Vaccination is still a major strategy in developing countries to control FMD. Currently, inactivated vaccine of FMDV has been used in many countries with limited success and safety concerns. Development of a novel effective vaccine is must. Methods In the present study, two recombinant pseudotype baculoviruses, one expressing the capsid of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) under the control of a cytomegalovirus immediate early enhancer/promoter (CMV-IE), and the other the caspid plus a T-cell immunogen coding region under a CAG promoter were constructed, and their expression was characterized in mammalian cells. In addition, their immunogenicity in a mouse model was investigated. The humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by pseudotype baculovirus were compared with those of inactivated vaccine. Results Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and indirect sandwich-ELISA (IS-ELISA) showed both recombinant baculoviruses (with or without T-cell epitopes) were transduced efficiently and expressed target proteins in BHK-21 cells. In mice, intramuscular inoculation of recombinants with 1 × 109 or 1 × 1010 PFU/mouse induced the production of FMDV-specific neutralizing antibodies and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Furthermore, recombinant baculovirus with T-cell epitopes had better immunogenicity than the recombinant without T-cell epitopes as demonstrated by significantly enhanced IFN-γ production (P < 0.01) and higher neutralizing antibody titer (P < 0.05). Although the inactivated vaccine produced the highest titer of neutralizing antibodies, a lower IFN-γ expression was observed compared to the two recombinant pseudotype baculoviruses. Conclusions These results indicate that pseudotype baculovirus-mediated gene delivery could be a alternative strategy to develop a new generation of vaccines against FMDV infection

  14. Infection of Female Primary Lower Genital Tract Epithelial Cells after Natural Pseudotyping of HIV-1: Possible Implications for Sexual Transmission of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuyang; George, Alvin; Nouvet, Franklin; Sweet, Stephanie; Emeagwali, Nkiruka; Taylor, Harry E.; Simmons, Glenn; Hildreth, James E. K.

    2014-01-01

    The global AIDS pandemic continues to expand and in some regions of the world, such as southern Africa, the prevalence of HIV-1 infection exceeds 20%. The devastating spread of the virus in young women in these countries appears disproportional to overall risk of infection. Regions with high prevalence of HIV-1 are often also highly endemic for other pathogenic viruses including HSV, CMV and HTLV. We propose that acquisition by HIV-1 of the envelope glycoproteins of other viruses, in a process we call “natural pseudotyping,” expands the cellular tropism of HIV-1, enabling it to infect female genital epithelial cells directly and thereby dramatically increasing risk of infection during sexual intercourse. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that when HIV-1 co-infects T cells along with the gammaretrovirus xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), progeny HIV-1 particles are produced capable of infecting primary vaginal, ectocervical and endocervical epithelial cells. These cell types are normally resistant to HIV-1 infection. Infection of primary genital cells was neutralized by antisera against the XMRV glycoprotein, confirming that infection was mediated by the XMRV glycoprotein acquired through pseudotyping of HIV. Inhibition by AZT showed that active replication of HIV-1 occurred in these cells and ruled out non-specific endocytic uptake of the virus. These results demonstrate that natural pseudotyping can expand the tropism of HIV-1 to include genital epithelial cells and have potential implications for sexual transmission of the virus. PMID:25010677

  15. The use of an optimized chimeric envelope glycoprotein enhances the efficiency of retrograde gene transfer of a pseudotyped lentiviral vector in the primate brain.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soshi; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Tsuge, Hitomi; Uezono, Shiori; Nagaya, Kiyomi; Fijiwara, Maki; Kato, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takada, Masahiko

    2017-02-28

    Lentiviral vectors have been used not only for various basic research experiments, but also for a wide range of gene therapy trials in animal models. The development of a pseudotyped lentiviral vector with the property of retrograde infection allows us to introduce foreign genes into neurons that are localized in regions innervating the site of vector injection. Here, we report the efficiency of retrograde gene transfer of a recently developed FuG-E pseudotyped lentiviral vector in the primate brain by comparing its transduction pattern with that of the parental FuG-C pseudotyped vector. After injection of the FuG-E vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the striatum of macaque monkeys, many GFP-immunoreactive neurons were found in regions projecting to the striatum, such as the cerebral cortex, thalamus, and substantia nigra. Quantitative analysis revealed that in all regions, the number of neurons retrogradely transduced with the FuG-E vector was larger than in the FuG-C vector injection case. It was also confirmed that the FuG-E vector displayed explicit neuronal specificity to the same extent as the FuG-C vector. This vector might promote approaches to pathway-selective gene manipulation and provide a powerful tool for effective gene therapy trials against neurological disorders through enhanced retrograde delivery.

  16. Lyophilisation of influenza, rabies and Marburg lentiviral pseudotype viruses for the development and distribution of a neutralisation -assay-based diagnostic kit.

    PubMed

    Mather, Stuart T; Wright, Edward; Scott, Simon D; Temperton, Nigel J

    2014-12-15

    Pseudotype viruses (PVs) are chimeric, replication-deficient virions that mimic wild-type virus entry mechanisms and can be safely employed in neutralisation assays, bypassing the need for high biosafety requirements and performing comparably to established serological assays. However, PV supernatant necessitates -80°C long-term storage and cold-chain maintenance during transport, which limits the scope of dissemination and application throughout resource-limited laboratories. We therefore investigated the effects of lyophilisation on influenza, rabies and Marburg PV stability, with a view to developing a pseudotype virus neutralisation assay (PVNA) based kit suitable for affordable global distribution. Infectivity of each PV was calculated after lyophilisation and immediate reconstitution, as well as subsequent to incubation of freeze-dried pellets at varying temperatures, humidities and timepoints. Integrity of glycoprotein structure following treatment was also assessed by employing lyophilised PVs in downstream PVNAs. In the presence of 0.5M sucrose-PBS cryoprotectant, each freeze-dried pseudotype was stably stored for 4 weeks at up to 37°C and could be neutralised to the same potency as unlyophilised PVs when employed in PVNAs. These results confirm the viability of a freeze-dried PVNA-based kit, which could significantly facilitate low-cost serology for a wide portfolio of emerging infectious viruses.

  17. A new generation of retroviral producer cells: predictable and stable virus production by Flp-mediated site-specific integration of retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schucht, R; Coroadinha, A S; Zanta-Boussif, M A; Verhoeyen, E; Carrondo, M J T; Hauser, H; Wirth, Dagmar

    2006-08-01

    We developed a new strategy that provides well-defined high-titer producer cells for recombinant retroviruses in a minimum amount of time. The strategy involves the targeted integration of the retroviral vector into a chromosomal locus with favorable properties. For proof of concept we established a novel HEK293-based retroviral producer cell line, called Flp293A, with a single-copy retroviral vector integrated at a selected chromosomal locus. The vector was flanked by noninteracting Flp-recombinase recognition sites and was exchanged for different retroviral vectors via Flp-mediated cassette exchange. All analyzed cell clones showed correct integration and identical titers for each of the vectors, confirming that the expression characteristics from the parental cell were preserved. Titers up to 2.5 x 10(7) infectious particles/10(6) cells were obtained. Also, high-titer producer cells for a therapeutic vector that encodes the 8.9-kb collagen VII cDNA in a marker-free cassette were obtained within 3 weeks without screening. Thus, we provide evidence that the precise integration of viral vectors into a favorable chromosomal locus leads to high and predictable virus production. This method is compatible with other retroviral vectors, including self-inactivating vectors and marker-free vectors. Further, it provides a tool for evaluation of different retroviral vector designs.

  18. The Early Years of Retroviral Protease Crystal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Soon after its discovery, the attempts to develop anti-AIDS therapeutics focused on the retroviral protease (PR) — an enzyme used by lentiviruses to process the precursor polypeptide into mature viral proteins. An urgent need for the three-dimensional structure of PR to guide rational drug design prompted efforts to produce milligram quantities of this enzyme. However, only minute amounts of PR were present in the HIV-1 and HIV-2 viruses, and initial attempts to express this protein in bacteria were not successful. This review describes X-ray crystallographic studies of the retroviral proteases carried out at NCI-Frederick in the late 1980s and early 1990s and puts into perspective the crucial role that the total protein chemical synthesis played in unraveling the structure, mechanism of action, and inhibition of HIV-1 PR. Notably, the first fully correct structure of HIV-1 PR and the first cocrystal structure of its complex with an inhibitor (a substrate-derived, reduced isostere hexapeptide MVT-101) were determined using chemically synthesized protein. Most importantly, these sets of coordinates were made freely available to the research community and were used worldwide to solve X-ray structures of HIV-1 PR complexes with an array of inhibitors and set in motion a variety of theoretical studies. Publication of the structure of chemically synthesized HIV-1 PR complexed with MVT-101 preceded only by six years the approval of the first PR inhibitor as an anti-AIDS drug. PMID:20593466

  19. Changing T cell specificity by retroviral T cell receptor display

    PubMed Central

    Kessels, Helmut W. H. G.; van den Boom, Marly D.; Spits, Hergen; Hooijberg, Erik; Schumacher, Ton N. M.

    2000-01-01

    The diversity of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is limited, because of the processes of positive and negative T cell selection. To obtain T cells with specificities beyond the immune system's capacity, we have developed a strategy for retroviral TCR display. In this approach, a library of T cell variants is generated in vitro and introduced into a TCR-negative murine T cell line by retroviral transfer. We document the value of TCR display by the creation of a library of an influenza A-specific TCR and the subsequent in vitro selection of TCRs that either recognize the parental influenza epitope or that have acquired a specificity for a different influenza A strain. The resulting in vitro selected TCRs induce efficient T cell activation after ligand recognition and are of equal or higher potency than the in vivo generated parent receptor. TCR display should prove a useful strategy for the generation of high-affinity tumor-specific TCRs for gene transfer purposes. PMID:11121060

  20. Retroviral Transcriptional Regulation and Embryonic Stem Cells: War and Peace

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses have evolved complex transcriptional enhancers and promoters that allow their replication in a wide range of tissue and cell types. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, however, characteristically suppress transcription of proviruses formed after infection by exogenous retroviruses and also of most members of the vast array of endogenous retroviruses in the genome. These cells have unusual profiles of transcribed genes and are poised to make rapid changes in those profiles upon induction of differentiation. Many of the transcription factors in ES cells control both host and retroviral genes coordinately, such that retroviral expression patterns can serve as markers of ES cell pluripotency. This overlap is not coincidental; retrovirus-derived regulatory sequences are often used to control cellular genes important for pluripotency. These sequences specify the temporal control and perhaps “noisy” control of cellular genes that direct proper cell gene expression in primitive cells and their differentiating progeny. The evidence suggests that the viral elements have been domesticated for host needs, reflecting the wide-ranging exploitation of any and all available DNA sequences in assembling regulatory networks. PMID:25547290

  1. Retroviral transcriptional regulation and embryonic stem cells: war and peace.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Sharon; Goff, Stephen P

    2015-03-01

    Retroviruses have evolved complex transcriptional enhancers and promoters that allow their replication in a wide range of tissue and cell types. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, however, characteristically suppress transcription of proviruses formed after infection by exogenous retroviruses and also of most members of the vast array of endogenous retroviruses in the genome. These cells have unusual profiles of transcribed genes and are poised to make rapid changes in those profiles upon induction of differentiation. Many of the transcription factors in ES cells control both host and retroviral genes coordinately, such that retroviral expression patterns can serve as markers of ES cell pluripotency. This overlap is not coincidental; retrovirus-derived regulatory sequences are often used to control cellular genes important for pluripotency. These sequences specify the temporal control and perhaps "noisy" control of cellular genes that direct proper cell gene expression in primitive cells and their differentiating progeny. The evidence suggests that the viral elements have been domesticated for host needs, reflecting the wide-ranging exploitation of any and all available DNA sequences in assembling regulatory networks.

  2. Genetic assay for multimerization of retroviral gag polyproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Luban, J; Alin, K B; Bossolt, K L; Humaran, T; Goff, S P

    1992-01-01

    We have established a genetic assay for the multimerization of retroviral gag polyproteins. This assay is based on the GAL4 two-hybrid system for studying protein-protein interactions (S. Fields and O. Song, Nature (London) 340:245-246, 1989). In our initial experiments, we generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasmids that separately express the GAL4 DNA-binding and GAL4 activation domains fused to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gag polyprotein, Pr55gag. The coexpression of these two hybrid proteins in S. cerevisiae results in the association of the GAL4 domains and the potent activation of an integrated GAL4-responsive lacZ indicator gene. Similar results were obtained with plasmids encoding GAL4-Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) gag polyprotein hybrid proteins. In contrast, the heterologous GAL4-HIV-1 gag and GAL4-M-MuLV gag fusion proteins were unable to interact with each other to induce lacZ expression. The results suggest that this yeast system provides a rapid and specific assay for the interactions of retroviral gag proteins that occur during virion assembly. Images PMID:1629970

  3. The Hypervariable Region 1 of the E2 Glycoprotein of Hepatitis C Virus Binds to Glycosaminoglycans, but This Binding Does Not Lead to Infection in a Pseudotype System

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Arnab; Beyene, Aster; Meyer, Keith; Ray, Ranjit

    2004-01-01

    The hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 envelope glycoprotein is a 27-amino-acid sequence located at its N terminus. In this study, we investigated the functional role of HVR1 for interaction with the mammalian cell surface. The C-terminal truncated E2 glycoprotein was appended to a transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein for generation of the chimeric E2-G gene construct. A deletion of the HVR1 sequence from E2 was created for the construction of E2ΔHVR1-G. Pseudotype virus, generated separately by infection of a stable cell line expressing E2-G or E2ΔHVR1-G with a temperature-sensitive mutant of VSV (VSVts045), displayed unique functional properties compared to VSVts045 as a negative control. Virus generated from E2ΔHVR1-G had a reduced plaquing efficiency (∼50%) in HepG2 cells compared to that for the E2-G virus. Cells prior treated with pronase (0.5 U/ml) displayed a complete inhibition of infectivity of the E2ΔHVR1-G or E2-G pseudotypes, whereas heparinase I treatment (8 U/ml) of cells reduced 40% E2-G pseudotype virus titer only. E2ΔHVR1-G pseudotypes were not sensitive to heparin (6 to 50 μg/ml) as an inhibitor of plaque formation compared to the E2-G pseudotype virus. Although the HVR1 sequence itself does not match with the known heparin-binding domain, a synthetic peptide representing 27 amino acids of the E2 HVR1 displayed a strong affinity for heparin in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This binding was competitively inhibited by a peptide from the V3 loop of a human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein subunit (gp120) known to bind with cell surface heparin. Taken together, our results suggest that the HVR1 of E2 glycoprotein binds to the cell surface proteoglycans and may facilitate virus-host interaction for replication cycle of HCV. PMID:15078928

  4. Optimization of vesicular stomatitis virus-G pseudotyped feline immunodeficiency virus vector for minimized cytotoxicity with efficient gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae Jin; Lee, Boyoung; Chang, Jin Woo; Kim, Joo-Hang; Kwon, Yunhee Kim; Lee, Heuiran

    2003-05-01

    FIV-based lentiviral vector has shown a unique opportunity as an efficient gene delivery vehicle, especially to nondividing human cells. Here, we genetically reconstructed the FIV-based vector by serially deleting residual virus genes of gag and vif, leading to minimized cytotoxicity together with efficient virus production and gene transfer. The modified FIV- based vector was generated by transiently transfecting 293T cells with three plasmids of the gene transfer vector with minimal gag region, the packaging plasmid without vif and the VSV-G-expressing plasmid. The vector was routinely generated as many as 1 x 10(7) transducing particles per ml and easily concentrated by simple centrifugation. The cytotoxic effect significantly decreased in sensitive cells to FIV infection even at high multiplicity of infection (MOI), such as 500. Moreover, the transduction efficiency was consistently retained after cell cycle was arrested in a variety of human cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the modified VSV-G pseudotyped FIV-based vector efficiently transduce dividing and nondividing human cells with minimal cytotoxicity.

  5. Retroviral vectors for homologous recombination provide efficient cloning and expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Hamana, Hiroshi; Nagai, Terumi; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2014-02-14

    Homologous recombination technologies enable high-throughput cloning and the seamless insertion of any DNA fragment into expression vectors. Additionally, retroviral vectors offer a fast and efficient method for transducing and expressing genes in mammalian cells, including lymphocytes. However, homologous recombination cannot be used to insert DNA fragments into retroviral vectors; retroviral vectors contain two homologous regions, the 5'- and 3'-long terminal repeats, between which homologous recombination occurs preferentially. In this study, we have modified a retroviral vector to enable the cloning of DNA fragments through homologous recombination. To this end, we inserted a bacterial selection marker in a region adjacent to the gene insertion site. We used the modified retroviral vector and homologous recombination to clone T-cell receptors (TCRs) from single Epstein Barr virus-specific human T cells in a high-throughput and comprehensive manner and to efficiently evaluate their function by transducing the TCRs into a murine T-cell line through retroviral infection. In conclusion, the modified retroviral vectors, in combination with the homologous recombination method, are powerful tools for the high-throughput cloning of cDNAs and their efficient functional analysis.

  6. Mechanisms and Factors that Influence High Frequency Retroviral Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista; Galli, Andrea; Nikolaitchik, Olga; Mens, Helene; Pathak, Vinay K.; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2011-01-01

    With constantly changing environmental selection pressures, retroviruses rely upon recombination to reassort polymorphisms in their genomes and increase genetic diversity, which improves the chances for the survival of their population. Recombination occurs during DNA synthesis, whereby reverse transcriptase undergoes template switching events between the two copackaged RNAs, resulting in a viral recombinant with portions of the genetic information from each parental RNA. This review summarizes our current understanding of the factors and mechanisms influencing retroviral recombination, fidelity of the recombination process, and evaluates the subsequent viral diversity and fitness of the progeny recombinant. Specifically, the high mutation rates and high recombination frequencies of HIV-1 will be analyzed for their roles in influencing HIV-1 global diversity, as well as HIV-1 diagnosis, drug treatment, and vaccine development. PMID:21994801

  7. Retroviral display in gene therapy, protein engineering, and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Urban, Johannes H; Merten, Christoph A

    2011-01-21

    The display and analysis of proteins expressed on biological surfaces has become an attractive tool for the study of molecular interactions in enzymology, protein engineering, and high-throughput screening. Among the growing number of established display systems, retroviruses offer a unique and fully mammalian platform for the expression of correctly folded and post-translationally modified proteins in the context of cell plasma membrane-derived particles. This is of special interest for therapeutic applications such as gene therapy and vaccine development and also offers advantages for the engineering of mammalian proteins toward customized binding affinities and catalytic activities. This review critically summarizes the basic concepts and applications of retroviral display and analyses its benefits in comparison to other display techniques.

  8. Retroviral Integrase Proteins and HIV-1 DNA Integration*

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Lavanya; Engelman, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Retroviral integrases catalyze two reactions, 3′-processing of viral DNA ends, followed by integration of the processed ends into chromosomal DNA. X-ray crystal structures of integrase-DNA complexes from prototype foamy virus, a member of the Spumavirus genus of Retroviridae, have revealed the structural basis of integration and how clinically relevant integrase strand transfer inhibitors work. Underscoring the translational potential of targeting virus-host interactions, small molecules that bind at the host factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75-binding site on HIV-1 integrase promote dimerization and inhibit integrase-viral DNA assembly and catalysis. Here, we review recent advances in our knowledge of HIV-1 DNA integration, as well as future research directions. PMID:23043109

  9. New insight into transcription of human endogenous retroviral elements.

    PubMed

    Pačes, Jan; Huang, Yao-Ting; Pačes, Václav; Rídl, Jakub; Chang, Chung-Ming

    2013-03-25

    It is generally assumed that human endogenous retroviral elements (HERVs) belong to the class of genomic repetitive nucleotide sequences often called 'junk DNA'. These elements were categorized to families, and members of some of these families (e.g. HERV-H, HERV-W and HERV-K) were shown to be transcribed. These transcriptions were associated with several severe diseases such as mental disorders, AIDS, autoimmune diseases and cancer. In this review we discuss several bioinformatics strategies for genome-wide scan of HERVs transcription using high-throughput RNA sequencing on several platforms. We show that many more HERVs than previously described are transcribed to various levels and we discuss possible implications of these transcriptions.

  10. Endogenous non-retroviral RNA virus elements in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masayuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Daito, Takuji; Oshida, Tatsuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Jern, Patric; Gojobori, Takashi; Coffin, John M; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2010-01-07

    Retroviruses are the only group of viruses known to have left a fossil record, in the form of endogenous proviruses, and approximately 8% of the human genome is made up of these elements. Although many other viruses, including non-retroviral RNA viruses, are known to generate DNA forms of their own genomes during replication, none has been found as DNA in the germline of animals. Bornaviruses, a genus of non-segmented, negative-sense RNA virus, are unique among RNA viruses in that they establish persistent infection in the cell nucleus. Here we show that elements homologous to the nucleoprotein (N) gene of bornavirus exist in the genomes of several mammalian species, including humans, non-human primates, rodents and elephants. These sequences have been designated endogenous Borna-like N (EBLN) elements. Some of the primate EBLNs contain an intact open reading frame (ORF) and are expressed as mRNA. Phylogenetic analyses showed that EBLNs seem to have been generated by different insertional events in each specific animal family. Furthermore, the EBLN of a ground squirrel was formed by a recent integration event, whereas those in primates must have been formed more than 40 million years ago. We also show that the N mRNA of a current mammalian bornavirus, Borna disease virus (BDV), can form EBLN-like elements in the genomes of persistently infected cultured cells. Our results provide the first evidence for endogenization of non-retroviral virus-derived elements in mammalian genomes and give novel insights not only into generation of endogenous elements, but also into a role of bornavirus as a source of genetic novelty in its host.

  11. Alteration of Blood–Brain Barrier Integrity by Retroviral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Philippe V.; Ozden, Simona; Cumont, Marie-Christine; Seilhean, Danielle; Cartier, Luis; Rezaie, Payam; Mason, Sarah; Lambert, Sophie; Huerre, Michel; Gessain, Antoine; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Pique, Claudine

    2008-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB), which forms the interface between the blood and the cerebral parenchyma, has been shown to be disrupted during retroviral-associated neuromyelopathies. Human T Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV-1) Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with BBB breakdown. The BBB is composed of three cell types: endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. Although astrocytes have been shown to be infected by HTLV-1, until now, little was known about the susceptibility of BBB endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection and the impact of such an infection on BBB function. We first demonstrated that human cerebral endothelial cells express the receptors for HTLV-1 (GLUT-1, Neuropilin-1 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans), both in vitro, in a human cerebral endothelial cell line, and ex vivo, on spinal cord autopsy sections from HAM/TSP and non-infected control cases. In situ hybridization revealed HTLV-1 transcripts associated with the vasculature in HAM/TSP. We were able to confirm that the endothelial cells could be productively infected in vitro by HTLV-1 and that blocking of either HSPGs, Neuropilin 1 or Glut1 inhibits this process. The expression of the tight-junction proteins within the HTLV-1 infected endothelial cells was altered. These cells were no longer able to form a functional barrier, since BBB permeability and lymphocyte passage through the monolayer of endothelial cells were increased. This work constitutes the first report of susceptibility of human cerebral endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection, with implications for HTLV-1 passage through the BBB and subsequent deregulation of the central nervous system homeostasis. We propose that the susceptibility of cerebral endothelial cells to retroviral infection and subsequent BBB dysfunction is an important aspect of HAM/TSP pathogenesis and should be considered in the design of future therapeutics strategies. PMID:19008946

  12. The early years of retroviral protease crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Soon after its discovery, the attempts to develop anti-AIDS therapeutics focused on the retroviral protease (PR)-an enzyme used by lentiviruses to process the precursor polypeptide into mature viral proteins. An urgent need for the three-dimensional structure of PR to guide rational drug design prompted efforts to produce milligram quantities of this enzyme. However, only minute amounts of PR were present in the HIV-1 and HIV-2 viruses, and initial attempts to express this protein in bacteria were not successful. This review describes X-ray crystallographic studies of the retroviral proteases carried out at NCI-Frederick in the late 1980s and early 1990s and puts into perspective the crucial role that the total protein chemical synthesis played in unraveling the structure, mechanism of action, and inhibition of HIV-1 PR. Notably, the first fully correct structure of HIV-1 PR and the first cocrystal structure of its complex with an inhibitor (a substrate-derived, reduced isostere hexapeptide MVT-101) were determined using chemically synthesized protein. Most importantly, these sets of coordinates were made freely available to the research community and were used worldwide to solve X-ray structures of HIV-1 PR complexes with an array of inhibitors and set in motion a variety of theoretical studies. Publication of the structure of chemically synthesized HIV-1 PR complexed with MVT-101 preceded only by six years the approval of the first PR inhibitor as an anti-AIDS drug. Copyright (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Role of ESCRT-I in Retroviral Budding

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Serrano, Juan; Zang, Trinity; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2003-01-01

    Retroviral late-budding (L) domains are required for the efficient release of nascent virions. The three known types of L domain, designated according to essential tetrapeptide motifs (PTAP, PPXY, or YPDL), each bind distinct cellular cofactors. We and others have demonstrated that recruitment of an ESCRT-I subunit, Tsg101, a component of the class E vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) machinery, is required for the budding of viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Ebola virus, that encode a PTAP-type L domain, but subsequent events remain undefined. In this study, we demonstrate that VPS28, a second component of ESCRT-I, binds to a sequence close to the Tsg101 C terminus and is therefore recruited to the plasma membrane by HIV-1 Gag. In addition, we show that Tsg101 exhibits a multimerization activity. Using a complementation assay in which Tsg101 is artificially recruited to sites of HIV-1 assembly, we demonstrate that the integrity of the VPS28 binding site within Tsg101 is required for particle budding. In addition, mutation of a putative leucine zipper or residues important for Tsg101 multimerization also impairs the ability of Tsg101 to support HIV-1 budding. A minimal multimerizing Tsg101 domain is a dominant negative inhibitor of PTAP-mediated HIV-1 budding but does not inhibit YPDL-type or PPXY-type L-domain function. Nevertheless, YDPL-type L-domain activity is inhibited by expression of a catalytically inactive mutant of the class E VPS ATPase VPS4. These results indicate that all three classes of retroviral L domains require a functioning class E VPS pathway in order to effect budding. However, the PTAP-type L domain appears to be unique in its requirement for an intact, or nearly intact, ESCRT-I complex. PMID:12663786

  14. Role of ESCRT-I in retroviral budding.

    PubMed

    Martin-Serrano, Juan; Zang, Trinity; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2003-04-01

    Retroviral late-budding (L) domains are required for the efficient release of nascent virions. The three known types of L domain, designated according to essential tetrapeptide motifs (PTAP, PPXY, or YPDL), each bind distinct cellular cofactors. We and others have demonstrated that recruitment of an ESCRT-I subunit, Tsg101, a component of the class E vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) machinery, is required for the budding of viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Ebola virus, that encode a PTAP-type L domain, but subsequent events remain undefined. In this study, we demonstrate that VPS28, a second component of ESCRT-I, binds to a sequence close to the Tsg101 C terminus and is therefore recruited to the plasma membrane by HIV-1 Gag. In addition, we show that Tsg101 exhibits a multimerization activity. Using a complementation assay in which Tsg101 is artificially recruited to sites of HIV-1 assembly, we demonstrate that the integrity of the VPS28 binding site within Tsg101 is required for particle budding. In addition, mutation of a putative leucine zipper or residues important for Tsg101 multimerization also impairs the ability of Tsg101 to support HIV-1 budding. A minimal multimerizing Tsg101 domain is a dominant negative inhibitor of PTAP-mediated HIV-1 budding but does not inhibit YPDL-type or PPXY-type L-domain function. Nevertheless, YDPL-type L-domain activity is inhibited by expression of a catalytically inactive mutant of the class E VPS ATPase VPS4. These results indicate that all three classes of retroviral L domains require a functioning class E VPS pathway in order to effect budding. However, the PTAP-type L domain appears to be unique in its requirement for an intact, or nearly intact, ESCRT-I complex.

  15. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  16. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  17. Characterization of the spike protein of human coronavirus NL63 in receptor binding and pseudotype virus entry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Han-Xin; Feng, Yan; Tu, Xinming; Zhao, Xuesen; Hsieh, Chih-Heng; Griffin, Lauren; Junop, Murray; Zhang, Chengsheng

    2011-09-01

    The spike (S) protein of human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) mediates both cell attachment by binding to its receptor hACE2 and membrane fusion during virus entry. We have previously identified the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and residues important for RBD-hACE2 association. Here, we further characterized the S protein by investigating the roles of the cytoplasmic tail and 19 residues located in the RBD in protein accumulation, receptor binding, and pseudotype virus entry. For these purposes, we first identified an entry-efficient S gene template from a pool of gene variants and used it as a backbone to generate a series of cytoplasmic tail deletion and single residue substitution mutants. Our results showed that: (i) deletion of 18aa from the C-terminus enhanced the S protein accumulation and virus entry, which might be due to the deletion of intracellular retention signals; (ii) further deletion to residue 29 also enhanced the amount of S protein on the cell surface and in virion, but reduced virus entry by 25%, suggesting that residues 19-29 contributes to membrane fusion; (iii) a 29aa-deletion mutant had a defect in anchoring on the plasma membrane, which led to a dramatic decrease of S protein in virion and virus entry; (iv) a total of 15 residues (Y498, V499, V531, G534, G537, D538, S540, G575, S576, E582, W585, Y590, T591, V593 and G594) within RBD were important for receptor binding and virus entry. They probably form three receptor binding motifs, and the third motif is conserved between NL63 and SARS-CoV.

  18. Automated recognition of retroviral sequences in genomic data—RetroTector©

    PubMed Central

    Sperber, Göran O.; Airola, Tove; Jern, Patric; Blomberg, Jonas

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain many endogenous retroviral sequences (ERVs). ERVs are often severely mutated, therefore difficult to detect. A platform independent (Java) program package, RetroTector© (ReTe), was constructed. It has three basic modules: (i) detection of candidate long terminal repeats (LTRs), (ii) detection of chains of conserved retroviral motifs fulfilling distance constraints and (iii) attempted reconstruction of original retroviral protein sequences, combining alignment, codon statistics and properties of protein ends. Other features are prediction of additional open reading frames, automated database collection, graphical presentation and automatic classification. ReTe favors elements >1000-bp long due to its dependence on order of and distances between retroviral fragments. It detects single or low-copy-number elements. ReTe assigned a ‘retroviral’ score of 890–2827 to 10 exogenous retroviruses from seven genera, and accurately predicted their genes. In a simulated model, ReTe was robust against mutational decay. The human genome was analyzed in 1–2 days on a LINUX cluster. Retroviral sequences were detected in divergent vertebrate genomes. Most ReTe detected chains were coincident with Repeatmasker output and the HERVd database. ReTe did not report most of the evolutionary old HERV-L related and MalR sequences, and is not yet tailored for single LTR detection. Nevertheless, ReTe rationally detects and annotates many retroviral sequences. PMID:17636050

  19. Retroviral DNA Integration Directed by HIV Integration Protein in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushman, Frederic D.; Fujiwara, Tamio; Craigie, Robert

    1990-09-01

    Efficient retroviral growth requires integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host. As a first step in analyzing the mechanism of integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA, a cell-free system was established that models the integration reaction. The in vitro system depends on the HIV integration (IN) protein, which was partially purified from insect cells engineered to express IN protein in large quantities. Integration was detected in a biological assay that scores the insertion of a linear DNA containing HIV terminal sequences into a λ DNA target. Some integration products generated in this assay contained five-base pair duplications of the target DNA at the recombination junctions, a characteristic of HIV integration in vivo; the remaining products contained aberrant junctional sequences that may have been produced in a variation of the normal reaction. These results indicate that HIV IN protein is the only viral protein required to insert model HIV DNA sequences into a target DNA in vitro.

  20. Conformational study of a putative HLTV-1 retroviral protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Llido, S; d'Estaintot, B L; Dautant, A; Geoffre, S; Picard, P; Precigoux, G

    1993-05-01

    The crystal structure of prolyl-glutaminyl-valyl-statyl-alanyl-leucine (Pro-Gln-Val-Sta-Ala-Leu, C(32)H(57)N(7)0(9).5H(2)0, M(r) = 683.9 + 90.1), a putative HTLV-1 protease inhibitor based on one of the consensus retroviral protease cleavage sequences, and containing the statine residue [(4S,3S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy-6-methylheptanoic acid], has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The same molecule has been modelled in the active site of the HTLV-1 protease and both conformations have been compared. The peptide crystallizes as a pentahydrate in space group P2(1) with a = 10.874(2), b = 9.501(2), c = 21.062(5) A, beta = 103.68 (1) degrees, Z = 2, V= 2114.3 A(3), D(x) = 1.21 g cm(-3), micro = 8.02 cm(-1), T= 293 K, lambda(Cu Kalpha) = 1.5418 A. The structure has been refined to an R value of 0.070 for 2152 observed reflections. The peptide main chain can be described as extended and adopts the usual zigzag conformation from the prolyl to the statyl residue. The main difference in conformation between the individual observed and modelled molecules is located on the Sta, Ala and Leu residues with the main chain of the modelled molecule rotated by about 180 degrees as compared to the observed conformation in the crystal state.

  1. Epigenetics, drugs of abuse, and the retroviral promoter

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Jasmine; Shah, Sonia; Sagar, Divya; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Wigdahl, Brian; Khan, Zafar K.; Jain, Pooja

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse alone has been shown to cause epigenetic changes in brain tissue that have been shown to play roles in addictive behaviors. In conjunction with HIV-1 infection, it can cause epigenetic changes at the viral promoter that can result in altered gene expression, and exacerbate disease progression overall. This review entails an in-depth look at research conducted on the epigenetic effects of three of the most widely abused drugs (cannabinoids, opioids, and cocaine), with a particular focus on the mechanisms through which these drugs interact with HIV-1 infection at the viral promoter. Here we discuss the impact of this interplay on disease progression from the point of view of the nature of gene regulation at the level of chromatin accessibility, chromatin remodeling, and nucleosome repositioning. Given the importance of chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation in controlling the retroviral promoter, and the high susceptibility of the drug abusing population of individuals to HIV infection, it would be beneficial to understand the way in which the host genome is modified and regulated by drugs of abuse. PMID:24218017

  2. O-linked glycosylation of retroviral envelope gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Pinter, A.; Honnen, W.J. )

    1988-03-01

    Treatment of ({sup 3}H)glucosamine-labeled Friend mink cell focus-forming virus (FrMCF) gp70 with excess peptide:N-glycanase F (PNGase F) resulted in removal of the expected seven N-linked oligosaccharide chains; however, approximately 10% of the glucosamine label was retained in the resulting 49,000-M{sub r} (49K) product. For ({sup 3}H)mannose-labeled gp70, similar treatment led to removal of all the carbohydrate label from the protein. Prior digestion of the PNGase F-treated gp70 with neuraminidase resulted in an addition size shift, and treatment with O-glycanase led to the removal of almost all of the PNGase F-resistant sugars. These results indicate that gp70 possesses sialic acid-containing O-linked oligosaccharides. Analysis of intracellular env precursors demonstrated that O-linked sugars were present in gPr90{sup env}, the polyprotein intermediate which contains complex sugars, but not in the primary translation product, gPr80{sup env}, and proteolytic digestion studies allowed localization of the O-linked carbohydrates to a 10K region near the center of the gp70 molecule. similar substituents were detected on the gp70s of ecotropic and xenotropic murine leukemia viruses and two subgroups of feline leukemia virus, indicting that O-linked glycosylation is a conserved feature of retroviral env proteins.

  3. The Effect of Life History on Retroviral Genome Invasions

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Ravinder K.; Coulson, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERV), or the remnants of past retroviral infections that are no longer active, are found in the genomes of most vertebrates, typically constituting approximately 10% of the genome. In some vertebrates, particularly in shorter-lived species like rodents, it is not unusual to find active endogenous retroviruses. In longer-lived species, including humans where substantial effort has been invested in searching for active ERVs, it is unusual to find them; to date none have been found in humans. Presumably the chance of detecting an active ERV infection is a function of the length of an ERV epidemic. Intuitively, given that ERVs or signatures of past ERV infections are passed from parents to offspring, we might expect to detect more active ERVs in species with longer generation times, as it should take more years for an infection to run its course in longer than in shorter lived species. This means the observation of more active ERV infections in shorter compared to longer-lived species is paradoxical. We explore this paradox using a modeling approach to investigate factors that influence ERV epidemic length. Our simple epidemiological model may explain why we find evidence of active ERV infections in shorter rather than longer-lived species. PMID:25692467

  4. Neural stem cells as tools for understanding retroviral neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lynch, W P; Portis, J L

    2000-06-05

    The discovery within the past decade that neural stem cells (NSCs) from the developing and adult mammalian brain can be propagated, cloned, and genetically manipulated ex vivo for ultimate transfer back into the CNS has opened the door to a novel means for modifying the CNS environment for experimental and therapeutic purposes. While a great deal of interest has been focused on the properties and promise of this new technology, especially in regard to cellular replacement and gene therapy, this minireview will focus on the recent use of NSCs to study the neuropathogenesis of the murine oncornaviruses. In brief, the use of this NSC-based approach has provided a means for selective reconstitution within the brain, of specific retroviral life cycle events, in order to consider their contribution to the induction of neurodegeneration. Furthermore, by virtue of their ability to disseminate virus within the brain, NSCs have provided a reliable means for assessing the true neurovirulence potential of murine oncornaviruses by directly circumventing a restriction to virus entry into the CNS. Importantly, these experiments have demonstrated that the neurovirulence of oncornaviruses requires late virus life cycle events occurring specifically within microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain. This initial application of NSC biology to the analysis of oncornavirus-CNS interactions may serve as an example for how other questions in viral neuropathogenesis might be addressed in the future.

  5. Retroviral particles in neoplasms of Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus).

    PubMed

    Chandra, A M; Jacobson, E R; Munn, R J

    2001-09-01

    Neoplastic diseases associated with retroviruses were diagnosed in four Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivattatus) from a single collection. Snake No. 1 was a 7-year-old female with recurrent undifferentiated mesenchymal round cell tumor (lymphosarcoma) of the oral cavity. At necropsy, similar neoplastic masses were evident in the uterus and ovary, and there was diffuse involvement of the spleen. Snake No. 2 was a 4.5-year-old female that was euthanatized because of complications following resection of a segmental colonic adenocarcinoma. Snake No. 3 was a 5-year-old female that was euthanatized because of a large transitional cell carcinoma of the right kidney. Snake No. 4 was a 19-year-old female that was euthanatized following recurrence of an intermandibular fibrosarcoma. Ultrastructural examination revealed few to numerous extracellular and intracellular (intravacuolar) type C-like retroviral particles in all tumors. Tumors were about 90-95 nm in diameter, with an electron-dense core and bilaminar external membrane. The relationship of the intraneoplastic viral particles to the etiology of the tumors is uncertain.

  6. Measles virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer into quiescent lymphocytes requires binding to both SLAM and CD46 entry receptors.

    PubMed

    Frecha, Cecilia; Lévy, Camille; Costa, Caroline; Nègre, Didier; Amirache, Fouzia; Buckland, Robin; Russell, Steven J; Cosset, François-Loïc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2011-06-01

    Gene transfer into quiescent T and B cells is of importance for gene therapy and immunotherapy approaches to correct hematopoietic disorders. Previously, we generated lentiviral vectors (LVs) pseudotyped with the Edmonston measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins (Hgps and Fgps) (H/F-LVs), which, for the first time, allowed efficient transduction of quiescent human B and T cells. These target cells express both MV entry receptors used by the vaccinal Edmonston strain, CD46 and signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). Interestingly, LVs pseudotyped with an MV Hgp, blind for the CD46 binding site, were completely inefficient for resting-lymphocyte transduction. Similarly, SLAM-blind H mutants that recognize only CD46 as the entry receptor did not allow stable LV transduction of resting T cells. The CD46-tropic LVs accomplished vector-cell binding, fusion, entry, and reverse transcription at levels similar to those achieved by the H/F-LVs, but efficient proviral integration did not occur. Our results indicate that both CD46 and SLAM binding sites need to be present in cis in the Hgp to allow successful stable transduction of quiescent lymphocytes. Moreover, the entry mechanism utilized appears to be crucial: efficient transduction was observed only when CD46 and SLAM were correctly engaged and an entry mechanism that strongly resembles macropinocytosis was triggered. Taken together, our results suggest that although vector entry can occur through the CD46 receptor, SLAM binding and subsequent signaling are also required for efficient LV transduction of quiescent lymphocytes to occur.

  7. Second generation of pseudotype-based serum neutralization assay for Nipah virus antibodies: sensitive and high-throughput analysis utilizing secreted alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Marsh, Glenn A; Barr, Jennifer A; Okutani, Akiko; Hotta, Kozue; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Broder, Christopher C; Yamada, Akio; Inoue, Satoshi; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV), Paramyxoviridae, Henipavirus, is classified as a biosafety level (BSL) 4 pathogen, along with the closely related Hendra virus (HeV). A novel serum neutralization test was developed for measuring NiV neutralizing antibodies under BSL2 conditions using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and pseudotyped with NiV F/G proteins (VSV-NiV-SEAP). A unique characteristic of this novel assay is the ability to obtain neutralization titers by measuring SEAP activity in supernatant using a common ELISA plate reader. This confers a remarkable advantage over the first generation of NiV-pseudotypes expressing green fluorescent protein or luciferase, which require expensive and specific measuring equipment. Using panels of NiV- and HeV-specific sera from various species, the VSV-NiV-SEAP assay demonstrated neutralizing antibody status (positive/negative) consistent with that obtained by conventional live NiV test, and gave higher antibody titers than the latter. Additionally, when screening sixty-six fruit bat sera at one dilution, the VSV-NiV-SEAP assay produced identical results to the live NiV test and only required a very small amount (2μl) of sera. The results suggest that this novel VSV-NiV-SEAP assay is safe, useful for high-throughput screening of sera using an ELISA plate reader, and has high sensitivity and specificity.

  8. Genome-Wide Screening of Retroviral Envelope Genes in the Nine-Banded Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus, Xenarthra) Reveals an Unfixed Chimeric Endogenous Betaretrovirus Using the ASCT2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Malicorne, Sébastien; Vernochet, Cécile; Cornelis, Guillaume; Mulot, Baptiste; Delsuc, Frédéric; Heidmann, Odile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retroviruses enter host cells through the interaction of their envelope (Env) protein with a cell surface receptor, which triggers the fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter ASCT2 is the common receptor of the large RD114 retrovirus interference group, whose members display frequent env recombination events. Germ line retrovirus infections have led to numerous inherited endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in vertebrate genomes, which provide useful insights into the coevolutionary history of retroviruses and their hosts. Rare ERV-derived genes display conserved viral functions, as illustrated by the fusogenic syncytin env genes involved in placentation. Here, we searched for functional env genes in the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) genome and identified dasy-env1.1, which clusters with RD114 interference group env genes and with two syncytin genes sharing ASCT2 receptor usage. Using ex vivo pseudotyping and cell-cell fusion assays, we demonstrated that the Dasy-Env1.1 protein is fusogenic and can use both human and armadillo ASCT2s as receptors. This gammaretroviral env gene belongs to a provirus with betaretrovirus-like features, suggesting acquisition through recombination. Provirus insertion was found in several Dasypus species, where it has not reached fixation, whereas related family members integrated before diversification of the genus Dasypus >12 million years ago (Mya). This newly described ERV lineage is potentially useful as a population genetic marker. Our results extend the usage of ASCT2 as a retrovirus receptor to the mammalian clade Xenarthra and suggest that the acquisition of an ASCT2-interacting env gene is a major selective force driving the emergence of numerous chimeric viruses in vertebrates. IMPORTANCE Retroviral infection is initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to a host cell receptor(s), triggering membrane fusion. Ancient germ line infections

  9. Retroviral nucleocapsid proteins possess potent nucleic acid strand renaturation activity.

    PubMed Central

    Dib-Hajj, F.; Khan, R.; Giedroc, D. P.

    1993-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) is the major genomic RNA binding protein that plays integral roles in the structure and replication of all animal retroviruses. In this report, select biochemical properties of recombinant Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) and HIV-1 NCs are compared. Evidence is presented that two types of saturated Zn2 NC-polynucleotide complexes can be formed under conditions of low [NaCl] that differ in apparent site-size (n = 8 vs. n = 14). The formation of one or the other complex appears dependent on the molar ratio of NC to RNA nucleotide with the putative low site-size mode apparently predominating under conditions of protein excess. Both MPMV and HIV-1 NCs kinetically facilitate the renaturation of two complementary DNA strands, suggesting that this is a general property of retroviral NCs. NC proteins increase the second-order rate constant for renaturation of a 149-bp DNA fragment by more than four orders of magnitude over that obtained in the absence of protein at 37 degrees C. The protein-assisted rate is 100-200-fold faster than that obtained at 68 degrees C, 1 M NaCl, solution conditions considered to be optimal for strand renaturation. Provided that sufficient NC is present to coat all strands, the presence of 400-1,000-fold excess nonhomologous DNA does not greatly affect the reaction rate. The HIV-1 NC-mediated renaturation reaction functions stoichiometrically, requiring a saturated strand of DNA nucleotide:NC ratio of about 7-8, rather than 14. Under conditions of less protein, the rate acceleration is not realized. The finding of significant nucleic acid strand renaturation activity may have important implications for various events of reverse transcription particularly in initiation and cDNA strand transfer. PMID:8443601

  10. Retroviral expression of connexins in embryonic chick lens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J X; Goodenough, D A

    1998-03-01

    To develop an in vivo model system in which exogenous proteins can be expressed in embryonic chick lens and to further understand the function of connexin-mediated gap junction intercellular communication in lens cell biology. RCAS(A) is a replication-competent chicken retrovirus that infects dividing cells. Retroviral constructs were prepared containing alkaline phosphatase (AP) and FLAG-tagged connexins. Chick lenses were infected in situ by injecting virus into the lumen of lens vesicles at stage 18, cultures were taken at various periods. The lenses were then dissected, and the expressed proteins were visualized by AP histochemical examination and immunostaining. Twenty-four hours after infection, alkaline phosphatase could be seen in epithelia and fibers. As lens fiber maturation progressed, however, the alkaline phosphatase staining was lost as the fibers matured, presumably because of the proteolytic removal of the enzyme. By 72 hours, alkaline phosphatase staining could still be observed in epithelial cells and in differentiating fibers in the bow region but not in the mature lens fibers. FLAG-tagged exogenous lens connexins were also abundantly expressed by viral infection. The exogenous connexins were localized at the cell surfaces in junctional maculae and showed the same cell-type specific distribution as that of their endogenous connexin counterparts. An in vivo model system has been developed in the chick that provides opportunities to study the expression of wild-type and mutant proteins during lens differentiation. Expression of wild-type connexins has revealed that the characteristic distribution of the three different lens connexins is maintained even when expression is driven by a viral promoter.

  11. Larger Mammalian Body Size Leads to Lower Retroviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Katzourakis, Aris; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Lim, Aaron G.; Gupta, Sunetra; Belshaw, Robert; Gifford, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses have been infecting mammals for at least 100 million years, leaving descendants in host genomes known as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). The abundance of ERVs is partly determined by their mode of replication, but it has also been suggested that host life history traits could enhance or suppress their activity. We show that larger bodied species have lower levels of ERV activity by reconstructing the rate of ERV integration across 38 mammalian species. Body size explains 37% of the variance in ERV integration rate over the last 10 million years, controlling for the effect of confounding due to other life history traits. Furthermore, 68% of the variance in the mean age of ERVs per genome can also be explained by body size. These results indicate that body size limits the number of recently replicating ERVs due to their detrimental effects on their host. To comprehend the possible mechanistic links between body size and ERV integration we built a mathematical model, which shows that ERV abundance is favored by lower body size and higher horizontal transmission rates. We argue that because retroviral integration is tumorigenic, the negative correlation between body size and ERV numbers results from the necessity to reduce the risk of cancer, under the assumption that this risk scales positively with body size. Our model also fits the empirical observation that the lifetime risk of cancer is relatively invariant among mammals regardless of their body size, known as Peto's paradox, and indicates that larger bodied mammals may have evolved mechanisms to limit ERV activity. PMID:25033295

  12. Myd88 Is Required for an Antibody Response to Retroviral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Edward P.; Littman, Dan R.

