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Sample records for amplifier control curve

  1. Efficient Power Amplifier for Motor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Pulse-width-modulated amplifier supplies high current as efficiently as low current needed for starting and running motor. Key to efficiency of motor-control amplifier is V-channel metal-oxide/semiconductor transistor Q1. Device has low saturation resistance. However, has large gate input capacitance and small margin between its turn-on voltage and maximum allowable gate-to-source voltage. Circuits for output stages overcome limitations of VMOS device.

  2. Magnetic Amplifier for Power Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-24

    GENI Project: ORNL is developing an electromagnet-based, amplifier-like device that will allow for complete control over the flow of power within the electric grid. To date, complete control of power flow within the grid has been prohibitively expensive. ORNL’s controller could provide a reliable, cost-effective solution to this problem. The team is combining two types of pre-existing technologies to assist in flow control, culminating in a prototype iron-based magnetic amplifier. Ordinarily, such a device would require expensive superconductive wire, but the magnetic iron core of ORNL’s device could serve as a low-cost alternative that is equally adept at regulating power flow.

  3. Linear control of oscillator and amplifier flows*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Peter J.; Sipp, Denis

    2016-08-01

    Linear control applied to fluid systems near an equilibrium point has important applications for many flows of industrial or fundamental interest. In this article we give an exposition of tools and approaches for the design of control strategies for globally stable or unstable flows. For unstable oscillator flows a feedback configuration and a model-based approach is proposed, while for stable noise-amplifier flows a feedforward setup and an approach based on system identification is advocated. Model reduction and robustness issues are addressed for the oscillator case; statistical learning techniques are emphasized for the amplifier case. Effective suppression of global and convective instabilities could be demonstrated for either case, even though the system-identification approach results in a superior robustness to off-design conditions.

  4. Magnetic Amplifier-Based Power-Flow Controller

    DOE PAGES

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar; Li, Zhi; Ozpineci, Burak

    2015-02-05

    The concept of the magnetic amplifier, a common electromagnetic device in electronic applications in the past, has seldom been used in power systems. In this paper, we introduce the magnetic amplifier-based power-flow controller (MAPFC), an innovative low-cost device that adopts the idea of the magnetic amplifier for power-flow control applications. The uniqueness of MAPFC is in the use of the magnetization of the ferromagnetic core, shared by an ac and a dc winding, as the medium to control the ac winding reactance inserted in series with the transmission line to be controlled. Large power flow in the line can bemore » regulated by the small dc input to the dc winding. Moreover, a project on the R&D of an MAPFC has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and Waukesha Electric Systems, Inc. since early 2012. Findings from the project are presented along with some results obtained in a laboratory environment.« less

  5. Magnetic Amplifier-Based Power-Flow Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar; Li, Zhi; Ozpineci, Burak

    2015-02-05

    The concept of the magnetic amplifier, a common electromagnetic device in electronic applications in the past, has seldom been used in power systems. In this paper, we introduce the magnetic amplifier-based power-flow controller (MAPFC), an innovative low-cost device that adopts the idea of the magnetic amplifier for power-flow control applications. The uniqueness of MAPFC is in the use of the magnetization of the ferromagnetic core, shared by an ac and a dc winding, as the medium to control the ac winding reactance inserted in series with the transmission line to be controlled. Large power flow in the line can be regulated by the small dc input to the dc winding. Moreover, a project on the R&D of an MAPFC has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and Waukesha Electric Systems, Inc. since early 2012. Findings from the project are presented along with some results obtained in a laboratory environment.

  6. Hybrid Antenna Amplifier: A Controllable High Power Microwave Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    relativistic traveling wave tubes (TWT), wide - bandwidth dielectric and plasma Cherenkov maser amplifiers [4-6] are developed as well. In all these...controllable power, frequency spectrum, phase, and also extracted microwave beam. The device may have wide bandwidth and high directivity. This could...of microwave antenna measurements were employed, with the use of low power X-band frequency tunable generator, to determine the level of reflections

  7. Drag Control through Wrinkling on Curved Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwagne, Denis; Reis, Pedro

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation on the wrinkling of positively curved surfaces and explore their use towards drag reduction applications. In our precision desktop-scale experiments we make use of rapid prototyping techniques to cast samples with custom geometry and material properties out of silicone-based rubbers. Our structures consist of a thin stiff shell that is chemically bonded to a thicker soft substrate. The substrate contains a spherical cavity that can be depressurized, under controlled volume conditions, to compress the ensemble structure. Under this compressive loading, the initially smooth outer-shell develops complex wrinkling patterns. We systematically characterize and quantify the morphology of the various patterns and study the phase diagram of the system. We consider both geometric and material quantities in the parameter space. Moreover, since the wrinkling patterns can be actuated dynamically using a pressure signal, we systematically characterize the aerodynamic behavior of our structures in the context of fluid drag reduction. An added advantage of the novel mechanism we introduce is that it allows for both dynamic switching and tuning of the surface morphology, thereby opening paths for drag control. D.T. thanks the B.A.E.F., the Fulbright Program and the WBI.World grants program for financial support.

  8. Drag Control through Wrinkling on Curved Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwagne, Denis; Reis, Pedro

    2013-03-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation on the wrinkling of positively curved surfaces and explore their use towards drag reduction applications. In our precision model experiments we make use of rapid prototyping techniques to cast samples with custom geometry and material properties out of silicone-based rubbers. Our structures consist of a thin stiff shell that is chemically bonded to a thicker soft substrate. The substrate contains a spherical cavity that can be depressurized, under controlled volume conditions, to compress the ensemble structure. Under this compressive loading, the initially smooth outer-shell develops complex wrinkling patterns. We systematically characterize and quantify the morphology of the various patterns and study the phase diagram of the system. We consider both geometric and material quantities in the parameter space. Moreover, since the wrinkling patterns can be actuated dynamically using a pressure signal, we systematically characterize the aerodynamic behavior of our structures in the context of fluid drag reduction. An added advantage of our novel mechanism is that it allows for both dynamic switching and tuning of the surface morphology, thereby opening paths for drag control. D.T. thanks the B.A.E.F., the Fulbright Program and the WBI.World grants program for financial support.

  9. A regenerative CO2 amplifier with controlled pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Kazakov, K. Kh.; Sorochenko, V. R.; Shakir, Iu. A.

    1991-03-01

    The paper reports the development of a regenerative TEA CO2 amplifier with the pulse duration in a train controlled within the range from 10 to 40 ns, the interval between the pulses amounting to 110 ns and their total energy amounting to 4 J. Laser radiation screening by an optical-air-breakdown plasma in a lens telescope focus was used to form the injected pulse. Good reproduction of the temporal parameters of the injected pulse was achieved by virtue of the injection of radiation from a frequency stabilized CW CO2-laser into the master oscillator.

  10. Array controller system with cryogenic pre-amplifiers for MIMIZUKU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, K.; Sako, S.; Miyata, T.; Kamizuka, T.; Ohsawa, R.; Uchiyama, M. S.; Mori, K.; Yamaguchi, J.; Asano, K.; Uchiyama, M.

    2016-07-01

    MIMIZUKU is a mid-infrared imager and spectrograph being developed for the University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory (TAO) 6.5-m telescope (PI: Y. Yoshii). To fully utilize a high atmospheric transmission of the Chajnantor site, MIMIZUKU covers a wide wavelength range from 2 to 38 μm with three array detectors: a HAWAII-1RG HgCdTe 1024 × 1024 array with a 5 μm cutoff manufactured by Teledyne, an Aquarius Si:As IBC 1024 × 1024 array by Raytheon, and a MF-128 Si:Sb BIB 128 × 128 array by DRS. We have newly developed an array controller system to operate these multiple arrays. A sampling rate higher than 0.5 MHz is required to prevent from saturation of their wells in broad-band imaging observations with MIMIZUKU due to high thermal background flux. Such high speed signals are dulled when passing through lines from the arrays to readout circuits. To overcome this problem, we have developed high-speed cryogenic buffer pre-amplifier circuits with commercial GaAs MESFETs, instead of Si JFETs, which are generally used in buffer amplifiers at cryogenic temperatures. The cryogenic buffer circuits are installed on an outer wall of the optical bench of MIMIZUKU at 20 K. We have measured readout noises of the array controller system including the cryogenic buffers in a test cryostat and room temperature circuits and confirmed that input referred noises of the system are lower than the specification value of the readout noise of the Aquarius array.

  11. Narrow linewidth laterally coupled 1.55 μm AlGaInAs/InP distributed feedback lasers integrated with a curved tapered semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lianping; Haji, Mohsin; Akbar, Jehan; Marsh, John H

    2012-11-01

    We present a laterally coupled 1.55 μm AlGaInAs/InP distributed feedback laser monolithically integrated with a curved tapered optical amplifier, providing an output power of 210 mW with single transverse and longitudinal mode operation exhibiting a record low linewidth of 64 kHz.

  12. Control Rod Reactivity Curves for the Annular Core Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depriest, K. Russell; Kajder, Karen C.; Frye, Jason N.; Denman, Matthew R.

    2009-08-01

    Experiments were conducted at the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) to increase the fidelity of the control rod integral reactivity worth curve. This experiment series was designed to refine the integral reactivity curve used for pulse yield prediction and eliminate the need for operator compensation in the pulse setup. The experiment series consisted of delayed critical and positive period measurements with various ACRR cavity configurations. An improved integral reactivity worth curve for the ACRR control rods has been constructed using the positive period measurements, the delayed critical measurements, and radiation transport modeling of the reactor. A series of prompt period measurements is used to validate that the new control rod curve more accurately predicts the energy yield of the pulse operations. The new reactivity worth curve is compared with the current curve that was developed using traditional approaches.

  13. Two stage dual gate MESFET monolithic gain control amplifier for Ka-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V.; Geddes, J.; Contolatis, A.

    A monolithic two stage gain control amplifier has been developed using submicron gate length dual gate MESFETs fabricated on ion implanted material. The amplifier has a gain of 12 dB at 30 GHz with a gain control range of over 30 dB. This ion implanted monolithic IC is readily integrable with other phased array receiver functions such as low noise amplifiers and phase shifters.

  14. Use of a photonic crystal for optical amplifier gain control

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2006-07-18

    An optical amplifier having a uniform gain profile uses a photonic crystal to tune the density-of-states of a gain medium so as to modify the light emission rate between atomic states. The density-of-states of the gain medium is tuned by selecting the size, shape, dielectric constant, and spacing of a plurality of microcavity defects in the photonic crystal. The optical amplifier is particularly useful for the regeneration of DWDM signals in long optical fibers.

  15. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL, STATIC CONTROL SERIES. MAGNETIC AMPLIFIERS, UNIT 9B, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR TEACHER USE IN DIRECTING INDIVIDUAL STUDENT STUDY OF STATIC CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. THE UNIT OBJECTIVE IS TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF MAGNETIC AMPLIFIERS. EACH OF THE 12 INSTRUCTOR'S SHEETS GIVES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY…

  16. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL, STATIC CONTROL SERIES. MAGNETIC AMPLIFIERS. UNIT 9 B, ASSIGNMENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR INDIVIDUAL STUDENT USE IN STUDYING STATIC CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. THE UNIT OBJECTIVE IS TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PRINCIPLES OF MAGNETIC AMPLIFIER OPERATION. EACH OF THE 12 ASSIGNMENT SHEETS CONTAINS THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE,…

  17. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL, STATIC CONTROL SERIES. MAGNETIC AMPLIFIERS. UNIT 9 B, ASSIGNMENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR INDIVIDUAL STUDENT USE IN STUDYING STATIC CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. THE UNIT OBJECTIVE IS TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PRINCIPLES OF MAGNETIC AMPLIFIER OPERATION. EACH OF THE 12 ASSIGNMENT SHEETS CONTAINS THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE,…

  18. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL, STATIC CONTROL SERIES. MAGNETIC AMPLIFIERS, UNIT 9B, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR TEACHER USE IN DIRECTING INDIVIDUAL STUDENT STUDY OF STATIC CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. THE UNIT OBJECTIVE IS TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF MAGNETIC AMPLIFIERS. EACH OF THE 12 INSTRUCTOR'S SHEETS GIVES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY…

  19. Addressing Institutional Amplifiers in the Dynamics and Control of Tuberculosis Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis outbreaks originating in prisons, mines, or hospital wards can spread to the larger community. Recent proposals have targeted these high-transmission institutional amplifiers by improving case detection, treatment, or reducing the size of the exposed population. However, what effects these alternative proposals may have is unclear. We mathematically modeled these control strategies and found case detection and treatment methods insufficient in addressing epidemics involving common types of institutional amplifiers. Movement of persons in and out of amplifiers fundamentally altered the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis in a manner not effectively mitigated by detection or treatment alone. Policies increasing the population size exposed to amplifiers or the per-person duration of exposure within amplifiers potentially worsened incidence, even in settings with high rates of detection and treatment success. However, reducing the total population size entering institutional amplifiers significantly lowered tuberculosis incidence and the risk of propagating new drug-resistant tuberculosis strains. PMID:21212197

  20. Addressing institutional amplifiers in the dynamics and control of tuberculosis epidemics.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis outbreaks originating in prisons, mines, or hospital wards can spread to the larger community. Recent proposals have targeted these high-transmission institutional amplifiers by improving case detection, treatment, or reducing the size of the exposed population. However, what effects these alternative proposals may have is unclear. We mathematically modeled these control strategies and found case detection and treatment methods insufficient in addressing epidemics involving common types of institutional amplifiers. Movement of persons in and out of amplifiers fundamentally altered the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis in a manner not effectively mitigated by detection or treatment alone. Policies increasing the population size exposed to amplifiers or the per-person duration of exposure within amplifiers potentially worsened incidence, even in settings with high rates of detection and treatment success. However, reducing the total population size entering institutional amplifiers significantly lowered tuberculosis incidence and the risk of propagating new drug-resistant tuberculosis strains.

  1. Optimal vibration control of curved beams using distributed parameter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushou; Jin, Dongping; Wen, Hao

    2016-12-01

    The design of linear quadratic optimal controller using spectral factorization method is studied for vibration suppression of curved beam structures modeled as distributed parameter models. The equations of motion for active control of the in-plane vibration of a curved beam are developed firstly considering its shear deformation and rotary inertia, and then the state space model of the curved beam is established directly using the partial differential equations of motion. The functional gains for the distributed parameter model of curved beam are calculated by extending the spectral factorization method. Moreover, the response of the closed-loop control system is derived explicitly in frequency domain. Finally, the suppression of the vibration at the free end of a cantilevered curved beam by point control moment is studied through numerical case studies, in which the benefit of the presented method is shown by comparison with a constant gain velocity feedback control law, and the performance of the presented method on avoidance of control spillover is demonstrated.

  2. OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIER CIRCUITS FOR CONTROLLED POTENTIAL CYCLIC VOLTAMMETRY, II,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    are described, a mechanical or motor driven unit, and an OA integrator network which is more versatile. Cyclic voltammetry appears to have great...Several practical, inexpensive, operational amplifier (OA) circuits are described which are particularly useful in single sweep and cyclic ... voltammetry at stationary electrodes. Specific adaptations of OA’s to electroanalytical instrumentation were made some time ago by Booman and coworkers and

  3. Amplifier Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeports, David

    2006-12-01

    By definition, a high fidelity amplifier's instantaneous output voltage is directly proportional to its instantaneous input voltage. While high fidelity is generally valued in the amplification of recorded music, nonlinearity, also known as distortion, is desirable in the amplification of some musical instruments. In particular, guitar amplifiers exploit nonlinearity to increase both the harmonic content and sustain of a guitar's sound. I will discuss how both modifications in sound result from saturation of triode tubes and transistors. Additionally, I will describe the difference in the symmetry of saturation curves for transistors and tubes and the reason why tube guitar amplifiers are generally considered to be superior to solid-state amplifiers. Finally, I will discuss attempts to use solid-state electronics to replicate the sound of tube amplifiers.

  4. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize and unstable wave.

  5. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize an unstable wave.

  6. Photonic Lantern Adaptive Spatial Mode Control in LMA Fiber Amplifiers using SPGD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-15

    fiber amplifiers using SPGD ** Juan Montoya 1,* , Chris Aleshire 1 , Christopher Hwang 1 , Nicolas K. Fontaine 2 , Amado Velazquez 3 , Dale H. Martz...ll.mit.edu Abstract: We demonstrate adaptive-spatial mode control (ASMC) in few- moded double-clad large mode area (LMA) fiber amplifiers by using an...D. V. Murphy, A. Sanchez, and T. Y. Fan, "Coherent combining of a 4 kW, eight-element fiber amplifier array," Opt. Lett. 36, 2686-2688 (2011). 3. F

  7. Optoelectronic gain control of a microwave single stage GaAs MESFET amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    1988-01-01

    Gain control of a single stage GaAs MESFET amplifier is demonstrated by the use of optical illumination of photon energy greater than the GaAs bandgap. The optical illumination is supplied by a semiconductor laser diode and is coupled to the Schottky gate of the MESFET by an optical fiber. The increase in gain is observed to be as much as 5.15 dB when the MESFET is biased close to pinchoff, that is, V(sub gs) equals -1.5 V and with optical illumination of 1.5 mW. The computed maximum available gain (MAG) and current gain (bar h sub 21 bar) from the de-embedded s-parameters show that MAG is unaffected by optical illumination, however, bar h(sub 21)bar increases by more than 2 dB under optical illumination of 1.5 mW. The maximum frequency of oscillation (F sub max) and the unity current gain cut-off frequency (F sub t) obtained by extrapolating the MAG and bar h(sub 21)bar curves, respectively, show that the F(sub max) is insensitive to optical illumination but F(sub t) increases by 5 GHz.

  8. A High Efficiency Variable Gain Amplifier Circuit with Controllable Transconductance Amp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okura, Tetsuro; Okura, Shunsuke; Ido, Toru; Taniguchi, Kenji

    A novel power reduction technique for a variable gain amplifier (VGA) with a two-stage operational amplifier is proposed. The technique improves the power consumption of a VGA by optimizing the bandwidth and the phase margin dynamically on all gain range of the VGA through controlling the input transconductance of opamp. A VGA utilizing the proposed technique shows 40% reduction of power consumption against a conventional VGA at the best condition of VGA gain range.

  9. Robust identification of backbone curves using control-based continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renson, L.; Gonzalez-Buelga, A.; Barton, D. A. W.; Neild, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Control-based continuation is a recently developed approach for testing nonlinear dynamic systems in a controlled manner and exploring their dynamic features as system parameters are varied. In this paper, control-based continuation is adapted to follow the locus where system response and excitation are in quadrature, extracting the backbone curve of the underlying conservative system. The method is applied to a single-degree-of-freedom oscillator under base excitation, and the results are compared with the standard resonant-decay method.

  10. Digitally Controllable Current Amplifier and Current Conveyors in Practical Application of Controllable Frequency Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, Josef; Jerabek, Jan; Langhammer, Lukas; Sotner, Roman; Dvorak, Jan; Panek, David

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the simulations results in comparison with the measured results of the practical realization of the multifunctional second order frequency filter with a Digitally Adjustable Current Amplifier (DACA) and two Dual-Output Controllable Current Conveyors (CCCII +/-). This filter is designed for use in current mode. The filter was designed of the single input multiple outputs (SIMO) type, therefore it has only one input and three outputs with individual filtering functions. DACA element used in a newly proposed circuit is present in form of an integrated chip and the current conveyors are implemented using the Universal Current Conveyor (UCC) chip with designation UCC-N1B. Proposed frequency filter enables independent control of the pole frequency using parameters of two current conveyors and also independent control of the quality factor by change of a current gain of DACA.

  11. Multiple curved descending approaches and the air traffic control problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, S. G.; Mcpherson, D.; Kreifeldt, J.; Wemple, T. E.

    1977-01-01

    A terminal area air traffic control simulation was designed to study ways of accommodating increased air traffic density. The concepts that were investigated assumed the availability of the microwave landing system and data link and included: (1) multiple curved descending final approaches; (2) parallel runways certified for independent and simultaneous operation under IFR conditions; (3) closer spacing between successive aircraft; and (4) a distributed management system between the air and ground. Three groups each consisting of three pilots and two air traffic controllers flew a combined total of 350 approaches. Piloted simulators were supplied with computer generated traffic situation displays and flight instruments. The controllers were supplied with a terminal area map and digital status information. Pilots and controllers also reported that the distributed management procedure was somewhat more safe and orderly than the centralized management procedure. Flying precision increased as the amount of turn required to intersect the outer mark decreased. Pilots reported that they preferred the alternative of multiple curved descending approaches with wider spacing between aircraft to closer spacing on single, straight in finals while controllers preferred the latter option. Both pilots and controllers felt that parallel runways are an acceptable way to accommodate increased traffic density safely and expeditiously.

  12. Computer controlled processing of composites utilizing dielectric signature curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, L. B.; Dominski, Marty

    1992-10-01

    Three composite materials for aircraft applications are experimentally developed by using automated computer control of the autoclave fabrication process. The computer-control methodology is an expert system based on data regarding the correlation of dielectric information and physicochemical changes in polymer matrices during processing. Thermal and rheological analyses are conducted with thermocouples and dielectric sensors, and real-time data are sent to the computer to control the autoclave processing. Sample laminates including PEEK APC-2/AS-4, SC-1008 phenolic, and PMR-15 polyimide are studied for density, resin/void content, and fiber volume. Critical process events are identified which contribute to the production of high-quality composites, and the process-control technique is shown to reduce scrap and enhance uniformity in the samples. The study demonstrates the utility of dielectric signature curves as the basis for computer-controlled composite processing.

  13. The power stability of a fiber amplifier based on a multifunction card and PID control program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linjie; Yang, Wenguang; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, JianMing; Jia, Suotang

    2016-06-01

    The power stability of a fiber amplifier was significantly improved by means of simultaneously controlling the current of a fiber amplifier and the diffraction efficiency of an acousto-optical modulator. The real-time fluctuation of laser power was recorded by a multifunction card and processed by a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control program. The feedback loop voltage was introduced to the fiber laser amplifier and acoustic-optic modulator through the analog output of the multifunction card. The control method based on a multifunction card and PID program has good scalability, flexibility and reliability for the complex system on the condition in which the frequency and power of the laser need to be precisely stabilized.

  14. Controllable Curved Mirrors Made from Single-Layer EAP Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2004-01-01

    A document proposes that lightweight, deployable, large-aperture, controllable curved mirrors made of reflectively coated thin electroactive-polymer (EAP) films be developed for use in spaceborne microwave and optical systems. In these mirrors, the EAP films would serve as both structures and actuators. EAPs that are potentially suitable for such use include piezoelectric, electrostrictive, ferroelectric, and dielectric polymers. These materials exhibit strains proportional to the squares of applied electric fields. Utilizing this phenomenon, a curved mirror according to the proposal could be made from a flat film, upon which a nonuniform electrostatic potential (decreasing from the center toward the edge) would be imposed to obtain a required curvature. The effect would be analogous to that of an old-fashioned metalworking practice in which a flat metal sheet is made into a bowl by hammering it repeatedly, the frequency of hammer blows decreasing with distance from the center. In operation, the nonuniform electrostatic potential could be imposed by use of an electron gun. Calculations have shown that by use of a single- layer film made of a currently available EAP, it would be possible to control the focal length of a 2-m-diameter mirror from infinity to 1.25 m.

  15. Time Difference Amplifier with Robust Gain Using Closed-Loop Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakura, Toru; Mandai, Shingo; Ikeda, Makoto; Asada, Kunihiro

    This paper presents a Time Difference Amplifier (TDA) that amplifies the input time difference into the output time difference. Cross coupled chains of variable delay cells with the same number of stages are applicable for TDA, and the gain is adjusted via the closed-loop control. The TDA was fabricated using 65nm CMOS and the measurement results show that the time difference gain is 4.78 at a nominal power supply while the designed gain is 4.0. The gain is stable enough to be less than 1.4% gain shift under ±10% power supply voltage fluctuation.

  16. Linear control of neuronal spike timing using phase response curves.

    PubMed

    Stigen, Tyler; Danzl, Per; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple, robust, linear method to control the spike timing of a periodically firing neuron. The control scheme uses the neuron's phase response curve to identify an area of optimal sensitivity for the chosen stimulation parameters. The spike advance as a function of current pulse amplitude is characterized at the optimal phase and a linear least-squares regression is fit to the data. The inverted regression is used as the control function for this method. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated through numerical simulations of a Hodgkin-Huxley style neuron model as well as in real neurons from rat hippocampal slice preparations. The study shows a proof of concept for the application of a linear control scheme to control neuron spike timing in-vitro. This study was done on an individual cell level, but translation to a tissue or network level is possible. Control schemes of this type could be implemented in a closed loop implantable device to treat neuromotor disorders involving pathologically neuronal activity such as epilepsy or Parkinson's disease.

  17. Controlling the 1 μm spontaneous emission in Er/Yb co-doped fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Antonczak, Arkadiusz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2011-09-26

    In this paper we present our experimental studies on controlling the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from Yb(3+) ions in Er/Yb co-doped fiber amplifiers. We propose a new method of controlling the Yb-ASE by stimulating a laser emission at 1064 nm in the amplifier, by providing a positive 1 μm signal feedback loop. The results are discussed and compared to a conventional amplifier setup without 1 μm ASE control and to an amplifier with auxiliary 1064 nm seeding. We have shown, that applying a 1064 nm signal loop in an Er/Yb amplifier can increase the output power at 1550 nm and provide stable operation without parasitic lasing at 1 μm.

  18. Automatic frequency controller for power amplifiers used in bio-implanted applications: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Mahammad A; Hussein, Hussein A; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-12-11

    With the development of communication technologies, the use of wireless systems in biomedical implanted devices has become very useful. Bio-implantable devices are electronic devices which are used for treatment and monitoring brain implants, pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants and so on. The inductive coupling link is used to transmit power and data between the primary and secondary sides of the biomedical implanted system, in which efficient power amplifier is very much needed to ensure the best data transmission rates and low power losses. However, the efficiency of the implanted devices depends on the circuit design, controller, load variation, changes of radio frequency coil's mutual displacement and coupling coefficients. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various power amplifier classes and their characteristics, efficiency and controller techniques that have been used in bio-implants. The automatic frequency controller used in biomedical implants such as gate drive switching control, closed loop power control, voltage controlled oscillator, capacitor control and microcontroller frequency control have been explained. Most of these techniques keep the resonance frequency stable in transcutaneous power transfer between the external coil and the coil implanted inside the body. Detailed information including carrier frequency, power efficiency, coils displacement, power consumption, supplied voltage and CMOS chip for the controllers techniques are investigated and summarized in the provided tables. From the rigorous review, it is observed that the existing automatic frequency controller technologies are more or less can capable of performing well in the implant devices; however, the systems are still not up to the mark. Accordingly, current challenges and problems of the typical automatic frequency controller techniques for power amplifiers are illustrated, with a brief suggestions and discussion section concerning the progress of

  19. Automatic Frequency Controller for Power Amplifiers Used in Bio-Implanted Applications: Issues and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Mahammad A.; Hussein, Hussein A.; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A.; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    With the development of communication technologies, the use of wireless systems in biomedical implanted devices has become very useful. Bio-implantable devices are electronic devices which are used for treatment and monitoring brain implants, pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants and so on. The inductive coupling link is used to transmit power and data between the primary and secondary sides of the biomedical implanted system, in which efficient power amplifier is very much needed to ensure the best data transmission rates and low power losses. However, the efficiency of the implanted devices depends on the circuit design, controller, load variation, changes of radio frequency coil's mutual displacement and coupling coefficients. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various power amplifier classes and their characteristics, efficiency and controller techniques that have been used in bio-implants. The automatic frequency controller used in biomedical implants such as gate drive switching control, closed loop power control, voltage controlled oscillator, capacitor control and microcontroller frequency control have been explained. Most of these techniques keep the resonance frequency stable in transcutaneous power transfer between the external coil and the coil implanted inside the body. Detailed information including carrier frequency, power efficiency, coils displacement, power consumption, supplied voltage and CMOS chip for the controllers techniques are investigated and summarized in the provided tables. From the rigorous review, it is observed that the existing automatic frequency controller technologies are more or less can capable of performing well in the implant devices; however, the systems are still not up to the mark. Accordingly, current challenges and problems of the typical automatic frequency controller techniques for power amplifiers are illustrated, with a brief suggestions and discussion section concerning the progress of

  20. Decision curve analysis revisited: overall net benefit, relationships to ROC curve analysis, and application to case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Decision curve analysis has been introduced as a method to evaluate prediction models in terms of their clinical consequences if used for a binary classification of subjects into a group who should and into a group who should not be treated. The key concept for this type of evaluation is the "net benefit", a concept borrowed from utility theory. Methods We recall the foundations of decision curve analysis and discuss some new aspects. First, we stress the formal distinction between the net benefit for the treated and for the untreated and define the concept of the "overall net benefit". Next, we revisit the important distinction between the concept of accuracy, as typically assessed using the Youden index and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and the concept of utility of a prediction model, as assessed using decision curve analysis. Finally, we provide an explicit implementation of decision curve analysis to be applied in the context of case-control studies. Results We show that the overall net benefit, which combines the net benefit for the treated and the untreated, is a natural alternative to the benefit achieved by a model, being invariant with respect to the coding of the outcome, and conveying a more comprehensive picture of the situation. Further, within the framework of decision curve analysis, we illustrate the important difference between the accuracy and the utility of a model, demonstrating how poor an accurate model may be in terms of its net benefit. Eventually, we expose that the application of decision curve analysis to case-control studies, where an accurate estimate of the true prevalence of a disease cannot be obtained from the data, is achieved with a few modifications to the original calculation procedure. Conclusions We present several interrelated extensions to decision curve analysis that will both facilitate its interpretation and broaden its potential area of application. PMID:21696604

  1. Reduction of Timing Jitter with Active Control in a kHz Regenerative Amplifier of Femtosecond Pulse Ti:Al2O3 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taisuke; Takasago, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Katsuyuki; Zhang, Zhigang; Torizuka, Kenji; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2001-03-01

    We measured the timing error of femtosecond pulses amplified by a Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier operated at a 1 kHz repetition rate using a modified cross-correlation technique. This technique can detect sub-femtosecond timing variation. By actively controlling the amplifier cavity length, we reduced the rms timing jitter of the regenerative amplifier into the sub-femtosecond range.

  2. Wavefront control of main-amplifier system in the SG-Ⅲ laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De'en, Wang; Dongxia, Hu; Qiang, Yuan; Qiao, Xue; Wei, Zhou; Ying, Yang; Xin, Zhang; Xuewei, Deng; Yuancheng, Wang; Junpu, Zhao; Wu, Deng; Xiaofeng, Wei; Wanjun, Dai; Feng, Jing; Qihua, Zhu; Wanguo, Zheng

    2017-07-01

    SG-Ⅲ is a large, 48-beam, high power laser facility mainly for inertial confinement fusion physics experiments. Wavefront distortion is a primary factor decreasing focusability quality of laser beam and impacting secure performance of laser device, and main-amplifier system is one major source of aberrations. Based on the specific configuration of the SG-Ⅲ main amplifier, two wavefront control approaches are studied, termed as traditional four-pass wavefront correction and novel double-pass wavefront correction. Comparison results show that, both of them are feasible for the wavefront compensation, but double-pass mode is more suitable for our system, mainly because it can make the wavefront distributing more evenly in the different spatial filter pinholes, the high power laser passing through the pinholes more secure and the output beam quality meeting the required performance.

  3. A digitally controlled power amplifier with neutralization capacitors for Zigbee™ applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Jia; Shengxi, Diao; Xuejuan, Zhang; Zhongqian, Fu; Fujiang, Lin

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a single chip CMOS power amplifier with neutralization capacitors for Zigbee™ system according to IEEE 802.15.4. A novel structure with digital interface is adopted, which allows the output power of a PA to be controlled by baseband signal directly, so there is no need for DAC. The neutralization capacitors will increase reverse isolation. The chip is implemented in SMIC 0.18 μm CMOS technology. Measurement shows that the proposed power amplifier has a 13.5 dB power gain, 3.48 dBm output power and 35.1% PAE at P1dB point. The core area is 0.73 × 0.55 mm2.

  4. Bidirectional amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Wright, James T.

    1986-01-01

    A bilateral circuit is operable for transmitting signals in two directions without generation of ringing due to feedback caused by the insertion of the circuit. The circuit may include gain for each of the signals to provide a bidirectional amplifier. The signals are passed through two separate paths, with a unidirectional amplifier in each path. A controlled sampling device is provided in each path for sampling the two signals. Any feedback loop between the two signals is disrupted by providing a phase displacement between the control signals for the two sampling devices.

  5. Bidirectional amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.T.

    1984-02-02

    A bilateral circuit is operable for transmitting signals in two directions without generation of ringing due to feedback caused by the insertion of the circuit. The circuit may include gain for each of the signals to provide a bidirectional amplifier. The signals are passed through two separate paths, with a unidirectional amplifier in each path. A controlled sampling device is provided in each path for sampling the two signals. Any feedback loop between the two signals is disrupted by providing a phase displacement between the control signals for the two sampling devices.

  6. Design and test of a new multi-amplifier system with phase and amplitude control.

    PubMed

    Wust, P; Fähling, H; Helzel, T; Kniephoff, M; Wlodarczyk, W; Mönich, G; Felix, R

    1998-01-01

    The clinical relevance of the radiofrequency regional hyperthermia (RF-RHT) as an adjuvant cancer therapy grows continuously. Simulation studies for optimization of RF-RHT based on the annular phased array systems have shown a significant improvement of power deposition patterns with increasing number of channels. However, this probably requires higher phase accuracy and amplitude stability than are provided by presently used clinical systems, e.g. BSD-2000. Measurements performed on the BSD-200 electronic revealed phase inaccuracies up to +/- 20 degrees and errors in the power registration of +/- 20 W (up to +/- 50 W in the low power range). These errors are further enhanced by the mismatching of the external load (antenna applicator) and thermal instabilities. To achieve the required phase accuracy and long-term stability in the prototype of a new amplifier system, single-sideband (SSB) mixing in combination with direct digital synthesizers (DDS), in-phase and quadrature-phase (IQ) processing and phase-lock loop (PLL) were used. In the DDS's the actual phase of the output signal of each channel is calculated in real-time. No analogue control loop is involved that may cause thermal offset or drift problems. Each DDS operates at a low intermediate frequency (IF) of 1 MHz. To transform the phase information of this IF signal into the desired RF band, SSB mixing-up is performed. A second frequency source, operating as a local oscillator (LO) in the RF band, is required for this technique. Also, the frequency adjustment of the desired RF signal is performed in the LO. These phase and frequency adjustment units are followed by the high efficiency AB-class solid state amplifier unit. The phase and power level stability of the amplifier are controlled by means of digital PLL structures in conjunction with look-up tables. For this control test signals are coupled out by means of directional couplers. The phase control is based on very sensitive phase comparison. These

  7. Photometry of particulate mixtures: What controls the phase curve?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilorget, C.; Fernando, J.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Douté, S.

    2015-04-01

    The amplitude and angular distribution of the light scattered by planetary surfaces give essential information about their physical and compositional properties. In particular, the angular variation of the bidirectional reflectance, characterized through the phase curve, is directly related to the grain size, shape and internal structure. We use a new radiative transfer model that allows specifying the photometric parameters of each grain individually to study the evolution of the phase curve for various kinds of mixtures (spatial, intimate and layered), mimicking different situations encountered for natural surfaces. Results show that the phase curve evolution is driven by the most abundant/brightest/highly anisotropic scattering grains within the mixture. Both spatial and intimate mixtures show similar trends in the phase curves when varying the photometric parameters of the grains. Simple laws have been produced to quantify the evolution of these variations. Layered mixtures have also been investigated and are generally very sensitive to the photometric properties of the top monolayer. Implications for the interpretation of photometric data and their link with the phases identified by spectroscopy are examined. The photometric properties of a few planetary bodies are also discussed over a couple of examples. These different results constitute a new support for the interpretation of orbital/in situ photometric datasets.

  8. Note: Wide band amplifier for quartz tuning fork sensors with digitally controlled stray capacitance compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ping; Hao, Lifeng; Ding, Ning; Jiao, Weicheng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Rongguo

    2015-11-01

    We presented a preamplifier design for quartz tuning fork (QTF) sensors in which the stray capacitance is digitally compensated. In this design, the manually controlled variable capacitor is replaced by a pair of varicap diodes, whose capacitance could be accurately tuned by a bias voltage. A tuning circuit including a single side low power operational amplifier, a digital-to-analog converter, and a microprocessor is also described, and the tuning process can be conveniently carried out on a personal computer. For the design, the noise level was investigated experimentally.

  9. Controlling Photon Echo in a Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifier Using Shaped Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A. K.; Karni, O.; Khanonkin, I.; Eisenstein, G.

    2017-05-01

    Two-pulse photon-echo-based quantum-memory applications require a precise control over the echo strength and appearance time. We describe a numerical investigation of observation and control of photon echo in a room-temperature InAs /InP -based quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). We address an important case where the spectral excitation is narrower than the inhomogeneous broadening of the SOA. It is revealed that, in such a QD SOA, the amplitude of the echo pulse depends not only on the excitation-to-rephasing pulse temporal separation but also on the interference among the rephrasing pulse and the echo pulses generated during the propagation along the amplifier. More importantly, the appearance time and amplitude of the echo pulse can be precisely controlled by shaping the first (excitation) pulse. We also assert that deviations in the echo pulse stemming from the SOA gain inhomogeneity can be compensated for so as to be utilized in quantum coherent information processing.

  10. A low-cost, FPGA-based servo controller with lock-in amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Barry, J. F.; Shuman, E. S.; Steinecker, M. H.; DeMille, D.

    2012-10-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a low-cost, FPGA-based servo controller with an integrated waveform synthesizer and lock-in amplifier. This system has been designed with the specific application of laser frequency locking in mind but should be adaptable to a variety of other purposes as well. The system incorporates an onboard waveform synthesizer, a lock-in amplifier, two channels of proportional-integral (PI) servo control, and a ramp generator on a single FPGA chip. The system is based on an inexpensive, off-the-shelf FPGA evaluation board with a wide variety of available accessories, allowing the system to interface with standard laser controllers and detectors while minimizing the use of custom hardware and electronics. Gains, filter constants, and other relevant parameters are adjustable via onboard knobs and switches. These parameters and other information are displayed to the user via an integrated LCD, allowing full operation of the device without an accompanying computer. We demonstrate the performance of the system in a test setup, in which the frequency of a tunable external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) is locked to a resonant optical transmission peak of a Fabry-Perot cavity. In this setup, we achieve a total servo-loop bandwidth of ~ 7 kHz and achieve locking of the ECDL to the cavity with a full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) linewidth of ~ 200 kHz.

  11. Active polarization control of a 1.43 kW narrow linewidth fiber amplifier based on SPGD algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rongtao; Liu, Yakun; Yang, Baolai; Ma, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Xu, Xiaojun

    2017-04-01

    Active polarization control of a high power fiber amplifier has been demonstrated. The master oscillator power amplifier system consisted of a narrow linewidth laser seed and a three-stage Yb-fiber amplifier. The narrow linewidth laser seed was generated by phase modulating a single frequency fiber laser using a white noise source. Maximum power of 1437 W was obtained from the main amplifier, which was limited by the available pump power. When the polarization state of the narrow linewidth (∼0.17 nm) laser was actively controlled by using a polarization controller based on stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm, the polarization extinction ratio of the laser beam was more than 11.1 dB at the maximum output power.

  12. Swelling-induced and controlled curving in layered gel beams

    PubMed Central

    Lucantonio, A.; Nardinocchi, P.; Pezzulla, M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe swelling-driven curving in originally straight and non-homogeneous beams. We present and verify a structural model of swollen beams, based on a new point of view adopted to describe swelling-induced deformation processes in bilayered gel beams, that is based on the split of the swelling-induced deformation of the beam at equilibrium into two components, both depending on the elastic properties of the gel. The method allows us to: (i) determine beam stretching and curving, once assigned the characteristics of the solvent bath and of the non-homogeneous beam, and (ii) estimate the characteristics of non-homogeneous flat gel beams in such a way as to obtain, under free-swelling conditions, three-dimensional shapes. The study was pursued by means of analytical, semi-analytical and numerical tools; excellent agreement of the outcomes of the different techniques was found, thus confirming the strength of the method. PMID:25383031

  13. Control of the shape of laser pulses amplified in the strong saturation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaykin, A A

    2014-05-30

    A new criterion for estimating the distortions of quasirectangular pulses in high-power amplifiers is proposed together with a method that allows generation of quasi-rectangular pulses at the output of a high-efficiency amplifier, i. e., in the regime of strong saturation. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of calculating the neodymium glass amplifier, used for pumping the petawatt parametric amplifier. (lasers)

  14. Combining Droop Curve Concepts with Control Systems for Wind Turbine Active Power Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Buckspan, A.; Aho, J.; Pao, L.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Wind energy is becoming a larger portion of the global energy portfolio and wind penetration has increased dramatically in certain regions of the world. This increasing wind penetration has driven the need for wind turbines to provide active power control (APC) services to the local utility grid, as wind turbines do not intrinsically provide frequency regulation services that are common with traditional generators. It is common for large scale wind turbines to be decoupled from the utility grid via power electronics, which allows the turbine to synthesize APC commands via control of the generator torque and blade pitch commands. Consequently, the APC services provided by a wind turbine can be more flexible than those provided by conventional generators. This paper focuses on the development and implementation of both static and dynamic droop curves to measure grid frequency and output delta power reference signals to a novel power set point tracking control system. The combined droop curve and power tracking controller is simulated and comparisons are made between simulations using various droop curve parameters and stochastic wind conditions. The tradeoffs involved with aggressive response to frequency events are analyzed. At the turbine level, simulations are performed to analyze induced structural loads. At the grid level, simulations test a wind plant's response to a dip in grid frequency.

  15. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, S.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Murnane, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethrough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate. 7 figs.

  16. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, Sterling; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    1997-01-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate.