    2009-01-01

    Although retroviruses have been extensively studied for many years, basic questions about how retroviral infections are detected by the immune system and which innate pathways are required for the generation of immune responses remain unanswered. Defining these pathways and how they contribute to the anti-retroviral immune responses would assist in the development of more effective vaccines for retroviral pathogens such as HIV. We have investigated the roles played by CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) and by Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways in the generation of an anti-retroviral immune response against a mouse retroviral pathogen, Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MLV). Specific deletion of DCs during F-MLV infection caused a significant increase in viral titers at 14 days post-infection, indicating the importance of DCs in immune control of the infection. Similarly, Myd88 knockout mice failed to control F-MLV, and sustained high viral titers (107 foci/spleen) for several months after infection. Strikingly, both DC-depleted mice and Myd88 knockout mice exhibited only a partial reduction of CD8+ T cell responses, while the IgG antibody response to F-MLV was completely lost. Furthermore, passive transfer of immune serum from wild-type mice to Myd88 knockout mice rescued control of F-MLV. These results identify TLR signaling and CD11c+ DCs as playing critical roles in the humoral response to retroviruses. PMID:19214214

  13. Closed hollow-fiber bioreactor: a new approach to retroviral vector production.

    PubMed

    Pan, D; Whitley, C B

    1999-01-01

    The ability to obtain high-titer and large quantities of retroviral vector production in a 'closed' system would have profound implications in clinical and experimental gene therapy. We studied the cell growth and vector production of three retroviral packaging cell lines in a variety of conditions using hollow-fiber bioreactors designed as an 'artificial capillary system' (ACS) and enhanced with the application of a hermetically sealing device for sterile welding of connecting plastic tubings. Vector titer, fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration, volume and the duration of productivity were assessed to optimize vector production. In this pilot study, we observed that retroviral vector production (frozen-and-thawed) from cultures containing as low as 2.5% FBS yielded titers up to 2.2 x 10(7) cfu/ml, 14.4-fold higher than titers obtained from control dish cultures. Up to 3 liters of vector supernatant were generated during a 2-month large-scale production run. There was a potential to double this volume of higher-titer supernatant by increasing the frequency of harvest. It seemed that a lower metabolic rate (i.e. lactate production) in the packaging cell culture was associated with higher vector producing ability. These data demonstrated the feasibility of producing retroviral vector with enhanced titers and clinically useful quantities in a 'closed' ACS. Thus a new approach for large-scale retroviral vector production is developed.

  14. An Intact Retroviral Gene Conserved in Spiny-Rayed Fishes for over 100 My.

    PubMed

    Henzy, Jamie E; Gifford, Robert J; Kenaley, Christopher P; Johnson, Welkin E

    2016-12-30

    We have identified a retroviral envelope gene with a complete, intact open reading frame (ORF) in 20 species of spiny-rayed fishes (Acanthomorpha). The taxonomic distribution of the gene, "percomORF", indicates insertion into the ancestral lineage >110 Ma, making it the oldest known conserved gene of viral origin in a vertebrate genome. Underscoring its ancient provenence, percomORF exists as an isolated ORF within the intron of a widely conserved host gene, with no discernible proviral sequence nearby. Despite its remarkable age, percomORF retains canonical features of a retroviral glycoprotein, and tests for selection strongly suggest cooption for a host function. Retroviral envelope genes have been coopted for a role in placentogenesis by numerous lineages of mammals, including eutherians and marsupials, representing a variety of placental structures. Therefore percomORF's presence within the group Percomorpha-unique among spiny-finned fishes in having evolved placentation and live birth-is especially intriguing.

  15. [Construction and characterization of a novel recombinant retroviral vector expressing mouse T-bet].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejie; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Zhou, Xuyu

    2014-10-01

    In order to study T-bet function in mouse cells, a novel retroviral vector expressing mouse T-bet and reporter gene Thy1.1 was constructed. Retrovirus particles were then produced by transfection of the recombinant retroviral plasmid into a packaging cell line Platinum-E. The recombinant retrovirus played considerable infection ability. T-bet expression was then identified by FACS after infection of CD4+ primary T cells from T-bet knockout mouse with recombinant retrovirus. To determine if exogenous expressing T-bet has normal function, we checked the expression level of T-bet target gene, Ifng. IFN-y expression was upregulated in the T-bet knockout T cells infected with recombinant retrovirus. In conclusion, we successfully constructed an effective mouse T-bet recombinant retroviral vector.

  16. An XMRV Derived Retroviral Vector as a Tool for Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retroviral vectors are widely used tools for gene delivery and gene therapy. They are useful for gene expression studies and genetic manipulation in vitro and in vivo. Many retroviral vectors are derived from the mouse gammaretrovirus, murine leukemia virus (MLV). These vectors have been widely used in gene therapy clinical trials. XMRV, initially found in prostate cancer tissue, was the first human gammaretrovirus described. Findings We developed a new retroviral vector based on XMRV called pXC. It was developed for gene transfer to human cells and is produced by transient cotransfection of LNCaP cells with pXC and XMRV-packaging plasmids. Conclusions We demonstrated that pXC mediates expression of inserted transgenes in cell lines. This new vector will be a useful tool for gene transfer in human and non-human cell lines, including gene therapy studies. PMID:21651801

  17. Optimization of a retroviral vector for transduction of human CD34 positive cells.

    PubMed

    Szyda, Anna; Paprocka, Maria; Krawczenko, Agnieszka; Lenart, Katarzyna; Heimrath, Jerzy; Grabarczyk, Piotr; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Duś, Danuta

    2006-01-01

    Human stem and progenitor cells have recently become objects of intensive studies as an important target for gene therapy and regenerative medicine. Retroviral vectors are among the most effective tools for genetic modification of these cells. However, their transduction efficiency strongly depends on the choice of the ex vivo transduction system. The aim of this study was to elaborate a system for retroviral vector transduction of human CD34 positive cells isolated from cord blood. The retroviral vector pMINV EGFP was chosen for transduction of two human erythroblastoid cell lines: KG-1a (CD34 positive) and K562 (CD34 negative). For vector construction, three promoters and two retroviral vector packaging cell lines were used. To optimize the physicochemical conditions of the transduction process, different temperatures of supernatant harvesting, the influence of centrifugation and the presence of transduction enhancing agents were tested. The conditions elaborated with KG-1a cells were further applied for transduction of CD34 positive cells isolated from cord blood. The optimal efficiency of transduction of CD34 positive cells with pMINV EGFP retroviral vector (26% of EGFP positive cells), was obtained using infective vector with LTR retroviral promoter, produced by TE FLY GA MINV EGFP packaging cell line. The transduction was performed in the presence of serum, at 37 degrees C, with co-centrifugation of cells with viral supernatants and the use of transduction enhancing agents. This study confirmed that for gene transfer into CD34 positive cells, the detailed optimization of each element of the transduction process is of great importance.

  18. Purification of retroviral vectors for clinical application: biological implications and technological challenges.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Teresa; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Cruz, Pedro E

    2007-01-10

    For centuries mankind led a difficult battle against viruses, the smallest infectious agents at the surface of the earth. Nowadays it is possible to use viruses for our benefit, both at a prophylactic level in the production of vaccines and at a therapeutic level in the promising field of gene therapy. Retroviruses were discovered at the end of the 19th century and constitute one of the most effective entities for gene transfer and insertion into the genome of mammalian cells. This attractive feature has intensified research in retroviral vectors development and production over the past years, mainly due to the expectations raised by the concept of gene therapy. The demand for high quality retroviral vectors that meet standard requisites from the regulatory agencies (FDA and EMEA) is therefore increasing, as the technology has moved into clinical trials. The development of safer producer cell lines that can be used in large-scale production will result in the production of large quantities of retroviral stocks. Cost-efficient and scalable purification processes are essential for production of injectable-grade preparations to achieve final implementation of these vectors as therapeutics. Several preparative purification steps already established for proteins can certainly be applied to retroviral vectors, in particular membrane filtration and chromatographic methods. Nevertheless, the special properties of these complex products require technological improvement of the existing purification steps and/or development of particular purification steps to increase productivity and throughput, while maintaining biological activity of the final product. This review focuses on downstream process development in relation to the retroviral vectors characteristics and quality assessment of retroviral stocks for intended use in gene therapy.

  19. Evidence for integration of retroviral vectors in a novel human repeat sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdi-Haidar, B.; Friedmann, T.

    1994-09-01

    Retroviruses have become attractive vehicles for the introduction of foreign genes into mammalian cells not only for gene therapy but also to serve as anchor points for long-range mapping purposes. The information relating to retroviral integration in mammalian cells is derived mostly from studies of rodent genomes. The absence of information regarding integration sites of murine-based retroviral vectors in human cells has prompted us to investigate the characteristics of integration sites in the human genome. We have constructed a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vector that carries the pUC8 origin of replication and the chloramphenicol resistance gene to allow the rescue of the flanking genomic sequences in plasmid form. We have infected human primary fibroblasts and myoblasts with this retroviral vector and isolated independently transduced clones. Genomic DNA was obtained from independent clones and the genomic fragment carrying the provirus-host sequence boundary was isolated after digestion of the genomic DNA, circularization, and transformation by electroporation of E. coli C cells to chloramphenicol resistance. Restriction map and nucleotide sequence analysis of the rescued plasmids showed that a number of the clones shared the same integration site within the human genome. We have used the nucleotide sequence information about the human DNA adjacent to the 3{prime}LTR to design a PCR-based assay diagnostic for this common integration site. Analysis revealed the presence of the same integration site in four out of twelve human primary fibroblast clones infected with this specific retroviral vector, and in one out of twelve human primary myoblast clones infected with a second retroviral vector. Further analysis revealed the common integration site to be a previously unreported primate repeat present in monkey and human genomes and absent from rodent, bovine and avian genomes.

  20. Pseudotyping Serotype 5 Adenovirus with the Fiber from Other Serotypes Uncovers a Key Role of the Fiber Protein in Adenovirus 5-Induced Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Raddi, Najat; Vigant, Frédéric; Wagner-Ballon, Oriane; Giraudier, Stéphane; Custers, Jerome; Hemmi, Silvio; Benihoud, Karim

    2016-02-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) infection in humans is associated with inflammatory responses and thrombocytopenia. Although several studies were conducted in mice models to understand molecular and cellular mechanisms of Ad-induced inflammatory responses, only few of them turned their interest toward the mechanisms of Ad-induced thrombocytopenia. Using different depletion methods, the present study ruled out any significant role of spleen, macrophages, and vitamin K-dependent factor in Ad-induced thrombocytopenia. Interestingly, mice displaying thrombocytopenia expressed high levels of cytokines/chemokines after Ad administration. Most importantly, pseudotyping adenovirus with the fiber protein from other serotypes was associated with reduction of both cytokine/chemokine production and thrombocytopenia. Altogether, our results suggest that capsid fiber protein (and more precisely its shaft) of Ad serotype 5 triggers the cytokine production that leads to Ad-induced thrombocytopenia.

  1. Long-term suppression of experimental arthritis following intramuscular administration of a pseudotyped AAV2/1-TNFR:Fc Vector.

    PubMed

    Sandalon, Ziv; Bruckheimer, Elizabeth M; Lustig, Kurt H; Burstein, Haim

    2007-02-01

    We previously reported that administration of an adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vector encoding a rat tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-immunoglobulin Fc (TNFR:Fc) fusion gene to rats with streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis resulted in suppression of joint inflammation and cartilage and bone destruction, as well as expression of joint proinflammatory cytokines. In this study, we used an alternate rat model of arthritis to compare the serum levels and duration of TNFR:Fc protein expression following intramuscular administration of pseudotyped AAV-TNFR:Fc vectors based on serotypes 1, 2, and 5. All three pseudotyped AAV-TNFR:Fc vectors led to sustained expression of serum TNFR:Fc protein for at least one year. Serum TNFR:Fc protein levels in rats administered intramuscularly with AAV2/1-TNFR:Fc vector were up to 100- and 10-fold higher than in rats administered the AAV2-TNFR:Fc or AAV2/5-TNFR:Fc vectors, respectively. A single intramuscular administration of AAV2/1-TNFR:Fc vector at vector doses ranging from 10(10) to 10(12) DNase-resistant particles (DRP) per animal, resulted in complete and long-term suppression of recurrent joint inflammation for at least 150 days. Our results establish a proof of concept for administration of an AAV2/1-TNFR:Fc vector to the muscle to achieve long-term, sustained and therapeutically relevant levels of TNFR:Fc protein to treat chronic systemic inflammatory joint diseases.

  2. Identification of candidate cancer-causing genes in mouse brain tumors by retroviral tagging

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Fredrik K.; Brodd, Josefin; Eklöf, Charlotta; Ferletta, Maria; Hesselager, Göran; Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt

    2004-01-01

    Murine retroviruses may cause malignant tumors in mice by insertional mutagenesis of host genes. The use of retroviral tagging as a means of identifying cancer-causing genes has, however, almost entirely been restricted to hematopoietic tumors. The aim of this study was to develop a system allowing for the retroviral tagging of candidate genes in malignant brain tumors. Mouse gliomas were induced by a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus encoding platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain. The underlying idea was that tumors evolve through a combination of PDGF-mediated autocrine growth stimulation and insertional mutagenesis of genes that cooperate with PDGF in gliomagenesis. Common insertion sites (loci that were tagged in more than one tumor) were identified by cloning and sequencing retroviral flanking segments, followed by blast searches of mouse genome databases. A number of candidate brain tumor loci (Btls) were identified. Several of these Btls correspond to known tumor-causing genes; these findings strongly support the underlying idea of our experimental approach. Other Btls harbor genes with a hitherto unproven role in transformation or oncogenesis. Our findings indicate that retroviral tagging with a growth factor-encoding virus may be a powerful means of identifying candidate tumor-causing genes in nonhematopoietic tumors. PMID:15273287

  3. Characterization of retroviral infectivity and superinfection resistance during retrovirus-mediated transduction of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, J; Wei, Q; Fan, J; Zou, Y; Song, D; Liu, J; Liu, F; Ma, C; Hu, X; Li, L; Yu, Y; Qu, X; Chen, L; Yu, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zeng, Z; Zhang, R; Yan, S; Wu, T; Wu, X; Shu, Y; Lei, J; Li, Y; Zhang, W; Wang, J; Reid, R R; Lee, M J; Huang, W; Wolf, J M; He, T-C; Wang, J

    2017-04-07

    Retroviral vectors including lentiviral vectors are commonly-used tools to stably express transgenes or RNA molecules in mammalian cells. Their utilities are roughly divided into two categories, stable overexpression of transgenes and RNA molecules, which requires maximal transduction efficiency, or functional selection with retrovirus-based libraries, which takes advantage of retroviral superinfection resistance. However, the dynamic features of retrovirus-mediated transduction are not well-characterized. Here, we engineered two MSCV-based retroviral vectors expressing dual fluorescence proteins and antibiotic markers and analyzed virion production efficiency and virion stability, dynamic infectivity and superinfection resistance in different cell types, and strategies to improve transduction efficiency. We found that the highest virion production occurred between 60 and 72 h after transfection. The stability of the harvested virion supernatant decreased by >60% after three days in storage. We found that retrovirus infectivity varied drastically in the tested human cancer lines, while low transduction efficiency was partially overcome with increased virus titer, prolonged infection duration, and/or repeated infections. Furthermore, we demonstrated that retrovirus receptors PIT1 and PIT2 were lowly expressed in the analyzed cells, and that PIT1 and/or PIT2 overexpression significantly improved transduction efficiency in certain cell lines. Thus, our findings provide resourceful information for the optimal conditions of retroviral-mediated gene delivery.Gene Therapy accepted article preview online, 07 April 2017. doi:10.1038/gt.2017.24.

  4. Statistical analysis of sparse infection data and its implications for retroviral treatment trials in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Spouge, J L

    1992-01-01

    Reports on retroviral primate trials rarely publish any statistical analysis. Present statistical methodology lacks appropriate tests for these trials and effectively discourages quantitative assessment. This paper describes the theory behind VACMAN, a user-friendly computer program that calculates statistics for in vitro and in vivo infectivity data. VACMAN's analysis applies to many retroviral trials using i.v. challenges and is valid whenever the viral dose-response curve has a particular shape. Statistics from actual i.v. retroviral trials illustrate some unappreciated principles of effective animal use: dilutions other than 1:10 can improve titration accuracy; infecting titration animals at the lowest doses possible can lower challenge doses; and finally, challenging test animals in small trials with more virus than controls safeguards against false successes, "reuses" animals, and strengthens experimental conclusions. The theory presented also explains the important concept of viral saturation, a phenomenon that may cause in vitro and in vivo titrations to agree for some retroviral strains and disagree for others. PMID:1323844

  5. XPB mediated retroviral cDNA degradation coincides with entry to the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, Kristine E.; Roddick, William; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Fishel, Richard

    2011-02-20

    Retroviruses must integrate their cDNA to a host chromosome, but a significant fraction of retroviral cDNA is degraded before integration. XPB and XPD are part of the TFIIH complex which mediates basal transcription and DNA nucleotide excision repair. Retroviral infection increases when XPB or XPD are mutant. Here we show that inhibition of mRNA or protein synthesis does not affect HIV cDNA accumulation suggesting that TFIIH transcription activity is not required for degradation. Other host factors implicated in the stability of cDNA are not components of the XPB and XPD degradation pathway. Although an increase of retroviral cDNA in XPB or XPD mutant cells correlates with an increase of integrated provirus, the integration efficiency of pre-integration complexes is unaffected. Finally, HIV and MMLV cDNA degradation appears to coincide with nuclear import. These results suggest that TFIIH mediated cDNA degradation is a nuclear host defense against retroviral infection.

  6. Inhibition of Marek's disease virus replication by retroviral vector-based RNA interference

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising antiviral methodology. We recently demonstrated that retroviral vectors expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNA-mirs) in the context of a modified endogenous micro-RNA (miRNA) can be effective in reducing replication of other retroviruses in chicken cells. In thi...

  7. Retroviral vectors elevate coexpressed protein levels in trans through cap-dependent translation.

    PubMed

    Gou, Yongqiang; Byun, Hyewon; Zook, Adam E; Singh, Gurvani B; Nash, Andrea K; Lozano, Mary M; Dudley, Jaquelin P

    2015-03-17

    Retroviruses cause immunodeficiency and cancer but also are used as vectors for the expression of heterologous genes. Nevertheless, optimal translation of introduced genes often is not achieved. Here we show that transfection into mammalian cells of lentiviral or gammaretroviral vectors, including those with specific shRNAs, increased expression of a cotransfected gene relative to standard plasmid vectors. Levels of most endogenous cellular proteins were unchanged. Transfer of lentiviral vector sequences into a standard plasmid conferred the ability to give increased expression of cotransfected genes (superinduction). Superinduction by the retroviral vector was not dependent on the cell type or species, the type of reporter gene, or the method of transfection. No differences were detected in the IFN, unfolded protein, or stress responses in the presence of retroviral vectors. RT-PCRs revealed that RNA levels of cotransfected genes were unchanged during superinduction, yet Western blotting, pulse labeling, and the use of bicistronic vectors showed increased cap-dependent translation of cointroduced genes. Expression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase target 4E-BP1, but not the mTOR inhibitor Torin 1, preferentially inhibited superinduction relative to basal protein expression. Furthermore, transcription of lentiviral vector sequences from a doxycycline-inducible promoter eliminated superinduction, consistent with a DNA-triggered event. Thus, retroviral DNA increased translation of cointroduced genes in trans by an mTOR-independent signaling mechanism. Our experiments have broad applications for the design of retroviral vectors for transfections, DNA vaccines, and gene therapy.

  8. Retroviral Scanning: Mapping MLV Integration Sites to Define Cell-specific Regulatory Regions.

    PubMed

    Romano, Oriana; Cifola, Ingrid; Poletti, Valentina; Severgnini, Marco; Peano, Clelia; De Bellis, Gianluca; Mavilio, Fulvio; Miccio, Annarita

    2017-05-28

    Moloney murine leukemia (MLV) virus-based retroviral vectors integrate predominantly in acetylated enhancers and promoters. For this reason, mLV integration sites can be used as functional markers of active regulatory elements. Here, we present a retroviral scanning tool, which allows the genome-wide identification of cell-specific enhancers and promoters. Briefly, the target cell population is transduced with an mLV-derived vector and genomic DNA is digested with a frequently cutting restriction enzyme. After ligation of genomic fragments with a compatible DNA linker, linker-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LM-PCR) allows the amplification of the virus-host genome junctions. Massive sequencing of the amplicons is used to define the mLV integration profile genome-wide. Finally, clusters of recurrent integrations are defined to identify cell-specific regulatory regions, responsible for the activation of cell-type specific transcriptional programs. The retroviral scanning tool allows the genome-wide identification of cell-specific promoters and enhancers in prospectively isolated target cell populations. Notably, retroviral scanning represents an instrumental technique for the retrospective identification of rare populations (e.g. somatic stem cells) that lack robust markers for prospective isolation.

  9. High-resolution structure of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer

    SciTech Connect

    Gilski, Miroslaw; Kazmierczyk, Maciej; Krzywda, Szymon; Zábranská, Helena; Cooper, Seth; Popović, Zoran; Khatib, Firas; DiMaio, Frank; Thompson, James; Baker, David; Pichová, Iva; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2011-11-01

    The crystal structure of Mason–Pfizer monkey virus protease folded as a monomer has been solved by molecular replacement using a model generated by players of the online game Foldit. The structure shows at high resolution the details of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer which can guide rational design of protease dimerization inhibitors as retroviral drugs. Mason–Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV), a D-type retrovirus assembling in the cytoplasm, causes simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus monkeys. Its pepsin-like aspartic protease (retropepsin) is an integral part of the expressed retroviral polyproteins. As in all retroviral life cycles, release and dimerization of the protease (PR) is strictly required for polyprotein processing and virion maturation. Biophysical and NMR studies have indicated that in the absence of substrates or inhibitors M-PMV PR should fold into a stable monomer, but the crystal structure of this protein could not be solved by molecular replacement despite countless attempts. Ultimately, a solution was obtained in mr-rosetta using a model constructed by players of the online protein-folding game Foldit. The structure indeed shows a monomeric protein, with the N- and C-termini completely disordered. On the other hand, the flap loop, which normally gates access to the active site of homodimeric retropepsins, is clearly traceable in the electron density. The flap has an unusual curled shape and a different orientation from both the open and closed states known from dimeric retropepsins. The overall fold of the protein follows the retropepsin canon, but the C{sup α} deviations are large and the active-site ‘DTG’ loop (here NTG) deviates up to 2.7 Å from the standard conformation. This structure of a monomeric retropepsin determined at high resolution (1.6 Å) provides important extra information for the design of dimerization inhibitors that might be developed as drugs for the treatment of retroviral infections

  10. Pseudotyped AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Transfer in a Human Fetal Trachea Xenograft Model: Implications for In Utero Gene Therapy for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alice; Katz, Anna B.; Lim, Foong-Yen; Habli, Mounira; Jones, Helen N.; Wilson, James M.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung disease including airway infection and inflammation currently causes the majority of morbidities and mortalities associated with cystic fibrosis (CF), making the airway epithelium and the submucosal glands (SMG) novel target cells for gene therapy in CF. These target cells are relatively inaccessible to postnatal gene transfer limiting the success of gene therapy. Our previous work in a human-fetal trachea xenograft model suggests the potential benefit for treating CF in utero. In this study, we aim to validate adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model and to compare transduction efficiencies of pseudotyping AAV2 vectors in fetal xenografts and postnatal xenograft controls. Methodology/Principal Findings Human fetal trachea or postnatal bronchus controls were xenografted onto immunocompromised SCID mice for a four-week engraftment period. After injection of AAV2/2, 2/1, 2/5, 2/7 or 2/8 with a LacZ reporter into both types of xenografts, we analyzed for transgene expression in the respiratory epithelium and SMGs. At 1 month, transduction by AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in respiratory epithelium and SMG cells was significantly greater than that of AAV2/1, 2/5, and 2/7 in xenograft tracheas. Efficiency in SMG transduction was significantly greater in AAV2/8 than AAV2/2. At 3 months, AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 transgene expression was >99% of respiratory epithelium and SMG. At 1 month, transduction efficiency of AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 was significantly less in adult postnatal bronchial xenografts than in fetal tracheal xenografts. Conclusions/Significance Based on the effectiveness of AAV vectors in SMG transduction, our findings suggest the potential utility of pseudotyped AAV vectors for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The human fetal trachea xenograft model may serve as an effective tool for further development of fetal gene therapy strategies for the in utero treatment of cystic fibrosis. PMID:22937069

  11. Rescue of endogenous 30S retroviral sequences from mouse cells by baboon type C virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sherwin, S A; Rapp, U R; Benveniste, R E; Sen, A; Todaro, G J

    1978-01-01

    Mus musculus SC-1 cells were infected with M7 baboon type C virus. The progeny of this infection included viral pseudotypes that contained M7 helper virus and endogenous 30S retrovirus-associated sequences derived from SC-1 cells (RAS). The RAS sequences are unrelated by nucleic acid hybridization criteria to previously described types of murine retroviruses and do not code for known murine viral structural proteins. The RAS genome is present in multiple copies in the DNA of laboratory (M. musculus) and Asian (M. caroli and M. cervicolor) mice, is expressed in the RNA of uninfected mouse cells, and can be efficiently rescued by type C, but not type B, viruses. RAS is closely related to 30S virus-associated RNA in NIH/3T3 and BALB/c JLSV-9 cells and may be analogous to the defective 30S RNA sequences found in rats. PMID:207887

  12. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  13. Mifepristone increases gamma-retroviral infection efficiency by enhancing integration of virus into the genome of infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Solodushko, Victor; Fouty, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-retroviruses are commonly used to deliver genes to cells. Previously we demonstrated that the synthetic anti-glucocorticoid and anti-progestin agent, mifepristone, increased gamma-retroviral infection efficiency in different target cells, independent of viral titer. In this paper, we examine how this occurs. We studied the effect of mifepristone on different steps of viral infection (viral entry, viral survival, viral DNA synthesis and retrovirus integration into the host genome) in three distinct retroviral backbones using different virus recognition receptors. We also tested the potential role of glucocorticoid and progesterone receptors in mediating mifepristone’s ability to increase gamma-retroviral infectivity. We show that mifepristone increases gamma-retroviral infection efficiency by facilitating viral integration into the host genome and that this effect appears to be due to mifepristone’s anti-glucocorticoid, but not its anti-progestin, activity. These results suggest that inhibition of the glucocorticoid receptor enhances retroviral integration into the host genome and indicates that cells may have a natural protection again retroviral infection that may be reduced by glucocorticoid receptor antagonists. PMID:20485384

  14. Dichotomy between T Cell and B Cell Tolerance to Neonatal Retroviral Infection Permits T Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mavrommatis, Bettina; Baudino, Lucie; Levy, Prisca; Merkenschlager, Julia; Eksmond, Urszula; Donnarumma, Tiziano; Young, George; Stoye, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of the immune requirements for control or elimination of retroviral infection remains an important aim. We studied the induction of adaptive immunity to neonatal infection with a murine retrovirus, under conditions leading to immunological tolerance. We found that the absence of either maternal or offspring adaptive immunity permitted efficient vertical transmission of the retrovirus. Maternal immunodeficiency allowed the retrovirus to induce central Th cell tolerance in the infected offspring. In turn, this compromised the offspring’s ability to mount a protective Th cell–dependent B cell response. However, in contrast to T cells, offspring B cells were not centrally tolerized and retained their ability to respond to the infection when provided with T cell help. Thus, escape of retrovirus-specific B cells from deletional tolerance offers the opportunity to induce protective retroviral immunity by restoration of retrovirus-specific T cell help, suggesting similar T cell immunotherapies for persistent viral infections. PMID:27647833

  15. Hypoxia- and radiation-inducible, breast cell-specific targeting of retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnik, Karoline; Greco, Olga; Scott, Simon; Knapp, Elzbieta; Mayrhofer, Elisabeth; Rosenfellner, Doris; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Hohenadl, Christine . E-mail: christine.hohenadl@vu-wien.ac.at

    2006-05-25

    To facilitate a more efficient radiation and chemotherapy of mammary tumours, synthetic enhancer elements responsive to hypoxia and ionizing radiation were coupled to the mammary-specific minimal promoter of the murine whey acidic protein (WAP) encoding gene. The modified WAP promoter was introduced into a retroviral promoter conversion (ProCon) vector. Expression of a transduced reporter gene in response to hypoxia and radiation was analysed in stably infected mammary cancer cell lines and an up to 9-fold increase in gene expression demonstrated in comparison to the respective basic vector. Expression analyses in vitro, moreover, demonstrated a widely preserved mammary cell-specific promoter activity. For in vivo analyses, xenograft tumours consisting of infected human mammary adenocarcinoma cells were established in SCID/beige mice. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a hypoxia-specific, markedly increased WAP promoter-driven expression in these tumours. Thus, this retroviral vector will facilitate a targeted gene therapeutic approach exploiting the unique environmental condition in solid tumours.

  16. Expression of human. alpha. sub 1 -antitrypsin in dogs after autologous transplantation of retroviral transduced hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.A.; Baley, P.; Rothenberg, S.; Leland, F; Fleming, L.; Ponder, K.P.; Liu, Tajen; Finegold, M.; Darlington, G.; Pokorny, W.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1992-01-01

    The liver represents an excellent organ for gene therapy since many genetic disorders result from the deficiency of liver-specific gene products. The authors have previously demonstrated that transgenic mouse hepatocytes can be heterologously transplanted into congenic recipients where they survived indefinitely and continued to function as hepatocytes. Here they demonstrate the autologous transplantation of retrovirally transduced canine hepatocytes. In two animals they have transplanted hepatocytes transduced with a retroviral vector containing the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin cDNA under transcriptional control of the cytomegalovirus promotor. Both animals had significant human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin in the serum for 1 month. The results suggest that gene therapy of hepatic deficiencies may be achieved by hepatocellular transplantation after genetic reconstruction with the use of promoters of cellular genes that are active in the normal liver.

  17. A MicroRNA-regulated and GP64-pseudotyped Lentiviral Vector Mediates Stable Expression of FVIII in a Murine Model of Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hideto; Hegadorn, Carol; Ozelo, Margareth; Burnett, Erin; Tuttle, Angie; Labelle, Andrea; McCray, Paul B; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, Brian; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2011-01-01

    The objective to use gene therapy to provide sustained, therapeutic levels of factor VIII (FVIII) for hemophilia A is compromised by the emergence of inhibitory antibodies that prevent FVIII from performing its essential function as a cofactor for factor IX (FIX). FVIII appears to be more immunogenic than FIX and an immune response is associated more frequently with FVIII than FIX gene therapy strategies. We have evaluated a modified lentiviral delivery strategy that facilitates liver-restricted transgene expression and prevents off-target expression in hematopoietic cells by incorporating microRNA (miRNA) target sequences. In contrast to outcomes using this strategy to deliver FIX, this modified delivery strategy was in and of itself insufficient to prevent an anti-FVIII immune response in treated hemophilia A mice. However, pseudotyping the lentivirus with the GP64 envelope glycoprotein, in conjunction with a liver-restricted promoter and a miRNA-regulated FVIII transgene resulted in sustained, therapeutic levels of FVIII. These modifications to the lentiviral delivery system effectively restricted FVIII transgene expression to the liver. Plasma levels of FVIII could be increased to around 9% that of normal levels when macrophages were depleted prior to treating the hemophilia A mice with the modified lentiviral FVIII delivery system. PMID:21285959

  18. High-throughput screening using pseudotyped lentiviral particles: a strategy for the identification of HIV-1 inhibitors in a cell-based assay.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jean-Michel; Gao, Anhui; He, Pei-Lan; Choi, Joyce; Tang, Wei; Bruzzone, Roberto; Schwartz, Olivier; Naya, Hugo; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia; Altmeyer, Ralf; Zuo, Jian-Ping

    2009-03-01

    Two decades after its discovery the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is still spreading worldwide and killing millions. There are 25 drugs formally approved for HIV currently on the market, but side effects as well as the emergence of HIV strains showing single or multiple resistances to current drug-therapy are causes for concern. Furthermore, these drugs target only 4 steps of the viral cycle, hence the urgent need for new drugs and also new targets. In order to tackle this problem, we have devised a cell-based assay using lentiviral particles to look for post-entry inhibitors of HIV-1. We report here the assay development, validation as well as confirmation of the hits using both wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 viruses. The screening was performed on an original library, rich in natural compounds and pure molecules from Traditional Chinese Medicine pharmacopoeia, which had never been screened for anti-HIV activity. The identified hits belong to four chemical sub-families that appear to be all non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Secondary tests with live viruses showed that there was good agreement with pseudotyped particles, confirming the validity of this approach for high-throughput drug screens. This assay will be a useful tool that can be easily adapted to screen for inhibitors of viral entry.

  19. A VSV-G Pseudotyped Last Generation Lentiviral Vector Mediates High Level and Persistent Gene Transfer in Models of Airway Epithelium In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Copreni, Elena; Palmieri, Lucia; Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency and duration of gene expression mediated by a VSV-G pseudotyped last generation lentiviral (LV) vector. We studied LV efficiency in ex-vivo models of respiratory epithelial cells, obtained from bronchial biopsies and nasal polyps, by GFP epifluorescence and cytofluorimetry. In vivo efficiency and persistence of gene expression was investigated by GFP immunohistochemistry and luciferase activity in lung cryosections and homogenates, respectively, upon intranasal and intratracheal administration protocols in C57Bl/6 mice. Both primary bronchial and nasal epithelial cells were transduced up to 70–80% 72 hr after the LV infection. In vivo nasal luciferase expression was increased by lysophosphatidylcholine pre-treatment of the nose. Conversely, the bronchial epithelium was transduced in the absence of any pre-conditioning treatment and luciferase expression lasted for at least 6 months without any decline. We conclude that a last generation LV vector is a promising gene transfer agent in the target organ of genetic and acquired lung diseases, as in the case of cystic fibrosis. PMID:21994695

  20. RD-MolPack technology for the constitutive production of self-inactivating lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with the nontoxic RD114-TR envelope

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Virna; Stornaiuolo, Anna; Piovan, Claudia; Corna, Stefano; Bossi, Sergio; Pema, Monika; Giuliani, Erica; Scavullo, Cinzia; Zucchelli, Eleonora; Bordignon, Claudio; Rizzardi, Gian Paolo; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    To date, gene therapy with transiently derived lentivectors has been very successful to cure rare infant genetic diseases. However, transient manufacturing is unfeasible to treat adult malignancies because large vector lots are required. By contrast, stable manufacturing is the best option for high-incidence diseases since it reduces the production cost, which is the major current limitation to scale up the transient methods. We have previously developed the proprietary RD2-MolPack technology for the stable production of second-generation lentivectors, based on the RD114-TR envelope. Of note, opposite to vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) envelope, RD114-TR does not need inducible expression thanks to lack of toxicity. Here, we present the construction of RD2- and RD3-MolPack cells for the production of self-inactivating lentivectors expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a proof-of-concept of the feasibility and safety of this technology before its later therapeutic exploitation. We report that human T lymphocytes transduced with self-inactivating lentivectors derived from RD3-MolPack cells or with self-inactivating VSV-G pseudotyped lentivectors derived from transient transfection show identical T-cell memory differentiation phenotype and comparable transduction efficiency in all T-cell subsets. RD-MolPack technology represents, therefore, a straightforward tool to simplify and standardize lentivector manufacturing to engineer T-cells for frontline immunotherapy applications. PMID:27222840

  1. Evaluation of antioxidant defense systems in H4IIE cells infected with a retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Oh, Soo Jin; Chae, Jooyoung; Zhu, Hongmei; Hien, Tran Thi; Lee, Kiho; Kim, Hwan Mook; Kang, Keon Wook; Song, Gyu Yong; Kang, Jong Seong; Kim, Bong-Hee; Kwon, Kwang-il; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2010-06-01

    Retroviral gene transfer technology is frequently used to establish stable transgenic cell lines. However, no studies to date have evaluated antioxidant defense systems in cells infected with retroviral particles. In the present study, we examined the effects of retroviral infection on antioxidant defense systems using H4IIE cells infected with a retrovirus that overexpresses green fluorescent protein (retro-H4IIE cells). Total oxyradical scavenging capacity and glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde, and peroxide levels were not significantly altered in retro-H4IIE cells; however, retro-H4IIE cells showed a higher resistance against cytotoxicity, GSH depletion, and malondialdehyde elevation under H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress conditions. Immunoblot analysis showed that alpha-class GSH S-transferase (GST) was increased 2.5-fold in retro-H4IIE cells as compared with H4IIE cells; however, catalase, GSH peroxidase-1, peroxiredoxin-1, and thioredoxin-1 remained unaltered or slightly decreased. l-Buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, a GSH synthesis inhibitor, and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, a GST substrate and competitive inhibitor, decreased the difference in H(2)O(2) responses between the two cell types. These results support the hypothesis that the resistance of retro-H4IIE cells to H(2)O(2) can be attributed to an increase in alpha-class GST expression, as levels of GSH and GSH peroxidase-1 were not altered. The present study suggests that antioxidant enzyme expression may change during the establishment of stable transformed cell lines using retroviral techniques.

  2. Statistical analysis of data from retroviral clonal experiments in the developing retina.

    PubMed

    Pounds, Stan; Dyer, Michael A

    2008-02-04

    Retroviral lineage studies have been widely used over the past decade to study retinal development in vivo and in explant culture [Donovan S.L., Dyer, M.A., 2006. Preparation and Square Wave Electroporation of Retinal Explant Cultures, Nature Protocols 1, 2710-2718; Donovan, S.L., Schweers, B., Martins, R., Johnson D., Dyer, M.A., 2001. Compensation by tumor suppressor genes during retinal development in mice and humans, BMC Biol 4 , 14; Dyer M.A., Cepko, C.L., 2001. p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 regulate proliferation in distinct retinal progenitor cell populations, J. of Neurosci 21, 4259-4271; Dyer M.A., Cepko, C.L., 2000. p57(Kip2) regulates progenitor cell proliferation and amacrine interneuron development in the mouse retina, Development 127, 3593-3605; Dyer, M.A., Livesey, F.J., Cepko C.L., Oliver, G., 2003. Prox1 function controls progenitor cell proliferation and horizontal cell genesis in the mammalian retina, Nat Genet 34, 53-58]. These approaches can provide important data on the proliferation, cell fate specification, differentiation and survival of individual neurons and glia derived from single infected retinal progenitor cells. In some experiments, these parameters are compared in retinae from animals with different targeted deletions or transgenes. Alternatively, the effect of ectopic expression of virally encoded transgenes may be studied at the level of individual retinal progenitor cells in vivo and in explant culture. One of the challenges with interpreting retroviral lineage studies is determining the statistical significance of differences in the proliferation, cell fate specification, differentiation of survival of retinal progenitor cells between experimental and control samples. In this study, we provide a clear step-by-step guide to the application of statistical methods to retroviral lineage analyses actual data sets. We anticipate that this will serve as a guide for future statistical analyses of retroviral lineage studies and will help to

  3. Increased immunoglobulin G, but not M, binding to endogenous retroviral antigens in HIV-1 infected persons.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, A; Johansson, B; Rabinayaran, D; Pipkorn, R; Blomberg, J

    2000-12-01

    The modes of interaction between products of human endogenous retroviral (HERV) sequences and the immune system are largely unknown. In HIV infected persons, an exogenous retrovirus adds further complexity to the situation. Therefore, 14 synthetic peptides with sequences derived from conserved regions of various endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and from related exogenous retroviruses were used to search for IgG and IgM antibodies that bind to such antigens in 15 HIV-1 seropositive and 17 seronegative immunosuppressed patients. IgG binding to three peptides, namely, the C-terminal half of murine leukemia virus (MLV) capsid protein, the conserved portion of HERV-H transmembrane protein, and the Pol region of human mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-like (HML3) sequence, was observed in both groups. Binding was, however, more frequent and more firm in HIV-1 positive samples (P<0.0001, Wilcoxon rank sum test). IgM binding to the same peptides showed no significant differentiation between the two groups of patients. Binding to both immunoglobulin isotypes was sometimes variable over time in both groups. No correlation of either IgG or IgM peptide binding with progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals was observed. Inhibition studies using analogous endogenous and exogenous retroviral peptides, including HIV-1, demonstrated specificity of the IgG antibodies for a narrow range of MLV- and MMTV-like retroviral antigens, and excluded cross-reactivity of antibodies to HIV-1 as a cause of these observations. Thus, unlike IgG, IgM binding to retroviral antigens was ubiquitous. It is suggested that anti-HERV IgM belong to a class of natural antibodies and might serve as primers in the mediation of humoral immune responses to more or less related exogenous retroviruses. Increased IgG binding in HIV-1 infected individuals could result from such priming, or reflect higher HERV antigen expression.

  4. Gene transfer in ovarian cancer cells: a comparison between retroviral and lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Indraccolo, Stefano; Habeler, Walter; Tisato, Veronica; Stievano, Laura; Piovan, Erich; Tosello, Valeria; Esposito, Giovanni; Wagner, Ralf; Uberla, Klaus; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi; Amadori, Alberto

    2002-11-01

    Local gene therapy could be a therapeutic option for ovarian carcinoma, a life-threatening malignancy, because of disease containment within the peritoneal cavity in most patients. Lentiviral vectors, which are potentially capable of stable transgene expression, may be useful to vehicle therapeutic molecules requiring long-term production in these tumors. To investigate this concept, we used lentiviral vectors to deliver the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene to ovarian cancer cells. Their efficiency of gene transfer was compared with that of a retroviral vector carrying the same envelope. In vitro, both vectors infected ovarian cancer cells with comparable efficiency under standard culture conditions; however, the lentiviral vector was much more efficient in transducing growth-arrested cells when compared with the retroviral vector. Gene transfer was fully neutralized by an anti-VSV-G antibody, and in vitro stability was similar. In vivo, the lentiviral vector delivered the transgene 10-fold more efficiently to ovarian cancer cells growing i.p. in SCID mice, as evaluated by real-time PCR analysis of the tumors. Confocal microscopy analysis of tumor sections showed a dramatic difference at the level of transgene expression, because abundant EGFP(+) cells were detected only in mice receiving the lentiviral vector. Quantitative analysis by flow cytometry confirmed this and indicated 0.05 and 5.6% EGFP(+) tumor cells after administration of the retroviral and lentiviral vector, respectively. Injection of ex vivo transduced tumor cells, sorted for EGFP expression, indicated that the lentiviral vector was considerably more resistant to in vivo silencing in comparison with the retroviral vector. Finally, multiple administrations of a murine IFN-alpha(1)-lentiviral vector to ovarian carcinoma-bearing mice significantly prolonged the animals' survival, indicating the therapeutic efficacy of this approach. These findings indicate that lentiviral vectors deserve

  5. Retroviral envelope gene captures and syncytin exaptation for placentation in marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Carradec, Quentin; Souquere, Sylvie; Mulot, Baptiste; Catzeflis, François; Nilsson, Maria A.; Menzies, Brandon R.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Pierron, Gérard; Zeller, Ulrich; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Syncytins are genes of retroviral origin captured by eutherian mammals, with a role in placentation. Here we show that some marsupials—which are the closest living relatives to eutherian mammals, although they diverged from the latter ∼190 Mya—also possess a syncytin gene. The gene identified in the South American marsupial opossum and dubbed syncytin-Opo1 has all of the characteristic features of a bona fide syncytin gene: It is fusogenic in an ex vivo cell–cell fusion assay; it is specifically expressed in the short-lived placenta at the level of the syncytial feto–maternal interface; and it is conserved in a functional state in a series of Monodelphis species. We further identify a nonfusogenic retroviral envelope gene that has been conserved for >80 My of evolution among all marsupials (including the opossum and the Australian tammar wallaby), with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of a canonical immunosuppressive domain, but with only limited expression in the placenta. This unusual captured gene, together with a third class of envelope genes from recently endogenized retroviruses—displaying strong expression in the uterine glands where retroviral particles can be detected—plausibly correspond to the different evolutionary statuses of a captured retroviral envelope gene, with only syncytin-Opo1 being the present-day bona fide syncytin active in the opossum and related species. This study would accordingly recapitulate the natural history of syncytin exaptation and evolution in a single species, and definitely extends the presence of such genes to all major placental mammalian clades. PMID:25605903

  6. Murine leukemias with retroviral insertions at Lmo2 are predictive of the leukemias induced in SCID-X1 patients following retroviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Davé, Utpal P; Akagi, Keiko; Tripathi, Rati; Cleveland, Susan M; Thompson, Mary A; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert; Downing, James R; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G

    2009-05-01

    Five X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency patients (SCID-X1) successfully treated with autologous bone marrow stem cells infected ex vivo with an IL2RG-containing retrovirus subsequently developed T-cell leukemia and four contained insertional mutations at LMO2. Genetic evidence also suggests a role for IL2RG in tumor formation, although this remains controversial. Here, we show that the genes and signaling pathways deregulated in murine leukemias with retroviral insertions at Lmo2 are similar to those deregulated in human leukemias with high LMO2 expression and are highly predictive of the leukemias induced in SCID-X1 patients. We also provide additional evidence supporting the notion that IL2RG and LMO2 cooperate in leukemia induction but are not sufficient and require additional cooperating mutations. The highly concordant nature of the genetic events giving rise to mouse and human leukemias with mutations at Lmo2 are an encouraging sign to those wanting to use mice to model human cancer and may help in designing safer methods for retroviral gene therapy.

  7. Suppression of retroviral propagation and disease by suramin in murine systems.

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, R M; Rossoni, L D; Haseltine, W A; Broder, S

    1985-01-01

    Retroviral propagation crucially depends on reverse transcriptase (RT). We have developed murine models to test the biological effectiveness of the RT inhibitor suramin. The drug was active in our assay system, which includes (i) inhibition of RT activity in the murine T-cell tropic virus SL3-3 and Rauscher murine leukemia virus (MuLV), (ii) inhibition of plaque formation in the XC plaque assay, (iii) inhibition of viral infection of cultured murine T cells, and (iv) inhibition of splenomegaly induced by Rauscher MuLV in BALB/c mice. Suramin decreases viral titers significantly, even if started 36 hr after infection. Viral titers and number of infected cells increased to control levels after removal of the drug. BALB/c mice treated i.v. with 40 mg of suramin per kg twice per week following infection with Rauscher MuLV showed a 35% decrease in splenomegaly. Suramin is an active antiretroviral agent whose effect on retroviral propagation is reversible. We conclude that it acts as a virustatic drug and that long-term administration of suramin will be necessary if it is used for experimental treatment of human retroviral illnesses such as the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. PMID:2415971

  8. Novel Endogenous Type D Retroviral Particles Expressed at High Levels in a SCID Mouse Thymic Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ristevski, Sika; Purcell, Damian F. J.; Marshall, John; Campagna, Daniella; Nouri, Sara; Fenton, Simon P.; McPhee, Dale A.; Kannourakis, George

    1999-01-01

    A xenograft model of the human disease Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) was investigated with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Transplantation of human LCH biopsy material into SCID mice resulted in the generation of mouse tumors resembling lymphomas. A thymoma cell line (ThyE1M6) was generated from one of these mice and found to display significant levels of Mg2+-dependent reverse transcriptase activity. Electron microscopy revealed particles with type D retroviral morphology budding from ThyE1M6 cells at a high frequency, whereas control cultures were negative. Reverse transcription-PCR of virion RNA with degenerate primers for conserved regions of various mouse, human, and primate retroviruses amplified novel sequences related to primate type D retroviruses, murine intracisternal A particles, Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus, and murine long interspersed nuclear elements but not other retroviral classes. We demonstrate that these sequences represent a novel group of endogenous retroviruses expressed at low levels in mice but expressed at high levels in the ThyE1M6 cell line. Furthermore, we propose that the activation of endogenous retroviral elements may be associated with a high incidence of thymomas in SCID mice. PMID:10233925

  9. Comparing the landcapes of common retroviral insertion sites across tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weishaupt, Holger; Čančer, Matko; Engström, Cristopher; Silvestrov, Sergei; Swartling, Fredrik J.

    2017-01-01

    Retroviral tagging represents an important technique, which allows researchers to screen for candidate cancer genes. The technique is based on the integration of retroviral sequences into the genome of a host organism, which might then lead to the artificial inhibition or expression of proximal genetic elements. The identification of potential cancer genes in this framework involves the detection of genomic regions (common insertion sites; CIS) which contain a number of such viral integration sites that is greater than expected by chance. During the last two decades, a number of different methods have been discussed for the identification of such loci and the respective techniques have been applied to a variety of different retroviruses and/or tumor models. We have previously established a retrovirus driven brain tumor model and reported the CISs which were found based on a Monte Carlo statistics derived detection paradigm. In this study, we consider a recently proposed alternative graph theory based method for identifying CISs and compare the resulting CIS landscape in our brain tumor dataset to those obtained when using the Monte Carlo approach. Finally, we also employ the graph-based method to compare the CIS landscape in our brain tumor model with those of other published retroviral tumor models.

  10. Cryo-EM reveals a novel octameric integrase structure for β-retroviral intasome function

    PubMed Central

    Ballandras-Colas, Allison; Brown, Monica; Cook, Nicola J.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Demeler, Borries; Cherepanov, Peter; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA (vDNA) into host target (tDNA), which is an essential step in the lifecycle of all retroviruses1. Prior structural characterization of IN-vDNA complexes, or intasomes, from the spumavirus prototype foamy virus (PFV) revealed a functional IN tetramer2–5, and it is generally believed that intasomes derived from other retroviral genera will employ tetrameric IN6–9. However, the intasomes of orthoretroviruses, which include all known pathogenic species, have not been characterized structurally. Using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallography, we determine here an unexpected octameric IN architecture for the β-retrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) intasome. The structure is composed of two core IN dimers, which interact with the vDNA ends and structurally mimic the PFV IN tetramer, and two flanking IN dimers that engage the core structure via their IN C-terminal domains (CTDs). Contrary to the belief that tetrameric IN components are sufficient to catalyze integration, the flanking IN dimers were necessary for MMTV IN activity. The IN octamer solves a conundrum for the β- as well as α-retroviruses by providing critical CTDs to the intasome core that cannot be provided in cis due to evolutionarily restrictive catalytic core domain (CCD)-CTD linker regions. The octameric architecture of the MMTV intasome provides a new paradigm for the structural basis of retroviral DNA integration. PMID:26887496

  11. Cross- and Co-Packaging of Retroviral RNAs and Their Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Lizna M.; Rizvi, Tahir A.; Mustafa, Farah

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses belong to the family Retroviridae and are ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles that contain a dimeric RNA genome. Retroviral particle assembly is a complex process, and how the virus is able to recognize and specifically capture the genomic RNA (gRNA) among millions of other cellular and spliced retroviral RNAs has been the subject of extensive investigation over the last two decades. The specificity towards RNA packaging requires higher order interactions of the retroviral gRNA with the structural Gag proteins. Moreover, several retroviruses have been shown to have the ability to cross-/co-package gRNA from other retroviruses, despite little sequence homology. This review will compare the determinants of gRNA encapsidation among different retroviruses, followed by an examination of our current understanding of the interaction between diverse viral genomes and heterologous proteins, leading to their cross-/co-packaging. Retroviruses are well-known serious animal and human pathogens, and such a cross-/co-packaging phenomenon could result in the generation of novel viral variants with unknown pathogenic potential. At the same time, however, an enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in these specific interactions makes retroviruses an attractive target for anti-viral drugs, vaccines, and vectors for human gene therapy. PMID:27727192

  12. Using RT-prone recombination to promote re-building of complete retroviral vectors from two defective precursors: low efficiency and sequence specificities.

    PubMed

    Bru, Thierry; Galetto, Román; Piver, Eric; Collin, Christine; Negroni, Matteo; Pagès, Jean-Christophe

    2007-06-01

    Retroviral recombination has been suggested as a useful way to modify retroviral vectors. The possibility to combine two multiply deleted retroviral vectors into a novel vector was evaluated. To investigate this possibility we have constructed two defective vectors containing a shared internal ribosome entry site (IRES). The IRES was selected for its complex secondary structure, a feature described to favour retroviral recombination. The IRES was expected to promote a recombination event leading to the formation of a unique, functional retroviral vector. By supporting expression of two transgenes from a single promoter, this sequence was also expected to allow straightforward detection of the recombination event. The present data confirms the achievement of recombination-dependent rescue, albeit at low efficiency. Unexpectedly, a preferential use of the packaging signal (Psi) for recombination was observed, as compared to the IRES. Together these observations mitigate the idea of using this technique for the design of retroviral vectors.

  13. TRIM5 Retroviral Restriction Activity Correlates with the Ability To Induce Innate Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lascano, Josefina; Uchil, Pradeep D.; Mothes, Walther

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Host restriction factor TRIM5 inhibits retroviral transduction in a species-specific manner by binding to and destabilizing the retroviral capsid lattice before reverse transcription is completed. However, the restriction mechanism may not be that simple since TRIM5 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, the proteasome, autophagy, and TAK1-dependent AP-1 signaling have been suggested to contribute to restriction. Here, we show that, among a panel of seven primate and Carnivora TRIM5 orthologues, each of which has potential for potent retroviral restriction activity, all activated AP-1 signaling. In contrast, TRIM family paralogues most closely related to TRIM5 did not. While each primate species has a single TRIM5 gene, mice have at least seven TRIM5 homologues that cluster into two groups, Trim12a, -b, and -c and Trim30a, -b, -c, and -d. The three Trim12 proteins activated innate immune signaling, while the Trim30 proteins did not, though none of the murine Trim5 homologues restricted any of a panel of cloned retroviruses. To determine if any mouse TRIM5 homologues had potential for restriction activity, each was fused to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CA binding protein cyclophilin A (CypA). The three Trim12-CypA fusions all activated AP-1 and restricted HIV-1 transduction, whereas the Trim30-CypA fusions did neither. AP-1 activation and HIV-1 restriction by the Trim12-CypA fusions were inhibited by disruption of TAK1. Overall then, these experiments demonstrate that there is a strong correlation between TRIM5 retroviral restriction activity and the ability to activate TAK1-dependent innate immune signaling. IMPORTANCE The importance of retroviruses for the evolution of susceptible host organisms cannot be overestimated. Eight percent of the human genome is retrovirus sequence, fixed in the germ line during past infection. Understanding how metazoa protect their genomes from mutagenic retrovirus infection is therefore of fundamental importance to

  14. Positive Selection of Iris, a Retroviral Envelope–Derived Host Gene in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Harmit S; Henikoff, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes can usurp enzymatic functions encoded by mobile elements for their own use. A particularly interesting kind of acquisition involves the domestication of retroviral envelope genes, which confer infectious membrane-fusion ability to retroviruses. So far, these examples have been limited to vertebrate genomes, including primates where the domesticated envelope is under purifying selection to assist placental function. Here, we show that in Drosophila genomes, a previously unannotated gene (CG4715, renamed Iris) was domesticated from a novel, active Kanga lineage of insect retroviruses at least 25 million years ago, and has since been maintained as a host gene that is expressed in all adult tissues. Iris and the envelope genes from Kanga retroviruses are homologous to those found in insect baculoviruses and gypsy and roo insect retroviruses. Two separate envelope domestications from the Kanga and roo retroviruses have taken place, in fruit fly and mosquito genomes, respectively. Whereas retroviral envelopes are proteolytically cleaved into the ligand-interaction and membrane-fusion domains, Iris appears to lack this cleavage site. In the takahashii/suzukii species groups of Drosophila, we find that Iris has tandemly duplicated to give rise to two genes (Iris-A and Iris-B). Iris-B has significantly diverged from the Iris-A lineage, primarily because of the “invention” of an intron de novo in what was previously exonic sequence. Unlike domesticated retroviral envelope genes in mammals, we find that Iris has been subject to strong positive selection between Drosophila species. The rapid, adaptive evolution of Iris is sufficient to unambiguously distinguish the phylogenies of three closely related sibling species of Drosophila (D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana), a discriminative power previously described only for a putative “speciation gene.” Iris represents the first instance of a retroviral envelope–derived host gene outside

  15. TRIM5α Degradation via Autophagy Is Not Required for Retroviral Restriction.

    PubMed

    Imam, Sabrina; Talley, Sarah; Nelson, Rachel S; Dharan, Adarsh; O'Connor, Christopher; Hope, Thomas J; Campbell, Edward M

    2016-01-13

    TRIM5α is an interferon-inducible retroviral restriction factor that prevents infection by inducing the abortive disassembly of capsid cores recognized by its C-terminal PRY/SPRY domain. The mechanism by which TRIM5α mediates the disassembly of viral cores is poorly understood. Previous studies demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors abrogate the ability of TRIM5α to induce premature core disassembly and prevent reverse transcription; however, viral infection is still inhibited, indicating that the proteasome is partially involved in the restriction process. Alternatively, we and others have observed that TRIM5α associates with proteins involved in autophagic degradation pathways, and one recent study found that autophagic degradation is required for the restriction of retroviruses by TRIM5α. Here, we show that TRIM5α is basally degraded via autophagy in the absence of restriction-sensitive virus. We observe that the autophagy markers LC3b and lysosome-associated membrane protein 2A (LAMP2A) localize to a subset of TRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies, and inhibition of lysosomal degradation with bafilomycin A1 increases this association. To test the requirement for macroautophagy in restriction, we examined the ability of TRIM5α to restrict retroviral infection in cells depleted of the autophagic mediators ATG5, Beclin1, and p62. In all cases, restriction of retroviruses by human TRIM5α, rhesus macaque TRIM5α, and owl monkey TRIM-Cyp remained potent in cells depleted of these autophagic effectors by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 genome editing. Collectively, these results are consistent with observations that the turnover of TRIM5α proteins is sensitive to autophagy inhibition; however, the data presented here do not support observations that the inhibition of autophagy abrogates retroviral restriction by TRIM5 proteins. Restriction factors are a class of proteins that inhibit

  16. Long-term expression of von Willebrand Factor by a VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus enhances the functional activity of secreted B-Domain-deleted Coagulation Factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Won; Choi, Sang-Yun

    2007-08-31

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a multimeric glycoprotein which functions within the coagulation system. It colocalizes with factor VIII (FVIII) by non-covalent interaction and alters its intracellular trafficking. vWF is also instrumental in maintaining the stability of secreted FVIII. The principal objective of this study was to generate a lentivirus-based vWF expression vector for gene therapy of hemophilia A. We inserted a vWF of 8.8 Kb into a lentiviral vector thereby producing VSV-G-pseudotyped vEx52. However, its titer was quite low, presumably because the length of vWF gene exceeds the size limit of the lentiviral vector. In order to overcome the low-titer, we concentrated the vEx52 and thus increased the efficiency of transduction approximately 6-fold with 1/100th of the volume. However, as concentration requires an additional laborious step, we attempted to enhance the transduction efficiency by deleting exons 24-46 and 29-46 in pRex52 to construct pRex23 and pRex28, and in pvEx52, yielding pvEx23 and pvEx28, respectively. The transfected pRex52 had a profound effect on the activity of secreted FVIII, and this activity declined as domains of vWF were deleted. However, when the domain-deleted vWF-lentiviruses were transduced into K562 cells, the vEx28 increased the activity of the secreted FVIII compared to what was observed with vEx52. This result is probably due to higher efficiencies of transduction and expression while retaining the essential domains required for proper interaction with FVIII.

  17. HSV-2- and HIV-1- permissive cell lines co-infected by HSV-2 and HIV-1 co-replicate HSV-2 and HIV-1 without production of HSV-2/HIV-1 pseudotype particles

    PubMed Central

    LeGoff, Jérôme; Bouhlal, Hicham; Lecerf, Maxime; Klein, Christophe; Hocini, Hakim; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Muggeridge, Martin; Bélec, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a major cofactor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) sexual acquisition and transmission. In the present study, we investigated whether HIV-1 and HSV-2 may interact at the cellular level by forming HIV-1 hybrid virions pseudotyped with HSV-2 envelope glycoproteins, as was previously reported for HSV type 1. Methods We evaluated in vitro the production of HSV-2/HIV-1 pseudotypes in mononuclear CEM cells and epithelial HT29 and P4P cells. We analyzed the incorporation into the HIV-1 membrane of HSV-2 gB and gD, two major HSV-2 glycoproteins required for HSV-2 fusion with the cell membrane, in co-infected cells and in HIV-1-infected P4P cells transfected by plasmids coding for gB or gD. Results We show that HSV-2 and HIV-1 co-replicated in dually infected cells, and gB and gD were co-localized with gp160. However, HIV-1 particles, produced in HIV-1-infected cells expressing gB or gD after transfection or HSV-2 superinfection, did not incorporate either gB or gD in the viral membrane, and did not have the capacity to infect cells normally non-permissive for HIV-1, such as epithelial cells. Conclusion Our results do not support the hypothesis of HSV-2/HIV-1 pseudotype formation and involvement in the synergistic genital interactions between HIV-1 and HSV-2. PMID:17207276

  18. Large-scale Clinical-grade Retroviral Vector Production in a Fixed-Bed Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuyan; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; Bartido, Shirley; Hermetet, Gregory; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The successful genetic engineering of patient T cells with γ-retroviral vectors expressing chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors for phase II clinical trials and beyond requires the large-scale manufacture of high-titer vector stocks. The production of retroviral vectors from stable packaging cell lines using roller bottles or 10- to 40-layer cell factories is limited by a narrow harvest window, labor intensity, open-system operations, and the requirement for significant incubator space. To circumvent these shortcomings, we optimized the production of vector stocks in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor using good manufacturing practice–grade packaging cell lines. High-titer vector stocks were harvested over 10 days, representing a much broader harvest window than the 3-day harvest afforded by cell factories. For PG13 and 293Vec packaging cells, the average vector titer and the vector stocks’ yield in the bioreactor were higher by 3.2- to 7.3-fold, and 5.6- to 13.1-fold, respectively, than those obtained in cell factories. The vector production was 10.4 and 18.6 times more efficient than in cell factories for PG13 and 293Vec cells, respectively. Furthermore, the vectors produced from the fixed-bed bioreactors passed the release test assays for clinical applications. Therefore, a single vector lot derived from 293Vec is suitable to transduce up to 500 patients cell doses in the context of large clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a robust fixed-bed bioreactor process can be used to produce γ-retroviral vector stocks scalable up to the commercialization phase. PMID:25751502

  19. Large-scale clinical-grade retroviral vector production in a fixed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuyan; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; Bartido, Shirley; Hermetet, Gregory; Sadelain, Michel; Rivière, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    The successful genetic engineering of patient T cells with γ-retroviral vectors expressing chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors for phase II clinical trials and beyond requires the large-scale manufacture of high-titer vector stocks. The production of retroviral vectors from stable packaging cell lines using roller bottles or 10- to 40-layer cell factories is limited by a narrow harvest window, labor intensity, open-system operations, and the requirement for significant incubator space. To circumvent these shortcomings, we optimized the production of vector stocks in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor using good manufacturing practice-grade packaging cell lines. High-titer vector stocks were harvested over 10 days, representing a much broader harvest window than the 3-day harvest afforded by cell factories. For PG13 and 293Vec packaging cells, the average vector titer and the vector stocks' yield in the bioreactor were higher by 3.2- to 7.3-fold, and 5.6- to 13.1-fold, respectively, than those obtained in cell factories. The vector production was 10.4 and 18.6 times more efficient than in cell factories for PG13 and 293Vec cells, respectively. Furthermore, the vectors produced from the fixed-bed bioreactors passed the release test assays for clinical applications. Therefore, a single vector lot derived from 293Vec is suitable to transduce up to 500 patients cell doses in the context of large clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a robust fixed-bed bioreactor process can be used to produce γ-retroviral vector stocks scalable up to the commercialization phase.

  20. Green fluorescent protein retroviral vectors: low titer and high recombination frequency suggest a selective disadvantage.

    PubMed

    Hanazono, Y; Yu, J M; Dunbar, C E; Emmons, R V

    1997-07-20

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been used as a reporter molecule for gene expression because it fluoresces green after blue-light excitation. Inclusion of this gene in a vector could allow rapid, nontoxic selection of successfully transduced cells. However, many attempts by our laboratory to isolate stable retroviral producer cell clones secreting biologically active vectors containing either the highly fluorescent S65T-GFP mutant or humanized GFP have failed. Vector plasmids containing various forms of GFP and the neomycin resistance gene were transfected into three different packaging cell lines and fluorescence was observed for several days, but stable clones selected with G418 no longer fluoresced. Using confocal microscopy, the brightest cells were observed to contract and die within a matter of days. RNA slot-blot analysis of retroviral producer supernatants showed no viral production from the GFP plasmid-transfected clones, although all clones derived after transfection with an identical retroviral construct not containing GFP produced virus. Genomic Southern analysis of the GFP-transduced clones showed a much higher probability of rearrangement of the priviral sequences than in the control non-GFP clones. Overall, 18/34 S65T-GFP clones and 17/33 humanized-GFP clones had rearrangements, whereas 2/15 control non-GFP clones had rearrangements. Hence, producer cells expressing high levels of these GFP genes seem to be selected against, with stable clones undergoing major rearrangements or other mutations that both abrogate GFP expression and prevent vector production. These observations indicate that GFP may not be an appropriate reporter gene for gene transfer applications in our vector/packaging system.

  1. Retroviral vectors containing Tet-controlled bidirectional transcription units for simultaneous regulation of two gene activities

    PubMed Central

    Loew, Rainer; Vigna, Elisa; Lindemann, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Bujard, Herman

    2006-01-01

    In this study retroviral self-inactivating (SIN)-vectors were constructed, that allow simultaneous regulation of two genes by integration of bidirectional Tet controlled transcription units. Marker genes (luciferase and eGFP) were expressed under the control of various bidirectional promoters Ptetbis, in order to determine (i) the fraction of HtTA-1 cells exhibiting tight doxycycline (Dox) dependent control; (ii) possible effects of the vector backbone on the regulation of gene transcription; (iii) the possibility for crosstalk between different minimal promoters within Ptetbi. When HtTA-1 cells, constitutively expressing the Tet-Transactivator (tTA), were transduced by S2f-lMCg retroviral vector, a high percentage (40) of the cell population displayed tight regulation (5000 fold) of Ptetbi activity over a wide range of Dox concentrations. As a result of our comparative study on the activity of virus derived minimal promoters (from MMTV, HIV and CMV), a clear hierarchy of activity as well as a different sensitivity to external influences among the various promoters studied was observed. Furthermore, our results strongly support the idea, that viral elements such as part of the MuLV pol/env region significantly affect the regulation capacity of an integrate. Taking into account our observations as outlined above, we succeeded in generating significantly optimized Tet regulated retroviral vectors. The application of such a one-step transfer system for Ptet controlled genes would be of particular relevance to applications where cellular systems do not allow prolonged selection procedures as it is the case with primary cells considered for ex vivo gene therapy. PMID:19565004

  2. Bone marrow extracellular matrix molecules improve gene transfer into human hematopoietic cells via retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Moritz, T; Patel, V P; Williams, D A

    1994-04-01

    Direct contact between hematopoietic cells and viral packaging cell lines or other sources of stroma has been shown to increase the efficiency of retroviral-mediated gene transfer into these target cells compared with infection with viral supernatant. We have investigated the role of defined bone marrow extracellular matrix molecules (ECM) in this phenomenon. Here we report that infection of cells adhering to the carboxy-terminal 30/35-kD fragment of the fibronectin molecule (30/35 FN), which contains the alternatively spliced CS-1 cell adhesion domain, significantly increases gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. Two retroviral vectors differing in recombinant viral titer were used. Gene transfer into committed progenitor cells and long-term culture-initiating cells, an in vitro assay for human stem cells, was significantly increased when the cells were infected while adherent to 30/35 FN-coated plates compared with cells infected on BSA-coated control plates or plates coated with other bone marrow ECM molecules. Although gene transfer into committed progenitor cells and to a lesser degree into long-term culture-initiating cells was increased on intact fibronectin as well, increased gene transfer efficiency into hematopoietic cells on 30/35 FN was dependent on CS-1 sequence since infection on a similar FN fragment lacking CS-1 (42 FN) was suboptimal. 30/35 FN has previously been shown by our laboratory and other investigators to mediate adhesion of primitive murine and human hematopoietic stem cells to the hematopoietic microenvironment. Additional studies showed that neither soluble 30/35 FN nor nonspecific binding of hematopoietic cells to poly-L-lysine-coated plates had any appreciable effect on the infection efficiency of these cells. Our findings indicate that hematopoietic stem cell adhesion to specific ECM molecules alters retroviral infection efficiency. These findings should aid in the design of gene transfer protocols using hematopoietic progenitor and

  3. Epidemiologic studies of adverse effects of anti-retroviral drugs: how well is statistical power reported.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Scott D; Barton, Todd D; Gross, Robert; Hennessy, Sean; Berlin, Jesse A; Strom, Brian L

    2005-03-01

    To determine whether there is a difference in average statistical power between pharmacoepidemiologic studies of anti-retroviral adverse drug effects (ADEs) sponsored by for-profit versus non-profit organizations. We studied all published pharmacoepidemiologic studies of ADEs associated with the 15 anti-retroviral drugs approved through the end of 1999. A priori, the primary outcome was the power of each study to detect a clinically important difference in the risk for an adverse effect among patients exposed to the study drug(s). We could not evaluate this outcome because of the infrequent reporting of power calculations. We instead report the distribution of studies across a 5-tiered measure of adequacy of reporting of statistical power, as well as the sponsorship of these studies. Of 48 studies meeting our inclusion criteria, only 1 (2%) reported either a completed, a priori power calculation or sufficient details for readers to calculate the power to detect a pre-defined, clinically important effect. Thirty-five studies (73%) reported the minimum information required for sophisticated readers to determine the power to detect an event rate of interest to them; 6 additional studies (13%) reported confidence intervals around at least one summary effect measure and 6 (13%) provided no indication of power or uncertainty. Of the 41 studies for which sponsorship was determined, only 3 (7%) were sponsored by for-profit organizations. The poor reporting of statistical power in this sample suggests a need for guidelines to improve the reporting of pharmacoepidemiologic studies of ADEs. Future research is needed to determine whether the observed paucity of industry-sponsored observational studies of anti-retroviral ADEs extends to other clinical areas, and if so, to identify the causes of this phenomenon. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems during anti-retroviral therapy: an under-recognized problem.

    PubMed

    Manzar, Md Dilshad; Sony, Peter; Salahuddin, Mohammed; Kumalo, Abera; Geneto, Mathewos; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Moscovitch, Adam; BaHammam, Ahmed S

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and the anti-retroviral therapy (ART) associated complications necessitate that the medical care system keeps evolving for proper management of this group of patients. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems are common in patients on ART. Both of these conditions are associated with increased morbidity (such as acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, low CD4 count, non-adherence and depression) and mortality. Therefore, screening for both sleep problems and electrolytes imbalance may help to decrease the risk of complications in patients on ART.

  5. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems during anti-retroviral therapy: an under-recognized problem

    PubMed Central

    Manzar, Md Dilshad; Sony, Peter; Salahuddin, Mohammed; Kumalo, Abera; Geneto, Mathewos; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Moscovitch, Adam; BaHammam, Ahmed S

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and the anti-retroviral therapy (ART) associated complications necessitate that the medical care system keeps evolving for proper management of this group of patients. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems are common in patients on ART. Both of these conditions are associated with increased morbidity (such as acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, low CD4 count, non-adherence and depression) and mortality. Therefore, screening for both sleep problems and electrolytes imbalance may help to decrease the risk of complications in patients on ART. PMID:28966741

  6. Detecting Statistically Significant Common Insertion Sites in Retroviral Insertional Mutagenesis Screens

    PubMed Central

    de Ridder, Jeroen; Uren, Anthony; Kool, Jaap; Reinders, Marcel; Wessels, Lodewyk

    2006-01-01

    Retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens, which identify genes involved in tumor development in mice, have yielded a substantial number of retroviral integration sites, and this number is expected to grow substantially due to the introduction of high-throughput screening techniques. The data of various retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens are compiled in the publicly available Retroviral Tagged Cancer Gene Database (RTCGD). Integrally analyzing these screens for the presence of common insertion sites (CISs, i.e., regions in the genome that have been hit by viral insertions in multiple independent tumors significantly more than expected by chance) requires an approach that corrects for the increased probability of finding false CISs as the amount of available data increases. Moreover, significance estimates of CISs should be established taking into account both the noise, arising from the random nature of the insertion process, as well as the bias, stemming from preferential insertion sites present in the genome and the data retrieval methodology. We introduce a framework, the kernel convolution (KC) framework, to find CISs in a noisy and biased environment using a predefined significance level while controlling the family-wise error (FWE) (the probability of detecting false CISs). Where previous methods use one, two, or three predetermined fixed scales, our method is capable of operating at any biologically relevant scale. This creates the possibility to analyze the CISs in a scale space by varying the width of the CISs, providing new insights in the behavior of CISs across multiple scales. Our method also features the possibility of including models for background bias. Using simulated data, we evaluate the KC framework using three kernel functions, the Gaussian, triangular, and rectangular kernel function. We applied the Gaussian KC to the data from the combined set of screens in the RTCGD and found that 53% of the CISs do not reach the significance

  7. Anti-retroviral drugs compliance in intravenous and non intravenous drug abusers.

    PubMed

    Daud, Muhammad Yousuf; Qazi, Rizwan Aziz; Bashir, Naila

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous drug abuse is often associated with poor adherence to anti-retroviral drugs in HIV/AIDS. Very few studies in Pakistan have determined implications of intravenous drug abuse on anti-retroviral drug compliance in HIV/AIDS patients. The objectives of the study were to assess and compare the adherence to anti-retroviral drugs in intravenous drug users (IDUs) and non-intravenous drug users (NIDUs) and to determine various factors influencing the adherence to anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs in HIV positive IDUs in HIV treatment centre Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad. This descriptive observational study was carried out at HIV/AIDS treatment and care centre PIMS, Islamabad. A total of 162 HIV positive male (81 IDU and 81 NIDU) were enrolled in this study. They were followed over a period of five years from 2008-2012. ARV drug compliance and anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT) outcome in IDUs and NIDUs were assessed using standard outcome parameters. Among IDUs Hepatitis C was positive in 63 (77.77%) cases and negative in 18 (22.22%) cases. In NIDUs hepatitis C was positive in 5 (6.17%) and negative in 76 (93.82%) (p=0.000). In IDUs Pulmonary tuberculosis was present in 61 (75.30%) patients and in NIDUs it was present in 52 (64.19%) (p=0.171). Regarding ATT outcome, amongst IDUs 41 (50.61%) lost to follow up, 16 (19.75%) were compliant to treatment and 4 (4.93%) were transferred out. In NIDUs, 2 (2.46%) patients were lost to follow-up, 38 (46.91%) remained compliant to treatment and 6 (7.40%) were transferred out (p=0.000). Regarding end status of ARVs, in IDUs, 48 (59.25%) were lost to follow-up, 1 (1.23%) was defaulter, 16 (19.75%) were compliant to treatment, 8 (9.87%) were transferred out and 8 (9.87%) expired. In NIDUs, 73 (90.12%) were compliant to treatment, 5 (6.17%) expired, 2 (2.46%) were lost to follow-up. Due to various socioeconomic and clinical factors, compliance to ARVs in IDUs is poorer as compared to NIDUs. The factors

  8. Inducible expression of p21WAF-1/CIP-1/SDI-1 from a promoter conversion retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Mrochen, S; Klein, D; Nikol, S; Smith, J R; Salmons, B; Günzburg, W H

    1997-01-01

    Constitutive, high-level expression of the potentially therapeutic WAF-1/CIP-1/SDI-1 gene is incompatible with cell growth. A promoter conversion retroviral vector carrying the WAF-1/CIP-1/SDI-1 gene under the transcriptional control of the glucocorticoid inducible promoter of mouse mammary tumor virus was used to infect human bladder carcinoma or feline kidney cells. Reduced cell growth due to a greater proportion of cells being in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle was observed when WAF-1/CIP-1/SDI-1 expression was activated by addition of glucocorticoid hormone. This system demonstrates the potential long-term therapeutic use of WAF-1/CIP-1/SDI-1 delivered by retroviral vectors for inhibiting the growth of rapidly proliferating cells. Moreover, the conditional expression of genes such as WAF-1/CIP-1/SDI-1 from such retroviral vectors may facilitate analysis of their function.

  9. Novel principles of gamma-retroviral insertional transcription activation in murine leukemia virus-induced end-stage tumors.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Martin; Wabl, Matthias; Ruiz, Irene Rius; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2014-05-19

    Insertional mutagenesis screens of retrovirus-induced mouse tumors have proven valuable in human cancer research and for understanding adverse effects of retroviral-based gene therapies. In previous studies, the assignment of mouse genes to individual retroviral integration sites has been based on close proximity and expression patterns of annotated genes at target positions in the genome. We here employed next-generation RNA sequencing to map retroviral-mouse chimeric junctions genome-wide, and to identify local patterns of transcription activation in T-lymphomas induced by the murine leukemia gamma-retrovirus SL3-3. Moreover, to determine epigenetic integration preferences underlying long-range gene activation by retroviruses, the colocalization propensity with common epigenetic enhancer markers (H3K4Me1 and H3K27Ac) of 6,117 integrations derived from end-stage tumors of more than 2,000 mice was examined. We detected several novel mechanisms of retroviral insertional mutagenesis: bidirectional activation of mouse transcripts on opposite sides of a provirus including transcription of unannotated mouse sequence; sense/antisense-type activation of genes located on opposite DNA strands; tandem-type activation of distal genes that are positioned adjacently on the same DNA strand; activation of genes that are not the direct integration targets; combination-type insertional mutagenesis, in which enhancer activation, alternative chimeric splicing and retroviral promoter insertion are induced by a single retrovirus. We also show that irrespective of the distance to transcription start sites, the far majority of retroviruses in end-stage tumors colocalize with H3K4Me1 and H3K27Ac-enriched regions in murine lymphoid tissues. We expose novel retrovirus-induced host transcription activation patterns that reach beyond a single and nearest annotated gene target. Awareness of this previously undescribed layer of complexity may prove important for elucidation of adverse effects

  10. Truncation of TRIM5 in the Feliformia explains the absence of retroviral restriction in cells of the domestic cat.

    PubMed

    McEwan, William A; Schaller, Torsten; Ylinen, Laura M; Hosie, Margaret J; Towers, Greg J; Willett, Brian J

    2009-08-01

    TRIM5alpha mediates a potent retroviral restriction phenotype in diverse mammalian species. Here, we identify a TRIM5 transcript in cat cells with a truncated B30.2 capsid binding domain and ablated restrictive function which, remarkably, is conserved across the Feliformia. Cat TRIM5 displayed no restriction activity, but ectopic expression conferred a dominant negative effect against human TRIM5alpha. Our findings explain the absence of retroviral restriction in cat cells and suggest that disruption of the TRIM5 locus has arisen independently at least twice in the Carnivora, with implications concerning the evolution of the host and pathogen in this taxon.

  11. Truncation of TRIM5 in the Feliformia Explains the Absence of Retroviral Restriction in Cells of the Domestic Cat▿

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, William A.; Schaller, Torsten; Ylinen, Laura M.; Hosie, Margaret J.; Towers, Greg J.; Willett, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    TRIM5α mediates a potent retroviral restriction phenotype in diverse mammalian species. Here, we identify a TRIM5 transcript in cat cells with a truncated B30.2 capsid binding domain and ablated restrictive function which, remarkably, is conserved across the Feliformia. Cat TRIM5 displayed no restriction activity, but ectopic expression conferred a dominant negative effect against human TRIM5α. Our findings explain the absence of retroviral restriction in cat cells and suggest that disruption of the TRIM5 locus has arisen independently at least twice in the Carnivora, with implications concerning the evolution of the host and pathogen in this taxon. PMID:19494015

  12. Consistent production of transgenic chickens using replication-deficient retroviral vectors and high-throughput screening procedures.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A J; Speksnijder, G; Baugh, L R; Morris, J A; Ivarie, R

    2002-02-01

    We have developed a novel method of DNA extraction combined with a high-throughput method of gene detection allowing thousands of potentially transgenic chicks to be screened quickly and reliably. By using this method and a replication-deficient retroviral vector based on avian leukosis virus (ALV), we have demonstrated germline transmission of three different transgenes. Several generations of chickens carrying intact transgenes were produced, validating the use of the ALV retroviral vectors for large-scale production of transgenic flocks. Fourth-generation chicks that were nontransgenic, hemizygous, or homozygous for the transgene were identified with the combined genetic screening methods.

  13. Entry Kinetics and Cell-Cell Transmission of Surface-Bound Retroviral Vector Particles

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Lee S.; Skinner, Amy M.; Woodward, Josha A.; Kurre, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background Transduction with recombinant Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) -1 derived lentivirus vectors is a multi-step process initiated by surface attachment and subsequent receptor-directed uptake into the target cell. We previously reported the retention of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G) pseudotyped particles on murine progenitor cells and their delayed cell-cell transfer. Methods To examine the underlying mechanism in more detail we used a combination of approaches focused on investigating the role of receptor-independent factors in modulating attachment. Results Studies of synchronized transduction herein reveal cell-type specific rates of vector particle clearance with substantial delays during particle entry into murine hematopoietic progenitor cells. The observed uptake kinetics from the surface of the 1° cell correlate inversely with the magnitude of transfer to 2° targets, corresponding with our initial observation of preferential cell-cell transfer in the context of brief vector exposures. We further demonstrate that vector particle entry into cells is associated with the cell–type specific abundance of extracellular matrix fibronectin. Residual particle – ECM binding and 2° transfer can be competitively disrupted by heparin exposure without affecting murine progenitor homing and repopulation. Conclusions While cellular attachment factors, including fibronectin, aid gene transfer by colocalizing particles to cells and disfavoring early dissociation from targets, they also appear to stabilize particles on the cell surface. Our study highlights the inadvertent consequences for cell entry and cell-cell transfer. PMID:20440757

  14. Prototypic chromatin insulator cHS4 protects retroviral transgene from silencing in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Suttiprapa, Sutas; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Brindley, Paul J

    2012-06-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) pseudotyped murine leukemia virus (MLV) virions can transduce schistosomes, leading to chromosomal integration of reporter transgenes. To develop VSVG-MLV for functional genomics in schistosomes, the influence of the chicken β-globin cHS4 element, a prototypic chromatin insulator, on transgene expression was examined. Plasmid pLNHX encoding the MLV 5'- and 3'-Long Terminal Repeats flanking the neomycin phosphotransferase gene (neo) was modified to include, within the U3 region of the 3'-LTR, active components of cHS4 insulator, the 250 bp core fused to the 400 bp 3'-region. Cultured larvae of Schistosoma mansoni were transduced with virions from producer cells transfected with control or cHS4-bearing plasmids. Schistosomules transduced with cHS4 virions expressed 2-20 times higher levels of neo than controls, while carrying comparable numbers of integrated proviral transgenes. The findings not only demonstrated that cHS4 was active in schistosomes but also they represent the first report of activity of cHS4 in any Lophotrochozoan species, which has significant implications for evolutionary conservation of heterochromatin regulation. The findings advance prospects for transgenesis in functional genomics of the schistosome genome to discover intervention targets because they provide the means to enhance and extend transgene activity including for vector based RNA interference.

  15. Detection of sequences homologous to human retroviral DNA in multiple sclerosis by gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, S.J.; Ehrlich, G.D.; Abbott, M.A.; Hurwitz, B.J.; Waldmann, T.A.; Poiesz, B.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic progressive type, were examined for DNA sequences homologous to a human retrovirus. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed for the presence of homologous sequences to the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat, 3{prime} gag, pol, and env domains by the enzymatic in vitro gene amplification technique, polymerase chain reaction. Positive identification of homologous pol sequences was made in the amplified DNA from six of these patients (29%). Three of these six patients (14%) also tested positive for the env region, but not for the other regions tested. In contrast, none of the samples from 35 normal individuals studied was positive when amplified and tested with the same primers and probes. Comparison of patterns obtained from controls and from patients with adult T-cell leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis suggests that the DNA sequences identified are exogenous to the human genome and may correspond to a human retroviral species. The data support the detection of a human retroviral agent in some patients with multiple sclerosis.

  16. Mechanism of Nucleic Acid Chaperone Function of Retroviral Nuceleocapsid (NC) Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzina, Ioulia; Vo, My-Nuong; Stewart, Kristen; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Cruceanu, Margareta; Williams, Mark

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted two main activities of HIV-1 NC protein contributing to its function as a universal nucleic acid chaperone. Firstly, it is the ability of NC to weakly destabilize all nucleic acid,(NA), secondary structures, thus resolving the kinetic traps for NA refolding, while leaving the annealed state stable. Secondly, it is the ability of NC to aggregate NA, facilitating the nucleation step of bi-molecular annealing by increasing the local NA concentration. In this work we use single molecule DNA stretching and gel-based annealing assays to characterize these two chaperone activities of NC by using various HIV-1 NC mutants and several other retroviral NC proteins. Our results suggest that two NC functions are associated with its zinc fingers and cationic residues, respectively. NC proteins from other retroviruses have similar activities, although expressed to a different degree. Thus, NA aggregating ability improves, and NA duplex destabilizing activity decreases in the sequence: MLV NC, HIV NC, RSV NC. In contrast, HTLV NC protein works very differently from other NC proteins, and similarly to typical single stranded NA binding proteins. These features of retroviral NCs co-evolved with the structure of their genomes.

  17. Biologically active mutants with deletions in the v-mos oncogene assayed with retroviral vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bold, R J; Donoghue, D J

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed retroviral expression vectors by manipulation of the Moloney murine leukemia virus genome such that an exogenous DNA sequence may be inserted and subsequently expressed when introduced into mammalian cells. A series of N-terminal deletions of the v-mos oncogene was constructed and assayed for biological activity with these retroviral expression vectors. The results of the deletion analysis demonstrate that the region of p37mos coding region upstream of the third methionine codon is dispensable with respect to transformation. However, deletion mutants of v-mos which allow initiation of translation at the fourth methionine codon have lost the biological activity of the parental v-mos gene. Furthermore, experiments were also carried out to define the C-terminal limit of the active region of p37mos by the construction of premature termination mutants by the insertion of a termination oligonucleotide. Insertion of the oligonucleotide just 69 base pairs upstream from the wild-type termination site abolished the focus-forming ability of v-mos. Thus, we have shown the N-terminal limit of the active region of p37mos to be between the third and fourth methionines, while the C-terminal limit is within the last 23 amino acids of the protein. PMID:3018503

  18. Construction and characterization of a highly complex retroviral library for lineage analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Golden, J A; Fields-Berry, S C; Cepko, C L

    1995-01-01

    Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors encoding histochemical reporter genes have been used for studying lineal relationships in a variety of species. A crucial element in the interpretation of data generated by this method is the identification of sibling relationships, or clonal boundaries. The use of a library of viruses in which each member is unique can greatly facilitate this aspect of the analysis. A previously reported murine retroviral library containing about 80 members demonstrated the utility of the library approach. However, the relatively low number of tags in the murine library necessitated using low infection rates in order to give confidence in clonal assignments. To obviate the need for low infection rates, a far more complex library was created and characterized. The CHAPOL library was constructed such that each member encodes a histochemical reporter gene and has a DNA tag derived from a degenerate oligonucleotide pool synthesized to have a complexity of > 1 x 10(7). The library was tested after infection of cells in vitro or in vivo. The DNA tag from each histochemically labeled cell or clone of cells was recovered by PCR and sequenced for unambiguous identification. Three hundred and twenty tags have been identified after infection, and so far no tag has been seen to result from more than one independent infection. Thus, an equal distribution of inserts is suggested, and Monte Carlo analysis predicts a complexity of > 10(4) members. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777573

  19. Epigenetic regulation of transcription and splicing of syncytins, fusogenic glycoproteins of retroviral origin

    PubMed Central

    Trejbalová, Kateřina; Blažková, Jana; Matoušková, Magda; Kučerová, Dana; Pecnová, Lubomíra; Vernerová, Zdenka; Heráček, Jiří; Hirsch, Ivan; Hejnar, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Syncytin-1 and -2, human fusogenic glycoproteins encoded by the env genes of the endogenous retroviral loci ERVWE1 and ERVFRDE1, respectively, contribute to the differentiation of multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast in chorionic villi. In non-trophoblastic cells, however, the expression of syncytins has to be suppressed to avoid potential pathogenic effects. We studied the epigenetic suppression of ERVWE1 and ERVFRDE1 5′-long terminal repeats by DNA methylation and chromatin modifications. Immunoprecipitation of the provirus-associated chromatin revealed the H3K9 trimethylation at transcriptionally inactivated syncytins in HeLa cells. qRT-PCR analysis of non-spliced ERVWE1 and ERVFRDE1 mRNAs and respective env mRNAs detected efficient splicing of endogenously expressed RNAs in trophoblastic but not in non-placental cells. Pointing to the pathogenic potential of aberrantly expressed syncytin-1, we have found deregulation of transcription and splicing of the ERVWE1 in biopsies of testicular seminomas. Finally, ectopic expression experiments suggest the importance of proper chromatin context for the ERVWE1 splicing. Our results thus demonstrate that cell-specific retroviral splicing represents an additional epigenetic level controling the expression of endogenous retroviruses. PMID:21771862

  20. The impact of maternal anti-retroviral therapy on cytokine profile in the uninfected neonates.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Taissa M; Hygino, Joana; Blanco, Bernardo; Xavier, Luciana; Araújo-Lima, Carlos Fernando; Guillermo, Landi V C; Bittencourt, Vera Carolina B; Guimarães, Vander; Andrade, Arnaldo F B; Bento, Cleonice A M

    2013-09-01

    The number of HIV-infected young women has been increasing since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic. The objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) of HIV-1-infected pregnant women (PW) on cytokine profile of uninfected neonates. Our results demonstrated that higher levels of IL-1β and TNF-α associated with lower IL-10 production were detected in the plasma obtained from neonates born from ART-treated PW. Furthermore, the production of TNF- α and IFN-γ was also significantly higher in polyclonally-activated T cells from those neonates. This elevated pro-inflammatory pattern detected by these activated-T cells was not associated to HIV-1 antigens sensitization. Finally, ART-exposed neonates showed to be born with lower weight, and it was inversely correlated with maternal peripheral TNF-a level. In summary, the data presented here suggest a significant disturbance in cytokine network of HIV-1-uninfected neonates exposed to potent anti-retroviral schemes during pregnancy.

  1. DNA minicircles clarify the specific role of DNA structure on retroviral integration.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Marco; Mornico, Damien; Volant, Stevenn; Juchet, Anna; Batisse, Julien; Bouchier, Christiane; Parissi, Vincent; Ruff, Marc; Lavery, Richard; Lavigne, Marc

    2016-09-19

    Chromatin regulates the selectivity of retroviral integration into the genome of infected cells. At the nucleosome level, both histones and DNA structure are involved in this regulation. We propose a strategy that allows to specifically study a single factor: the DNA distortion induced by the nucleosome. This strategy relies on mimicking this distortion using DNA minicircles (MCs) having a fixed rotational orientation of DNA curvature, coupled with atomic-resolution modeling. Contrasting MCs with linear DNA fragments having identical sequences enabled us to analyze the impact of DNA distortion on the efficiency and selectivity of integration. We observed a global enhancement of HIV-1 integration in MCs and an enrichment of integration sites in the outward-facing DNA major grooves. Both of these changes are favored by LEDGF/p75, revealing a new, histone-independent role of this integration cofactor. PFV integration is also enhanced in MCs, but is not associated with a periodic redistribution of integration sites, thus highlighting its distinct catalytic properties. MCs help to separate the roles of target DNA structure, histone modifications and integrase (IN) cofactors during retroviral integration and to reveal IN-specific regulation mechanisms.

  2. Strategies for the isolation and purification of retroviral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Braas, G; Searle, P F; Slater, N K; Lyddiatt, A

    1996-01-01

    Viral gene therapy vectors promise new opportunities for treatment of hitherto debilitating and life threatening illnesses. To enable early and rapid clinical evaluation of the therapeutic potential of the technology, the initial objectives of process development have so far largely concerned vector assembly, product quality and safety, and manufacturing consistency appropriate to modest scales. The first of such vectors are under test in clinical trials approved through the regulatory CTX/IND route and thus conform to the standards specified for purity and contaminant removal. Process optimisation, scale-up and operability have been of secondary concern and the establishment of a scientific basis for the mechanistic development of future vector manufacturing processes has yet to be seriously addressed. This review considers the manufacturing demands of retroviral vectors and the candidate separation technologies which could facilitate preparation of clinical grade materials. Note is made that the practising community appears to place implicit confidence in the capability of conventional membranes and chromatographic supports developed for protein purification to perform adequately for large-scale purification of viruses. In particular, these are expected to deliver virus preparations to product standards currently required of therapeutic proteins. It is argued that the basis for this confidence may be ill-placed, since the physical and chemical characteristics of viral particles differ significantly from macromolecular proteins. The specific requirements for separation systems and materials for processing of retroviral vectors are considered, and specific routes to more efficient manufacturing processes are proposed.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Enhancer-Blocking Insulators to Reduce Retroviral Vector Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Lovelett, Emilie; Emery, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The chromatin insulator cHS4 can reduce silencing chromosomal position effects and genotoxicity associated with integrating viral vectors. However, the fully active version of this element can also reduce vector titers and is only partially effective. In order to identify alternatives to cHS4, we developed a functional lentiviral vector-based reporter screen for enhancer-blocking insulators. Using this system, we screened candidate sequences that were initially identified by chromatin profiling for binding by CTCF and for DNase hypersensitivity. All 12 analyzed candidates blocked enhancer-promoter activity. The enhancer-blocking activity of the top two candidates was confirmed in two complementary plasmid-based assays. Studies in a gammaretroviral reporter vector indicated these two candidates have little to no effect on vector titers, and do not diminish vector expression in primary mouse bone marrow cultures. Subsequent assessment in a mouse in vivo tumor formation model demonstrated that both candidates reduced the rate of gammaretroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity as effectively as the cHS4 insulator. In summary, we have developed a novel lentiviral vector-based method of screening candidate elements for insulator activity, and have used this method to identify two new insulator elements capable of improving the safety of retroviral vectors without diminishing vector titers or expression. These findings expand the limited arsenal of insulators functionally validated to reduce the rate of retroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity. PMID:24098520

  4. Long terminal repeat of murine retroviral DNAs: sequence analysis, host-proviral junctions, and preintegration site.

    PubMed Central

    Van Beveren, C; Rands, E; Chattopadhyay, S K; Lowy, D R; Verma, I M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of three murine retroviral DNAs has been determined. The data indicate that the U5 region (sequences originating from the 5' end of the genome) of various LTRs is more conserved than the U3 region (sequences from the 3' end of the genome). The location and sequence of the control elements such as the 5' cap, "TATA-like" sequences, "CCAAT-box," and presumptive polyadenylic acid addition signal AATAAA in the various LTRs are nearly identical. Some murine retroviral DNAs contain a duplication of sequences within the LTR ranging in size from 58 to 100 base pairs. A variant of molecularly cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus DNA in which one of the two LTRs integrated into the viral DNA was also analyzed. A 4-base-pair duplication was generated at the site of integration of LTR in the viral DNA. The host-viral junction of two molecularly cloned AKR-murine leukemia virus DNAs (clones 623 and 614) was determined. In the case of AKR-623 DNA, a 3- or 4-base-pair direct repeat of cellular sequences flanking the viral DNA was observed. However, AKR-614 DNA contained a 5-base-pair repeat of cellular sequences. The nucleotide sequence of the preintegration site of AKR-623 DNA revealed that the cellular sequences duplicated during integration are present only once. Finally, a striking homology between the sequences flanking the preintegration site and viral LTRs was observed. Images PMID:6281466

  5. Viral and Cellular Requirements for the Nuclear Entry of Retroviral Preintegration Nucleoprotein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Matreyek, Kenneth A.; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Retroviruses integrate their reverse transcribed genomes into host cell chromosomes as an obligate step in virus replication. The nuclear envelope separates the chromosomes from the cell cytoplasm during interphase, and different retroviral groups deal with this physical barrier in different ways. Gammaretroviruses are dependent on the passage of target cells through mitosis, where they are believed to access chromosomes when the nuclear envelope dissolves for cell division. Contrastingly, lentiviruses such as HIV-1 infect non-dividing cells, and are believed to enter the nucleus by passing through the nuclear pore complex. While numerous virally encoded elements have been proposed to be involved in HIV-1 nuclear import, recent evidence has highlighted the importance of HIV-1 capsid. Furthermore, capsid was found to be responsible for the viral requirement of various nuclear transport proteins, including transportin 3 and nucleoporins NUP153 and NUP358, during infection. In this review, we describe our current understanding of retroviral nuclear import, with emphasis on recent developments on the role of the HIV-1 capsid protein. PMID:24103892

  6. Improved self-inactivating retroviral vectors derived from spleen necrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, P; Nelson, S; Dornburg, R

    1994-01-01

    Self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors contain a deletion spanning most of the right long terminal repeat's (LTR's) U3 region. Reverse transcription copies this deletion to both LTRs. As a result, there is no transcription from the 5' LTR, preventing further replication. Many previously developed SIN vectors, however, had reduced titers or were genetically unstable. Earlier, we reported that certain SIN vectors derived from spleen necrosis virus (SNV) experienced reconstitution of the U3-deleted LTR at high frequencies. This reconstitution occurred on the DNA level and appeared to be dependent on defined vector sequences. To study this phenomenon in more detail, we developed an almost completely U3-free retroviral vector. The promoter and enhancer of the left LTR were replaced with those of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early genes. This promoter swap did not impair the level of transcription or alter its start site. Our data indicate that SNV contains a strong initiator which resembles that of human immunodeficiency virus. We show that the vectors replicate with efficiencies similar to those of vectors possessing two wild-type LTRs. U3-deleted vectors carrying the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene did not observably undergo LTR reconstitution, even when replicated in helper cells containing SNV-LTR sequences. However, vectors carrying the neomycin resistance gene did undergo LTR reconstitution with the use of homologous helper cell LTR sequences as template. This supports our earlier finding that sequences within the neomycin resistance gene can trigger recombination. Images PMID:7933088

  7. Retrovirus Integration Database (RID): a public database for retroviral insertion sites into host genomes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Shan, Jigui; Kearney, Mary F; Wu, Xiaolin; Maldarelli, Frank; Mellors, John W; Luke, Brian; Coffin, John M; Hughes, Stephen H

    2016-07-04

    The NCI Retrovirus Integration Database is a MySql-based relational database created for storing and retrieving comprehensive information about retroviral integration sites, primarily, but not exclusively, HIV-1. The database is accessible to the public for submission or extraction of data originating from experiments aimed at collecting information related to retroviral integration sites including: the site of integration into the host genome, the virus family and subtype, the origin of the sample, gene exons/introns associated with integration, and proviral orientation. Information about the references from which the data were collected is also stored in the database. Tools are built into the website that can be used to map the integration sites to UCSC genome browser, to plot the integration site patterns on a chromosome, and to display provirus LTRs in their inserted genome sequence. The website is robust, user friendly, and allows users to query the database and analyze the data dynamically. https://rid.ncifcrf.gov ; or http://home.ncifcrf.gov/hivdrp/resources.htm .