  17. Practical quality control tools for curves and surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Scott G.

    1992-01-01

    Curves (geometry) and surfaces created by Computer Aided Geometric Design systems in the engineering environment must satisfy two basic quality criteria: the geometric shape must have the desired engineering properties; and the objects must be parameterized in a way which does not cause computational difficulty for geometric processing and engineering analysis. Interactive techniques are described which are in use at Boeing to evaluate the quality of aircraft geometry prior to Computational Fluid Dynamic analysis, including newly developed methods for examining surface parameterization and its effects.

  18. Conditions for continuation of the efficient curve for multi-objective control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakowska, Joanna

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the conditions for continuation of the efficient curve for bi-objective control-structure optimization of a ten-bar truss with two collocated sensors and actuators. The curve has been obtained with an active set algorithm using a homotopy method. The curve is discontinuous. A general stability theory has been implemented to determine sufficient conditions for the persistence of minima, and bifurcation theory has been used to characterize the possible points of discontinuity of the path.

  19. Long non-coding RNAs: spatial amplifiers that control nuclear structure and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Engreitz, Jesse M; Ollikainen, Noah; Guttman, Mitchell

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that mammalian genomes encode thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), many of which are now implicated in diverse biological processes. Recent work studying the molecular mechanisms of several key examples - including Xist, which orchestrates X chromosome inactivation - has provided new insights into how lncRNAs can control cellular functions by acting in the nucleus. Here we discuss emerging mechanistic insights into how lncRNAs can regulate gene expression by coordinating regulatory proteins, localizing to target loci and shaping three-dimensional (3D) nuclear organization. We explore these principles to highlight biological challenges in gene regulation, in which lncRNAs are well-suited to perform roles that cannot be carried out by DNA elements or protein regulators alone, such as acting as spatial amplifiers of regulatory signals in the nucleus.

  20. Analog Pre-Distortion Linearizer Using Self Base Bias Controlled Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinjo, Shintaro; Mori, Kazutomi; Yamada, Keiki; Suematsu, Noriharu; Shimozawa, Mitsuhiro

    An analog pre-distortion linearizer employing a radio frequency (RF) transistor with a self base bias control circuit is proposed. The self base bias control circuit extracts the envelope from the modulated input RF signal of the RF transistor and automatically controls its base current according to the extracted envelope. As a result, the proposed linearizer realizes positive gain deviation at high input power level. By adding a resistor between the RF transistor and the self base bias control circuit, the negative gain deviation can be derived. The design of the proposed lineaizer is described with taking the envelope frequency response of the self base bias control circuit into consideration. The fabricated linearizer achieves the adjacent channel power leakage ratio (ACLR) improvement of 8.1dB for a 2GHz-band, 10W-class GaAs FET high-power amplifier (HPA) with negative gain deviation for W-CDMA base stations. It also achieves the ACLR improvement of 8.3dB for a LDMOS HPA with positive gain deviation for the same application.

  1. Geometrically controlled snapping transitions in shells with curved creases

    PubMed Central

    Bende, Nakul Prabhakar; Evans, Arthur A.; Innes-Gold, Sarah; Marin, Luis A.; Cohen, Itai; Hayward, Ryan C.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    Curvature and mechanics are intimately connected for thin materials, and this coupling between geometry and physical properties is readily seen in folded structures from intestinal villi and pollen grains to wrinkled membranes and programmable metamaterials. While the well-known rules and mechanisms behind folding a flat surface have been used to create deployable structures and shape transformable materials, folding of curved shells is still not fundamentally understood. Shells naturally deform by simultaneously bending and stretching, and while this coupling gives them great stability for engineering applications, it makes folding a surface of arbitrary curvature a nontrivial task. Here we discuss the geometry of folding a creased shell, and demonstrate theoretically the conditions under which it may fold smoothly. When these conditions are violated we show, using experiments and simulations, that shells undergo rapid snapping motion to fold from one stable configuration to another. Although material asymmetry is a proven mechanism for creating this bifurcation of stability, for the case of a creased shell, the inherent geometry itself serves as a barrier to folding. We discuss here how two fundamental geometric concepts, creases and curvature, combine to allow rapid transitions from one stable state to another. Independent of material system and length scale, the design rule that we introduce here explains how to generate snapping transitions in arbitrary surfaces, thus facilitating the creation of programmable multistable materials with fast actuation capabilities. PMID:26294253

  2. Geometrically controlled snapping transitions in shells with curved creases.

    PubMed

    Bende, Nakul Prabhakar; Evans, Arthur A; Innes-Gold, Sarah; Marin, Luis A; Cohen, Itai; Hayward, Ryan C; Santangelo, Christian D

    2015-09-08

    Curvature and mechanics are intimately connected for thin materials, and this coupling between geometry and physical properties is readily seen in folded structures from intestinal villi and pollen grains to wrinkled membranes and programmable metamaterials. While the well-known rules and mechanisms behind folding a flat surface have been used to create deployable structures and shape transformable materials, folding of curved shells is still not fundamentally understood. Shells naturally deform by simultaneously bending and stretching, and while this coupling gives them great stability for engineering applications, it makes folding a surface of arbitrary curvature a nontrivial task. Here we discuss the geometry of folding a creased shell, and demonstrate theoretically the conditions under which it may fold smoothly. When these conditions are violated we show, using experiments and simulations, that shells undergo rapid snapping motion to fold from one stable configuration to another. Although material asymmetry is a proven mechanism for creating this bifurcation of stability, for the case of a creased shell, the inherent geometry itself serves as a barrier to folding. We discuss here how two fundamental geometric concepts, creases and curvature, combine to allow rapid transitions from one stable state to another. Independent of material system and length scale, the design rule that we introduce here explains how to generate snapping transitions in arbitrary surfaces, thus facilitating the creation of programmable multistable materials with fast actuation capabilities.

  3. A new approach to control noise from entertainment facilities: Active control and measurement of amplified community noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppin, Richard J.; Casamajó, Joan

    2003-04-01

    While traffic noise is perhaps the most pervasive of community noises, much of the contribution now comes from amplified sound: live music, discos, theme parks, and exercise studios. Those producing the sound or music want it loud and those not interested want to be protected against noise. Noise limits at the receiving or producing property line must be met for the minimum community acceptance. However the time-, and perhaps the spatially-, varying sound in entertainment facilities is often constantly modified (and maybe monitored) near the source of the sound. Hence it is hard to relate and to control the sound at the property line. This paper presents a unique noise control device. It is based on the octave band ``transfer function'' between the sound produced in the entertainment area and the noise received at the property line. The overall insulation can be measured and is input to the instrument. When a noise level limit is exceeded at the receiver, due to the amplified interior noise at the facility, the sound output of the device is automatically controlled to reduce the noise. The paper provides details of the design and possible abatement scenarios with examples.

  4. Evaluation of a mixed controller that amplifies spatial errors while reducing timing errors.

    PubMed

    Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Baumann, Tanja; Fichmann, Daniela; Maassen, Steve; Duarte, Jaime E; Riener, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Previous results suggest that haptic guidance enhances learning of the timing components of motor tasks, whereas error amplification is better for learning the spatial components. In this paper we evaluate a novel mixed guidance controller that combines haptic guidance and error amplification to simultaneously promote learning of the timing and spatial components. The controller is realized using a saddle-like force field around the desired movement position. This force field has a stable manifold tangential to the trajectory that guides subjects in velocity related aspects. The force field has its unstable manifold perpendicular to the trajectory, which amplifies the normal (spatial) error. We conducted an experiment with twenty nine healthy subjects to test whether training with the mixed guidance controller resulted in better learning than training without guidance or with guidance-as-needed. Subjects trained two tasks: a continuous rhythmic task (circle) and a continuous single task (line). We found that the effectiveness of the training strategy depended on the task. Training with mixed guidance was especially beneficial for learning the timing components of the line, but limited learning of the circle. Perhaps the continuous change in the force directions during training of the circle was too difficult to interpret.

  5. A capacitive immunosensor measurement system with a lock-in amplifier and potentiostatic control by software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, B.; Lal, R.

    1999-11-01

    We report an elegant small-signal capacitance measurement system for capacitive immunosensors, prototyped around a computer-controlled two-phase lock-in amplifier. Capacitive immunosensors require low-ionic-strength electrolytes for effective antibody-antigen interaction and low dielectric thickness for high sensitivity to phenomena occurring at the insulator-electrolyte interface. The problem of measuring a high intrinsic sensor capacitance in the presence of a modest parasitic cell resistance is overcome by using a potential-sensing electrode close to the electrolyte-dielectric interface for measuring and controlling the stimulus to the intrinsic device. The current phasor through the capacitive sensor is measured after effecting potential control via a software feedback loop and the sensor capacitance calculated. Capacitance can be measured in the range 100 pF to 0.1 µF with an accuracy of ±0.5% at 1 kHz. The technique obviates the need for expensive high-speed potentiostats or impedance analysers for such measurements and can also be used for small-signal admittance measurements in other electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor or electrolyte-insulator-metal systems. The suitability of the proposed measurement system for immunodetection is shown by capacitance measurements on fibronectin-sensitive capacitive immunosensors.

  6. Active Flow Control of a Transonic Shock over Curved Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gissen, Abraham N.; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari; Gogineni, Sivaram P.

    2013-11-01

    The effects of fluidic actuation on the evolution and dynamics of a transonic shock over a two-dimensional convex surface by controlling the ensuing shock-induced separation are investigated in wind tunnel experiments. Actuation is effected by a spanwise array of high-frequency (nominally 10 kHz) fluidic oscillating jets. The flow field upstream and downstream of the shock is investigated using high-speed Schlieren and PIV (3,000fps), and surface pressure measurements. It is shown that control of the shock-induced separating shear layer by exploiting direct control of small-scale motion can alter the degree of flow attachment and have a profound effect on the shock dynamics. The actuation diminishes shock oscillations near the surface, and leads to streamwise shock displacement that is proportional to the actuation strength (as measured, for example, by the mass flow rate coefficient). The strong correlation between the shock displacement and surface pressure are explored for application of closed-loop control.

  7. Technology innovations and experience curves for nitrogen oxides control technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Sonia Yeh; Edward S. Rubin; Margaret R. Taylor; David A. Hounshell

    2005-12-15

    This paper reviews the regulatory history for nitrogen oxides (NOx) pollutant emissions from stationary sources, primarily in coal-fired power plants. Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) is one of the six criteria pollutants regulated by the 1970 Clean Air Act where National Ambient Air Quality Standards were established to protect public health and welfare. Patent data are used to show that in the cases of Japan, Germany, and the United States, innovations in NOx control technologies did not occur until stringent government regulations were in place, thus 'forcing' innovation. It is demonstrated that reductions in the capital and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs of new generations of high-efficiency NOx control technologies, selective catalytic reduction (SCR), are consistently associated with the increasing adoption of the control technology: the so-called learning-by-doing phenomena. The results show that as cumulative world coal-fired SCR capacity doubles, capital costs decline to {approximately} 86% and O&M costs to 58% of their original values. The observed changes in SCR technology reflect the impact of technological advance as well as other factors, such as market competition and economies of scale. 38 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Technology innovations and experience curves for nitrogen oxides control technologies.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S; Taylor, Margaret R; Hounshell, David A

    2005-12-01

    This paper reviews the regulatory history for nitrogen oxides (NOx) pollutant emissions from stationary sources, primarily in coal-fired power plants. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of the six criteria pollutants regulated by the 1970 Clean Air Act where National Ambient Air Quality Standards were established to protect public health and welfare. We use patent data to show that in the cases of Japan, Germany, and the United States, innovations in NOx control technologies did not occur until stringent government regulations were in place, thus "forcing" innovation. We also demonstrate that reductions in the capital and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs of new generations of high-efficiency NOx control technologies, selective catalytic reduction (SCR), are consistently associated with the increasing adoption of the control technology: the so-called learning-by-doing phenomena. The results show that as cumulative world coal-fired SCR capacity doubles, capital costs decline to approximately 86% and O&M costs to 58% of their original values. The observed changes in SCR technology reflect the impact of technological advance as well as other factors, such as market competition and economies of scale.

  9. Optically controlled switch-mode current-source amplifiers for on-coil implementation in high-field parallel transmission.

    PubMed

    Gudino, Natalia; Duan, Qi; de Zwart, Jacco A; Murphy-Boesch, Joe; Dodd, Stephen J; Merkle, Hellmut; van Gelderen, Peter; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-07-01

    We tested the feasibility of implementing parallel transmission (pTX) for high-field MRI using a radiofrequency (RF) amplifier design to be located on or in the immediate vicinity of an RF transmit coil. We designed a current-source switch-mode amplifier based on miniaturized, nonmagnetic electronics. Optical RF carrier and envelope signals to control the amplifier were derived, through a custom-built interface, from the RF source accessible in the scanner control. Amplifier performance was tested by benchtop measurements as well as with imaging at 7T (300 MHz) and 11.7 T (500 MHz). The ability to perform pTX was evaluated by measuring interchannel coupling and phase adjustment in a two-channel setup. The amplifier delivered in excess of 44 W RF power and caused minimal interference with MRI. The interface derived accurate optical control signals with carrier frequencies ranging from 64 to 750 MHz. Decoupling better than 14 dB was obtained between two coil loops separated by only 1 cm. Application to MRI was demonstrated by acquiring artifact-free images at 7 T and 11.7 T. We propose an optically controlled miniaturized RF amplifier for on-coil implementation at high fields that should facilitate implementation of high-density pTX arrays. Magn Reson Med 76:340-349, 2016. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Temperature Tolerant Evolvable Systems Utilizing FPGA Boards and Bias-Controlled Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Nikhil R.

    2005-01-01

    Space missions often require radiation and extreme-temperature hardened electronics to survive the harsh environments beyond Earth's atmosphere. Traditional approaches to preserve electronics incorporate shielding, insulation and redundancy at the expense of power and weight. However, a novel way of bypassing these problems is the concept of evolutionary hardware. A reconfigurable device, consisting of several switches interconnected with analog/digital parts, is controlled by an evolutionary processor (EP). When the EP detects degradation in the circuit it sends signals to reconfigure the switches, thus forming a new circuit with the desired output. This concept has been developed since the mid-l990s, but one problem remains-the EP cannot degrade substantially. For this reason, extensive testing at extreme temperatures (-180 to 120 C) has been done on devices found on FPGA boards (taking the role of the EP), such as the Analog to Digital and the Digital to Analog Converter. The EP is used in conjunction with a bias-controlled amplifier and a new prototype relay board, which is interconnected with 6 G4-FETs, a tri-input transistor-like element developed at JPL. The greatest improvements to be made lie in the reconfigurable device, so future design and testing of the G4-FET chip is required.

  11. Silicon Carbide MOSFET-Based Switching Power Amplifier for Precision Magnet Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James; Picard, Julian

    2016-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. (EHT) is using the latest in solid-state switching technologies to advance the state-of-the-art in magnet control for fusion science. Silicon carbide (SiC) MOSFETs offer advantages over IGBTs including lower drive energy requirements, lower conduction and switching losses, and higher switching frequency capabilities. When comparing SiC and traditional silicon-based MOSFETs, SiC MOSFETs provide higher current carrying capability allowing for smaller package weights and sizes and lower operating temperature. To validate the design, EHT has developed a low-power switching power amplifier (SPA), which has been used for precision control of magnetic fields, including rapidly changing the fields in coils. This design has been incorporated in to a high power SPA, which has been bench tested. This high power SPA will be tested at the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT) at the University of Washington. Following successful testing, EHT will produce enough SiC MOSFET-based SPAs to replace all of the units at HIT, which allows for higher frequency operation and an overall increase in pulsed current levels.

  12. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  13. Electronic amplifiers: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Several types of amplifiers and amplifier systems are considered. These include preamplifiers, high power amplifiers, buffer and isolation amplifiers, amplifier circuits, and general purpose amplifiers.

  14. Asymptotic Properties of the Sequential Empirical ROC, PPV and NPV Curves Under Case-Control Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Koopmeiners, Joseph S.; Feng, Ziding

    2013-01-01

    The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the positive predictive value (PPV) curve and the negative predictive value (NPV) curve are three measures of performance for a continuous diagnostic biomarker. The ROC, PPV and NPV curves are often estimated empirically to avoid assumptions about the distributional form of the biomarkers. Recently, there has been a push to incorporate group sequential methods into the design of diagnostic biomarker studies. A thorough understanding of the asymptotic properties of the sequential empirical ROC, PPV and NPV curves will provide more flexibility when designing group sequential diagnostic biomarker studies. In this paper we derive asymptotic theory for the sequential empirical ROC, PPV and NPV curves under case-control sampling using sequential empirical process theory. We show that the sequential empirical ROC, PPV and NPV curves converge to the sum of independent Kiefer processes and show how these results can be used to derive asymptotic results for summaries of the sequential empirical ROC, PPV and NPV curves. PMID:24039313

  15. The feedback control research on straight and curved road with car-following model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi-Ming; Cheng, Rong-Jun; Ge, Hong-Xia

    2017-07-01

    Taking account of the road consisting of curved part and straight part, an extended car-following model is proposed in this paper. A control signal including the velocity difference between the considered vehicle and the vehicle in front is taken into account. The control theory method is applied into analysis of the stability condition for the model. Numerical simulations are implemented to prove that the stability of the traffic flow strengthens effectively with an increase of the radius of curved road, and the control signal can suppress the traffic congestion. The results are in good agree with the theoretical analysis.

  16. Mode control in a high gain relativistic klystron amplifier with 3 GW output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yang; Xie, Hong-Quan; Xu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Higher mode excitation is very serious in the relativistic klystron amplifier, especially for the high gain relativistic amplifier working at tens of kilo-amperes. The mechanism of higher mode excitation is explored in the PIC simulation and it is shown that insufficient separation of adjacent cavities is the main cause of higher mode excitation. So RF lossy material mounted on the drift tube wall is adopted to suppress higher mode excitation. A high gain S-band relativistic klystron amplifier is designed for the beam current of 13 kA and the voltage of 1 MV. PIC simulation shows that the output power is 3.2 GW when the input power is only 2.8 kW.

  17. The smile effect reduction of diode laser bar by bare bar curve control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guannan; Yao, Shun; Luo, Xiaoying; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Zhiyong

    2017-02-01

    To reduce the diode laser bar's smile effect induced by packaging, a method based on a chip mounter is presented. When the bare bar is picked up by the pick-up tool (PUT) of the chip mounter, the curve direction and volume of the bar can be measured by scanning the P side surface of the bar with a laser rangefinder, and they can be controlled through adjusting the setting up of the PUT. By controlling the curve direction and volume at an appropriate state to compensate the packaging induced strain, the obtaining smile effect is restricted within 0.5μm steadily.

  18. Coherent combining of pulsed fiber amplifiers in the nonlinear chirp regime with intra-pulse phase control.

    PubMed

    Palese, Stephen; Cheung, Eric; Goodno, Gregory; Shih, Chun-Ching; Di Teodoro, Fabio; McComb, Timothy; Weber, Mark

    2012-03-26

    Two high pulse contrast (> 95 dB) polarization maintaining all-fiber amplifier chains were coherently combined to generate 0.42 mJ, 1 ns 25 kHz pulses with 79% efficiency despite 38 radians of intra-pulse phase distortion. A recursive intra-pulse phase compensation method was utilized to correct for the large nonlinear chirp providing a path for improved coherent waveform control of nanosecond pulse trains.

  19. Lane changing trajectory planning and tracking control for intelligent vehicle on curved road.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lukun; Zhao, Xiaoying; Su, Hao; Tang, Gongyou

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores lane changing trajectory planning and tracking control for intelligent vehicle on curved road. A novel arcs trajectory is planned for the desired lane changing trajectory. A kinematic controller and a dynamics controller are designed to implement the trajectory tracking control. Firstly, the kinematic model and dynamics model of intelligent vehicle with non-holonomic constraint are established. Secondly, two constraints of lane changing on curved road in practice (LCCP) are proposed. Thirdly, two arcs with same curvature are constructed for the desired lane changing trajectory. According to the geometrical characteristics of arcs trajectory, equations of desired state can be calculated. Finally, the backstepping method is employed to design a kinematic trajectory tracking controller. Then the sliding-mode dynamics controller is designed to ensure that the motion of the intelligent vehicle can follow the desired velocity generated by kinematic controller. The stability of control system is proved by Lyapunov theory. Computer simulation demonstrates that the desired arcs trajectory and state curves with B-spline optimization can meet the requirements of LCCP constraints and the proposed control schemes can make tracking errors to converge uniformly.

  20. LOGARITHMIC AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    De Shong, J.A. Jr.

    1957-12-31

    A logarithmic current amplifier circuit having a high sensitivity and fast response is described. The inventor discovered the time constant of the input circuit of a system utilizing a feedback amplifier, ionization chamber, and a diode, is inversely proportional to the input current, and that the amplifier becomes unstable in amplifying signals in the upper frequency range when the amplifier's forward gain time constant equals the input circuit time constant. The described device incorporates impedance networks having low frequency response characteristic at various points in the circuit to change the forward gain of the amplifler at a rate of 0.7 of the gain magnitude for every two times increased in frequency. As a result of this improvement, the time constant of the input circuit is greatly reduced at high frequencies, and the amplifier response is increased.

  1. Daily Time Step Refinement of Optimized Flood Control Rule Curves for a Global Warming Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Fitzgerald, C.; Hamlet, A. F.; Burges, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    Pacific Northwest temperatures have warmed by 0.8 °C since 1920 and are predicted to further increase in the 21st century. Simulated streamflow timing shifts associated with climate change have been found in past research to degrade water resources system performance in the Columbia River Basin when using existing system operating policies. To adapt to these hydrologic changes, optimized flood control operating rule curves were developed in a previous study using a hybrid optimization-simulation approach which rebalanced flood control and reservoir refill at a monthly time step. For the climate change scenario, use of the optimized flood control curves restored reservoir refill capability without increasing flood risk. Here we extend the earlier studies using a detailed daily time step simulation model applied over a somewhat smaller portion of the domain (encompassing Libby, Duncan, and Corra Linn dams, and Kootenai Lake) to evaluate and refine the optimized flood control curves derived from monthly time step analysis. Moving from a monthly to daily analysis, we found that the timing of flood control evacuation needed adjustment to avoid unintended outcomes affecting Kootenai Lake. We refined the flood rule curves derived from monthly analysis by creating a more gradual evacuation schedule, but kept the timing and magnitude of maximum evacuation the same as in the monthly analysis. After these refinements, the performance at monthly time scales reported in our previous study proved robust at daily time scales. Due to a decrease in July storage deficits, additional benefits such as more revenue from hydropower generation and more July and August outflow for fish augmentation were observed when the optimized flood control curves were used for the climate change scenario.

  2. Marginal abatement cost curve for NOx incorporating controls, renewable electricity, energy efficiency and fuel switching

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the relationship between the quantity of pollution abated and the marginal cost of abating each additional unit. In the context of air quality management, MACCs typically are developed by sorting end-of-pipe controls by their resp...

  3. Marginal abatement cost curve for NOx incorporating controls, renewable electricity, energy efficiency and fuel switching

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the relationship between the quantity of pollution abated and the marginal cost of abating each additional unit. In the context of air quality management, MACCs typically are developed by sorting end-of-pipe controls by their resp...

  4. An implantable neural activity monitor with nonlinear gain-controlled amplifier.

    PubMed

    Kyoso, Masaki; Takeda, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    An implantable neural spike monitor with nonlinear amplifier was proposed for robust measurement against noise. In embedded electrophysiological signal processing systems, detection performance depends on signal to noise ratio (SNR), however, it is getting worth after implantation because of neoformation surrounding the electrodes and so on. We proposed a spike enhancer in this study. It has two remarkable function; automatic gain optimization with feedback loop and SNR improvement by nonlinear amplifier. In this report, the system performance was evaluated without feedback loop. A prototype circuit is prepared with small number of parts and tested on input-output characteristics. For the final evaluation, neural spike signal from somatosensory cortex of a rat was applied to the circuit. The test results show that system can expand SNR on neural spike signal from rat. It indicates that the spike enhancer can improve total performance of neural activity processing system.

  5. Tracing the efficient curve for multi-objective control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakowska, J.; Haftka, R. T.; Watson, L. T.

    1992-01-01

    A recently developed active set algorithm for tracing parameterized optima is adapted to multiobjective optimization. The algorithm traces a path of Kuhn-Tucker points using homotopy curve tracking techniques, and is based on identifying and maintaining the set of active constraints. Second order necessary optimality conditions are used to determine nonoptimal stationary points on the path. In the bi-objective optimization case the algorithm is used to trace the curve of efficient solution (Pareto optima). As an example, the algorithm is applied to the simultaneous minimization of the weight and control force of a ten-bar truss with two collocated sensors and actuators, with some interesting results.

  6. Shape of porous region to control cooling along curved exit boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Snyder, A.

    1984-01-01

    A cooled porous insert in a curved wall has a specified spatially varying heat flux applied to one side. It is desired to control the distribution of coolant flow out through this curved surface so that the surface will be kept at a desired uniform temperature. The flow regulation is accomplished by shaping the surface through which the coolant enters the region to obtain the required variation of flow resistance within the region. The proper surface shape is found by solving a Cauchy boundary value problem. Analytical solutions are given in two dimensions for various shapes of the heated boundary subjected to different heating distributions.

  7. Operational Amplifiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxcroft, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the introduction of low cost equipment into high school and college physical science classes. Examines the properties of an "ideal" operational amplifier and discusses how it might be used under saturated and non-saturated conditions. Notes the action of a "real" operational amplifier. (TW)

  8. Operational Amplifiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxcroft, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the introduction of low cost equipment into high school and college physical science classes. Examines the properties of an "ideal" operational amplifier and discusses how it might be used under saturated and non-saturated conditions. Notes the action of a "real" operational amplifier. (TW)

  9. Controlled dynamics at an avoided crossing interpreted in terms of dynamically fluctuating potential energy curves.

    PubMed

    Scheit, Simona; Arasaki, Yasuki; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2012-03-22

    The nonadiabatic nuclear wavepacket dynamics on the coupled two lowest (1)Σ(+) states of the LiF molecule under the action of a control pulse is investigated. The control is achieved by a modulation of the characteristics of the potential energy curves using an infrared field with a cycle duration comparable to the time scale of nuclear dynamics. The transition of population between the states is interpreted on the basis of the coupled nuclear wavepacket dynamics on the effective potential curves, which are transformed from the adiabatic potential curves with use of a diabatic representation that diagonalizes the dipole-moment matrix of the relevant electronic states. The basic feature of the transition dynamics is characterized in terms of the notion of the collision between the dynamical crossing point and nuclear wavepackets running on such modulated potential curves, and the transition amplitude is mainly dominated by the off-diagonal matrix element of the time-independent electronic Hamiltonian in the present diabatic representation. The importance of the geometry dependence of the intrinsic dipole moments as well as of the diabatic coupling potential is illustrated both theoretically and numerically. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 2: Role of seasonality, the regime curve, and associated process controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Yaeger, M.; Coopersmith, E.; Cheng, L.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the process controls underpinning regional patterns of variations of streamflow regime behavior, i.e., the mean seasonal variation of streamflow within the year, across the continental United States. The ultimate motivation is to use the resulting process understanding to generate insights into the physical controls of another signature of streamflow variability, namely the flow duration curve (FDC). The construction of the FDC removes the time dependence of flows. Thus in order to better understand the physical controls in regions that exhibit strong seasonal dependence, the regime curve (RC), which is closely connected to the FDC, is studied in this paper and later linked back to the FDC. To achieve these aims a top-down modeling approach is adopted; we start with a simple two-stage bucket model, which is systematically enhanced through addition of new processes on the basis of model performance assessment in relation to observations, using rainfall-runoff data from 197 United States catchments belonging to the MOPEX dataset. Exploration of dominant processes and the determination of required model complexity are carried out through model-based sensitivity analyses, guided by a performance metric. Results indicated systematic regional trends in dominant processes: snowmelt was a key process control in cold mountainous catchments in the north and north-west, whereas snowmelt and vegetation cover dynamics were key controls in the north-east; seasonal vegetation cover dynamics (phenology and interception) were important along the Appalachian mountain range in the east. A simple two-bucket model (with no other additions) was found to be adequate in warm humid catchments along the west coast and in the south-east, with both regions exhibiting strong seasonality, whereas much more complex models are needed in the dry south and south-west. Agricultural catchments in the mid-west were found to be difficult to predict with the use of

  11. Gm-Realization of Controlled-Gain Current Follower Transconductance Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Tangsrirat, Worapong

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the conception of the current follower transconductance amplifier (CFTA) with electronically and linearly current tunable. The newly modified element is realized based on the use of transconductance cells (G m s) as core circuits. The advantage of this element is that the current transfer ratios (i z/i p and i x/i z) can be tuned electronically and linearly by adjusting external DC bias currents. The circuit is designed and analyzed in 0.35 μm TSMC CMOS technology. Simulation results for the circuit with ±1.25 V supply voltages show that it consumes only 0.43 mw quiescent power with 70 MHz bandwidth. As an application example, a current-mode KHN biquad filter is designed and simulated. PMID:24381513

  12. Chest Computed Tomography Radiation Dose Optimization: Comparison of Automatic Exposure Control Strength Curves.

    PubMed

    Gyssels, Elodie; Bohy, Pascale; Cornil, Arnaud; van Muylem, Alain; Howarth, Nigel; Gevenois, Pierre A; Tack, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare radiation dose and image quality between the "average" and the "very strong" automatic exposure control (AEC) strength curves. Images reconstructed with filtered back-projection techniques and radiation dose data of unenhanced helical chest computed tomography (CT) examinations obtained at 2 hospitals (hospital A, hospital B) using the same scanner devices and acquisition protocols but different AEC strength curves were evaluated over a 3-month period. The selected AEC strength curve applied to "slim" patients (diameter <32 cm estimated from the attenuation automatically measured on the topogram) was "average" and "very strong" in hospital A and hospital B, respectively. Two radiologists with 13 and 24 years of experience scored the image quality of the lung parenchyma and the mediastinum on a 5-point scale. The patients' effective diameter, the delivered CT dose index volume, and dose-length products were recorded. A total of 410 patients were included. The average body mass index was 24.0 kg/m in hospital A and 24.8 kg/m in hospital B. There was no significant difference between hospitals with respect to age, sex ratio, weight, height, body mass index, effective diameters, and image quality scores for each radiologist (P ranging from 0.050 to 1.000). The mean CT dose index volume for the entire population was 2.0 mGy and was significantly lower in hospital B with the "very strong" AEC curve as compared with hospital A (-11%, P=0.001). The mean dose-length product delivered in this 70 kg-weight population was 68 mGy cm, corresponding to an effective dose of 0.95 mSv. Changing the AEC strength curve from "average" to "very strong" for slim patients maintains image quality and reduces the radiation dose to <1 mSv in routine chest CT examinations reconstructed with filtered back-projection techniques.

  13. Asynchronous, self-controlled, all-optical label and payload separator using nonlinear polarization rotation in a semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vegas Olmos, J. J.; Tafur Monroy, I.; Liu, Y.; Garcia Larrode, M.; Turkiewicz, J.; Dorren, H. J. S.; Koonen, A. M. J.

    2004-09-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical label and payload separator based on nonlinear polarization rotation in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The proposed scheme uses a packet format composed of a label and payload information signal combined with a control signal by using polarization division multiplexing. The control signal is employed to separate the label from the payload signal by exploiting nonlinear polarization rotation in a SOA. Experimental results show a label from payload suppression factor of 22 dB. This scheme operates asynchronously and does not need external control signal. Clean and wide open eye diagrams are obtained for both the payload and the label signal operating at bit-rates of 10 Gbit/s and 625 Mbit/s, respectively.

  14. Asynchronous, self-controlled, all-optical label and payload separator using nonlinear polarization rotation in a semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Vegas Olmos, J; Monroy, I; Liu, Y; Garcia Larrode, M; Turkiewicz, J; Dorren, H; Koonen, A

    2004-09-06

    We demonstrate an all-optical label and payload separator based on nonlinear polarization rotation in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The proposed scheme uses a packet format composed of a label and payload information signal combined with a control signal by using polarization division multiplexing. The control signal is employed to separate the label from the payload signal by exploiting nonlinear polarization rotation in a SOA. Experimental results show a label from payload suppression factor of 22 dB. This scheme operates asynchronously and does not need external control signal. Clean and wide open eye diagrams are obtained for both the payload and the label signal operating at bit-rates of 10 Gbit/s and 625 Mbit/s, respectively.

  15. Control scheme of nonadiabatic transitions with the dynamical shift of potential curve crossing

    SciTech Connect

    Scheit, Simona; Arasaki, Yasuki Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2014-06-28

    We investigate how the nuclear dynamics at an avoided crossing is affected and can be controlled by the introduction of a laser field whose cycle is comparable to the time-scale of the nuclear dynamics. By introducing the concepts of light-induced effective potential energy curves and dynamical avoided crossing, we describe the laser controlled nuclear dynamics and present basic control scenarios, giving a detailed explanation of the underlying dynamical mechanisms. The scenarios presented allow for examples to understand from a different perspective the results of dynamic Stark control experiments. The proposed interpretation is applied to the laser-controlled nonadiabatic dynamics between the two lowest {sup 1}Σ{sup +} states of LiF, where the usefulness of the concepts developed is elucidated.

  16. An optically isolated amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. J.

    1982-11-01

    The design presented was used for biomedical signal detection and monitoring. The amplifier was successfully applied for EMG and ECG research studies. The patient is safely isolated from the processing equipment when using the amplifier. This opto-isolated amplifier was also applied industrially for monitoring mercury arc rectifier control signals. The device has proved itself in an industrial environment as an interface for a microprocessor. This unit can be used whenever large offset voltages are found, and can therefore be put to good use in many power electrical engineering applications.

  17. A curving ACC system with coordination control of longitudinal car-following and lateral stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dezhao; Li, Keqiang; Wang, Jianqiang

    2012-07-01

    The paper presents a curving adaptive cruise control (ACC) system that is coordinated with a direct yaw-moment control (DYC) system and gives consideration to both longitudinal car-following capability and lateral stability on curved roads. A model including vehicle longitudinal and lateral dynamics is built first, which is as discrete as the predictive model of the system controller. Then, a cost function is determined to reflect the contradictions between vehicle longitudinal and lateral dynamics. Meanwhile, some I/O constraints are formulated with a driver permissible longitudinal car-following range and the road adhesion condition. After that, desired longitudinal acceleration and desired yaw moment are obtained by a linear matrix inequality based robust constrained state feedback method. Finally, driver-in-the-loop tests on a driving simulator are conducted and the results show that the developed control system provides significant benefits in weakening the impact of DYC on ACC longitudinal car-following capability while also improving lateral stability.

  18. Interleukin-6 amplifies glucagon secretion: coordinated control via the brain and pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Tammy M.; Otero, Yolanda F.; Elliott, Amicia D.; Locke, Alicia D.; Malabanan, Carlo M.; Coldren, Anastasia G.; Brissova, Marcela; Piston, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate glucagon secretion contributes to hyperglycemia in inflammatory disease. Previous work implicates the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in glucagon secretion. IL-6-KO mice have a blunted glucagon response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that is restored by intravenous replacement of IL-6. Given that IL-6 has previously been demonstrated to have a transcriptional (i.e., slow) effect on glucagon secretion from islets, we hypothesized that the rapid increase in glucagon following LPS occurred by a faster mechanism, such as by action within the brain. Using chronically catheterized conscious mice, we have demonstrated that central IL-6 stimulates glucagon secretion uniquely in the presence of an accompanying stressor (hypoglycemia or LPS). Contrary to our hypothesis, however, we found that IL-6 amplifies glucagon secretion in two ways; IL-6 not only stimulates glucagon secretion via the brain but also by direct action on islets. Interestingly, IL-6 augments glucagon secretion from both sites only in the presence of an accompanying stressor (such as epinephrine). Given that both adrenergic tone and plasma IL-6 are elevated in multiple inflammatory diseases, the interactions of the IL-6 and catecholaminergic signaling pathways in regulating GCG secretion may contribute to our present understanding of these diseases. PMID:25205821

  19. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja; Jäntti, Jussi; Mojzita, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications.

  20. Interleukin-6 amplifies glucagon secretion: coordinated control via the brain and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Tammy M; Otero, Yolanda F; Elliott, Amicia D; Locke, Alicia D; Malabanan, Carlo M; Coldren, Anastasia G; Brissova, Marcela; Piston, David W; McGuinness, Owen P

    2014-11-15

    Inappropriate glucagon secretion contributes to hyperglycemia in inflammatory disease. Previous work implicates the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in glucagon secretion. IL-6-KO mice have a blunted glucagon response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that is restored by intravenous replacement of IL-6. Given that IL-6 has previously been demonstrated to have a transcriptional (i.e., slow) effect on glucagon secretion from islets, we hypothesized that the rapid increase in glucagon following LPS occurred by a faster mechanism, such as by action within the brain. Using chronically catheterized conscious mice, we have demonstrated that central IL-6 stimulates glucagon secretion uniquely in the presence of an accompanying stressor (hypoglycemia or LPS). Contrary to our hypothesis, however, we found that IL-6 amplifies glucagon secretion in two ways; IL-6 not only stimulates glucagon secretion via the brain but also by direct action on islets. Interestingly, IL-6 augments glucagon secretion from both sites only in the presence of an accompanying stressor (such as epinephrine). Given that both adrenergic tone and plasma IL-6 are elevated in multiple inflammatory diseases, the interactions of the IL-6 and catecholaminergic signaling pathways in regulating GCG secretion may contribute to our present understanding of these diseases.

  1. Joint Subchannel Pairing and Power Control for Cognitive Radio Networks with Amplify-and-Forward Relaying

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yanyan; Wang, Shuqiang; Wei, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic spectrum sharing has drawn intensive attention in cognitive radio networks. The secondary users are allowed to use the available spectrum to transmit data if the interference to the primary users is maintained at a low level. Cooperative transmission for secondary users can reduce the transmission power and thus improve the performance further. We study the joint subchannel pairing and power allocation problem in relay-based cognitive radio networks. The objective is to maximize the sum rate of the secondary user that is helped by an amplify-and-forward relay. The individual power constraints at the source and the relay, the subchannel pairing constraints, and the interference power constraints are considered. The problem under consideration is formulated as a mixed integer programming problem. By the dual decomposition method, a joint optimal subchannel pairing and power allocation algorithm is proposed. To reduce the computational complexity, two suboptimal algorithms are developed. Simulations have been conducted to verify the performance of the proposed algorithms in terms of sum rate and average running time under different conditions. PMID:25045731

  2. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications. PMID:26901642

  3. Joint subchannel pairing and power control for cognitive radio networks with amplify-and-forward relaying.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanyan; Wang, Shuqiang; Wei, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic spectrum sharing has drawn intensive attention in cognitive radio networks. The secondary users are allowed to use the available spectrum to transmit data if the interference to the primary users is maintained at a low level. Cooperative transmission for secondary users can reduce the transmission power and thus improve the performance further. We study the joint subchannel pairing and power allocation problem in relay-based cognitive radio networks. The objective is to maximize the sum rate of the secondary user that is helped by an amplify-and-forward relay. The individual power constraints at the source and the relay, the subchannel pairing constraints, and the interference power constraints are considered. The problem under consideration is formulated as a mixed integer programming problem. By the dual decomposition method, a joint optimal subchannel pairing and power allocation algorithm is proposed. To reduce the computational complexity, two suboptimal algorithms are developed. Simulations have been conducted to verify the performance of the proposed algorithms in terms of sum rate and average running time under different conditions.

  4. LOGARITHMIC AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.; Stone, R.S.

    1959-03-10

    Electronic,amplifier circuits, especially a logai-ithmic amplifier characterizxed by its greatly improved strability are discussed. According to the in ention, means are provided to feed bach the output valtagee to a diode in the amplifier input circuit, the diode being utilized to produce the logarithmic characteristics. The diode is tics, The diode isition therewith and having its filament operated from thc same source s the filament of the logarithmic diode. A bias current of relatively large value compareii with the signal current is continuously passed through the compiting dioie to render the diode insensitivy to variations in the signal current. by this odes kdu to variaelled, so that the stability of the amlifier will be unimpaired.

  5. Future path and tangent point models in the visual control of locomotion in curve driving.

    PubMed

    Lappi, Otto

    2014-10-21

    Studying human behavior in the natural context of everyday visual tasks--including locomotor tasks such as driving--can reveal visual strategies or even suggest underlying visual mechanisms. This paper reviews empirical and theoretical work in the past 20 years (1994-2014) on the visual control of steering a vehicle along a winding path-one of the most comprehensively studied forms of visually guided locomotion in humans. The focus is on on-road studies of visual behavior and what they can reveal about the visual strategies in curve driving. Theoretical models and results from simulator studies are discussed where they have direct relevance to the interpretation of on-road data. For the past 20 years, the point of departure in studies of curve driving has been tangent point orientation, and tangent point models (models based on tracking the tangent point) have become established as the default account of how vision is used in curve negotiation. More recent studies have questioned the generality of the tangent point hypothesis, however, arguing that in addition to (or instead of) the tangent point, drivers target visual reference points on their future path. Ecological validity of real-world studies often comes at the cost of methodological challenges that make the data difficult to interpret in terms of underlying mechanisms, and the limitations of existing data and the complementary roles of real-world and laboratory studies are discussed.

  6. Spline Trajectory Algorithm Development: Bezier Curve Control Point Generation for UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Lauren R.; Allen, B. Danette

    2016-01-01

    A greater need for sophisticated autonomous piloting systems has risen in direct correlation with the ubiquity of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology. Whether surveying unknown or unexplored areas of the world, collecting scientific data from regions in which humans are typically incapable of entering, locating lost or wanted persons, or delivering emergency supplies, an unmanned vehicle moving in close proximity to people and other vehicles, should fly smoothly and predictably. The mathematical application of spline interpolation can play an important role in autopilots' on-board trajectory planning. Spline interpolation allows for the connection of Three-Dimensional Euclidean Space coordinates through a continuous set of smooth curves. This paper explores the motivation, application, and methodology used to compute the spline control points, which shape the curves in such a way that the autopilot trajectory is able to meet vehicle-dynamics limitations. The spline algorithms developed used to generate these curves supply autopilots with the information necessary to compute vehicle paths through a set of coordinate waypoints.