  8. Genomic rearrangements of retroviral vectors carrying two genes in F9 EC cells.

    PubMed

    Breuer, B; Steuer, B; Alonso, A

    1993-02-01

    We have used two classes of double-expression retroviral vectors for the expression of foreign genetic information in embryonal carcinoma cell lines. The splice-vector pM5neo takes advantage of mutated sequences that mediate an LTR-driven expression in F9 EC cells. The second vector (pXT1 type) uses an internal HSV-tk promoter as the control element for the transcription of the second gene. Genomic analysis of DNA from infected F9 cell lines revealed that most of the proviruses have rearranged upon integration into the host genome. This reorganization always included the nonselected gene and is sequence independent, but depends on the selective pressure applied. No retroviral genomic rearrangements were observed in F9 cells infected with pM5 proviruses carrying only the neo resistance gene. On the contrary, gross rearrangements were found in cells infected with parental pXT1 retroviruses. In both vectors the transcriptional activity was very low. A direct correlation between selective pressure, proviral reorganization, and transcription was observed.

  9. Moesin regulates stable microtubule formation and limits retroviral infection in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Naghavi, Mojgan H; Valente, Susana; Hatziioannou, Theodora; de Los Santos, Kenia; Wen, Ying; Mott, Christina; Gundersen, Gregg G; Goff, Stephen P

    2007-01-10

    In a functional screen of mammalian complementary DNA libraries, we identified moesin as a novel gene whose overexpression blocks infection by murine leukemia viruses and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in human and rodent lines, before the initiation of reverse transcription. Knockdown of moesin by RNA interference resulted in enhanced infection, suggesting that even the endogenous basal levels of moesin in rat fibroblasts are sufficient to limit virus infection. Moesin acts as a crosslinker between plasma membrane and actin filaments, as well as a signal transducer in responses involving cytoskeletal remodeling. Moesin overexpression was found to downregulate the formation of stable microtubules, whereas knockdown of moesin increased stable microtubule formation. A virus-resistant mutant cell line also displayed decreased stable microtubule levels, and virus-sensitive revertants recovered from the mutant line showed restoration of the stable microtubules, suggesting that these cytoskeletal networks play an important role in early post-entry events in the retroviral lifecycle. Together, these results suggest that moesin negatively regulates stable microtubule networks and is a natural determinant of cellular sensitivity to retroviral infection.

  10. High Expression of Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene in the Equine Fetal Part of the Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Stefanetti, Valentina; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Katia; Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Coletti, Mauro; Capomaccio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are proviral phases of exogenous retroviruses that have co-evolved with vertebrate genomes for millions of years. Previous studies have identified the envelope (env) protein genes of retroviral origin preferentially expressed in the placenta which suggests a role in placentation based on their membrane fusogenic capacity and therefore they have been named syncytins. Until now, all the characterized syncytins have been associated with three invasive placentation types: the endotheliochorial (Carnivora), the synepitheliochorial (Ruminantia), and the hemochorial placentation (human, mouse) where they play a role in the syncytiotrophoblast formation. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether EqERV env RNA is expressed in horse tissues as well and investigate if the horse, possessing an epitheliochorial placenta, has “captured” a common retroviral env gene with syncytin-like properties in placental tissues. Interestingly, although in the equine placenta there is no syncytiotrophoblast layer at the maternal-fetal interface, our results showed that EqERV env RNA is highly expressed at that level, as expected for a candidate syncytin-like gene but with reduced abundance in the other somatic tissues (nearly 30-fold lower) thus suggesting a possible role in the placental tissue. Although the horse is one of the few domestic animals with a sequenced genome, few studies have been conducted about the EqERV and their expression in placental tissue has never been investigated. PMID:27176223

  11. Cytoreductive conditioning intensity predicts clonal diversity in ADA-SCID retroviral gene therapy patients.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Aaron R; Lill, Georgia R; Shaw, Kit; Carbonaro-Sarracino, Denise A; Davila, Alejandra; Sokolic, Robert; Candotti, Fabio; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kohn, Donald B

    2017-05-11

    Retroviral gene therapy has proved efficacious for multiple genetic diseases of the hematopoietic system, but roughly half of clinical gene therapy trial protocols using gammaretroviral vectors have reported leukemias in some of the patients treated. In dramatic contrast, 39 adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) patients have been treated with 4 distinct gammaretroviral vectors without oncogenic consequence. We investigated clonal dynamics and diversity in a cohort of 15 ADA-SCID children treated with gammaretroviral vectors and found clear evidence of genotoxicity, indicated by numerous common integration sites near proto-oncogenes and by increased abundance of clones with integrations near MECOM and LMO2 These clones showed stable behavior over multiple years and never expanded to the point of dominance or dysplasia. One patient developed a benign clonal dominance that could not be attributed to insertional mutagenesis and instead likely resulted from expansion of a transduced natural killer clone in response to chronic Epstein-Barr virus viremia. Clonal diversity and T-cell repertoire, measured by vector integration site sequencing and T-cell receptor β-chain rearrangement sequencing, correlated significantly with the amount of busulfan preconditioning delivered to patients and to CD34(+) cell dose. These data, in combination with results of other ADA-SCID gene therapy trials, suggest that disease background may be a crucial factor in leukemogenic potential of retroviral gene therapy and underscore the importance of cytoreductive conditioning in this type of gene therapy approach.

  12. Retroviral intasomes search for a target DNA by 1D diffusion which rarely results in integration

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nathan D.; Lopez Jr, Miguel A.; Hanne, Jeungphill; Peake, Mitchell B.; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard; Yoder, Kristine E.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses must integrate their linear viral cDNA into the host genome for a productive infection. Integration is catalysed by the retrovirus-encoded integrase (IN), which forms a tetramer or octamer complex with the viral cDNA long terminal repeat (LTR) ends termed an intasome. IN removes two 3′-nucleotides from both LTR ends and catalyses strand transfer of the recessed 3′-hydroxyls into the target DNA separated by 4–6 bp. Host DNA repair restores the resulting 5′-Flap and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) gap. Here we have used multiple single molecule imaging tools to determine that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) retroviral intasome searches for an integration site by one-dimensional (1D) rotation-coupled diffusion along DNA. Once a target site is identified, the time between PFV strand transfer events is 470 ms. The majority of PFV intasome search events were non-productive. These observations identify new dynamic IN functions and suggest that target site-selection limits retroviral integration. PMID:27108531

  13. Characterisation of cytoplasmic DNA complementary to non-retroviral RNA viruses in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Akira; Nakatani, Yoko; Nakamura, Takako; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu; Boeke, Jef D.; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and subsequent genomic integration of DNA that is complementary to the genomes of non-retroviral RNA viruses are rarely observed. However, upon infection of various human cell lines and primary fibroblasts with the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), we detected DNA complementary to the VSV RNA. The VSV DNA was detected in the cytoplasm as single-stranded DNA fully complementary to the viral mRNA from the poly(A) region to the 7-methyl guanosine cap. The formation of this DNA was cell-dependent. Experimentally, we found that the transduction of cells that do not produce VSV DNA with the long interspersed nuclear element 1 and their infection with VSV could lead to the formation of VSV DNA. Viral DNA complementary to other RNA viruses was also detected in the respective infected human cells. Thus, the genetic information of the non-retroviral RNA virus genome can flow into the DNA of mammalian cells expressing LINE-1-like elements. PMID:24875540

  14. Characterisation of cytoplasmic DNA complementary to non-retroviral RNA viruses in human cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Akira; Nakatani, Yoko; Nakamura, Takako; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu; Boeke, Jef D; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2014-05-30

    The synthesis and subsequent genomic integration of DNA that is complementary to the genomes of non-retroviral RNA viruses are rarely observed. However, upon infection of various human cell lines and primary fibroblasts with the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), we detected DNA complementary to the VSV RNA. The VSV DNA was detected in the cytoplasm as single-stranded DNA fully complementary to the viral mRNA from the poly(A) region to the 7-methyl guanosine cap. The formation of this DNA was cell-dependent. Experimentally, we found that the transduction of cells that do not produce VSV DNA with the long interspersed nuclear element 1 and their infection with VSV could lead to the formation of VSV DNA. Viral DNA complementary to other RNA viruses was also detected in the respective infected human cells. Thus, the genetic information of the non-retroviral RNA virus genome can flow into the DNA of mammalian cells expressing LINE-1-like elements.

  15. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated high-efficiency, transient expression of the murine cationic amino acid transporter (ecotropic retroviral receptor) permits stable transduction of human HeLa cells by ecotropic retroviral vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bertran, J; Miller, J L; Yang, Y; Fenimore-Justman, A; Rueda, F; Vanin, E F; Nienhuis, A W

    1996-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus has a broad host range, is nonpathogenic, and integrates into a preferred location on chromosome 19, features that have fostered development of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) as gene transfer vectors for therapeutic applications. We have used an rAAV to transfer and express the murine cationic amino acid transporter which functions as the ecotropic retroviral receptor, thereby rendering human cells conditionally susceptible to infection by an ecotropic retroviral vector. The proportion of human HeLa cells expressing the receptor at 60 h varied as a function of the multiplicity of infection (MOI) with the rAAV. Cells expressing the ecotropic receptor were efficiently transduced with an ecotropic retroviral vector encoding a nucleus-localized form of beta-galactosidase. Cells coexpressing the ecotropic receptor and nucleus-localized beta-galactosidase were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and cell lines were recovered by cloning at limiting dilution. After growth in culture, all clones contained the retroviral vector genome, but fewer than 10% (3 of 47) contained the rAAV genome and continued to express the ecotropic receptor. The ecotropic receptor coding sequences in the rAAV genome were under the control of a tetracycline-modulated promoter. In the presence of tetracycline, receptor expression was low and the proportion of cells transduced by the ecotropic retroviral vector was decreased. Modulation of receptor expression was achieved with both an episomal and an integrated form of the rAAV genome. These data establish that functional gene expression from an rAAV genome can occur transiently without genome integration. PMID:8794313

  16. Improvement of retroviral vectors by coating with poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(L-lysine) block copolymer (PEG-PLL).

    PubMed

    Katakura, Hiromichi; Harada, Atsushi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Furusho, Miki; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Wada, Hiromi; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro

    2004-04-01

    Although some cationic reagents, such as polybrene, improve gene transduction in vitro, their use in vivo is prohibited due to their toxicity to the exposed cells. This paper demonstrates that a new cationic reagent, poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(L-lysine) block copolymer (PEG-PLL), improves gene transduction with retroviral vectors without increasing cell toxicity. A retroviral vector derived from the Moloney leukemia virus, containing the lacZ gene, was modified with PEG-PLL prior to transduction into NIH3T3, Lewis lung carcinoma, and primary cultured mouse brain cells. LacZ transduction efficacy was evaluated by counting the number of X-Gal-positive cells. We have demonstrated that PEG-PLL is able to stably modify the viral particle surface due to the affinity of the PEG moiety to the biomembrane, and neutralizes negative charges by the cationic nature of the poly-lysine residue. Thus, PEG-PLL increased the gene transduction efficiency and minimized cell toxicity because free PEG-PLL was removable by centrifugation. We have shown that PEG-PLL increased the viral gene transduction efficiency 3- to 7-fold with NIH3T3 or Lewis lung carcinoma cell lines without increasing cytotoxicity. It improved retroviral gene transduction efficacy even against labile cells, such as primary cultured brain cells. PEG-PLL is a novel reagent that improves retroviral gene transduction efficacy without increasing cytotoxicity. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  18. Retroviral vector integration deregulates gene expression but has no consequence on the biology and function of transplanted T cells

    PubMed Central

    Recchia, Alessandra; Bonini, Chiara; Magnani, Zulma; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Sartori, Daniela; Muraro, Sara; Tagliafico, Enrico; Bondanza, Attilio; Stanghellini, Maria Teresa Lupo; Bernardi, Massimo; Pescarollo, Alessandra; Ciceri, Fabio; Bordignon, Claudio; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2006-01-01

    The use of retroviral vectors in gene therapy has raised safety concerns for the genotoxic risk associated with their uncontrolled insertion into the human genome. We have analyzed the consequences of retroviral transduction in T cells from leukemic patients treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation and donor lymphocytes genetically modified with a suicide gene (HSV-TK). Retroviral vectors integrate preferentially within or near transcribed regions of the genome, with a preference for sequences around promoters and for genes active in T cells at the time of transduction. Quantitative transcript analysis shows that one fifth of these integrations affect the expression of nearby genes. However, transduced T cell populations maintain remarkably stable gene expression profiles, phenotype, biological functions, and immune repertoire in vivo, with no evidence of clonal selection up to 9 yr after administration. Analysis of integrated proviruses in transduced cells before and after transplantation indicates that integrations interfering with normal T cell function are more likely to lead to clonal ablation than expansion in vivo. Despite the potentially dangerous interactions with the T cell genome, retroviral integration has therefore little consequence on the safety and efficacy of T cell transplantation. PMID:16432223

  19. High-definition mapping of retroviral integration sites defines the fate of allogeneic T cells after donor lymphocyte infusion.

    PubMed

    Cattoglio, Claudia; Maruggi, Giulietta; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Malani, Nirav; Pellin, Danilo; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Magnani, Zulma; Ciceri, Fabio; Ambrosi, Alessandro; von Kalle, Christof; Bushman, Frederic D; Bonini, Chiara; Schmidt, Manfred; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2010-12-22

    The infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the HSV-TK suicide gene in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for leukemia/lymphoma promotes immune reconstitution and prevents infections and graft-versus-host disease. Analysis of the clonal dynamics of genetically modified lymphocytes in vivo is of crucial importance to understand the potential genotoxic risk of this therapeutic approach. We used linear amplification-mediated PCR and pyrosequencing to build a genome-wide, high-definition map of retroviral integration sites in the genome of peripheral blood T cells from two different donors and used gene expression profiling and bioinformatics to associate integration clusters to transcriptional activity and to genetic and epigenetic features of the T cell genome. Comparison with matched random controls and with integrations obtained from CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells showed that integration clusters occur within chromatin regions bearing epigenetic marks associated with active promoters and regulatory elements in a cell-specific fashion. Analysis of integration sites in T cells obtained ex vivo two months after infusion showed no evidence of integration-related clonal expansion or dominance, but rather loss of cells harboring integration events interfering with RNA post-transcriptional processing. The study shows that high-definition maps of retroviral integration sites are a powerful tool to analyze the fate of genetically modified T cells in patients and the biological consequences of retroviral transduction.

  20. High-Definition Mapping of Retroviral Integration Sites Defines the Fate of Allogeneic T Cells After Donor Lymphocyte Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Cattoglio, Claudia; Maruggi, Giulietta; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Malani, Nirav; Pellin, Danilo; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Magnani, Zulma; Ciceri, Fabio; Ambrosi, Alessandro; von Kalle, Christof; Bushman, Frederic D.; Bonini, Chiara; Schmidt, Manfred; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    The infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the HSV-TK suicide gene in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for leukemia/lymphoma promotes immune reconstitution and prevents infections and graft-versus-host disease. Analysis of the clonal dynamics of genetically modified lymphocytes in vivo is of crucial importance to understand the potential genotoxic risk of this therapeutic approach. We used linear amplification-mediated PCR and pyrosequencing to build a genome-wide, high-definition map of retroviral integration sites in the genome of peripheral blood T cells from two different donors and used gene expression profiling and bioinformatics to associate integration clusters to transcriptional activity and to genetic and epigenetic features of the T cell genome. Comparison with matched random controls and with integrations obtained from CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells showed that integration clusters occur within chromatin regions bearing epigenetic marks associated with active promoters and regulatory elements in a cell-specific fashion. Analysis of integration sites in T cells obtained ex vivo two months after infusion showed no evidence of integration-related clonal expansion or dominance, but rather loss of cells harboring integration events interfering with RNA post-transcriptional processing. The study shows that high-definition maps of retroviral integration sites are a powerful tool to analyze the fate of genetically modified T cells in patients and the biological consequences of retroviral transduction. PMID:21203516

  1. Characterization of rodent models of HIV-gp120 and anti-retroviral-associated neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Victoria C. J.; Blackbeard, Julie; Segerdahl, Andrew R.; Hasnie, Fauzia; Pheby, Timothy; McMahon, Stephen B.; Rice, Andrew S. C.

    2009-01-01

    A distal symmetrical sensory peripheral neuropathy is frequently observed in people living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1). This neuropathy can be associated with viral infection alone, probably involving a role for the envelope glycoprotein gp120; or a drug-induced toxic neuropathy associated with the use of nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors as a component of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying drug-induced neuropathy in the context of HIV infection, we have characterized pathological events in the peripheral and central nervous system following systemic treatment with the anti-retroviral agent, ddC (Zalcitabine) with or without the concomitant delivery of HIV-gp120 to the rat sciatic nerve (gp120+ddC). Systemic ddC treatment alone is associated with a persistent mechanical hypersensitivity (33% decrease in limb withdrawal threshold) that when combined with perineural HIV-gp120 is exacerbated (48% decrease in threshold) and both treatments result in thigmotactic (anxiety-like) behaviour. Immunohistochemical studies revealed little ddC-associated alteration in DRG phenotype, as compared with known changes following perineural HIV-gp120. However, the chemokine CCL2 is significantly expressed in the DRG of rats treated with perineural HIV-gp120 and/or ddC and there is a reduction in intraepidermal nerve fibre density, comparable to that seen in herpes zoster infection. Moreover, a spinal gliosis is apparent at times of peak behavioural sensitivity that is exacerbated in gp120+ddC as compared to either treatment alone. Treatment with the microglial inhibitor, minocycline, is associated with delayed onset of hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in the gp120+ddC model and reversal of some measures of thigmotaxis. Finally, the hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli was sensitive to systemic treatment with gabapentin, morphine and the cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2, but not with

  2. Characterization of rodent models of HIV-gp120 and anti-retroviral-associated neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Victoria C J; Blackbeard, Julie; Segerdahl, Andrew R; Hasnie, Fauzia; Pheby, Timothy; McMahon, Stephen B; Rice, Andrew S C

    2007-10-01

    A distal symmetrical sensory peripheral neuropathy is frequently observed in people living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1). This neuropathy can be associated with viral infection alone, probably involving a role for the envelope glycoprotein gp120; or a drug-induced toxic neuropathy associated with the use of nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors as a component of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying drug-induced neuropathy in the context of HIV infection, we have characterized pathological events in the peripheral and central nervous system following systemic treatment with the anti-retroviral agent, ddC (Zalcitabine) with or without the concomitant delivery of HIV-gp120 to the rat sciatic nerve (gp120+ddC). Systemic ddC treatment alone is associated with a persistent mechanical hypersensitivity (33% decrease in limb withdrawal threshold) that when combined with perineural HIV-gp120 is exacerbated (48% decrease in threshold) and both treatments result in thigmotactic (anxiety-like) behaviour. Immunohistochemical studies revealed little ddC-associated alteration in DRG phenotype, as compared with known changes following perineural HIV-gp120. However, the chemokine CCL2 is significantly expressed in the DRG of rats treated with perineural HIV-gp120 and/or ddC and there is a reduction in intraepidermal nerve fibre density, comparable to that seen in herpes zoster infection. Moreover, a spinal gliosis is apparent at times of peak behavioural sensitivity that is exacerbated in gp120+ddC as compared to either treatment alone. Treatment with the microglial inhibitor, minocycline, is associated with delayed onset of hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in the gp120+ddC model and reversal of some measures of thigmotaxis. Finally, the hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli was sensitive to systemic treatment with gabapentin, morphine and the cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2, but not with

  3. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer corrects very-long-chain fatty acid metabolism in adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Cartier, N; Lopez, J; Moullier, P; Rocchiccioli, F; Rolland, M O; Jorge, P; Mosser, J; Mandel, J L; Bougnères, P F; Danos, O

    1995-01-01

    Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a lethal demyelinating disease of the brain, is caused by mutations of a gene encoding an ATP-binding transporter, called ALDP, localized in the peroxisomal membrane. It is associated with a defective oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids, leading to their accumulation in many tissues. This study reports that the retroviral-mediated transfer of the ALD cDNA restored very-long-chain fatty acid oxidation in ALD fibroblasts in vitro following abundant expression and appropriate targeting of the vector-encoded ALDP in peroxisomes. The same method may be used in hematopoietic cells as a further step of a gene therapy approach of ALD. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7878038

  4. Home-based caregivers' knowledge regarding anti-retroviral therapy in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Niikondo, H N; Hoque, M E; Ntuli-Ngcobo, B

    2011-03-01

    Lack of practical knowledge among home-based caregivers (HBCs) on HIV/AIDS, anti-retroviral treatment (ART) and poor individual adherence to treatment are among the root causes of ineffective ART service delivery in Namibia. The purpose of the study was to investigate the knowledge of HBCs in Namibia regarding ART. The study was a descriptive, cross-sectional study in which 89 participants completed self-administered questionnaires to assess their knowledge regarding ART. Knowledge of HBCs on ART was above average in some aspects, there was still lack of knowledge on necessity of post-test counseling. Training organizations should put emphasis on the necessity of post-test counseling, consequence of poor adherence and type of facilities that issue ART.

  5. Features, processing states and heterologous protein interactions in the modulation of the retroviral nucleocapsid protein function

    PubMed Central

    Mirambeau, Gilles; Lyonnais, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    Nucleocapsid (NC) is central to retroviral replication. Nucleic acid chaperoning is a key function for NC through the action of its conserved basic amino acids and zinc-finger structures. NC manipulates genomic RNA from its packaging in the producer cell to reverse transcription into the infected host cell. This chaperone function, in conjunction with NCs aggregating properties, is up-modulated by successive NC processing events, from the Gag precursor to the fully mature protein, resulting in the condensation of the nucleocapsid within the capsid shell. Reverse transcription also depends on NC processing, whereas this process provokes NC dissociation from double-stranded DNA, leading to a preintegration complex (PIC), competent for host chromosomal integration. In addition NC interacts with cellular proteins, some of which are involved in viral budding, and also with several viral proteins. All of these properties are reviewed here, focusing on HIV-1 as a paradigmatic reference and highlighting the plasticity of the nucleocapsid architecture. PMID:21045549

  6. Maturation of the Gag core decreases the stability of retroviral lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Davidoff, Candice; Payne, Riley; Willis, Sharon H.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Rucker, Joseph B.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand how detergents disrupt enveloped viruses, we monitored the biophysical stability of murine leukemia virus (MLV) virus-like particles (VLPs) against a panel of commonly used detergents using real-time biosensor measurements. Although exposure to many detergents, such as Triton X-100 and Empigen, results in lysis of VLP membranes, VLPs appeared resistant to complete membrane lysis by a significant number of detergents, including Tween 20, Tween 80, Lubrol, and Saponin. VLPs maintained their structural integrity after exposure to Tween 20 at concentrations up to 500-fold above its CMC. Remarkably, VLPs containing immature cores composed of unprocessed (uncleaved) Gag polyprotein were significantly more resistant to detergent lysis than VLPs with mature cores. Although the maturity of retroviral Gag is known to influence the stability of the protein core structure itself, our studies suggest that the maturity of the Gag core also influences the stability of the lipid bilayer surrounding the core. PMID:22995186

  7. Synthesis, Assembly, and Processing of the Env ERVWE1/Syncytin Human Endogenous Retroviral Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Cheynet, V.; Ruggieri, A.; Oriol, G.; Blond, J.-L.; Boson, B.; Vachot, L.; Verrier, B.; Cosset, F.-L.; Mallet, F.

    2005-01-01

    Syncytin is a fusogenic protein involved in the formation of the placental syncytiotrophoblast layer. This protein is encoded by the envelope gene of the ERVWE1 proviral locus belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus W (HERV-W) family. The HERV-W infectious ancestor entered the primate lineage 25 to 40 million years ago. Although the syncytin fusion property has been clearly demonstrated, little is known about this cellular protein maturation process with respect to classical infectious retrovirus envelope proteins. Here we show that the cellular syncytin protein is synthesized as a glycosylated gPr73 precursor cleaved into two mature proteins, a gp50 surface subunit (SU) and a gp24 transmembrane subunit (TM). These SU and TM subunits are found associated as homotrimers. The intracytoplasmic tail is critical to the fusogenic phenotype, although its cleavage requirements seem to have diverged from those of classical retroviral maturation. PMID:15827173

  8. Synthesis, assembly, and processing of the Env ERVWE1/syncytin human endogenous retroviral envelope.

    PubMed

    Cheynet, V; Ruggieri, A; Oriol, G; Blond, J-L; Boson, B; Vachot, L; Verrier, B; Cosset, F-L; Mallet, F

    2005-05-01

    Syncytin is a fusogenic protein involved in the formation of the placental syncytiotrophoblast layer. This protein is encoded by the envelope gene of the ERVWE1 proviral locus belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus W (HERV-W) family. The HERV-W infectious ancestor entered the primate lineage 25 to 40 million years ago. Although the syncytin fusion property has been clearly demonstrated, little is known about this cellular protein maturation process with respect to classical infectious retrovirus envelope proteins. Here we show that the cellular syncytin protein is synthesized as a glycosylated gPr73 precursor cleaved into two mature proteins, a gp50 surface subunit (SU) and a gp24 transmembrane subunit (TM). These SU and TM subunits are found associated as homotrimers. The intracytoplasmic tail is critical to the fusogenic phenotype, although its cleavage requirements seem to have diverged from those of classical retroviral maturation.

  9. Ectopic DNMT3L triggers assembly of a repressive complex for retroviral silencing in somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tzu-Hao; Liao, Hung-Fu; Wolf, Daniel; Tai, Kang-Yu; Chuang, Ching-Yu; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Hata, Kenichiro; Zhang, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong; Goff, Stephen P; Ooi, Steen K T; Bestor, Timothy H; Lin, Shau-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Mammalian genomes are replete with retrotransposable elements, including endogenous retroviruses. DNA methyltransferase 3-like (DNMT3L) is an epigenetic regulator expressed in prospermatogonia, growing oocytes, and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here, we demonstrate that DNMT3L enhances the interaction of repressive epigenetic modifiers, including histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), SET domain, bifurcated 1 (SETDB1), DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), and tripartite motif-containing protein 28 (TRIM28; also known as TIF1β and KAP1) in ES cells and orchestrates retroviral silencing activity with TRIM28 through mechanisms including, but not limited to, de novo DNA methylation. Ectopic expression of DNMT3L in somatic cells causes methylation-independent retroviral silencing activity by recruitment of the TRIM28/HDAC1/SETDB1/DNMT3A/DNMT3L complex to newly integrated Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) proviral DNA. Concurrent with this recruitment, we also observed the accumulation of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) and heterochromatin protein 1 gamma (HP1γ), as well as reduced H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation at Mo-MuLV proviral sequences. Ectopic expression of DNMT3L in late-passage mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) recruited cytoplasmically localized HDAC1 to the nucleus. The formation of this epigenetic modifying complex requires interaction of DNMT3L with DNMT3A as well as with histone H3. In fetal testes at embryonic day 17.5, endogenous DNMT3L also enhanced the binding among TRIM28, DNMT3A, SETDB1, and HDAC1. We propose that DNMT3L may be involved in initiating a cascade of repressive epigenetic modifications by assisting in the preparation of a chromatin context that further attracts DNMT3A-DNMT3L binding and installs longer-term DNA methylation marks at newly integrated retroviruses. Almost half of the mammalian genome is composed of endogenous retroviruses and other retrotransposable elements that threaten genomic integrity. These elements are usually

  10. Specificity and sequence requirements for interactions between various retroviral Gag proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Franke, E K; Yuan, H E; Bossolt, K L; Goff, S P; Luban, J

    1994-01-01

    We previously established a genetic assay for retroviral Gag polyprotein multimerization (J. Luban, K. B. Alin, K. L. Bossolt, T. Humaran, and S. P. Goff, J. Virol. 66:5157-5160, 1992). Here we use this assay to demonstrate homomeric interactions between Gag polyproteins encoded by six different retroviruses. Of the Gag polyproteins tested, only those encoded by closely related retroviruses formed heteromultimers. To determine the primary sequence requirements for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag polyprotein multimerization, we studied the effects on multimerization of deletion and linker insertion mutations. Sequences necessary for this process were located between the C-terminal one-third of the capsid domain and the C terminus of the nucleocapsid domain. PMID:8035530

  11. Multiple sulfatase deficiency: catalytically inactive sulfatases are expressed from retrovirally introduced sulfatase cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Rommerskirch, W; von Figura, K

    1992-04-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease characterized by the deficiency of at least seven sulfatases. The basic defect in MSD is thought to be in a post-translational modification common to all sulfatases. In accordance with this concept, RNAs of normal size and amount were detected in MSD fibroblasts for three sulfatases tested. cDNAs encoding arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, or steroid sulfatase were introduced into MSD fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a single sulfatase deficiency by retroviral gene transfer. Infected fibroblasts overexpressed the respective sulfatase polypeptides. While in single-sulfatase-deficiency fibroblasts a concomitant increase of sulfatase activities was observed, MSD fibroblasts expressed sulfatase polypeptides with a severely diminished catalytic activity. From these results we conclude that the mutation in MSD severely decreases the capacity of a co- or post-translational process that renders sulfatases enzymatically active or prevents their premature inactivation.

  12. Multiple sulfatase deficiency: catalytically inactive sulfatases are expressed from retrovirally introduced sulfatase cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Rommerskirch, W; von Figura, K

    1992-01-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease characterized by the deficiency of at least seven sulfatases. The basic defect in MSD is thought to be in a post-translational modification common to all sulfatases. In accordance with this concept, RNAs of normal size and amount were detected in MSD fibroblasts for three sulfatases tested. cDNAs encoding arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, or steroid sulfatase were introduced into MSD fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a single sulfatase deficiency by retroviral gene transfer. Infected fibroblasts overexpressed the respective sulfatase polypeptides. While in single-sulfatase-deficiency fibroblasts a concomitant increase of sulfatase activities was observed, MSD fibroblasts expressed sulfatase polypeptides with a severely diminished catalytic activity. From these results we conclude that the mutation in MSD severely decreases the capacity of a co- or post-translational process that renders sulfatases enzymatically active or prevents their premature inactivation. Images PMID:1348358

  13. Retroviral transfer and long-term expression of the adrenoleukodystrophy gene in human CD34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Doerflinger, N; Miclea, J M; Lopez, J; Chomienne, C; Bougnères, P; Aubourg, P; Cartier, N

    1998-05-01

    Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that results from a genetic deficiency of ALDP, an ABC protein involved in the transport of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). The cloning of the ALD gene and the positive effects of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation support the feasibility of a gene therapy approach. We report the retroviral transfer of the ALD cDNA to peripheral blood and bone marrow CD34+ cells from control donors and ALD patients. Prestimulation of these cells with cytokines, followed by infection with the M48-ALD retroviral vector, resulted in 20% transduction efficiency (4-40%) and expression of the vector-encoded ALDP in 20% of CD34+ cells (7.3-50%). Long-term culture (LTC) of transduced CD34+ cells from two ALD patients showed efficient transduction (24-28%) and stable expression (25-32%) of ALDP in derived clonogenic progenitors at 3 weeks of culture. The expression of ALDP in CFU cells derived from 5 and 6 weeks of LTC confirmed the effective transduction of LTC-initiating cells. Expression of ALDP was observed in CD68+ CFU-derived cells, suggesting that monocyte-macrophages, the target bone marrow cells in ALD, were produced from transduced progenitor cells. VL-CFA content was corrected in LTC and CFU-derived cells in proportion to the percentage of transduced cells, indicating that the vector-encoded ALDP was functional. Although not efficient yet to allow a clinical perspective, these results demonstrate the feasibility of ALD gene transfer into CD34+ cells of ALD patients.

  14. The utilization of humanized mouse models for the study of human retroviral infections

    PubMed Central

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Pedati, Caitlin; Guendel, Irene; Carpio, Lawrence; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2009-01-01

    The development of novel techniques and systems to study human infectious diseases in both an in vitro and in vivo settings is always in high demand. Ideally, small animal models are the most efficient method of studying human afflictions. This is especially evident in the study of the human retroviruses, HIV-1 and HTLV-1, in that current simian animal models, though robust, are often expensive and difficult to maintain. Over the past two decades, the construction of humanized animal models through the transplantation and engraftment of human tissues or progenitor cells into immunocompromised mouse strains has allowed for the development of a reconstituted human tissue scaffold in a small animal system. The utilization of small animal models for retroviral studies required expansion of the early CB-17 scid/scid mouse resulting in animals demonstrating improved engraftment efficiency and infectivity. The implantation of uneducated human immune cells and associated tissue provided the basis for the SCID-hu Thy/Liv and hu-PBL-SCID models. Engraftment efficiency of these tissues was further improved through the integration of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mutation leading to the creation of NODSCID, NOD/Shi-scid IL2rγ-/-, and NOD/SCID β2-microglobulinnull animals. Further efforts at minimizing the response of the innate murine immune system produced the Rag2-/-γc-/- model which marked an important advancement in the use of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Together, these animal models have revolutionized the investigation of retroviral infections in vivo. PMID:19674458

  15. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Expression of an endogenous retroviral element, during early gestation in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    McLean, K J; Crouse, M S; Crosswhite, M R; Black, D N; Dahlen, C R; Borowicz, P P; Reynolds, L P; Ward, A K; Neville, B W; Caton, J S

    2016-10-01

    Endogenous retroviral gene elements have been implicated in development and formation of the feto-maternal interface. A variant of the syncytin endogenous retroviral envelope gene family, , was recently found in ruminants. We hypothesized that mRNA would be differentially expressed in utero-placental tissues and would fluctuate during key time points of early gestation in beef heifers. Commercial Angus crossbred heifers ( = 46; ∼15 mo of age; BW = 362.3 ± 34.7kg) housed in 6-animal pens were fed daily with native grass hay and supplemented with cracked corn to gain 0.3 kg/d. The heifers were estrus synchronized, artificially inseminated, (d of breeding= d 0) and ovariohysterectomized on d 16, 22, 28, 34, 40, and 50 ( = 9, 6, 6, 7, 6, and 5, respectively) of gestation and at d 16 of the estrous cycle for non-bred, non-pregnant controls (NP; = 7). Harvested tissues were separated into maternal caruncle (CAR), intercarunclar endometrium (ICAR), and fetal membranes, (FM; chorioallantois, d 22 and later). All tissues were obtained from the ipsilateral uterine horn to the CL. Statistical analyses were conducted via the GLM procedure of SAS. Maternal CAR expression of was greater ( = 0.003) on d 50 by 81.5-fold compared to NP controls. At d 50 expression of in CAR was 190.3-fold greater than ( < 0.0001) ICAR. Fetal membranes had greater ( < 0.002) expression of from d 22 until d 50 of gestation compared to maternal ICAR (d 16 not analyzed). Expression of in FM was greater ( < 0.004) than in CAR until d 40 of gestation. Therefore, we conclude that is differentially expressed in utero-placental tissues and may be involved in the establishment of pregnancy. The expression of in maternal tissues is completely novel and indicates unique functions of syncytin in ruminant pregnancy.

  16. In vitro correction of JAK3-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency by retroviral-mediated gene transduction

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Mutations affecting the expression of the Janus family kinase JAK3 were recently shown to be responsible for autosomal recessive severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). JAK3-deficient patients present with a clinical phenotype virtually indistinguishable from boys affected by X-linked SCID, a disease caused by genetic defects of the common gamma chain (gamma c) that is a shared component of the receptors for IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15. The specific interaction of JAK3 and gamma c represents the biochemical basis for the similarities between these two immunodeficiencies. Both forms of SCID are characterized by recurrent, severe infections leading to death in infancy unless successfully treated by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Because of the potentially lethal complications associated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and the frequent lack of suitable marrow donors, the development of alternative forms of therapy is highly desirable. To this end, we investigated a retroviral-mediated gene correction approach for JAK3-deficiency. A vector carrying a copy of JAK3 cDNA was constructed and used to transduce B cell lines derived from patients with JAK3-deficient SCID. We demonstrate restoration of JAK3 expression and phosphorylation upon IL-2 and IL-4 stimulation. Furthermore, patients' cells transduced with JAK3 acquired the ability to proliferate normally in response to IL-2. These data indicate that the biological defects of JAK3-deficient cells can be efficiently corrected in vitro by retroviral-mediated gene transfer, thus providing the basis for future investigation of gene therapy as treatment for JAK3- deficient SCID. PMID:8676091

  17. Multiple Groups of Novel Retroviral Genomes in Pigs and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Patience, Clive; Switzer, William M.; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Griffiths, David J.; Goward, Melanie E.; Heneine, Walid; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Weiss, Robin A.

    2001-01-01

    In view of the concern over potential infection hazards in the use of porcine tissues and organs for xenotransplantation to humans, we investigated the diversity of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) genomes in the DNA of domestic pigs and related species. In addition to the three known envelope subgroups of infectious gamma retroviruses (PERV-A, -B, and -C), classed together here as PERV group γ1, four novel groups of gamma retrovirus (γ2 to γ5) and four novel groups of beta retrovirus (β1 to β4) genomes were detected in pig DNA using generic and specific PCR primers. PCR quantification indicated that the retroviral genome copy number in the Landrace × Duroc F1 hybrid pig ranged from 2 (β2 and γ5) to approximately 50 (γ1). The γ1, γ2, and β4 genomes were transcribed into RNA in adult kidney tissue. Apart from γ1, the retroviral genomes are not known to be infectious, and sequencing of a small number of amplified genome fragments revealed stop codons in putative open reading frames in several cases. Analysis of DNA from wild boar and other species of Old World pigs (Suidae) and New World peccaries (Tayassuidae) showed that one retrovirus group, β2, was common to all species tested, while the others were present among all Old World species but absent from New World species. The PERV-C subgroup of γ1 genomes segregated among domestic pigs and were absent from two African species (red river hog and warthog). Thus domestic swine and their phylogenetic relatives harbor multiple groups of hitherto undescribed PERV genomes. PMID:11222700

  18. Multiple groups of novel retroviral genomes in pigs and related species.

    PubMed

    Patience, C; Switzer, W M; Takeuchi, Y; Griffiths, D J; Goward, M E; Heneine, W; Stoye, J P; Weiss, R A

    2001-03-01

    In view of the concern over potential infection hazards in the use of porcine tissues and organs for xenotransplantation to humans, we investigated the diversity of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) genomes in the DNA of domestic pigs and related species. In addition to the three known envelope subgroups of infectious gamma retroviruses (PERV-A, -B, and -C), classed together here as PERV group gamma 1, four novel groups of gamma retrovirus (gamma 2 to gamma 5) and four novel groups of beta retrovirus (beta 1 to beta 4) genomes were detected in pig DNA using generic and specific PCR primers. PCR quantification indicated that the retroviral genome copy number in the Landrace x Duroc F(1) hybrid pig ranged from 2 (beta 2 and gamma 5) to approximately 50 (gamma 1). The gamma 1, gamma 2, and beta 4 genomes were transcribed into RNA in adult kidney tissue. Apart from gamma 1, the retroviral genomes are not known to be infectious, and sequencing of a small number of amplified genome fragments revealed stop codons in putative open reading frames in several cases. Analysis of DNA from wild boar and other species of Old World pigs (Suidae) and New World peccaries (Tayassuidae) showed that one retrovirus group, beta 2, was common to all species tested, while the others were present among all Old World species but absent from New World species. The PERV-C subgroup of gamma1 genomes segregated among domestic pigs and were absent from two African species (red river hog and warthog). Thus domestic swine and their phylogenetic relatives harbor multiple groups of hitherto undescribed PERV genomes.

  19. Size distribution of retrovirally marked lineages matches prediction from population measurements of cell cycle behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Li; Hayes, Nancy L.; Takahashi, Takao; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Nowakowski, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate neuron production in the developing mouse neocortex were examined by using a retroviral lineage marking method to determine the sizes of the lineages remaining in the proliferating population of the ventricular zone during the period of neuron production. The distribution of clade sizes obtained experimentally in four different injection-survival paradigms (E11-E13, E11-E14, E11-E15, and E12-E15) from a total of over 500 labeled lineages was compared with that obtained from three models in which the average behavior of the proliferating population [i.e., the proportion of cells remaining in the proliferative population (P) vs. that exiting the proliferative population (Q)] was quantitatively related to lineage size distribution. In model 1, different proportions of asymmetric, symmetric terminal, and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions coexisted during the entire developmental period. In model 2, the developmental period was divided into two epochs: During the first, asymmetric and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions occurred, but, during the second, asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions occurred. In model 3, the shifts in P and Q are accounted for by changes in the proportions of the two types of symmetric cell divisions without the inclusion of any asymmetric cell divisions. The results obtained from the retroviral experiments were well accounted for by model 1 but not by model 2 or 3. These findings demonstrate that: 1) asymmetric and both types of symmetric cell divisions coexist during the entire period of neurogenesis in the mouse, 2) neuron production is regulated in the proliferative population by the independent decisions of the two daughter cells to reenter S phase, and 3) neurons are produced by both asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions. In addition, the findings mean that cell death and/or tangential movements of cells in the proliferative population occur at only a low rate and that there are no

  20. Sites of retroviral DNA integration: From basic research to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan N

    2016-01-01

    One of the most crucial steps in the life cycle of a retrovirus is the integration of the viral DNA (vDNA) copy of the RNA genome into the genome of an infected host cell. Integration provides for efficient viral gene expression as well as for the segregation of viral genomes to daughter cells upon cell division. Some integrated viruses are not well expressed, and cells latently infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can resist the action of potent antiretroviral drugs and remain dormant for decades. Intensive research has been dedicated to understanding the catalytic mechanism of integration, as well as the viral and cellular determinants that influence integration site distribution throughout the host genome. In this review, we summarize the evolution of techniques that have been used to recover and map retroviral integration sites, from the early days that first indicated that integration could occur in multiple cellular DNA locations, to current technologies that map upwards of millions of unique integration sites from single in vitro integration reactions or cell culture infections. We further review important insights gained from the use of such mapping techniques, including the monitoring of cell clonal expansion in patients treated with retrovirus-based gene therapy vectors, or patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). These insights span from integrase (IN) enzyme sequence preferences within target DNA (tDNA) at the sites of integration, to the roles of host cellular proteins in mediating global integration distribution, to the potential relationship between genomic location of vDNA integration site and retroviral latency.

  1. Tumor-specific suicide gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma by transcriptionally targeted retroviral replicating vectors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y-H; Lin, C-C; Chen, S-H; Tai, C-K

    2015-02-01

    Replicating virus vectors are attractive tools for anticancer gene therapy, but the potential for adverse events due to uncontrolled spread of the vectors has been a major concern. To design a tumor-specific retroviral replicating vector (RRV), we replaced the U3 region of the RRV ACE-GFP with a regulatory sequence consisting of the hepatitis B virus enhancer II (EII) and human α-fetoprotein (AFP) core promoter to produce ACE-GFP-EIIAFP, a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-targeting RRV. Similar to ACE-GFP, ACE-GFP-EIIAFP exhibited robust green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in HCC cells and, most importantly, it exhibited HCC-specific replication and did not replicate in non-HCC tumor cells or normal liver cells. We sequenced the promoter region of ACE-GFP-EIIAFP collected from serial infection cycles to examine the genomic stability of the vector during its replicative spread, and found that the vector could retain the hybrid promoter in the genome for at least six infection cycles. In vitro studies revealed that ACE-CD-EIIAFP and ACE-PNP-EIIAFP, which express the yeast cytosine deaminase and Escherichia coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase, respectively, exert a highly potent cytotoxic effect on HCC cells in the presence of their respective prodrugs. In vivo, ACE-CD-EIIAFP-mediated suicide gene therapy efficiently suppressed HCC tumor growth and no detectable RRV signal was observed in extratumoral tissues. These results suggest that the tumor-specific, suicide-gene-encoding RRV may fulfill the promise of retroviral gene therapy for cancer.

  2. Improved Retroviral Vector Design Results in Sustained Expression after Adult Gene Therapy in Mucopolysaccharidosis I Mice

    PubMed Central

    Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Ma, Xiucui; Tittiger, Mindy; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Kovacs, Attila; Ponder, Katherine P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disease due to α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) deficiency that results in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Gene therapy can reduce most clinical manifestations, but mice that receive transfer as adults lose expression unless they receive immunosuppression. Increasing liver specificity of transgene expression has reduced immune responses to other genes. Methods A gamma retroviral vector was generated with a liver-specific human α1-antitrypsin promoter and the canine IDUA cDNA inverted relative to the retroviral long-terminal repeat. Adult MPS I mice received the vector intravenously at 6 weeks of age and were assessed for expression via serial serum IDUA assays. Functional testing and organ analysis were performed at 8 months. Results This vector resulted in high specificity of expression in liver, and serum IDUA activity was stable in 90% of animals. Although the average serum IDUA activity was relatively low at 12.6 ± 8.1 units/mL in mice with stable expression, a relatively high percentage of enzyme contained the mannose 6-phosphorylation necessary for uptake by other cells. At 6.5 months after transduction, most organs had high IDUA activity and normalized GAG levels. There was complete correction of hearing and vision abnormalities and significant improvements in bone, although the aorta was refractory to treatment. Conclusions Stable expression of IDUA in adult MPS I mice can be achieved without immunosuppression by modifying the vector to reduce expression in the spleen. This approach may be effective in patients with MPS I or other lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:18613275

  3. Size distribution of retrovirally marked lineages matches prediction from population measurements of cell cycle behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Li; Hayes, Nancy L.; Takahashi, Takao; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Nowakowski, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate neuron production in the developing mouse neocortex were examined by using a retroviral lineage marking method to determine the sizes of the lineages remaining in the proliferating population of the ventricular zone during the period of neuron production. The distribution of clade sizes obtained experimentally in four different injection-survival paradigms (E11-E13, E11-E14, E11-E15, and E12-E15) from a total of over 500 labeled lineages was compared with that obtained from three models in which the average behavior of the proliferating population [i.e., the proportion of cells remaining in the proliferative population (P) vs. that exiting the proliferative population (Q)] was quantitatively related to lineage size distribution. In model 1, different proportions of asymmetric, symmetric terminal, and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions coexisted during the entire developmental period. In model 2, the developmental period was divided into two epochs: During the first, asymmetric and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions occurred, but, during the second, asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions occurred. In model 3, the shifts in P and Q are accounted for by changes in the proportions of the two types of symmetric cell divisions without the inclusion of any asymmetric cell divisions. The results obtained from the retroviral experiments were well accounted for by model 1 but not by model 2 or 3. These findings demonstrate that: 1) asymmetric and both types of symmetric cell divisions coexist during the entire period of neurogenesis in the mouse, 2) neuron production is regulated in the proliferative population by the independent decisions of the two daughter cells to reenter S phase, and 3) neurons are produced by both asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions. In addition, the findings mean that cell death and/or tangential movements of cells in the proliferative population occur at only a low rate and that there are no

  4. Feline mediastinal lymphoma: a retrospective study of signalment, retroviral status, response to chemotherapy and prognostic indicators.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Francesca; Calam, Amy E; Dobson, Jane M; Middleton, Stephanie A; Murphy, Sue; Taylor, Samantha S; Schwartz, Anita; Stell, Anneliese J

    2014-08-01

    Historically, feline mediastinal lymphoma has been associated with young age, positive feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) status, Siamese breed and short survival times. Recent studies following widespread FeLV vaccination in the UK are lacking. The aim of this retrospective multi-institutional study was to re-evaluate the signalment, retroviral status, response to chemotherapy, survival and prognostic indicators in feline mediastinal lymphoma cases in the post-vaccination era. Records of cats with clinical signs associated with a mediastinal mass and cytologically/histologically confirmed lymphoma were reviewed from five UK referral centres (1998-2010). Treatment response, survival and prognostic indicators were assessed in treated cats with follow-up data. Fifty-five cases were reviewed. The median age was 3 years (range, 0.5-12 years); 12 cats (21.8%) were Siamese; and the male to female ratio was 3.2:1.0. Five cats were FeLV-positive and two were feline immunodeficiency-positive. Chemotherapy response and survival was evaluated in 38 cats. Overall response was 94.7%; complete (CR) and partial response (PR) rates did not differ significantly between protocols: COP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone) (n = 26, CR 61.5%, PR 34.0%); Madison-Wisconsin (MW) (n = 12, CR 66.7%, PR 25.0%). Overall median survival was 373 days (range, 20-2015 days) (COP 484 days [range, 20-980 days]; MW 211 days [range, 24-2015 days] [P = 0.892]). Cats achieving CR survived longer (980 days vs 42 days for PR; P = 0.032). Age, breed, sex, location (mediastinal vs mediastinal plus other sites), retroviral status and glucocorticoid pretreatment did not affect response or survival. Feline mediastinal lymphoma cases frequently responded to chemotherapy with durable survival times, particularly in cats achieving CR. The prevalence of FeLV-antigenaemic cats was low; males and young Siamese cats appeared to be over-represented.