  7. Controlling Chaos Via Knowledge of Initial Condition for a Curved Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear response of a flexible curved panel exhibiting bifurcation to fully developed chaos is demonstrated along with the sensitivity to small perturbation from the initial conditions. The response is determined from the measured time series at two fixed points. The panel is forced by an external nonharmonic multifrequency and monofrequency sound field. Using a low power time-continuous feedback control, carefully tuned at each initial condition, produces large long-term effects on the dynamics toward taming chaos. Without the knowledge of the initial conditions, control may be achieved by destructive interference. In this case, the control power is proportional to the loading power. Calculation of the correlation dimension and the estimation of positive Lyapunov exponents, in practice, are the proof of chaotic response.

  8. Closed loop engine control for regulating NOx emissions, using a two-dimensional fuel-air curve

    DOEpatents

    Bourn, Gary D.; Smith, Jack A.; Gingrich, Jess W.

    2007-01-30

    An engine control strategy that ensures that NOx emissions from the engine will be maintained at an acceptable level. The control strategy is based on a two-dimensional fuel-air curve, in which air manifold pressure (AMP) is a function of fuel header pressure and engine speed. The control strategy provides for closed loop NOx adjustment to a base AMP value derived from the fuel-air curve.

  9. Amplified Policymaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Katherine; Woempner, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    This brief examines the policy implications of two drivers of change presented in the "2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning"-- Pattern Recognition and Amplified Organization. These drivers point toward a series of cultural shifts and illuminate how we are developing new ways of organizing, constructing, and managing knowledge.…

  10. Preventing conflicts among bid curves used with transactive controllers in a market-based resource allocation system

    DOEpatents

    Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.; Pratt, Robert G.; Hauer, Matthew; Tuffner, Francis K.

    2017-03-07

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for distributing a resource (such as electricity) using a resource allocation system. One of the disclosed embodiments is a method for operating a transactive thermostatic controller configured to submit bids to a market-based resource allocation system. According to the exemplary method, a first bid curve is determined, the first bid curve indicating a first set of bid prices for corresponding temperatures and being associated with a cooling mode of operation for a heating and cooling system. A second bid curve is also determined, the second bid curve indicating a second set of bid prices for corresponding temperatures and being associated with a heating mode of operation for a heating and cooling system. In this embodiment, the first bid curve, the second bid curve, or both the first bid curve and the second bid curve are modified to prevent overlap of any portion of the first bid curve and the second bid curve.

  11. Marginal abatement cost curve for nitrogen oxides incorporating controls, renewable electricity, energy efficiency, and fuel switching.

    PubMed

    Loughlin, Daniel H; Macpherson, Alexander J; Kaufman, Katherine R; Keaveny, Brian N

    2017-10-01

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the relationship between the quantity of pollution abated and the marginal cost of abating each additional unit. In the context of air quality management, MACCs are typically developed by sorting control technologies by their relative cost-effectiveness. Other potentially important abatement measures such as renewable electricity, energy efficiency, and fuel switching (RE/EE/FS) are often not incorporated into MACCs, as it is difficult to quantify their costs and abatement potential. In this paper, a U.S. energy system model is used to develop a MACC for nitrogen oxides (NOx) that incorporates both traditional controls and these additional measures. The MACC is decomposed by sector, and the relative cost-effectiveness of RE/EE/FS and traditional controls are compared. RE/EE/FS are shown to have the potential to increase emission reductions beyond what is possible when applying traditional controls alone. Furthermore, a portion of RE/EE/FS appear to be cost-competitive with traditional controls. Renewable electricity, energy efficiency, and fuel switching can be cost-competitive with traditional air pollutant controls for abating air pollutant emissions. The application of renewable electricity, energy efficiency, and fuel switching is also shown to have the potential to increase emission reductions beyond what is possible when applying traditional controls alone.

  12. Tuning Curves for Arm Posture Control in Motor Cortex Are Consistent with Random Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, L. F.; Vaadia, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal responses characterized by regular tuning curves are typically assumed to arise from structured synaptic connectivity. However, many responses exhibit both regular and irregular components. To address the relationship between tuning curve properties and underlying circuitry, we analyzed neuronal activity recorded from primary motor cortex (M1) of monkeys performing a 3D arm posture control task and compared the results with a neural network model. Posture control is well suited for examining M1 neuronal tuning because it avoids the dynamic complexity of time-varying movements. As a function of hand position, the neuronal responses have a linear component, as has previously been described, as well as heterogeneous and highly irregular nonlinearities. These nonlinear components involve high spatial frequencies and therefore do not support explicit encoding of movement parameters. Yet both the linear and nonlinear components contribute to the decoding of EMG of major muscles used in the task. Remarkably, despite the presence of a strong linear component, a feedforward neural network model with entirely random connectivity can replicate the data, including both the mean and distributions of the linear and nonlinear components as well as several other features of the neuronal responses. This result shows that smoothness provided by the regularity in the inputs to M1 can impose apparent structure on neural responses, in this case a strong linear (also known as cosine) tuning component, even in the absence of ordered synaptic connectivity. PMID:27224735

  13. Control over hysteresis curves and thresholds of optical bistability in different semiconductor double quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, R. Hamedi; M, R. Mehmannavaz; Hadi, Afshari

    2015-08-01

    The effects of optical field on the phenomenon of optical bistability (OB) are investigated in a K-type semiconductor double quantum well (SDQW) under various parametric conditions. It is shown that the OB threshold can be manipulated by increasing the intensity of coupling field. The dependence of the shift of OB hysteresis curve on probe wavelength detuning is then explored. In order to demonstrate controllability of the OB in this SDQW, we compare the OB features of three different configurations which could arise in this SDQW scheme, i.e., K-type, Y-type, and inverted Y-type systems. The controllability of this semiconductor nanostructure medium makes the presented OB scheme more valuable for applications in all-optical switches, information storage, and logic circuits of all optical information processing. Project supported by the Lithuanian Research Council (Grant No. VP1-3.1-ŠM-01-V-03-001).

  14. Development of primers to amplify mitochondrial DNA control region of Old World porcupines (subgenus Hystrix).

    PubMed

    Trucchi, E; Gentile, G; Sbordoni, V

    2008-09-01

    Eight primers were developed for the amplification of mitochondrial DNA control region of Old world porcupines (subgenus Hystrix). Successful amplifications of low-quality DNA extracted from old (12 years old) and recent quills were performed, thus facilitating field sampling. Successful cross-species amplifications were obtained for Hystrix africaeaustralis, H. cristata and H. indica. Length and structure of mitochondrial DNA control region were analysed and its usefulness as genetic marker for interspecific and population investigation was discussed.

  15. Mimicking the cochlear amplifier in a cantilever beam using nonlinear velocity feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian cochlea exhibits a nonlinear amplification which allows mammals to detect a large range of sound pressure levels while maintaining high frequency sensitivity. This work seeks to mimic the cochlea’s nonlinear amplification in a mechanical system. A nonlinear, velocity-based feedback control law is applied to a cantilever beam with piezoelectric actuators. The control law reduces the linear viscous damping of the system while introducing a cubic damping term. The result is a system which is positioned close to a Hopf bifurcation. Modelling and experimental results show that the beam with this control law undergoes a one-third amplitude scaling near the resonance frequency and an amplitude-dependent bandwidth. Both behaviors are characteristic of data obtained from the mammalian cochlea. This work could provide insight on the biological cochlea while producing bio-inspired sensors with a large dynamic range and sharp frequency sensitivity.

  16. Local phase control for a planar array of fiber laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffanic, Patrick; Johannes, Benjamin T.; Sison, Claudia A.; Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; O'Neill, Hugh; Kangas, Miikka; Brashears, Travis; Zhang, Qicheng; Griswold, Janelle; Riley, Jordan; Motta, Caio

    2015-09-01

    Arrays of phase-locked lasers have been developed for numerous directed-energy applications. Phased-array designs are capable of producing higher beam intensity than similar sized multi-beam emitters, and also allow beam steering and beam profile manipulation. In phased-array designs, individual emitter phases must be controllable, based on suitable feedback. Most current control schemes sample individual emitter phases, such as with an array-wide beam splitter, and compare to a master phase reference. Reliance on a global beam splitter limits scalability to larger array sizes due to lack of design modularity. This paper describes a conceptual design and control scheme that relies only on feedback from the array structure itself. A modular and scalable geometry is based on individual hexagonal frames for each emitter; each frame cell consists of a conventional lens mounted in front of the fiber tip. A rigid phase tap structure physically connects two adjacent emitter frame cells. A target sensor is mounted on top of the phase tap, representing the local alignment datum. Optical sensors measure the relative position of the phase tap and target sensor. The tap senses the exit phase of both emitters relative to the target normal plane, providing information to the phase controller for each emitter. As elements are added to the array, relative local position data between adjacent phase taps allows accurate prediction of the relative global position of emitters across the array, providing additional constraints to the phase controllers. The approach is scalable for target distance and number of emitters without loss of control.

  17. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  18. Robust 1550-nm single-frequency all-fiber ns-pulsed fiber amplifier for wind-turbine predictive control by wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, F.; de Vries, O.; Schreiber, T.; Eberhardt, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Bollig, C.; Hofmeister, P. G.; Schmidt, J.; Reuter, R.

    2013-02-01

    Scaling of the power yield of offshore wind farms relies on the capacity of the individual wind turbines. This results in a trend to very large rotor diameters, which are difficult to control. It is crucial to monitor the inhomogeneous wind field in front of the wind turbines at different distances to ensure reliable operation and a long lifetime at high output levels. In this contribution, we demonstrate an all-fiber ns-pulsed fiber amplifier based on cost-efficient commercially available components. The amplifier is a suitable source for coherent Doppler lidar pulses making a predictive control of the turbine operation feasible.

  19. Electrically controlled plasmonic lasing resonances with silver nanoparticles embedded in amplifying nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chin; Deng, Luogen

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrated an electrical control of coherent plasmonic random lasing with very diluted Ag nanoparticles dispersed in a dye-doped nematic liquid crystal (NLC), in which the external electric field dependent emission intensity and frequency-splitting were recorded. A modified rate equation model is proposed to interpret the observed coherent lasing, which is a manifestation of the double enhancements caused by the plasmon-polariton near-fields of Ag particles on the population inversion of laser dye molecules and on the optical energy density of lasing modes. The featured laser quenching as weakening the applied field indicates that the present lasing resonances are very sensitive to the fluctuant dielectric perturbations in the NLC host, and are thus most likely associated with some coupled plasmonic oscillations among the metal nanoparticles.

  20. SAG-QC: quality control of single amplified genome information by subtracting non-target sequences based on sequence compositions.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Toru; Mori, Tetsushi; Yamagishi, Keisuke; Takeyama, Haruko

    2017-03-04

    Whole genome amplification techniques have enabled the analysis of unexplored genomic information by sequencing of single-amplified genomes (SAGs). Whole genome amplification of single bacteria is currently challenging because contamination often occurs in experimental processes. Thus, to increase the confidence in the analyses of sequenced SAGs, bioinformatics approaches that identify and exclude non-target sequences from SAGs are required. Since currently reported approaches utilize sequence information in public databases, they have limitations when new strains are the targets of interest. Here, we developed a software SAG-QC that identify and exclude non-target sequences independent of database. In our method, "no template control" sequences acquired during WGA were used. We calculated the probability that a sequence was derived from contaminants by comparing k-mer compositions with the no template control sequences. Based on the results of tests using simulated SAG datasets, the accuracy of our method for predicting non-target sequences was higher than that of currently reported techniques. Subsequently, we applied our tool to actual SAG datasets and evaluated the accuracy of the predictions. Our method works independently of public sequence information for distinguishing SAGs from non-target sequences. This method will be effective when employed against SAG sequences of unexplored strains and we anticipate that it will contribute to the correct interpretation of SAGs.

  1. Learning Curve in Monitoring Magnetically Controlled Growing Rod Distractions With Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jason P Y; Yiu, Karen K L; Bow, Cora; Cheung, Prudence W H; Samartzis, Dino; Cheung, Kenneth M C

    2017-09-01

    Prospective study. To determine whether a learning curve exists for ultrasound measurement of magnetically controlled growing rod (MCGR) distractions. For patients managed by MCGRs, close monitoring of interval distraction length gains is important to determine whether the distractions are translating into actual spine growth. Radiographs are the criterion standard for measuring length gains, but ultrasound has been shown to be effective in monitoring distraction lengths without radiation exposure. It is, however, an operator-dependent tool and thus the accuracy of ultrasound measurement of distracted length may improve with experience. This is a prospective correlation analysis of patients who underwent MCGR treatment for scoliosis. The study period was inclusive of 19th February 2013 to 31st March 2015. All subjects were consecutively recruited in a prospective manner. Data regarding date of the distraction visit, and the interval radiograph and ultrasound measurements of the distracted lengths were collected. Only those episodes with both radiograph and ultrasound performed were used for analysis. The mean differences in change of radiograph and ultrasound measurements were plotted to determine correlation differences and to observe for a learning curve. A total of 379 distraction episodes were analyzed. The mean differences between ultrasound and radiograph measurements per distraction episode were -0.3 mm for the right rod and -0.1 mm for the left rod. For learning curve analysis, there were three distinct timepoints in which the difference of correlation became significantly better and were described as clusters. The correlation in the first cluster (19th February 2013 to 15th October 2013) was 0.612 (right rod) and 0.795 (left rod), the second cluster (16th October 2013 to 20th May 2014) was 0.879 (right rod) and 0.918 (left rod), and the third cluster (21st May 2014 to 31st March 2015) was 0.956 (right rod) and 0.932 (left rod). Thus, a plateau was observed

  2. Quality control procedures for dose-response curve generation using nanoliter dispense technologies.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Catherine; Rosenstein, Craig; Hughes, Bethany; Middleton, Richard; Kariv, Ilona

    2007-09-01

    With the advancement of high-throughput biomolecular screening techniques to the lead optimization stage, there is a critical need to quality control (QC) dose-response curves generated by robotic liquid handlers to ensure accurate affinity determinations. One challenge in evaluating the performance of liquid handlers is identifying and validating a robust method for testing dispense volumes across different instruments. Although traditional automated liquid handlers are still considered the standard platform in many laboratories, nanoliter dispensers are becoming more common and pose new challenges for routine quality control procedures. For example, standard gravimetric measurements are unreliable for testing the accuracy of nanoliter liquid dispenses. However, nanoliter dispensing technology allows for the conservation of compound, reduces compound carryover from well to well through discrete dispenses, and eliminates the need for intermediate compound dilution steps to achieve a low final DMSO assay concentration. Moreover, an intermediate dilution step in aqueous solution might result in compound precipitation at high concentrations. This study compared representative automation procedures done on a variety of liquid dispensers, including manual, traditional, and nanodispense volumes. The data confirmed the importance of establishing robust QC procedures for dose-response generation in addition to accuracy and precision determinations for each instrument, and they validated the use of nanoliter pipettors for dose-response testing. The results of this study also support the requirement for thorough mixing during serial compound dilutions prepared for high-throughput lead optimization strategies using traditional liquid handlers.

  3. Amplifying genetic logic gates.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Jerome; Yin, Peter; Ortiz, Monica E; Subsoontorn, Pakpoom; Endy, Drew

    2013-05-03

    Organisms must process information encoded via developmental and environmental signals to survive and reproduce. Researchers have also engineered synthetic genetic logic to realize simpler, independent control of biological processes. We developed a three-terminal device architecture, termed the transcriptor, that uses bacteriophage serine integrases to control the flow of RNA polymerase along DNA. Integrase-mediated inversion or deletion of DNA encoding transcription terminators or a promoter modulates transcription rates. We realized permanent amplifying AND, NAND, OR, XOR, NOR, and XNOR gates actuated across common control signal ranges and sequential logic supporting autonomous cell-cell communication of DNA encoding distinct logic-gate states. The single-layer digital logic architecture developed here enables engineering of amplifying logic gates to control transcription rates within and across diverse organisms.

  4. Evaluation of the Phase-Dependent Rhythm Control of Human Walking Using Phase Response Curves

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Aoi, Shinya; Imai, Takashi; Aoyagi, Toshio; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Humans and animals control their walking rhythms to maintain motion in a variable environment. The neural mechanism for controlling rhythm has been investigated in many studies using mechanical and electrical stimulation. However, quantitative evaluation of rhythm variation in response to perturbation at various timings has rarely been investigated. Such a characteristic of rhythm is described by the phase response curve (PRC). Dynamical simulations of human skeletal models with changing walking rhythms (phase reset) described a relation between the effective phase reset on stability and PRC, and phase reset around touch-down was shown to improve stability. A PRC of human walking was estimated by pulling the swing leg, but such perturbations hardly influenced the stance leg, so the relation between the PRC and walking events was difficult to discuss. This research thus examines human response to variations in floor velocity. Such perturbation yields another problem, in that the swing leg is indirectly (and weakly) perturbed, so the precision of PRC decreases. To solve this problem, this research adopts the weighted spike-triggered average (WSTA) method. In the WSTA method, a sequential pulsed perturbation is used for stimulation. This is in contrast with the conventional impulse method, which applies an intermittent impulsive perturbation. The WSTA method can be used to analyze responses to a large number of perturbations for each sequence. In the experiment, perturbations are applied to walking subjects by rapidly accelerating and decelerating a treadmill belt, and measured data are analyzed by the WSTA and impulse methods. The PRC obtained by the WSTA method had clear and stable waveforms with a higher temporal resolution than those obtained by the impulse method. By investigation of the rhythm transition for each phase of walking using the obtained PRC, a rhythm change that extends the touch-down and mid-single support phases is found to occur. PMID:27203839

  5. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  6. Regional and sectoral marginal abatement cost curves for NOx incorporating controls, renewable electricity, energy efficiency and fuel switching

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the relationship between the quantity of pollution abated and the marginal cost of abating each additional unit. In the context of air quality management, MACCs typically are developed by sorting end-of-pipe controls by their resp...

  7. Regional and sectoral marginal abatement cost curves for NOx incorporating controls, renewable electricity, energy efficiency and fuel switching

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the relationship between the quantity of pollution abated and the marginal cost of abating each additional unit. In the context of air quality management, MACCs typically are developed by sorting end-of-pipe controls by their resp...

  8. A non-saturated sliding-mode control of shaft deflection for magnetically suspended momentum wheel with coupled disturbance and saturated amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chao; Wang, Xinwei; Yu, Yuanjin; Yang, Zhaohua

    2017-10-01

    The magnetically suspended momentum wheel (MSMW) expands its fresh functions through deflecting the rotary shaft. An improved nonsingular terminal sliding-mode control (NTSMC) method is proposed to achieve high precision tracking of shaft deflection for the MSMW under coupled disturbance and saturated amplifier. A novel structure designed for this MSMW is introduced initially. Its magnetic torque model and coupled disturbance are analyzed, and a tracking error dynamic model is established. Then a NTSMC method is applied to shaft tracking control. As the saturation of amplifier influences tracking performances, an improved NTSMC is designed to deal with saturation problem. Finally, several simulations are performed to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results indicate the proposed method improves the tracking precision and velocity compared with the conventional integral sliding-mode method, and solves the saturation problem compared with existing NTSMC method.

  9. Finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for threshold detection of stimulus-response curves.

    PubMed

    Duc, Luu Hoang; Chávez, Joseph Páez; Son, Doan Thai; Siegmund, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In biochemical networks transient dynamics plays a fundamental role, since the activation of signalling pathways is determined by thresholds encountered during the transition from an initial state (e.g. an initial concentration of a certain protein) to a steady-state. These thresholds can be defined in terms of the inflection points of the stimulus-response curves associated to the activation processes in the biochemical network. In the present work, we present a rigorous discussion as to the suitability of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for the detection of inflection points of stimulus-response curves with sigmoidal shape.

  10. Low cost instrumentation amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Amplifier can be used for many applications requiring high input impedance and common mode rejection, low drift, and gain accuracy on order of one percent. Performance of inexpensive amplifier approaches that of some commercial instrumentation amplifiers in many specifications.

  11. In the Way of Peacemaker Guide Curve between Water Supply and Flood Control for Short Term Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, G.; Sensoy, A.; Yavuz, O.; Sorman, A. A.; Gezgin, T.

    2012-04-01

    Effective management of a controlled reservoir system where it involves multiple and sometimes conflicting objectives is a complex problem especially in real time operations. Yuvacık Dam Reservoir, located in the Marmara region of Turkey, is built to supply annual demand of 142 hm3 water for Kocaeli city requires such a complex management strategy since it has relatively small (51 hm3) effective capacity. On the other hand, the drainage basin is fed by both rainfall and snowmelt since the elevation ranges between 80 - 1548 m. Excessive water must be stored behind the radial gates between February and May in terms of sustainability especially for summer and autumn periods. Moreover, the downstream channel physical conditions constraint the spillway releases up to 100 m3/s although the spillway is large enough to handle major floods. Thus, this situation makes short term release decisions the challenging task. Long term water supply curves, based on historical inflows and annual water demand, are in conflict with flood regulation (control) levels, based on flood attenuation and routing curves, for this reservoir. A guide curve, that is generated using both water supply and flood control of downstream channel, generally corresponds to upper elevation of conservation pool for simulation of a reservoir. However, sometimes current operation necessitates exceeding this target elevation. Since guide curves can be developed as a function of external variables, the water potential of a basin can be an indicator to explain current conditions and decide on the further strategies. Besides, releases with respect to guide curve are managed and restricted by user-defined rules. Although the managers operate the reservoir due to several variable conditions and predictions, still the simulation model using variable guide curve is an urgent need to test alternatives quickly. To that end, using HEC-ResSim, the several variable guide curves are defined to meet the requirements by

  12. Rhombic micro-displacement amplifier for piezoelectric actuator and its linear and hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinglong; Zhang, Chunlin; Xu, Minglong; Zi, Yanyang; Zhang, Xinong

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes rhombic micro-displacement amplifier (RMDA) for piezoelectric actuator (PA). First, the geometric amplification relations are analyzed and linear model is built to analyze the mechanical and electrical properties of this amplifier. Next, the accurate modeling method of amplifier is studied for important application of precise servo control. The classical Preisach model (CPM) is generally implemented using a numerical technique based on the first-order reversal curves (FORCs). The accuracy of CPM mainly depends on the number of FORCs. However, it is generally difficult to achieve enough number of FORCs in practice. So, Support Vector Machine (SVM) is employed in the work to circumvent the deficiency of the CPM. Then the hybrid model, which is based on discrete CPM and SVM is developed to account for hysteresis and dynamic effects. Finally, experimental validation is carried out. The analyzed result shows that this amplifier with the hybrid model is suitable for control application.

  13. Marginal abatement cost curves for NOx incorporating both controls and alternative measures

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the efficient marginal abatement cost level for any aggregate emissions target when a least cost approach is implemented. In order for it to represent the efficient MAC level, all abatement opportunities across all sectors and loc...

  14. Marginal abatement cost curves for NOx incorporating both controls and alternative measures

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the efficient marginal abatement cost level for any aggregate emissions target when a least cost approach is implemented. In order for it to represent the efficient MAC level, all abatement opportunities across all sectors and loc...

  15. Optimization and validation of moving average quality control procedures using bias detection curves and moving average validation charts.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Huub H; Kemperman, Hans

    2017-02-01

    To date, no practical tools are available to obtain optimal settings for moving average (MA) as a continuous analytical quality control instrument. Also, there is no knowledge of the true bias detection properties of applied MA. We describe the use of bias detection curves for MA optimization and MA validation charts for validation of MA. MA optimization was performed on a data set of previously obtained consecutive assay results. Bias introduction and MA bias detection were simulated for multiple MA procedures (combination of truncation limits, calculation algorithms and control limits) and performed for various biases. Bias detection curves were generated by plotting the median number of test results needed for bias detection against the simulated introduced bias. In MA validation charts the minimum, median, and maximum numbers of assay results required for MA bias detection are shown for various bias. Their use was demonstrated for sodium, potassium, and albumin. Bias detection curves allowed optimization of MA settings by graphical comparison of bias detection properties of multiple MA. The optimal MA was selected based on the bias detection characteristics obtained. MA validation charts were generated for selected optimal MA and provided insight into the range of results required for MA bias detection. Bias detection curves and MA validation charts are useful tools for optimization and validation of MA procedures.

  16. Choosing the Optimal Number of B-spline Control Points (Part 1: Methodology and Approximation of Curves)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmening, Corinna; Neuner, Hans

    2016-09-01

    Due to the establishment of terrestrial laser scanner, the analysis strategies in engineering geodesy change from pointwise approaches to areal ones. These areal analysis strategies are commonly built on the modelling of the acquired point clouds. Freeform curves and surfaces like B-spline curves/surfaces are one possible approach to obtain space continuous information. A variety of parameters determines the B-spline's appearance; the B-spline's complexity is mostly determined by the number of control points. Usually, this number of control points is chosen quite arbitrarily by intuitive trial-and-error-procedures. In this paper, the Akaike Information Criterion and the Bayesian Information Criterion are investigated with regard to a justified and reproducible choice of the optimal number of control points of B-spline curves. Additionally, we develop a method which is based on the structural risk minimization of the statistical learning theory. Unlike the Akaike and the Bayesian Information Criteria this method doesn't use the number of parameters as complexity measure of the approximating functions but their Vapnik-Chervonenkis-dimension. Furthermore, it is also valid for non-linear models. Thus, the three methods differ in their target function to be minimized and consequently in their definition of optimality. The present paper will be continued by a second paper dealing with the choice of the optimal number of control points of B-spline surfaces.

  17. Intelligent control for modeling of real-time reservoir operation, part II: artificial neural network with operating rule curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Ting; Chang, Li-Chiu; Chang, Fi-John

    2005-04-01

    To bridge the gap between academic research and actual operation, we propose an intelligent control system for reservoir operation. The methodology includes two major processes, the knowledge acquired and implemented, and the inference system. In this study, a genetic algorithm (GA) and a fuzzy rule base (FRB) are used to extract knowledge based on the historical inflow data with a design objective function and on the operating rule curves respectively. The adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is then used to implement the knowledge, to create the fuzzy inference system, and then to estimate the optimal reservoir operation. To investigate its applicability and practicability, the Shihmen reservoir, Taiwan, is used as a case study. For the purpose of comparison, a simulation of the currently used M-5 operating rule curve is also performed. The results demonstrate that (1) the GA is an efficient way to search the optimal input-output patterns, (2) the FRB can extract the knowledge from the operating rule curves, and (3) the ANFIS models built on different types of knowledge can produce much better performance than the traditional M-5 curves in real-time reservoir operation. Moreover, we show that the model can be more intelligent for reservoir operation if more information (or knowledge) is involved.

  18. SQUARE WAVE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Leavitt, M.A.; Lutz, I.C.

    1958-08-01

    An amplifier circuit is described for amplifying sigmals having an alternating current component superimposed upon a direct current component, without loss of any segnnent of the alternating current component. The general circuit arrangement includes a vibrator, two square wave amplifiers, and recombination means. The amplifier input is connected to the vibrating element of the vibrator and is thereby alternately applied to the input of each square wave amplifier. The detailed circuitry of the recombination means constitutes the novelty of the annplifier and consists of a separate, dual triode amplifier coupled to the output of each square wave amplifier with a recombination connection from the plate of one amplifier section to a grid of one section of the other amplifier. The recombination circuit has provisions for correcting distortion caused by overlapping of the two square wave voltages from the square wave amplifiers.

  19. Segmented amplifier configurations for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    1979-01-01

    An amplifier system for high power lasers, the system comprising a compact array of segments which (1) preserves high, large signal gain with improved pumping efficiency and (2) allows the total amplifier length to be shortened by as much as one order of magnitude. The system uses a three dimensional array of segments, with the plane of each segment being oriented at substantially the amplifier medium Brewster angle relative to the incident laser beam and with one or more linear arrays of flashlamps positioned between adjacent rows of amplifier segments, with the plane of the linear array of flashlamps being substantially parallel to the beam propagation direction.

  20. Pulse width dependence of motor threshold and input–output curve characterized with controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Goetz, Stefan M.; Westin, Gregory G.; Luber, Bruce; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the use of a novel controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device to characterize human corticospinal tract physiology. Methods Motor threshold and input-output (IO) curve of right first dorsal interosseus were determined in 26 and 12 healthy volunteers, respectively, at pulse widths of 30, 60, and 120 μs using a custom-built cTMS device. Strength–duration curve rheobase and time constant were estimated from the motor thresholds. IO slope was estimated from sigmoid functions fitted to the IO data. Results All procedures were well tolerated with no seizures or other serious adverse events. Increasing pulse width decreased the motor threshold and increased the pulse energy and IO slope. The average strength–duration curve time constant is estimated to be 196 μs, 95% CI [181 μs, 210 μs]. IO slope is inversely correlated with motor threshold both across and within pulse width. A simple quantitative model explains these dependencies. Conclusions Our strength–duration time constant estimate compares well to published values and may be more accurate given increased sample size and enhanced methodology. Multiplying the IO slope by the motor threshold may provide a sensitive measure of individual differences in corticospinal tract physiology. Significance Pulse parameter control offered by cTMS provides enhanced flexibility that can contribute novel insights in TMS studies. PMID:23434439

  1. A controlled evaluation of oral screen effects on intra-oral pressure curve characteristics.

    PubMed

    Knösel, Michael; Jung, Klaus; Kinzinger, Gero; Bauss, Oskar; Engelke, Wilfried

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of oral screen (OS) application on intra-oral pressure characteristics in three malocclusion groups. Fifty-six randomly recruited participants (26 males and 30 females) who met the inclusion criteria of either an Angle Class I occlusal relationships or Angle Class II1 or II2 malocclusions, were assigned by dentition to group I (n = 31), group II1 (n = 12), or group II2 (n = 13). Two 3 minute periods of intra-oral pressure monitoring were conducted on each participant, using two different oral end fittings connected to a piezo-resistive relative pressure sensor: (1) a flexible OS and (2) a small-dimensioned air-permeable end cap (EC), which was placed laterally in the premolar region, thus recording intra-oral pressure independent of the influence of the OS. Pressure curve characteristics for both periods and between the malocclusion groups were evaluated with reference to the frequency of swallowing peaks, duration, and altitude of negative pressure plateau phases and the area under the pressure curve. Statistical analysis was undertaken using analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test, and spearman correlation coefficient. A median number of two peaks (median height -20.9 mbar) and three plateau phases (median height of -2.3 mbar) may be regarded as normative for normal occlusion subjects during a 3 minute period, at rest. OS application raised the median average duration and height of intra-oral negative pressure plateau phases in the II1 subjects, exceeding those of group I, but less than the plateau duration in group II2. Median peak heights were distinctively lower in groups I and II1 during OS application. It is concluded that additional training for extension of intra-oral pressure phases may be a promising approach to pre-orthodontic Class II division 1 treatment.

  2. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  3. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  4. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  5. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  6. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  7. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  8. Pushing Typists Back on the Learning Curve: Memory Chunking in the Hierarchical Control of Skilled Typewriting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Motonori; Logan, Gordon D.

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical control of skilled performance depends on the ability of higher level control to process several lower level units as a single chunk. The present study investigated the development of hierarchical control of skilled typewriting, focusing on the process of memory chunking. In the first 3 experiments, skilled typists typed words or…

  9. Pushing Typists Back on the Learning Curve: Memory Chunking in the Hierarchical Control of Skilled Typewriting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Motonori; Logan, Gordon D.

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical control of skilled performance depends on the ability of higher level control to process several lower level units as a single chunk. The present study investigated the development of hierarchical control of skilled typewriting, focusing on the process of memory chunking. In the first 3 experiments, skilled typists typed words or…

  10. An All-Digital Fast Tracking Switching Converter with a Programmable Order Loop Controller for Envelope Tracking RF Power Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Anabtawi, Nijad; Ferzli, Rony; Harmanani, Haidar M

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a step down, switched mode power converter for use in multi-standard envelope tracking radio frequency power amplifiers (RFPA). The converter is based on a programmable order sigma delta modulator that can be configured to operate with either 1(st), 2(nd), 3(rd) or 4(th) order loop filters, eliminating the need for a bulky passive output filter. Output ripple, sideband noise and spectral emission requirements of different wireless standards can be met by configuring the modulator's filter order and converter's sampling frequency. The proposed converter is entirely digital and is implemented in 14nm bulk CMOS process for post layout verification. For an input voltage of 3.3V, the converter's output can be regulated to any voltage level from 0.5V to 2.5V, at a nominal switching frequency of 150MHz. It achieves a maximum efficiency of 94% at 1.5 W output power.

  11. Frequency-modulated, tunable, semiconductor-optical-amplifier-based fiber ring laser for linewidth and line shape control.

    PubMed

    Girard, Simon Lambert; Chen, Hongxin; Schinn, Gregory W; Piché, Michel

    2008-08-15

    We report how the linewidth and line shape of a tunable semiconductor-optical-amplifier-based fiber ring laser can be actively adjusted by applying an intracavity frequency modulation to the laser. Frequency-modulated laser operation is achieved by driving the phase modulator frequency close to the cavity axial-mode spacing, leading to a constant-amplitude laser output having a periodically varying instantaneous frequency. The resulting linewidth varies proportionally with the inverse of the frequency detuning, and it is adjustable from submegahertz to over more than 5 GHz. By appropriate selection of the modulating waveform we have synthesized a near-Gaussian output line shape; other line shapes can be produced by modifying the modulating waveform. Experimental observations are in good agreement with a simple model.

  12. A method for monitoring a process from an out of control to an in control state: Application to the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Biau, David J; Porcher, Raphaël

    2010-08-15

    The cumulative summation (CUSUM) test is increasingly being used in medicine to monitor a wide variety of processes such as cardiac surgery or disease outbreaks. The CUSUM sequentially tests the null hypothesis that the process is in control, i.e. its mean is equal to a given target. Thus, it detects when the process changes to an out of control state. Conversely, monitoring the learning curve requires detecting the time when the process reaches an in control state. In this work we develop an alternative to the CUSUM, the learning curve CUSUM (LC-CUSUM), that serves to detect when a process deviates from an out of control state to an in control state. The test is based on a two one-sided tests procedure where the null hypothesis is that the process is out of control. This can be written as H(0): |mu-mu(0)|> or =delta tested against H(1): |mu-mu(0)|< delta. The null hypothesis is thus the union of two one-sided hypotheses and is rejected when both are rejected. A CUSUM test statistic is then constructed for each hypothesis in a traditional way. The properties of the test are investigated through numerical simulations, and are illustrated on the learning curve of an endoscopist performing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographies for biliary tract disorders.

  13. Routine enema before urodynamics has no impact on the quality of abdominal pressure curves: Results of a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Rigole, H; Senal, N; Damphousse, M; Brochard, C; Manunta, A; Kerdraon, J; Tondut, L; Alimi, Q; Hascoet, J; Siproudhis, L; Peyronnet, B; Bonan, I

    2016-12-01

    The presence of stools in the rectum might affect the quality of the abdominal pressure curve during filling cystometry, but, to date, no study has evaluated the impact of bowel preparation before urodynamics. We evaluated the influence of a sodium phosphate enema before urodynamics on the quality of the abdominal pressure curve. A prospective, controlled, single-blind study was conducted in a single center from May to June 2013. The patients were divided into 2 consecutive groups: patients seen in outpatient clinics during the first 6 weeks (group A) who underwent urodynamics without bowel preparation and patients seen in outpatient clinics during the second 6 weeks (group B) who had a prescription of sodium phosphate enema before urodynamics. The primary endpoint was the quality of the abdominal pressure curve evaluated independently by three physicians who were blinded to the study group. The following data were also collected: age, gender, the presence of a neurological disorder, complicated nature of urodynamics and bother related to preparation for it, assessed using a Likert scale (0 to 10), and the equipment used. A per protocol analysis and an intent-to-treat analysis were conducted. One hundred and thirty-nine patients were included: 54 in group A and 85 in group B. One-third of patients had neurological conditions. 14 patients in group B did not perform their scheduled enema. Thus, 68 patients performed an enema before urodynamics and 71 did not. There was no difference between groups A and B regarding the complicated nature of urodynamics (Likert scale: 3.12 vs. 3.18; P=0.91) or bother related to preparation for it (Likert scale: 3.46 vs. 2.97; P=0.43). In the per protocol analysis, the abdominal pressure curve was considered perfectly interpretable (PI) in 69% of patients who did not receive an enema before urodynamics and in 65% of patients who did (P=0.61). The between-group difference was not statistically significant in intent-to-treat analysis (P

  14. Cross-formational flow of water into coalbed methane reservoirs: controls on relative permeability curve shape and production profile.

    PubMed

    Salmachi, Alireza; Karacan, C Özgen

    2017-03-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) wells tend to produce large volumes of water, especially when there is hydraulic connectivity between coalbed and nearby formations. Cross-formational flow between producing coal and adjacent formations can have significant production and environmental implications, affecting economic viability of production from these shallow reservoirs. Such flows can also affect how much gas can be removed from a coalbed prior to mining and thus can have implications for methane control in mining as well. The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of water flow from an external source into coalbed on production performance and also on reservoir variables including cleat porosity and relative permeability curves derived from production data analysis. A reservoir model is constructed to investigate the production performance of a CBM well when cross-formational flow is present between the coalbed and the overlying formation. Results show that cleat porosity calculated by analysis of production data can be more than one order of magnitude higher than actual cleat porosity. Due to hydraulic connectivity, water saturation within coalbed does not considerably change for a period of time, and hence, the peak of gas production is delayed. Upon depletion of the overlying formation, water saturation in coalbed quickly decreases. Rapid decline of water saturation in the coalbed corresponds to a sharp increase in gas production. As an important consequence, when cross-flow is present, gas and water relative permeability curves, derived from simulated production data, have distinctive features compared to the initial relative permeability curves. In the case of cross-flow, signatures of relative permeability curves are concave downward and low gas permeability for a range of water saturation, followed by rapid increase afterward for water and gas, respectively. The results and analyses presented in this work can help to assess the impact of cross

  15. Cross-formational flow of water into coalbed methane reservoirs: controls on relative permeability curve shape and production profile

    PubMed Central

    Karacan, C. Özgen

    2017-01-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) wells tend to produce large volumes of water, especially when there is hydraulic connectivity between coalbed and nearby formations. Cross-formational flow between producing coal and adjacent formations can have significant production and environmental implications, affecting economic viability of production from these shallow reservoirs. Such flows can also affect how much gas can be removed from a coalbed prior to mining and thus can have implications for methane control in mining as well. The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of water flow from an external source into coalbed on production performance and also on reservoir variables including cleat porosity and relative permeability curves derived from production data analysis. A reservoir model is constructed to investigate the production performance of a CBM well when cross-formational flow is present between the coalbed and the overlying formation. Results show that cleat porosity calculated by analysis of production data can be more than one order of magnitude higher than actual cleat porosity. Due to hydraulic connectivity, water saturation within coalbed does not considerably change for a period of time, and hence, the peak of gas production is delayed. Upon depletion of the overlying formation, water saturation in coalbed quickly decreases. Rapid decline of water saturation in the coalbed corresponds to a sharp increase in gas production. As an important consequence, when cross-flow is present, gas and water relative permeability curves, derived from simulated production data, have distinctive features compared to the initial relative permeability curves. In the case of cross-flow, signatures of relative permeability curves are concave downward and low gas permeability for a range of water saturation, followed by rapid increase afterward for water and gas, respectively. The results and analyses presented in this work can help to assess the impact of cross

  16. Portable musical instrument amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, David E.

    1990-07-24

    The present invention relates to a musical instrument amplifier which is particularly useful for electric guitars. The amplifier has a rigid body for housing both the electronic system for amplifying and processing signals from the guitar and the system's power supply. An input plug connected to and projecting from the body is electrically coupled to the signal amplifying and processing system. When the plug is inserted into an output jack for an electric guitar, the body is rigidly carried by the guitar, and the guitar is operatively connected to the electrical amplifying and signal processing system without use of a loose interconnection cable. The amplifier is provided with an output jack, into which headphones are plugged to receive amplified signals from the guitar. By eliminating the conventional interconnection cable, the amplifier of the present invention can be used by musicians with increased flexibility and greater freedom of movement.

  17. Correcting the Stress-Strain Curve in the Stroke-Rate Controlling Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. P.; Matsumoto, H.; Chiba, A.

    2009-05-01

    In this article, a detailed description of the friction correction, adiabatic correction, and the correction from the stroke-rate controlling process into the strain-rate controlling process on the IHS38MSV hypoeutectoid steel is provided. By using compensated data, processing maps were plotted and used to predict the optimum hot forging process. The compressive tests were performed at stroke rates ranging from 0.12 to 120 mm/s and temperatures ranging from 800 °C to 1200 °C by using ThermecMaster-Z equipment. The results showed that the correction by instant friction coefficient, which was carried out on the basis of previous research, could be extended to wider experimental conditions. The corrected data from both stroke-rate controlling and strain-rate controlling processes were in good agreement with each other, indicating that the present correction from the stroke rate into the strain-rate correction is practical and appropriate.

  18. Curved descending landing approach guidance and control. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Linear optimal regulator theory is applied to a nonlinear simulation of a transport aircraft performing a helical landing approach. A closed form expression for the quasi-steady nominal flight path is presented along with the method for determining the corresponding constant nominal control inputs. The Jacobian matrices and the weighting matrices in the cost functional are time varying. A method of solving for the optimal feedback gains is reviewed. The control system is tested on several alternative landing approaches using both three and six degree flight path angles. On each landing approach, the aircraft was subjected to large random initial state errors and to randomly directed crosswinds. The system was also tested for sensitivity to changes in the parameters of the aircraft and of the atmosphere. Performance of the optimal controller on all the three degree approaches was very good, and the control system proved to be reasonably insensitive to parametric uncertainties.

  19. Active Control of Sound Transmission Through a Curved Panel Into a Cylindrical Enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HENRY, J. K.; CLARK, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    Current research has focused on the reduction of sound transmission through the aircraft fuselage into the interior of aircraft due to turbulent boundary layer excitation. The present work utilizes an analytical model, previously developed by the authors, as a design tool in the development of feedback control systems to attenuate sound transmission. The model is of a typical aircraft panel in service conditions with attached piezoelectric actuators, coupled to the interior acoustics of a rigid-wall cylinder. The control design process, which includes transducer optimization andH2 synthesis, is documented. Control designs are presented utilizing both acoustic pressure measurements and structural velocity measurements. Results indicate that an active structural acoustic control design using structural velocity measurements and insight gained from analysis of the structural acoustic coupling can achieve performance similar to a control design utilizing acoustic pressure measurements. Further analysis shows that the active structural acoustic control design can be implemented regardless of panel position on the enclosure, and can withstand perturbations in panel dynamics resulting from variations in static pressure loading with flight altitude. Significant reduction of sound transmission into the enclosure is achieved.

  20. An All-Digital Fast Tracking Switching Converter with a Programmable Order Loop Controller for Envelope Tracking RF Power Amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Anabtawi, Nijad; Ferzli, Rony; Harmanani, Haidar M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a step down, switched mode power converter for use in multi-standard envelope tracking radio frequency power amplifiers (RFPA). The converter is based on a programmable order sigma delta modulator that can be configured to operate with either 1st, 2nd, 3rd or 4th order loop filters, eliminating the need for a bulky passive output filter. Output ripple, sideband noise and spectral emission requirements of different wireless standards can be met by configuring the modulator’s filter order and converter’s sampling frequency. The proposed converter is entirely digital and is implemented in 14nm bulk CMOS process for post layout verification. For an input voltage of 3.3V, the converter’s output can be regulated to any voltage level from 0.5V to 2.5V, at a nominal switching frequency of 150MHz. It achieves a maximum efficiency of 94% at 1.5 W output power. PMID:28919657

  1. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain.

  2. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-10-20

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain. 6 figs.

  3. High performance polarization-independent Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifier with 22 dB fiber to fiber gain using Mode Propagation Tuning without additional polarization controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmani, Ali; Farhang, Mahmoud; Sheikhi, Mohammad H.

    2017-08-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of polarization-independent quantum dot InAs/GaAs semiconductor optical amplifier (PIQS) based on a technique called mode propagation tuning (MPT) without the need for the polarization controller (PC) is reported, which can solve the limitation caused by polarization sensitivity in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Our calculations show that by a suitable tuning of the thickness of the active layer, only the TE0 and TM0 modes can propagate. Moreover, the gain saturation behavior of this SOA was measured at 1.55 μ m and found to be polarization-independent (PI). At active layer thickness of 1.7 μ m, the confinement factor was 0.75 and 0.7 for TE0 and TM0 modes, respectively, which leads to a gain difference up to 0.1 dB. The rate equations of the QD-SOA were also solved and a fiber to fiber gain of 22 dB was obtained. Additionally, a numerical simulation is presented which shows that the residual gain ripple and polarization sensitivity are sufficiently reduced when residual facet reflectivities of the SOA are in the range below 10-4 . In addition, the full-width at half-maximum of the horizontal and vertical far-field patterns (FFPs) are measured as 30° × 30°. The proposed structure can be used for logical applications.

  4. An Application of Rayleigh Curve Theory to Contract Cost Estimation and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Estimatin_ afd L_’feCy Control: Gett~ng TRS37fiaiTe-V55 - unar.arence T., computer soci• PFes , 1980. 10. Intriligator, Michael D., Eoqometric odIs ___hjgL...Monterey, California 93940 8. Sr. J. Kammerer DASD MCant and Audit ) am. I336 Pentagon Washi±ngton, D.C. 20.301 9. Professor Kneale T. MarshallI Department

  5. Numerical Investigation of the Control of Separation from Curved and Blunt Trailing Edges Using DNS and LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Hermann F.

    2002-07-01

    Wall jets over a curved wall geometry (Coanda flows) are investigated using DNS and turbulence modeling. In experiments large coherent structures have enhanced the effectiveness of wall jets in delaying or preventing flow separation on airfoils. Understanding the behavior of these structures is essential for utilizing wall jets for separation control. The research objective is to investigate curvature effects on large coherent structures, in particular the development of longitudinal (Goertler-type) vortices and their interaction with 2D vortices. The focus is on Coanda cylinders using two computational approaches. With the Flow Simulation Methodology (FSM), a turbulent wall jet is computed over a cylinder segment on a body-fitted grid. In FSM, the contribution of the turbulence model depends on the grid resolution relative to a local turbulent length scale. For a flat-plate reference case, FSM is employed as DNS, LES, and URANS. In all cases the large 2D vortices are captured. For the curved-wall geometry, FSM is employed as a DNS. Goertler-type vortices emerge in the simulation but remain weak due to the narrow computational domain. In the second approach, Coanda flows including nozzle and separated region are computed using immersed boundary techniques (IBT). The feasibility of IBT for Coanda Flows is established.

  6. Amplified wind turbine apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, L. A.; Myers, W. N. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An invention related to the utilization of wind energy and increasing the effects thereof for power generation is described. Amplified wind turbine apparatus is disclosed wherein ambient inlet air is prerotated in a first air rotation chamber having a high pressure profile increasing the turbulence and Reynolds number thereof. A second rotation chamber adjacent and downstream of the turbine has a low pressure core profile whereby flow across the turbine is accelerated and thereafter exits the turbine apparatus through a draft anti-interference device. Interference with ambient winds at the outlet of the turbine apparatus is thus eliminated. Pivotable vanes controlled in response to prevailing wind direction admit air to the chambers and aid in imparting rotation. A central core may be utilized for creating the desired pressure profile in the chamber.

  7. On the design of pulsed dye laser amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Hnilo, A.A.; Martinez, O.E.

    1987-05-01

    The authors apply a formula for the small signal gain of a dye laser amplifier (obtained and verified in a previous work) to the case of a transverse pumped R6G amplifier. They trace a set of curves as a function of dimensionless parameters which give the gain for any combination of the parameters characterizing the amplifier (dye concentration, active length, etc.) The curves can be applied to design dye laser amplifiers for ultrashort pulses, both with saturated or unsaturated gain. They give numerical examples of the use of those curves that suggest that the new designs would require much lower pumping energies than the previous ones. Similar sets of curves can be easily obtained for other dyes or pumping configurations.

  8. Wireless Josephson amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Narla, A.; Sliwa, K. M.; Hatridge, M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-06-09

    Josephson junction parametric amplifiers are playing a crucial role in the readout chain in superconducting quantum information experiments. However, their integration with current 3D cavity implementations poses the problem of transitioning between waveguide, coax cables, and planar circuits. Moreover, Josephson amplifiers require auxiliary microwave components, like directional couplers and/or hybrids, that are sources of spurious losses and impedance mismatches that limit measurement efficiency and amplifier tunability. We have developed a wireless architecture for these parametric amplifiers that eliminates superfluous microwave components and interconnects. This greatly simplifies their assembly and integration into experiments. We present an experimental realization of such a device operating in the 9–11 GHz band with about 100 MHz of amplitude gain-bandwidth product, on par with devices mounted in conventional sample holders. The simpler impedance environment presented to the amplifier also results in increased amplifier tunability.

  9. Wireless Josephson amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narla, A.; Sliwa, K. M.; Hatridge, M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-06-01

    Josephson junction parametric amplifiers are playing a crucial role in the readout chain in superconducting quantum information experiments. However, their integration with current 3D cavity implementations poses the problem of transitioning between waveguide, coax cables, and planar circuits. Moreover, Josephson amplifiers require auxiliary microwave components, like directional couplers and/or hybrids, that are sources of spurious losses and impedance mismatches that limit measurement efficiency and amplifier tunability. We have developed a wireless architecture for these parametric amplifiers that eliminates superfluous microwave components and interconnects. This greatly simplifies their assembly and integration into experiments. We present an experimental realization of such a device operating in the 9-11 GHz band with about 100 MHz of amplitude gain-bandwidth product, on par with devices mounted in conventional sample holders. The simpler impedance environment presented to the amplifier also results in increased amplifier tunability.

  10. A dual-mode highly efficient class-E stimulator controlled by a low-Q class-E power amplifier through duty cycle.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Wei; Lu, Chien-Chi; Chuang, Jia-min; Lin, Wei-Tso; Lin, Chii-Wann; Kao, Ming-Chien; Lin, Mu-Lien

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the design flow of two high-efficiency class-E amplifiers for the implantable electrical stimulation system. The implantable stimulator is a high-Q class-E driver that delivers a sine-wave pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation, which was verified to have a superior efficacy in pain relief to a square wave. The proposed duty-cycle-controlled class-E PRF driver designed with a high-Q factor has two operational modes that are able to achieve 100% DC-AC conversion, and involves only one switched series inductor and an unchanged parallel capacitor. The measured output amplitude under low-voltage (LV) mode using a 22% duty cycle was 0.98 V with 91% efficiency, and under high-voltage (HV) mode using a 47% duty cycle was 2.95 V with 92% efficiency. These modes were inductively controlled by a duty-cycle detector, which can detect the duty-cycle modulated signal generated from the external complementary low-Q class-E power amplifier (PA). The design methodology of the low-Q inductive interface for a non-50% duty cycle is presented. The experimental results exhibits that the 1.5-V PA that consumes DC power of 14.21 mW was able to deliver a 2.9-V sine wave to a 500 Ω load. The optimal 60% drain efficiency of the system from the PA to the load was obtained at a 10-mm coupling distance.

  11. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  12. Coupling of online control and inhibitory systems in children with atypical motor development: A growth curve modelling study.

    PubMed

    Ruddock, Scott; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Piek, Jan; Sugden, David; Hyde, Christian; Morris, Sue; Rigoli, Daniela; Steenbergen, Bert; Wilson, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Previous research indicates that children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) show deficits performing online corrections, an issue exacerbated by adding inhibitory constraints; however, cross-sectional data suggests that these deficits may reduce with age. Using a longitudinal design, the aim of the study presented here was to model the coupling that occurs between inhibitory systems and (predictive) online control in typically developing children (TDC) and in those with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) over an extended period of time, using a framework of interactive specialization. We predicted that TDC would show a non-linear growth pattern, consistent with re-organisation in the coupling during the middle childhood period, while DCD would display a developmental lag. A group of 196 children (111 girls and 85 boys) aged between 6 and 12years participated in the study. Children were classified as DCD according to research criteria. Using a cohort sequential design, both TDC and DCD groups were divided into age cohorts. Predictive (online) control was defined operationally by performance on a Double-Jump Reaching Task (DJRT), which was assessed at 6-month intervals over two years (5 time points in total). Inhibitory control was examined using an anti-jump condition of the DJRT paradigm whereby children were instructed to touch a target location in the hemispace opposite a cued location. For the TDC group, model comparison using growth curve analysis revealed that a quadratic trend was the most appropriate fit with evidence of rapid improvement in anti-reach performance up until middle childhood (around 8-9years of age), followed by a more gradual rate of improvement into late childhood and early adolescence. This pattern was evident on both chronometric and kinematic measures. In contrast, for children with DCD, a linear function provided the best to fit on the key metrics, with a slower rate of improvement than controls. We conclude that

  13. Motor-prediction improvements after virtual rehabilitation in geriatrics: frail patients reveal different learning curves for movement and postural control.

    PubMed

    Kubicki, A; Bonnetblanc, F; Petrement, G; Mourey, F

    2014-01-01

    Postural control associated with self-paced movement is critical for balance in frail older adults. The present work aimed to investigate the effects of a 2D virtual reality-based program on postural control associated with rapid arm movement in this population. Participants in an upright standing position performed rapid arm-raising movements towards a target. Practice-related changes were assessed by pre- and post-test comparisons of hand kinematics and centre-of-pressure (CoP) displacement parameters measured in a training group and a control group. During these pre- and post-test sessions, patients have to reach towards yellow balls appearing on the screen, form a standardized upright position (with 15cm between the two malleoli). Training group patients took part in six sessions of virtual game. In this, patients were asked to reach their arm towards yellow balls appearing on the screen, from an upright position. After training, we observed improvements in arm movements and in the initial phase of CoP displacement, especially in the anticipatory postural adjustments. Learning curves for these two types of motor improvements showed different rates. These were continuous for the control of the arm movement, and discontinuous for the control of the CoP during the anticipatory postural adjustments. These results suggest that some level of motor (re)-learning is maintained in frail patients with low functional reserves. They also suggest that re-learning of anticipatory postural control (i.e. motor prediction) is less robust than explicit motor learning involved for the arm reaching. This last point should encourage clinicians to extend the training course duration, even if reaching movement improvements seems acquired, in order to automate these anticipatory postural activities. However, other studies should be done to measure the retention of these two types of learning on a longer-term period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. A signal-amplified electrochemical DNA biosensor incorporated with a colorimetric internal control for Vibrio cholerae detection using shelf-ready reagents.

    PubMed

    Low, Kim-Fatt; Zain, Zainiharyati Mohd; Yean, Chan Yean

    2017-01-15

    A novel enzyme/nanoparticle-based DNA biosensing platform with dual colorimetric/electrochemical approach has been developed for the sequence-specific detection of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of acute diarrheal disease in cholera. This assay platform exploits the use of shelf-stable and ready-to-use (shelf-ready) reagents to greatly simplify the bioanalysis procedures, allowing the assay platform to be more amenable to point-of-care applications. To assure maximum diagnosis reliability, an internal control (IC) capable of providing instant validation of results was incorporated into the assay. The microbial target, single-stranded DNA amplified with asymmetric PCR, was quantitatively detected via electrochemical stripping analysis of gold nanoparticle-loaded latex microspheres as a signal-amplified hybridization tag, while the incorporated IC was analyzed using a simplified horseradish peroxidase enzyme-based colorimetric scheme by simple visual observation of enzymatic color development. The platform showed excellent diagnostic sensitivity and specificity (100%) when challenged with 145 clinical isolate-spiked fecal specimens. The limits of detection were 0.5ng/ml of genomic DNA and 10 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml of bacterial cells with dynamic ranges of 0-100ng/ml (R(2)=0.992) and log10 (1-10(4) CFU/ml) (R(2)=0.9918), respectively. An accelerated stability test revealed that the assay reagents were stable at temperatures of 4-37°C, with an estimated ambient shelf life of 200 days. The versatility of the biosensing platform makes it easily adaptable for quantitative detection of other microbial pathogens.

  15. Implementation of CTRLPOS, a VENTURE module for control rod position criticality searches, control rod worth curve calculations, and general criticality searches

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Renier, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    A module in the VENTURE reactor analysis code system, CTRLPOS, is developed to position control rods and perform control rod position criticality searches. The module is variably dimensioned so that calculations can be performed with any number of control rod banks each having any number of control rods. CTRLPOS can also calculate control rod worth curves for a single control rod or a bank of control rods. Control rod depletion can be calculated to provide radiation source terms. These radiation source terms can be used to predict radiation doses to personnel and estimate the shielding and long-term storage requirements for spent control rods. All of these operations are completely automated. The numerous features of the module are discussed in detail. The necessary input data for the CTRLPOS module is explained. Several sample problems are presented to show the flexibility of the module. The results presented with the sample problems show that the CTRLPOS module is a powerful tool which allows a wide variety of calculations to be easily performed.

  16. Quantum coherence effects in a Raman amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Harun, S. W.; Ahmad, H.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied optical pulse propagation in a Raman fiber amplifier doped with a three-level medium and driven by a control laser pulse. We analyze the spatial-temporal dynamics of pulse propagation for different atomic initial conditions. The propagation of an optical pulse through the amplifier can be sustained by a control laser that induces transparency via quantum coherence, which is useful for extending the distance between optical repeaters. Under certain conditions, amplification is achieved without population inversion. The results could be useful for laser control of optical pulses in amplifiers and waveguides.

  17. Impact of cap-assisted colonoscopy on the learning curve and quality in colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhouwen; Zhang, Daniel S; Thrift, Aaron P; Patel, Kalpesh K

    2017-06-23

    Colonoscopy competency assessment in trainees traditionally has been informal. Comprehensive metrics such as the Assessment of Competency in Endoscopy (ACE) tool suggest that competency thresholds are higher than assumed. Cap-assisted colonoscopy (CAC) may improve competency, but data regarding novice trainees are lacking. We compared CAC versus standard colonoscopy (SC) performed by novice trainees in a randomized controlled trial. All colonoscopies performed by 3 gastroenterology fellows without prior experience were eligible for the study. Exclusion criteria included patient age <18 or >90 years, pregnancy, prior colon resection, diverticulitis, colon obstruction, severe hematochezia, referral for EMR, or a procedure done without patient sedation. Patients were randomized to either CAC or SC in a 1:1 fashion. The primary outcome was the independent cecal intubation rate (ICIR). Secondary outcomes were cecal intubation time, polyp detection rate, polyp miss rate, adenoma detection rate, ACE tool scores, and cumulative summation learning curves. A total of 203 colonoscopies were analyzed, 101 in CAC and 102 in SC. CAC resulted in a significantly higher cecal intubation rate, at 79.2% in CAC compared with 66.7% in SC (P = .04). Overall cecal intubation time was significantly shorter at 13.7 minutes for CAC versus 16.5 minutes for SC (P =.02). Cecal intubation time in the case of successful independent fellow intubation was not significantly different between CAC and SC (11.6 minutes vs 12.7 minutes; P = .29). Overall ACE tool motor and cognitive scores were higher with CAC. Learning curves for ICIR approached the competency threshold earlier with cap use but reached competency for only 1 fellow. The polyp detection rate, polyp miss rate, and adenoma detection rate were not significantly different between groups. CAC resulted in significant improvement in ICIR, overall ACE tool scores, and trend toward competency on learning curves when compared with SC in

  18. Dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye lr amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant.

  19. Dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye laser amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant. 3 figs.

  20. DIRECT COUPLED AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Dandl, R.A.

    1961-09-19

    A transistor amplifier is designed for vyery small currents below 10/sup -8/ amperes. The filrst and second amplifier stages use unusual selected transistors in which the current amplification increases markedly for values of base current below 10/sup -6/ amperes.

  1. DISTRIBUTED AMPLIFIER INCORPORATING FEEDBACK

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R. Jr.

    1958-10-21

    An improved distributed amplifier system employing feedback for stabilization is presented. In accordance with the disclosed invention, a signal to be amplified is applled to one end of a suitable terminated grid transmission line. At intervals along the transmission line, the signal is fed to stable, resistance-capacitance coupled amplifiers incorporating feedback loops therein. The output current from each amplifier is passed through an additional tube to minimize the electrostatic capacitance between the tube elements of the last stage of the amplifier, and fed to appropriate points on an output transmission line, similar to the grid line, but terminated at the opposite (input) end. The output taken from the unterminated end of the plate transmission line is proportional to the input voltage impressed upon the grid line.

  2. Versatile composite amplifier configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gift, Stephan J. G.; Maundy, Brent

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a versatile composite amplifier in which a current feedback amplifier (CFA) drives an operational amplifier (OPA). In the conventional OPA-CFA composite amplifier, an OPA drives a CFA resulting in a composite structure that combines the DC input stability of the OPA and the high speed capability of the CFA. The proposed composite configuration combines different features of the CFA and OPA, specifically the constant bandwidth property of the CFA and the high power and high current output capacity of the OPA. The new circuit is easily implemented in the standard inverting and non-inverting configurations using commercially available devices, and the accuracy and constant bandwidth features were experimentally verified. Local feedback around the associated CFA ensures that the proposed composite amplifier possesses a higher level of bandwidth constancy than a single CFA.

  3. An Additional Approach to Model Current Followers and Amplifiers with Electronically Controllable Parameters from Commercially Available ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotner, R.; Kartci, A.; Jerabek, J.; Herencsar, N.; Dostal, T.; Vrba, K.

    2012-12-01

    Several behavioral models of current active elements for experimental purposes are introduced in this paper. These models are based on commercially available devices. They are suitable for experimental tests of current- and mixed-mode filters, oscillators, and other circuits (employing current-mode active elements) frequently used in analog signal processing without necessity of onchip fabrication of proper active element. Several methods of electronic control of intrinsic resistance in the proposed behavioral models are discussed. All predictions and theoretical assumptions are supported by simulations and experiments. This contribution helps to find a cheaper and more effective way to preliminary laboratory tests without expensive on-chip fabrication of special active elements.

  4. Multiple CubicBezier Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Horn, Douglas

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm is described for generating smooth curves of first-order continuity. The algorithm is composed of several cubic Bezier curves joined together at the user defined control points. Introduced is a tension control parameter which can be set thus providing additional flexibility in the design of free-form curves. (KR)

  5. Violacein as a genetically-controlled, enzymatically amplified and photobleaching-resistant chromophore for optoacoustic bacterial imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Sigmund, Felix; Reber, Josefine; Luís Deán-Ben, Xosé; Glasl, Sarah; Kneipp, Moritz; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in genetically expressed reporters for in vivo studies of bacterial colonization in the context of infectious disease research, studies of the bacterial microbiome or cancer imaging and treatment. To empower non-invasive high-resolution bacterial tracking with deep tissue penetration, we herein use the genetically controlled biosynthesis of the deep-purple pigment Violacein as a photobleaching-resistant chromophore label for in vivo optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging in the near-infrared range. We demonstrate that Violacein-producing bacteria can be imaged with high contrast-to-noise in strongly vascularized xenografted murine tumors and further observe that Violacein shows anti-tumoral activity. Our experiments thus identify Violacein as a robust bacterial label for non-invasive optoacoustic imaging with high potential for basic research and future theranostic applications in bacterial tumor targeting. PMID:26091543

  6. On-chip frequency compensation with a dual signal path operational transconductance amplifier for a voltage mode control DC/DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ye; Jie, Liu; Bing, Yuan; Xinquan, Lai; Ning, Liu

    2012-04-01

    A novel on-chip frequency compensation circuit for a voltage-mode control DC/DC converter is presented. By employing an RC network in the two signal paths of an operational transconductance amplifier (OTA), the proposed circuit generates two zeros to realize high closed-loop stability. Meanwhile, full on-chip integration is also achieved due to its simple structure. Hence, the number of off-chip components and the board space is greatly reduced. The structure of the dual signal path OTA is also optimized to help get a better transition response. Implemented in a 0.5 μm CMOS process, the voltage mode control DC/DC converter with the proposed frequency compensation circuit exhibits good stability. The test results show that both load and line regulations are less than 0.3%, and the output voltage can be recovered within 15 μs for a 400 mA load step. Moreover, the compensation components area is less than 2% of the die's area and the board space is also reduced by 11%. The efficiency of the whole chip can be up to 95%.

  7. Auto-Zero Differential Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilligan, Gerard T. (Inventor); Aslam, Shahid (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An autozero amplifier may include a window comparator network to monitor an output offset of a differential amplifier. The autozero amplifier may also include an integrator to receive a signal from a latched window comparator network, and send an adjustment signal back to the differential amplifier to reduce an offset of the differential amplifier.

  8. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Hallberg, Carl; Cecil, Jim

    1994-01-01

    A state-of-the-art instrumentation amplifier capable of being used with most types of transducers has been developed at the Kennedy Space Center. This Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) can eliminate costly measurement setup item and troubleshooting, improve system reliability and provide more accurate data than conventional amplifiers. The USCA can configure itself for maximum resolution and accuracy based on information read from a RAM chip attached to each transducer. Excitation voltages or current are also automatically configured. The amplifier uses both analog and digital state-of-the-art technology with analog-to-digital conversion performed in the early stages in order to minimize errors introduced by offset and gain drifts in the analog components. A dynamic temperature compensation scheme has been designed to achieve and maintain 12-bit accuracy of the amplifier from 0 to 70 C. The digital signal processing section allows the implementation of digital filters up to 511th order. The amplifier can also perform real-time linearizations up to fourth order while processing data at a rate of 23.438 kS/s. Both digital and analog outputs are available from the amplifier.

  9. Tuning Broadband Microwave Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Alaniz, Gabriel

    2003-09-05

    The PEP-II/DA {Phi} NE/ALS longitudinal feedback systems are complex wide bandwidth systems requiring analog, digital and microwave circuits. The solid-state amplifier is one of the components in the microwave circuit that is required to suppress the coupled bunch instabilities that exist in the PEP-II accelerator. The suppression is achieved by using an antenna as a kicker structure that provides an electric field in order to increase or decrease the energy of particles passing through the structure. The amplifier is made up of sixteen 30 to 35W microstrip GaAs FET modules that are combined to obtain 500W over a bandwidth of 850MHz to 1850MHz. The amplifier malfunctioned causing a reduction in the functionality and power output of the individual GaAs FET modules. The amplifier must be repaired. After repair, the amplifier must be tuned to optimize the gain while maintaining proper power output. The amplifier is tuned using microstrip circuit techniques. A variety of microstrip methods are used to obtain the proper line impedance. The result is a working amplifier that operates efficiently.

  10. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.L.; Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.

    1994-02-08

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse. 7 figures.

  11. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John L.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  12. Small and lightweight power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Fox, Robert L.; Moses, Robert W.; Bryant, Robert G.; Robinson, Paul C.; Shirvani, Mir

    2002-07-01

    The control of u wanted structural vibration is implicit in most of NASA's programs. Currently several approaches to control vibrations in large, lightweight, deployable structures and twin tail aircraft at high angles of attack are being evaluated. The Air Force has been examining a vertical tail buffet load alleviation system that can be integrated onboard an F/A-18 and flown. Previous wind tunnel and full-scale ground tests using distributed actuators have shown that the concept works; however, there is insufficient rom available onboard an F/A-18 to store current state-of- the-art system components such as amplifiers, DC-to-DC converter and a computer for performing vibration suppression. Sensor processing, power electronics, DC-to-DC converters, and control electronics that may be collocated with distributed actuators, are particularly desirable. Such electronic system would obviate the need for complex, centralized, control processing and power distribution components that will eliminate the weight associated with lengthy wiring and cabling networks. Several small and lightweight power amplifiers ranging from 300V pp to 650V pp have been designed using off the shelf components for different applications. In this paper, the design and testing of these amplifiers will be presented under various electrical loads.

  13. Amplified hazard of small-volume monogenetic eruptions due to environmental controls, Orakei Basin, Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Agustin Flores, Javier

    2012-11-01

    Orakei maar and tuff ring in the Auckland Volcanic Field is an example of a basaltic volcano in which the style and impacts of the eruption of a small volume of magma were modulated by a fine balance between magma flux and groundwater availability. These conditions were optimised by the pre-85 ka eruption being hosted in a zone of fractured and variably permeable Plio-Pleistocene mudstones and sandstones. Orakei maar represents an end-member in the spectrum of short-lived basaltic volcanoes, where substrate conditions rather than the magmatic volatile content was the dominant factor controlling explosivity and eruption styles. The eruption excavated a crater ≫80 m deep that was subsequently filled by slumped crater wall material, followed by lacustrine and marine sediments. The explosion crater may have been less than 800 m in diameter, but wall collapse and wave erosion has left a 1,000-m-diameter roughly circular basin. A tuff ring around part of the maar comprises dominantly base surge deposits, along with subordinate fall units. Grain size, texture and shape characteristics indicate a strong influence of magma-water and magma-mud interactions that controlled explosivity throughout the eruption, but also an ongoing secondary role of magmatic gas-driven expansion and fragmentation. The tuff contains >70 % of material recycled from the underlying Plio-Pliestocene sediments, which is strongly predominant in the >2 ϕ fraction. The magmatic clasts are evolved alkali basalt, consistent with the eruption of a very small batch of magma. The environmental impact of this eruption was disproportionally large, when considering the low volume of magma involved (DRE < 0.003 km3). Hence, this eruption exemplifies one of the worst-case scenarios for an eruption within the densely populated Auckland City, destroying an area of ~3 km2 by crater formation and base surge impact. An equivalent scenario for the same magma conditions without groundwater interaction would yield a

  14. Perceived weight discrimination amplifies the link between central adiposity and nondiabetic glycemic control (HbA1c).

    PubMed

    Tsenkova, Vera K; Carr, Deborah; Schoeller, Dale A; Ryff, Carol D

    2011-04-01

    While the preclinical development of type 2 diabetes is partly explained by obesity and central adiposity, psychosocial research has shown that chronic stressors such as discrimination have health consequences as well. We investigated the extent to which the well-established effects of obesity and central adiposity on nondiabetic glycemic control (indexed by HbA(1c)) were moderated by a targeted psychosocial stressor linked to weight: perceived weight discrimination. The data came from the nondiabetic subsample (n = 938) of the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS II) survey. Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, and waist circumference were linked to significantly higher HbA(1c) (p < 0.001). Multivariate-adjusted models showed that weight discrimination exacerbated the effects of waist-to-hip ratio on HbA(1c) ( p < 0.05), such that people who had higher waist-to-hip ratios and reported weight discrimination had the highest HbA(1c) levels. Understanding how biological and psychosocial factors interact at nondiabetic levels to increase vulnerability could have important implications for public health and education strategies. Effective strategies may include targeting sources of discrimination rather than solely targeting the health behaviors and practices of overweight and obese persons.

  15. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Interferometric modulation in an optical amplifier based on an InGaAsP/lnP heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luc, Vu V.; Duraev, V. P.; Eliseev, P. G.; Nedelin, E. T.; Tsotsoriya, M. V.

    1992-07-01

    Optical amplifiers made of laser diodes can be used as fast switches and modulators of the transmitted light. An "interferometric" modulation variant is interesting in this application: a part of the input radiation propagates along a passive emitter layer and interferes at the output with a part transmitted by an amplifying region. An optical amplifier operating in the 1.3-μm range made of an InGaAsP/lnP heterostructure is used as an example to show that such an interferometric variant can be used to achieve separately amplitude and phase modulation, and to increase the slope of the amplitude characteristic.

  16. Multilevel Growth Curve Analyses of Treatment Effects of a Web-Based Intervention for Stress Reduction: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Raeder, Sabine; Kraft, Pål; Bjørkli, Cato Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Background Stress is commonly experienced by many people and it is a contributing factor to many mental and physical health conditions, However, few efforts have been made to develop and test the effects of interventions for stress. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a Web-based stress-reduction intervention on stress, investigate mindfulness and procrastination as potential mediators of any treatment effects, and test whether the intervention is equally effective for females as males, all ages, and all levels of education. Methods We employed a randomized controlled trial in this study. Participants were recruited online via Facebook and randomly assigned to either the stress intervention or a control condition. The Web-based stress intervention was fully automated and consisted of 13 sessions over 1 month. The controls were informed that they would get access to the intervention after the final data collection. Data were collected at baseline and at 1, 2, and 6 months after intervention onset by means of online questionnaires. Outcomes were stress, mindfulness, and procrastination, which were all measured at every measurement occasion. Results A total of 259 participants were included and were allocated to either the stress intervention (n=126) or the control condition (n=133). Participants in the intervention and control group were comparable at baseline; however, results revealed that participants in the stress intervention followed a statistically different (ie, cubic) developmental trajectory in stress levels over time compared to the controls. A growth curve analysis showed that participants in the stress intervention (unstandardized beta coefficient [B]=–3.45, P=.008) recovered more quickly compared to the control group (B=–0.81, P=.34) from baseline to 1 month. Although participants in the stress intervention did show increases in stress levels during the study period (B=2.23, P=.008), long-term stress levels did decrease

  17. Multilevel growth curve analyses of treatment effects of a Web-based intervention for stress reduction: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Drozd, Filip; Raeder, Sabine; Kraft, Pål; Bjørkli, Cato Alexander

    2013-04-22

    Stress is commonly experienced by many people and it is a contributing factor to many mental and physical health conditions, However, few efforts have been made to develop and test the effects of interventions for stress. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a Web-based stress-reduction intervention on stress, investigate mindfulness and procrastination as potential mediators of any treatment effects, and test whether the intervention is equally effective for females as males, all ages, and all levels of education. We employed a randomized controlled trial in this study. Participants were recruited online via Facebook and randomly assigned to either the stress intervention or a control condition. The Web-based stress intervention was fully automated and consisted of 13 sessions over 1 month. The controls were informed that they would get access to the intervention after the final data collection. Data were collected at baseline and at 1, 2, and 6 months after intervention onset by means of online questionnaires. Outcomes were stress, mindfulness, and procrastination, which were all measured at every measurement occasion. A total of 259 participants were included and were allocated to either the stress intervention (n=126) or the control condition (n=133). Participants in the intervention and control group were comparable at baseline; however, results revealed that participants in the stress intervention followed a statistically different (ie, cubic) developmental trajectory in stress levels over time compared to the controls. A growth curve analysis showed that participants in the stress intervention (unstandardized beta coefficient [B]=-3.45, P=.008) recovered more quickly compared to the control group (B=-0.81, P=.34) from baseline to 1 month. Although participants in the stress intervention did show increases in stress levels during the study period (B=2.23, P=.008), long-term stress levels did decrease again toward study end at 6 months (B=-0

  18. Bradford Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of informetric distributions shows that generalized Leimkuhler functions give proper fits to a large variety of Bradford curves, including those exhibiting a Groos droop or a rising tail. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to test goodness of fit, and least-square fits are compared with Egghe's method. (Contains 53 references.) (LRW)

  19. Amplify Interest in STS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiappetta, Eugene L; Mays, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Presents activities in which students construct simple crystal radio sets and amplifiers out of diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits. Provides conceptual background, materials needed, instructions, diagrams, and classroom applications. (MDH)

  20. Amplify Interest in STS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiappetta, Eugene L; Mays, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Presents activities in which students construct simple crystal radio sets and amplifiers out of diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits. Provides conceptual background, materials needed, instructions, diagrams, and classroom applications. (MDH)

  1. Fully relayed regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Alexander J.

    1981-01-01

    A regenerative laser apparatus and method using the optical relay concept to maintain high fill factors, to suppress diffraction effects, and to minimize phase distortions in a regenerative amplifier.

  2. Crystal oscillators using negative voltage gain, single pole response amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive crystal oscillator is provided which employs negative voltage gain, single pole response amplifiers. The amplifiers may include such configurations as gate inverters, operational amplifiers and conventional bipolar transistor amplifiers, all of which operate at a frequency which is on the roll-off portion of their gain versus frequency curve. Several amplifier feedback circuit variations are employed to set desired bias levels and to allow the oscillator to operate at the crystal's fundamental frequency or at an overtone of the fundamental frequency. The oscillator is made less expensive than comparable oscillators by employing relatively low frequency amplifiers and operating them at roll-off, at frequencies beyond which they are customarily used. Simplicity is provided because operation at roll-off eliminates components ordinarily required in similar circuits to provide sufficient phase-shift in the feedback circuitry for oscillation to occur.

  3. High stability amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. A.; Reinhardt, V. S. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An electrical RF signal amplifier for providing high temperature stability and RF isolation and comprised of an integrated circuit voltage regulator, a single transistor, and an integrated circuit operational amplifier mounted on a circuit board such that passive circuit elements are located on side of the circuit board while the active circuit elements are located on the other side is described. The active circuit elements are embedded in a common heat sink so that a common temperature reference is provided for changes in ambient temperature. The single transistor and operational amplifier are connected together to form a feedback amplifier powered from the voltage regulator with transistor implementing primarily the desired signal gain while the operational amplifier implements signal isolation. Further RF isolation is provided by the voltage regulator which inhibits cross-talk from other like amplifiers powered from a common power supply. Input and output terminals consisting of coaxial connectors are located on the sides of a housing in which all the circuit components and heat sink are located.

  4. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 1: Insights from statistical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Yaeger, M.; Viglione, A.; Coopersmith, E.; Ye, S.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-11-01

    The flow duration curve (FDC) is a classical method used to graphically represent the relationship between the frequency and magnitude of streamflow. In this sense it represents a compact signature of temporal runoff variability that can also be used to diagnose catchment rainfall-runoff responses, including similarity and differences between catchments. This paper is aimed at extracting regional patterns of the FDCs from observed daily flow data and elucidating the physical controls underlying these patterns, as a way to aid towards their regionalization and predictions in ungauged basins. The FDCs of total runoff (TFDC) using multi-decadal streamflow records for 197 catchments across the continental United States are separated into the FDCs of two runoff components, i.e., fast flow (FFDC) and slow flow (SFDC). In order to compactly display these regional patterns, the 3-parameter mixed gamma distribution is employed to characterize the shapes of the normalized FDCs (i.e., TFDC, FFDC and SFDC) over the entire data record. This is repeated to also characterize the between-year variability of "annual" FDCs for 8 representative catchments chosen across a climate gradient. Results show that the mixed gamma distribution can adequately capture the shapes of the FDCs and their variation between catchments and also between years. Comparison between the between-catchment and between-year variability of the FDCs revealed significant space-time symmetry. Possible relationships between the parameters of the fitted mixed gamma distribution and catchment climatic and physiographic characteristics are explored in order to decipher and point to the underlying physical controls. The baseflow index (a surrogate for the collective impact of geology, soils, topography and vegetation, as well as climate) is found to be the dominant control on the shapes of the normalized TFDC and SFDC, whereas the product of maximum daily precipitation and the fraction of non-rainy days was found to

  5. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 1: Insights from statistical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Yaeger, M.; Viglione, A.; Coopersmith, E.; Ye, S.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-06-01

    The Flow Duration Curve (FDC) is a classical method used to graphically represent the relationship between the frequency and magnitude of streamflow. In this sense it represents a compact signature of temporal runoff variability that can also be used to diagnose catchment rainfall-runoff responses, including similarity and differences between catchments. This paper is aimed at extracting regional patterns of the FDCs from observed daily flow data and elucidating the physical controls underlying these patterns, as a way to aid towards their regionalization and predictions in ungauged basins. The FDCs of total runoff (TFDC) using multi-decadal streamflow records for 197 catchments across the continental United States are separated into the FDCs of two runoff components, i.e., fast flow (FFDC) and slow flow (SFDC). In order to compactly display these regional patterns the 3-parameter mixed gamma distribution is employed to characterize the shapes of the normalized FDCs (i.e., TFDC, FFDC and SFDC) over the entire data record. This is repeated to also characterize the between-year variability of "annual" FDCs for 8 representative catchments chosen across a climate gradient. Results show that the mixed gamma distribution can adequately capture the shapes of the FDCs and their variation between catchments and also between years. Comparison between the between-catchment and between-year variability of the FDCs revealed significant space-time symmetry. Possible relationships between the parameters of the fitted mixed gamma distribution and catchment climatic and physiographic characteristics are explored in order to decipher and point to the underlying physical controls. The baseflow index (a surrogate for the collective impact of geology, soils, topology and vegetation, as well as climate) is found to be the dominant control on the shapes of the normalized TFDC and SFDC, whereas the product of maximum daily precipitation and the fraction of non-rainy days was found to

  6. The control of denitrification time in full scale by the automatic detection of the low nitrate bend in the redox curve.

    PubMed

    Cecil, David

    2008-01-01

    A practical problem with using redox potential to control nitrogen removal in activated sludge is detecting the bend in the redox curve that occurs when the nitrate concentration is reduced to low levels. In this paper, a method for detecting the bend is proposed. The method is based on fitting a third-order polynomial to the whole redox curve during a denitrification period. The bend is then the point of inflection on this curve. This is the potential when the second derivative of the polynomial is zero. The practical application of the method is demonstrated in full scale. The method successfully detected the bend in about 90% of aeration denitrification cycles. However, this method gave no significant improvement in nitrogen removal and less than 4% reduction in electricity consumption when compared with control based on a fixed redox set point. Therefore, it is recommended that a fixed set point be used, as this is a much simpler and more robust method.

  7. Orientation and density control of bispecific anti-HER2 antibody on functionalized carbon nanotubes for amplifying effective binding reactivity to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hye-In; Hwang, Dobeen; Jeon, Su-Ji; Lee, Sangyeop; Park, Jung Hyun; Yim, Dabin; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Kang, Homan; Choo, Jaebum; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Chung, Junho; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Nanomaterial bioconjugates have gained unabated interest in the field of sensing, imaging and therapy. As a conjugation process significantly affects the biological functions of proteins, it is crucial to attach them to nanomaterials with control over their orientation and the nanomaterial-to-protein ratio in order to amplify the binding efficiency of nanomaterial bioconjugates to targets. Here, we describe a targeting nanomaterial platform utilizing carbon nanotubes functionalized with a cotinine-modified dextran polymer and a bispecific anti-HER2 × cotinine tandem antibody. This new approach provides an effective control over antibody orientation and density on the surface of carbon nanotubes through site-specific binding between the anti-cotinine domain of the bispecific tandem antibody and the cotinine group of the functionalized carbon nanotubes. The developed synthetic carbon nanotube/bispecific tandem antibody conjugates (denoted as SNAs) show an effective binding affinity against HER2 that is three orders of magnitude higher than that of the carbon nanotubes bearing a randomly conjugated tandem antibody prepared by carbodiimide chemistry. As the density of a tandem antibody on SNAs increases, their effective binding affinity to HER2 increases as well. SNAs exhibit strong resonance Raman signals for signal transduction, and are successfully applied to the selective detection of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells.Nanomaterial bioconjugates have gained unabated interest in the field of sensing, imaging and therapy. As a conjugation process significantly affects the biological functions of proteins, it is crucial to attach them to nanomaterials with control over their orientation and the nanomaterial-to-protein ratio in order to amplify the binding efficiency of nanomaterial bioconjugates to targets. Here, we describe a targeting nanomaterial platform utilizing carbon nanotubes functionalized with a cotinine-modified dextran polymer and a bispecific anti-HER2

  8. Coherent combining technology of master oscillator power amplifier fiber arrays.

    PubMed

    Xiao, R; Hou, J; Liu, M; Jiang, Z F

    2008-02-04

    Coherent beam combination of fiber laser array is an important technology of realize high-power, high-radiance fiber laser system. In this paper, Master Oscillator-Power Amplifier scheme is used to realize phase controlling of three ytterbium fiber amplifiers, the experiment results of both two and three fiber amplifiers are given and compared. Far-field patterns with different fill factor are studied experimentally. We perform optical phase-noise measurements of a commercial 1-W ytterbium fiber amplifier using our phase control electronics, the dominant phase noises of the 1-W fiber amplifier are at frequencies below one kilohertz.