  5. E47 retroviral rescue of intrinsic B-cell defects in senescent mice

    PubMed Central

    Landin, Ana M.; Frasca, Daniela; Harrison, Patrick; Scallan, Martina; Riley, Richard L.; Blomberg, Bonnie B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In aging, immune responses are dramatically impaired, specifically the ability to produce protective antibodies. We previously showed that with age there is a B-cell intrinsic decrease in class switch recombination (CSR) because of a decrease in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). One mechanism we have demonstrated for decreased AID includes increased mRNA degradation of the transcription factor E47, critical for AID transcription. Here, we show by means of a retroviral construct containing the DsRED reporter and the 3′UTR of E47 that the 3′UTR lowers mRNA expression, and particularly in B cells from old mice. This is the first demonstration that the E47 3′UTR directly regulates its degradation. The AID mRNA was not differentially regulated by degradation in aging. Therefore, we have here further established critical components for decreased AID with age. The major aim of this study was to establish conditions for the rescue of the intrinsic defect of aged B cells with retroviral addition of the coding region of E47 in splenic B cells to restore their ability to produce optimal AID and class switch to IgG. In this study, we show that young and old primary B cells overexpressing a stable E47 mRNA up-regulate E47, AID, and CSR and improve B-cell immune responses in senescent murine B cells. Our results provide a proof of principle for the rescue of intrinsic B-cell defects and the humoral immune response in senescence. PMID:21241451

  6. Sites of Retroviral DNA Integration: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most crucial steps in the life cycle of a retrovirus is the integration of the viral DNA (vDNA) copy of the RNA genome into the genome of an infected host cell. Integration provides for efficient viral gene expression as well as for the segregation of the viral genomes to daughter cells upon cell division. Some integrated viruses are not well expressed, and cells latently infected with HIV-1 can resist the action of potent antiretroviral drugs and remain dormant for decades. Intensive research has been dedicated to understanding the catalytic mechanism of integration, as well as the viral and cellular determinants that influence integration site distribution throughout the host genome. In this review we summarize the evolution of techniques that have been used to recover and map retroviral integration sites, from the early days that first indicated that integration could occur in multiple cellular DNA locations, to current technologies that map upwards of millions of unique integration sites from single in vitro integration reactions or cell culture infections. We further review important insights gained from the use of such mapping techniques, including the monitoring of cell clonal expansion in patients treated with retrovirus-based gene therapy vectors, or AIDS patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). These insights span from integrase (IN) enzyme sequence preferences within target DNA (tDNA) at the sites of integration, to the roles of host cellular proteins in mediating global integration distribution, to the potential relationship between genomic location of vDNA integration site and retroviral latency. PMID:26508664

  7. Interleukin-Encoding Adenoviral Vectors as Genetic Adjuvant for Vaccination against Retroviral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4+ T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4+ T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity. PMID:24349306

  8. Interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors as genetic adjuvant for vaccination against retroviral infection.

    PubMed

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4(+) T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4(+) T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity.

  9. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Ratner, Daniel M; Ryan, Christopher M; Johnson, Patricia J; O'Keefe, Barry R; Secor, W Evan; Anderson, Deborah J; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans), like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin) and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas.

  10. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Ratner, Daniel M.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Johnson, Patricia J.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Secor, W. Evan; Anderson, Deborah J.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans), like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin) and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas. PMID:26252012

  11. Use of the piggyBac transposon to create stable packaging cell lines for the production of clinical-grade self-inactivating γ-retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Steven A; Xu, Hui; Black, Mary A; Park, Tristen S; Robbins, Paul F; Kochenderfer, James N; Morgan, Richard A; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2014-08-01

    Efforts to improve the biosafety of γ-retroviral-mediated gene therapy have resulted in a shift toward the use of self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retroviral vectors. However, scale-up and manufacturing of such vectors requires significant optimization of transient transfection-based processes or development of novel platforms for the generation of stable producer cell clones. To that end, we describe the use of the piggybac transposon to generate stable producer cell clones for the production of SIN γ-retroviral vectors. The piggybac transposon is a universal tool allowing for the stable integration of SIN γ-retroviral constructs into murine (PG13) and human 293-based Phoenix (GALV and RD114, respectively) packaging cell lines without reverse transcription. Following transposition, a high-titer clone is selected for manufacture of a master cell bank and subsequent γ-retroviral vector supernatant production. Packaging cell clones created using the piggybac transposon have comparable titers to non-SIN vectors generated via conventional methods. We describe herein the use of the piggybac transposon for the production of stable packaging cell clones for the manufacture of clinical-grade SIN γ-retroviral vectors for ex vivo gene therapy clinical trials.

  12. Structural and functional studies of murine Mbo I repeat LTR (MRL) retroviral genes on the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, L.Y.; Hoyt, P.R.; Wang, T.H.; Kanagala, R.; Henley, D.C.; Yang, D.M.; Yang, W.K. )

    1991-03-15

    The mouse genome harbors approximately 200 copies of MRL retroviral elements (or MuRRs) that are preferentially expressed in the reproductive system. The MRL retroviral gene family is wildly distributed in the genus Mus. About 10% of the elements are located on the Y chromosome and the abundance is probably due to gene amplification. Multiple copies of Y chromosome-specific MRL retroviral sequences are present only in the genome of M spretus and M. musculus. Structural and sequence analyses revealed a truncation of the male-specific MRL elements isolated from a BALB/c mouse DNA library. Consequently, two-thirds of an intact LTR was retained at the 5{prime} end and the 3{prime} structure was disrupted immediately downstream of the pol gene with a concomitant loss of the 3{prime} LTR. Southern analysis of male and female mouse DNA confirmed that sequences adjacent to the 3{prime} breakpoint were Y chromosome specific. These sequences are length polymorphic in nature and appear to be co-amplified with MRL retroviral genes on the Y chromosome. A collinear cDNA of 9.5 kb containing fused MRL and Y chromosome sequences was also isolated from a testis library. The LTR of male-specific MRL elements was unable to drive the expression of the bacterial CAT gene in cultured mouse NIH/3T3 and mink CCL64 cells. However, when its enhancer domain was linked to an SV40 promoter, the CAT gene was expressed at a significant level. Differential binding activities to male-specific MRL were found in nuclear extracts of the liver, kidney, and testis.

  13. Activities of wildtype and mutant p53 in suppression of homologous recombination as measured by a retroviral vector system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiongbin; Lozano, Guillermina; Donehower, Lawrence A

    2003-01-28

    DNA repair of double strand breaks, interstrand DNA cross-links, and other types of DNA damage utilizes the processes of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining to repair the damage. Aberrant homologous recombination is likely to be responsible for a significant fraction of chromosomal deletions, duplications, and translocations that are observed in cancer cells. To facilitate measurement of homologous recombination frequencies in normal cells, mutant cells, and cancer cells, we have developed a high titer retroviral vector containing tandem repeats of mutant versions of a GFP-Zeocin resistance fusion gene and an intact neomycin resistance marker. Recombination between the tandem repeats regenerates a functional GFP-Zeo(R) marker that can be easily scored. This retroviral vector was used to assess homologous recombination frequencies in human cancer cells and rodent fibroblasts with differing dosages of wild type or mutant p53. Absence of wild type p53 stimulated spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced homologous recombination, confirming previous studies. Moreover, p53(+/-) mouse fibroblasts show elevated levels of homologous recombination compared to their p53(+/+) counterparts following retroviral vector infection, indicating that p53 is haploinsufficient for suppression of homologous recombination. Transfection of vector-containing p53 null Saos-2 cells with various human cancer-associated p53 mutants revealed that these altered p53 proteins retain some recombination suppression function despite being totally inactive for transcriptional transactivation. The retroviral vector utilized in these studies may be useful in performing recombination assays on a wide array of cell types, including those not readily transfected by normal vectors.

  14. A simple and efficient procedure for generating stable expression libraries by cDNA cloning in a retroviral vector.

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, J R; Gonda, T J

    1994-01-01

    cDNA expression cloning is a powerful method for the rescue and identification of genes that are able to confer a readily identifiable phenotype on specific cell types. Retroviral vectors provide several advantages over DNA-mediated gene transfer for the introduction of expression libraries into eukaryotic cells since they can be used to express genes in a wide range of cell types, including those that form important experimental systems such as the hemopoietic system. We describe here a straightforward and efficient method for generating expression libraries by using a murine retroviral vector. Essentially, the method involves the directional cloning of cDNA into the retroviral vector and the generation of pools of stable ecotropic virus producing cells from this DNA. The cells so derived constitute the library, and the virus they yield is used to infect appropriate target cells for subsequent functional screening. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this procedure by constructing several large retroviral libraries (10(5) to 10(6) individual clones) and then using one of these libraries to isolate cDNAs for interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on the basis of the ability of these factors to confer autonomous growth on the factor-dependent hemopoietic cell line FDC-P1. Moreover, the frequency at which these factor-independent clones were isolated approximated the frequency at which they were represented in the original plasmid library. These results suggest that expression cloning with retroviruses is a practical and efficient procedure and should be a valuable method for the isolation of important regulatory genes. Images PMID:8289827

  15. Correction of the Enzyme Deficiency in Hematopoietic Cells of Gaucher Patients Using a Clinically Acceptable Retroviral Supernatant Transduction Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    preparation of samples retroviral mec:ated gene transfer . J Exp Med 176:1125 for PCR. In: HA Erlich (ed) PCR Technology : Principles 47. Ringden 0. G...forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) human GC gene has been transferred into hematopoietic pro- colonies were scored for vector presence by... transfer of normal human GC cDNA into CFU-G.f Therefore, multiple proviral copies resulting in higher titer hematopoietic progenitor cells from Gaucher

  16. Effects of Membrane Charge and Order on Membrane Binding of the Retroviral Structural Protein Gag

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Dick, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The retroviral structural protein Gag binds to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane (PM), and many cellular proteins do so as well. We used Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag together with membrane sensors to study the principles governing peripheral protein membrane binding, including electrostatics, specific recognition of phospholipid headgroups, sensitivity to phospholipid acyl chain compositions, preference for membrane order, and protein multimerization. We used an in vitro liposome-pelleting assay to test protein membrane binding properties of Gag, the well-characterized MARCKS peptide, a series of fluorescent electrostatic sensor proteins (mNG-KRn), and the specific phosphatidylserine (PS) binding protein Evectin2. RSV Gag and mNG-KRn bound well to membranes with saturated and unsaturated acyl chains, whereas the MARCKS peptide and Evectin2 preferentially bound to membranes with unsaturated acyl chains. To further discriminate whether the primary driving force for Gag membrane binding is electrostatic interactions or preference for membrane order, we measured protein binding to giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing the same PS concentration in both disordered (Ld) and ordered (Lo) phases. RSV Gag and mNG-KRn membrane association followed membrane charge, independent of membrane order. Consistent with pelleting data, the MARCKS peptide showed preference for the Ld domain. Surprisingly, the PS sensor Evectin2 bound to the PS-rich Ld domain with 10-fold greater affinity than to the PS-rich Lo domain. In summary, we found that RSV Gag shows no preference for membrane order, while proteins with reported membrane-penetrating domains show preference for disordered membranes. IMPORTANCE Retroviral particles assemble on the PM and bud from infected cells. Our understanding of how Gag interacts with the PM and how different membrane properties contribute to overall Gag assembly is incomplete. This study examined how membrane charge and membrane order

  17. HTLV-associated diseases: human retroviral infection and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, K; Goldman, B; Oseroff, A R; Glenister, N; Jaffe, E S; Bisaccia, E; Pincus, S; Greenberg, S J

    1997-01-01

    An array of neurologic, oncologic, and autoimmune disorders are associated with infection with the human pathogenic retroviruses human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II (HTLV-I, II), as well as the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV). The cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, mycosis fungoides (MF) and its hematogenous variant Sezary Syndrome (SS), share similar clinical and pathological features to HTLV-I-associated adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and speculation of a retroviral link to MF and SS, especially in areas non-endemic for ATL, has lead to an intensified search for HTLV- and HIV-like agents in these diseases. To further explore a potential role for human retroviruses in MF and SS, skin biopsy-derived or peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived DNA from 17 patients (MF, n = 7; erythrodermic MF (EMF), n = 5; SS, n = 5) from the North Eastern United States were screened using gene amplification by PCR and a liquid hybridization detection assay. Previously published primers and probes for HTLV-I (LTR, gag, pol, env, and pX), and our own primers and probes for HTLV-I (gag, pol, and env), HTLV-II (pol and env) and HIV-I (gag and pol) were employed. Serum antibodies to HTLV-I were negative in all but one EMF patient. The single HTLV-I seropositive patient carrying a diagnosis of EMF generated positive amplified signals for all of the eight HTLV-I regions tested. Ultimately, this individual evolved to exhibit clinical manifestations indistinguishable from ATL. The other 16 patients were negative for all 12 HTLV and HIV retroviral regions. Our findings suggest that none of the known prototypic human retroviruses are associated with seronegative MF and SS. The uniformly positive results for HTLV-I in the seropositive patient suggests that this patient initially presented with a smoldering form of ATL and illustrates the difficulty that sometimes may be encountered in the differential diagnosis of MF, SS, and ATL based solely on clinical and histopathological criteria.

  18. Identification of Host Proteins Associated with Retroviral Vector Particles by Proteomic Analysis of Highly Purified Vector Preparations▿

    PubMed Central

    Segura, María Mercedes; Garnier, Alain; Di Falco, Marcos Rafael; Whissell, Gavin; Meneses-Acosta, Angélica; Arcand, Normand; Kamen, Amine

    2008-01-01

    The Moloney murine leukemia virus (MMLV) belongs to the Retroviridae family of enveloped viruses, which is known to acquire minute amounts of host cellular proteins both on the surface and inside the virion. Despite the extensive use of retroviral vectors in experimental and clinical applications, the repertoire of host proteins incorporated into MMLV vector particles remains unexplored. We report here the identification of host proteins from highly purified retroviral vector preparations obtained by rate-zonal ultracentrifugation. Viral proteins were fractionated by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, in-gel tryptic digested, and subjected to liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Immunogold electron microscopy studies confirmed the presence of several host membrane proteins exposed at the vector surface. These studies led to the identification of 27 host proteins on MMLV vector particles derived from 293 HEK cells, including 5 proteins previously described as part of wild-type MMLV. Nineteen host proteins identified corresponded to intracellular proteins. A total of eight host membrane proteins were identified, including cell adhesion proteins integrin β1 (fibronectin receptor subunit beta) and HMFG-E8, tetraspanins CD81 and CD9, and late endosomal markers CD63 and Lamp-2. Identification of membrane proteins on the retroviral surface is particularly attractive, since they can serve as anchoring sites for the insertion of tags for targeting or purification purposes. The implications of our findings for retrovirus-mediated gene therapy are discussed. PMID:18032515

  19. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Komatsubara, Akira T.; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002–0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer. PMID:26290434

  20. Evaluating a Ligation-Mediated PCR and Pyrosequencing Method for the Detection of Clonal Contribution in Polyclonal Retrovirally Transduced Samples

    PubMed Central

    Brugman, Martijn H.; Suerth, Julia D.; Rothe, Michael; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Schambach, Axel; Modlich, Ute; Kustikova, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Retroviral gene transfer has proven therapeutic potential in clinical gene therapy trials but may also cause abnormal cell growth via perturbation of gene expression in the locus surrounding the insertion site. By establishing clonal marks, retroviral insertions are also used to describe the regenerative potential of individual cells. Deep sequencing approaches have become the method of choice to study insertion profiles in preclinical models and clinical trials. We used a protocol combining ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LM-PCR) and pyrosequencing for insertion profiling and quantification in cells of various tissues transduced with various retroviral vectors. The presented method allows simultaneous analysis of a multitude of DNA-barcoded samples per pyrosequencing run, thereby allowing cost-effective insertion screening in studies with multiple samples. In addition, we investigated whether the number of pyrosequencing reads can be used to quantify clonal abundance. By comparing pyrosequencing reads against site-specific quantitative PCR and by performing spike-in experiments, we show that considerable variation exists in the quantification of insertion sites even when present in the same clone. Our results suggest that the protocol used here and similar approaches might misinterpret abundance clones defined by insertion sites, unless careful calibration measures are taken. The crucial variables causing this variation need to be defined and methodological improvements are required to establish pyrosequencing reads as a quantification measure in polyclonal situations. PMID:23384086

  1. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-20

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

  2. Non-integrating gamma-retroviral vectors as a versatile tool for transient zinc-finger nuclease delivery.

    PubMed

    Bobis-Wozowicz, Sylwia; Galla, Melanie; Alzubi, Jamal; Kuehle, Johannes; Baum, Christopher; Schambach, Axel; Cathomen, Toni

    2014-04-11

    Designer nucleases, like zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), represent valuable tools for targeted genome editing. Here, we took advantage of the gamma-retroviral life cycle and produced vectors to transfer ZFNs in the form of protein, mRNA and episomal DNA. Transfer efficacy and ZFN activity were assessed in quantitative proof-of-concept experiments in a human cell line and in mouse embryonic stem cells. We demonstrate that retrovirus-mediated protein transfer (RPT), retrovirus-mediated mRNA transfer (RMT), and retrovirus-mediated episome transfer (RET) represent powerful methodologies for transient protein delivery or protein expression. Furthermore, we describe complementary strategies to augment ZFN activity after gamma-retroviral transduction, including serial transduction, proteasome inhibition, and hypothermia. Depending on vector dose and target cell type, gene disruption frequencies of up to 15% were achieved with RPT and RMT, and >50% gene knockout after RET. In summary, non-integrating gamma-retroviral vectors represent a versatile tool to transiently deliver ZFNs to human and mouse cells.

  3. Membrane immunoglobulin expressed by retroviral vector gene transfer mimics partial function of the B-cell receptor in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Chen, Feng; Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Lingling; Xu, Peng; Liu, Depei; Liang, Chihchuan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of B-cells is initiated by the ligation of B-cell receptors by its cognate antigen, inducing a series of signal cascades. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of these important events is a crucial goal for immunologists. Chimeric B cell receptors provide a powerful tool for analysis of B-cell signal function. However, this method can only be used in tool cells, but cannot be used for in vivo study. Here, we constructed a retroviral vector to encode both heavy chains and light chains of a membrane immunoglobulin, and expressed them in primary B-cells using retroviral gene transfer. Our results demonstrate that the membrane immunoglobulin expressed by retroviral vectors transfer can initiate B-cell receptor-mediated signaling, resulting in the phosphorylation of Syk and Erk1/2 proteins. The results showed that B-cells expressing membrane immunoglobulin can make proliferative responses to cognate antigen both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we provide a methodology for rapidly analyzing the downstream signals of B-cell receptors both in vitro and in vivo, which could expedite the identification of proteins involved in B-cell function.

  4. Foxp3-dependent transformation of human primary CD4+ T lymphocytes by the retroviral protein tax.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Huan; Cheng, Hua

    2015-10-23

    The retroviral Tax proteins of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and -2) are highly homologous viral transactivators. Both viral proteins can immortalize human primary CD4+ memory T cells, but when expressed alone they rarely transform T cells. In the present study, we found that the Tax proteins displayed a differential ability to immortalize human CD4+Foxp3+ T cells with characteristic expression of CTLA-4 and GITR. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was reportedly expressed and activated in a subset of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells, we introduced an activated EGFR into Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. We observed that these modified cells were grown independently of exogenous IL-2, correlating with a T cell transformation phenotype. In Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3- T cells, ectopic expression of Foxp3 was a prerequisite for Tax transformation of T cells. Accordingly, treatment of the transformed T cells with erlotinib, a selective inhibitor of EGFR, induced degradation of EGFR in lysosome, consequently causing T cell growth inhibition. Further, we identified autophagy as a crucial cellular survival pathway for the transformed T cells. Silencing key autophagy molecules including Beclin1, Atg5 and PI3 kinase class III (PI3KC3) resulted in drastic impairment of T cell growth. Our data, therefore, unveiled a previously unidentified role of Foxp3 in T cell transformation, providing a molecular basis for HTLV-1 transformation of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

  5. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  6. Endogenous murine leukemia retroviral variation across wild European and inbred strains of house mouse.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Stefanie; Hasenkamp, Natascha; Mayer, Jens; Michaux, Johan; Morand, Serge; Mazzoni, Camila J; Roca, Alfred L; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-08-18

    Endogenous murine leukemia retroviruses (MLVs) are high copy number proviral elements difficult to comprehensively characterize using standard low throughput sequencing approaches. However, high throughput approaches generate data that is challenging to process, interpret and present. Next generation sequencing (NGS) data was generated for MLVs from two wild caught Mus musculus domesticus (from mainland France and Corsica) and for inbred laboratory mouse strains C3H, LP/J and SJL. Sequence reads were grouped using a novel sequence clustering approach as applied to retroviral sequences. A Markov cluster algorithm was employed, and the sequence reads were queried for matches to specific xenotropic (Xmv), polytropic (Pmv) and modified polytropic (Mpmv) viral reference sequences. Various MLV subtypes were more widespread than expected among the mice, which may be due to the higher coverage of NGS, or to the presence of similar sequence across many different proviral loci. The results did not correlate with variation in the major MLV receptor Xpr1, which can restrict exogenous MLVs, suggesting that endogenous MLV distribution may reflect gene flow more than past resistance to infection.

  7. Neonatal Gene Therapy With a Gamma Retroviral Vector in Mucopolysaccharidosis VI Cats

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Katherine P; O'Malley, Thomas M; Wang, Ping; O'Donnell, Patricia A; Traas, Anne M; Knox, Van W; Aguirre, Gustavo A; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Metcalf, Jason A; Wang, Bin; Parkinson-Lawrence, Emma J; Sleeper, Meg M; Brooks, Doug A; Hopwood, John J; Haskins, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VI is due to a deficiency in the activity of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase (4S), also known as arylsulfatase B. Previously, retroviral vector (RV)-mediated neonatal gene therapy reduced the clinical manifestations of MPS I and MPS VII in mice and dogs. However, sulfatases require post-translational modification by sulfatase-modifying factors. MPS VI cats were injected intravenously (i.v.) with a gamma RV-expressing feline 4S, resulting in 5 ± 3 copies of RV per 100 cells in liver. Liver and serum 4S activity were 1,450 ± 1,720 U/mg (26-fold normal) and 107 ± 60 U/ml (13-fold normal), respectively, and were directly proportional to the liver 4S protein levels for individual cats. This study suggests that sulfatase-modifying factor (SUMF) activity in liver was sufficient to result in active enzyme despite overexpression of 4S. RV-treated MPS VI cats achieved higher body weights and longer appendicular skeleton lengths, had reduced articular cartilage erosion, and reduced aortic valve thickening and aortic dilatation compared with untreated MPS VI cats, although cervical vertebral bone lengths were not improved. This demonstrates that therapeutic expression of a functional sulfatase protein can be achieved with neonatal gene therapy using a gamma RV, but some aspects of bone disease remain difficult to treat. PMID:22395531

  8. Immortalization and leukemic transformation of a myelomonocytic precursor by retrovirally transduced HRX-ENL.

    PubMed

    Lavau, C; Szilvassy, S J; Slany, R; Cleary, M L

    1997-07-16

    A subset of chromosomal translocations in acute leukemias results in the fusion of the trithorax-related protein HRX with a variety of heterologous proteins. In particular, leukemias with the t(11;19)(q23;p13.3) translocation express HRX-ENL fusion proteins and display features which suggest the malignant transformation of myeloid and/or lymphoid progenitor(s). To characterize directly the potential transforming effects of HRX-ENL on primitive hematopoietic precursors, the fusion cDNA was transduced by retroviral gene transfer into cell populations enriched in hematopoietic stem cells. The infected cells had a dramatically enhanced potential to generate myeloid colonies with primitive morphology in vitro. Primary colonies could be replated for at least three generations in vitro and established primitive myelomonocytic cell lines upon transfer into suspension cultures supplemented with interleukin-3 and stem cell factor. Immortalized cells contained structurally intact HRX-ENL proviral DNA and expressed a low-level of HRX-ENL mRNA. In contrast, wild-type ENL or a deletion mutant of HRX-ENL lacking the ENL component did not demonstrate in vitro transforming capabilities. Immortalized cells or enriched primary hematopoietic stem cells transduced with HRX-ENL induced myeloid leukemias in syngeneic and SCID recipients. These studies demonstrate a direct role for HRX-ENL in the immortalization and leukemic transformation of a myeloid progenitor and support a gain-of-function mechanism for HRX-ENL-mediated leukemogenesis.

  9. Definition of a high-affinity Gag recognition structure mediating packaging of a retroviral RNA genome

    PubMed Central

    Gherghe, Cristina; Lombo, Tania; Leonard, Christopher W.; Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Bess, Julian W.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rein, Alan; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    All retroviral genomic RNAs contain a cis-acting packaging signal by which dimeric genomes are selectively packaged into nascent virions. However, it is not understood how Gag (the viral structural protein) interacts with these signals to package the genome with high selectivity. We probed the structure of murine leukemia virus RNA inside virus particles using SHAPE, a high-throughput RNA structure analysis technology. These experiments showed that NC (the nucleic acid binding domain derived from Gag) binds within the virus to the sequence UCUG-UR-UCUG. Recombinant Gag and NC proteins bound to this same RNA sequence in dimeric RNA in vitro; in all cases, interactions were strongest with the first U and final G in each UCUG element. The RNA structural context is critical: High-affinity binding requires base-paired regions flanking this motif, and two UCUG-UR-UCUG motifs are specifically exposed in the viral RNA dimer. Mutating the guanosine residues in these two motifs—only four nucleotides per genomic RNA—reduced packaging 100-fold, comparable to the level of nonspecific packaging. These results thus explain the selective packaging of dimeric RNA. This paradigm has implications for RNA recognition in general, illustrating how local context and RNA structure can create information-rich recognition signals from simple single-stranded sequence elements in large RNAs. PMID:20974908

  10. Probing Retroviral and Retrotransposon Genome Structures: The “SHAPE” of Things to Come

    PubMed Central

    Sztuba-Solinska, Joanna; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the nuances of RNA structure as they pertain to biological function remains a formidable challenge for retrovirus research and development of RNA-based therapeutics, an area of particular importance with respect to combating HIV infection. Although a variety of chemical and enzymatic RNA probing techniques have been successfully employed for more than 30 years, they primarily interrogate small (100–500 nt) RNAs that have been removed from their biological context, potentially eliminating long-range tertiary interactions (such as kissing loops and pseudoknots) that may play a critical regulatory role. Selective 2′ hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE), pioneered recently by Merino and colleagues, represents a facile, user-friendly technology capable of interrogating RNA structure with a single reagent and, combined with automated capillary electrophoresis, can analyze an entire 10,000-nucleotide RNA genome in a matter of weeks. Despite these obvious advantages, SHAPE essentially provides a nucleotide “connectivity map,” conversion of which into a 3-D structure requires a variety of complementary approaches. This paper summarizes contributions from SHAPE towards our understanding of the structure of retroviral genomes, modifications to which technology that have been developed to address some of its limitations, and future challenges. PMID:22685659

  11. Effects of retroviral envelope-protein cleavage upon trafficking, incorporation, and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Swapna; Sanders, David Avram

    2010-09-15

    Retroviral envelope glycoproteins undergo proteolytic processing by cellular subtilisin-like proprotein convertases at a polybasic amino-acid site in order to produce the two functional subunits, SU and TM. Most previous studies have indicated that envelope-protein cleavage is required for rendering the protein competent for promoting membrane fusion and for virus infectivity. We have investigated the role of proteolytic processing of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope-protein through site-directed mutagenesis of the residues near the SU-TM cleavage site and have established that uncleaved glycoprotein is unable either to be incorporated into virus particles efficiently or to induce membrane fusion. Additionally, the results suggest that cleavage of the envelope protein plays an important role in intracellular trafficking of protein via the cellular secretory pathway. Based on our results it was concluded that a positively charged residue located at either P2 or P4 along with the arginine at P1 is essential for cleavage.

  12. Biomaterial-Mediated Retroviral Gene Transfer Using Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Gersbach, Charles A.; Coyer, Sean R.; Le Doux, Joseph M.; García, Andrés J.

    2007-01-01

    Biomaterial-mediated gene delivery has recently emerged as a promising alternative to conventional gene transfer technologies that focus on direct delivery of viral vectors or DNA-polymer/matrix complexes. However, biomaterial-based strategies have primarily targeted transient gene expression vehicles, including plasmid DNA and adenovirus particles. This study expands on this work by characterizing biomaterial properties conducive to the surface immobilization of retroviral particles and subsequent transduction of mammalian cells at the cell-material interface. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of functionally-terminated alkanethiols on gold were used to establish biomaterial surfaces of defined chemical composition. Gene transfer was observed to be greater than 90% on NH2-terminated surfaces, approximately 50% on COOH-functionalized surfaces, and undetectable on CH3-terminated SAMs, similar to controls of tissue culture-treated polystyrene. Gene delivery via the NH2-SAM was further characterized as a function of coating time, virus concentration, and cell seeding density. Finally, SAM-mediated gene delivery was comparable to fibronectin- and poly-L-lysine-based methods for gene transfer. This work is significant to establishing safe and effective gene therapy strategies, developing efficient methods for gene delivery, and supporting recent progress in the field of biomaterial-mediated gene transfer. PMID:17698189

  13. Retroviral infection of non-dividing cells: Old and new perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Masahiro; Emerman, Michael . E-mail: memerman@fhcrc.org

    2006-01-05

    The dependence of retroviral replication on cell proliferation was described as early as 1958, although different classes of retroviruses are able to infect non-dividing cells with different efficiencies. For example, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other lentiviruses infect most non-dividing cells nearly as well as dividing cells, while the gammaretroviruses such as the murine leukemia virus (MLV) cannot infect non-dividing cells, and other retroviruses have intermediate phenotypes. One exception to the ability of HIV to infect non-dividing cells involves resting CD4+ T cells in vitro where there are multiple restrictions. However, recent data show that there is massive infection of non-activated CD4+ T cell during acute infection which suggests that the situation is different in vivo. Finally, much work trying to explain the difference between HIV and MLV in non-dividing cells has focused on describing the ability of HIV to enter the nucleus during interphase. However, we suggest that events in the viral lifecycle other than nuclear import may be more important in determining the ability of a given retrovirus to infect non-dividing cells.

  14. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  15. Host factors in retroviral integration and the selection of integration target sites

    PubMed Central

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to replicate, a retrovirus must integrate a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host cell. The study of retroviral integration has advanced considerably in the last few years. Here we focus on host factor interactions and the linked area of integration targeting. Genome-wide screens for cellular factors affecting HIV replication have identified a series of host cell proteins that may mediate subcellular trafficking of integration complexes, nuclear import, and integration target site selection. The cell transcriptional co-activator protein LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a tethering factor important for HIV integration, and recently, BET proteins (Brd2, 4, and 4) have been identified as tethering factors for the gammaretroviruses. A new class of HIV inhibitors has been developed targeting the HIV-1 IN-LEDGF binding site, though surprisingly these inhibitors appear to block assembly late during replication and do not act at the integration step. Going forward, genome-wide studies of HIV-host interactions offer many new starting points to investigate HIV replication and identify potential new inhibitor targets. PMID:26104434

  16. Effects of Hormonal Contraception on Anti-Retroviral Drug Metabolism, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Andrea Ries; Anderson, Sharon; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2014-01-01

    Among women, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is most prevalent in those of reproductive age. These women are also at risk of unintended or mistimed pregnancies. Hormonal contraceptives (HCs) are one of the most commonly used methods of family planning world-wide. Therefore concurrent use of HC among women on anti-retroviral medications (ARVs) is increasingly common. ARVs are being investigated and have been approved for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and therefore drug-drug interactions must also be considered in HIV-1 negative women who want to prevent both unintended pregnancy and HIV-1 infection. This article will review four main interactions: (1) the effect of HCs on ARV pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) during therapy, (2) the effect of ARVs on HC PK and PD, (3) the role of drug transporters on drug-drug interactions and (4) ongoing research into the effect of HCs on pre-exposure prophylaxis PK and PD. PMID:24521428

  17. Critical assessment of lifelong phenotype correction in hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats after retroviral mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T H; Aubert, D; Bellodi-Privato, M; Flageul, M; Pichard, V; Jaidane-Abdelghani, Z; Myara, A; Ferry, N

    2007-09-01

    Among inherited diseases of the liver, Crigler-Najjar type 1 disease (CN-1), which results from complete deficiency in bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity (B-UGT1), is an attractive target for gene therapy studies. Hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats, a model of CN-1, were injected at 2 days of age with lentiviral or oncoretroviral vectors encoding the human B-UGT1. After injection, bilirubinemia was normalized for up to 95 weeks. Bilirubin conjugates were present in the bile, demonstrating liver transduction. PCR and enzyme activity analysis confirmed gene and phenotype correction in liver. We observed that when using a strong viral promoter, a complete correction was achieved with less than 5% of B-UGT1 copy per haploid genome and after a reconstitution of 12% B-UGT1 normal activity. Liver histology remained normal throughout the experiment and tissue distribution analysis revealed preferential hepatocyte transduction after systemic delivery. Finally, no adverse immune response occurred even after induction of nonspecific liver inflammation, suggesting immune ignorance to the therapeutic protein. Our present results document the lifelong safety of gene therapy for CN-1 with retroviral vectors. They offer a better delineation of liver gene correction level required to achieve complete correction of bilirubinemia and pave the way for future clinical application of gene therapy for inherited liver disorders.

  18. Evolution of a cytoplasmic tripartite motif (TRIM) protein in cows that restricts retroviral infection.

    PubMed

    Si, Zhihai; Vandegraaff, Nick; O'huigin, Colm; Song, Byeongwoon; Yuan, Wen; Xu, Chen; Perron, Michel; Li, Xing; Marasco, Wayne A; Engelman, Alan; Dean, Michael; Sodroski, Joseph

    2006-05-09

    Primate tripartite motif 5alpha (TRIM5alpha) proteins mediate innate intracellular resistance to retroviruses. In humans, TRIM5 is located in a paralogous cluster that includes TRIM6, TRIM34, and TRIM22. Although TRIM6 and TRIM34 orthologs are found in other mammals, TRIM5 has to date been identified only in primates. Cow cells exhibit early blocks to infection by several retroviruses. We identify a cytoplasmic TRIM protein encoded by LOC505265 that is responsible for the restriction of infection by several lentiviruses and N-tropic murine leukemia virus in cow cells. Susceptibility of N-tropic murine leukemia virus to 505265-mediated restriction is determined primarily by residue 110 of the viral capsid protein. Phylogenetically, cow LOC505265 segregates with the TRIM5/TRIM6/TRIM34 group, but is not an ortholog of known TRIM genes. The B30.2/SPRY domain of 505265 exhibits long variable regions, a characteristic of the proteins encoded by this paralogous group, and shows evidence of positive selection. Apparently, cows have independently evolved a retroviral restriction factor from the same TRIM family that spawned TRIM5 in primates. Particular features of this subset of cytoplasmic TRIM proteins may be conducive to the convergent evolution of virus-restricting factors.

  19. Evolution of a cytoplasmic tripartite motif (TRIM) protein in cows that restricts retroviral infection

    PubMed Central

    Si, Zhihai; Vandegraaff, Nick; O’hUigin, Colm; Song, Byeongwoon; Yuan, Wen; Xu, Chen; Perron, Michel; Li, Xing; Marasco, Wayne A.; Engelman, Alan; Dean, Michael; Sodroski, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Primate tripartite motif 5α (TRIM5α) proteins mediate innate intracellular resistance to retroviruses. In humans, TRIM5 is located in a paralogous cluster that includes TRIM6, TRIM34, and TRIM22. Although TRIM6 and TRIM34 orthologs are found in other mammals, TRIM5 has to date been identified only in primates. Cow cells exhibit early blocks to infection by several retroviruses. We identify a cytoplasmic TRIM protein encoded by LOC505265 that is responsible for the restriction of infection by several lentiviruses and N-tropic murine leukemia virus in cow cells. Susceptibility of N-tropic murine leukemia virus to 505265-mediated restriction is determined primarily by residue 110 of the viral capsid protein. Phylogenetically, cow LOC505265 segregates with the TRIM5/TRIM6/TRIM34 group, but is not an ortholog of known TRIM genes. The B30.2/SPRY domain of 505265 exhibits long variable regions, a characteristic of the proteins encoded by this paralogous group, and shows evidence of positive selection. Apparently, cows have independently evolved a retroviral restriction factor from the same TRIM family that spawned TRIM5 in primates. Particular features of this subset of cytoplasmic TRIM proteins may be conducive to the convergent evolution of virus-restricting factors. PMID:16648259

  20. Economic evaluation of task-shifting approaches to the dispensing of anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A scarcity of human resources for health has been identified as one of the primary constraints to the scale-up of the provision of Anti-Retroviral Treatment (ART). In South Africa there is a particularly severe lack of pharmacists. The study aims to compare two task-shifting approaches to the dispensing of ART: Indirectly Supervised Pharmacist’s Assistants (ISPA) and Nurse-based pharmaceutical care models against the standard of care which involves a pharmacist dispensing ART. Methods A cross-sectional mixed methods study design was used. Patient exit interviews, time and motion studies, expert interviews and staff costs were used to conduct a costing from the societal perspective. Six facilities were sampled in the Western Cape province of South Africa, and 230 patient interviews conducted. Results The ISPA model was found to be the least costly task-shifting pharmaceutical model. However, patients preferred receiving medication from the nurse. This related to a fear of stigma and being identified by virtue of receiving ART at the pharmacy. Conclusions While these models are not mutually exclusive, and a variety of pharmaceutical care models will be necessary for scale up, it is useful to consider the impact of implementing these models on the provider, patient access to treatment and difficulties in implementation. PMID:22974373

  1. AAV gene transfer to the retina does not protect retrovirally transduced hepatocytes from the immune response.

    PubMed

    Bellodi-Privato, Marta; Le Meur, Guylène; Aubert, Dominique; Mendes-Madera, Alexandra; Pichard, Virginie; Rolling, Fabienne; Ferry, Nicolas

    2004-06-01

    Gene therapy of inherited hepatic disease relies on sustained expression of the therapeutic transgene. In many instances, such expression will require immune tolerization to the non-self therapeutic transgene product. We previously demonstrated that a cytotoxic immune response eliminated hepatocytes after in vivo transduction using recombinant retroviral vectors. In the present study we investigated whether prior gene transfer to the retina, which is suspected to induce immune tolerance, could alleviate the immune response occurring after retrovirus mediated gene transfer to the liver. Retinal cells were transduced using adeno-associated viral vectors harbouring a beta-galactosidase transgene. Sixty days later, regenerating hepatocytes were transduced after partial hepatectomy using a recombinant retrovirus carrying the transgene. Three weeks later, anti beta-galactosidase antibodies were present in all animals. Elimination of the transduced hepatocytes eventually occurred in all animals by 2 months after liver gene transfer, although sustained beta-galactosidase expression was still present in the retina in 66% of the animals. We conclude that although the retina behaves as an immunoprivileged site, gene expression in the subretinal space is not sufficient to induce immune tolerance to a transgene product expressed in the liver.

  2. Production of human glucocerebrosidase in mice after retroviral gene transfer into multipotential hematopoietic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, P.H.; Fink, J.K.; Brady, R.O.; Perry, L.K.; Karlsson, S. )

    1989-11-01

    The human glucocerebrosidase (GC) gene has been transferred efficiently into spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) multipotential hematopoietic progenitor cells, and production of human GC RNA and protein has been achieved in transduced CFU-S colonies. High-titer retroviral vectors containing the human GC cDNA were constructed. Four vectors were compared with respect to gene-transfer efficiency into CFU-S progenitors. One vector (G vector) required high concentrations of interleukins 3 and 6 during stimulation and coculture for efficient transduction of CFU-S progenitors. The remaining three vectors (NTG, GTN, and GI vectors) transduced these progenitors at infection frequencies approaching 100% using low concentrations of hematopoietic growth factors to simulate cell division prior to and during the infection. Vectors using the viral long terminal repeat enhancer/promoter to drive the human GC cDNA produced high levels of human GC RNA in the progeny of CFU-S progenitors after gene transfer. All three vectors producing human GC RNA in CFU-S colonies can generate human GC as detected by immunochemical analysis of CFU-S colonies. The capacity of the viral long terminal repeat and the internal thymidine kinase promoter to direct synthesis of RNA in transduced bone marrow and spleen cells 5 months after bone marrow transplantation reflected the performance of these promoters in NTG-transduced CFU-S colonies.

  3. Thiazolobenzimidazole: biological and biochemical anti-retroviral activity of a new nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Buckheit, R W; Hollingshead, M G; Germany-Decker, J; White, E L; McMahon, J B; Allen, L B; Ross, L J; Decker, W D; Westbrook, L; Shannon, W M

    1993-07-01

    Thiazolobenzimidazole (NSC 625487) was a highly potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus-induced cell killing and viral replication in a variety of human cell lines, as well as fresh human peripheral blood lymphocytes and macrophages. The compound was active against a panel of biologically diverse laboratory and clinical strains of HIV-1, including the AZT-resistant strain G910-6. However, the agent was inactive against HIV-2 and a pyridinone-resistant strain (A17) of HIV-1, a strain which is cross-resistant to several structurally diverse members of a common pharmacologic class of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The compound selectively inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase but not HIV-2 reverse transcriptase. Combinations of thiazolobenzimidazole with either AZT or ddI synergistically inhibited HIV-1 induced cell killing in vitro. Thiazolobenzimidazole also inhibited the replication of the Rauscher murine leukemia retrovirus. Thus, thiazolobenzimidazole is a new active anti-HIV-1 chemotype and may represent a subclass of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with an enhanced range of anti-retroviral activity.

  4. Critical role of conserved hydrophobic residues within the major homology region in mature retroviral capsid assembly.

    PubMed

    Purdy, John G; Flanagan, John M; Ropson, Ira J; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E; Craven, Rebecca C

    2008-06-01

    During retroviral maturation, the CA protein undergoes dramatic structural changes and establishes unique intermolecular interfaces in the mature capsid shell that are different from those that existed in the immature precursor. The most conserved region of CA, the major homology region (MHR), has been implicated in both immature and mature assembly, although the precise contribution of the MHR residues to each event has been largely undefined. To test the roles of specific MHR residues in mature capsid assembly, an in vitro system was developed that allowed for the first-time formation of Rous sarcoma virus CA into structures resembling authentic capsids. The ability of CA to assemble organized structures was destroyed by substitutions of two conserved hydrophobic MHR residues and restored by second-site suppressors, demonstrating that these MHR residues are required for the proper assembly of mature capsids in addition to any role that these amino acids may play in immature particle assembly. The defect caused by the MHR mutations was identified as an early step in the capsid assembly process. The results provide strong evidence for a model in which the hydrophobic residues of the MHR control a conformational reorganization of CA that is needed to initiate capsid assembly and suggest that the formation of an interdomain interaction occurs early during maturation.

  5. A Self-inactivating γ-Retroviral Vector Reduces Manifestations of Mucopolysaccharidosis I in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Jason A; Ma, Xiucui; Linders, Bruce; Wu, Susan; Schambach, Axel; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Kovacs, Attila; Bigg, Mark; He, Li; Tollefsen, Douglas M; Ponder, Katherine P

    2009-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disease due to deficiency in α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) that results in accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) throughout the body, causing numerous clinical defects. Intravenous administration of a γ-retroviral vector (γ-RV) with an intact long terminal repeat (LTR) reduced the clinical manifestations of MPS I, but could cause insertional mutagenesis. Although self-inactivating (SIN) γ-RVs in which the enhancer and promoter elements in the viral LTR are absent after transduction reduces this risk, such vectors could be less effective. This report demonstrates that intravenous (i.v.) injection of a SIN γ-RV expressing canine IDUA from the liver-specific human α1-antitrypsin promoter into adult or newborn MPS I mice completely prevents biochemical abnormalities in several organs, and improved bone disease, vision, hearing, and aorta to a similar extent as was seen with administration of the LTR-intact vector to adults. Improvements were less profound than when using an LTR-intact γ-RV in newborns, which likely reflects a lower level of transduction and expression for the SIN vector-transduced mice, and might be overcome by using a higher dose of SIN vector. A SIN γ-RV vector ameliorates clinical manifestations of MPS I in mice and should be safer than an LTR-intact γ-RV. PMID:19844196

  6. A self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vector reduces manifestations of mucopolysaccharidosis I in mice.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Jason A; Ma, Xiucui; Linders, Bruce; Wu, Susan; Schambach, Axel; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Kovacs, Attila; Bigg, Mark; He, Li; Tollefsen, Douglas M; Ponder, Katherine P

    2010-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disease due to deficiency in alpha-L-iduronidase (IDUA) that results in accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) throughout the body, causing numerous clinical defects. Intravenous administration of a gamma-retroviral vector (gamma-RV) with an intact long terminal repeat (LTR) reduced the clinical manifestations of MPS I, but could cause insertional mutagenesis. Although self-inactivating (SIN) gamma-RVs in which the enhancer and promoter elements in the viral LTR are absent after transduction reduces this risk, such vectors could be less effective. This report demonstrates that intravenous (i.v.) injection of a SIN gamma-RV expressing canine IDUA from the liver-specific human alpha(1)-antitrypsin promoter into adult or newborn MPS I mice completely prevents biochemical abnormalities in several organs, and improved bone disease, vision, hearing, and aorta to a similar extent as was seen with administration of the LTR-intact vector to adults. Improvements were less profound than when using an LTR-intact gamma-RV in newborns, which likely reflects a lower level of transduction and expression for the SIN vector-transduced mice, and might be overcome by using a higher dose of SIN vector. A SIN gamma-RV vector ameliorates clinical manifestations of MPS I in mice and should be safer than an LTR-intact gamma-RV.

  7. Neonatal gene therapy with a gamma retroviral vector in mucopolysaccharidosis VI cats.

    PubMed

    Ponder, Katherine P; O'Malley, Thomas M; Wang, Ping; O'Donnell, Patricia A; Traas, Anne M; Knox, Van W; Aguirre, Gustavo A; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Metcalf, Jason A; Wang, Bin; Parkinson-Lawrence, Emma J; Sleeper, Meg M; Brooks, Doug A; Hopwood, John J; Haskins, Mark E

    2012-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VI is due to a deficiency in the activity of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase (4S), also known as arylsulfatase B. Previously, retroviral vector (RV)-mediated neonatal gene therapy reduced the clinical manifestations of MPS I and MPS VII in mice and dogs. However, sulfatases require post-translational modification by sulfatase-modifying factors. MPS VI cats were injected intravenously (i.v.) with a gamma RV-expressing feline 4S, resulting in 5 ± 3 copies of RV per 100 cells in liver. Liver and serum 4S activity were 1,450 ± 1,720 U/mg (26-fold normal) and 107 ± 60 U/ml (13-fold normal), respectively, and were directly proportional to the liver 4S protein levels for individual cats. This study suggests that sulfatase-modifying factor (SUMF) activity in liver was sufficient to result in active enzyme despite overexpression of 4S. RV-treated MPS VI cats achieved higher body weights and longer appendicular skeleton lengths, had reduced articular cartilage erosion, and reduced aortic valve thickening and aortic dilatation compared with untreated MPS VI cats, although cervical vertebral bone lengths were not improved. This demonstrates that therapeutic expression of a functional sulfatase protein can be achieved with neonatal gene therapy using a gamma RV, but some aspects of bone disease remain difficult to treat.