  9. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm–1). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics. PMID:25710188

  10. High input impedance amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1995-01-01

    High input impedance amplifiers are provided which reduce the input impedance solely to a capacitive reactance, or, in a somewhat more complex design, provide an extremely high essentially infinite, capacitive reactance. In one embodiment, where the input impedance is reduced in essence, to solely a capacitive reactance, an operational amplifier in a follower configuration is driven at its non-inverting input and a resistor with a predetermined magnitude is connected between the inverting and non-inverting inputs. A second embodiment eliminates the capacitance from the input by adding a second stage to the first embodiment. The second stage is a second operational amplifier in a non-inverting gain-stage configuration where the output of the first follower stage drives the non-inverting input of the second stage and the output of the second stage is fed back to the non-inverting input of the first stage through a capacitor of a predetermined magnitude. These amplifiers, while generally useful, are very useful as sensor buffer amplifiers that may eliminate significant sources of error.

  11. Amplified DNA Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, Itamar; Shlyahovsky, Bella; Willner, Bilha; Zayats, Maya

    Amplified detection of DNA is a central research topic in modern bioanalytical science. Electronic or optical transduction of DNA recognition events provides readout signals for DNA biosensors. Amplification of the DNA analysis is accomplished by the coupling of nucleic acid-functionalized enzymes or nucleic acid-functionalized nanoparticles (NP) as labels for the DNA duplex formation. This chapter discusses the amplified amperometric analysis of DNA by redox enzymes, the amplified optical sensing of DNA by enzymes or DNAzymes, and the amplified voltammetric, optical, or microgravimetric analysis of DNA using metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. Further approaches to amplify DNA detection involve the use of micro-carriers of redox compounds as labels for DNA complex formation on electrodes, or the use of micro-objects such as liposomes, that label the resulting DNA complexes on electrodes and alter the interfacial properties of the electrodes. Finally, DNA machines are used for the optical detection of DNA, and the systems are suggested as future analytical procedures that could substitute the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process.

  12. Electrospun amplified fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-03-11

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm(-1)). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics.

  13. STABILIZED FEEDBACK AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Fishbine, H.L.; Sewell, C. Jr.

    1957-08-01

    Negative feedback amplifiers, and particularly a negative feedback circuit which is economical on amode power consumption, are described. Basically, the disclosed circuit comprises two tetrode tubes where the output of the first tube is capacitamce coupled to the grid of the second tube, which in turn has its plate coupled to the cathode of the first tube to form a degenerative feedback circuit. Operating potential for screen of the second tube is supplied by connecting the cathode resistor of the first tube to the screen, while the screen is by-passed to the cathode of its tube for the amplified frequencies. Also, the amplifier incorporates a circuit to stabilize the transconductance of the tubes by making the grid potential of each tube interdependent on anode currents of both lubes by voltage divider circuitry.

  14. A grid amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moonil; Weikle, Robert M., II; Hacker, Jonathan B.; Delisio, Michael P.; Rutledge, David B.; Rosenberg, James J.; Smith, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    A 50-MESFET grid amplifier is reported that has a gain of 11 dB at 3.3 GHz. The grid isolates the input from the output by using vertical polarization for the input beam and horizontal polarization for the transmitted output beam. The grid unit cell is a two-MESFET differential amplifier. A simple calibration procedure allows the gain to be calculated from a relative power measurement. This grid is a hybrid circuit, but the structure is suitable for fabrication as a monolithic wafer-scale integrated circuit, particularly at millimeter wavelengths.

  15. Spatial Light Amplifier Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Sverre T.; Olsson, N. Anders

    1992-01-01

    Spatial light amplifier modulators (SLAM's) are conceptual devices that effect two-dimensional spatial modulation in optical computing and communication systems. Unlike current spatial light modulators, these provide gain. Optical processors incorporating SLAM's designed to operate in reflection or transmission mode. Each element of planar SLAM array is optical amplifier - surface-emitting diode laser. Array addressed electrically with ac modulating signals superimposed on dc bias currents supplied to lasers. SLAM device provides both desired modulation and enough optical gain to enable splitting of output signal into many optical fibers without excessive loss of power.

  16. A grid amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moonil; Weikle, Robert M., II; Hacker, Jonathan B.; Delisio, Michael P.; Rutledge, David B.; Rosenberg, James J.; Smith, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    A 50-MESFET grid amplifier is reported that has a gain of 11 dB at 3.3 GHz. The grid isolates the input from the output by using vertical polarization for the input beam and horizontal polarization for the transmitted output beam. The grid unit cell is a two-MESFET differential amplifier. A simple calibration procedure allows the gain to be calculated from a relative power measurement. This grid is a hybrid circuit, but the structure is suitable for fabrication as a monolithic wafer-scale integrated circuit, particularly at millimeter wavelengths.

  17. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Hallberg, Carl; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center have designed a signal conditioning amplifier which automatically matches itself to almost any kind of transducer. The product, called Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), uses state-of-the-art technologies to deliver high accuracy measurements. USCA's features which can be either programmable or automated include: voltage, current, or pulsed excitation, unlimited resolution gain, digital filtering and both analog and digital output. USCA will be used at Kennedy Space Center's launch pads for environmental measurements such as vibrations, strains, temperatures and overpressures. USCA is presently being commercialized through a co-funded agreement between NASA, the State of Florida, and Loral Test and Information Systems, Inc.

  18. 32 CFR 245.12 - Amplifying instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS PLAN FOR THE EMERGENCY SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC (ESCAT) The ESCAT Plan § 245.12 Amplifying... management, airspace and/or security measures required. Every effort will be made to obtain the approval of... air traffic identification and control procedures to the more restrictive identification and control...

  19. 32 CFR 245.12 - Amplifying instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS PLAN FOR THE EMERGENCY SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC (ESCAT) The ESCAT Plan § 245.12 Amplifying... management, airspace and/or security measures required. Every effort will be made to obtain the approval of... air traffic identification and control procedures to the more restrictive identification and control...

  20. 32 CFR 245.12 - Amplifying instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS PLAN FOR THE EMERGENCY SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC (ESCAT) The ESCAT Plan § 245.12 Amplifying... management, airspace and/or security measures required. Every effort will be made to obtain the approval of... air traffic identification and control procedures to the more restrictive identification and control...

  1. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  2. New microelectronic power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    New, T. C.

    1968-01-01

    Integrated push-pull power amplifier fabricated on a chip of silicon has interdigitated power transistors and is hermetically encapsulated in a beryllia flat package. It provides current output greater than the nominal 10 amperes from an input current drive of 1 ampere.

  3. The radical amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastie, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The radical amplifier as a method for measuring radical concentrations in the atmosphere has received renewed attention lately. In principle, it can measure the total concentration of HO(x) and RO(x) radicals by reacting ambient air with high concentrations of CO (3-10 percent) and NO (2-6 ppmv), and measuring the NO2 produced.

  4. Improved RF Isolation Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. L.; Macconnell, J.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit has high reverse isolation and wide bandwidth. Wideband isolation amplifier has low intermodulation distortion and high reverse isolation. Circuit does not require selected or matched components or directional coupling device. Circuit used in applications requiring high reverse isolation such as receiver intermediate-frequency (IF) strips and frequency distribution systems. Also applicable in RF and video signaling.

  5. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  6. 500-Watt Solid-State RF Power Amplifier AM-7209( )/VRC.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-18

    nocoe y and td&tIl#)Y by blocki numiber) VHF RF Amplifiers 30 - 88 MHz Switching Power Supplies Power Amplifier li Freauency HoODing 20 ABSTRACT eCeIIIDI... switch which permits selection of either the full 500-watt nominal output or a reduced 250-watt level and a display control switch . The amplifier...AMPLIFIER SPECIFICATIONS The following specifications describe the 500-watt VHF power amplifier. OPERATOR CONTROLS POWER SWITCH Turns on primary power to the

  7. Investigations of electronic amplifiers supplying a piezobimorph actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milecki, Andrzej; Regulski, Roman

    2016-10-01

    Piezoelectric bending actuators, also known as bimorphs, are characterized by very good dynamic properties and by displacements in a range of a few millimeters. Therefore these actuators are used in a wide range of applications. However their usage is limited because they require supplying amplifiers with output voltage of about 200 V, which are rather expensive. This paper presents investigation results of such amplifiers with high voltage output. The model of a piezobending actuator is proposed and implemented in Matlab-Simulink software in order to simulate the behavior of the actuator supplied by the amplifiers. The simulation results are presented and compared with investigation results of high voltage amplifier used for supplying a piezoactuator. The influence of current limitation of operational amplifier on the actuator current is tested. Finally, a low cost audio power amplifier is proposed to control the piezobender actuator (as a cheaper alternative to the high-voltage amplifier) and its investigations results are presented in the paper.

  8. Research on fluidics, valves, and proportional amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Research and development being conducted at the Systems and Controls Laboratory is reviewed. Static characteristics (supply, input, transfer, output, and noise characteristics) of laminar proportional amplifiers were investigated. Other topics discussed include velocity profiles for laminar fluidic jets, speed control systems employing a jet pipe valve, and power amplification with a vortex valve.

  9. Optimization of plasma amplifiers

    DOE PAGES

    Sadler, James D.; Trines, Raoul M. G. M.; Tabak, Max; ...

    2017-05-24

    Here, plasma amplifiers offer a route to side-step limitations on chirped pulse amplification and generate laser pulses at the power frontier. They compress long pulses by transferring energy to a shorter pulse via the Raman or Brillouin instabilities. We present an extensive kinetic numerical study of the three-dimensional parameter space for the Raman case. Further particle-in-cell simulations find the optimal seed pulse parameters for experimentally relevant constraints. The high-efficiency self-similar behavior is observed only for seeds shorter than the linear Raman growth time. A test case similar to an upcoming experiment at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics is found tomore » maintain good transverse coherence and high-energy efficiency. Effective compression of a 10kJ, nanosecond-long driver pulse is also demonstrated in a 15-cm-long amplifier.« less

  10. STABILIZED TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Noe, J.B.

    1963-05-01

    A temperature stabilized transistor amplifier having a pair of transistors coupled in cascade relation that are capable of providing amplification through a temperature range of - 100 un. Concent 85% F to 400 un. Concent 85% F described. The stabilization of the amplifier is attained by coupling a feedback signal taken from the emitter of second transistor at a junction between two serially arranged biasing resistances in the circuit of the emitter of the second transistor to the base of the first transistor. Thus, a change in the emitter current of the second transistor is automatically corrected by the feedback adjustment of the base-emitter potential of the first transistor and by a corresponding change in the base-emitter potential of the second transistor. (AEC)

  11. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  12. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1993-03-30

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  13. Optimization of plasma amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, James D.; Trines, Raoul M. Â. G. Â. M.; Tabak, Max; Haberberger, Dan; Froula, Dustin H.; Davies, Andrew S.; Bucht, Sara; Silva, Luís O.; Alves, E. Paulo; Fiúza, Frederico; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Kasim, Muhammad F.; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter A.

    2017-05-01

    Plasma amplifiers offer a route to side-step limitations on chirped pulse amplification and generate laser pulses at the power frontier. They compress long pulses by transferring energy to a shorter pulse via the Raman or Brillouin instabilities. We present an extensive kinetic numerical study of the three-dimensional parameter space for the Raman case. Further particle-in-cell simulations find the optimal seed pulse parameters for experimentally relevant constraints. The high-efficiency self-similar behavior is observed only for seeds shorter than the linear Raman growth time. A test case similar to an upcoming experiment at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics is found to maintain good transverse coherence and high-energy efficiency. Effective compression of a 10 kJ , nanosecond-long driver pulse is also demonstrated in a 15-cm-long amplifier.

  14. Man-Amplifying Exoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosheim, Mark E.

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes a design for a man-amplifying exoskeleton, an electrically powered, articulated frame worn by an operator. The design features modular construction and employ anthropomorphic pitch-yaw joints for arms and legs. These singularity-free designs offer a significant advancement over simple pivot-type joints used in older designs. Twenty-six degrees-of-freedom excluding the hands gives the Man-Amplifier its unique dexterity. A five hundred-pound load capacity is engineered for a diverse range of tasks. Potential applications in emergency rescue work, restoring functionality to the handicapped, and military applications ranging from material handling to an elite fighting core are discussed. A bibliography concludes this paper.

  15. Helical Fiber Amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Kliner, Dahy; Goldberg, Lew

    2002-12-17

    A multi-mode gain fiber is provided which affords substantial improvements in the maximum pulse energy, peak power handling capabilities, average output power, and/or pumping efficiency of fiber amplifier and laser sources while maintaining good beam quality (comparable to that of a conventional single-mode fiber source). These benefits are realized by coiling the multimode gain fiber to induce significant bend loss for all but the lowest-order mode(s).

  16. Longitudinal space charge amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2013-05-01

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) driven microbunching instability in electron beam formation systems of X-ray FELs is a recently discovered effect hampering beam instrumentation and FEL operation. The instability was observed in different facilities in infrared and visible wavelength ranges. In this paper we propose to use such an instability for generation of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray radiation. A typical longitudinal space charge amplifier (LSCA) consists of few amplification cascades (drift space plus chicane) with a short undulator behind the last cascade. If the amplifier starts up from the shot noise, the amplified density modulation has a wide band, on the order of unity. The bandwidth of the radiation within the central cone is given by inverse number of undulator periods. A wavelength compression could be an attractive option for LSCA since the process is broadband, and a high compression stability is not required. LSCA can be used as a cheap addition to the existing or planned short-wavelength FELs. In particular, it can produce the second color for a pump-probe experiment. It is also possible to generate attosecond pulses in the VUV and X-ray regimes. Some user experiments can profit from a relatively large bandwidth of the radiation, and this is easy to obtain in LSCA scheme. Finally, since the amplification mechanism is broadband and robust, LSCA can be an interesting alternative to self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL) in the case of using laser-plasma accelerators as drivers of light sources.

  17. Selective Thoracic Fusion of Lenke I and II Curves Affects Sagittal Profiles But Not Sagittal or Spinopelvic Alignment: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Ries, Zachary; Harpole, Bethany; Graves, Christopher; Gnanapragasam, Gnanapradeep; Larson, Nyle; Weintstein, Stuart; Mendoza-Lattes, Sergio A

    2015-06-15

    Literature review and retrospective case-control study (level 3 evidence) examining 50 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) (Lenke I or II curve) cases with 32 healthy controls of the same age. The sagittal profiles were measured preoperatively, 6 months, and 2 years after surgery and compared with those of age-matched controls at baseline. The purpose of this study is to compare baseline sagittal profiles of AIS Lenke I and II curves with age-matched healthy controls and at 6 months and 2 years after surgery, as well as with previously published reports. Sagittal alignment and profiles have gained significant attention in spinal deformity outcomes. The sagittal profile of patients with AIS has been previously reported, as well as the effects of surgical correction, with inconsistent results and no clear references to nonscoliotic controls. Baseline sagittal profiles of 50 patients presenting with Lenke I or II AIS curves treated with selective thoracic fusion were compared with 32 age-matched controls without spinal pathology. These values were also measured at 6 months and 2 years postoperatively to examine effects of selective thoracic fusion over time. Sagittal parameters examined include pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, C7 plumb line (sagittal vertical alignment), thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar lordosis. A literature review was performed comparing previously published data. Data are presented as mean (95% confidence interval). P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Interobserver reliability (Cohen κ= 0.49-0.95). All demographic and preoperative sagittal alignment parameters were comparable between controls and patients with AIS prior to surgery. After selective thoracic fusion, thoracic kyphosis decreased significantly from baseline (25.4º [21.6-29.2] vs. 15.3º [12.8-17.8]; P < 0.001) at 6 months and at 2 years (10.3º [7.5-13.1]; P < 0.001). The lumbar lordosis significantly decreased at 6 months from baseline (54.5º [28.6-80.5] vs. 61.8º

  18. Multiple pass laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Brueckner, Keith A.; Jorna, Siebe; Moncur, N. Kent

    1977-01-01

    A laser amplification method for increasing the energy extraction efficiency from laser amplifiers while reducing the energy flux that passes through a flux limited system which includes apparatus for decomposing a linearly polarized light beam into multiple components, passing the components through an amplifier in delayed time sequence and recombining the amplified components into an in phase linearly polarized beam.

  19. Improved-Bandwidth Transimpedance Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapsky, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The widest available operational amplifier, with the best voltage and current noise characteristics, is considered for transimpedance amplifier (TIA) applications where wide bandwidth is required to handle fast rising input signals (as for time-of-flight measurement cases). The added amplifier inside the TIA feedback loop can be configured to have slightly lower voltage gain than the bandwidth reduction factor.

  20. Radiologic findings and curve progression 22 years after treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: comparison of brace and surgical treatment with matching control group of straight individuals.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, A J; Nachemson, A L

    2001-03-01

    This study is a follow-up investigation for a consecutive series of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated between 1968 and 1977. In this series, 156 patients underwent surgery with distraction and fusion using Harrington rods, and 127 were treated with brace. To determine the long-term outcome in terms of radiologic findings and curve progression at least 20 years after completion of the treatment. Radiologic appearance is important in comparing the outcome of different treatment options and in evaluating clinical results. Earlier studies have shown a slight increase of the Cobb angle in brace-treated patients with time, but not in fused patients. Of 283 patients, 252 attended a clinical and radiologic follow-up assessment by an unbiased observer (91% of the surgically treated and 87% of the brace-treated patients). This evaluation included chart reviews, validated questionnaires, clinical examination, and full-length standing frontal and lateral roentgenographs. Curve size was measured by the Cobb method on anteroposterior roentgenograms as well as by sagittal contour and balance on lateral films. The occurrence of any degenerative changes or other complications was noted. An age- and gender-matched control group of 100 individuals was randomly selected and subjected to the same examinations. The mean follow-up times were 23 years for surgically treated group and 22 years for brace-treated group. The deterioration of the curves was 3.5 degrees for all the surgically treated curves and 7.9 degrees for all the brace-treated curves (P < 0.001). Five patients, all brace-treated, had a curve increase of 20 degrees or more. The overall complication rate after surgery was low: Pseudarthrosis occurred in three patients, and flat back syndrome developed in four patients. Eight of the patients treated with fusion (5.1%) had undergone some additional curve-related surgical procedure. The lumbar lordosis was less in the surgically treated than in the brace

  1. Modulation instability in high power laser amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Rubenchik, Alexander M; Turitsyn, Sergey K; Fedoruk, Michail P

    2010-01-18

    The modulation instability (MI) is one of the main factors responsible for the degradation of beam quality in high-power laser systems. The so-called B-integral restriction is commonly used as the criteria for MI control in passive optics devices. For amplifiers the adiabatic model, assuming locally the Bespalov-Talanov expression for MI growth, is commonly used to estimate the destructive impact of the instability. We present here the exact solution of MI development in amplifiers. We determine the parameters which control the effect of MI in amplifiers and calculate the MI growth rate as a function of those parameters. The safety range of operational parameters is presented. The results of the exact calculations are compared with the adiabatic model, and the range of validity of the latest is determined. We demonstrate that for practical situations the adiabatic approximation noticeably overestimates MI. The additional margin of laser system design is quantified.

  2. Design Guide for Laminar Flow Fluidic Amplifiers and Sensors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-27

    input * and output characteristics for the geometry of any amplifier . The only constraint is that the flow out of the supply nozzle remains laminar and...supply pressure in the range of 2 to 20 MPa. Although turbulent flow jet deflection amplifiers have useful characteristics , their low gain and low dynamic...simple proportional fluidic controllers using turbulent flow amplifiers indicated that the characteristics of these devices would restrict the

  3. Amplifying Electrochemical Indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong; Li, Jun; Han, Jie

    2004-01-01

    Dendrimeric reporter compounds have been invented for use in sensing and amplifying electrochemical signals from molecular recognition events that involve many chemical and biological entities. These reporter compounds can be formulated to target specific molecules or molecular recognition events. They can also be formulated to be, variously, hydrophilic or amphiphilic so that they are suitable for use at interfaces between (1) aqueous solutions and (2) electrodes connected to external signal-processing electronic circuits. The invention of these reporter compounds is expected to enable the development of highly miniaturized, low-power-consumption, relatively inexpensive, mass-producible sensor units for diverse applications.

  4. Amplified total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Dogariu, A; Wang, L J

    2003-02-24

    Totally internal reflected beams can be amplified if the lowerindex medium has gain. We analyze the reflection and refraction of light, and analytically derive the expression for the Goos-Hänchen shifts of a Gaussian beam incident on a lower-index medium, both active and absorptive. We examine the energy flow and the Goos-Hänchen shifts for various cases. The analytical results are consistent with the numerical results. For the TE mode, the Goos-Hänchen shift for the transmitted beam is exactly half of that of the reflected beam, resulting in a "1/2" rule.

  5. REGENERATIVE TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Kabell, L.J.

    1958-11-25

    Electrical circults for use in computers and the like are described. particularly a regenerative bistable transistor amplifler which is iurned on by a clock signal when an information signal permits and is turned off by the clock signal. The amplifier porforms the above function with reduced power requirements for the clock signal and circuit operation. The power requirements are reduced in one way by employing transformer coupling which increases the collector circuit efficiency by eliminating the loss of power in the collector load resistor.

  6. Efficient terahertz wave generation from GaP crystals pumped by chirp-controlled pulses from femtosecond photonic crystal fiber amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiang; Shi, Junkai; Xu, Baozhong; Xing, Qirong; Wang, Chingyue; Chai, Lu E-mail: yanfengli@tju.edu.cn; Liu, Bowen; Hu, Minglie; Li, Yanfeng E-mail: yanfengli@tju.edu.cn; Fedotov, Andrey B.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2014-01-20

    A chirp-tunable femtosecond 10 W, 42 MHz photonic-crystal-fiber oscillator-amplifier system that is capable of delivering sub-60 fs light pulses at 1040 nm is used to demonstrate high-efficiency terahertz radiation generation via optical rectification in GaP crystals only a few millimeters in length. The optimization of the chirp of the fiber-laser pulses is shown to radically enhance the terahertz output, indicating one possible way to more efficiently use these extended nonlinear crystals in compact fiber-pumped terahertz radiation sources.

  7. Curves and Their Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Robert C.

    This volume, a reprinting of a classic first published in 1952, presents detailed discussions of 26 curves or families of curves, and 17 analytic systems of curves. For each curve the author provides a historical note, a sketch or sketches, a description of the curve, a discussion of pertinent facts, and a bibliography. Depending upon the curve,…

  8. Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Frank

    1997-01-01

    The Technological Research and Development Authority (TRDA) and NASA-KSC entered into a cooperative agreement in March of 1994 to achieve the utilization and commercialization of a technology development for benefiting both the Space Program and U.S. industry on a "dual-use basis". The technology involved in this transfer is a new, unique Universal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) used in connection with various types of transducers. The project was initiated in partnership with I-Net Corporation, Lockheed Martin Telemetry & Instrumentation (formerly Loral Test and Information Systems) and Brevard Community College. The project consists of designing, miniaturizing, manufacturing, and testing an existing prototype of USCA that was developed for NASA-KSC by the I-Net Corporation. The USCA is a rugged and field-installable self (or remotely)- programmable amplifier that works in combination with a tag random access memory (RAM) attached to various types of transducers. This summary report comprises performance evaluations, TRDA partnership tasks, a project summary, project milestones and results.

  9. DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BOHON, J.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; ISAKOVIC, A.; RAO, T.; WU, Q.

    2007-11-26

    High-average-current linear electron accelerators require photoinjectors capable of delivering tens to hundreds of mA average current, with peak currents of hundreds of amps. Standard photocathodes face significant challenges in meeting these requirements, and often have short operational lifetimes in an accelerator environment. We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission amplifiers for photocathodes, which are intended to increase the achievable average current while protecting the cathode from the accelerator. The amplifier is a thin diamond wafer which converts energetic (few keV) primary electrons into hundreds of electron-hole pairs via secondary electron emission. The electrons drift through the diamond under an external bias and are emitted into vacuum via a hydrogen-terminated surface with negative electron affinity (NEA). Secondary emission gain of over 200 has been achieved. Two methods of patterning diamond, laser ablation and reactive-ion etching (RIE), are being developed to produce the required geometry. A variety of diagnostic techniques, including FTIR, SEM and AFM, have been used to characterize the diamonds.

  10. Tuneable, non-degenerated, nonlinear, parametrically-excited amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolev, Amit; Bucher, Izhak

    2016-01-01

    The proposed parametric amplifier scheme can be tuned to amplify a wide range of input frequencies by altering the parametric excitation with no need to physically modify the oscillator. Parametric amplifiers had been studied extensively, although most of the work focused on amplifiers that are parametrically excited at a frequency twice the amplifier's natural frequency. These amplifiers are confined to amplifying predetermined frequencies. The proposed parametric amplifier's bandwidth is indeed tuneable to nearly any input frequency, not bound to be an integer multiple of a natural frequency. In order to tune the stiffness and induce a variable frequency parametric excitation, a digitally controlled electromechanical element must be incorporated in the realization. We introduce a novel parametric amplifier with nonlinearity, Duffing type hardening, that bounds the otherwise unlimited amplitude. Moreover, we present a multi degree of freedom system in which a utilization of the proposed method enables the projection of low frequency vector forces on any eigenvector and corresponding natural frequency of the system, and thus to transform external excitations to a frequency band where signal levels are considerably higher. Using the method of multiple scales, analytical expressions for the responses have been retrieved and verified numerically. Parametric studies of the amplifiers' gain, sensitivities and spatial projection of the excitation on the system eigenvectors were carried out analytically. The results demonstrate the advantage of the proposed approach over existing schemes. Practical applications envisaged for the proposed method will be outlined.

  11. Controlling mode instabilities at 628 W average output power in an Yb-doped rod-type fiber amplifier by active modulation of the pump power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stihler, Christoph; Jauregui, Cesar; Otto, Hans-Jürgen; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    The phenomenon of transverse mode instabilities (TMI) is currently the most limiting effect for the scaling of the average output power of fiber laser systems with nearly diffraction-limited beam quality. Thus, it is of high interest to develop efficient mitigation strategies to further enhance the performance of fiber laser systems. By actively modulating the pump power of an Yb-doped rod-type fiber amplifier, it was possible to weaken the thermally-induced refractive index grating along the fiber and, thus, to mitigate TMI to a large extent. A significant advantage of this approach is that it can be easily integrated in any existing fiber-laser system since no further optical components are needed. A function generator connected to the pump diode driver was used to achieve the modulation. With this setup we were able to extract a fully stabilized beam at 1.5 times above the TMI threshold. Furthermore, a stabilization of the beam was still feasible at an average output power of 628 W, which is more than three times higher than the free-running TMI threshold of that particular fiber under identical conditions (e.g. seed power). This is the highest average output power reported from a single-channel rod-type fiber amplifier with a high-quality stabilized beam, to the best of our knowledge.

  12. 32 CFR 245.12 - Amplifying instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... appropriate, regarding any changes in the air traffic management, airspace, and/or security measures required...) MISCELLANEOUS PLAN FOR THE EMERGENCY SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC (ESCAT) The ESCAT Plan § 245.12 Amplifying... with DOT through the FAA Administrator and DHS through the TSA Administrator to discuss the air traffic...

  13. 32 CFR 245.12 - Amplifying instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... appropriate, regarding any changes in the air traffic management, airspace, and/or security measures required...) MISCELLANEOUS PLAN FOR THE EMERGENCY SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC (ESCAT) The ESCAT Plan § 245.12 Amplifying... with DOT through the FAA Administrator and DHS through the TSA Administrator to discuss the air traffic...

  14. Injection- Seeded Optoplasmonic Amplifier in the Visible

    PubMed Central

    Gartia, Manas Ranjan; Seo, Sujin; Kim, Junhwan; Chang, Te-Wei; Bahl, Gaurav; Lu, Meng; Liu, Gang Logan; Eden, J. Gary

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid optoplasmonic amplifier, injection-seeded by an internally-generated Raman signal and operating in the visible (563–675 nm), is proposed and evidence for amplification is presented. Comprising a gain medium tethered to a whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator with a protein, and a plasmonic surface, the optical system described here selectively amplifies a single (or a few) Raman line(s) produced within the WGM resonator and is well-suited for routing narrowband optical power on-a-chip. Over the past five decades, optical oscillators and amplifiers have typically been based on the buildup of the field from the spontaneous emission background. Doing so limits the temporal coherence of the output, lengthens the time required for the optical field intensity to reach saturation, and often is responsible for complex, multiline spectra. In addition to the spectral control afforded by injection-locking, the effective Q of the amplifier can be specified by the bandwidth of the injected Raman signal. This characteristic contrasts with previous WGM-based lasers and amplifiers for which the Q is determined solely by the WGM resonator. PMID:25156810

  15. Nanoscale electromechanical parametric amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, Benjamin Jose; Zettl, Alexander

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a parametric amplifier. In one aspect, a device includes an electron source electrode, a counter electrode, and a pumping electrode. The electron source electrode may include a conductive base and a flexible conductor. The flexible conductor may have a first end and a second end, with the second end of the flexible conductor being coupled to the conductive base. A cross-sectional dimension of the flexible conductor may be less than about 100 nanometers. The counter electrode may be disposed proximate the first end of the flexible conductor and spaced a first distance from the first end of the flexible conductor. The pumping electrode may be disposed proximate a length of the flexible conductor and spaced a second distance from the flexible conductor.

  16. The microstrip SQUID amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therrien, Roy

    A Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDS) can operate at frequencies up to several GHz and can be cooled to less than 100 mK. Such characteristics make the SQUID---a flux-to-voltage transducer---an excellent candidate for use as a low-noise rf amplifier. Coupling of input signals of frequencies larger than 200 MHz, however, has been limited by the parasitic capacitance between the input coil and SQUID body. We present experimental observations of a do SQUID-based rf amplifier which circumvents this problem by incorporating the input coil as a microstrip resonator. The microstrip input configuration uses the capacitance and inductance of the input coil to form a resonant cavity capable of operating up to several GHz. The input signal is applied between the SQUID body and one end of the input coil, while the other end of the coil is left open. We present data from microstrip SQUID amplifiers with gains of up to 22 dB at 900 MHz. In order to understand the gain and input impedance of the microstrip SQUID in greater detail, we made and studied a 1:190 scale analog patterned on a double-sided printed circuit board consisting of copper deposited on a kapton sheet. The measured input impedance of the analog SQUID is successfully modeled by describing the microstrip input as a low-loss transmission line. When operated with the slit in the copper washer ground plane shorted, the input coil behaves exactly like a linear resonator with the resonant frequency given by f = 1/2ℓ(L 0C0)1/2, where L0 and C0 are the inductance and capacitance per unit length and ℓ is the coil length. With the slit in the washer left open, the inductance of the input coil is significantly altered in a manner partially consistent with the Ketchen-Jaycox model in which the reflected inductance of the input coil is Li = n2L, where L is the inductance of the washer loop and n is the number of turns in the coil. We present input impedance measurements on microstrip SQUIDs cooled to 4

  17. Effect of Schroth exercises on curve characteristics and clinical outcomes in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Sanja; Parent, Eric C; Hedden, Douglas M; Moreau, Marc; Hill, Doug; Lou, Edmond

    2014-12-01

    The promising results of Schroth scoliosis-specific exercises for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis found in low-quality studies will be strengthened by confirmation in a randomised controlled trial. 1. Are Schroth exercises combined with standard care for 6 months more effective than standard care alone in improving radiographic and clinical outcomes for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis? 2. Will the outcomes of the control group (who will be offered Schroth therapy delayed by 6 months) improve after 6 months of Schroth therapy? 3. Are the effects maintained 6 months after discontinuing the supervised intervention? This is an assessor-blinded and statistician-blinded randomised controlled trial with transfer of the controls to the exercise group after 6 months. Two hundred and fifty-eight consecutive adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis, aged 10 to 16 years, treated with or without a brace, with curves between 10 and 45 deg Cobb and Risser sign ≤ 3 will be recruited from three scoliosis clinics. Combined with standard care, the Schroth group will receive five individual training sessions, followed by weekly group classes and daily home exercises for 6 months. Controls will only receive standard care consisting of observation or bracing, and will be offered Schroth therapy 6 months later. Curve severity (Cobb angle) and vertebral rotation will be assessed from radiographs at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Secondary clinical outcomes (back muscle endurance, surface topography measures of posture, and self-reported perceived spinal appearance and quality of life) will be assessed at baseline, and every 3 months until 1-year follow-up. Data will be analysed using intention-to-treat linear mixed models. The results will demonstrate whether Schroth exercises combined with standard of care can improve outcomes in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. This study has potential to influence clinical practice worldwide, where exercises are not routinely prescribed for

  18. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Mark A.

    1985-01-01

    A laser pulse is injected into an unstable ring resonator-amplifier structure. Inside this resonator the laser pulse is amplified, spatially filtered and magnified. The laser pulse is recirculated in the resonator, being amplified, filtered and magnified on each pass. The magnification is chosen so that the beam passes through the amplifier in concentric non-overlapping regions similar to a single pass MOPA. After a number of passes around the ring resonator the laser pulse is spatially large enough to exit the ring resonator system by passing around an output mirror.

  19. Wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, D.J.; Bado, P.

    1988-11-01

    We describe a wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier which is used to amplify nanosecond slices from a single-frequency cw dye laser or 50-ps pulses emitted by a diode laser to energies in the 10-mJ range. The amplified 5-ns slices generated by the cw-pumped line narrowed dye laser are Fourier transform limited. The 50-ps pulses emitted by a gain-switched diode laser are amplified by more than 10 orders of magnitude in a single stage.

  20. Optical Amplifier for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Cole, Spencer T.; Gamble, Lisa J.; Diffey, William M.; Keys, Andrew S.

    1999-01-01

    We describe an optical amplifier designed to amplify a spatially sampled component of an optical wavefront to kilowatt average power. The goal is means for implementing a strategy of spatially segmenting a large aperture wavefront, amplifying the individual segments, maintaining the phase coherence of the segments by active means, and imaging the resultant amplified coherent field. Applications of interest are the transmission of space solar power over multi-megameter distances, as to distant spacecraft, or to remote sites with no preexisting power grid.

  1. Quantum Brachistochrone Curves as Geodesics: Obtaining Accurate Minimum-Time Protocols for the Control of Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Allegra, Michele; Jacobs, Kurt; Lloyd, Seth; Lupo, Cosmo; Mohseni, Masoud

    2015-05-01

    Most methods of optimal control cannot obtain accurate time-optimal protocols. The quantum brachistochrone equation is an exception, and has the potential to provide accurate time-optimal protocols for a wide range of quantum control problems. So far, this potential has not been realized, however, due to the inadequacy of conventional numerical methods to solve it. Here we show that the quantum brachistochrone problem can be recast as that of finding geodesic paths in the space of unitary operators. We expect this brachistochrone-geodesic connection to have broad applications, as it opens up minimal-time control to the tools of geometry. As one such application, we use it to obtain a fast numerical method to solve the brachistochrone problem, and apply this method to two examples demonstrating its power.

  2. Valves Based on Amplified Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Letty, R.; Lhermet, N.; Patient, G.; Claeyssen, F.; Lang, M.

    2004-10-01

    Amplified Piezo Actuators have been developed at CEDRAT TECHNOLOGIES for several years and found several applications in space. Their well-known advantages (rapid response and precise positioning) have been used in valve designs to obtain either rapid or fine proportional valves. A first gas valve is using a small amplified piezo actuator and is further driven with a switched amplifier to get a high frequency modulation. A frequency modulation higher than 400 Hz with a stroke of 100 m has been measured. These properties can also be used for gasoline injectors. A second gas valve is also using an amplified piezo actuator, a linear amplifier, and a servo controller to get an accurate proportional valve dedicated to precise gas flow control in the fields of instrumentation and space. A linear and stable flow control has been demonstrated. The low power consumption of the piezoelectric valve in the space applications is an additional advantage. A stable flow of dry Nitrogen ranging from 0.1 sccm to 200 sccm has been measured with an inlet pressure of 1 bar. These valves have been designed with the help of several modelling tools: finite element procedure for the electro-mechanical part, the contact mechanics between the poppet and the seat, the computational fluid dynamics. The valves have been further measured by using several measuring equipment's, including a laser interferometer, a spectrum analyser to measure the gas flow stability, Thermal vacuum and leak tests have also been performed. A special emphasis is realised on the driving and control aspects of this valve for space applications.

  3. High-gain cryogenic amplifier assembly employing a commercial CMOS operational amplifier.

    PubMed

    Proctor, J E; Smith, A W; Jung, T M; Woods, S I

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a cryogenic amplifier for the measurement of small current signals (10 fA-100 nA) from cryogenic optical detectors. Typically operated with gain near 10(7) V/A, the amplifier performs well from DC to greater than 30 kHz and exhibits noise level near the Johnson limit. Care has been taken in the design and materials to control heat flow and temperatures throughout the entire detector-amplifier assembly. A simple one-board version of the amplifier assembly dissipates 8 mW to our detector cryostat cold stage, and a two-board version can dissipate as little as 17 μW to the detector cold stage. With current noise baseline of about 10 fA/(Hz)(1/2), the cryogenic amplifier is generally useful for cooled infrared detectors, and using blocked impurity band detectors operated at 10 K, the amplifier enables noise power levels of 2.5 fW/(Hz)(1/2) for detection of optical wavelengths near 10 μm.

  4. Locus of Control Orientations in Students with Intellectual Disability, Learning Disabilities, and No Disabilities: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shogren, Karrie A.; Bovaird, James A.; Palmer, Susan B.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested differences in the locus of control (LOC) orientations of students with intellectual disability, learning disabilities, and no disabilities, although this research has been characterized by methodological limitations. The purpose of this study was to examine the development of LOC orientations in students with…

  5. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 4: A synthesis of empirical analysis, process modeling and catchment classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaeger, M.; Coopersmith, E.; Ye, S.; Cheng, L.; Viglione, A.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-06-01

    The paper reports on a four-pronged study of the physical controls on regional patterns of the Flow Duration Curve (FDC). This involved a comparative analysis of long-term continuous data from nearly 200 catchments around the US, encompassing a wide range of climates, geology and ecology. The analysis was done from three different perspectives - statistical analysis, process-based modeling, and data-based classification, followed by a synthesis, which is the focus of this paper. Streamflow data was separated into fast and slow flow responses, and associated signatures, and both total flow and its components were analyzed to generate patterns. Regional patterns emerged in all aspects of the study. The mixed gamma distribution described well the shape of the FDC; regression analysis indicated that certain climate and catchment properties were first order controls on the shape of the FDC. In order to understand the spatial patterns revealed by the statistical study, and guided by the hypothesis that the middle portion of the FDC is a function of the regime curve (RC, mean within year variation of flow), we set out to classify these catchments, both empirically and through process-based modeling, in terms of their regime behavior. The classification analysis showed that climate seasonality and aridity, either directly (empirical classes) or through phenology (vegetation processes), were the dominant controls on the RC. Quantitative synthesis of these results determined that these classes were indeed related to the FDC through its slope and related statistical parameters. Qualitative synthesis revealed much diversity in the shapes of the FDCs even within each climate-based homogeneous class, especially in the low-flow tails, suggesting that catchment properties may have become the dominant controls. Thus, while the middle portion of the FDC contains the average response of the catchment, and is mainly controlled by climate, the tails of the FDC, notably the low

  6. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 4: A synthesis of empirical analysis, process modeling and catchment classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaeger, M.; Coopersmith, E.; Ye, S.; Cheng, L.; Viglione, A.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-11-01

    The paper reports on a four-pronged study of the physical controls on regional patterns of the flow duration curve (FDC). This involved a comparative analysis of long-term continuous data from nearly 200 catchments around the US, encompassing a wide range of climates, geology, and ecology. The analysis was done from three different perspectives - statistical analysis, process-based modeling, and data-based classification - followed by a synthesis, which is the focus of this paper. Streamflow data were separated into fast and slow flow responses, and associated signatures, and both total flow and its components were analyzed to generate patterns. Regional patterns emerged in all aspects of the study. The mixed gamma distribution described well the shape of the FDC; regression analysis indicated that certain climate and catchment properties were first-order controls on the shape of the FDC. In order to understand the spatial patterns revealed by the statistical study, and guided by the hypothesis that the middle portion of the FDC is a function of the regime curve (RC, mean within-year variation of flow), we set out to classify these catchments, both empirically and through process-based modeling, in terms of their regime behavior. The classification analysis showed that climate seasonality and aridity, either directly (empirical classes) or through phenology (vegetation processes), were the dominant controls on the RC. Quantitative synthesis of these results determined that these classes were indeed related to the FDC through its slope and related statistical parameters. Qualitative synthesis revealed much diversity in the shapes of the FDCs even within each climate-based homogeneous class, especially in the low-flow tails, suggesting that catchment properties may have become the dominant controls. Thus, while the middle portion of the FDC contains the average response of the catchment, and is mainly controlled by climate, the tails of the FDC, notably the low

  7. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Vavilov-Cherenkov amplifiers with irregular electrodynamic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, Yurii V.; Kravchenko, Viktor F.; Kuraev, Aleksandr A.

    2004-06-01

    Optimal control theory-based methods for improving the efficiency of Cherenkov microwave amplifiers with irregular electrodynamic structures are reviewed. The physics of optimal processes in amplifiers and oscillators with Cherenkov- and combined-type interactions is discussed.

  8. What do we measure with luminol-, lucigenin- and penicillin-amplified chemiluminescence? 1. Investigations with hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Rost, M; Karge, E; Klinger, W

    1998-01-01

    Evidence is provided that the amplifiers luminol and lucigenin react with different reactive oxygen species (ROS), depending on the ROS-generating system used. H2O2 is used to produce calibration curves for luminol- and lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence. With this chemiluminescence generator we characterized the specificity and sensitivity of luminol- and lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence and also studied penicillin G, a known enhancer of luminol-amplified chemiluminescence. The combination of luminol and lucigenin in reciprocally changing concentrations is effective in an additive manner, but the weak amplifier penicillin increases luminol-amplified chemiluminescence distinctly more than in an additive manner in different combinations. Lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence is increased by penicillin at about 1% of the optimum concentration of penicillin; increasing concentrations of penicillin are less and less effective. On the other hand, low lucigenin concentrations enhance penicillin-amplified chemiluminescence at optimum penicillin concentrations more than in an additive manner. Fe2+ does not alter luminol-, lucigenin- or penicillin-amplified chemiluminescence. Co2+ increases luminol-amplified chemiluminescence by a factor of 100. Lucigenin- and penicillin-amplified chemiluminescence are minimally enhanced by Co2+. Cu2+ enhances luminol-amplified chemiluminescence with increasing concentrations by a factor of 1000. Lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence increases also by the factor of 1000, but the concentration-reaction curve is not as steep. NaOCl enhances H2O2/Fe(2+)-driven luminol-amplified chemiluminescence in a concentration-dependent manner by a factor of 10(4) (in the highest concentration of 10 mmol/L) and lucigenin amplified chemiluminescence only by a factor of about 25. Catalase (CAT) abolishes luminol-, lucigenin- and penicillin-amplified chemiluminescence completely, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) has no effect on luminol- or

  9. Deflection amplifier for image dissectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    Balanced symmetrical y-axis amplifier uses zener-diode level shifting to interface operational amplifiers to high voltage bipolar output stages. Nominal voltage transfer characteristic is 40 differential output volts per input volt; bandwidth, between -3-dB points, is approximately 8 kHz; loop gain is nominally 89 dB with closed loop gain of 26 dB.

  10. Suicide Risk: Amplifiers and Attenuators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plutchik, Robert; Van Praag, Herman M.

    1994-01-01

    Attempts to integrate findings on correlates of suicide and violent risk in terms of a theory called a two-stage model of countervailing forces, which assumes that the strength of aggressive impulses is modified by amplifiers and attenuators. The vectorial interaction of amplifiers and attenuators creates an unstable equilibrium making prediction…

  11. Improved radiographic image amplifier panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. L., Sr.

    1968-01-01

    Layered image amplifier for radiographic /X ray and gamma ray/ applications, combines very high radiation sensitivity with fast image buildup and erasure capabilities by adding a layer of material that is both photoconductive and light-emitting to basic image amplifier and cascading this assembly with a modified Thorne panel.

  12. Suicide Risk: Amplifiers and Attenuators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plutchik, Robert; Van Praag, Herman M.

    1994-01-01

    Attempts to integrate findings on correlates of suicide and violent risk in terms of a theory called a two-stage model of countervailing forces, which assumes that the strength of aggressive impulses is modified by amplifiers and attenuators. The vectorial interaction of amplifiers and attenuators creates an unstable equilibrium making prediction…

  13. DIAMOND AMPLIFIER FOR PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO,T.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL,A.; CHANG,X.; HULBERT,S.; JOHNSON,P.D.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    We report a new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. Primary electrons are produced by a photocathode (or other means) and are accelerated to a few thousand electron-volts, then strike a specially prepared diamond window. The large Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) provides a multiplication of the number of electrons by about two orders of magnitude. The secondary electrons drift through the diamond under an electric field and emerge into the accelerating proper of the ''gun'' through a Negative Electron Affinity surface of the diamond. The advantages of the new approach include the following: (1) Reduction of the number of primary electrons by the large SEY, i.e. a very low laser power in a photocathode producing the primaries. (2) Low thermal emittance due to the NEA surface and the rapid thermalization of the electrons. (3) Protection of the cathode from possible contamination from the gun, allowing the use of large quantum efficiency but sensitive cathodes. (4) Protection of the gun from possible contamination by the cathode, allowing the use of superconducting gun cavities. (5) Production of high average currents, up to ampere class. (6) Encapsulated design, making the ''load-lock'' systems unnecessary. This paper presents the criteria that need to be taken into account in designing the amplifier.

  14. Detection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) controlling the waxy character in wheat by using a derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (dCAPS) marker.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, T; Kiribuchi-Otobe, C; Hirano, H; Suzuki, Y; Fujita, M

    2003-06-01

    We investigated a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the Wx-D1 gene, which was found in a mutant waxy wheat, and which expressed the Wx-D1 protein (granule-bound starch synthase I) as shown by immunoblot analysis. We also assayed starch synthase activity of granule-bound proteins. Using 22 doubled-haploid (DH) lines and 172 F(5) lines derived from the wild type x the mutant, we detected SNP via a PCR-based (dCAPS) marker. Amplified PCR products from Wx-D1 gene-specific primers, followed by mismatched primers designed for dCAPS analysis, were digested with the appropriate restriction enzyme. The two alleles, and the heterozygote genotype were easily and rapidly discriminated by gel-electrophoresis resolution to reveal SNP. All progeny lines that have the SNP of the mutant allele were waxy. Integrating the results of dCAPS analysis, immunoblot analysis and assays of starch synthase activity of granule-bound proteins indicates that the SNP in the Wx-D1 gene was responsible for its waxy character. This dCAPS marker is therefore useful as a marker to introduce the mutant allele into elite breeding lines.

  15. New compressed Ti:sapphire femtosecond amplifier layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Andrew J.; Barnes, Charles C.; Tenyakov, Sergey

    2006-02-01

    A novel new design for an 8-pass multipass Titanium doped sapphire femtosecond amplifier (MPA) is studied. Ultrafast amplifiers based on the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique have been widely used to amplify the output pulses of Kerr lens mode locked (KLM) Ti:sapphire lasers from the nanojoule to the microjoule level. The system presented here also takes advantage of CPA to reduce the peak power and thus the potential damage to optical components from self-focusing. The amplifier scheme is based on a single curved mirror and a Brewster cut Ti:sapphire laser rod. Optical excitation of the Ti:sapphire gain medium is achieved by pumping with a Q-switched and frequency doubled Nd:YLF laser at 527 nm. The rear face of the gain crystal is coated to form a high reflector for both the pumping wavelength (490-550 nm) and the amplified seed pulse (740-860 nm). In this configuration the gain crystal itself acts as a second mirror, reducing the size of the amplifier and allowing for the most effective use of the pumping energy. By employing a Brewster cut lasing crystal the amount of active gain material can be adjusted for maximum gain. The advantages of this approach, compared to traditional two curved mirror MPA designs, are the reduced foot print and the ability to easily adjust the amount of gain material. At the same time the system retains the low amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and temporally clean output pulse characteristic of MPA systems.

  16. Curved Finite Elements and Curve Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baart, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The approximation of parameterized curves by segments of parabolas that pass through the endpoints of each curve segment arises naturally in all quadratic isoparametric transformations. While not as popular as cubics in curve design problems, the use of parabolas allows the introduction of a geometric measure of the discrepancy between given and approximating curves. The free parameters of the parabola may be used to optimize the fit, and constraints that prevent overspill and curve degeneracy are introduced. This leads to a constrained optimization problem in two varibles that can be solved quickly and reliably by a simple method that takes advantage of the special structure of the problem. For applications in the field of computer-aided design, the given curves are often cubic polynomials, and the coefficient may be calculated in closed form in terms of polynomial coefficients by using a symbolic machine language so that families of curves can be approximated with no further integration. For general curves, numerical quadrature may be used, as in the implementation where the Romberg quadrature is applied. The coefficient functions C sub 1 (gamma) and C sub 2 (gamma) are expanded as polynomials in gamma, so that for given A(s) and B(s) the integrations need only be done once. The method was used to find optimal constrained parabolic approximation to a wide variety of given curves.

  17. Multi-pass light amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaessmann, Henry (Inventor); Grossman, William M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A multiple-pass laser amplifier that uses optical focusing between subsequent passes through a single gain medium so that a reproducibly stable beam size is achieved within the gain region. A confocal resonator or White Cell resonator is provided, including two or three curvilinearly shaped mirrors facing each other along a resonator axis and an optical gain medium positioned on the resonator axis between the mirrors (confocal resonator) or adjacent to one of the mirrors (White Cell). In a first embodiment, two mirrors, which may include adjacent lenses, are configured so that a light beam passing through the gain medium and incident on the first mirror is reflected by that mirror toward the second mirror in a direction approximately parallel to the resonator axis. A light beam translator, such as an optical flat of transparent material, is positioned to translate this light beam by a controllable amount toward or away from the resonator axis for each pass of the light beam through the translator. The optical gain medium may be solid-state, liquid or gaseous medium and may be pumped longitudinally or transversely. In a second embodiment, first and second mirrors face a third mirror in a White Cell configuration, and the optical gain medium is positioned at or adjacent to one of the mirrors. Defocusing means and optical gain medium cooling means are optionally provided with either embodiment, to controllably defocus the light beam, to cool the optical gain medium and to suppress thermal lensing in the gain medium.

  18. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants’ gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15–65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions. PMID:27551358

  19. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-12-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants' gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15-65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions.

  20. Capacities of quantum amplifier channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Haoyu; Wilde, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum amplifier channels are at the core of several physical processes. Not only do they model the optical process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion, but the transformation corresponding to an amplifier channel also describes the physics of the dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting circuits, the Unruh effect, and Hawking radiation. Here we study the communication capabilities of quantum amplifier channels. Invoking a recently established minimum output-entropy theorem for single-mode phase-insensitive Gaussian channels, we determine capacities of quantum-limited amplifier channels in three different scenarios. First, we establish the capacities of quantum-limited amplifier channels for one of the most general communication tasks, characterized by the trade-off between classical communication, quantum communication, and entanglement generation or consumption. Second, we establish capacities of quantum-limited amplifier channels for the trade-off between public classical communication, private classical communication, and secret key generation. Third, we determine the capacity region for a broadcast channel induced by the quantum-limited amplifier channel, and we also show that a fully quantum strategy outperforms those achieved by classical coherent-detection strategies. In all three scenarios, we find that the capacities significantly outperform communication rates achieved with a naive time-sharing strategy.

  1. X-Band, 17-Watt Solid-State Power Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittskus, Anthony; Stone, Ernest; Boger, William; Burgess, David; Honda, Richard; Nuckolls, Carl

    2005-01-01

    An advanced solid-state power amplifier that can generate an output power of as much as 17 W at a design operating frequency of 8.4 GHz has been designed and constructed as a smaller, lighter, less expensive alternative to traveling-wave-tube X-band amplifiers and to prior solid-state X-band power amplifiers of equivalent output power. This amplifier comprises a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier module and a power-converter module integrated into a compact package (see Figure 1). The amplifier module contains an input variable-gain amplifier (VGA), an intermediate driver stage, a final power stage, and input and output power monitors (see Figure 2). The VGA and the driver amplifier are 0.5-m GaAs-based metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs). The final power stage contains four parallel high-efficiency, GaAs-based pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistors (PHEMTs). The gain of the VGA is voltage-variable over a range of 10 to 24 dB. To provide for temperature compensation of the overall amplifier gain, the gain-control voltage is generated by an operational-amplifier circuit that includes a resistor/thermistor temperature-sensing network. The driver amplifier provides a gain of 14 dB to an output power of 27 dBm to drive the four parallel output PHEMTs, each of which is nominally capable of putting out as much as 5 W. The driver output is sent to the input terminals of the four parallel PHEMTs through microstrip power dividers; the outputs of these PHEMTs are combined by microstrip power combiners (which are similar to the microstrip power dividers) to obtain the final output power of 17 W.

  2. All-optical processing of optical-network signals using distributed feedback amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maywar, Drew Nelson

    2001-06-01

    We study the nonlinear response and signal-processing capabilities of distributed feedback semiconductor optical amplifiers, and seek to advance their application to optical communication networks. Bistability occurring for optical signals tuned near a Bragg resonance is useful for switching and memory applications, but traditionally exhibits a limited wavelength range. We relax this constraint by varying the grating pitch along the length of the distributed feedback amplifier. A transfer-matrix method is developed for simulating this improvement, and for studying changes in the shape of the hysteresis curve throughout this wavelength range. We predict a new hysteresis-curve shape on reflection, and show how the grating-pitch variation can suppress or enhance this shape. Optical memory based on bistability is useful for sequential signal-processing applications, but previous control techniques operate with wavelengths only in the vicinity of the bistable-signal wavelength. We propose, model, and demonstrate control techniques via auxiliary optical signals that exhibit a very wide wavelength range. Set and reset signals vary the refractive index in opposite ways and shift the upward- and downward- switching thresholds, respectively, of the hysteresis curve through the holding-beam input power, which is kept constant. We develop a numerical model and an experimental system to investigate the performance of the all-optical flip-flop pertaining to speed, power, polarization, and response to back-to-back `set' pulses. We propose and numerically simulate a sequential processing application to fiberoptic networks-data format conversion from high-speed, return-to-zero signals to low-speed, non- return-to-zero signals. We demonstrate data-wavelength conversion to a signal wavelength of 1547 nm (in the vicinity of the Bragg wavelength) from initial data signals at 1306 nm, 1466 nm, and 1560 nm. This research demonstrates that cross- phase-modulation-based conversion using

  3. Laser Amplifier Developments at Mercury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    particularly foil lifetime, with no degradation in pumping. Mercury Amplifier 2 (A2 or Pluto ) is a downsized version of the Aurora Large Aperture Module (LAM...everywhere above the 4.5% cm-I required. Modifications to Pluto (Amplifier 2) The second amplifier, Pluto , was constructed by modifying Aurora’s...discharge the PFLs into matched resistors when the output switches failed to fire. lJ Figure 3. The diode of Pluto has a 40-cm high by 200-cm long

  4. Capacitive Trans-Impedance Amplifier Circuit with Charge Injection Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milkov, Mihail M. (Inventor); Gulbransen, David J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A capacitive trans-impedance amplifier circuit with charge injection compensation is provided. A feedback capacitor is connected between an inverting input port and an output port of an amplifier. A MOS reset switch has source and drain terminals connected between the inverting input and output ports of the amplifier, and a gate terminal controlled by a reset signal. The reset switch is open or inactive during an integration phase, and closed or active to electrically connect the inverting input port and output port of the amplifier during a reset phase. One or more compensation capacitors are provided that are not implemented as gate oxide or MOS capacitors. Each compensation capacitor has a first port connected to a compensation signal that is a static signal or a toggling compensation signal that toggles between two compensation voltage values, and a second port connected to the inverting input port of the amplifier.

  5. Erbium-doped-fiber optical limiting amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graydon, Oliver C.; Nickolaos Zervas, Michael; Laming, Richard I.

    1995-05-01

    A novel configuration of an erbium-doped-fiber optical output-limiting amplifier (OLA) is presented which is realized by simply introducing a differential lump-loss between the signal and the pump power at a particular point along the fiber. The OLA exhibits an input-power dynamic range in excess of 40 dB and the capacity to control optically the level of the constant-output signal.

  6. Isolated thermocouple amplifier system for stirred fixed-bed gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1992-01-01

    A sensing system is provided for determining the bed temperature profile of the bed of a stirred, fixed-bed gasifier including a plurality of temperature sensors for sensing the bed temperature at different levels, a transmitter for transmitting data based on the outputs of the sensors to a remote operator's station, and a battery-based power supply. The system includes an isolation amplifier system comprising a plurality of isolation amplifier circuits for amplifying the outputs of the individual sensors. The isolation amplifier circuits each comprise an isolation operational amplifier connected to a sensor; a first "flying capacitor" circuit for, in operation, controlling the application of power from the power supply to the isolation amplifier; an output sample and hold circuit connected to the transmitter; a second "flying capacitor" circuit for, in operation, controlling the transfer of the output of the isolation amplifier to the sample and hold circuit; and a timing and control circuit for activating the first and second capacitor circuits in a predetermined timed sequence.

  7. High-Common-Mode-Rejection Differential Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukens, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    High-common-mode-rejection differential amplifier amplifies low-level signals in presence of high frequency noise. Amplifier used in power system requiring current monitoring on high side of high-voltage powerline.

  8. Power amplifiers (tube)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental model of the SPS transmitting antenna architecture was developed by combining a microwave oven magnetron with a ferrite circulator, a section of slotted waveguide radiator, and a control system to force the amplitude and the phase of the radiated output to follow phase and amplitude references. The amplitude control arrangement is depicted and evaluated.

  9. Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dunham, Mark E.; Morley, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

  10. New Packaging for Amplifier Slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.; Thorsness, C.; Suratwala, T.; Steele, R.; Rogowski, G.

    2015-03-18

    The following memo provides a discussion and detailed procedure for a new finished amplifier slab shipping and storage container. The new package is designed to maintain an environment of <5% RH to minimize weathering.

  11. A single supply biopotential amplifier.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, E M; Martinez, N H; Mayosky, M A

    2001-04-01

    A biopotential amplifier for single supply operation is presented. It uses a Driven Right Leg Circuit (DRL) to drive the patient's body to a DC common mode voltage, centering biopotential signals with respect to the amplifier's input voltage range. This scheme ensures proper range operation when a single power supply is used. The circuit described is especially suited for low consumption, battery-powered applications, requiring a single battery and avoiding switching voltage inverters to achieve dual supplies. The generic circuit is described and, as an example, a biopotential amplifier with a gain of 60 dB and a DC input range of +/-200 mV was implemented using low power operational amplifiers. A Common Mode Rejection Ratio (CMRR) of 126 dB at 50 Hz was achieved without trimming.

  12. Characterization of SLUG microwave amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, I.-C.; Zhu, S.; Thorbeck, T.; McDermott, R.; Mutus, J.; Jeffrey, E.; Barends, R.; Chen, Y.; Roushan, P.; Fowler, A.; Sank, D.; White, T.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Kelly, J.; Megrant, A.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Martinis, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of superconducting circuits quantum technology, a near quantum-limited amplifier at GHz frequency is needed to enable high fidelity measurements. We describe such an amplifier, the SQUID based, superconducting low inductance undulatory galvanometer (SLUG) amplifier. We measure the full scattering matrix of the SLUG. In particular, we measure both forward and reverse gain, as well as reflection. We see 15dB forward gain with added noise from one quanta to several quanta. The -1 dB compression point is around -95 dBm, about two orders of magnitude higher than that of typical Josephson parametric amplifiers. With these properties, SLUG is well suited for the high fidelity, simultaneous multiplexed readout of superconducting qubits.

  13. 32-GHz Wideband Maser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J. S.; Neff, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    High-gain, wideband, microwave amplifier based on ruby cooled by liquid helium. Features include low input equivalent noise temperature and 400-MHz bandwidth. Design basically extension of previous reflected-wave masers built for frequency range of 18 to 26 GHz. Maser amplifier includes eight stages connected in reflected-wave configuration. Particularly useful for detection of weak microwave signals in radio astronomy and communications.

  14. Dye laser traveling wave amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.; Hohman, J.

    1984-01-01

    A flashlamp pumped dye laser suitable for use as a single stage amplifier is described. Particular emphasis is placed on the efforts to increase output pulse energy and improve the temporal profile of the injected pulse. By using high power thin film polarizers, output energies reach from 4 to 45 mJ. Various dispersive elements are used to develop an amplified pulse with an extremely clean temporal profile.

  15. 32-GHz Wideband Maser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J. S.; Neff, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    High-gain, wideband, microwave amplifier based on ruby cooled by liquid helium. Features include low input equivalent noise temperature and 400-MHz bandwidth. Design basically extension of previous reflected-wave masers built for frequency range of 18 to 26 GHz. Maser amplifier includes eight stages connected in reflected-wave configuration. Particularly useful for detection of weak microwave signals in radio astronomy and communications.

  16. Operational amplifiers-some misconceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, M. K.

    1980-03-01

    The simplified theoretical treatments of operational amplifier behaviour found in material for use by teachers and students is often misleading and sometimes inaccurate. The author identifies some of these inadequacies and describes some pedagogical pitfalls which are best avoided. The closed loop gain of an operational amplifier in the inverting configuration taken from the JMB publication Physics (Advanced)-Notes on the Core Syllabus (1978a) is reproduced to act as a focus for discussion.

  17. Numerical simulation of cross field amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.

    1990-01-01

    Cross field amplifiers (CFA) have been used in many applications where high power, high frequency microwaves are needed. Although these tubes have been manufactured for decades, theoretical analysis of their properties is not as highly developed as for other microwave devices such as klystrons. One feature distinguishing cross field amplifiers is that the operating current is produced by secondary emission from a cold cathode. This removes the need for a heater and enables the device to act as a switch tube, drawing no power until the rf drive is applied. However, this method of generating the current does complicate the simulation. We are developing a simulation model of cross field amplifiers using the PIC code CONDOR. We simulate an interaction region, one traveling wavelength long, with periodic boundary conditions. An electric field with the appropriate phase velocity is imposed on the upper boundary of the problem. Evaluation of the integral of E{center dot}J gives the power interchanged between the wave and the beam. Given the impedance of the structure, we then calculate the change in the traveling wave field. Thus we simulate the growth of the wave through the device. The main advance of our model over previous CFA simulations is the realistic tracking of absorption and secondary emission. The code uses experimental curves to calculate secondary production as a function of absorbed energy, with a theoretical expression for the angular dependence. We have used this code to model the 100 MW X-band CFA under construction at SLAC, as designed by Joseph Feinstein and Terry Lee. We are examining several questions of practical interest, such as the power and spectrum of absorbed electrons, the minimum traveling wave field needed to initiate spoke formation, and the variation of output power with dc voltage, anode-cathode gap, and magnetic field. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  18. CoxNi100-x nanoparticles encapsulated by curved graphite layers: controlled in situ metal-catalytic preparation and broadband microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Dai, Y Y; Geng, D Y; Ma, S; Li, D; An, J; He, J; Liu, W; Zhang, Z D

    2015-11-07

    We report a one-step approach for preparing dispersive CoxNi100-x nanoparticles completely encapsulated by curved graphite layers. The nanoparticles were prepared by evaporating Co-Ni alloys and the shell of graphite layers was formed by in situ metal-catalytic growth on the surface of nanoparticles whose layer number was controlled by tuning the Co content of the alloys. By modulating the composition of the magnetic core and the layer number of the shell, the magnetic and dielectric properties of these core/shell structures are simultaneously optimized and their permeability and permittivity were improved to obtain the enhanced electromagnetic match. As a result, the bandwidth of reflection loss (RL) exceeding -20 dB (99% absorption) of the nanocapsules is 9.6 GHz for S1, 12.8 GHz for S2, 13.5 GHz for S3 and 14.2 GHz for S4. The optimal RL value reaches -53 dB at 13.2 GHz for an absorber thickness of 2.55 mm. An optimized impedance match by controlling the growth of the core and shell is responsible for this extraordinary microwave absorption.

  19. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback Based on Polyphase Difference Amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Marta G.; Pauly, John M.; Scott, Greig C.

    2010-01-01

    A modified Cartesian feedback method called “frequency-offset Cartesian feedback” and based on polyphase difference amplifiers is described that significantly reduces the problems associated with quadrature errors and DC-offsets in classic Cartesian feedback power amplifier control systems. In this method, the reference input and feedback signals are down-converted and compared at a low intermediate frequency (IF) instead of at DC. The polyphase difference amplifiers create a complex control bandwidth centered at this low IF, which is typically offset from DC by 200–1500 kHz. Consequently, the loop gain peak does not overlap DC where voltage offsets, drift, and local oscillator leakage create errors. Moreover, quadrature mismatch errors are significantly attenuated in the control bandwidth. Since the polyphase amplifiers selectively amplify the complex signals characterized by a +90° phase relationship representing positive frequency signals, the control system operates somewhat like single sideband (SSB) modulation. However, the approach still allows the same modulation bandwidth control as classic Cartesian feedback. In this paper, the behavior of the polyphase difference amplifier is described through both the results of simulations, based on a theoretical analysis of their architecture, and experiments. We then describe our first printed circuit board prototype of a frequency-offset Cartesian feedback transmitter and its performance in open and closed loop configuration. This approach should be especially useful in magnetic resonance imaging transmit array systems. PMID:20814450

  20. From principal curves to granular principal curves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyun; Pedrycz, Witold; Miao, Duoqian; Wei, Zhihua

    2014-06-01

    Principal curves arising as an essential construct in dimensionality reduction and data analysis have recently attracted much attention from theoretical as well as practical perspective. In many real-world situations, however, the efficiency of existing principal curves algorithms is often arguable, in particular when dealing with massive data owing to the associated high computational complexity. A certain drawback of these constructs stems from the fact that in several applications principal curves cannot fully capture some essential problem-oriented facets of the data dealing with width, aspect ratio, width change, etc. Information granulation is a powerful tool supporting processing and interpreting massive data. In this paper, invoking the underlying ideas of information granulation, we propose a granular principal curves approach, regarded as an extension of principal curves algorithms, to improve efficiency and achieve a sound accuracy-efficiency tradeoff. First, large amounts of numerical data are granulated into C intervals-information granules developed with the use of fuzzy C-means clustering and the two criteria of information granulation, which significantly reduce the amount of data to be processed at the later phase of the overall design. Granular principal curves are then constructed by determining the upper and the lower bounds of the interval data. Finally, we develop an objective function using the criteria of information confidence and specificity to evaluate the granular output formed by the principal curves. We also optimize the granular principal curves by adjusting the level of information granularity (the number of clusters), which is realized with the aid of the particle swarm optimization. A number of numeric studies completed for synthetic and real-world datasets provide a useful quantifiable insight into the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  1. The Microstrip DC SQUID Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael

    2000-03-01

    We have developed an extremely sensitive rf amplifier based on the dc superconducting quantum interference device (dc SQUID). Unlike a conventional semiconductor amplifier, a SQUID can be cooled to ultra low temperatures (300 mK or less) and thus potentially achieve a much lower noise temperature. In a conventional SQUID amplifier, where the integrated input coil is operated as a lumped element, parasitic capacitance between the coil and the SQUID washer limits the frequency up to which a substantial gain can be achieved to a few hundred MHz. This problem can be circumvented by operating the input coil of the SQUID as a microstrip resonator: instead of connecting the input signal between the two ends of the coil, it is connected between the SQUID washer and one end of the coil; the other end is left open. Such amplifiers have gains of 20 dB or more at frequencies up to 1.5 GHz. The resonant nature of the input circuit limits the -3 dB bandwidth of the amplifier to at most 100 MHz. The resonant frequency of the microstrip can be tuned, however, by means of a varactor diode connected across the otherwise open end of the resonator. The noise temperature of microstrip SQUID amplifiers was measured to be between 0.5 K ± 0.3 K at a resonant frequency of 80 MHz and 1.6 K ± 1.2 K at 1 GHz. An even lower noise temperature can be achieved by cooling the SQUID to about 0.4 K. In this case, a noise temperature of 100 mK ± 20 mK was achieved at 90 MHz, and of about 120 ± 100 mK at 440 MHz. The gain of the SQUID amplifier is sensitive to changes of the static magnetic flux through the SQUID. In order to prevent low frequency magnetic noise from changing the amplifier gain, we developed a directly coupled flux-locked loop which stabilizes the static flux bias of the SQUID. Finally, although the maximum output voltage of the SQUID amplifier is relatively small, two-tone intermodulation measurements show an intermodulation-free dynamic range of nearly 50 dB in a bandwidth of

  2. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  3. Limit circuit prevents overdriving of operational amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Openshaw, F. L.

    1967-01-01

    Cutoff-type high gain amplifier coupled by a diode prevents overdriving of operational amplifier. An amplified feedback signal offsets the excess input signal that tends to cause the amplifier to exceed its preset limit. The output is, therfore, held to the set clamp level.

  4. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains more than 500 fatigue curves for industrial ferrous and nonferrous alloys. It also includes a thorough explanation of fatigue testing and interpretation of test results. Each curve is presented independently and includes an explanation of its particular importance. The curves are titled by standard industrial designations (AISI, CDA, AA, etc.) of the metals, and a complete reference is given to the original source to facilitate further research. The collection includes standard S-N curves, curves showing effect of surface hardening on fatigue strength, crack growth-rate curves, curves comparing the fatigue strengths of various alloys, effect of variables (i,e, temperature, humidity, frequency, aging, environment, etc.) and much, much more. This one volume consolidates the fatigue data in a single source.

  5. Variable Gain Semiconductor Optical Linear Amplifier (OLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michie, W. Craig; Kelly, Tony; Tomlinson, Andy; Andonovic, Ivan

    2002-12-01

    The semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is a versatile component that can be deployed to meet the expanding applications associated with the introduction of additional functionalities at the optical level in wavelength division multiplexed systems. The future network requires low cost, small footprint, directly controllable amplification throughout the different application layers from long haul through to metro; the intrinsic size and integration capability advantages will ensure that the SOA plays a key role in this evolution. In multi-wavelength gating/amplification applications the gain dynamics, oscillating at timescales comparable to that of the data which is being amplified, introduce issues of pattern dependent waveform distortion (patterning) in single channel, and inter-channel cross-talk in multi-wavelength cases which require management through careful SOA design and understanding of the network application scenarios. In this paper, an optical linear amplifier (OLA) architecture with the unique capability to provide variable gain whilst maintaining linear operation at high output saturation powers will be described. Initial characterisation results for the OLA will be presented.

  6. Laser system using regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L. [Pleasanton, CA

    1980-03-04

    High energy laser system using a regenerative amplifier, which relaxes all constraints on laser components other than the intrinsic damage level of matter, so as to enable use of available laser system components. This can be accomplished by use of segmented components, spatial filters, at least one amplifier using solid state or gaseous media, and separated reflector members providing a long round trip time through the regenerative cavity, thereby allowing slower switching and adequate time to clear the spatial filters, etc. The laser system simplifies component requirements and reduces component cost while providing high energy output.

  7. Optical amplifiers for coherent lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard

    1996-01-01

    We examine application of optical amplification to coherent lidar for the case of a weak return signal (a number of quanta of the return optical field close to unity). We consider the option that has been explored to date, namely, incorporation of an optical amplifier operated in a linear manner located after reception of the signal and immediately prior to heterodyning and photodetection. We also consider alternative strategies where the coherent interaction, the nonlinear processes, and the amplification are not necessarily constrained to occur in the manner investigated to date. We include the complications that occur because of mechanisms that occur at the level of a few, or one, quantum excitation. Two factors combine in the work to date that limit the value of the approach. These are: (1) the weak signal tends to require operation of the amplifier in the linear regime where the important advantages of nonlinear optical processing are not accessed, (2) the linear optical amplifier has a -3dB noise figure (SN(out)/SN(in)) that necessarily degrades the signal. Some improvement is gained because the gain provided by the optical amplifier can be used to overcome losses in the heterodyned process and photodetection. The result, however, is that introduction of an optical amplifier in a well optimized coherent lidar system results in, at best, a modest improvement in signal to noise. Some improvement may also be realized on incorporating more optical components in a coherent lidar system for purely practical reasons. For example, more compact, lighter weight, components, more robust alignment, or more rapid processing may be gained. We further find that there remain a number of potentially valuable, but unexplored options offered both by the rapidly expanding base of optical technology and the recent investigation of novel nonlinear coherent interference phenomena occurring at the single quantum excitation level. Key findings are: (1) insertion of linear optical

  8. Design considerations for neural amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Holleman, Jeremy

    2016-08-01

    The initial amplification stage is a critical element of a neural signal acquisition system, and the design of low-noise, low-power amplifiers has received a great deal of attention in recent publications. In this paper we discuss practical considerations for the design of amplifiers intended for neural interfaces. Noise is a major issue due to the low amplitude of neural signals. Practical system deployments also require adequate rejection of common-mode interference, such as that due to line power noise or muscle artifacts, and supply noise. This paper attempts to provide some guideance for system and circuit designers and point out opportunities for potential future exploration.

  9. Coherent amplified optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Rao, Bin; Chen, Zhongping

    2007-07-01

    A technique to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a high speed 1300 nm swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system was demonstrated. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was employed in the sample arm to coherently amplify the weak light back-scattered from sample tissue without increasing laser power illuminated on the sample. The image quality improvement was visualized and quantified by imaging the anterior segment of a rabbit eye at imaging speed of 20,000 A-lines per second. The theory analysis of SNR gain is given followed by the discussion on the technologies that can further improve the SNR gain.

  10. Reactanceless synthesized impedance bandpass amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An active R bandpass filter network is formed by four operational amplifier stages interconnected by discrete resistances. One pair of stages synthesize an equivalent input impedance of an inductance (L sub eq) in parallel with a discrete resistance (R sub o) while the second pair of stages synthesizes an equivalent input impedance of a capacitance (C sub eq) serially coupled to another discrete resistance (R sub i) coupled in parallel with the first two stages. The equivalent input impedances aggregately define a tuned resonant bandpass filter in the roll-off regions of the operational amplifiers.

  11. Laser system using regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, J.L.

    1980-03-04

    High energy laser system is disclosed using a regenerative amplifier, which relaxes all constraints on laser components other than the intrinsic damage level of matter, so as to enable use of available laser system components. This can be accomplished by use of segmented components, spatial filters, at least one amplifier using solid state or gaseous media, and separated reflector members providing a long round trip time through the regenerative cavity, thereby allowing slower switching and adequate time to clear the spatial filters, etc. The laser system simplifies component requirements and reduces component cost while providing high energy output. 10 figs.

  12. Operational Performance of the Two-Channel 10 Megawatt Feedback Amplifier System for MHD Control on the Columbia University HBT-EP Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W.A.; Wurden, G.A.

    1997-10-06

    The operational characteristics and performance of the two channel 10 Megawatt MHD feedback control system as installed by Los Alamos National Laboratory on the Columbia University HBT-EP tokamak are described. In the present configuration, driving independent 300 {micro}H saddle coil sets, each channel can deliver 1100 Amperes and 16 kV peak to peak. Full power bandwidth is about 12 kHz, with capabilities at reduced power to 30 kHz. The present system topology is designed to suppress magnetohydrodynamic activity with m=2, n=1 symmetry. Application of either static (single phase) or rotating (twin phased) magnetic perturbations shows the ability to spin up or slow down the plasma, and also prevent (or cause) so-called ''mode-locking''. Open loop and active feedback experiments using a digital signal processor (DSP) have been performed on the HBT-EP tokamak and initial results show the ability to manipulate the plasma MHD mode frequency.

  13. Dye laser traveling wave amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1983-01-01

    A flash lamp pumped dye laser suitable for use as an amplifier stage was developed. The desired output laser pulses are of nanosecond duration, tunable in center frequency, and of good optical quality. Its usefulness as a laser oscillator is emphasized, because it constitutes a compact, relatively efficient source of tunable dye laser light.

  14. Hybrid EDFA/Raman Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Hiroji

    This chapter describes the technologies needed for cascading an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and a fiber Raman amplifier (FRA or RA) to create a hybrid amplifier (HA), the EDFA/Raman HA. Two kinds of HA are defined in this chapter: the narrowband HA (NB-HA) and the seamless and wideband HA (SWB-HA). The NB-HA employs distributed Raman amplification in the transmission fiber together with an EDFA and provides low noise transmission in the C- or L-band. The noise figure of the transmission line is lower than it would be if only an EDFA were used. The SWB-HA, on the other hand, employs distributed or discrete Raman amplification together with an EDFA, and provides a low-noise and wideband transmission line or a low-noise and wideband discrete amplifier for the C- and L-bands. The typical gain bandwidth (Δλ) of the NB-HA is ~30 to 40 nm, whereas that of the SWB-HA is ~70 to 80 nm.

  15. pH-, sugar-, and temperature-sensitive electrochemical switch amplified by enzymatic reaction and controlled by logic gates based on semi-interpenetrating polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Liu, Hongyun; Hu, Naifei

    2012-02-09

    Phenylboronic acid (PBA) moieties are grafted onto the backbone of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), forming the PAA-PBA polyelectrolyte. The semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) films composed of PAA-PBA and poly(N,N-diethylacrylamide) (PDEA) were then synthesized on electrode surface with entrapped horseradish peroxidase (HRP), designated as PDEA-(PAA-PBA)-HRP. The films demonstrated reversible pH-, fructose-, and thermo-responsive on-off behavior toward electroactive probe K(3)Fe(CN)(6) in its cyclic voltammetric (CV) response. This multiswitchable CV behavior of the system could be further employed to control and modulate the electrochemical reduction of H(2)O(2) catalyzed by HRP immobilized in the films with K(3)Fe(CN)(6) as the mediator in solution. The responsive mechanism of the system was also explored and discussed. The pH-sensitive property was attributed to the electrostatic interaction between the PAA component of the films and the probe at different pH; the thermo-responsive behavior originated from the structure change of PDEA hydrogel component of the films with temperature; the fructose-sensitive property was ascribed to the structure change of the films induced by the complexation between the PBA constituent and the sugar. This smart system could be used as a 3-input logic network composed of enabled OR (EnOR) gates in chemical or biomolecular computing by combining the multiresponsive property of the films and the amplification effect of bioelectrocatalysis and demonstrated the potential perspective for fabricating novel multiswitchable electrochemical biosensors and bioelectronic devices. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  16. A 500 A device characterizer utilizing a pulsed-linear amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacouture, Shelby; Bayne, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    With the advent of modern power semiconductor switching elements, the envelope defining "high power" is an ever increasing quantity. Characterization of these semiconductor power devices generally falls into two categories: switching, or transient characteristics, and static, or DC characteristics. With the increasing native voltage and current levels that modern power devices are capable of handling, characterization equipment meant to extract quasi-static IV curves has not kept pace, often leaving researchers with no other option than to construct ad hoc curve tracers from disparate pieces of equipment. In this paper, a dedicated 10 V, 500 A curve tracer was designed and constructed for use with state of the art high power semiconductor switching and control elements. The characterizer is a physically small, pulsed power system at the heart of which is a relatively high power linear amplifier operating in a switched manner in order to deliver well defined square voltage pulses. These actively shaped pulses are used to obtain device's quasi-static DC characteristics accurately without causing any damage to the device tested. Voltage and current waveforms from each pulse are recorded simultaneously by two separate high-speed analog to digital converters and averaged over a specified interval to obtain points in the reconstructed IV graph.

  17. Curved versus Straight Stem Uncemented Total Hip Arthroplasty Osteoarthritis Multicenter trial (CUSTOM): design of a prospective blinded randomised controlled multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    van Beers, Loes W A H; van Oldenrijk, Jakob; Scholtes, Vanessa A B; Geerdink, Carel H; Niers, Bob B A M; Runne, Wouter; Bhandari, Mohit; Poolman, Rudolf W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Answering the demands of an increasingly young and active patient population, recent developments in total hip arthroplasty (THA) have shifted towards minimising tissue damage. The Collum Femoris Preserving (CFP) stem was developed to preserve the trochanteric region of the femur, which potentially preserves the insertion of the gluteus musculature. This might accelerate early postoperative rehabilitation and improve functional outcome. Currently the functional results of the CFP stem have not been compared with conventional straight stems in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). The primary purpose of this trial is to compare the functional result of CFP stem THA with conventional uncemented straight stem THA, measured by the Dutch Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) at 3-month follow-up. Methods A prospective blinded multicentre RCT will be performed. We aim to recruit 150 patients. The patients will be randomly allocated to a THA with a straight or a curved stem. All patients, research assistants, clinical assessors and investigators will be blinded for the type of prosthesis for 5 years. Clinical assessments and roentgenograms will be taken preoperative, at 6 weeks after surgery, at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years after surgery. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) will be obtained at the same follow-up moments. In addition, the PROMs will also be sent to the patients at 3 and 6 months after surgery. The HOOS at 3-month follow-up will be our primary outcome. Ethics and dissemination This trial will be performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. A local ethics committee has approved this trial. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participating patients. All serious adverse events will be reported to the ethics committee. Results Results will be submitted for publication to an orthopaedics related journal. Trial registration number NTR1560. PMID:27009147

  18. Multi-pass light amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaessmann, Henry (Inventor); Grossman, William M. (Inventor); Olson, Todd E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A multiple-pass laser amplifier that uses optical focusing between subsequent passes through a single gain medium so that a reproducibly stable beam size is achieved within the gain region. A resonator or a White Cell cavity is provided, including two or more mirrors (planar or curvilinearly shaped) facing each other along a resonator axis and an optical gain medium positioned on a resonator axis between the mirrors or adjacent to one of the mirrors. In a first embodiment, two curvilinear mirrors, which may include adjacent lenses, are configured so that a light beam passing through the gain medium and incident on the first mirror is reflected by that mirror toward the second mirror in a direction approximately parallel to the resonator axis. A light beam translator, such as an optical flat of transparent material, is positioned to translate this light beam by a controllable amount toward or away from the resonator axis for each pass of the light beam through the translator. A second embodiment uses two curvilinear mirrors and one planar mirror, with a gain medium positioned in the optical path between each curvilinear mirror and the planar mirror. A third embodiment uses two curvilinear mirrors and two planar mirrors, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to a planar mirror. A fourth embodiment uses a curvilinear mirror and three planar mirrors, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to a planar mirror. A fourth embodiment uses four planar mirrors and a focusing lens system, with a gain medium positioned between the four mirrors. A fifth embodiment uses first and second planar mirrors, a focusing lens system and a third mirror that may be planar or curvilinear, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to the third mirror. A sixth embodiment uses two planar mirrors and a curvilinear mirror and a fourth mirror that may be planar or curvilinear, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to the fourth mirror. In a seventh embodiment, first and second mirrors face a third

  19. Statistical Analyses for Probabilistic Assessments of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Structural Integrity: Building a Master Curve on an Extract of the 'Euro' Fracture Toughness Dataset, Controlling Statistical Uncertainty for Both Mono-Temperature and multi-temperature tests

    SciTech Connect

    Josse, Florent; Lefebvre, Yannick; Todeschini, Patrick; Turato, Silvia; Meister, Eric

    2006-07-01

    Assessing the structural integrity of a nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients is extremely important to safety. In addition to conventional deterministic calculations to confirm RPV integrity, Electricite de France (EDF) carries out probabilistic analyses. Probabilistic analyses are interesting because some key variables, albeit conventionally taken at conservative values, can be modeled more accurately through statistical variability. One variable which significantly affects RPV structural integrity assessment is cleavage fracture initiation toughness. The reference fracture toughness method currently in use at EDF is the RCCM and ASME Code lower-bound K{sub IC} based on the indexing parameter RT{sub NDT}. However, in order to quantify the toughness scatter for probabilistic analyses, the master curve method is being analyzed at present. Furthermore, the master curve method is a direct means of evaluating fracture toughness based on K{sub JC} data. In the framework of the master curve investigation undertaken by EDF, this article deals with the following two statistical items: building a master curve from an extract of a fracture toughness dataset (from the European project 'Unified Reference Fracture Toughness Design curves for RPV Steels') and controlling statistical uncertainty for both mono-temperature and multi-temperature tests. Concerning the first point, master curve temperature dependence is empirical in nature. To determine the 'original' master curve, Wallin postulated that a unified description of fracture toughness temperature dependence for ferritic steels is possible, and used a large number of data corresponding to nuclear-grade pressure vessel steels and welds. Our working hypothesis is that some ferritic steels may behave in slightly different ways. Therefore we focused exclusively on the basic french reactor vessel metal of types A508 Class 3 and A 533 grade B Class 1, taking the sampling

  20. Tornado-Shaped Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Sol Sáez; de la Rosa, Félix Martínez; Rojas, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In Advanced Calculus, our students wonder if it is possible to graphically represent a tornado by means of a three-dimensional curve. In this paper, we show it is possible by providing the parametric equations of such tornado-shaped curves.