  8. Serial bone marrow transplantation reveals in vivo expression of the pCLPG retroviral vector

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene therapy in the hematopoietic system remains promising, though certain aspects of vector design, such as transcriptional control elements, continue to be studied. Our group has developed a retroviral vector where transgene expression is controlled by p53 with the intention of harnessing the dynamic and inducible nature of this tumor suppressor and transcription factor. We present here a test of in vivo expression provided by the p53-responsive vector, pCLPG. For this, we used a model of serial transplantation of transduced bone marrow cells. Results We observed, by flow cytometry, that the eGFP transgene was expressed at higher levels when the pCLPG vector was used as compared to the parental pCL retrovirus, where expression is directed by the native MoMLV LTR. Expression from the pCLPG vector was longer lasting, but did decay along with each sequential transplant. The detection of eGFP-positive cells containing either vector was successful only in the bone marrow compartment and was not observed in peripheral blood, spleen or thymus. Conclusions These findings indicate that the p53-responsive pCLPG retrovirus did offer expression in vivo and at a level that surpassed the non-modified, parental pCL vector. Our results indicate that the pCLPG platform may provide some advantages when applied in the hematopoietic system. PMID:20096105

  9. Integration Site and Clonal Expansion in Human Chronic Retroviral Infection and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, Heather A.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral vectors have been successfully used therapeutically to restore expression of genes in a range of single-gene diseases, including several primary immunodeficiency disorders. Although clinical trials have shown remarkable results, there have also been a number of severe adverse events involving malignant outgrowth of a transformed clonal population. This clonal expansion is influenced by the integration site profile of the viral integrase, the transgene expressed, and the effect of the viral promoters on the neighbouring host genome. Infection with the pathogenic human retrovirus HTLV-1 also causes clonal expansion of cells containing an integrated HTLV-1 provirus. Although the majority of HTLV-1-infected people remain asymptomatic, up to 5% develop an aggressive T cell malignancy. In this review we discuss recent findings on the role of the genomic integration site in determining the clonality and the potential for malignant transformation of cells carrying integrated HTLV-1 or gene therapy vectors, and how these results have contributed to the understanding of HTLV-1 pathogenesis and to improvements in gene therapy vector safety. PMID:25365582

  10. A retroviral RNA secondary structure required for efficient initiation of reverse transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Cobrinik, D; Soskey, L; Leis, J

    1988-01-01

    Genetic evidence is presented which suggests the existence of an important structural element in the 5' noncoding region of avian retrovirus RNA. The proposed structure, which we term the U5-leader stem, is composed of sequences in the middle of U5 and in the leader, flanking the primer-binding site. U5 and leader mutations which would disrupt this structure caused a partial replication defect. However, nucleotide substitutions in the leader, which would structurally compensate for a U5 deletion mutation, restored normal replication. Analysis of replication intermediates of viruses with the above mutations suggests that the U5-leader stem is required for efficient DNA synthesis in vivo and for initiation of DNA synthesis from the tRNA(Trp) primer in melittin-activated virions. However, this structure does not appear to be required for binding of the tRNA(Trp) primer to viral RNA. These results support a role for the U5-leader stem structure, independent of its primary sequence, in the initiation of retroviral replication. Images PMID:2458484

  11. Inhibition Profiling of Retroviral Protease Inhibitors Using an HIV-2 Modular System

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Mohamed; Szojka, Zsófia; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral protease inhibitors (PIs) are fundamental pillars in the treatment of HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Currently used PIs are designed against HIV-1, and their effect on HIV-2 is understudied. Using a modular HIV-2 protease cassette system, inhibition profiling assays were carried out for protease inhibitors both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. Moreover, the treatment-associated resistance mutations (I54M, L90M) were introduced into the modular system, and comparative inhibition assays were performed to determine their effect on the susceptibility of the protease. Our results indicate that darunavir, saquinavir, indinavir and lopinavir were very effective HIV-2 protease inhibitors, while tipranavir, nelfinavir and amprenavir showed a decreased efficacy. I54M, L90M double mutation resulted in a significant reduction in the susceptibility to most of the inhibitors with the exception of tipranavir. To our knowledge, this modular system constitutes a novel approach in the field of HIV-2 protease characterization and susceptibility testing. PMID:26633459

  12. Structural and functional comparisons of retroviral envelope protein C-terminal domains: still much to learn.

    PubMed

    Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Kuhlmann, Anne-Sophie; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2014-01-16

    Retroviruses are a family of viruses that cause a broad range of pathologies in animals and humans, from the apparently harmless, long-term genomic insertion of endogenous retroviruses, to tumors induced by the oncogenic retroviruses and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) resulting from human immunodeficiency virus infection. Disease can be the result of diverse mechanisms, including tumorigenesis induced by viral oncogenes or immune destruction, leading to the gradual loss of CD4 T-cells. Of the virally encoded proteins common to all retroviruses, the envelope (Env) displays perhaps the most diverse functionality. Env is primarily responsible for binding the cellular receptor and for effecting the fusion process, with these functions mediated by protein domains localized to the exterior of the virus. The remaining C-terminal domain may have the most variable functionality of all retroviral proteins. The C-terminal domains from three prototypical retroviruses are discussed, focusing on the different structures and functions, which include fusion activation, tumorigenesis and viral assembly and lifecycle influences. Despite these genetic and functional differences, however, the C-terminal domains of these viruses share a common feature in the modulation of Env ectodomain conformation. Despite their differences, perhaps each system still has information to share with the others.

  13. The RUNX Genes as Conditional Oncogenes: Insights from Retroviral Targeting and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Neil, James C; Gilroy, Kathryn; Borland, Gillian; Hay, Jodie; Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The observation that the Runx genes act as targets for transcriptional activation by retroviral insertion identified a new family of dominant oncogenes. However, it is now clear that Runx genes are 'conditional' oncogenes whose over-expression is growth inhibitory unless accompanied by another event such as concomitant over-expression of MYC or loss of p53 function. Remarkably, while the oncogenic activities of either MYC or RUNX over-expression are suppressed while p53 is intact, the combination of both neutralises p53 tumour suppression in vivo by as yet unknown mechanisms. Moreover, there is emerging evidence that endogenous, basal RUNX activity is important to maintain the viability and proliferation of MYC-driven lymphoma cells. There is also growing evidence that the human RUNX genes play a similar conditional oncogenic role and are selected for over-expression in end-stage cancers of multiple types. Paradoxically, reduced RUNX activity can also predispose to cell immortalisation and transformation, particularly by mutant Ras. These apparently conflicting observations may be reconciled in a stage-specific model of RUNX involvement in cancer. A question that has yet to be fully addressed is the extent to which the three Runx genes are functionally redundant in cancer promotion and suppression.

  14. Retroviral modification of mesenchymal stem cells for gene therapy of hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Doering, Christopher B

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising target for the delivery of secreted proteins due to their ease of isolation, expansion, and genetic modification. The bleeding disorder hemophilia A results from the deficiency of a secreted blood clotting factor termed factor VIII (fVIII). Hemophilia A could be cured by gene-transfer-based procedures targeting virtually any cell type, including MSCs. Here, we describe methods for retroviral modification of MSCs incorporating a high-expression porcine (HEP)-fVIII transgene and a murine model of hemophilia A. MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of hemophilia A mice, expanded, and transduced ex vivo. Genetically modified MSCs secreted high levels of HEP-fVIII into the conditioned medium. HEP-fVIII was purified from the conditioned medium and demonstrated to have a specific activity, relative electrophoretic mobility, and proteolytic activation pattern similar to HEP-fVIII produced by other commercial cell lines. Collectively, these data support the concept that MSCs can be utilized as a cellular vehicle for successful gene-transfer-based therapy of hemophilia A and other disorders resulting from the deficiency of a secreted protein.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups influence lipoatrophy after Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Sher L.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Poole, Jason C.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Palella, Frank J.; Bream, Jay H.; Wallace, Douglas C.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Although highly active retroviral therapy (HAART) has been extremely effective in lowering AIDS incidence among patients infected with HIV, certain drugs included in HAART can cause serious mitochondrial toxicities. One of the most frequent adverse events is lipoatrophy, which is the loss of subcutaneous fat in the face, arms, buttocks and/or legs as an adverse reaction to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). The clinical symptoms of lipoatrophy resemble those of inherited mitochondrial diseases, which suggests that host mitochondrial genotype may play a role in susceptibility. We analyzed the association between mitochondrial haplogroup and severity of lipoatrophy in HIV-infected European American patients on HAART in the Multicenter AIDS cohort Study (MACS) and found that mitochondrial haplogroup H was strongly associated with increased atrophy (arms: p = 0.007, OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.17–2.69 legs: p = 0.037, OR = 1.54 95% CI = 1.03–2.31, and buttocks: p = 0.10, OR = 1.41 95% CI = 0.94–2.12). We also saw borderline significance for haplogroup T as protective against lipoatrophy (p = 0.05, OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.20–1.00). These data suggest that mitochondrial DNA haplogroup may influence the propensity for lipoatrophy in patients receiving NRTIs. PMID:19339895

  16. Inhibition of HMGI-C protein synthesis suppresses retrovirally induced neoplastic transformation of rat thyroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Berlingieri, M T; Manfioletti, G; Santoro, M; Bandiera, A; Visconti, R; Giancotti, V; Fusco, A

    1995-01-01

    Elevated expression of the three high-mobility group I (HMGI) proteins (HMGI, HMGY, and HMGI-C) has previously been correlated with the presence of a highly malignant phenotype in epithelial and fibroblastic rat thyroid cells and in experimental thyroid, lung, mammary, and skin carcinomas. Northern (RNA) blot and run-on analyses demonstrated that the induction of HMGI genes in transformed thyroid cells occurs at the transcriptional level. An antisense methodology to block HMGI-C protein synthesis was then used to analyze the role of this protein in the process of thyroid cell transformation. Transfection of an antisense construct for the HMGI-C cDNA into normal thyroid cells, followed by infection with transforming myeloproliferative sarcoma virus or Kirsten murine sarcoma virus, generated cell lines that expressed significant levels of the retroviral transforming oncogenes v-mos or v-ras-Ki and removed the dependency on thyroid-stimulating hormones. However, in contrast with untransfected cells or cells transfected with the sense construct, those containing the antisense construct did not demonstrate the appearance of any malignant phenotypic markers (growth in soft agar and tumorigenicity in athymic mice). A great reduction of the HMGI-C protein levels and the absence of the HMGI(Y) proteins was observed in the HMGI-C antisense-transfected, virally infected cells. Therefore, the HMGI-C protein seems to play a key role in the transformation of these thyroid cells. PMID:7862147

  17. Effects of Gag mutation and processing on retroviral dimeric RNA maturation.

    PubMed

    Fu, William; Dang, Que; Nagashima, Kunio; Freed, Eric O; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2006-02-01

    After their release from host cells, most retroviral particles undergo a maturation process, which includes viral protein cleavage, core condensation, and increased stability of the viral RNA dimer. Inactivating the viral protease prevents protein cleavage; the resulting virions lack condensed cores and contain fragile RNA dimers. Therefore, protein cleavage is linked to virion morphological change and increased stability of the RNA dimer. However, it is unclear whether protein cleavage is sufficient for mediating virus RNA maturation. We have observed a novel phenotype in a murine leukemia virus capsid mutant, which has normal virion production, viral protein cleavage, and RNA packaging. However, this mutant also has immature virion morphology and contains a fragile RNA dimer, which is reminiscent of protease-deficient mutants. To our knowledge, this mutant provides the first evidence that Gag cleavage alone is not sufficient to promote RNA dimer maturation. To extend our study further, we examined a well-defined human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag mutant that lacks a functional PTAP motif and produces immature virions without major defects in viral protein cleavage. We found that the viral RNA dimer in the PTAP mutant is more fragile and unstable compared with those from wild-type HIV-1. Based on the results of experiments using two different Gag mutants from two distinct retroviruses, we conclude that Gag cleavage is not sufficient for promoting RNA dimer maturation, and we propose that there is a link between the maturation of virion morphology and the viral RNA dimer.

  18. Ophthalmic manifestations of HIV in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Mowatt, L

    2013-01-01

    HIV-related eye disease can be classified as retinal HIV microangiopathy, opportunistic infections, neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and unusual malignancies. There is a 52-100% lifetime accumulative risk of HIV patients developing eye problems. Seventy-seven per cent of patients with ocular manifestations of HIV had CD4 counts < 200 cells/μL. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most prevalent opportunistic infection, however, Africa has a low incidence of this, and more commonly squamous cell carcinoma, compared to the western hemisphere. Due to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the anti-CMV therapy may be discontinued if the CD4+ T cell count is > 100 cells/μL for a minimum of three months. Despite HAART, patients with a CD4 count < 50 cells/μL have a similar risk of developing CMV retinitis as compared to the pre-HAART era. Opportunistic infections include CMV, herpetic retinopathy (progressive outer retinal necrosis - PORN), less commonly toxoplasmosis, pneumocystis and cryptococcus. Malignancies associated with HIV include Kaposi's sarcoma and conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma. Cranial nerve palsies, optic disc swelling and atrophy are characteristic neuro-ophthalmic features. They usually occur secondary to meningitis/encephalitis (from cryptococcus and tuberculosis). With the advent of HAART, new complications have developed in CMV retinitis: immune recovery uveitis (IRU) and cystoid macula oedema (CMO). Immune recovery uveitis occurs in 71% of patients if HAART is started before the induction of the anti-CMV treatment. However, this is reduced to 31% if HAART is started after the induction treatment. Molluscum contagiosum and Kaposi's sarcoma can spontaneously resolve on HAART. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy has reduced the frequencies of opportunistic infections and improved the remission duration in HIV patients.

  19. Oral manifestations of HIV in children receiving anti-retroviral therapy in Hyderabad, India.

    PubMed

    Baghirath, P V; Krishna, A B; Gannepalli, A; Ali, M M

    2013-12-01

    To assess and compare the oral manifestations of HIV-infected paediatric patients undergoing ART (anti-retroviral therapy) and those not undergoing ART. A cross-sectional study was conducted amongst the 5-12 years old, HIV positive children (receiving and not receiving ART) registered at Nireekshana ART centre, Hyderabad and HIV negative children enrolled in a nearby school. HIV-related oral lesions were diagnosed according to WHO criteria. Information on age, gender, place of residence (urban/rural), socio-economic status, duration of HIV infection, duration of ART therapy, use of traditional medicine, presence of HIV-related systemic disease was recorded. CD4+ cell count was also determined for each subject. Chi-square test, stepwise multiple linear and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. For all tests, confidence interval and p value were set at 95 % and p ≤ 0.05, respectively. Twelve percent and 21.3 % of the study participants were on short-term and long-term ART (Group I), respectively. A greater proportion of HIV patients receiving treatment had CD4+ cell counts of more than 750 cells/mm(3). Nearly 81.3 % of HIV patients receiving long-term therapy did not have any oral lesions. Around half of the participants not receiving treatment suffered from HIV-related oral lesions. The best predictors for presence of oral lesions were socio-economic status, group (ART treatment), duration of HIV infection and CD4+ cell count. The results of the present study demonstrated that ART proved to be effective in reducing the prevalence of HIV-related oral lesions.

  20. Outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children after anti-retroviral therapy in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Moy, Fong Siew; Fahey, Paul; Nik Yusoff, Nik K; Razali, Kamarul A; Nallusamy, Revathy

    2015-02-01

    To describe outcome and examine factors associated with mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children in Malaysia after anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Retrospective and prospective data collected through March 2009 from children in four different states in Malaysia enrolled in TREAT Asia's Pediatric HIV Observational Database were analysed. Of 347 children in the cohort, only 278 (80.1%) were commenced on ART. The median CD4 count and median age at baseline prior to ART was 272 cells/μL and 4.2 years (interquartile range (IQR): 1.4, 7.4 years), respectively. The median duration of follow-up was 3.7 years (IQR: 1.8, 6.0) with 32 deaths giving a crude mortality rate of 2.86 per 100 child-years. The mortality rate highest in the first 6 months of ART was 10.62 per 100 child-years and declined to 1.83 per 100 child-years thereafter. On univariate analyses, only baseline median CD4 percentage, weight for age z score, height for age z score and anaemia were significantly associated with mortality. Upon including all four of these predictors into a single multivariate model, only weight for age z score remained statistically significantly predictive of mortality. Children commenced on ART had high mortality in the first 6 months especially in those with low CD4 percentage, wasting and anaemia. Poor nutritional status is an important independent predictor of mortality in this study. Besides initiating ART therapy, nutritional support and intervention must receive the utmost attention. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. Unhealthy Alcohol Use is Associated with Monocyte Activation Prior to Starting Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Carrico, Adam W.; Hunt, Peter W.; Emenyonu, Nneka I.; Muyindike, Winnie; Ngabirano, Christine; Cheng, Debbie M.; Winter, Michael R.; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Hahn, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol use may accelerate HIV disease progression, but the plausible biological mechanisms have not been clearly elucidated. Methods HIV-positive persons who were not on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) completed the baseline assessment for a longitudinal study examining the association of alcohol use with HIV disease markers. Oversampling drinkers, baseline samples were tested for markers of monocyte activation (sCD14), inflammation (IL-6), and coagulation (D-dimer). We defined “unhealthy alcohol use” as testing positive using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test – Consumption (AUDIT-C; ≥ 3 for women and ≥ 4 for men) in the past 3 months or testing positive using a biomarker of heavy drinking, phophatidylethanol (PEth; ≥ 50 ng/ml). Multiple linear regression was used to examine the associations of unhealthy alcohol use with sCD14, Log10 IL-6, and D-dimer. Results Compared to those who were abstinent from alcohol, unhealthy drinkers had significantly higher sCD14 levels (mean = 1,676 vs. 1,387 ng/ml; mean difference (95% CI) = 289 (83, 495), p < 0.01). In analyses adjusted for demographic factors, current cigarette smoking, and HIV disease markers, unhealthy drinkers continued to display significantly higher sCD14 levels compared to those who were abstinent from alcohol (adjusted mean = 1,670 vs. 1,406 ng/ml; adjusted mean difference (95% CI) = 264 (47, 480), p = 0.02). Unhealthy alcohol use was not significantly associated with IL-6 or D-dimer levels. Conclusions unhealthy alcohol use was independently associated with a marker of monocyte activation (i.e., higher sCD14) that predicts mortality in treated HIV infection. Longitudinal research should examine if unhealthy alcohol use predicts changes in sCD14 prior to and following ART initiation. PMID:26509359

  2. Activation and regulation of endogenous retroviral genes in the human pituitary gland and related endocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Buslei, Rolf; Strissel, Pamela L; Henke, Christine; Schey, Regina; Lang, Nadine; Ruebner, Matthias; Stolt, Claus C; Fabry, Ben; Buchfelder, Michael; Strick, Reiner

    2015-02-01

    Adenohypophysis (AH) hormone-producing cells represent the origin of diverse groups of pituitary adenomas (PA). Deregulation of hypothalamic hormone receptors, growth factors and cAMP signalling have been implicated in the aetiology of PA. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are derived from past exogenous retroviral infections and represent more than 8% of the human genome. Some ERV genes encode open reading frames and produce functional proteins, for example, the ERVW-1 envelope gene Syncytin-1, essential for placentogenesis, but also deregulated in human tumours. Data concerning ERV expression in the AH and related endocrine tumours are missing. Syncytin-1 protein was analysed in normal AH (n = 15) and compared with five PA subtypes (n = 117) by immunohistochemistry. Absolute gene expression of 20 ERV functional envelope genes and ERVW-5 gag was measured. PA tissues were examined for Syncytin-1 and the cAMP signalling marker phospho-CREB-Ser133 using immunohistochemistry. Isolated primary human PA cells were treated with different hormones. Murine embryonic and adult pituitary gland ERV expressions were compared with human AH. Syncytin-1 protein colocalized with corticotropic cells of AH. In contrast, all PA demonstrated significant Syncytin-1 protein overexpression, supporting deregulation. All other ERV genes showed significant up-regulations in different PA subtypes. Phospho-CREB-Ser133 and Syncytin-1 colocalized in PA cells. Cultivated primary PA cells with ACTH or CRH induced their respective receptors and ERV genes. Syncytin-A/-B, murine orthologues to human Syncytin-1/-2, localized to embryonic and adult pituitary glands demonstrating functional mammalian conservation. Deregulated ERV genes may contribute to PA development via cAMP signalling. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  3. Reversible immortalization of human myogenic cells by site-specific excision of a retrovirally transferred oncogene.

    PubMed

    Berghella, L; De Angelis, L; Coletta, M; Berarducci, B; Sonnino, C; Salvatori, G; Anthonissen, C; Cooper, R; Butler-Browne, G S; Mouly, V; Ferrari, G; Mavilio, F; Cossu, G

    1999-07-01

    Myogenic cells have a limited life span in culture, which prevents expansion at clinically relevant levels, and seriously limits any potential use in cell replacement or ex vivo gene therapy. We developed a strategy for reversibly immortalizing human primary myogenic cells, based on retrovirus-mediated integration of a wild-type SV40 large-T antigen (Tag), excisable by means of the Cre-Lox recombination system. Myogenic cells were transduced with a vector (LTTN-LoxP) expressing the SV40 Tag under the control of an LTR modified by the insertion of a LoxP site in the U3 region. Clonal isolates of Tag-positive cells showed modified growth characteristics and a significantly extended life span, while maintaining a full myogenic potential. Transient expression of Cre recombinase, delivered by transfection or adenoviral vector transduction, allowed excision of the entire provirus with up to >90% efficiency. Cultures of Cre-treated (Tag-) or untreated (Tag+) myogenic cells were genetically labeled with a lacZ retroviral vector, and injected into the regenerating muscle of SCID/bg immunodeficient mice. Tag- cells underwent terminal differentiation in vivo, giving rise to clusters of beta-Gal+ hybrid fibers with an efficiency comparable to that of control untransduced cells. Tag+ cells could not be detected after injection. Neither Tag+ nor Tag- cells formed tumor in this xenotransplantation model. Reversible immortalization by Tag therefore allows the expansion of primary myogenic cells in culture without compromising their ability to differentiate in vivo, and could represent a safe method by which to increase the availability of these cells for clinical application.

  4. Outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children after anti-retroviral therapy in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Fong Siew; Fahey, Paul; Nik Yusoff, Nik K.; Razali, Kamarul A.; Nallusamy, Revathy

    2015-01-01

    Aims To describe outcome and examine factors associated with mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children in Malaysia after anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Methods Retrospective and prospective data collected through March 2009 from children in four different states in Malaysia enrolled in TREAT Asia’s Pediatric HIV Observational Database were analysed. Results Of 347 children in the cohort, only 278 (80.1%) were commenced on ART. The median CD4 count and median age at baseline prior to ART was 272 cells/μL and 4.2 years (interquartile range (IQR): 1.4, 7.4 years), respectively. The median duration of follow-up was 3.7 years (IQR: 1.8, 6.0) with 32 deaths giving a crude mortality rate of 2.86 per 100 child-years. The mortality rate highest in the first 6 months of ART was 10.62 per 100 child-years and declined to 1.83 per 100 child-years thereafter. On univariate analyses, only baseline median CD4 percentage, weight for age z score, height for age z score and anaemia were significantly associated with mortality. Upon including all four of these predictors into a single multivariate model, only weight for age z score remained statistically significantly predictive of mortality. Conclusions Children commenced on ART had high mortality in the first 6 months especially in those with low CD4 percentage, wasting and anaemia. Poor nutritional status is an important independent predictor of mortality in this study. Besides initiating ART therapy, nutritional support and intervention must receive the utmost attention. PMID:25142757

  5. Non-hominid TP63 lacks retroviral LTRs but contains a novel conserved upstream exon.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Ulrike; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2011-06-15

    We have recently identified novel isoforms of human p63, with specific expression in testicular germ cells. The synthesis of these p63 mRNA species is driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the endogenous retrovirus ERV9. This LTR was inserted upstream of the previously known TP63 exons roughly 15 million years ago, leading to the expression of novel exons and the synthesis of germline-specific transactivating p63 (GTAp63) isoforms in humans and great apes (Beyer et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2011; 108:3624-9). However, this study did not reveal whether similar upstream exons can also be found in the TP63 genes of non-hominid animals. Here we performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to identify a novel upstream exon of murine TP63, located in the 5' position from the previously described start of transcription. This exon, termed "exon U3" in our previous publication, is conserved within a broad range of mammalian species, including hominids. However, in contrast to the human TP63 gene structure, the murine exon U3 represented the most upstream transcribed sequence of TP63. Murine exon U3 is then alternatively spliced to acceptor sites within exon 1 or upstream of exon 2, resulting in two different available translational start sites. p63 mRNAs comprising exon U3 are detectable in various tissues, with no particular preference for testicular cells. Thus, whereas the retroviral LTR in hominid species results in strictly germline-associated p63 isoforms, the upstream exon in non-hominids fails to confer this tissue specificity. This notion strongly supports the concept that the synthesis of a testis-specific p63 isoform is a recently acquired, unique feature of humans and great apes.

  6. Inhibition of retroviral replication by members of the TRIM protein family.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Adam J; Towers, Greg J

    2013-01-01

    The TRIM protein family is emerging as a central component of mammalian antiviral innate immunity. Beginning with the identification of TRIM5α as a mammalian post-entry restriction factor against retroviruses, to the repeated observation that many TRIMs ubiquitinate and regulate signaling pathways, the past decade has witnessed an intense research effort to understand how TRIM proteins influence immunity. The list of viral families targeted directly or indirectly by TRIM proteins has grown to include adenoviruses, hepadnaviruses, picornaviruses, flaviviruses, orthomyxoviruses, paramyxoviruses, herpesviruses, rhabdoviruses and arenaviruses. We have come to appreciate how, through intense bouts of positive selection, some TRIM genes have been honed into species-specific restriction factors. Similarly, in the case of TRIMCyp, we are beginning to understand how viruses too have mutated to evade restriction, suggesting that TRIM and viruses have coevolved for millions of years of primate evolution. Recently, TRIM5α returned to the limelight when it was shown to trigger the expression of antiviral genes upon recognition of an incoming virus, a paradigm shift that demonstrated that restriction factors make excellent pathogen sensors. However, it remains unclear how many of ~100 human TRIM genes are antiviral, despite the expression of many of these genes being upregulated by interferon and upon viral infection. TRIM proteins do not conform to one type of antiviral mechanism, reflecting the diversity of viruses they target. Moreover, the cofactors of restriction remain largely enigmatic. The control of retroviral replication remains an important medical subject and provides a useful backdrop for reviewing how TRIM proteins act to repress viral replication.

  7. The role of the S-S bridge in retroviral protease function and virion maturation.

    PubMed

    Zábranská, Helena; Tůma, Roman; Kluh, Ivan; Svatos, Ales; Ruml, Tomás; Hrabal, Richard; Pichová, Iva

    2007-02-02

    Retroviral proteases are translated as a part of Gag-related polyproteins, and are released and activated during particle release. Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) Gag polyproteins assemble into immature capsids within the cytoplasm of the host cells; however, their processing occurs only after transport to the plasma membrane and subsequent release. Thus, the activity of M-PMV protease is expected to be highly regulated during the replication cycle. It has been proposed that reversible oxidation of protease cysteine residues might be responsible for such regulation. We show that cysteine residues in M-PMV protease can form an intramolecular S-S bridge. The disulfide bridge shifts the monomer/dimer equilibrium in favor of the dimer, and increases the proteolytic activity significantly. To investigate the role of this disulfide bridge in virus maturation and replication, we engineered an M-PMV clone in which both protease cysteine residues were replaced by alanine (M-PMV(PRC7A/C106A)). Surprisingly, the cysteine residues were dispensable for Gag polyprotein processing within the virus, indicating that even low levels of protease activity are sufficient for polyprotein processing during maturation. However, the long-term infectivity of M-PMV(PRC7A/C106A) was noticeably compromised. These results show clearly that the proposed redox mechanism does not rely solely on the formation of the stabilizing S-S bridge in the protease. Thus, in addition to the protease disulfide bridge, reversible oxidation of cysteine and/or methionine residues in other domains of the Gag polyprotein or in related cellular proteins must be involved in the regulation of maturation.

  8. Cloning of the rat ecotropic retroviral receptor and studies of its expression in intestinal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Puppi, M.; Henning, S.J.

    1995-05-01

    A long-term goal of our laboratory is to establish a rat model to study the feasibility of using the intestinal tract as a site for somatic gene therapy. As a step toward that goal, the current study reports the cloning of the rat ecotropic retroviral receptor (EcoR) cDNA and the study of various aspects of its expression in the intestinal cDNA library with mouse EcoR cDNA. A clone of approximately 7 kb, designated MP10, was obtained. Partial sequencing of MP10 from the 5{prime} end revealed a level of similarity of 92% compared with mouse EcoR. The presence of a 5{prime} untranslated region and a 3{prime} poly(A)tract, together with the overall size of the cDNA, suggest that is very close to being a full-length cDNA for this large transcript. Northern blots with MP10 showed an RNA of approximately 7.9 kb present along the entire length of the small intestine and somewhat less abundant in the colon. Developmental studies showed high levels of EcoR in fetal rat intestine, a decline in the early postnatal period, then a gradual rise to adulthood. Caco-2 cells were used to assess the expression of EcoR in proliferating compared with differentiated intestinal epithelial cells. EcoR mRNA was found to be very much more abundant in nondifferentiated cells and declined to low levels as the cells underwent spontaneous differentiation. These patterns of EcoR expression indicate that ecotropic retroviruses should be suitable vectors with which to attempt gene transfer into the intestinal epithelium. In addition, since the endogenous role of EcoR is as the y{sup +} cationic amino acid transporter, these data have significance for understanding patterns of amino acid transport in the intestinal epithelium. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Retrovirally transduced murine T lymphocytes expressing FasL mediate effective killing of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Symes, JC; Siatskas, C; Fowler, DH; Medin, JA

    2010-01-01

    Adoptively transferred T cells possess anticancer activities partially mediated by T-cell FasL engagement of Fas tumor targets. However, antigen-induced T-cell activation and clonal expansion, which stimulates FasL activity, is often inefficient in tumors. As a gene therapy approach to overcome this obstacle, we have created oncoretroviral vectors to overexpress FasL or non-cleavable FasL (ncFasL) on murine T cells of a diverse T-cell receptor repertoire. Expression of c-FLIP was also engineered to prevent apoptosis of transduced cells. Retroviral transduction of murine T lymphocytes has historically been problematic, and we describe optimized T-cell transduction protocols involving CD3/CD28 co-stimulation of T cells, transduction on ice using concentrated oncoretrovirus, and culture with IL-15. Genetically modified T cells home to established prostate cancer tumors in vivo. Co-stimulated T cells expressing FasL, ncFasL and ncFasL/c-FLIP each mediated cytotoxicity in vitro against RM-1 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To evaluate the compatibility of this approach with current prostate cancer therapies, we exposed RM-1, LNCaP, and TRAMP-C1 cells to radiation, mitoxantrone, or docetaxel. Fas and H-2b expression were upregulated by these methods. We have developed a novel FasL-based immuno-gene therapy for prostate cancer that warrants further investigation given the apparent constitutive and inducible Fas pathway expression in this malignancy. PMID:19096446

  10. Optimized retroviral transduction of mouse T cells for in vivo assessment of gene function.

    PubMed

    Kurachi, Makoto; Kurachi, Junko; Chen, Zeyu; Johnson, John; Khan, Omar; Bengsch, Bertram; Stelekati, Erietta; Attanasio, John; McLane, Laura M; Tomura, Michio; Ueha, Satoshi; Wherry, E John

    2017-09-01

    Retroviral (RV) expression of genes of interest (GOIs) is an invaluable tool and has formed the foundation of cellular engineering for adoptive cell therapy in cancer and other diseases. However, monitoring of transduced T cells long term (weeks to months) in vivo remains challenging because of the low frequency and often poor durability of transduced T cells over time when transferred without enrichment. Traditional methods often require additional overnight in vitro culture after transduction. Moreover, in vitro-generated effector CD8(+) T cells enriched by sorting often have reduced viability, making it difficult to monitor the fate of transferred cells in vivo. Here, we describe an optimized mouse CD8(+) T-cell RV transduction protocol that uses simple and rapid Percoll density centrifugation to enrich RV-susceptible activated CD8(+) T cells. Percoll density centrifugation is simple, can be done on the day of transduction, requires minimal time, has low reagent costs and improves cell recovery (up to 60%), as well as the frequency of RV-transduced cells (∼sixfold over several weeks in vivo as compared with traditional methods). We have used this protocol to assess the long-term stability of CD8(+) T cells after RV transduction by comparing the durability of T cells transduced with retroviruses expressing each of six commonly used RV reporter genes. Thus, we provide an optimized enrichment and transduction approach that allows long-term in vivo assessment of RV-transduced T cells. The overall procedure from T-cell isolation to RV transduction takes 2 d, and enrichment of activated T cells can be done in 1 h.

  11. Long-term clinical and molecular follow-up of large animals receiving retrovirally transduced stem and progenitor cells: no progression to clonal hematopoiesis or leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kiem, Hans-Peter; Sellers, Stephanie; Thomasson, Bobbie; Morris, Julia C; Tisdale, John F; Horn, Peter A; Hematti, Peiman; Adler, Rima; Kuramoto, Ken; Calmels, Boris; Bonifacino, Aylin; Hu, Jiong; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Sorrentino, Brian; Nienhuis, Arthur; Blau, C Anthony; Andrews, Robert G; Donahue, Robert E; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2004-03-01

    There has been significant progress toward clinically relevant levels of retroviral gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), and the therapeutic potential of HSC-based gene transfer has been convincingly demonstrated in children with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID). However, the subsequent development of leukemia in two children with X-linked SCID who were apparently cured after transplantation of retrovirally corrected CD34+ cells has raised concerns regarding the safety of gene therapy approaches utilizing integrating vectors. Nonhuman primates and dogs represent the best available models for gene transfer safety and efficacy and are particularly valuable for evaluation of long-term effects. We have followed 42 rhesus macaques, 23 baboons, and 17 dogs with significant levels of gene transfer for a median of 3.5 years (range 1-7) after infusion of CD34+ cells transduced with retroviral vectors expressing marker or drug-resistance genes. None developed abnormal hematopoiesis or leukemia. Integration site analysis confirmed stable, polyclonal retrovirally marked hematopoiesis, without progression toward mono- or oligoclonality over time. These results suggest that retroviral integrations using replication-incompetent vectors, at copy numbers achieved using standard protocols, are unlikely to result in leukemogenesis and that patient- or transgene-specific factors most likely contributed to the occurrence of leukemia in the X-SCID gene therapy trial.

  12. Cytotoxic immune response after retroviral-mediated hepatic gene transfer in rat does not preclude expression from adeno-associated virus 1 transduced muscles.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Dominique; Pichard, Virginie; Durand, Sophie; Moullier, Philippe; Ferry, Nicolas

    2003-03-20

    Intravenous delivery of nls-lacZ retroviral vectors to the regenerating liver triggers a cytotoxic immune response directed against transduced hepatocytes. We sought to determine whether prior immunization with retroviral vectors impacted on adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated muscular expression of the same transgene. The first group of rats first received nls-lacZ retroviral vectors intravenously after a partial hepatectomy. Thirty days later they received AAV vectors intramuscularly in both legs. In the second group, animals received the same vectors in the opposite sequence (i.e., AAV first and retroviruses 20 days later). In the first group, immune response occurred after retrovirus delivery with appearance of anti-beta-galactosidase antibodies and elimination of transduced hepatocytes. However, the immune response did not prevent sustained (9-month) beta-galactosidase expression in AAV-injected muscles. In the second group, AAV injections did not induce immune response and resulted in beta-galactosidase expression in myofibers. In this group, subsequent delivery of retroviral vectors triggered appearance of immune response and elimination of transduced hepatocytes. However, the immune response did not modify beta-galactosidase expression in AAV-transduced myofibers for up to 9 months. These results demonstrate a differential susceptibility between retrovirally transduced liver and AAV-transduced muscles to immune response against the transgene product.

  13. Gamma-retroviral vector design for the co-expression of artificial microRNAs and therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Park, Tristen S; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Zhang, Ling; Zheng, Zhili; Morgan, Richard A

    2014-10-01

    To generate γ-retroviral vectors for stable conjoint expression of artificial microRNAs (amiR) and therapeutic genes in primary human lymphocytes, and to identify the design parameters that are key for successful vector generation. Gamma-retroviral vectors were designed to co-express both amiRs and a linked reporter gene, truncated CD34 (tCD34). Artificial miRs based on microRNAs miR-16, miR-142, miR-146b, miR-150, miR155, and miR-223 were inserted into sites within the intron of the vector and tested for tCD34 expression by flow cytometry (FACS). Different constructs were assembled with amiRs targeted to knockdown expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) or programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, PD-1). Three of the six amiRs maintained tCD34 expression. Expansion of primary human T cells transduced with these amiR vectors, as well as transgene expression, were equivalent to control engineered T cells over a 40-day period. Knockdown of SOCS1 RNA and PD-1 expression by FACS was shown to vary between constructs, dependent on either the specific short interfering RNA sequence used in the amiR, or the microRNA backbone and location in the vector intron. Gamma-retroviral vectors that both efficiently knockdown endogenous gene expression and maintain linked transgene production can be produced, but empirical vector evaluations were best suited for optimal construct analysis.

  14. Evaluation of γ-retroviral vectors that mediate the inducible expression of IL-12 for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Feldman, Steven A; Zheng, Zhili; Chinnasamy, Nachimuthu; Xu, Hui; Nahvi, Azam V; Dudley, Mark E; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    The clinical application of interleukin-12 (IL-12) has been hindered by the toxicity associated with its systemic administration. To potentially overcome this problem, we developed a promoter designed to direct IL-12 expression within the tumor environment using an inducible composite promoter containing binding motifs for the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) linked to a minimal IL-2 promoter. In this study, the NFAT promoter was coupled to a single-chain human IL-12 gene and inserted into 2 γ-retroviral self-inactivating vectors (SERS.NFAT.hIL12 and SERS.NFAT.hIL12.PA2) and 1 γ-retroviral vector (MSGV1.NFAT.hIL.12 PA2). Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were double transduced with an antigen-specific T-cell receptor and the 3 NFAT.hIL12 vectors. Evaluation of inducible IL-12 expression, transduction efficiency, and vector production considerations led to the choice of the MSGV1.NFAT.hIL12.PA2 vector for clinical application. MSGV1.NFAT.hIL12.PA2 PG13 retroviral vector producer cell clones were screened by transduction of tumor antigen-specific PBLs. On the basis of expression studies in PBL, clone D3 was chosen to produce clinical-grade viral vector supernatant and was demonstrated to efficiently transduce young tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). The vector-transduced young TIL with known tumor recognition demonstrated specific inducible IL-12 production after coculture with HLA-matched tumor targets and had augmented effector function as demonstrated by increased IFN-γ secretion. These results support the clinical application of adoptive transfer of young TIL engineered with the NFAT.hIL12 vector as a new approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Retroviral-mediated transfer and expression of human. beta. -globin genes in cultured murine and human erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weber-Benarous, A.; Cone, R.D.; London, I.M.; Mulligan, R.C.

    1988-05-05

    The authors cloned human ..beta..-globin DNA sequences from a genomic library prepared from DNA isolated from the human leukemia cell line K562 and have used the retroviral vector pZip-NeoSV(X)1 to introduce a 3.0-kilobase segment encompassing the globin gene into mouse erythroleukemia cells. Whereas the endogenous K562 ..beta..-globin gene is repressed in K562 cells, when introduced into mouse erythroleukemia cells by retroviral-mediated gene transfer, the ..beta..-globin gene from K562 cells was transcribed and induced 5-20-fold after treatment of the cells with dimethyl sulfoxide. The transcripts were correctly initiated, and expression and regulation of the K562 gene were identical to the expression of a normal human ..beta..-globin gene transferred into mouse erythroleukemia cells in the same way. They have also introduced the normal human ..beta..-globin gene into K562 cells using the same retrovirus vector. SP6 analysis of the RNA isolated from the transduced cells showed that the normal ..beta..-globin gene was transcribed at a moderately high level, before or after treatment with hemin. Based on these data, they suggest that the lack of expression of the endogenous ..beta..-globin gene in K562 cells does not result from an alteration in the gene itself and may not result from a lack of factor(s) necessary for ..beta..-lobin gene transcription. Retroviral-mediated transfer of the human ..beta..-globin gene may, however, uniquely influence expression of the gene K562 cells.

  16. Retroviral insertions 90 kilobases proximal to the Evi-1 myeloid transforming gene activate transcription from the normal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, C; Ihle, J N

    1991-01-01

    The inappropriate production of the Evi-1 zinc finger protein occurs in retrovirus-induced murine myeloid leukemias and human acute myelogenous leukemias. In murine leukemias, expression of the Evi-1 gene is associated with retroviral insertions either in the Evi-1 locus, which is immediately 5' of the coding region of the gene, or in the genetically linked Cb-1/fim-3 locus. In these studies, we demonstrate by chromosomal walking and pulse field electrophoresis that the Cb-1/fim-3 locus is located 90 kb 5' of the Evi-1 locus. Primary structure analysis of Evi-1 cDNA clones from a Cb-1/fim-3 rearranged cell line (DA-3) demonstrates that transcription initiates 5' of the Evi-1 locus and that the first noncoding exon of the gene is 681 bp larger than previously defined. S1 nuclease protection studies reveal multiple transcription initiation sites within this region. Comparable transcriptional initiation sites were identified in RNA from kidney and ovary, in which the gene is normally expressed, suggesting that retroviral insertions in the Cb-1/fim-3 locus activate transcription from the normal promoter. In one myeloid cell line (DA-3), a single long terminal repeat (LTR) is present in the Cb-1/fim-3 locus. No stable transcripts were detectable from this LTR. In cells with retroviral insertions in the Cb-1/fim-3 locus, one allele of the Evi-1 locus becomes hypermethylated in the 5' region of the gene. Together, these results are most consistent with an LTR-mediated, long-range cis activation of Evi-1 gene expression. Images PMID:1848663

  17. Complete association between a retroviral insertion in the tyrosinase gene and the recessive white mutation in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chung-Ming; Coville, Jean-Luc; Coquerelle, Gérard; Gourichon, David; Oulmouden, Ahmad; Tixier-Boichard, Michèle

    2006-01-01

    Background In chickens, three mutant alleles have been reported at the C locus, including the albino mutation, and the recessive white mutation, which is characterized by white plumage and pigmented eyes. The albino mutation was found to be a 6 bp deletion in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. The present work describes an approach to identify the structural rearrangement in the TYR gene associated with the recessive white mutation. Results Molecular analysis of the chicken TYR gene has revealed a major structural difference (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, RFLP) in the genomic DNA of the recessive white chicken. A major size difference of 7.7 kb was found in intron 4 of the TYR gene by long-range PCR. Molecular cloning and sequencing results showed the insertion of a complete avian retroviral sequence of the Avian Leukosis Virus (ALV) family. Several aberrant transcripts of the tyrosinase gene were found in 10 week old recessive white chickens but not in the homozygous wild type colored chicken. We established a rapid genotyping diagnostic test based on the discovery of this retroviral insertion. It shows that all homozygous carriers of this insertion had a white plumage in various chicken strains. Furthermore, it was possible to distinguish heterozygous carriers from homozygous normal chickens in a segregating line. Conclusion In this study, we conclude that the insertion of a complete avian retroviral sequence in intron 4 of the tyrosinase gene is diagnostic of the recessive white mutation in chickens. This insertion causes aberrant transcripts lacking exon 5, and we propose that this insertion is the causal mutation for the recessive white allele in the chicken. PMID:16457736

  18. RetroTector online, a rational tool for analysis of retroviral elements in small and medium size vertebrate genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Sperber, Göran; Lövgren, Anders; Eriksson, Nils-Einar; Benachenhou, Farid; Blomberg, Jonas

    2009-06-16

    The rapid accumulation of genomic information in databases necessitates rapid and specific algorithms for extracting biologically meaningful information. More or less complete retroviral sequences, also called proviral or endogenous retroviral sequences; ERVs, constitutes at least 5% of vertebrate genomes. After infecting the host, these retroviruses have integrated in germ line cells, and have then been carried in genomes for at least several 100 million years. A better understanding of structure and function of these sequences can have profound biological and medical consequences. RetroTector (ReTe) is a platform-independent Java program for identification and characterization of proviral sequences in vertebrate genomes. The full ReTe requires a local installation with a MySQL database. Although not overly complicated, the installation may take some time. A "light" version of ReTe, (RetroTector online; ROL) which does not require specific installation procedures is provided, via the World Wide Web. ROL http://www.fysiologi.neuro.uu.se/jbgs/ was implemented under the Batchelor web interface (A Lövgren et al). It allows both GenBank accession number, file and FASTA cut-and-paste admission of sequences (5 to 10,000 kilobases). Up to ten submissions can be done simultaneously, allowing batch analysis of retroviral sequences found in the submitted sequence is graphically presented, exportable in standard formats. With the current server, a complete analysis of a 1 Megabase sequence is complete in 10 minutes. It is possible to mask nonretroviral repetitive sequences in the submitted sequence, using host genome specific "brooms", which increase specificity. Proviral sequences can be hard to recognize

  19. A rev1-vpu polymorphism unique to HIV-1 subtype A and C strains impairs envelope glycoprotein expression from rev-vpu-env cassettes and reduces virion infectivity in pseudotyping assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Grayson, Truman; McPherson, David T.; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Williamson, Carolyn; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2010-02-20

    Functional studies of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) commonly include the generation of pseudoviruses, which are produced by co-transfection of rev-vpu-env cassettes with an env-deficient provirus. Here, we describe six Env constructs from transmitted/founder HIV-1 that were defective in the pseudotyping assay, although two produced infectious virions when expressed from their cognate proviruses. All of these constructs exhibited an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and vpu were in the same reading frame without an intervening stop codon. Disruption of the rev1-vpu fusion gene by frameshift mutation, stop codon, or abrogation of the rev initiation codon restored pseudovirion infectivity. Introduction of the fusion gene into wildtype Env cassettes severely compromised their function. The defect was not due to altered env and rev transcription or a dominant negative effect of the expressed fusion protein, but seemed to be caused by inefficient translation at the env initiation codon. Although the rev1-vpu polymorphism affects Env expression only in vitro, it can cause problems in studies requiring Env complementation, such as analyses of co-receptor usage and neutralization properties, since 3% of subtype A, 20% of subtype C and 5% of CRF01{sub A}/E viruses encode the fusion gene. A solution is to eliminate the rev initiation codon when amplifying rev-vpu-env cassettes since this increases Env expression irrespective of the presence of the polymorphism.

  20. Lack of evidence for retroviral infections formerly related to chronic fatigue in Spanish Fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    present evidence of any of the two types of retroviral infection formerly associated to chronic fatigue does not rule out the possibility that other viruses are involved in inciting or maintaining fibromyalgia and/or chronic fatigue conditions. PMID:24216038

  1. Cloning of the rat ecotropic retroviral receptor and studies of its expression in intestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Puppi, M; Henning, S J

    1995-05-01

    A long-term goal of our laboratory is to establish a rat model to study the feasibility of using the intestinal tract as a site for somatic gene therapy. As a step toward that goal, the current study reports the cloning of the rat ecotropic retroviral receptor (EcoR) cDNA and the study of various aspects of its expression in the intestinal tissues. The cDNA for rat EcoR was cloned by screening a size-selected rat intestinal cDNA library with mouse EcoR cDNA. A clone of approximately 7 kb, designated MP10, was obtained. Partial sequencing of MP10 from the 5' end revealed a level of similarity of 92% compared with mouse EcoR. The presence of a 5' untranslated region and a 3' poly(A) tract, together with the overall size of the cDNA, suggest that is very close to being a full-length cDNA for this large transcript. Northern blots with MP10 showed an RNA of approximately 7.9 kb present along the entire length of the small intestine and somewhat less abundant in the colon. Developmental studies showed high levels of EcoR in fetal rat intestine, a decline in the early postnatal period, then a gradual rise to adulthood. Caco-2 cells were used to assess the expression of EcoR in proliferating compared with differentiated intestinal epithelial cells. EcoR mRNA was found to be very much more abundant in nondifferentiated cells and declined to low levels as the cells underwent spontaneous differentiation. These patterns of EcoR expression indicate that ecotropic retroviruses should be suitable vectors with which to attempt gene transfer into the intestinal epithelium. In addition, since the endogenous role of EcoR is as the y+ cationic amino acid transporter, these data have significance for understanding patterns of amino acid transport in the intestinal epithelium.