  1. Tornado-Shaped Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Sol Sáez; de la Rosa, Félix Martínez; Rojas, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In Advanced Calculus, our students wonder if it is possible to graphically represent a tornado by means of a three-dimensional curve. In this paper, we show it is possible by providing the parametric equations of such tornado-shaped curves.

  2. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  3. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Even, Wesley Paul; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  4. Flow-duration curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James Kincheon

    1959-01-01

    The flow-duration curve is a cumulative frequency curve that shows the percent of time specified discharges were equaled or exceeded during a given period. It combines in one curve the flow characteristics of a stream throughout the range of discharge, without regard to the sequence of occurrence. If the period upon which the curve is based represents the long-term flow of a stream, the curve may be used to predict the distribution of future flows for water- power, water-supply, and pollution studies. This report shows that differences in geology affect the low-flow ends of flow-duration curves of streams in adjacent basins. Thus, duration curves are useful in appraising the geologic characteristics of drainage basins. A method for adjusting flow-duration curves of short periods to represent long-term conditions is presented. The adjustment is made by correlating the records of a short-term station with those of a long-term station.

  5. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  6. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  7. CURVES: curve evolution for vessel segmentation.

    PubMed

    Lorigo, L M; Faugeras, O D; Grimson, W E; Keriven, R; Kikinis, R; Nabavi, A; Westin, C F

    2001-09-01

    The vasculature is of utmost importance in neurosurgery. Direct visualization of images acquired with current imaging modalities, however, cannot provide a spatial representation of small vessels. These vessels, and their branches which show considerable variations, are most important in planning and performing neurosurgical procedures. In planning they provide information on where the lesion draws its blood supply and where it drains. During surgery the vessels serve as landmarks and guidelines to the lesion. The more minute the information is, the more precise the navigation and localization of computer guided procedures. Beyond neurosurgery and neurological study, vascular information is also crucial in cardiovascular surgery, diagnosis, and research. This paper addresses the problem of automatic segmentation of complicated curvilinear structures in three-dimensional imagery, with the primary application of segmenting vasculature in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images. The method presented is based on recent curve and surface evolution work in the computer vision community which models the object boundary as a manifold that evolves iteratively to minimize an energy criterion. This energy criterion is based both on intensity values in the image and on local smoothness properties of the object boundary, which is the vessel wall in this application. In particular, the method handles curves evolving in 3D, in contrast with previous work that has dealt with curves in 2D and surfaces in 3D. Results are presented on cerebral and aortic MRA data as well as lung computed tomography (CT) data.

  8. Low Cost RF Amplifier for Community TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Syafaruddin; Sasongko, Sudi Mariyanto Al; Made Budi Suksmadana, I.; Mustiko Okta Muvianto, Cahyo; Ariessaputra, Suthami

    2016-01-01

    he capability of television to deliver audio video makes this media become the most effective method to spread information. This paper presents an experiment of RF amplifier design having low-cost design and providing sufficient RF power particularly for community television. The RF amplifier consists of two stages of amplifier. The first stage amplifier was used to leverage output of TV modulator from 11dBm to enable to drive next stage amplifier. CAD simulation and fabrication were run to reach optimum RF amplifier design circuit. The associated circuit was made by determining stability circle, stability gain, and matching impedance. Hence, the average power of first stage RF amplifier was 24.68dBm achieved. The second stage used RF modules which was ready match to 50 ohm for both input and output port. The experiment results show that the RF amplifier may operate at frequency ranging from 174 to 230MHz. The average output power of the 2nd stage amplifier was 33.38 Watt with the overall gain of 20.54dB. The proposed RF amplifier is a cheap way to have a stable RF amplifier for community TV. The total budget for the designed RF amplifier is only a 1/5 compared to local design of final TV amplifier.

  9. Piecewise quartic polynomial curves with a local shape parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuli

    2006-10-01

    Piecewise quartic polynomial curves with a local shape parameter are presented in this paper. The given blending function is an extension of the cubic uniform B-splines. The changes of a local shape parameter will only change two curve segments. With the increase of the value of a shape parameter, the curves approach a corresponding control point. The given curves possess satisfying shape-preserving properties. The given curve can also be used to interpolate locally the control points with GC2 continuity. Thus, the given curves unify the representation of the curves for interpolating and approximating the control polygon. As an application, the piecewise polynomial curves can intersect an ellipse at different knot values by choosing the value of the shape parameter. The given curve can approximate an ellipse from the both sides and can then yield a tight envelope for an ellipse. Some computing examples for curve design are given.

  10. Controlled Avalanche Transit-Time Triode Amplifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    invention brought about an unprecedented grov;th of research and deveio.ent in solid-state phisics and engineer- 1g. Tra.sltors are now key elements, for...large-signal simulations used the label DEV:material, type, letter , N( (cm 3 ), WT (Um) for devices with uniformly dopedC collectors and DEV:material...type, letter , N (cm-), w (Um),av av Ndrif t (cm-3 ), wD (jim) for devices with HI-LO collector regions, where the symbols Nc, wT, N , w, NI and w have

  11. Implementation of a Fiber Raman Amplifier for CW-IM Measurements of Atmospheric Oxygen at 1.26 Microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, J. T.; Nagel, J.; Temyanko, V.; Zaccheo, S.; Browell, E. V.; Kooi, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Starting in February 2009 ITT, along with our partners at TIPD, AER and NASA LaRC, has been working to develop a fiber Raman amplifier at a wavelength near 1.26 microns, and evaluate its performance for measuring atmospheric O2 remotely. Two prototype amplifiers have been built and integrated into an existing continuous wave (CW) intensity modulated (IM) engineering development unit (EDU), developed at ITT for the measurement of CO2, in order to demonstrate the CW-IM measurement of atmospheric O2. The CO2 and O2 measurements are being evaluated for application to the active sensing of CO2 emissions over nights days and seasons (ASCENDS) mission described in the 2007 National Research Council's Decadal Survey. The O2 measurement takes advantage of the fact that O2 is a well mixed gas to allow the determination of the CO2 dry air mixing ratio, which is the required product for the ASCENDS mission. The Raman amplifier development has been focused on optimizing fiber designs to limit stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), which is a nonlinear process typically limiting this type of amplifier from generating high power narrow linewidth outputs. This work has centered around two approaches, varying the fiber core diameter to broaden the Brillouin gain curve and designing transverse fiber doping profiles which serve to separate the acoustic and optical wave overlap responsible for SBS. The most recent amplifier is producing 1.5 Watts of average power while maintaining the narrow linewidth of the seed laser (~3 MHz). The latest amplifier has been integrated with the CO2 EDU and initial ground testing was performed at the ITT ground test facility in New Haven, Indiana. The transmitter has subsequently been integrated into a NASA DC-8 rack and is currently being flown on the NASA DC-8. We discuss results from these ground and flight measurements in addition to the discussion of the amplifier design and our plans for scaling the design to space. This document is not subject

  12. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  13. Transverse Bragg resonance laser amplifier.

    PubMed

    Yariv, Amnon; Xu, Yong; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2003-02-01

    We propose and analyze a new type of optical amplifier that is formed by addition of gain in the periodic cladding of a transverse Bragg resonance waveguide [Opt. Lett. 27, 936 (2002)]. Using the coupled-wave formalism, we calculate the mode profiles, the exponential gain constant, and, for comparison, the gain enhancement compared with those of conventional semiconductor optical amplifiers. In contrast with coupled-mode theory, in one-dimensional structures (e.g., the distributed-feedback laser) the exponential gain constant in the longitudinal direction is involved in both longitudinal and transverse confinement, and its solution has to be achieved self-consistently, together with the quantized guiding channel width.

  14. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-05-22

    A high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg.

  15. 338-GHz Semiconductor Amplifier Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Fung, King Man; Rasisic, Vesna; Deal, William; Leong, Kevin; Mei, Xiao Bing; Yoshida, Wayne; Liu, Po-Hsin; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Research findings were reported from an investigation of new gallium nitride (GaN) monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) targeting the highest output power and the highest efficiency for class-A operation in W-band (75-110 GHz). W-band PAs are a major component of many frequency multiplied submillimeter-wave LO signal sources. For spectrometer arrays, substantial W-band power is required due to the passive lossy frequency multipliers.

  16. High power gas laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Leland, Wallace T.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1981-01-01

    A high power output CO.sub.2 gas laser amplifier having a number of sections, each comprising a plurality of annular pumping chambers spaced around the circumference of a vacuum chamber containing a cold cathode, gridded electron gun. The electron beam from the electron gun ionizes the gas lasing medium in the sections. An input laser beam is split into a plurality of annular beams, each passing through the sections comprising one pumping chamber.

  17. Compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H.Z.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Levush, B.; Tate, J.; Chen, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    A compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling wave amplifier is being developed. The device is a three-stage tube with the output section running as a fourth harmonic gyro-TWT, the input section running as a fundamental gyro-TWT, and the middle operating at the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. Radiation is suppressed by servers between the sections. The operating beam of the tube is produced by a magnetron injection gun (MIG). A TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit consisting of mode converters and a filter waveguide is employed for both input and output sections to solve the mode competition problem, which is pervasive in gyro-TWT operation. The input section has an input coupler designed as a TE{sub 0n} mode launcher. It excites a signal at the fundamental cyclotron frequency (17.5 GHz), which is amplified in the first TWT interaction region. So far the device is similar to a two-stage harmonic gyro-TWT. The distinction is that in the three-stage device the second section will be optimized not for output power but for fourth harmonic bunching of the beam. A gyroklystron amplifier has also been designed. The configuration is similar to the gyro-TWT but with the traveling wave interaction structures replaced by mode selective special complex cavities. Cold test results of the wideband input coupler and the TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit have been obtained.

  18. Highly stable biased amplifier and stretcher system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddick, R. G.

    1970-01-01

    Amplifier and stretcher system, which minimizes thermal effects and compensates for repetition-rate effects, maintains resolution levels in spectrum analysis. An additional inverting amplifier is used in the system to provide a noiseless charge restorer.

  19. A Single Switcher Combined Series Parallel Hybrid Envelope Tracking Amplifier for Wideband RF Power Amplifier Applications.

    PubMed

    Anabtawi, Nijad; Ferzli, Rony; Harmanani, Haidar M

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an improved architecture for RF power amplifier envelope tracking supply modulator is presented. It consists of a single switched mode supply regulator and one linear regulator. The switched mode supply regulator has two outputs, one of which is used in conjunction with the linear regulator to provide a wideband, high efficiency power supply to the RF amplifier, whereas the second output provides a band limited high efficiency supply to the linear regulator. The design offers improved power efficiency, reduced system complexity and area savings since the dual output switched mode regulator requires one inductor and a simple control loop. The design was implemented in 14nm CMOS process and validated with simulations. The supply modulator achieves a peak efficiency of 74% with a 6 dB PAPR 20MHz LTE signal at 29dBm output power.

  20. A Single Switcher Combined Series Parallel Hybrid Envelope Tracking Amplifier for Wideband RF Power Amplifier Applications

    PubMed Central

    Anabtawi, Nijad; Ferzli, Rony; Harmanani, Haidar M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an improved architecture for RF power amplifier envelope tracking supply modulator is presented. It consists of a single switched mode supply regulator and one linear regulator. The switched mode supply regulator has two outputs, one of which is used in conjunction with the linear regulator to provide a wideband, high efficiency power supply to the RF amplifier, whereas the second output provides a band limited high efficiency supply to the linear regulator. The design offers improved power efficiency, reduced system complexity and area savings since the dual output switched mode regulator requires one inductor and a simple control loop. The design was implemented in 14nm CMOS process and validated with simulations. The supply modulator achieves a peak efficiency of 74% with a 6 dB PAPR 20MHz LTE signal at 29dBm output power. PMID:28919658

  1. Soil Water Retention Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. E.; Kim, J.; Cifelli, R.; Chandra, C. V.

    2016-12-01

    Potential water retention, S, is one of parameters commonly used in hydrologic modeling for soil moisture accounting. Physically, S indicates total amount of water which can be stored in soil and is expressed in units of depth. S can be represented as a change of soil moisture content and in this context is commonly used to estimate direct runoff, especially in the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number (CN) method. Generally, the lumped and the distributed hydrologic models can easily use the SCS-CN method to estimate direct runoff. Changes in potential water retention have been used in previous SCS-CN studies; however, these studies have focused on long-term hydrologic simulations where S is allowed to vary at the daily time scale. While useful for hydrologic events that span multiple days, the resolution is too coarse for short-term applications such as flash flood events where S may not recover its full potential. In this study, a new method for estimating a time-variable potential water retention at hourly time-scales is presented. The methodology is applied for the Napa River basin, California. The streamflow gage at St Helena, located in the upper reaches of the basin, is used as the control gage site to evaluate the model performance as it is has minimal influences by reservoirs and diversions. Rainfall events from 2011 to 2012 are used for estimating the event-based SCS CN to transfer to S. As a result, we have derived the potential water retention curve and it is classified into three sections depending on the relative change in S. The first is a negative slope section arising from the difference in the rate of moving water through the soil column, the second is a zero change section representing the initial recovery the potential water retention, and the third is a positive change section representing the full recovery of the potential water retention. Also, we found that the soil water moving has traffic jam within 24 hours after finished first

  2. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  3. NASA developments in solid state power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Regis F.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last ten years, NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of solid state power amplifiers for space applications. Historically, the program may be divided into three phases. The first efforts were carried out in support of the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program, which is developing an experimental version of a Ka-band commercial communications system. These first amplifiers attempted to use hybrid technology. The second phase was still targeted at ACTS frequencies, but concentrated on monolithic implementations, while the current, third phase, is a monolithic effort that focusses on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and stresses amplifier efficiency. The topics covered include: (1) 20 GHz hybrid amplifiers; (2) 20 GHz monolithic MESFET power amplifiers; (3) Texas Instruments' (TI) 20 GHz variable power amplifier; (4) TI 20 GHz high power amplifier; (5) high efficiency monolithic power amplifiers; (6) GHz high efficiency variable power amplifier; (7) TI 32 GHz monolithic power amplifier performance; (8) design goals for Hughes' 32 GHz variable power amplifier; and (9) performance goals for Hughes' pseudomorphic 60 GHz power amplifier.

  4. Solid state, S-band, power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digrindakis, M.

    1973-01-01

    The final design and specifications for a solid state, S-band, power amplifier is reported. Modifications from a previously proposed design were incorporated to improve efficiency and meet input overdrive and noise floor requirements. Reports on the system design, driver amplifier, power amplifier, and voltage and current limiter are included along with a discussion of the testing program.

  5. Remote Acquisition Amplifier For 50-Ohm Cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amador, Jose J.

    1995-01-01

    Buffer-amplifier unit designed to drive 50-Ohm cables up to 100 ft. (30 m) long, compensating for attenuation in cables and enabling remote operation of oscilloscopes. Variable resistor provides for adjustment of gain of amplifier, such that overall gain from input terminals of amplifier to output end of cable set to unity.

  6. Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2006-02-01

    The December 2004 issue of TPT presented a problem concerning how a car should accelerate around an unbanked curve of constant radius r starting from rest if it is to avoid skidding. Interestingly enough, two solutions were proffered by readers.2 The purpose of this note is to compare and contrast the two approaches. Further experimental investigation of various turning strategies using a remote-controlled car and overhead video analysis could make for an interesting student project.

  7. Curve Stitching in LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscat, Jean-Paul

    1992-01-01

    Uses LOGO to enhance the applicability of curve stitching in the mathematics curriculum. Presents the formulas and computer programs for the construction of parabolas, concentric circles, and epicycloids. Diagrams of constructed figures are provided. (MDH)

  8. Crystallography on Curved Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lucks, Julius; Nelson, David

    2007-03-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical study of the static and dynamical properties that distinguish two dimensional curved crystals from their flat space counterparts. Experimental realizations include block copolymer mono-layers on lithographically patterned substrates and self-assembled colloidal particles on a curved interface. At the heart of our approach lies a simple observation: the packing of interacting spheres constrained to lie on a curved surface is necessarily frustrated even in the absence of defects. As a result, whenever lattice imperfections or topological defects are introduced in the curved crystal they couple to the pre-stress of geometric frustration giving rise to elastic potentials. These geometric potentials are non-local functions of the Gaussian curvature and depend on the position of the defects. They play an important role in stress relaxation dynamics, elastic instabilities and melting.

  9. Principal Curves and Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    the Mahalanobis distance defined in terms of t. In particular when 9 is diagonal the procedure amounts to finding the line that minimizes the weighted...the m~a~l of apj dimensional’ data set. They mhinima, the distance from the poinsa, and provide a mom-linear summary of the data. The carves awe moe...project there. The zmain theorems proms thaprincipal curves mre critical values of the expected squared distance between the points and the curve

  10. Improved techniques for switching power amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Flinder, F.M.; Wolfs, P.J.; Kwong, K.C.

    1993-10-01

    The control system design of a dc to 10 kHz bandwidth 45 kVA current sourced power amplifier suitable for geophysical exploration applications is presented. A five-level modulation scheme has been implemented using a modified bridge topology with only four switches. This scheme give as an order of magnitude improvement in switching ripple and control performance over two-level modulation. Using this system, a 50 kHz switch frequency allows a 20 kHz, {minus}3dB bandwidth to be easily achieved. Simulation as well as tenth scale model test results are presented. The current output waveform reproduction is of high quality over the rated dc to 10 kHz frequency range. The THD is 0.3% at 1 kHz.

  11. Chemically amplified photoresist: Materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawloski, Adam Richard

    2002-01-01

    Advances in microfabrication technology to construct smaller and faster integrated circuits depend on improving resolution capabilities of patterning thin films of photoresist materials by photolithographic imaging. Positive-tone, chemically amplified photoresists represent one of the most important classes of photoresist materials. These materials function by the generation of a photoacid catalyst from the decomposition of a photoacid generator with exposure that catalyzes chemical reactions that alter the development rate of the exposed resist. Chemical amplification is derived from the fact that a single molecule of photogenerated catalyst may participate in numerous reactions. Photoacid catalyzes the cleavage of acid-labile protecting groups from the backbone of the resin polymer, increasing the dissolution rate of the resist in aqueous base. A pattern is formed in the photoresist film from the difference between dissolution rates of the exposed and unexposed material. The continual improvement of the resolution of chemically amplified resists depends on understanding, controlling, and optimizing the chemical processes that govern pattern formation, namely photoacid generation, resin deprotection, and resist dissolution. To elucidate how the formulation of the resist affects these processes, a systematic methodology was designed, validated and implemented to analyze the materials and processing of chemically amplified photoresist systems. The efficiency of photoacid generation and the concentration of photoacid produced upon exposure were determined for a wide range of resist formulations, processing conditions, and exposure technologies. The chemical structure of photoacid generators and base quenchers were found to affect the processes of acid-base neutralization, resin deprotection, and resist development. The reaction-diffusion process of photoacid to deprotect the resin was identified to depend on the concentration of the photoacid generator. A much

  12. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  13. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  14. Log amplifier with pole-zero compensation

    DOEpatents

    Brookshier, William

    1987-01-01

    A logarithmic amplifier circuit provides pole-zero compensation for improved stability and response time over 6-8 decades of input signal frequency. The amplifier circuit includes a first operational amplifier with a first feedback loop which includes a second, inverting operational amplifier in a second feedback loop. The compensated output signal is provided by the second operational amplifier with the log elements, i.e., resistors, and the compensating capacitors in each of the feedback loops having equal values so that each break point or pole is offset by a compensating break point or zero.

  15. Functional Electronic Amplifiers with Broad Dynamic Band,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-27

    dynamic properties of amplifiers, assembled on this type of amplifier instruments, it is expedient to introduce the concept of the dynamic quality...qjvL> ql. 3. Amplifier has data: K" =K’/m; , vus,, q -q4cujvv.4 in Fig. 1). Functional amplifier is assembled on the block diagram Fig. 2b. It has...following data: K-mr’ vv;m-v-mvv’-" qpYmq j° ey" As can be seen from the given examples, dynamic quality of FU, assembled on the identical amplifier

  16. Differences in strength-duration curves of electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists between DJ-1 homozygous knockout and wild-type mice: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Won-Deok; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Strength-duration (SD) curves are used in electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists to confirm muscle degeneration. However, the usefulness of SD curves in comparing muscle degeneration in DJ-1 homozygous knockout (DJ-1−/−) and wild-type mice (DJ-1+/+) is not yet fully understood. The electrical properties of the gastrocnemius muscles of DJ-1−/− and DJ-1+/+ mice were compared in the current study. [Subjects and Methods] The electrode of an electrical stimulator was applied to the gastrocnemius muscle to measure the rheobase until the response of contractive muscle to electrical stimulation became visible in mice. [Results] The rheobase of DJ-1−/− mice showed a significant increase in a time-dependent manner, compared to that of DJ-1+/+ mice. [Conclusion] These results demonstrate that the DJ-1 protein may be implicated in the regulation of neuromuscular activity of gastrocnemius muscles of mice. PMID:27313379

  17. The meaning of the turning point of the index of motor current amplitude curve in controlling a continuous flow pump or evaluation of left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Endo, G J; Kojima, K; Nakamura, K; Matsuzaki, Y; Onitsuka, T

    2003-03-01

    In this series, we investigated the meaning of the t-point of index of motor current amplitude (ICA) curve from a point of view of flow rate on in vitro and in vivo studies. On mock circulation loop and left ventricular assist device (LVAD)-equipped pigs, we detected the t-point and compared the pump flow at the t-point with the simultaneous cardiac output. The pump flow at the t-point showed high correlation against the simultaneous cardiac output for in vitro or in vivo study. By detection of the t-point of the ICA curve and measuring or estimating the pump flow at t-point, the cardiac output may be assessed without any sensor in various cardiac conditions.

  18. Visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier free electron laser undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Roger; Cornacchia, Max; Emma, Paul; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Poling, Ben; Ruland, Robert; Johnson, Erik; Rakowsky, George; Skaritka, John; Lidia, Steve; Duffy, Pat; Libkind, Marcus; Frigola, Pedro; Murokh, Alex; Pellegrini, Claudio; Rosenzweig, James; Tremaine, Aaron

    2001-12-01

    The visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier (VISA) free electron laser (FEL) is an experimental device designed to show self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) to saturation in the near infrared to visible light energy range. It generates a resonant wavelength output from 800-600 nm, so that silicon detectors may be used to characterize the optical properties of the FEL radiation. VISA is designed to show how SASE FEL theory corresponds with experiment in this wavelength range, using an electron beam with emittance close to that planned for the future Linear Coherent Light Source at SLAC. VISA comprises a 4 m pure permanent magnet undulator with four 99 cm segments, each of 55 periods, 18 mm long. The undulator has distributed focusing built into it, to reduce the average beta function of the 70-85 MeV electron beam to about 30 cm. There are four FODO cells per segment. The permanent magnet focusing lattice consists of blocks mounted on either side of the electron beam, in the undulator gap. The most important undulator error parameter for a free electron laser is the trajectory walk-off, or lack of overlap of the photon and electron beams. Using pulsed wire magnet measurements and magnet shimming, we were able to control trajectory walk-off to less than +/-50 μm per field gain length.

  19. Design criteria for ultrafast optical parametric amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, C.; Cerullo, G.

    2016-10-01

    Optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) exploit second-order nonlinearity to transfer energy from a fixed frequency pump pulse to a variable frequency signal pulse, and represent an easy way of tuning over a broad range the frequency of an otherwise fixed femtosecond laser system. OPAs can also act as broadband amplifiers, transferring energy from a narrowband pump to a broadband signal and thus considerably shortening the duration of the pump pulse. Due to these unique properties, OPAs are nowadays ubiquitous in ultrafast laser laboratories, and are employed by many users, such as solid state physicists, atomic/molecular physicists, chemists and biologists, who are not experts in ultrafast optics. This tutorial paper aims at providing the non-specialist reader with a self-consistent guide to the physical foundations of OPAs, deriving the main equations describing their performance and discussing how they can be used to understand their most important working parameters (frequency tunability, bandwidth, pulse energy/repetition rate scalability, control over the carrier-envelope phase of the generated pulses). Based on this analysis, we derive practical design criteria for OPAs, showing how their performance depends on the type of the nonlinear interaction (crystal type, phase-matching configuration, crystal length), on the characteristics of the pump pulse (frequency, duration, energy, repetition rate) and on the OPA architecture.

  20. HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, ILAN, DAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-08-21

    Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department.

  1. ULTRA-STABILIZED D. C. AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Hartwig, E.C.; Kuenning, R.W.; Acker, R.C.

    1959-02-17

    An improved circuit is described for stabilizing the drift and minimizing the noise and hum level of d-c amplifiers so that the output voltage will be zero when the input is zero. In its detailed aspects, the disclosed circuit incorporates a d-c amplifier having a signal input, a second input, and an output circuit coupled back to the first input of the amplifier through inverse feedback means. An electronically driven chopper having a pair of fixed contacts and a moveable contact alternately connects the two inputs of a difference amplifier to the signal input. The A. E. error signal produced in the difference amplifier is amplified, rectified, and applied to the second input of the amplifier as the d-c stabilizing voltage.

  2. Nondegenerate optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Jovanovic, Igor; Ebbers, Christopher A.

    2005-03-22

    A system provides an input pump pulse and a signal pulse. A first dichroic beamsplitter is highly reflective for the input signal pulse and highly transmissive for the input pump pulse. A first optical parametric amplifier nonlinear crystal transfers part of the energy from the input pump pulse to the input signal pulse resulting in a first amplified signal pulse and a first depleted pump pulse. A second dichroic beamsplitter is highly reflective for the first amplified signal pulse and highly transmissive for the first depleted pump pulse. A second optical parametric amplifier nonlinear crystal transfers part of the energy from the first depleted pump pulse to the first amplified signal pulse resulting in a second amplified signal pulse and a second depleted pump pulse. A third dichroic beamsplitter receives the second amplified signal pulse and the second depleted pump pulse. The second depleted pump pulse is discarded.

  3. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers the period from April 1, 1985 to Sept. 30, 1985 under NASA grant NAS1-441 entitled direct solar pumped iodine laser amplifier. During this period the parametric studies of the iodine laser oscillator pumped by a Vortek simulator was carried out before the amplifier studies. The amplifier studies are postponed to the extended period following completion of the parametric studies. In addition, the kinetic modeling of a solar pumped iodine laser amplifier, and the experimental work for a solar pumped dye laser amplifier are in progress. This report contains three parts: (1) the radiation characteristics of solar simulator and the parametric characteristics of photodissociation iodine laser continuously pumped by a Vortek solar simulator; (2) kinetic modeling of a solar pumped iodine laser amplifier; and (3) the study of the dye laser amplifier pumped by a Tamarack solar simulator.

  4. High temperature charge amplifier for geothermal applications

    DOEpatents

    Lindblom, Scott C.; Maldonado, Frank J.; Henfling, Joseph A.

    2015-12-08

    An amplifier circuit in a multi-chip module includes a charge to voltage converter circuit, a voltage amplifier a low pass filter and a voltage to current converter. The charge to voltage converter receives a signal representing an electrical charge and generates a voltage signal proportional to the input signal. The voltage amplifier receives the voltage signal from the charge to voltage converter, then amplifies the voltage signal by the gain factor to output an amplified voltage signal. The lowpass filter passes low frequency components of the amplified voltage signal and attenuates frequency components greater than a cutoff frequency. The voltage to current converter receives the output signal of the lowpass filter and converts the output signal to a current output signal; wherein an amplifier circuit output is selectable between the output signal of the lowpass filter and the current output signal.

  5. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-05-22

    Disclosed is a high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg. 2 figs.

  6. Charge amplifier with bias compensation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    An ion beam uniformity monitor for very low beam currents using a high-sensitivity charge amplifier with bias compensation. The ion beam monitor is used to assess the uniformity of a raster-scanned ion beam, such as used in an ion implanter, and utilizes four Faraday cups placed in the geometric corners of the target area. Current from each cup is integrated with respect to time, thus measuring accumulated dose, or charge, in Coulombs. By comparing the dose at each corner, a qualitative assessment of ion beam uniformity is made possible. With knowledge of the relative area of the Faraday cups, the ion flux and areal dose can also be obtained.

  7. Multiple FM/FDM carriers through nonlinear amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavehrad, M.

    1981-05-01

    A description is given of a general procedure which can be employed for studying intermodulation effects in connection with the use of a nonlinear amplifier. In deriving the presented results, use was made of traveling-wave tube characteristics curves reported by Westcott (1967). The results of the current study can, therefore, be compared to Westcott's experimental data. The single third-order intermodulation power and the single carrier power/single third-order intermodulation power are computed as a function of the total output power backoff for any number of equal power carriers involved.

  8. Contact Geometry of Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliou, Peter J.

    2009-10-01

    Cartan's method of moving frames is briefly recalled in the context of immersed curves in the homogeneous space of a Lie group G. The contact geometry of curves in low dimensional equi-affine geometry is then made explicit. This delivers the complete set of invariant data which solves the G-equivalence problem via a straightforward procedure, and which is, in some sense a supplement to the equivariant method of Fels and Olver. Next, the contact geometry of curves in general Riemannian manifolds (M,g) is described. For the special case in which the isometries of (M,g) act transitively, it is shown that the contact geometry provides an explicit algorithmic construction of the differential invariants for curves in M. The inputs required for the construction consist only of the metric g and a parametrisation of structure group SO(n); the group action is not required and no integration is involved. To illustrate the algorithm we explicitly construct complete sets of differential invariants for curves in the Poincaré half-space H3 and in a family of constant curvature 3-metrics. It is conjectured that similar results are possible in other Cartan geometries.

  9. Field Effect Transistor /FET/ circuit for variable gin amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, G. H.

    1969-01-01

    Amplifier circuit using two FETs combines improved input and output impedances with relatively large signal handling capability and an immunity from adverse effects of automatic gain control. Circuit has sources and drains in parallel plus a resistive divider for signal and bias to either of the gate terminals.

  10. Dispersion-Engineered Traveling Wave Kinetic Inductance Parametric Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas (Inventor); Day, Peter K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifier comprises a superconducting transmission line and a dispersion control element. The transmission line can include periodic variations of its dimension along its length. The superconducting material can include a high normal state resistivity material. In some instances the high normal state resistivity material includes nitrogen and a metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, niobium and vanadium. The traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifier is expected to exhibit a noise temperature below 100 mK/GHz.

  11. High power metallic halide laser. [amplifying a copper chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A laser amplification system is disclosed whereby a metallic halide vapor such as copper chloride is caused to flow through a laser amplifier and a heat exchanger in a closed loop system so that the flow rate is altered to control the temperature rise across the length of the laser amplifier. The copper atoms within the laser amplifier should not exceed a temperature of 3000 K, so that the number of copper atoms in the metastable state will not be high enough to prevent amplification in the amplifier. A molecular dissociation apparatus is provided at the input to the laser amplifier for dissociating the copper chloride into copper atoms and ions and chlorine atoms and ions. The dissociation apparatus includes a hollow cathode tube and an annular ring spaced apart from the tube end. A voltage differential is applied between the annular ring and the hollow cathode tube so that as the copper chloride flows through, it is dissociated into copper and chlorine ions and atoms.

  12. Design and development of digital seismic amplifier recorder

    SciTech Connect

    Samsidar, Siti Alaa; Afuar, Waldy; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-16

    A digital seismic recording is a recording technique of seismic data in digital systems. This method is more convenient because it is more accurate than other methods of seismic recorders. To improve the quality of the results of seismic measurements, the signal needs to be amplified to obtain better subsurface images. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of measurement by amplifying the input signal. We use seismic sensors/geophones with a frequency of 4.5 Hz. The signal is amplified by means of 12 units of non-inverting amplifier. The non-inverting amplifier using IC 741 with the resistor values 1KΩ and 1MΩ. The amplification results were 1,000 times. The results of signal amplification converted into digital by using the Analog Digital Converter (ADC). Quantitative analysis in this study was performed using the software Lab VIEW 8.6. The Lab VIEW 8.6 program was used to control the ADC. The results of qualitative analysis showed that the seismic conditioning can produce a large output, so that the data obtained is better than conventional data. This application can be used for geophysical methods that have low input voltage such as microtremor application.

  13. Integrated circuit amplifiers for multi-electrode intracortical recording.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Thomas; Denison, Timothy; Wolf, Patrick

    2009-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in systems that interpret the electrical signals of the brain in order to control an actuator. One version of these systems senses neuronal extracellular action potentials with an array of up to 100 miniature probes inserted into the cortex. The impedance of each probe is high, so environmental electrical noise is readily coupled to the neuronal signal. To minimize this noise, an amplifier is placed close to each probe. Thus, the need has arisen for many amplifiers to be placed near the cortex. Commercially available integrated circuits do not satisfy the area, power and noise requirements of this application, so researchers have designed custom integrated-circuit amplifiers. This paper presents a comprehensive survey of the neural amplifiers described in publications prior to 2008. Methods to achieve high input impedance, low noise and a large time-constant high-pass filter are reviewed. A tutorial on the biological, electrochemical, mechanical and electromagnetic phenomena that influence amplifier design is provided. Areas for additional research, including sub-nanoampere electrolysis and chronic cortical heating, are discussed. Unresolved design concerns, including teraohm circuitry, electrical overstress and component failure, are identified.

  14. Design and development of digital seismic amplifier recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsidar, Siti Alaa; Afuar, Waldy; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-01

    A digital seismic recording is a recording technique of seismic data in digital systems. This method is more convenient because it is more accurate than other methods of seismic recorders. To improve the quality of the results of seismic measurements, the signal needs to be amplified to obtain better subsurface images. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of measurement by amplifying the input signal. We use seismic sensors/geophones with a frequency of 4.5 Hz. The signal is amplified by means of 12 units of non-inverting amplifier. The non-inverting amplifier using IC 741 with the resistor values 1KΩ and 1MΩ. The amplification results were 1,000 times. The results of signal amplification converted into digital by using the Analog Digital Converter (ADC). Quantitative analysis in this study was performed using the software Lab VIEW 8.6. The Lab VIEW 8.6 program was used to control the ADC. The results of qualitative analysis showed that the seismic conditioning can produce a large output, so that the data obtained is better than conventional data. This application can be used for geophysical methods that have low input voltage such as microtremor application.

  15. The sales learning curve.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Mark; Holloway, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    When a company launches a new product into a new market, the temptation is to immediately ramp up sales force capacity to gain customers as quickly as possible. But hiring a full sales force too early just causes the firm to burn through cash and fail to meet revenue expectations. Before it can sell an innovative product efficiently, the entire organization needs to learn how customers will acquire and use it, a process the authors call the sales learning curve. The concept of a learning curve is well understood in manufacturing. Employees transfer knowledge and experience back and forth between the production line and purchasing, manufacturing, engineering, planning, and operations. The sales learning curve unfolds similarly through the give-and-take between the company--marketing, sales, product support, and product development--and its customers. As customers adopt the product, the firm modifies both the offering and the processes associated with making and selling it. Progress along the manufacturing curve is measured by tracking cost per unit: The more a firm learns about the manufacturing process, the more efficient it becomes, and the lower the unit cost goes. Progress along the sales learning curve is measured in an analogous way: The more a company learns about the sales process, the more efficient it becomes at selling, and the higher the sales yield. As the sales yield increases, the sales learning process unfolds in three distinct phases--initiation, transition, and execution. Each phase requires a different size--and kind--of sales force and represents a different stage in a company's production, marketing, and sales strategies. Adjusting those strategies as the firm progresses along the sales learning curve allows managers to plan resource allocation more accurately, set appropriate expectations, avoid disastrous cash shortfalls, and reduce both the time and money required to turn a profit.

  16. Dynamics of curved interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero, Carlos

    2009-08-15

    Stochastic growth phenomena on curved interfaces are studied by means of stochastic partial differential equations. These are derived as counterparts of linear planar equations on a curved geometry after a reparametrization invariance principle has been applied. We examine differences and similarities with the classical planar equations. Some characteristic features are the loss of correlation through time and a particular behavior of the average fluctuations. Dependence on the metric is also explored. The diffusive model that propagates correlations ballistically in the planar situation is particularly interesting, as this propagation becomes nonuniversal in the new regime.

  17. Implementation of a digital evaluation platform to analyze bifurcation based nonlinear amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldkord, Sven; Reit, Marco; Mathis, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Recently, nonlinear amplifiers based on the supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation have become a focus of attention, especially in the modeling of the mammalian hearing organ. In general, to gain deeper insights in the input-output behavior, the analysis of bifurcation based amplifiers requires a flexible framework to exchange equations and adjust certain parameters. A DSP implementation is presented which is capable to analyze various amplifier systems. Amplifiers based on the Andronov-Hopf and Neimark-Sacker bifurcations are implemented and compared exemplarily. It is shown that the Neimark-Sacker system remarkably outperforms the Andronov-Hopf amplifier regarding the CPU usage. Nevertheless, both show a similar input-output behavior over a wide parameter range. Combined with an USB-based control interface connected to a PC, the digital framework provides a powerful instrument to analyze bifurcation based amplifiers.

  18. A compact 500 MHz 4 kW Solid-State Power Amplifier for accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, M.; Pedrozzi, M.; Ferreira, L. F. R.; Garvey, T.

    2011-05-01

    We present the development of a compact narrow-band Solid-State Power Amplifier (SSPA). We foresee a promising application of solid-state amplifiers specifically in accelerators for new generation synchrotron light sources. Such a new technology has reached a competitive price/performance ratio and expected lifetime in comparison with klystron and IOT amplifiers. The increasing number of synchrotron light sources using 500 MHz as base frequency justifies the effort in the development of the proposed amplifier. Two different techniques are also proposed to improve the control and performance of these new distributed amplification systems which we call, respectively, complete distributed system and forced compression.

  19. Rapid Diagnosis of α-Thalassemia by Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Munkongdee, Thongperm; Vattanaviboon, Phantip; Thummarati, Parichut; Sewamart, Paijit; Winichagoon, Pranee; Fucharoen, Suthat; Svasti, Saovaros

    2010-01-01

    α-Thalassemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder that results from defective synthesis of α-globin protein. Couples who both carry the α-thalassemia-1 gene are at risk of having a fetus with Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis. Rapid and accurate screening for individuals carrying the α-thalassemia-1 gene is the most effective strategy to prevent and control this severe form of thalassemia. In this study, a new and accurate method for α-thalassemia diagnosis was developed by genotyping α-thalassemia-1, the Southeast Asian type (−−SEA) and Thai type (−−THAI) deletions, using multiplex PCR followed by a melting curve analysis. Primers were designed to specifically amplify two deletion fragments, the −−SEA and −−THAI deletions and two normal fragments, ψζ- and α2-globin gene. The primers were capable of distinguishing α-thalassemia 1 heterozygotes from α-thalassemia 2 homozygotes, which are unable to be diagnosed by standard hematological data and hemoglobin typing. The melting temperatures of the −−THAI, −−SEA, ψζ-globin, and α2-globin gene fragments were 79.9 ± 0.2, 89.4 ± 0.5, 92.8 ± 0.2, and 85.0 ± 0.2°C, respectively. Melting curve analysis was performed in 130 subjects in parallel with conventional gap-PCR analysis, and results showed 100% concordance. This method eliminates the post-PCR electrophoresis process, which is laborious, and allows high throughput screening suitable for large population screening for prevention and control of thalassemia. PMID:20190015

  20. Signal-Conditioning Amplifier Recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Taylor, John

    2003-01-01

    Signal-conditioning amplifier recorders (SCAmpRs) have been proposed as a means of simplifying and upgrading the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Ground Measurement System (GMS), which is a versatile data-acquisition system that gathers and records a variety of measurement data before and during the launch of a space shuttle. In the present version of the GMS system, signal conditioning amplifiers digitize and transmit data to a VME chassis that multiplexes up to 416 channels. The data is transmitted via a high-speed data bus to a second VME chassis where it is available for snapshots. The data is passed from the second VME chassis to a high-speed data recorder. This process is duplicated for installations at two launch pads and the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). Since any failure of equipment in the data path results in loss of data, much of the system is redundant. The architecture of the existing GMS limits expansion or any modification to the system to meet changing requirements because of the cost and time required. A SCAmpR-based system is much more flexible. The basis of the simplification, flexibility, and reliability is the shifting of the recording function to the individual amplifier channels. Each SCAmpR is a self-contained single channel data acquisition system, which in its current implementation, has a data storage capacity of up to 30 minutes when operating at the fastest data sampling rates. The SCAmpR channels are self-configuring and self-calibrating. Multiple SCAmpR channels are ganged on printed circuit boards and mounted in a chassis that provides power, a network hub, and Inter-Range Instrument Group (IRIG) time signals. The SCAmpR channels share nothing except physical mounting on a circuit board. All circuitry is electrically separate for each channel. All that is necessary to complete the data acquisition system is a single master computer tied to the SCAmpR channels by standard network equipment. The size of the data acquisition system

  1. Differentiation of infectious bursal disease virus strains using real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; O'Rourke, Denise; Ignjatovic, Jagoda; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) strains is crucial for effective vaccination programs and epidemiological investigations. In this study, a combination of real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of IBDV strains/isolates. The hypervariable region of VP2 gene was amplified from several IBDV strains and subjected to HRM curve analysis. The method could readily differentiate between classical vaccines/isolates and variants. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the amplicons from each strain revealed that each melt curve profile was related to a unique DNA sequence. The real-time RT-PCR HRM curve analysis was also able to differentiate IBDV strains/isolates directly in bursal tissues from field submissions and from vaccinated commercial flocks. The differences between melting peaks generated from IBDV strains were significantly different (P<0.0001) demonstrating the high discriminatory power of this technique. The results presented in this study indicated that real-time RT-PCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid and robust technique for genotyping IBDV isolates/strains and can contribute to effective control of IBDV outbreaks.