  2. Retroviral vector insertions in T-lymphocytes used for suicide gene therapy occur in gene groups with specific molecular functions.

    PubMed

    Giordano, F A; Fehse, B; Hotz-Wagenblatt, A; Jonnakuty, S; del Val, C; Appelt, J-U; Nagy, K Z; Kuehlcke, K; Naundorf, S; Zander, A R; Zeller, W J; Ho, A D; Fruehauf, S; Laufs, S

    2006-08-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a severe complication in the context of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. The transfer of a suicide gene into donor T-lymphocytes (TLCs) allows selective elimination of GvHD-causing cells. As retroviral gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells can induce leukaemia, there is an urgent need also to analyze retroviral integration sites in TLCs. We examined suicide gene-transduced TLCs in four grafts and from four transplanted patients. One-hundred and fifteen integration sites were detected in vitro. Of these 90 could be mapped to the human genome; 50% (45) were located in genes and 32% (29) were detected 10 kb upstream or downstream of transcription start sites. We found a significant overrepresentation of genes encoding for proteins with receptor activity, signal transducer activity, transcription regulator activity, nucleic acid binding activity and translation regulator activity. Similar data were obtained from patient samples. Our results point to preferred vector integration patterns, which are specific for the target cell population and probably independent of selection processes. Thus, future preclinical analysis of the integration repertoire with abundant amounts of transduced cells could allow a prediction also for the in vivo situation, where target cells are scarce.

  3. Production of high-titer helper virus-free retroviral vectors by cocultivation of packaging cells with different host ranges.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, C M; Miller, A D

    1991-01-01

    The titer of retroviral vectors can be increased by cocultivation of retrovirus packaging cells that produce a vector with packaging cells having a different host range. Multiple rounds of infection occur in such cultures, producing an amplification of vector copy number and titer. Production of a vector with a very high titer of over 10(10) CFU per ml of conditioned medium has been reported, although replication-competent helper virus was also present. Since helper-free virus is a requirement for many applications of retroviral vectors, we repeated this procedure with a modified vector and achieved a 2- to 10-fold amplification of vector titer in the absence of helper virus, up to 2 x 10(7) CFU/ml. We have also repeated these experiments with the same vector and methods described previously or have assayed virus from the high-titer vector-producing cell line reported previously and observed maximum titers of 10(8) CFU/ml, invariably accompanied by helper virus. Thus, while amplification of vector titer in the absence of helper virus is possible, some unexplained difference in the assays for virus titer must account for our inability to obtain the exceptionally high vector titers that were reported previously. PMID:2041097

  4. Retroviral Gene Therapy for X-linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease: Results From Phase I/II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyoung Jin; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Paruzynski, Anna; Arens, Anne; Kim, Sujeong; Yu, Seung Shin; Hong, Youngtae; Joo, Chang-Wan; Yoon, Nam-Kyung; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Kim, Joong Gon; Von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Kim, Sunyoung; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2011-01-01

    X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency caused by a defect in the gp91phox gene. In an effort to treat X-CGD, we investigated the safety and efficacy of gene therapy using a retroviral vector, MT-gp91. Two X-CGD patients received autologous CD34+ cells transduced with MT-gp91 after a conditioning regimen consisting of fludarabine and busulfan. The level of gene-marked cells was highest at day 21 (8.3 and 11.7% in peripheral blood cells) but decreased to 0.08 and 0.5%, respectively, 3 years after gene transfer. The level of functionally corrected cells, as determined by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase assay, reached a peak at day 17 (6.5% patient 1 (P1) and 14.3% patient 2 (P2) of total granulocytes) and declined to 0.05% (P1) and 0.21% (P2), 3 years later. Some retroviral vectors were found to have integrated within or close to the proto-oncogenes MDS1-EVI1, PRDM16, and CCND2; however, no abnormal cell expansion or related hematological malignancy was observed. Overall, the gene transfer procedure did not produce any serious adverse effects and was able to convert a significant fraction of blood cells to biologically functional cells, albeit for a short period of time. PMID:21878903

  5. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer of human phenylalanine hydroxylase into NIH 3T3 and hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ledley, F.D.; Grenett, H.E.; McGinnis-Shelnutt, M.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1986-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is caused by deficiency of the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). A full-length human PAH cDNA sequence has been inserted into pzip-neoSV(X), which is a retroviral vector containing the bacterial neo gene. The recombinant has been transfected into Psi2 cells, which provide synthesis of the retroviral capsid. Recombinant virus was detected in the culture medium of the transfected Psi2 cells, which is capable of transmitting the human PAH gene into mouse NIH 3T3 cells by infection leading to stable incorporation of the recombinant provirus. Infected cells express PAH mRNA, immunoreactive PAH protein, and exhibit pterin-dependent phenylaline hydroxylase activity. The recombinant virus is also capable of infecting a mouse hepatoma cell line that does not normal synthesize PAH. PAH activity is present in the cellular extracts and the entire hydroxylation system is reconstituted in the hepatoma cells infected with the recombinant viruses. Thus, recombinant viruses containing human PAH cDNA provide a means for introducing functional PAH into mammalian cells of hepatic origin and can potentially be introduced into whole animals as a model for somatic gene therapy for PKU.

  6. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Pin; Löber, Ulrike; Alquezar-Planas, David E; Ishida, Yasuko; Courtiol, Alexandre; Timms, Peter; Johnson, Rebecca N; Lenz, Dorina; Helgen, Kristofer M; Roca, Alfred L; Hartman, Stefanie; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-01-01

    Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW) koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small.

  7. Retroviral envelope syncytin capture in an ancestrally diverged mammalian clade for placentation in the primitive Afrotherian tenrecs

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Malicorne, Sébastien; Souquere, Sylvie; Tzika, Athanasia C.; Goodman, Steven M.; Catzeflis, François; Robinson, Terence J.; Milinkovitch, Michel C.; Pierron, Gérard; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Syncytins are fusogenic envelope (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Syncytins have been identified in Euarchontoglires (primates, rodents, Leporidae) and Laurasiatheria (Carnivora, ruminants) placental mammals. Here, we searched for similar genes in species that retained characteristic features of primitive mammals, namely the Malagasy and mainland African Tenrecidae. They belong to the superorder Afrotheria, an early lineage that diverged from Euarchotonglires and Laurasiatheria 100 Mya, during the Cretaceous terrestrial revolution. An in silico search for env genes with full coding capacity within a Tenrecidae genome identified several candidates, with one displaying placenta-specific expression as revealed by RT-PCR analysis of a large panel of Setifer setosus tissues. Cloning of this endogenous retroviral env gene demonstrated fusogenicity in an ex vivo cell–cell fusion assay on a panel of mammalian cells. Refined analysis of placental architecture and ultrastructure combined with in situ hybridization demonstrated specific expression of the gene in multinucleate cellular masses and layers at the materno–fetal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. This gene, which we named “syncytin-Ten1,” is conserved among Tenrecidae, with evidence of purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. To our knowledge, it is the first syncytin identified to date within the ancestrally diverged Afrotheria superorder. PMID:25267646

  8. Detection of clinical interactions between methadone and anti-retroviral compounds using an enantioselective capillary electrophoresis for methadone analysis.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Javier; de la Cruz Pellín, María; Gimeno, Carmen; Barril, José; Mora, Eva; Giménez, Jesús; Vilanova, Eugenio

    2004-06-15

    A capillary electrophoresis method was developed to detect interactions between methadone and anti-retroviral compounds. Eight subjects, who underwent methadone maintenance treatment in the Province of Alicante (Spain), consented to participate in the present study. Of those, one subject was followed up for 123 days to detect drug-drug interactions. The enantiomers of methadone and those of its main metabolite were conveniently resolved within 4 min using a chiral electrophoresis buffer mixture which consisted of phosphate buffer, pH 5, plus 0.2% highly sulphated-(beta)-cyclodextrin. The effective mobility of the analytes was in the 0.061-0.140 cm(2)/(kV s) range at pH 5. The R-methadone plasma concentration range for seven patients was 91-318 ng/mL, it decreased from 186 to 46 ng/mL in a patient followed-up on commencement of the anti-retroviral therapy, returning to the previous higher levels after progressive dose increases. We conclude that monitoring R-methadone plasma levels can be a useful tool for the dose adjustment of methadone.

  9. Expression of the human. beta. -globin gene following retroviral-mediated transfer into multipotential hematopoietic progenitors of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, S.; Bodine, D.M.; Perry, L.; Papayannopoulou, T.; Nienhuis, A.W. )

    1988-08-01

    Efficient transfer of the {beta}-globin gene into primitive hematopoietic progenitors was achieved with consistent and significant expression in the progeny of those cells. Retroviral vectors containing the intact genomic human {beta}-globin gene and the neomycin (G418)-resistance (neo{sup R}) gene were constructed. These gave titers of 10{sup 6} or more neo{sup R} colony-forming units/ml when packaged in {psi}2 cells. Mouse bone marrow cells were infected by coculture with producer cells and injected into lethally irradiated animals. Several parameters were varied to enhance infection frequency of colony-forming units, spleen (CFU-S); overall 41% of 116 foci studied contained an intact proviral genome. The human {beta}-globin gene was expressed in 31 of 35 CFU-S-derived spleen colonies that contained the intact vector genome at levels ranging from 1% to 5% of that of the mouse {beta}-globin genes. Infected bone marrow cells were also injected into genetically anemic W/W{sup v} recipients without prior irradiation. Human {beta}-globin chains were detected in circulating erythrocytes by immunofluorescent staining with a specific monoclonal antibody. All animals injected with donor cells that had been cultured in G418 (1 mg/ml) for 48 hr after retroviral infection had circulating erythrocytes containing human {beta}-globin chains between 3 and 8 weeks after transplantation.

  10. Clonotypic Composition of the CD4+ T Cell Response to a Vectored Retroviral Antigen Is Determined by Its Speed

    PubMed Central

    Thorborn, Georgina; Ploquin, Mickaël J.; Eksmond, Urszula; Pike, Rebecca; Bayer, Wibke; Dittmer, Ulf; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Pepper, Marion

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms whereby different vaccines may expand distinct Ag-specific T cell clonotypes or induce disparate degrees of protection are incompletely understood. We found that several delivery modes of a model retroviral Ag, including natural infection, preferentially expanded initially rare high-avidity CD4+ T cell clonotypes, known to mediate protection. In contrast, the same Ag vectored by human adenovirus serotype 5 induced clonotypic expansion irrespective of avidity, eliciting a predominantly low-avidity response. Nonselective clonotypic expansion was caused by relatively weak adenovirus serotype 5–vectored Ag presentation and was reproduced by replication-attenuated retroviral vaccines. Mechanistically, the potency of Ag presentation determined the speed and, consequently, completion of the CD4+ T cell response. Whereas faster completion retained the initial advantage of high-avidity clonotypes, slower completion permitted uninhibited accumulation of low-avidity clonotypes. These results highlighted the importance of Ag presentation patterns in determining the clonotypic composition of vaccine-induced T cell responses and ultimately the efficacy of vaccination. PMID:25000983

  11. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome

    PubMed Central

    Alquezar-Planas, David E.; Ishida, Yasuko; Courtiol, Alexandre; Timms, Peter; Johnson, Rebecca N.; Lenz, Dorina; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Roca, Alfred L.; Hartman, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW) koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small. PMID:27069793

  12. Expression of the human BETA-globin gene after retroviral transfer into murine erythroleukemia cells and human BFU-E cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.A.; Miller, A.D.; Gelinas, R.E.

    1988-04-01

    Replication-defective amphotropic retrovirus vectors containing either the human ..beta..-globin gene with introns or an intronless ..beta..-globin minigene were constructed and used to study ..beta..-globin expression following gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. The ..beta..-globin genes were marked by introducing a 6-base-pair insertion into the region corresponding to the 5' untranslated region of the ..beta..-globin mRNA to allow detection of RNA encoded by the new gene in human cells expressing normal human ..beta..-globin RNA. Introduction of a virus containing the ..beta..-globin gene with introns into murine erythroleukemia cells resulted in inducible expression of human ..beta..-globin RNA and protein, while the viruses containing the minigene were inactive. The introduced human ..beta..-globin gene was 6 to 110% as active as the endogenous mouse ..beta../sup maj/-globin genes in six randomly chosen cell clones. Introduction of the viruses into human BFU-E cells, followed by analysis of marked and unmarked globin RNAs in differentiated erythroid colonies, revealed that the introduced ..beta..-globin gene was about 5% as active as the endogenous genes in these normal human erythroid cells and that again the minigene was inactive. These data are discussed in terms of the potential treatment of genetic disease by gene therapy.

  13. Expression of the human beta-globin gene after retroviral transfer into murine erythroleukemia cells and human BFU-E cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, M A; Miller, A D; Gelinas, R E

    1988-01-01

    Replication-defective amphotropic retrovirus vectors containing either the human beta-globin gene with introns or an intronless beta-globin minigene were constructed and used to study beta-globin expression following gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. The beta-globin genes were marked by introducing a 6-base-pair insertion into the region corresponding to the 5' untranslated region of the beta-globin mRNA to allow detection of RNA encoded by the new gene in human cells expressing normal human beta-globin RNA. Introduction of a virus containing the beta-globin gene with introns into murine erythroleukemia cells resulted in inducible expression of human beta-globin RNA and protein, while the viruses containing the minigene were inactive. The introduced human beta-globin gene was 6 to 110% as active as the endogenous mouse beta maj-globin genes in six randomly chosen cell clones. Introduction of the viruses into human BFU-E cells, followed by analysis of marked and unmarked globin RNAs in differentiated erythroid colonies, revealed that the introduced beta-globin gene was about 5% as active as the endogenous genes in these normal human erythroid cells and that again the minigene was inactive. These data are discussed in terms of the potential treatment of genetic disease by gene therapy. Images PMID:3288863

  14. Construction of retroviral vector carrying HSV-tk gene under control of human AFP enhancer core sequence and human pgk promotor

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Cao, Guang-Wen; Qi, Zhong-Tian; Qiu, Xiao-Fang; Wu, Zhong-Di; Du, Ping; Yang, Wen-Guo; Cui, Long

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To construct retroviral vector bringing HSV-tk gene under control of human AFP enhancer core sequence and human pgk promoter. METHODS: Internal SV40 promoter was deleted by SalI from retroviral vector pMNSM to construct pMNM. HSV-tk gene driven by pgk promoter was released by BamH I from an eukaryotic expression vector pBPGK-tk, and inserted into polylinker site of pMNM to construct pMNP-tk retroviral vector. Human α-fetoprotein gene enhancer core sequence was released by EcoR I from pGEM. 7Z-AFPe plasmid was inserted into the immediate upstream of pgk promoter of pMNP-tk vector. Construction of hepatoma specific retroviral vector pMNAP-tk was completed. RESULTS: The structure of pMNP-tk and pMNAP-tk vector was confirmed by restriction analysis. CONCLUSION: The vector is of great significance for hepatoma specific prodrug transformation gene therapy. PMID:27006574

  15. Retroviral gene transfer into primary human NK cells activated by IL-2 and K562 feeder cells expressing membrane-bound IL-21.

    PubMed

    Streltsova, Maria A; Barsov, Eugene; Erokhina, Sofia A; Kovalenko, Elena I

    2017-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are capable of rapidly recognizing and efficiently killing tumor cells. This makes them a potentially promising agent for cancer immunotherapy. Additional genetic modifications of NK cells may further improve their anti-tumor efficacy. Numerous technical challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. We achieved efficient retroviral vector transduction of primary human NK cells that were stimulated by a combination of IL-2 and engineered K562 cells expressing membrane-bound IL-21. The activated NK cells were in less differentiated state and expressed NK cell activation receptors NKG2D, NKp30, CD16, and were highly HLA-DR-positive. This NK cell population was highly susceptible to the transduction by both GFP- and NGFR-expressing retroviral vectors, with transduction efficiency exceeding 50%. More mature CD57(+) NK cell population was generally resistant to retroviral vector transduction because of poor response to the stimulation. Our findings may facilitate retroviral vector-mediated genetic engineering of human primary NK cells for future immunotherapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cognitive and Behavioural Correlates of Non-Adherence to HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy: Theoretical and Practical Insight for Clinical Psychology and Health Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begley, Kim; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Ross, Michael W.; Gold, Julian

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study identified variables associated with protease inhibitor (PI) non-adherence in 179 patients taking anti-retroviral therapy. Univariate analyses identified 11 variables associated with PI non-adherence. Multiple logistic regression modelling identified three predictors of PI non-adherence: low adherence self-efficacy and…

  17. Cognitive and Behavioural Correlates of Non-Adherence to HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy: Theoretical and Practical Insight for Clinical Psychology and Health Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begley, Kim; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Ross, Michael W.; Gold, Julian

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study identified variables associated with protease inhibitor (PI) non-adherence in 179 patients taking anti-retroviral therapy. Univariate analyses identified 11 variables associated with PI non-adherence. Multiple logistic regression modelling identified three predictors of PI non-adherence: low adherence self-efficacy and…

  18. The retroviral hypermutation specificity of APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G is governed by the C-terminal DNA cytosine deaminase domain.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Liddament, Mark T; Harris, Reuben S

    2005-03-25

    The human proteins APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G restrict retroviral infection by deaminating cytosine residues in the first cDNA strand of a replicating virus. These proteins have two putative deaminase domains, and it is unclear whether one or both catalyze deamination, unlike their homologs, AID and APOBEC1, which are well characterized single domain deaminases. Here, we show that only the C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain of APOBEC3F and -3G governs retroviral hypermutation. A chimeric protein with the N-terminal cytosine deaminase domain from APOBEC3G and the C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain from APOBEC3F elicited a dinucleotide hypermutation preference nearly indistinguishable from that of APOBEC3F. This 5'-TC-->TT mutational specificity was confirmed in a heterologous Escherichia coli-based mutation assay, in which the 5'-CC-->CT dinucleotide hypermutation preference of APOBEC3G also mapped to the C-terminal deaminase domain. An N-terminal APOBEC3G deletion mutant displayed a preference indistinguishable from that of the full-length protein, and replacing the C-terminal deaminase domain of APOBEC3F with AID resulted in an AID-like mutational signature. Together, these data indicate that only the C-terminal domain of APOBEC3F and -3G dictates the retroviral minus strand 5'-TC and 5'-CC dinucleotide hypermutation preferences, respectively, leaving the N-terminal domain to perform other aspects of retroviral restriction.

  19. Inhibition of histone deacetylation in 293GPG packaging cell line improves the production of self-inactivating MLV-derived retroviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Jaalouk, Diana E; Crosato, Milena; Brodt, Pnina; Galipeau, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Background Self-inactivating retroviral vectors (SIN) are often associated with very low titers. Promoter elements embedded within SIN designs may suppress transcription of packageable retroviral RNA which in turn results in titer reduction. We tested whether this dominant-negative effect involves histone acetylation state. We designed an MLV-derived SIN vector using the cytomegalovirus immediate early enhancer-promoter (CMVIE) as an embedded internal promoter (SINCMV) and transfected the pantropic 293GPG packaging cell line. Results The SINCMV retroviral producer had uniformly very low titers (~10,000 infectious retroparticles per ml). Northern blot showed low levels of expression of retroviral mRNA in producer cells in particular that of packageable RNA transcript. Treatment of the producers with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors sodium butyrate and trichostatin A reversed transcriptional suppression and resulted in an average 106.3 ± 4.6 – fold (P = 0.002) and 15.5 ± 1.3 – fold increase in titer (P = 0.008), respectively. A histone gel assay confirmed increased histone acetylation in treated producer cells. Conclusion These results show that SIN retrovectors incorporating strong internal promoters such as CMVIE, are susceptible to transcriptional silencing and that treatment of the producer cells with HDAC inhibitors can overcome this blockade suggesting that histone deacetylation is implicated in the mechanism of transcriptional suppression. PMID:16603064

  20. An Efficient Large-Scale Retroviral Transduction Method Involving Preloading the Vector into a RetroNectin-Coated Bag with Low-Temperature Shaking

    PubMed Central

    Dodo, Katsuyuki; Chono, Hideto; Saito, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Tahara, Kenichi; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    In retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer, transduction efficiency can be hampered by inhibitory molecules derived from the culture fluid of virus producer cell lines. To remove these inhibitory molecules to enable better gene transduction, we had previously developed a transduction method using a fibronectin fragment-coated vessel (i.e., the RetroNectin-bound virus transduction method). In the present study, we developed a method that combined RetroNectin-bound virus transduction with low-temperature shaking and applied this method in manufacturing autologous retroviral-engineered T cells for adoptive transfer gene therapy in a large-scale closed system. Retroviral vector was preloaded into a RetroNectin-coated bag and incubated at 4°C for 16 h on a reciprocating shaker at 50 rounds per minute. After the supernatant was removed, activated T cells were added to the bag. The bag transduction method has the advantage of increasing transduction efficiency, as simply flipping over the bag during gene transduction facilitates more efficient utilization of the retroviral vector adsorbed on the top and bottom surfaces of the bag. Finally, we performed validation runs of endoribonuclease MazF-modified CD4+ T cell manufacturing for HIV-1 gene therapy and T cell receptor-modified T cell manufacturing for MAGE-A4 antigen-expressing cancer gene therapy and achieved over 200-fold (≥1010) and 100-fold (≥5×109) expansion, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the large-scale closed transduction system is highly efficient for retroviral vector-based T cell manufacturing for adoptive transfer gene therapy, and this technology is expected to be amenable to automation and improve current clinical gene therapy protocols. PMID:24454964

  1. Detection and Induction of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses by Use of Recombinant Retroviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lonning, S. M.; Zhang, W.; Leib, S. R.; McGuire, T. C.

    1999-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) appear to be critical in resolving or reducing the severity of lentivirus infections. Retroviral vectors expressing the Gag/Pr or SU protein of the lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) were constructed and used to evaluate EIAV-specific CTL responses in horses. Three promoters, cytomegalovirus, simian virus SV40, and Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MoMSV) long terminal repeat (LTR), were used, and there was considerable variation in their ability to direct expression of Gag/Pr and SU. Vectors expressing EIAV proteins under the direction of MoMSV LTR and using the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) Env for internalization were efficient at transducing equine kidney (EK) target cells and were effective targets for EIAV-specific CTL lysis. CTL from EIAV-infected horses caused lysis of retroviral vector-transduced EK cells expressing either Gag/Pr or SU in an ELA-A-restricted manner. In contrast, lysis of recombinant vaccinia virus-infected EK cells expressing Gag/Pr and SU/TM was often non-LA-A restricted. Five horses were immunized by direct intramuscular injection with a mixture of retroviral vectors expressing Gag/Pr or SU, and one responded with EIAV-specific CTL. This result indicates that retroviral vector stimulation of CTL in horses needs to be optimized, perhaps by inclusion of appropriate cytokine genes in the constructs. However, the studies demonstrated that retroviral vector-transduced target cells were very effective for in vitro dissection of EIAV-specific CTL responses. PMID:10074123

  2. Structure-function studies of nucleocytoplasmic transport of retroviral genomic RNA by mRNA export factor TAP

    PubMed Central

    Teplova, Marianna; Wohlbold, Lara; Khin, Nyan W.; Izaurralde, Elisa; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2011-01-01

    Messenger RNA export is mediated by the TAP-p15 heterodimer, which belongs to the family of NTF2-like export receptors. TAP-p15 heterodimers also bind to the constitutive transport element (CTE) present in simian type D retroviral RNAs, and mediate export of viral unspliced RNAs to the host cytoplasm. We have solved the crystal structure of the RNA recognition and leucine-rich repeat motifs of TAP bound to one symmetrical-half of CTE RNA. L-shaped conformations of protein and RNA are involved in a mutual molecular embrace on complex formation. We have monitored the impact of structure-guided mutations on binding affinities in vitro and transport assays in vivo. Our studies define the principles by which CTE RNA subverts the mRNA export receptor TAP, thereby facilitating nuclear export of viral genomic RNAs, and more generally, provide insights on cargo RNA recognition by mRNA export receptors. PMID:21822283

  3. Structure-function Studies of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport of Retroviral Genomic RNA by mRNA Export Factor TAP

    SciTech Connect

    M Teplova; L Wohlbold; N Khin; E Izaurralde; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    mRNA export is mediated by the TAP-p15 heterodimer, which belongs to the family of NTF2-like export receptors. TAP-p15 heterodimers also bind to the constitutive transport element (CTE) present in simian type D retroviral RNAs, and they mediate the export of viral unspliced RNAs to the host cytoplasm. We have solved the crystal structure of the RNA recognition and leucine-rich repeat motifs of TAP bound to one symmetrical half of the CTE RNA. L-shaped conformations of protein and RNA are involved in a mutual molecular embrace on complex formation. We have monitored the impact of structure-guided mutations on binding affinities in vitro and transport assays in vivo. Our studies define the principles by which CTE RNA subverts the mRNA export receptor TAP, thereby facilitating the nuclear export of viral genomic RNAs, and, more generally, provide insights on cargo RNA recognition by mRNA export receptors.

  4. Identification of a novel retroviral gene unique to human immunodeficiency virus type 2 and simian immunodeficiency virus SIVMAC.

    PubMed Central

    Kappes, J C; Morrow, C D; Lee, S W; Jameson, B A; Kent, S B; Hood, L E; Shaw, G M; Hahn, B H

    1988-01-01

    Human and simian immunodeficiency-associated retroviruses are extraordinarily complex, containing at least five genes, tat, art, sor, R, and 3' orf, in addition to the structural genes gag, pol, and env. Recently, nucleotide sequence analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and simian immunodeficiency virus SIVMAC revealed the existence of still another open reading frame, termed X, which is highly conserved between these two viruses but absent from HIV-1. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time that the X open reading frame represents a functional retroviral gene in both HIV-2 and SIVMAC and that it encodes a virion-associated protein of 14 and 12 kilodaltons, respectively. We also describe the production of recombinant TrpE/X fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and show that sera from some HIV-2-infected individuals specifically recognize these proteins. Images PMID:3136256

  5. Restoration of normal lysosomal function in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII cells by retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, J H; Schuchman, E H; Stramm, L E; Concaugh, E A; Haskins, M E; Aguirre, G D; Patterson, D F; Desnick, R J; Gilboa, E

    1990-01-01

    Retroviral vectors were constructed containing a rat beta-glucuronidase cDNA driven by heterologous promoters. Vector-mediated gene transfer into human and canine beta-glucuronidase-deficient mucopolysaccharidosis type VII fibroblasts completely corrected the deficiency in beta-glucuronidase enzymatic activity. In primary cultures of canine mucopolysaccharidosis type VII retinal pigment epithelial cells, which contain large amounts of undegraded glycosaminoglycan substrates, vector correction restored normal processing of specific glycosaminoglycans in the lysosomal compartment. In canine mucopolysaccharidosis type VII bone marrow cells, beta-glucuronidase was expressed at high levels in transduced cells. Thus, the vector-encoded beta-glucuronidase was expressed at therapeutic levels in the appropriate organelle and corrected the metabolic defect in cells exhibiting the characteristic pathology of this lysosomal storage disorder. Images PMID:2158095

  6. Identification of Phe187 as a crucial dimerization determinant facilitates crystallization of a monomeric retroviral integrase core domain.

    PubMed

    Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2014-10-07

    Retroviral DNA integration into the host genome is mediated by nucleoprotein assemblies containing tetramers of viral integrase (IN). Whereas the fully active form of IN comprises a dimer of dimers, the molecular basis of IN multimerization has not been fully characterized. IN has consistently been crystallized in an analogous dimeric form in all crystallographic structures and experimental evidence as to the level of similarity between IN monomeric and dimeric conformations is missing because of the lack of IN monomeric structures. Here we identify Phe187 as a critical dimerization determinant of IN from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a nonprimate lentivirus that causes AIDS in the natural host, and report, in addition to a canonical dimeric structure of the FIV IN core-domain, a monomeric structure revealing the preservation of the backbone structure between the two multimeric forms and suggest a role for Phe187 in "hinging" the flexible IN dimer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Laboratory investigations for the morphologic, pharmacokinetic, and anti-retroviral properties of indinavir nanoparticles in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dou, Huanyu; Morehead, Justin; Destache, Christopher J; Kingsley, Jeffrey D; Shlyakhtenko, Lyudmila; Zhou, You; Chaubal, Mahesh; Werling, Jane; Kipp, James; Rabinow, Barrett E; Gendelman, Howard E

    2007-02-05

    The effectiveness of anti-retroviral therapies (ART) depends on its ultimate ability to clear reservoirs of continuous human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We reasoned that a principal vehicle for viral dissemination, the mononuclear phagocytes could also serve as an ART transporter and as such improve therapeutic indices. A nanoparticle-indinavir (NP-IDV) formulation was made and taken up into and released from vacuoles of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Following a single NP-IDV dose, drug levels within and outside MDM remained constant for 6 days without cytotoxicity. Administration of NP-IDV when compared to equal drug levels of free soluble IDV significantly blocked induction of multinucleated giant cells, production of reverse transcriptase activity in culture fluids and cell-associated HIV-1p24 antigens after HIV-1 infection. These data provide "proof of concept" for the use of macrophage-based NP delivery systems for human HIV-1 infections.

  8. Genetic modification of hematopoietic cells using retroviral and lentiviral vectors: safety considerations for vector design and delivery into target cells.

    PubMed

    Dropulic, Boro

    2005-07-01

    The recent development of leukemia in three patients following retroviral vector gene transfer in hematopoietic stem cells, resulting in the death of one patient, has raised safety concerns for the use of integrating gene transfer vectors for human gene therapy. This review discusses these serious adverse events from the perspective of whether restrictions on vector design and vector-modified target cells are warranted at this time. A case is made against presently establishing specific restrictions for vector design and transduced cells; rather, their safety should be ascertained by empiric evaluation in appropriate preclinical models on a case-by-case basis. Such preclinical data, coupled with proper informed patient consent and a risk-benefit ratio analysis, provide the best available prospective evaluation of gene transfer vectors prior to their translation into the clinic.

  9. Reduction of client waiting time using task shifting in an anti-retroviral clinic at Specialist Hospital Bauchi, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Nisser Ali; Hajara, Moses John; Khalifa, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Aiming to assess the impact of the intervention in reducing the patients' waiting time in the clinic, two surveys were conducted before and after task shifting intervention in an anti-retroviral (ARV) clinic at the Specialist Hospital, Bauchi, Nigeria in November 2008 and April 2009, respectively. Before the task shifting, six nurses from the clinic were trained on integrated management of adolescent and adult illness, as well as on the principle and guidelines for the anti-retroviral therapy, after which their schedule in the clinic was broadened to include seeing HIV patients presenting for routine refill and follow-up visits. In this study, fifty-six and sixty patients, respectively out of 186 and 202 who attended the clinic on the days of the pre- and post-intervention surveys, were randomly sampled. Data on patients' sex, age and marital status, whether patient a first timer or follow up visitor and the time spent in the clinic on that day as well as the number and composition of staff and equipment in the clinic was collected. The difference in waiting time spent between the first group before task shifting and second group after task shifting was statistically analyzed and significance tested using unpaired t-test. There was a reduction in the average waiting time for patients attending the clinic from 6.48 h before task shifting to 4.35 h after task shifting. The difference of mean was -2.13 h, with 95% CI: -2.44:-1.82 hours and the test of significance by unpaired t-test P<0.0001. PMID:28299042

  10. Reduction of client waiting time using task shifting in an anti-retroviral clinic at Specialist Hospital Bauchi, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Nisser Ali; Hajara, Moses John; Khalifa, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Aiming to assess the impact of the intervention in reducing the patients' waiting time in the clinic, two surveys were conducted before and after task shifting intervention in an anti-retroviral (ARV) clinic at the Specialist Hospital, Bauchi, Nigeria in November 2008 and April 2009, respectively. Before the task shifting, six nurses from the clinic were trained on integrated management of adolescent and adult illness, as well as on the principle and guidelines for the anti-retroviral therapy, after which their schedule in the clinic was broadened to include seeing HIV patients presenting for routine refill and follow-up visits. In this study, fifty-six and sixty patients, respectively out of 186 and 202 who attended the clinic on the days of the pre- and post-intervention surveys, were randomly sampled. Data on patients' sex, age and marital status, whether patient a first timer or follow up visitor and the time spent in the clinic on that day as well as the number and composition of staff and equipment in the clinic was collected. The difference in waiting time spent between the first group before task shifting and second group after task shifting was statistically analyzed and significance tested using unpaired t-test. There was a reduction in the average waiting time for patients attending the clinic from 6.48 h before task shifting to 4.35 h after task shifting. The difference of mean was −2.13 h, with 95% CI: −2.44:−1.82 hours and the test of significance by unpaired t-test P<0.0001. PMID:28299044

  11. A retroviral-derived peptide phosphorylates protein kinase D/protein kinase Cmu involving phospholipase C and protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Luangwedchakarn, Voravich; Day, Noorbibi K; Hitchcock, Remi; Brown, Pam G; Lerner, Danica L; Rucker, Rajivi P; Cianciolo, George J; Good, Robert A; Haraguchi, Soichi

    2003-05-01

    CKS-17, a synthetic peptide representing a unique amino acid motif which is highly conserved in retroviral transmembrane proteins and other immunoregulatory proteins, induces selective immunomodulatory functions, both in vitro and in vivo, and activates intracellular signaling molecules such as cAMP and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. In the present study, using Jurkat T-cells, we report that CKS-17 phosphorylates protein kinase D (PKD)/protein kinase C (PKC) mu. Total cell extracts from CKS-17-stimulated Jurkat cells were immunoblotted with an anti-phospho-PKCmu antibody. The results show that CKS-17 significantly phosphorylates PKD/PKCmu in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with the PKC inhibitors GF 109203X and Ro 31-8220, which do not act directly on PKD/PKCmu, attenuates CKS-17-induced phosphorylation of PKD/PKCmu. In contrast, the selective protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 does not reverse the action of CKS-17. Furthermore, a phospholipase C (PLC) selective inhibitor, U-73122, completely blocks the phosphorylation of PKD/PKCmu by CKS-17 while a negative control U-73343 does not. In addition, substitution of lysine for arginine residues in the CKS-17 sequence completely abrogates the ability of CKS-17 to phosphorylate PKD/PKCmu. These results clearly indicate that CKS-17 phosphorylates PKD/PKCmu through a PLC- and PKC-dependent mechanism and that arginine residues play an essential role in this activity of CKS-17, presenting a novel modality of the retroviral peptide CKS-17 and molecular interaction of this compound with target cells.

  12. Role of retroviral restriction factors in the interferon-α-mediated suppression of HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Satish K; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Guatelli, John; Skasko, Mark; Monto, Alexander; Fujimoto, Katsuya; Yukl, Steven; Greene, Warner C; Kovari, Helen; Rauch, Andri; Fellay, Jacques; Battegay, Manuel; Hirschel, Bernard; Witteck, Andrea; Bernasconi, Enos; Ledergerber, Bruno; Günthard, Huldrych F; Wong, Joseph K

    2012-02-21

    The antiviral potency of the cytokine IFN-α has been long appreciated but remains poorly understood. A number of studies have suggested that induction of the apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide 3 (APOBEC3) and bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2/tetherin/CD317) retroviral restriction factors underlies the IFN-α-mediated suppression of HIV-1 replication in vitro. We sought to characterize the as-yet-undefined relationship between IFN-α treatment, retroviral restriction factors, and HIV-1 in vivo. APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, and BST-2 expression levels were measured in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected, antiretroviral therapy-naïve individuals before, during, and after pegylated IFN-α/ribavirin (IFN-α/riba) combination therapy. IFN-α/riba therapy decreased HIV-1 viral load by -0.921 (±0.858) log(10) copies/mL in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. APOBEC3G/3F and BST-2 mRNA expression was significantly elevated during IFN-α/riba treatment in patient-derived CD4+ T cells (P < 0.04 and P < 0.008, paired Wilcoxon), and extent of BST-2 induction was correlated with reduction in HIV-1 viral load during treatment (P < 0.05, Pearson's r). APOBEC3 induction during treatment was correlated with degree of viral hypermutation (P < 0.03, Spearman's ρ), and evolution of the HIV-1 accessory protein viral protein U (Vpu) during IFN-α/riba treatment was suggestive of increased BST-2-mediated selection pressure. These data suggest that host restriction factors play a critical role in the antiretroviral capacity of IFN-α in vivo, and warrant investigation into therapeutic strategies that specifically enhance the expression of these intrinsic immune factors in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  13. Role of retroviral restriction factors in the interferon-α–mediated suppression of HIV-1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Satish K.; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Guatelli, John; Skasko, Mark; Monto, Alexander; Fujimoto, Katsuya; Yukl, Steven; Greene, Warner C.; Kovari, Helen; Rauch, Andri; Fellay, Jacques; Battegay, Manuel; Hirschel, Bernard; Witteck, Andrea; Bernasconi, Enos; Ledergerber, Bruno; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Wong, Joseph K.; Barth, J; Battegay, M; Bernasconi, E; Böni, J; Bucher, HC; Burton-Jeangros, C; Calmy, A; Cavassini, M; Cellerai, C; Egger, M; Elzi, L; Fehr, J; Fellay, J; Flepp, M; Francioli, P; Furrer, H; Fux, CA; Gorgievski, M; Günthard, H; Haerry, D; Hasse, B; Hirsch, HH; Hirschel, B; Hösli, I; Kahlert, C; Kaiser, L; Keiser, O; Kind, C; Klimkait, T; Kovari, H; Ledergerber, B; Martinetti, G; Martinez de Tejada, B; Metzner, K; Müller, N; Nadal, D; Pantaleo, G; Rauch, A; Regenass, S; Rickenbach, M; Rudin, C; Schmid, P; Schultze, D; Schöni-Affolter, F; Schüpbach, J; Speck, R; Taffé, P; Tarr, P; Telenti, A; Trkola, A; Vernazza, P; Weber, R; Yerly, S

    2012-01-01

    The antiviral potency of the cytokine IFN-α has been long appreciated but remains poorly understood. A number of studies have suggested that induction of the apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide 3 (APOBEC3) and bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2/tetherin/CD317) retroviral restriction factors underlies the IFN-α–mediated suppression of HIV-1 replication in vitro. We sought to characterize the as-yet-undefined relationship between IFN-α treatment, retroviral restriction factors, and HIV-1 in vivo. APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, and BST-2 expression levels were measured in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected, antiretroviral therapy-naïve individuals before, during, and after pegylated IFN-α/ribavirin (IFN-α/riba) combination therapy. IFN-α/riba therapy decreased HIV-1 viral load by −0.921 (±0.858) log10 copies/mL in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. APOBEC3G/3F and BST-2 mRNA expression was significantly elevated during IFN-α/riba treatment in patient-derived CD4+ T cells (P < 0.04 and P < 0.008, paired Wilcoxon), and extent of BST-2 induction was correlated with reduction in HIV-1 viral load during treatment (P < 0.05, Pearson's r). APOBEC3 induction during treatment was correlated with degree of viral hypermutation (P < 0.03, Spearman's ρ), and evolution of the HIV-1 accessory protein viral protein U (Vpu) during IFN-α/riba treatment was suggestive of increased BST-2–mediated selection pressure. These data suggest that host restriction factors play a critical role in the antiretroviral capacity of IFN-α in vivo, and warrant investigation into therapeutic strategies that specifically enhance the expression of these intrinsic immune factors in HIV-1–infected individuals. PMID:22315404

  14. Dissection of Genetic Mechanisms Governing the Expression of Serum Retroviral gp70 Implicated in Murine Lupus Nephritis1

    PubMed Central

    Baudino, Lucie; Yoshinobu, Kumiko; Morito, Naoki; Kikuchi, Shuichi; Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Morley, Bernard J.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Hirose, Sachiko; Jørgensen, Trine N.; Tucker, Rebecca M.; Roark, Christina L.; Kotzin, Brian L.; Evans, Leonard H.; Izui, Shozo

    2008-01-01

    The endogenous retroviral envelope glycoprotein, gp70, implicated in murine lupus nephritis is secreted by hepatocytes as an acute phase protein, and has been believed to be a product of an endogenous xenotropic virus, NZB-X1. However, since endogenous polytropic (PT) and modified polytropic (mPT) viruses encode gp70s that are closely related to xenotropic gp70, these viruses can be additional sources of serum gp70. To better understand the genetic basis of the expression of serum gp70, we analyzed the abundance of xenotropic, PT or mPT gp70 RNAs in livers and the genomic composition of corresponding proviruses in various strains of mice, including two different Sgp (serum gp70 production) congenic mice. Our results demonstrated that the expression of different viral gp70 RNAs was remarkable heterogeneous among various mouse strains and that the level of serum gp70 production was regulated by multiple structural and regulatory genes. In addition, a significant contribution of PT and mPT gp70s to serum gp70 was revealed by the detection of PT and mPT, but not xenotropic transcripts in 129 mice and by a closer correlation of serum levels of gp70 with the abundance of PT and mPT gp70 RNAs than with that of xenotropic gp70 RNA in Sgp3 congenic mice. Furthermore, the injection of lipopolysaccharides selectively up-regulated the expression of xenotropic and mPT gp70 RNAs, but not PT gp70 RNA. Our data indicate that the genetic origin of serum gp70 is more heterogeneous than previously believed, and that distinct retroviral gp70s are differentially regulated in physiological vs. inflammatory conditions. PMID:18684976

  15. Recurrent 8q13.2-13.3 microdeletions associated with branchio-oto-renal syndrome are mediated by human endogenous retroviral (HERV) sequence blocks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Jun; Mitchell, Elyse; Guo, Jin; Wang, Liwen; Zhang, Yu; Hodge, Jennelle C; Shen, Yiping

    2014-08-19

    Human endogenous retroviral (HERV) sequences are the remnants of ancient retroviral infection and comprise approximately 8% of the human genome. The high abundance and interspersed nature of homologous HERV sequences make them ideal substrates for genomic rearrangements. A role for HERV sequences in mediating human disease-associated rearrangement has been reported but is likely currently underappreciated. In the present study, two independent de novo 8q13.2-13.3 microdeletion events were identified in patients with clinical features of Branchio-Oto-Renal (BOR) syndrome. Nucleotide-level mapping demonstrated the identical breakpoints, suggesting a recurrent microdeletion including multiple genes such as EYA1, SULF1, and SLCO5A1, which is mediated by HERV1 homologous sequences. These findings raise the potential that HERV sequences may more commonly underlie recombination of dosage sensitive regions associated with recurrent syndromes.

  16. Endothelial progenitor and mesenchymal stem cell-derived cells persist in tissue-engineered patch in vivo: application of green and red fluorescent protein-expressing retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Sales, Virna L; Mettler, Bret A; Lopez-Ilasaca, Marco; Johnson, John A; Mayer, John E

    2007-03-01

    An unresolved question regarding tissue-engineered (TE) cardiac valves and vessels is the fate of the transplanted cells in vivo. We have developed a strategy to track the anatomic location of seeded cells within TE constructs and neighboring tissues using a retroviral vector system encoding green and red fluorescent proteins (GFPs and RFPs, respectively) in ovine circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). We demonstrate that stable transduction ex vivo with high-titer Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vector yields transduction efficiency of greater than 97% GFP(+) EPC- and RFP(+) mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-derived cells. Cellular phenotype and transgene expression were also maintained through 25 subsequent passages. Using a retroviral vector system to distinguish our pre-seeded cells from tissue-resident progenitor cells and circulating endothelial and marrow-derived precursors, we simultaneously co-seeded 2 x 10(6) GFP(+) EPCs and 2 x 10(5) RFP(+) MSCs onto the TE patches. In a series of ovine pulmonary artery patch augmentation studies, transplanted GFP(+) EPC- and RFP(+) MSC-derived cells persisted within the TE patch 7 to 14 days after implantation, as identified using immunofluorescence. Analysis showed 81% luminal coverage of the TE patches before implantation with transduced cells, increasing to 96% at day 7 and decreasing to 67% at day 14 post-implantation. This suggests a temporal association between retroviral expression of progenitor cells and mediating effects of these cells on the physiological remodeling and maturation of the TE constructs. To our knowledge, this is the first cardiovascular tissue-engineering in vivo study using a double-labeling method to demonstrate a direct evidence of the source, persistence, and incorporation into a TE vascular patch of co-cultured and simultaneously pre-seeded adult progenitor cells.

  17. Accelerated generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells with retroviral transduction and chemical inhibitors under physiological hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Nakada, Akira; Shigeno, Keiji; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very rapid generation of human iPS cells under optimized conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five chemical inhibitors under hypoxia boosted reprogramming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. -- Abstract: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated from somatic cells by the forced expression of a defined set of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Human iPS cells can be propagated indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body except for extra-embryonic tissues. This technology not only represents a new way to use individual-specific stem cells for regenerative medicine but also constitutes a novel method to obtain large amounts of disease-specific cells for biomedical research. Despite their great potential, the long reprogramming process (up to 1 month) remains one of the most significant challenges facing standard virus-mediated methodology. In this study, we report the accelerated generation of human iPS cells from adipose-derived stem (ADS) cells, using a new combination of chemical inhibitors under a setting of physiological hypoxia in conjunction with retroviral transduction of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and L-Myc. Under optimized conditions, we observed human embryonic stem (ES)-like cells as early as 6 days after the initial retroviral transduction. This was followed by the emergence of fully reprogrammed cells bearing Tra-1-81-positive and DsRed transgene-silencing properties on day 10. The resulting cell lines resembled human ES cells in many respects including proliferation rate, morphology, pluripotency-associated markers, global gene expression patterns, genome-wide DNA methylation states, and the ability to differentiate into all three of the germ layers, both in vitro and in vivo. Our method, when combined with chemical inhibitors under conditions of physiological hypoxia, offers a powerful tool for rapidly

  18. Endogenous IL-2 production by natural killer cells maintains cytotoxic and proliferative capacity following retroviral-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Miller, J S; Tessmer-Tuck, J; Blake, N; Lund, J; Scott, A; Blazar, B R; Orchard, P J

    1997-10-01

    Interleukin (IL)-2 therapy given at tolerable doses is insufficient to induce maximum activation of natural killer (NK) cells. We recently demonstrated that NK cells expanded in vivo can be maximally activated by short-term ex vivo incubation with 1000 U/mL IL-2. However, IL-2 withdrawal, which would occur with reinfusion, may lead to a rapid loss of cell viability and function. We hypothesized that retroviral transduction could provide an endogenous source of IL-2 to maintain NK function as measured by proliferation and cytotoxicity. Enriched NK cells were transduced with supernatants containing an MFG-based retrovirus designed to express murine IL-2 cDNA. Several supernatant transduction strategies were evaluated. NK cells were initially cultured in 1000 U/mL of huIL2 for 7-8 days, harvested, and replated prior to transduction (4 hours at 37degrees C); this proved insufficient to sustain NK proliferation or maintain cytotoxicity after exogenous human IL-2 (huIL-2) withdrawal. An alternative transduction procedure using phosphate-depleted medium, centrifugation, and transduction for 16 hours at 32degrees C was then evaluated. NK cells transduced under these conditions maintained significant NK proliferation in the absence of exogenous IL-2 compared with sham-transduced controls. Two consecutive daily transductions resulted in less proliferation, suggesting that several exposures to retroviral supernatant may inhibit subsequent NK proliferation. Cytotoxicity of the transduced NK cells against K562 and Raji was maintained under these conditions without exogenous IL-2. Sham-transduced NK cells produced 8.3+/-2.6 U/mL of murine IL-2 (muIL-2) by ELISA (background) after 7 days without exogenous IL-2. In contrast, 109+/-23 U/mL muIL-2 was produced by NK cells transduced with supernatant from the MFG/muIL-2 producer line. These experiments demonstrate that NK cells can be successfully transduced with retroviruses and induced to express sufficient IL-2 to maintain their

  19. Overexpression of connexin 43 using a retroviral vector improves electrical coupling of skeletal myoblasts with cardiac myocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachov, Oleg; Ma, Yu-Ling; Themis, Michael; Patel, Pravina; Spohr, Hilmar; MacLeod, Kenneth T; Ullrich, Nina D; Kienast, Yvonne; Coutelle, Charles; Peters, Nicholas S

    2006-01-01

    Background Organ transplantation is presently often the only available option to repair a damaged heart. As heart donors are scarce, engineering of cardiac grafts from autologous skeletal myoblasts is a promising novel therapeutic strategy. The functionality of skeletal muscle cells in the heart milieu is, however, limited because of their inability to integrate electrically and mechanically into the myocardium. Therefore, in pursuit of improved cardiac integration of skeletal muscle grafts we sought to modify primary skeletal myoblasts by overexpression of the main gap-junctional protein connexin 43 and to study electrical coupling of connexin 43 overexpressing myoblasts to cardiac myocytes in vitro. Methods To create an efficient means for overexpression of connexin 43 in skeletal myoblasts we constructed a bicistronic retroviral vector MLV-CX43-EGFP expressing the human connexin 43 cDNA and the marker EGFP gene. This vector was employed to transduce primary rat skeletal myoblasts in optimised conditions involving a concomitant use of the retrovirus immobilising protein RetroNectin® and the polycation transduction enhancer Transfectam®. The EGFP-positive transduced cells were then enriched by flow cytometry. Results More than four-fold overexpression of connexin 43 in the transduced skeletal myoblasts, compared with non-transduced cells, was shown by Western blotting. Functionality of the overexpressed connexin 43 was demonstrated by microinjection of a fluorescent dye showing enhanced gap-junctional intercellular transfer in connexin 43 transduced myoblasts compared with transfer in non-transduced myoblasts. Rat cardiac myocytes were cultured in multielectrode array culture dishes together with connexin 43/EGFP transduced skeletal myoblasts, control non-transduced skeletal myoblasts or alone. Extracellular field action potential activation rates in the co-cultures of connexin 43 transduced skeletal myoblasts with cardiac myocytes were significantly higher than

  20. Helminthic Infections Rates and Malaria in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women on Anti-Retroviral Therapy in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Ivan, Emil; Crowther, Nigel J.; Mutimura, Eugene; Osuwat, Lawrence Obado; Janssen, Saskia; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Within sub-Saharan Africa, helminth and malaria infections cause considerable morbidity in HIV-positive pregnant women and their offspring. Helminth infections are also associated with a higher risk of mother-to-child HIV transmission. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of, and the protective and risk factors for helminth and malaria infections in pregnant HIV-positive Rwandan women receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Methodology and principle findings Pregnant females (n = 980) were recruited from health centres in rural and peri-urban locations in the central and eastern provinces of Rwanda. Helminth infection was diagnosed using the Kato Katz method whilst the presence of Plasmodium falciparum was identified from blood smears. The prevalence of helminth infections was 34.3%; of malaria 13.3%, and of co-infections 6.6%. Helminth infections were more common in rural (43.1%) than peri-urban (18.0%; p<0.0005) sites. A CD4 count ≤350 cells/mm3 was associated with a higher risk of helminth infections (odds ratio, 3.39; 95% CIs, 2.16–5.33; p<0.0005) and malaria (3.37 [2.11–5.38]; p<0.0005) whilst helminth infection was a risk factor for malaria infection and vice versa. Education and employment reduced the risk of all types of infection whilst hand washing protected against helminth infection (0.29 [0.19–0.46]; p<0.0005);). The TDF-3TC-NVP (3.47 [2.21–5.45]; p<0.0005), D4T-3TC-NVP (2.47 [1.27–4.80]; p<0.05) and AZT-NVP (2.60 [1.33–5.08]; p<0.05) regimens each yielded higher helminth infection rates than the AZT-3TC-NVP regimen. Anti-retroviral therapy had no effect on the risk of malaria. Conclusion/significance HIV-positive pregnant women would benefit from the scaling up of de-worming programs alongside health education and hygiene interventions. The differential effect of certain ART combinations (as observed here most strongly with AZT-3TC-NVP) possibly protecting against helminth infection warrants further

  1. Crystal structure of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 gp21 ectodomain crystallized as a maltose-binding protein chimera reveals structural evolution of retroviral transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, Bostjan; Center, Rob J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    1999-01-01

    Retroviral entry into cells depends on envelope glycoproteins, whereby receptor binding to the surface-exposed subunit triggers membrane fusion by the transmembrane protein (TM) subunit. We determined the crystal structure at 2.5-Å resolution of the ectodomain of gp21, the TM from human T cell leukemia virus type 1. The gp21 fragment was crystallized as a maltose-binding protein chimera, and the maltose-binding protein domain was used to solve the initial phases by the method of molecular replacement. The structure of gp21 comprises an N-terminal trimeric coiled coil, an adjacent disulfide-bonded loop that stabilizes a chain reversal, and a C-terminal sequence structurally distinct from HIV type 1/simian immunodeficiency virus gp41 that packs against the coil in an extended antiparallel fashion. Comparison of the gp21 structure with the structures of other retroviral TMs contrasts the conserved nature of the coiled coil-forming region and adjacent disulfide-bonded loop with the variable nature of the C-terminal ectodomain segment. The structure points to these features having evolved to enable the dual roles of retroviral TMs: conserved fusion function and an ability to anchor diverse surface-exposed subunit structures to the virion envelope and infected cell surface. The structure of gp21 implies that the N-terminal fusion peptide is in close proximity to the C-terminal transmembrane domain and likely represents a postfusion conformation. PMID:10200260

  2. Retroviral insertional activation in a herpesvirus: transcriptional activation of US genes by an integrated long terminal repeat in a Marek's disease virus clone.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D; Brunovskis, P; Witter, R; Kung, H J

    1996-01-01

    Insertional activation of host proto-oncogenes has been recognized as a basic mechanism by which nonacute retroviruses induce cancer. Our previous work has demonstrated that retroviruses can efficiently integrate into DNA virus genomes. Specifically, coinfection of cultured fibroblasts with a chicken herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus (MDV), and a chicken retrovirus results in frequent stable retroviral insertions into the herpesvirus genome. Such insertions could alter the expression of herpesvirus genes, possibly resulting in novel phenotypic properties. In this article, we report the characterization of a replication-competent clone of MDV with integrated retroviral sequences. This virus was isolated from a chicken following injection of fibroblasts coinfected with MDV and the retrovirus, reticuloendotheliosis virus. Transcripts originating from the reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat promoters were found to encode the adjoining MDV genes, SORF2, US1, and US10. This virus replicates well in culture but has an unusual phenotype in chickens, characterized by an attenuated virulence which produces no nerve lesions but, rather, severe thymic atrophy. While the causal relationship between the insertion and the observed phenotypes remains to be established, our data provide the first evidence of retroviral insertional activation of herpesvirus genes. PMID:8642673

  3. Complementation of a primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector by a genetically engineered tRNA-like primer.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, A H; Duch, M; Lovmand, J; Jørgensen, P; Pedersen, F S

    1997-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes is primed by a tRNA annealed to an 18-nucleotide primer binding site. Here, we present a primer complementation system to study molecular interaction of the replication machinery with the primer and primer binding site in vivo. Introduction of eight base substitutions into the primer binding site of a murine leukemia virus-based vector allowed efficient RNA encapsidation but resulted in severely reduced vector replication capacity. Replication was restored upon complementation with a synthetic gene designed to encode a complementary tRNA-like primer, but not with a noncomplementary tRNA-like molecule. The engineered primer was shown to be involved in both the initiation of first-strand synthesis and second-strand transfer. These results provide an in vivo demonstration that the retroviral replication machinery may recognize sequence complementarity rather than actual primer binding site and 3' primer sequences. Use of mutated primer binding site vectors replicating via engineered primers may add additional control features to retroviral gene transfer technology. PMID:8995641

  4. Exacerbation of microcytic anemia associated with cessation of anti-retroviral therapy in an HIV-1-infected patient with beta thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yoshitaka; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Minami, Rumi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    We report a patient with Japanese minor β thalassemia and HIV-1 infection. The patient showed prolonged anemia, which was originally attributed to chronic parvovirus B19 infection. Twelve years later, the patient presented with exacerbation of microcytic anemia following cessation of anti-retroviral therapy; the exacerbation resolved when anti-retroviral therapy was resumed. Sequencing of the β globin gene revealed heterozygosity for a four-nucleotides deletion at codon 41/42 and minor β thalassemia was confirmed. Because HIV-1-infected patients frequently show anemia due to nutritional deficiencies, opportunistic infections, AIDS-related malignancies, drug treatment and a direct effect of HIV-1 on the bone marrow, it is likely to overlook other causes of anemia. Thalassemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of anemia even in HIV-1 infected patients, when microcytic anemia without iron deficiency is observed. Our case suggested that active HIV infection may have worsened β thalassemia, and early introduction of anti-retroviral therapy is beneficial for the recovery of anemia. Copyright © 2014 China Ordnance Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A rapid and efficient polyethylenimine-based transfection method to prepare lentiviral or retroviral vectors: useful for making iPS cells and transduction of primary cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaozhe; Shi, Haijun; Chu, Xinran; Zhou, Xiaoling; Sun, Pingnan

    2016-09-01

    To improve the efficiency, reproducibility and consistency of the PEI-based transfection method that is often used in preparation of recombinant lentiviral or retroviral vectors. The contributions to transfection efficiency of multi-factors including concentration of PEI or DNA, dilution buffer for PEI/DNA, manner to prepare PEI/DNA complexes, influence of serum, incubation time for PEI/DNA complexes, and transfection time were studied. Gentle mixing during the preparation of PEI/DNA transfection complexes is critical for a high transfection efficiency. PEI could be stored at room temperature or 4 °C, and most importantly, multigelation should be avoided. The transfection efficiency of the PEI-based new method in different types of cells, such as 293T, Cos-7, HeLa, HepG2, Hep3B, Huh7 and L02, was also higher than that of the previous method. After optimization, the titer of our lentiviral system or retroviral system produced by PEI-based new method was about 10- or 3-times greater than that produced by PEI-based previous method, respectively. We provide a rapid and efficient PEI-based method for preparation of recombinant lentiviral or retroviral vectors which is useful for making iPS cells as well as transduction of primary cell cultures.

  6. Effects of T592 phosphomimetic mutations on tetramer stability and dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 can not explain the retroviral restriction defect

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Akash; Wang, Zhonghua; White, Tommy; Buffone, Cindy; Nguyen, Laura A.; Shepard, Caitlin N.; Kim, Baek; Demeler, Borries; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Ivanov, Dmitri N.

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1, a dNTP triphosphohydrolase, contributes to interferon signaling and restriction of retroviral replication. SAMHD1-mediated retroviral restriction is thought to result from the depletion of cellular dNTP pools, but it remains controversial whether the dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 is sufficient for restriction. The restriction ability of SAMHD1 is regulated in cells by phosphorylation on T592. Phosphomimetic mutations of T592 are not restriction competent, but appear intact in their ability to deplete cellular dNTPs. Here we use analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence polarization and NMR-based enzymatic assays to investigate the impact of phosphomimetic mutations on SAMHD1 tetramerization and dNTPase activity in vitro. We find that phosphomimetic mutations affect kinetics of tetramer assembly and disassembly, but their effects on tetramerization equilibrium and dNTPase activity are insignificant. In contrast, the Y146S/Y154S dimerization-defective mutant displays a severe dNTPase defect in vitro, but is indistinguishable from WT in its ability to deplete cellular dNTP pools and to restrict HIV replication. Our data suggest that the effect of T592 phosphorylation on SAMHD1 tetramerization is not likely to explain the retroviral restriction defect, and we hypothesize that enzymatic activity of SAMHD1 is subject to additional cellular regulatory mechanisms that have not yet been recapitulated in vitro. PMID:27511536

  7. Ex Vivo γ-Retroviral Gene Therapy of Dogs with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and the Development of a Thymic T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Douglas R.; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Jeffrey S.; Vernau, William; Moore, Peter F.; O’Malley, Thomas; Burkly, Linda C.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results in sustained T cell reconstitution and sustained marking in myeloid and B cells for up to 4 years with no evidence of any serious adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ex vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of XSCID dogs results in a similar outcome. Eight of 12 XSCID dogs treated with an average of dose of 5.8 × 106 transduced CD34+ cells/kg successfully engrafted producing normal numbers of gene-corrected CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells. However, this was followed by a steady decrease in CD45RA+ T cells, T cell diversity, and thymic output as measured by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) resulting in a T cell lymphopenia. None of the dogs survived past 11 months post treatment. At necropsy, few gene-corrected thymocytes were observed correlating with the TREC levels and one of the dogs was diagnosed with a thymic T cell lymphoma that was attributed to the gene therapy. This study highlights the outcome differences between the ex vivo and in vivo approach to γ-retroviral gene therapy and is the first to document a serious adverse event following gene therapy in a canine model of a human genetic disease. PMID:21536334

  8. High-Level Expression of Single-Chain Fv-Fc Fusion Protein in Serum and Egg White of Genetically Manipulated Chickens by Using a Retroviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Kamihira, Masamichi; Ono, Ken-ichiro; Esaka, Kazuhisa; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Kigaku, Ryoko; Komatsu, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Takashi; Kyogoku, Kenji; Iijima, Shinji

    2005-01-01

    We report here the generation of transgenic chickens using a retroviral vector for the production of recombinant proteins. It was found that the transgene expression was suppressed when a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vector was injected into chicken embryos at the blastodermal stage. When a concentrated viral solution was injected into the heart of developing embryos after 50 to 60 h of incubation, transgene expression was observed throughout the embryo, including the gonads. For practical production, a retroviral vector encoding an expression cassette of antiprion single-chain Fv fused with the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G1 (scFv-Fc) was injected into chicken embryos. The birds that hatched stably produced scFv-Fc in their serum and eggs at high levels (∼5.6 mg/ml). We obtained transgenic progeny from a transgenic chicken generated with this procedure. The transgene was stably integrated into the chromosomes of transgenic progeny. The transgenic progeny also expressed scFv-Fc in the serum and eggs. PMID:16103139

  9. Imported Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome–Related Histoplasmosis in Metropolitan France: A Comparison of Pre–Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy and Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy Eras

    PubMed Central

    Peigne, Vincent; Dromer, Françoise; Elie, Caroline; Lidove, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum infection is rare outside disease-endemic areas. Clinical presentation and outcome of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome–related histoplasmosis are unknown in non-endemic areas with wide access to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Retrospective analysis of cases recorded at the French National Reference Center for Mycoses and Antifungals during two decades: pre-HAART (1985–1994) and HAART (1997–2006). Clinical features and outcome of all adults with proven acquired immunodeficiency syndrome–related histoplasmosis were compared between the two periods. One hundred four patients were included (40 during the pre-HAART era and 64 during the HAART era). Diagnosis was established a mean of 62 days after onset of symptoms. One-year overall mortality rates decreased from 53% (pre-HAART era) to 22% (HAART era). Diagnosis during the pre-HAART era and an older age were the only independent factors associated with death. Histoplasmosis is a rare invasive fungal infection outside disease-endemic areas. Its prognosis improved significantly during the HAART era. PMID:22049053

  10. Imported acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis in metropolitan France: a comparison of pre-highly active anti-retroviral therapy and highly active anti-retroviral therapy eras.

    PubMed

    Peigne, Vincent; Dromer, Françoise; Elie, Caroline; Lidove, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum infection is rare outside disease-endemic areas. Clinical presentation and outcome of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis are unknown in non-endemic areas with wide access to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Retrospective analysis of cases recorded at the French National Reference Center for Mycoses and Antifungals during two decades: pre-HAART (1985-1994) and HAART (1997-2006). Clinical features and outcome of all adults with proven acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis were compared between the two periods. One hundred four patients were included (40 during the pre-HAART era and 64 during the HAART era). Diagnosis was established a mean of 62 days after onset of symptoms. One-year overall mortality rates decreased from 53% (pre-HAART era) to 22% (HAART era). Diagnosis during the pre-HAART era and an older age were the only independent factors associated with death. Histoplasmosis is a rare invasive fungal infection outside disease-endemic areas. Its prognosis improved significantly during the HAART era.

  11. Annotation and visualization of endogenous retroviral sequences using the Distributed Annotation System (DAS) and eBioX

    PubMed Central

    Martínez Barrio, Álvaro; Lagercrantz, Erik; Sperber, Göran O; Blomberg, Jonas; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Background The Distributed Annotation System (DAS) is a widely used network protocol for sharing biological information. The distributed aspects of the protocol enable the use of various reference and annotation servers for connecting biological sequence data to pertinent annotations in order to depict an integrated view of the data for the final user. Results An annotation server has been devised to provide information about the endogenous retroviruses detected and annotated by a specialized in silico tool called RetroTector. We describe the procedure to implement the DAS 1.5 protocol commands necessary for constructing the DAS annotation server. We use our server to exemplify those steps. Data distribution is kept separated from visualization which is carried out by eBioX, an easy to use open source program incorporating multiple bioinformatics utilities. Some well characterized endogenous retroviruses are shown in two different DAS clients. A rapid analysis of areas free from retroviral insertions could be facilitated by our annotations. Conclusion The DAS protocol has shown to be advantageous in the distribution of endogenous retrovirus data. The distributed nature of the protocol is also found to aid in combining annotation and visualization along a genome in order to enhance the understanding of ERV contribution to its evolution. Reference and annotation servers are conjointly used by eBioX to provide visualization of ERV annotations as well as other data sources. Our DAS data source can be found in the central public DAS service repository, , or at . PMID:19534743

  12. IMMUNE RECONSTITUTION INFLAMMATORY SYNDROME (IRIS)-ASSOCIATED BURKITT LYMPHOMA FOLLOWING COMBINATION ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Vishnu, Prakash; Dorer, Russell P.; Aboulafia, David M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is defined as a paradoxical worsening or unmasking of infections and autoimmune diseases, following initiation of combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). More recently, the case definition of IRIS has been broadened to include certain malignancies including Kaposi’s sarcoma, and less frequently Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Here in we describe 3 patients infected with HIV who began cART and within a median of 15 weeks each achieved non-detectable HIV viral loads, and yet within 6 months presented for medical attention with fevers, night sweats, weight loss and bulky lymphadenopathy. Laboratory studies included elevated lactate dehydrogenase and β-2 microglobulin levels and well preserved CD4+ lymphocyte counts in excess of 350 cells/µL. In each patient lymph node biopsies were diagnostic of Burkitt lymphoma (BL). Patients were managed with multi-agent chemotherapy in conjunction with cART. We also survey the medical literature of other cases of IRIS-associated BL. Although the pathogenesis of IRIS-associated BL is not well elucidated, chronic antigenic stimulation coupled with immune deterioration, followed by subsequent restoration of the immune response and aberrant cytokine expression may be a pathway to lymphomagenesis. IRIS-associated BL should be suspected in patients with normal or near normal CD4+ lymphocyte counts who develop progressive lymphadenopathy post-initiation of cART. PMID:25458079

  13. Human gene transfer: Characterization of human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes as vehicles for retroviral-mediated gene transfer in man

    SciTech Connect

    Kasid, A.; Morecki, S.; Aebersold, P.; Cornetta, K.; Culver, K.; Freeman, S.; Director, E.; Lotze, M.T.; Blaese, R.M.; Anderson, W.F.; Rosenberg, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are cells generated from tumor suspensions cultured in interleukin 2 that can mediate cancer regression when adoptively transferred into mice or humans. Since TILs proliferate rapidly in vitro, recirculate, and preferentially localize at the tumor site in vivo, they provide an attractive model for delivery of exogenous genetic material into man. To determine whether efficient gene transfer into TILs is feasible. The authors transduced human TILs with the bacterial gene for neomycin-resistance (Neo{sup R}) using the retroviral vector N2. The transduced TIL populations were stable and polyclonal with respect to the intact Neo{sup R} gene integration and expressed high levels of neomycin phosphotransferase activity. The Neo{sup R} gene insertion did not alter the in vitro growth pattern and interleukin 2 dependence of the transduced TILs. Analyses of T-cell receptor gene rearrangement for {beta}- and {gamma}-chain genes revealed the oligoclonal nature of the TIL populations with no major change in the DNA rearrangement patterns or the levels of mRNA expression of the {beta} and {gamma} chains following transduction and selection of TILs in the neomycin analog G418. Human TILs expressed mRNA for tumor necrosis factors ({alpha} and {beta}) and interleukin 2 receptor P55. This pattern of cytokine-mRNA expression was not significantly altered following the transduction of TILs. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of TILs as suitable cellular vehicles for the introduction of therapeutic genes into patients receiving autologous TILs.

  14. Reported consent processes and demographics: a substudy of the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    Denning, Eileen; Sharma, Shweta; Smolskis, Mary; Touloumi, Giota; Walker, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; Clewett, Megan; Emanuel, Ezekiel; Florence, Eric; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Sánchez, Adriana; Tavel, Jorge; Grady, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Efforts are needed to improve informed consent of participants in research. The Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Therapy (START) study provides a unique opportunity to study the effect of length and complexity of informed consent documents on understanding and satisfaction among geographically diverse participants. Methods Interested START sites were randomised to use either the standard consent form or the concise consent form for all of the site’s participants. Results A total of 4473 HIV-positive participants at 154 sites worldwide took part in the Informed Consent Substudy, with consent given in 11 primary languages. Most sites sent written information to potential participants in advance of clinic visits, usually including the consent form. At about half the sites, staff reported spending less than an hour per participant in the consent process. The vast majority of sites assessed participant understanding using informal nonspecific questions or clinical judgment. Conclusions These data reflect the interest of START research staff in evaluating the consent process and improving informed consent. The START Informed Consent Substudy is by far the largest study of informed consent intervention ever conducted. Its results have the potential to impact how consent forms are written around the world. PMID:25711320

  15. Reconstitution of T cell receptor signaling in ZAP-70-deficient cells by retroviral transduction of the ZAP-70 gene.

    PubMed

    Taylor, N; Bacon, K B; Smith, S; Jahn, T; Kadlecek, T A; Uribe, L; Kohn, D B; Gelfand, E W; Weiss, A; Weinberg, K

    1996-11-01

    A variant of severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID) with a selective inability to produce CD8 single positive T cells and a signal transduction defect in peripheral CD4+ cells has recently been shown to be the result of mutations in the ZAP-70 gene. T cell receptor (TCR) signaling requires the association of the ZAP-70 protein tyrosine kinase with the TCR complex. Human T cell leukemia virus type I-transformed CD4+ T cell lines were established from ZAP-70-deficient patients and normal controls. ZAP-70 was expressed and appropriately phosphorylated in normal T cell lines after TCR engagement, but was not detected in T cell lines from ZAP-70-deficient patients. To determine whether signaling could be reconstituted, wild-type ZAP-70 was introduced into deficient cells with a ZAP-70 retroviral vector. High titer producer clones expressing ZAP-70 were generated in the Gibbon ape leukemia virus packaging line PG13. After transduction, ZAP-70 was detected at levels equivalent to those observed in normal cells, and was appropriately phosphorylated on tyrosine after receptor engagement. The kinase activity of ZAP-70 in the reconstituted cells was also appropriately upregulated by receptor aggregation. Moreover, normal and transduced cells, but not ZAP-70-deficient cells, were able to mobilize calcium after receptor ligation, indicating that proximal TCR signaling was reconstituted. These results indicate that this form of SCID may be corrected by gene therapy.

  16. [Successful treatment with hyper-CVAD and highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) for AIDS-related Burkitt lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuhito; Nakazato, Tomonori; Sanada, Yukinari; Mihara, Ai; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Kurai, Hanako; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Sachiko; Kakimoto, Tsunayuki

    2010-03-01

    A 38-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of continuous fever and right facial palsy. He was diagnosed as HIV positive. Abdominal CT scan showed a large mass in the ascending colon. Gallium scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake in the ascending colon. Colonoscopy was performed and histological examination of the colon tumor revealed Burkitt's lymphoma (BL). He received highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) and his facial palsy improved. Because CD4 count was significantly low at 31/microl, he was treated with dose-adjusted EPOCH (DA-EPOCH) combined with HAART. Although the tumor was decreased in size by DA-EPOCH, we changed to the combination of hyper-CVAD/MTX-Ara-C alternating therapy with HAART in order to increase dose intensity. Six cycles of hyper-CVAD/MTX-Ara-C were performed and complete remission was obtained. In the HAART era, the survival of patients with AIDS-related diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) improved dramatically, whereas the survival of similarly treated patients with AIDS-related BL remained poor. Our case suggests that intensive chemotherapy with hyper-CVAD/MTX-Ara-C combined with HAART may be well tolerated and effective in AIDS-related BL.

  17. Assessment of factors influencing adherence to anti-retroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus positive mothers and their infected children.

    PubMed

    De, Arun Kumar; Dalui, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Mothers and children are biologically related and dependent. They should be considered as a single unit which is very important regarding adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Very high levels of adherence are required for effective ART. We therefore carried out this study to examine the adherence levels and different factors associated with adherence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive mothers and their HIV-positive children receiving ART. A hospital-based cross-sectional study. Ninety-four HIV-positive mothers and their 94 HIV-positive children under ART attending the ART center of a tertiary care hospital were recruited in this study. Consenting mothers were asked to complete the "Case Study Form" containing socio-demographic and care-giving details. Mothers were also asked to complete the Beck's depression inventory, State trait anxiety inventory, and Ways of coping inventory. Adherence was assessed using pill count. Criteria for good and poor adherence were defined. Current CD4 counts were retrieved from the hospital record. Fifty-six percent of respondent mothers and 65.8% of respondent children showed good adherence to ART. Different factors were associated with poor adherence in both mothers and their children. Adherence of HIV-positive mothers and their HIV-positive children to ART is influenced by multiple factors and identification of these factors is necessary to get complete adherence to ART. There is statistically significant relationship between maternal and pediatric adherence to ART.

  18. Fv-1 restriction of murine leukemia viruses: a model for studying host genetic control of retroviral gene movement and leukemogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.K.; Boone, L.R.; Tennant, R.W.; Brown, A.

    1983-01-01

    Since the first isolation of a murine leukemia, it has been noted that transmission of the leukemic disease is very much dependent on the mouse strain selected for the virus inoculation. There are many different genetic determinants that may render the most resistant to viral leukemogenesis. The most well-defined among these resistance genes is the Fv-1 locus, which is present in laboratory strains as well as in wild populations of the mouse. The Fv-1 locus, with its fundamental biology and genetics well established, is ideal for biochemical studies. The molecular mechanism elucidated for this restriction system may provide information useful for further studies to understand the complex genetic factors related to the control of carcinogenesis. Recent understanding of the interaction between host Fv-1 gene and the restricted virus may be summarized as follows: there are dominantly expressed Fv-1 gene products in the cell; there are specific target molecules in the virion; the restriction is an intracellular event which leads to failure of proviral DNA integration. On the basis of these basic facts as well as results of our detailed analysis of retroviral DNA intermediates in the Fv-1 restrictive cells, we have constructed a working hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of Fv-1 gene restriction, which places particular emphasis on the structural and functional behavior of long terminal repeats (LTR) during the early phase of retrovirus infection.

  19. An activation domain within the walleye dermal sarcoma virus retroviral cyclin protein is essential for inhibition of the viral promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Rovnak, Joel; Hronek, Brett W.; Ryan, Sean O.; Cai, Sumin; Quackenbush, Sandra L. . E-mail: sandra.quackenbush@colostate.edu

    2005-11-25

    Walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV) is a complex retrovirus associated with seasonal dermal sarcomas. Developing tumors have low levels of accessory gene transcripts, A1 and B, and regressing tumors have high levels of full-length and spliced transcripts. Transcript A1 encodes a retroviral cyclin (rv-cyclin) with limited homology to host cyclins. The rv-cyclin is physically linked to components of the transcriptional co-activator complex, Mediator, and regulates transcription. In walleye fibroblasts, it inhibits the WDSV promoter independently of cis-acting DNA sequences. The rv-cyclin activates transcription from GAL4 promoters when fused to the GAL4 DNA binding domain. A 30 a.a. activation domain in the carboxy region can be inactivated by single point mutations, and these mutations diminish the ability of the rv-cyclin to inhibit the WDSV promoter. When fused to glutathione S-transferase, the rv-cyclin, its carboxy region, and the activation domain pull down components of transcription complexes from nuclear extracts, and pulldown is lost by mutation of the activation domain.

  20. Pentecostalism and AIDS treatment in Mozambique: creating new approaches to HIV prevention through anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, James

    2011-01-01

    Pentecostal fervor has rapidly spread throughout central and southern Mozambique since the end of its protracted civil war in the early 1990s. In the peri-urban bairros and septic fringes of Mozambican cities African Independent Churches (AICs) with Pentecostal roots and mainstream Pentecostals can now claim over half the population as adherents. Over this same period another important phenomenon has coincided with this church expansion: the AIDS epidemic. Pentecostalism and HIV have travelled along similar vectors and been propelled by deepening inequality. Recognising this relationship has important implications for HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment strategies. The striking overlap between high HIV prevalence in peri-urban populations and high Pentecostal participation suggests that creative strategies, to include these movements in HIV/AIDS programming, may influence the long-term success of HIV care and the scale-up of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) across the region. The provision of ART has opened up new possibilities for engaging with local communities, especially Pentecostals and AICS, who are witnessing the immediate benefits of ARV therapy. Expanded treatment may be the key to successful prevention as advocates of a comprehensive approach to the epidemic have long argued.

  1. [Successful treatment of HIV-associated chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy by early initiation of highly active anti-retroviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Kume, Kodai; Ikeda, Kazuyo; Kamada, Masaki; Touge, Tetsuo; Deguchi, Kazushi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with HIV infection presented with lower leg dominant dysesthesia, muscle weakness and sensory ataxia of 3 month's duration. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) showed demyelination change in the median and tibial nerves and sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) in the sural nerve was not evoked. Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) showed the delayed N9 latency. Diagnose of HIV-associated chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) was made. Although the CD4 lymphocyte counts were relatively preserved (466/μl), highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) was started according to a new guideline for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescents recommending early initiation of treatment. After six months, HIV1-RNA was not detected and the CD4 lymphocyte counts showed a recovering trend (585/μl). His symptoms had disappeared, except for dysesthesia in the tip of a toe. Repeated NCS demonstrated full recovery from the demyelination and appearance of SNAP in the sural nerve. The improvement of his symptoms and NCS findings has been maintained for two years. Although effectiveness of immunotherapies such as oral prednisone, high-dose immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis have been reported in HIV-associated CIDP, early initiation of HAART may be also important for favorable prognosis in HIV-associated CIDP.

  2. IMMORTALIZATION OF HUMAN AND RHESUS MACAQUE PRIMARY ANTIGEN-SPECIFIC T CELLS BY RETROVIRALLY TRANSDUCED TELOMERASE REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE

    PubMed Central

    Barsov, Eugene V.

    2011-01-01

    Human and rhesus macaque primary antigen-specific T cells derived from infected or immunized individuals or animals are a valuable material with which to study cellular immune responses against pathogens and tumors. Antigen-specific T cells can be expanded in vitro but have a finite proliferative life span. After a limited period in culture, primary T cells undergo replicative senescence and stop dividing. This restricts their applicability to short term experiments and complicates their use in adoptive immunotherapy. The proliferative life span of primary human and rhesus macaque T cells can be considerably extended by ectopically expressed human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). Antigen-specific T cells transduced with TERT-expressing retroviral vectors can proliferate and expand in culture for long periods of time while maintaining their primary T cell characteristics including antigen-specific responses. Thus, TERT-immortalized T cells are an important and valuable resource for studying T cell immune responses and, potentially, for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:22048804

  3. A review of ICT systems for HIV/AIDS and anti-retroviral treatment management in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Tove; Rivett, Ulrike; Fortuin, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Telemedicine and e-health systems have been proposed as a support tool, to monitor and evaluate HIV/AIDS management strategies. The aim of the present study was to provide an overview of telemedicine and e-health systems for HIV/AIDS in South Africa as a basis for developing an e-health toolkit for anti-retroviral treatment (ART). An initial literature review and a subsequent interactive networking approach were chosen to identify telemedicine and e-health systems, projects and services for HIV/AIDS and ART facilities in low-resource settings and under-served areas. The literature review produced little useful information. In contrast, the face-to-face interviews and the focus group discussions provided useful information about projects and systems which had not been published. The meetings involved 1 - 5 people per session, about 30 people in total. The review showed that there were some plans for telemedicine and e-health implementation in South Africa. However, there was no all-inclusive ICT-based system in place for AIDS treatment there. With the exception of the major health information systems and electronic patient record systems, none of the telemedicine and e-health systems identified in the review were ready to be deployed across the country as a whole.

  4. Predictors for mortality and loss to follow-up among children receiving anti-retroviral therapy in Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Fetzer, Bradley C.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kamthuzi, Portia; Hyde, Lisa; Bramson, Brian; Jobarteh, Kebba; Torjesen, Kristine; Miller, William C.; Hoffman, Irving; Kazembe, Peter; Mwansambo, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Summary OBJECTIVES To determine predictors of mortality in children on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) who attended the Paediatric HIV Clinic at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi. METHODS Retrospective case cohort study by chart review of children who had started ART between October 2004 and May 2006. Bivariable and multivariable analysis were performed with and without defaulters to evaluate associations according to vital status and to identify independent predictors of mortality. RESULTS Forty-one of 258 children (15.9%) were deceased, 185 (71.7%) were alive, and 32 (12.4%) had defaulted: 51% were female, 7% were under 18 months, 26% were 18 months to 5 years, and 54% were >5 years of age. Most were WHO stage III or IV (56% and 37%, respectively). On multivariate analysis, factors most strongly associated with mortality and defaulting were age <18 months [hazards ratio (HR) 2.11 (95% CI 1.0–4.51)] and WHO stage IV [HR 2.00 (95% CI 1.07–3.76)]. CONCLUSIONS To improve outcomes of HIV-positive children, they must be identified and treated early, specifically children under 18 months of age. Access to infant diagnostic procedures must be improved to allow effective initiation of ART in infants at higher risk of death. PMID:19563431

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cells retrovirally transduced with prodrug-converting genes are suitable vehicles for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ďuriniková, E; Kučerová, L; Matúšková, M

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) possess a set of several fairly unique properties which make them ideally suitable both for cellular therapies and regenerative medicine. These include: relative ease of isolation, the ability to differentiate along mesenchymal and non-mesenchymal lineages in vitro and the ability to be extensively expanded in culture without a loss of differentiative capacity. MSC are not only hypoimmunogenic, but they mediate immunosuppression upon transplantation, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory properties. They are able to home to damaged tissues, tumors, and metastases following systemic administration. The ability of homing holds big promise for tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Viruses are naturally evolved vehicles efficiently transferring their genes into host cells. This ability made them suitable for engineering vector systems for the delivery of genes of interest. MSC can be retrovirally transduced with genes encoding prodrug-converting genes (suicide genes), which are not toxic per se, but catalyze the formation of highly toxic metabolites following the application of a nontoxic prodrug. The homing ability of MSC holds advantages compared to virus vehicles which display many shortcomings in effective delivery of the therapeutic agents. Gene therapies mediated by viruses are limited by their restricted ability to track cancer cells infiltrating into the surrounding tissue, and by their low migratory capacity towards tumor. Thus combination of cellular therapy and gene delivery is an attractive option - it protects the vector from immune surveillance, and supports targeted delivery of a therapeutic gene/protein to the tumor site.

  6. Retroviral vector integration in post-transplant hematopoiesis in mice conditioned with either submyeloablative or ablative irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sadat, M A; Dirscherl, S; Sastry, L; Dantzer, J; Pech, N; Griffin, S; Hawkins, T; Zhao, Y; Barese, C N; Cross, S; Orazi, A; An, C; Goebel, W S; Yoder, M C; Li, X; Grez, M; Cornetta, K; Mooney, S D; Dinauer, M C

    2009-12-01

    X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency with absent phagocyte NADPH-oxidase activity caused by defects in the gene-encoding gp91(phox). Here, we evaluated strategies for less intensive conditioning for gene therapy of genetic blood disorders without selective advantage for gene correction, such as might be used in a human X-CGD protocol. We compared submyeloablative with ablative irradiation as conditioning in murine X-CGD, examining engraftment, oxidase activity and vector integration in mice transplanted with marrow transduced with a gamma-retroviral vector for gp91(phox) expression. The frequency of oxidase-positive neutrophils in the donor population was unexpectedly higher in many 300 cGy-conditioned mice compared with lethally irradiated recipients, as was the fraction of vector-marked donor secondary CFU-S12. Vector integration sites in marrow, spleen and secondary CFU-S12 DNA from primary recipients were enriched for cancer-associated genes, including Evi1, and integrations in or near cancer-associated genes were more frequent in marrow and secondary CFU-S12 from 300 cGy-conditioned mice compared with fully ablated mice. These findings support the concept that vector integration can confer a selection bias, and suggest that the intensity of the conditioning regimen may further influence the effects of vector integration on clonal selection in post-transplant engraftment and hematopoiesis.

  7. Sex after ART: sexual partnerships established by HIV-infected persons taking anti-retroviral therapy in Eastern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Janet; Russell, Steven; Khana, Kenneth; Ezati, Enoch; King, Rachel; Bunnell, Rebecca

    2009-10-01

    This paper explores the social contexts that influence the formation and nature of sexual partnerships among people on anti-retroviral therapy (ART). We draw on the findings of a qualitative, longitudinal study of 70 people (36 women and 34 men) who have been participating in a home-based ART programme for over three years in Eastern Uganda. Since initiating ART, 32 (18 men and 14 women) participants reported having had a new partner. Five participants (4 men and 1 woman) renewed relationships with spouses with whom they had been prior to starting ART. Overall, 37 of the 70 participants had had a sexual partner after starting ART. Companionship, material support, social and cultural norms, as well as a desire for sex and children, are drivers of new relationships. The opportunity that ART brings for people to get on with their lives brings with it a reinstatement into a social world that places a value on marriage and child-bearing. The sexual rights of those living with HIV and on ART need to be taken seriously and safer sex facilitated.

  8. Critical Role of Conserved Hydrophobic Residues within the Major Homology Region in Mature Retroviral Capsid Assembly ▿

    PubMed Central

    Purdy, John G.; Flanagan, John M.; Ropson, Ira J.; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E.; Craven, Rebecca C.

    2008-01-01

    During retroviral maturation, the CA protein undergoes dramatic structural changes and establishes unique intermolecular interfaces in the mature capsid shell that are different from those that existed in the immature precursor. The most conserved region of CA, the major homology region (MHR), has been implicated in both immature and mature assembly, although the precise contribution of the MHR residues to each event has been largely undefined. To test the roles of specific MHR residues in mature capsid assembly, an in vitro system was developed that allowed for the first-time formation of Rous sarcoma virus CA into structures resembling authentic capsids. The ability of CA to assemble organized structures was destroyed by substitutions of two conserved hydrophobic MHR residues and restored by second-site suppressors, demonstrating that these MHR residues are required for the proper assembly of mature capsids in addition to any role that these amino acids may play in immature particle assembly. The defect caused by the MHR mutations was identified as an early step in the capsid assembly process. The results provide strong evidence for a model in which the hydrophobic residues of the MHR control a conformational reorganization of CA that is needed to initiate capsid assembly and suggest that the formation of an interdomain interaction occurs early during maturation. PMID:18400856

  9. Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency: clinical comparison of retroviral vectors and treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Candotti, Fabio; Shaw, Kit L; Muul, Linda; Carbonaro, Denise; Sokolic, Robert; Choi, Christopher; Schurman, Shepherd H; Garabedian, Elizabeth; Kesserwan, Chimene; Jagadeesh, G Jayashree; Fu, Pei-Yu; Gschweng, Eric; Cooper, Aaron; Tisdale, John F; Weinberg, Kenneth I; Crooks, Gay M; Kapoor, Neena; Shah, Ami; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Smogorzewska, Monika; Wayne, Alan S; Rosenblatt, Howard M; Davis, Carla M; Hanson, Celine; Rishi, Radha G; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Yang, Otto O; Balamurugan, Arumugam; Bauer, Gerhard; Ireland, Joanna A; Engel, Barbara C; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Hershfield, Michael S; Blaese, R Michael; Parkman, Robertson; Kohn, Donald B

    2012-11-01

    We conducted a gene therapy trial in 10 patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency using 2 slightly different retroviral vectors for the transduction of patients' bone marrow CD34(+) cells. Four subjects were treated without pretransplantation cytoreduction and remained on ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) throughout the procedure. Only transient (months), low-level (< 0.01%) gene marking was observed in PBMCs of 2 older subjects (15 and 20 years of age), whereas some gene marking of PBMC has persisted for the past 9 years in 2 younger subjects (4 and 6 years). Six additional subjects were treated using the same gene transfer protocol, but after withdrawal of ERT and administration of low-dose busulfan (65-90 mg/m(2)). Three of these remain well, off ERT (5, 4, and 3 years postprocedure), with gene marking in PBMC of 1%-10%, and ADA enzyme expression in PBMC near or in the normal range. Two subjects were restarted on ERT because of poor gene marking and immune recovery, and one had a subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These studies directly demonstrate the importance of providing nonmyeloablative pretransplantation conditioning to achieve therapeutic benefits with gene therapy for ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency.

  10. Scale-up and manufacturing of clinical-grade self-inactivating γ-retroviral vectors by transient transfection.

    PubMed

    van der Loo, J C M; Swaney, W P; Grassman, E; Terwilliger, A; Higashimoto, T; Schambach, A; Baum, C; Thrasher, A J; Williams, D A; Nordling, D L; Reeves, L; Malik, P

    2012-03-01

    The need for γ-retroviral (gRV) vectors with a self-inactivating (SIN) design for clinical application has prompted a shift in methodology of vector manufacturing from the traditional use of stable producer lines to transient transfection-based techniques. Herein, we set out to define and optimize a scalable manufacturing process for the production of gRV vectors using transfection in a closed-system bioreactor in compliance with current good manufacturing practices (cGMP). The process was based on transient transfection of 293T cells on Fibra-Cel disks in the Wave Bioreactor. Cells were harvested from tissue culture flasks and transferred to the bioreactor containing Fibra-Cel in the presence of vector plasmid, packaging plasmids and calcium-phosphate in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and 10% fetal bovine serum. Virus supernatant was harvested at 10-14 h intervals. Using optimized procedures, a total of five ecotropic cGMP-grade gRV vectors were produced (9 liters each) with titers up to 3.6 × 10(7) infectious units per milliliter on 3T3 cells. One GMP preparation of vector-like particles was also produced. These results describe an optimized process for the generation of SIN viral vectors by transfection using a disposable platform that allows for the generation of clinical-grade viral vectors without the need for cleaning validation in a cost-effective manner.

  11. Retroviral Transduction of Helper T Cells as a Genetic Approach to Study Mechanisms Controlling their Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yogesh; Garden, Oliver A.; Lang, Florian; Cobb, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Helper T cell development and function must be tightly regulated to induce an appropriate immune response that eliminates specific pathogens yet prevents autoimmunity. Many approaches involving different model organisms have been utilized to understand the mechanisms controlling helper T cell development and function. However, studies using mouse models have proven to be highly informative due to the availability of genetic, cellular, and biochemical systems. One genetic approach in mice used by many labs involves retroviral transduction of primary helper T cells. This is a powerful approach due to its relative ease, making it accessible to almost any laboratory with basic skills in molecular biology and immunology. Therefore, multiple genes in wild type or mutant forms can readily be tested for function in helper T cells to understand their importance and mechanisms of action. We have optimized this approach and describe here the protocols for production of high titer retroviruses, isolation of primary murine helper T cells, and their transduction by retroviruses and differentiation toward the different helper subsets. Finally, the use of this approach is described in uncovering mechanisms utilized by microRNAs (miRNAs) to regulate pathways controlling helper T cell development and function. PMID:27842353

  12. Different impact of anti-retroviral regimen containing protease inhibitors on development of HIV-related Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Carleo, Maria Aurora; Di Martino, Filomena; Del Giudice, Annalisa; Gargiulo, Miriam; Parrella, Giovanni; Rosario, Pietro; Sangiovanni, Vincenzo; Viglietti, Rosaria; Esposito, Vincenzo; Chirianni, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), an AIDS-related malignancy, has dramatically decreased in the Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy (HAART) era. However, KS remains the second most frequent tumor in HIV-infected patients worldwide and has become the most common cancer in the sub-Saharan Africa. Experimental studies have demonstrated a direct anti-neoplastic effect of HAART, and overall of protease inhibitors (PIs), on KS. We describe five cases of KS in HIV-infected patients on HAART regimen, containing PIs as atazanavir/r (ATV/r), darunavir/r (DRV/r), lopinavir/r (LPV/r) and fosamprenavir (fAMP/r). Clinical and experimental observations support the hypothesis that PIs may play an important role in prevention and treatment of KS. In our study, the treatment with PIs of recent generation was not protective against the development of KS. Therefore, it could be necessary to re-evaluate the therapeutic effects of PIs and their role in the development and treatment of KS in HIV-infected patients. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase–deficient severe combined immune deficiency: clinical comparison of retroviral vectors and treatment plans

    PubMed Central

    Candotti, Fabio; Shaw, Kit L.; Muul, Linda; Carbonaro, Denise; Sokolic, Robert; Choi, Christopher; Schurman, Shepherd H.; Garabedian, Elizabeth; Kesserwan, Chimene; Jagadeesh, G. Jayashree; Fu, Pei-Yu; Gschweng, Eric; Cooper, Aaron; Tisdale, John F.; Weinberg, Kenneth I.; Crooks, Gay M.; Kapoor, Neena; Shah, Ami; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Smogorzewska, Monika; Wayne, Alan S.; Rosenblatt, Howard M.; Davis, Carla M.; Hanson, Celine; Rishi, Radha G.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Yang, Otto O.; Balamurugan, Arumugam; Bauer, Gerhard; Ireland, Joanna A.; Engel, Barbara C.; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Hershfield, Michael S.; Blaese, R. Michael; Parkman, Robertson

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a gene therapy trial in 10 patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA)–deficient severe combined immunodeficiency using 2 slightly different retroviral vectors for the transduction of patients' bone marrow CD34+ cells. Four subjects were treated without pretransplantation cytoreduction and remained on ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) throughout the procedure. Only transient (months), low-level (< 0.01%) gene marking was observed in PBMCs of 2 older subjects (15 and 20 years of age), whereas some gene marking of PBMC has persisted for the past 9 years in 2 younger subjects (4 and 6 years). Six additional subjects were treated using the same gene transfer protocol, but after withdrawal of ERT and administration of low-dose busulfan (65-90 mg/m2). Three of these remain well, off ERT (5, 4, and 3 years postprocedure), with gene marking in PBMC of 1%-10%, and ADA enzyme expression in PBMC near or in the normal range. Two subjects were restarted on ERT because of poor gene marking and immune recovery, and one had a subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These studies directly demonstrate the importance of providing nonmyeloablative pretransplantation conditioning to achieve therapeutic benefits with gene therapy for ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency. PMID:22968453

  14. Examining the relationship between psychological distress and adherence to anti-retroviral therapy among Ugandan adolescents living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mutumba, Massy; Musiime, Victor; Lepkwoski, James M; Harper, Gary W; Snow, Rachel C; Resnicow, Ken; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2016-07-01

    Psychological distress is common among adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) worldwide, and has been associated with non-adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART), leading to poor virologic suppression, drug resistance, and increased risk for AIDS morbidity and mortality. However, only a few studies have explored the relationship between psychological distress and ART adherence among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. The paper examines the relationship between psychological distress and ART adherence, and effect of psychosocial resources on ART adherence. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 464 ALHIV (aged 12-19; 53% female) seeking HIV care at a large HIV treatment center in Kampala, Uganda. ALHIV were recruited during routine clinic visits. Three self-reported binary adherence measures were utilized: missed pills in the past three days, non-adherence to the prescribed medical regimen, and self-rated adherence assessed using a visual analog scale. Psychological distress was measured as a continuous variable, and computed as the mean score on a locally developed and validated 25-item symptom checklist for Ugandan ALHIV. Psychosocial resources included spirituality, religiosity, optimism, social support, and coping strategies. After adjusting for respondents' socio-demographic characteristics and psychosocial resources, a unit increase in psychological distress was associated with increased odds of missing pills in past 3 days (Odds Ratio(OR) = 1.75; Confidence Interval (CI): 1.04-2.95), not following the prescribed regimen (OR = 1.63; CI: 1.08-2.46), and lower self-rated adherence (OR = 1.79; CI: 1.19-2.69). Psychosocial resources were associated with lower odds for non-adherence on all three self-report measures. There is a need to strengthen the psychosocial aspects of adolescent HIV care by developing interventions to identify and prevent psychological distress among Ugandan ALHIV.

  15. Challenges, successes and patterns of enrolment in the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial

    PubMed Central

    Rappoport, C; Engen, NW; Carey, C; Hudson, F; Denning, E; Sharma, S; Florence, E; Vjecha, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this report is to describe the challenges, successes and patterns of enrolment in the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study. Methods START is a collaboration of many partners with central coordination provided by the protocol team, the statistical and data management centre (SDMC), the International Network for Strategic Initiatives in Global HIV Trials (INSIGHT) network leadership, international coordinating centres and site coordinating centres. The SDMC prepared reports on study accrual, baseline characteristics and site performance that allowed monitoring of enrolment and data quality and helped to ensure the successful enrolment of this lar