  2. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  3. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  4. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    PubMed Central

    Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase P.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. Although these fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. Here we theoretically study force transmission in these networks. We find that collective fiber buckling in the vicinity of a local active unit results in a rectification of stress towards strongly amplified isotropic contraction. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks’ disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. Our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks and shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue. PMID:26921325

  5. Resonant isolator for maser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.; Quinn, R. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An isolator is described for use in a low noise maser amplifier, which provides low loss across a wide bandwidth and which can be constructed at moderate cost. The isolator includes a train of garnet or ferrite elements extending along the length of a microwave channel parallel to the slow wave structure, with the elements being of staggered height, so that the thin elements which are resonant to the microwaves are separated by much thicker elements. The thick garnet or ferrite elements reduce the magnetic flux passing through the thin elements to permit altering of the shape of the thin elements so as to facilitate their fabrication and to provide better isolation with reduced loss, by increasing the thickness of the thin elements and decreasing their length and width.

  6. Transverse pumped laser amplifier architecture

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Manes, Kenneth R.; Deri, Robert; Erlandson, Alvin; Caird, John; Spaeth, Mary L.

    2015-05-19

    An optical gain architecture includes a pump source and a pump aperture. The architecture also includes a gain region including a gain element operable to amplify light at a laser wavelength. The gain region is characterized by a first side intersecting an optical path, a second side opposing the first side, a third side adjacent the first and second sides, and a fourth side opposing the third side. The architecture further includes a dichroic section disposed between the pump aperture and the first side of the gain region. The dichroic section is characterized by low reflectance at a pump wavelength and high reflectance at the laser wavelength. The architecture additionally includes a first cladding section proximate to the third side of the gain region and a second cladding section proximate to the fourth side of the gain region.

  7. Transverse pumped laser amplifier architecture

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Manes, Kenneth; Deri, Robert; Erlandson, Al; Caird, John; Spaeth, Mary

    2013-07-09

    An optical gain architecture includes a pump source and a pump aperture. The architecture also includes a gain region including a gain element operable to amplify light at a laser wavelength. The gain region is characterized by a first side intersecting an optical path, a second side opposing the first side, a third side adjacent the first and second sides, and a fourth side opposing the third side. The architecture further includes a dichroic section disposed between the pump aperture and the first side of the gain region. The dichroic section is characterized by low reflectance at a pump wavelength and high reflectance at the laser wavelength. The architecture additionally includes a first cladding section proximate to the third side of the gain region and a second cladding section proximate to the fourth side of the gain region.

  8. Resonantly amplified vibronic symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliakoff, E. D.; Rathbone, G. J.; Bozek, J. D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2002-05-01

    In photoelectron spectroscopy, it is normally assumed that excitation of a single quantum of a non-totally symmetric vibrational mode is forbidden owing to symmetry constraints. Using vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy over a broad spectral range, we have shown that a previously overlooked mechanism can lead to these nominally forbidden transitions. Specifically, the photoelectron can mediate the oscillator strength for such a transition via resonantly amplified vibronic symmetry breaking, and this effect results from intrachannel rather than interchannel coupling. In our first experiments, we focused on bending excitation accompanying CO2 photoionization. Photoelectron spectroscopy on the CO_2^+(C^2Σ_g^+) state showed that the excitation of the (010) vibrational mode is mediated by a shape resonant continuum electron. The degree of vibrational excitation can be substantial, and extensions to other types of symmetry breaking are currently being investigated.

  9. Hydraulically amplified PZT mems actuator

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-11-02

    A hydraulically amplified microelectromechanical systems actuator. A piece of piezoelectric material or stacked piezo bimorph is bonded or deposited as a thin film. The piece is operatively connected to a primary membrane. A reservoir is operatively connected to the primary membrane. The reservoir contains a fluid. A membrane is operatively connected to the reservoir. In operation, energizing the piezoelectric material causing the piezoelectric material to bow. Bowing of the piezoelectric material causes movement of the primary membrane. Movement of the primary membrane results in a force in being transmitted to the liquid in the reservoir. The force in the liquid causes movement of the membrane. Movement of the membrane results in an operating actuator.

  10. Method and apparatus for stabilizing pulsed microwave amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, D.B.

    1993-01-26

    Phase and amplitude variations at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier arising from instabilities of the driving electron beam are suppressed with a feed-forward system that can stabilize pulses which are too brief for regulation by conventional feedback techniques. Such variations tend to be similar during successive pulses. The variations are detected during each pulse by comparing the amplifier output with the low power input signal to obtain phase and amplitude error signals. This enables storage of phase and amplitude correction signals which are used to make compensating changes in the low power input signal during the following amplifier output pulse which suppress the variations. In the preferred form of the invention, successive increments of the correction signals for each pulse are stored in separate channels of a multi-channel storage. Sequential readout of the increments during the next pulse provides variable control voltages to a voltage controlled phase shifter and voltage controlled amplitude modulator in the amplifier input signal path.

  11. Method and apparatus for stabilizing pulsed microwave amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Donald B.

    1993-01-01

    Phase and amplitude variations at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier arising from instabilities of the driving electron beam are suppressed with a feed-forward system that can stabilize pulses which are too brief for regulation by conventional feedback techniques. Such variations tend to be similar during successive pulses. The variations are detected during each pulse by comparing the amplifier output with the low power input signal to obtain phase and amplitude error signals. This enables storage of phase and amplitude correction signals which are used to make compensating changes in the low power input signal during the following amplifier output pulse which suppress the variations. In the preferred form of the invention, successive increments of the correction signals for each pulse are stored in separate channels of a multi-channel storage. Sequential readout of the increments during the next pulse provides variable control voltages to a voltage controlled phase shifter and voltage controlled amplitude modulator in the amplifier input signal path.

  12. The Disappearing Bell Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Dawn M.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the history of the bell curve and its application to gifted education and suggests rejection of this paradigm in favor of a focus on criteria rather than norms and a better understanding of the distribution and structure of intelligence. (Contains references.) (DB)

  13. Editorial: The Skewed Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausell, R. Barker

    1995-01-01

    This editorial provides an informal review of "The Bell Curve" (Herrnstein and Murray, 1994). The book, packaged as scientific writing, is an attack on affirmative action and on government attempts to foster egalitarianism. It is a political treatise that assumes that racial differences in intelligence are valid and genetic. (SLD)

  14. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  15. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  16. Curve Fit Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Suzanne R.; Driskell, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    Graphic tips for using the Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) are described. The methods to import an image into GSP, define a coordinate system, plot points and curve fit the function using a graphical calculator are demonstrated where the graphic features of GSP allow teachers to expand the use of the technology application beyond the classroom.

  17. Curve Fit Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Suzanne R.; Driskell, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    Graphic tips for using the Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) are described. The methods to import an image into GSP, define a coordinate system, plot points and curve fit the function using a graphical calculator are demonstrated where the graphic features of GSP allow teachers to expand the use of the technology application beyond the classroom.

  18. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  19. The Axial Curve Rotator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Walter M.

    This document contains detailed directions for constructing a device that mechanically produces the three-dimensional shape resulting from the rotation of any algebraic line or curve around either axis on the coordinate plant. The device was developed in response to student difficulty in visualizing, and thus grasping the mathematical principles…

  20. Straightening Out Learning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corlett, E. N.; Morecombe, V. J.

    1970-01-01

    The basic mathematical theory behind learning curves is explained, together with implications for clerical and industrial training, evaluation of skill development, and prediction of future performance. Brief studies of textile worker and typist training are presented to illustrate such concepts as the reduction fraction (a consistent decrease in…

  1. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  2. The energy transfer between the ports of an implemented gyrator using LM13700 operational transconductance amplifier.

    PubMed

    Tatai, Ildiko; Zaharie, Ioan

    2012-11-01

    In this paper a gyrator implementation using a LM13700 operational transconductance amplifier is analyzed. It was first verified under PSpice simulation and experimentally the antireciprocity of this gyrator, i.e., its properties. This type of gyrator can be used for controlling the energy transfer from one port to the other by modifying the bias currents of the operational transconductance amplifier.

  3. The energy transfer between the ports of an implemented gyrator using LM13700 operational transconductance amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatai, Ildiko; Zaharie, Ioan

    2012-11-01

    In this paper a gyrator implementation using a LM13700 operational transconductance amplifier is analyzed. It was first verified under PSpice simulation and experimentally the antireciprocity of this gyrator, i.e., its properties. This type of gyrator can be used for controlling the energy transfer from one port to the other by modifying the bias currents of the operational transconductance amplifier.

  4. A THEORY FOR BROADBAND VARACTOR PARAMETRIC AMPLIFIERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This thesis is concerned with the development of a general and rigorous broadbanding theory for varactor parametric amplifiers . Fundamental gain...bandwidth limitations of a varactor parametric amplifier are obtained which are independent of the equalizer. Results obtained in this theory lead to the...design and synthesis of broadband varactor parametric amplifiers . The circuit considered in this thesis is that of linear variable capacitors embedded

  5. A dc amplifier for nuclear particle measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macnee, A. B.; Masnari, N. A.

    1978-01-01

    A monolithic preamplifier-postamplifier combination has been developed for use with solid state particle detectors. The direct coupled amplifiers employ interdigitated n-channel JFET's, diodes, and diffused resistors. The circuits developed demonstrate the feasibility of matching the performance of existing discrete component designs. The fabrication procedures for the monolithic amplifier fabrication are presented and the results of measurements on a limited number of sample amplifiers are given.

  6. Class E/F switching power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor); Rutledge, David B. (Inventor); Kee, Scott David (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention discloses a new family of switching amplifier classes called class E/F amplifiers. These amplifiers are generally characterized by their use of the zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) phase correction technique to eliminate of the loss normally associated with the inherent capacitance of the switching device as utilized in class-E amplifiers, together with a load network for improved voltage and current wave-shaping by presenting class-F.sup.-1 impedances at selected overtones and class-E impedances at the remaining overtones. The present invention discloses a several topologies and specific circuit implementations for achieving such performance.

  7. Log amplifier with pole-zero compensation

    DOEpatents

    Brookshier, W.

    1985-02-08

    A logarithmic amplifier circuit provides pole-zero compensation for improved stability and response time over 6-8 decades of input signal frequency. The amplifer circuit includes a first operational amplifier with a first feedback loop which includes a second, inverting operational amplifier in a second feedstock loop. The compensated output signal is provided by the second operational amplifier with the log elements, i.e., resistors, and the compensating capacitors in each of the feedback loops having equal values so that each break point is offset by a compensating break point or zero.

  8. Retrodiction for optical attenuators, amplifiers, and detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jedrkiewicz, Ottavia; Loudon, Rodney; Jeffers, John

    2004-09-01

    The transformation that an attenuator makes on the state of an optical field is the time reverse of that of an amplifier. Thus predicting the output state for an amplifier is equivalent to retrodicting the input state of an attenuator. We explore the consequences of this equivalence for simple optical quantum communication channels. One counterintuitive consequence is that the mean number of photons sent into an amplifier as retrodicted from a measurement of the number of output photons does not include the contribution of the amplifier noi0008.

  9. Ping-pong auto-zero amplifier with glitch reduction

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Mark R.

    2008-01-22

    A ping-pong amplifier with reduced glitching is described. The ping-pong amplifier includes a nulling amplifier coupled to a switching network. The switching network is used to auto-zero a ping amplifier within a ping-pong amplifier. The nulling amplifier drives the output of a ping amplifier to a proper output voltage level during auto-zeroing of the ping amplifier. By being at a proper output voltage level, glitches associated with transitioning between a ping amplifier and a pong amplifier are reduced or eliminated.

  10. High voltage electrical amplifier having a short rise time

    DOEpatents

    Christie, David J.; Dallum, Gregory E.

    1991-01-01

    A circuit, comprising an amplifier and a transformer is disclosed that produces a high power pulse having a fast response time, and that responds to a digital control signal applied through a digital-to-analog converter. The present invention is suitable for driving a component such as an electro-optic modulator with a voltage in the kilovolt range. The circuit is stable at high frequencies and during pulse transients, and its impedance matching circuit matches the load impedance with the output impedance. The preferred embodiment comprises an input stage compatible with high-speed semiconductor components for amplifying the voltage of the input control signal, a buffer for isolating the input stage from the output stage; and a plurality of current amplifiers connected to the buffer. Each current amplifier is connected to a field effect transistor (FET), which switches a high voltage power supply to a transformer which then provides an output terminal for driving a load. The transformer comprises a plurality of transmission lines connected to the FETs and the load. The transformer changes the impedance and voltage of the output. The preferred embodiment also comprises a low voltage power supply for biasing the FETs at or near an operational voltage.

  11. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This Atlas was developed to serve engineers who are looking for fatigue data on a particular metal or alloy. Having these curves compiled in a single book will also facilitate the computerization of the involved data. It is pointed out that plans are under way to make the data in this book available in ASCII files for analysis by computer programs. S-N curves which typify effects of major variables are considered along with low-carbon steels, medium-carbon steels, alloy steels, HSLA steels, high-strength alloy steels, heat-resisting steels, stainless steels, maraging steels, cast irons, and heat-resisting alloys. Attention is also given to aluminum alloys, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, molybdenum, tin alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium, steel castings, closed-die forgings, powder metallurgy parts, composites, effects of surface treatments, and test results for component parts.

  12. Trishear for curved faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Fault-propagation folds form an important trapping element in both onshore and offshore fold-thrust belts, and as such benefit from reliable interpretation. Building an accurate geologic interpretation of such structures requires palinspastic restorations, which are made more challenging by the interplay between folding and faulting. Trishear (Erslev, 1991; Allmendinger, 1998) is a useful tool to unravel this relationship kinematically, but is limited by a restriction to planar fault geometries, or at least planar fault segments. Here, new methods are presented for trishear along continuously curved reverse faults defining a flat-ramp transition. In these methods, rotation of the hanging wall above a curved fault is coupled to translation along a horizontal detachment. Including hanging wall rotation allows for investigation of structures with progressive backlimb rotation. Application of the new algorithms are shown for two fault-propagation fold structures: the Turner Valley Anticline in Southwestern Alberta, and the Alpha Structure in the Niger Delta.

  13. Design of ultra-low power biopotential amplifiers for biosignal acquisition applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Holleman, Jeremy; Otis, Brian P

    2012-08-01

    Rapid development in miniature implantable electronics are expediting advances in neuroscience by allowing observation and control of neural activities. The first stage of an implantable biosignal recording system, a low-noise biopotential amplifier (BPA), is critical to the overall power and noise performance of the system. In order to integrate a large number of front-end amplifiers in multichannel implantable systems, the power consumption of each amplifier must be minimized. This paper introduces a closed-loop complementary-input amplifier, which has a bandwidth of 0.05 Hz to 10.5 kHz, an input-referred noise of 2.2 μ Vrms, and a power dissipation of 12 μW. As a point of comparison, a standard telescopic-cascode closed-loop amplifier with a 0.4 Hz to 8.5 kHz bandwidth, input-referred noise of 3.2 μ Vrms, and power dissipation of 12.5 μW is presented. Also for comparison, we show results from an open-loop complementary-input amplifier that exhibits an input-referred noise of 3.6 μ Vrms while consuming 800 nW of power. The two closed-loop amplifiers are fabricated in a 0.13 μ m CMOS process. The open-loop amplifier is fabricated in a 0.5 μm SOI-BiCMOS process. All three amplifiers operate with a 1 V supply.

  14. G2-degree reduction of disk Bézier curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rababah, Abedallah; Hamza, Yusuf Fatihu

    2016-06-01

    A disk Bézier curve is a Bézier curve whose control points are disks. It can be considered as a parametric curve with error tolerances. In this paper, we propose method to find G2-multi degree reduction of disk Bézier curves based on two stages. The center and the radius curves are degree reduced using G2-continuity in the first stage and minimizing the error of approximating the radius curve in the second stage. We give some examples and figures to demonstrate the efficiency of the method.

  15. LCC: Light Curves Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Light Curves Classifier uses data mining and machine learning to obtain and classify desired objects. This task can be accomplished by attributes of light curves or any time series, including shapes, histograms, or variograms, or by other available information about the inspected objects, such as color indices, temperatures, and abundances. After specifying features which describe the objects to be searched, the software trains on a given training sample, and can then be used for unsupervised clustering for visualizing the natural separation of the sample. The package can be also used for automatic tuning parameters of used methods (for example, number of hidden neurons or binning ratio). Trained classifiers can be used for filtering outputs from astronomical databases or data stored locally. The Light Curve Classifier can also be used for simple downloading of light curves and all available information of queried stars. It natively can connect to OgleII, OgleIII, ASAS, CoRoT, Kepler, Catalina and MACHO, and new connectors or descriptors can be implemented. In addition to direct usage of the package and command line UI, the program can be used through a web interface. Users can create jobs for ”training” methods on given objects, querying databases and filtering outputs by trained filters. Preimplemented descriptors, classifier and connectors can be picked by simple clicks and their parameters can be tuned by giving ranges of these values. All combinations are then calculated and the best one is used for creating the filter. Natural separation of the data can be visualized by unsupervised clustering.

  16. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  17. 500-Watt Solid-State RF Power Amplifier AM-7209( )/VRC.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-18

    Amplifier Frequency Hopping 20 ADSTRACT fContinu an revtee aide If nee eary and identify by block number) I Progress in amplifier module circuit design...Rectifiers 45 2.6.1.1.5 Output Capacitors 45 2.6.1.1.6 Snubber Networks 47 2.6.1.1.7 Regulator Loop/Control Circuits 49 2.6.1.2 Control Circuit Power...Supply 51 2.6.1.3 Loop Considerations 53 2.6.1.3.1 RF Amplifier Power Supply 53 2.6.1.3.2 Control Circuit Power Supply 62 2.6.2 EMI Filter Design 71

  18. Quantization on Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frønsdal, Christian; Kontsevich, Maxim

    2007-02-01

    Deformation quantization on varieties with singularities offers perspectives that are not found on manifolds. The Harrison component of Hochschild cohomology, vanishing on smooth manifolds, reflects information about singularities. The Harrison 2-cochains are symmetric and are interpreted in terms of abelian *-products. This paper begins a study of abelian quantization on plane curves over mathbb{C}, being algebraic varieties of the form {mathbb{C}}^2/R, where R is a polynomial in two variables; that is, abelian deformations of the coordinate algebra mathbb{C}[x,y]/(R). To understand the connection between the singularities of a variety and cohomology we determine the algebraic Hochschild (co)homology and its Barr Gerstenhaber Schack decomposition. Homology is the same for all plane curves mathbb{C}[x,y]/R, but the cohomology depends on the local algebra of the singularity of R at the origin. The Appendix, by Maxim Kontsevich, explains in modern mathematical language a way to calculate Hochschild and Harrison cohomology groups for algebras of functions on singular planar curves etc. based on Koszul resolutions.

  19. Amplifying human ability through autonomics and machine learning in IMPACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzieciuch, Iryna; Reeder, John; Gutzwiller, Robert; Gustafson, Eric; Coronado, Braulio; Martinez, Luis; Croft, Bryan; Lange, Douglas S.

    2017-05-01

    Amplifying human ability for controlling complex environments featuring autonomous units can be aided by learned models of human and system performance. In developing a command and control system that allows a small number of people to control a large number of autonomous teams, we employ an autonomics framework to manage the networks that represent mission plans and the networks that are composed of human controllers and their autonomous assistants. Machine learning allows us to build models of human and system performance useful for monitoring plans and managing human attention and task loads. Machine learning also aids in the development of tactics that human supervisors can successfully monitor through the command and control system.

  20. Noise figure of hybrid optical parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Marhic, Michel E

    2012-12-17

    Following a fiber optical parametric amplifier, used as a wavelength converter or in the phase-sensitive mode, by a phase-insensitive amplifier (PIA) can significantly reduce four-wave mixing between signals in broadband systems. We derive the quantum mechanical noise figures (NF) for these two hybrid configurations, and show that adding the PIA only leads to a moderate increase in NF.

  1. DESIGN OF A MOLECULAR AMPLIFIER GROUP.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    would be capable of field operation. The Molecular Amplifier Group consists of a traveling -wave amplifier and sufficient support equipment to provide...Ferrite disks of yttrium iron garnet are incorporated in the traveling -wave maser structure to provide sufficient reverse loss for short-circuit

  2. Amplifiers and the origin of animal signals

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Rufus A.

    2016-01-01

    In 1989, Hasson introduced the concept of an ‘amplifier’ within animal communication. This display reduces errors in the assessment of traits for which there is direct selection and renders differences in quality among animals more obvious. Amplifiers can evolve to fixation via the benefit they confer on high-quality animals. However, they also impose a cost on low-quality animals by revealing their lower quality, potentially leading these to refrain from amplifying. Hence, it was suggested that, if the level of amplification correlates with quality, direct choice for the amplifying display might emerge. Using the framework of signal detection theory, this article shows that, if the use of an amplifier is observable, direct choice for the amplifying display can indeed evolve. Consequently, low-quality animals may choose to amplify to some extent as well, even though this reveals their lower quality. In effect, the amplifier evolves to become a signal in its own right. We show that, as amplifiers can evolve without direct female choice and are likely to become correlated with male quality, selection for quality-dependent amplification provides a simple explanation for the origin of reliable signals in the absence of pre-existing preferences.

  3. A multicarrier feed-forward amplifier design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myer, Daniel P.

    1994-10-01

    Cellular base stations employ feed-forward amplifiers to maintain low levels of intermodulation distortion. The relative level of distortion depends on the characteristics of the signal (stimulus) as much as the design of the amplifier itself. Careful attention to details in both of these areas is essential for a successful feed-forward design.

  4. Method for reducing snap in magnetic amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, R. L. E.; Word, J. L.

    1968-01-01

    Method of reducing snap in magnetic amplifiers uses a degenerative feedback circuit consisting of a resistor and a separate winding on a magnetic core. The feedback circuit extends amplifier range by allowing it to be used at lower values of output current.

  5. A theoretical study of complexes formed between cations and curved aromatic systems: electrostatics does not always control cation-π interaction.

    PubMed

    Carrazana-García, Jorge A; Cabaleiro-Lago, Enrique M; Rodríguez-Otero, Jesús

    2017-04-10

    The present work studies the interaction of two extended curved π-systems (corannulene and sumanene) with various cations (sodium, potassium, ammonium, tetramethylammonium, guanidinium and imidazolium). Polyatomic cations are models of groups found in important biomolecules in which cation-π interaction plays a fundamental role. The results indicate an important size effect: with extended π systems and cations of the size of potassium and larger, dispersion is much more important than has been generally recognized for cation-π interactions. In most of the systems studied here, the stability of the cation-π complexes is the result of a balanced combination of electrostatic, induction and dispersion contributions. None of the systems studied here owes its stability to the electrostatic interaction more than 42%. Induction dominates stabilization in complexes with sodium, and in some of the potassium and ammonium complexes. In complexes with large cations and with flat cations dispersion is the major stabilizing contribution and can provide more than 50% of the stabilization energy. This implies that theoretical studies of the cation-π interaction involving large or even medium-size fragments require a level of calculation capable of properly modelling dispersion. The separation between the cation and the π system is another important factor to take into account, especially when the fragments of the cation-π complex are bound (for example, to a protein backbone) and cannot interact at the most favourable distance.

  6. A revealed preference approach to estimating supply curves for ecosystem services: use of auctions to set payments for soil erosion control in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Jack, B Kelsey; Leimona, Beria; Ferraro, Paul J

    2009-04-01

    To supply ecosystem services, private landholders incur costs. Knowledge of these costs is critical for the design of conservation-payment programs. Estimating these costs accurately is difficult because the minimum acceptable payment to a potential supplier is private information. We describe how an auction of payment contracts can be designed to elicit this information during the design phase of a conservation-payment program. With an estimate of the ecosystem-service supply curve from a pilot auction, conservation planners can explore the financial, ecological, and socioeconomic consequences of alternative scaled-up programs. We demonstrate the potential of our approach in Indonesia, where soil erosion on coffee farms generates downstream ecological and economic costs. Bid data from a small-scale, uniform-price auction for soil-conservation contracts allowed estimates of the costs of a scaled-up program, the gain from integrating biophysical and economic data to target contracts, and the trade-offs between poverty alleviation and supply of ecosystem services. Our study illustrates an auction-based approach to revealing private information about the costs of supplying ecosystem services. Such information can improve the design of programs devised to protect and enhance ecosystem services.

  7. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. While fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. I will present a comprehensive theoretical study of force transmission in these networks. I will show that the linear, small-force response of the networks is remarkably simple, as the macroscopic active stress depends only on the geometry of the force-exerting unit. In contrast, as non-linear buckling occurs around these units, local active forces are rectified towards isotropic contraction and strongly amplified. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. I will show that our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks, and that they shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue.

  8. Ultrafast disk lasers and amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Dirk H.; Kleinbauer, Jochen; Bauer, Dominik; Wolf, Martin; Tan, Chuong; Gebs, Raphael; Budnicki, Aleksander; Wagenblast, Philipp; Weiler, Sascha

    2012-03-01

    Disk lasers with multi-kW continuous wave (CW) output power are widely used in manufacturing, primarily for cutting and welding applications, notably in the automotive industry. The ytterbium disk technology combines high power (average and/or peak power), excellent beam quality, high efficiency, and high reliability with low investment and operating costs. Fundamental mode picosecond disk lasers are well established in micro machining at high throughput and perfect precision. Following the world's first market introduction of industrial grade 50 W picosecond lasers (TruMicro 5050) at the Photonics West 2008, the second generation of the TruMicro series 5000 now provides twice the average power (100 W at 1030 nm, or 60 W frequency doubled, green output) at a significantly reduced footprint. Mode-locked disk oscillators achieve by far the highest average power of any unamplified lasers, significantly exceeding the 100 W level in laboratory set-ups. With robust long resonators their multi-microjoule pulse energies begin to compete with typical ultrafast amplifiers. In addition, significant interest in disk technology has recently come from the extreme light laser community, aiming for ultra-high peak powers of petawatts and beyond.

  9. Post pulse shutter for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, Laird P. [Livermore, CA; Carder, Bruce M. [Antioch, CA; Gagnon, William L. [Berkeley, CA

    1981-03-17

    Apparatus and method for quickly closing off the return path for an amplified laser pulse at the output of an amplifier so as to prevent damage to amplifiers and other optical components appearing earlier in the chain by the return of an amplified pulse. The apparatus consists of a fast retropulse or post pulse shutter to suppress target reflection and/or beam return. This is accomplished by either quickly placing a solid across the light transmitting aperture of a component in the chain, such as a spatial filter pinhole, or generating and directing a plasma with sufficiently high density across the aperture, so as to, in effect, close the aperture to the returning amplified energy pulse.

  10. Post pulse shutter for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, L.P.; Carder, B.M.; Gagnon, W.L.

    1981-03-17

    Disclosed are an apparatus and method for quickly closing off the return path for an amplified laser pulse at the output of an amplifier so as to prevent damage to amplifiers and other optical components appearing earlier in the chain by the return of an amplified pulse. The apparatus consists of a fast retropulse or post pulse shutter to suppress target reflection and/or beam return. This is accomplished by either quickly placing a solid across the light transmitting aperture of a component in the chain, such as a spatial filter pinhole, or generating and directing a plasma with sufficiently high density across the aperture, so as to, in effect, close the aperture to the returning amplified energy pulse. 13 figs.

  11. Dual-range linearized transimpedance amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2010-11-02

    A transimpedance amplifier system is disclosed which simultaneously generates a low-gain output signal and a high-gain output signal from an input current signal using a single transimpedance amplifier having two different feedback loops with different amplification factors to generate two different output voltage signals. One of the feedback loops includes a resistor, and the other feedback loop includes another resistor in series with one or more diodes. The transimpedance amplifier system includes a signal linearizer to linearize one or both of the low- and high-gain output signals by scaling and adding the two output voltage signals from the transimpedance amplifier. The signal linearizer can be formed either as an analog device using one or two summing amplifiers, or alternately can be formed as a digital device using two analog-to-digital converters and a digital signal processor (e.g. a microprocessor or a computer).

  12. Bandwidth tunable amplifier for recording biopotential signals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sungkil; Aninakwa, Kofi; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a low noise, low power, bandwidth tunable amplifier for bio-potential signal recording applications. By employing depletion-mode pMOS transistor in diode configuration as a tunable sub pA current source to adjust the resistivity of MOS-Bipolar pseudo-resistor, the bandwidth is adjusted without any need for a separate band-pass filter stage. For high CMRR, PSRR and dynamic range, a fully differential structure is used in the design of the amplifier. The amplifier achieves a midband gain of 39.8dB with a tunable high-pass cutoff frequency ranging from 0.1Hz to 300Hz. The amplifier is fabricated in 0.18εm CMOS process and occupies 0.14mm(2) of chip area. A three electrode ECG measurement is performed using the proposed amplifier to show its feasibility for low power, compact wearable ECG monitoring application.

  13. Calculations of superconducting parametric amplifiers performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, T.; Takeda, M.; Saito, S.; Shimakage, H.

    2017-07-01

    A superconducting parametric amplifier is an electromagnetic wave amplifier with high-quality characteristics such as a wide bandwidth, an extremely low noise, and a high dynamic range. In this paper, we report on the estimations of a YBCO superconducting parametric amplifier characteristic. The YBCO thin films were deposited on an MgO substrate by a pulsed laser deposition method. Based on the measured YBCO thin film parameters, theoretical calculations were implemented for evaluations of kinetic inductance nonlinearities and parametric gains. The nonlinearity of the YBCO thin film was estimated to be stronger than a single crystal NbTiN thin film. It is indicated that the YBCO parametric amplifier has a potential to be realized the amplifier with the high parametric gain. It is also expected that it could be operated in the range of the high frequency band, at the high temperature, and low applied current.

  14. Design and performance of the beamlet amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Erlandson, A.C.; Rotter, M.D.; Frank, M.D.; McCracken, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    In future laser systems, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), multi-segment amplifiers (MSAs) will be used to amplify the laser beam to the required levels. As a prototype of such a laser architecture, the authors have designed, built, and tested flash-lamp-pumped, Nd:Glass, Brewster-angle slab MSAs for the Beamlet project. In this article, they review the fundamentals of Nd:Glass amplifiers, describe the MSA geometry, discuss parameters that are important in amplifier design, and present our results on the characterization of the Beamlet MSAs. In particular, gain and beam steering measurements show that the Beamlet amplifiers meet all optical performance specifications and perform close to model predictions.

  15. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    During this period the parametric studies of the iodine laser oscillator pumped by a Vortek simulator were carried out before amplifier studies. The amplifier studies are postponed to the extended period after completing the parametric studies. In addition, the kinetic modeling of a solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier, and the experimental work for a solar pumped dye laser amplifier are in progress. This report contains three parts: (1) a 10 W CW iodine laser pumped by a Vortek solar simulator; (2) kinetic modeling to predict the time to lasing threshold, lasing time, and energy output of solar-pumped iodine laser; and (3) the study of the dye laser amplifier pumped by a Tamarack solar simulator.

  16. Detection of Ehrlichia canis in canine blood samples by real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) PCR and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Kongklieng, Amornmas; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Intapan, Pewpan M; Boonmars, Thidarut; Janwan, Penchom; Sanpool, Oranuch; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Morakote, Nimit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-09-01

    Ehrlichia canis is a small pleomorphic gram-negative, coccoid, obligatory intracellular bacterium and the cause of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. A real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer polymerase chain reaction (real-time FRET PCR) coupled with melting curve analysis was established for detection of E. canis infection in canine blood samples. The VirB9 gene was amplified using one pair of primers and the melting curve analysis was generated by heating the hybridizing probes and amplified products. Eight E. canis-infected dog blood samples were initially identified using the Giemsa staining/microscopic method followed by conventional PCR (cPCR)/Sanger sequencing for confirmation. The sensitivity and specificity of the real-time FRET PCR detection were 87.5% and 100%, respectively and the limit of detection was 6.6 x 10(3) copies of positive E. canis control plasmids. The real-time FRET PCR with melting curve analysis reported here is better than microscopic visualization or cPCR because the method is not affected by the false bias inherent in the microscopic method. Furthermore, many samples can be processed rapidly at the same time. This convenient tool is beneficial as an alternative assay for the epidemiologic study of canine ehrlichiosis as well as for eradication of these organisms in prevention and control programs in endemic areas.

  17. Semiconductor laser amplifier and its optoelectronic properties for application in lightwave communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luc, V. V.; Eliseev, Petr G.; Man'ko, M. A.; Tsotsoriya, M. V.

    1992-12-01

    Output power and fiber-to-fiber gain along with infernal gain of the active element and optoelectronic signal curves at different values of input power versus pumping current are measured for the amplifier modules on the base of AR-coated InGaAsP/InP BH diodes. It is shown that diagnostics of the amplifier module oper''ation regime may be performed by voltage measurements and the optoelectronic signal can be used to monitor optical information passage in the regenerator device or for the distributed access the data transmitted in the lightwave comrnunicat ion systems. I.

  18. Curved PVDF airborne transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Toda, M

    1999-01-01

    In the application of airborne ultrasonic ranging measurement, a partially cylindrical (curved) PVDF transducer can effectively couple ultrasound into the air and generate strong sound pressure. Because of its geometrical features, the ultrasound beam angles of a curved PVDF transducer can be unsymmetrical (i.e., broad horizontally and narrow vertically). This feature is desired in some applications. In this work, a curved PVDF air transducer is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Two resonances were observed in this transducer. They are length extensional mode and flexural bending mode. Surface vibration profiles of these two modes were measured by a laser vibrometer. It was found from the experiment that the surface vibration was not uniform along the curvature direction for both vibration modes. Theoretical calculations based on a model developed in this work confirmed the experimental results. Two displacement peaks were found in the piezoelectric active direction of PVDF film for the length extensional mode; three peaks were found for the flexural bending mode. The observed peak positions were in good agreement with the calculation results. Transient surface displacement measurements revealed that vibration peaks were in phase for the length extensional mode and out of phase for the flexural bending mode. Therefore, the length extensional mode can generate a stronger ultrasound wave than the flexural bending mode. The resonance frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the two modes strongly depend on the structure parameters as well as the material properties. For the transducer design, the theoretical model developed in this work can be used to optimize the ultrasound performance.

  19. Magnetism in curved geometries

    DOE PAGES

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; ...

    2016-08-17

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. Asmore » a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.« less

  20. Magnetism in curved geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-08-17

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  1. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  2. Rotation Curves of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnajs, Agris J.

    One can obtain a fairly good understanding of the relation between axially symmetric mass distributions and the rotation curves they produce without resorting to calculations. However it does require a break with tradition. The first step consists of replacing quantities such as surface density, volume density, and circular velocity with the mass in a ring, mass in a spherical shell, and the square of the circular velocity, or more precisely with 2 pi G r mu(r), 4 pi G r^2 rho(r), and Vc^2 (r). These three quantities all have the same dimensions, and are related to each other by scale-free linear operators. The second step consists of introducing ln(r) as the coordinate. On the log scale the scale-free operators becomes the more familiar convolution operations. Convolutions are easily handled by Fourier techniques and a surface density can be converted into a rotation curve or volume density in a small fraction of a second. A simple plot of 2 pi G r mu(r) as a function of ln(r) reveals the relative contributions of different radii to Vc^2(r). Such a plot also constitutes a sanity test for the fitting of various laws to photometric data. There are numerous examples in the literature of excellent fits to the tails that lack data or are poor fits around the maximum of 2 pi G r mu(r). I will discuss some exact relations between the above three quantities as well as some empirical observations such as the near equality of the maxima of 2 pi G r mu(r) and Vc^2 (r) curves for flat mass distributions.

  3. Complementary Curves of Descent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-16

    provision of law , no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid...curves of descent 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Naval Academy,Physics Department,Annapolis,MD,21402-1363 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  4. The spectacular human nose: an amplifier of individual quality?

    PubMed Central

    Mikalsen, Åse Kristine Rognmo; Yoccoz, Nigel Gilles; Laeng, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Amplifiers are signals that improve the perception of underlying differences in quality. They are cost free and advantageous to high quality individuals, but disadvantageous to low quality individuals, as poor quality is easier perceived because of the amplifier. For an amplifier to evolve, the average fitness benefit to the high quality individuals should be higher than the average cost for the low quality individuals. The human nose is, compared to the nose of most other primates, extraordinary large, fragile and easily broken—especially in male–male interactions. May it have evolved as an amplifier among high quality individuals, allowing easy assessment of individual quality and influencing the perception of attractiveness? We tested the latter by manipulating the position of the nose tip or, as a control, the mouth in facial pictures and had the pictures rated for attractiveness. Our results show that facial attractiveness failed to be influenced by mouth manipulations. Yet, facial attractiveness increased when the nose tip was artificially centered according to other facial features. Conversely, attractiveness decreased when the nose tip was displaced away from its central position. Our results suggest that our evaluation of attractiveness is clearly sensitive to the centering of the nose tip, possibly because it affects our perception of the face’s symmetry and/or averageness. However, whether such centering is related to individual quality remains unclear. PMID:24765588

  5. High-power fiber laser/amplifier: present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzur, Tariq; Bastien, Steven P.

    2000-03-01

    As a result of the overwhelming demand for bandwidth, the number of channels offered in commercially available DWDM systems has climbed from 8 to 160 in just a few short years. With the growth in channel counts comes increasing demands placed upon optical amplifiers for the long haul market. High powers, flatter gain profiles, extended bandwidths (both C- and L-band), dispersion compensation, longer distances and greater control at the optical level are all capabilities that future networks will require. Today's optical amplifiers must be capable of supporting these services in advance of their installation to prepare networks for these foreseeable demands. Optigain's expertise and focus on optical amplifiers for the telecommunications industry has enabled it to achieve a technology leadership position in the field of optical amplification. Optigain's leadership position in the development of high power amplifiers based upon fiber laser technology will permit the Company to obtain favorable pricing and to gain significant market share in high growth markets. Figures 1 and 2 show the EDFA future global market shares.

  6. Piecewise power laws in individual learning curves.

    PubMed

    Donner, Yoni; Hardy, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    The notion that human learning follows a smooth power law (PL) of diminishing gains is well-established in psychology. This characteristic is observed when multiple curves are averaged, potentially masking more complex dynamics underpinning the curves of individual learners. Here, we analyzed 25,280 individual learning curves, each comprising 500 measurements of cognitive performance taken from four cognitive tasks. A piecewise PL (PPL) model explained the individual learning curves significantly better than a single PL, controlling for model complexity. The PPL model allows for multiple PLs connected at different points in the learning process. We also explored the transition dynamics between PL curve component pieces. Performance in later pieces typically surpassed that in earlier pieces, after a brief drop in performance at the transition point. The transition rate was negatively associated with age, even after controlling for overall performance. Our results suggest at least two processes at work in individual learning curves: locally, a gradual, smooth improvement, with diminishing gains within a specific strategy, which is modeled well as a PL; and globally, a discrete sequence of strategy shifts, in which each strategy is better in the long term than the ones preceding it. The piecewise extension of the classic PL of practice has implications for both individual skill acquisition and theories of learning.

  7. Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

  8. Transforming Curves into Curves with the Same Shape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Michael V.

    Curves are considered to have the same shape when they are related by a similarity transformation of a certain kind. This paper extends earlier work on parallel curves to curves with the same shape. Some examples are given more or less explicitly. A generalization is used to show that the theory is ordinal and to show how the theory may be applied…

  9. Quasi-optical constrained lens amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenberg, Jon S.

    1995-09-01

    A major goal in the field of quasi-optics is to increase the power available from solid state sources by combining the power of individual devices in free space, as demonstrated with grid oscillators and grid amplifiers. Grid amplifiers and most amplifier arrays require a plane wave feed, provided by a far field source or at the beam waist of a dielectric lens pair. These feed approaches add considerable loss and size, which is usually greater than the quasi-optical amplifier gain. In addition, grid amplifiers require external polarizers for stability, further increasing size and complexity. This thesis describes using constrained lens theory in the design of quasi optical amplifier arrays with a focal point feed, improving the power coupling between the feed and the amplifier for increased gain. Feed and aperture arrays of elements, input/output isolation and stability, amplifier circuitry, delay lines and bias distribution are all contained on a single planar substrate, making monolithic circuit integration possible. Measured results of X band transmission lenses and a low noise receive lens are presented, including absolute power gain up to 13 dB, noise figure as low as 1.7 dB, beam scanning to +/-30 deg, beam forming and beam switching of multiple sources, and multiple level quasi-optical power combining. The design and performance of millimeter wave power combining amplifier arrays is described, including a Ka Band hybrid array with 1 watt output power, and a V Band 36 element monolithic array with a 5 dB on/off ratio.

  10. A Low-Noise Semiconductor Optical Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ratowsky, R.P.; Dijaili, S.; Kallman, J.S.; Feit, M.D.; Walker, J.

    1999-03-23

    Optical amplifiers are essential devices for optical networks, optical systems, and computer communications. These amplifiers compensate for the inevitable optical loss in long-distance propagation (>50 km) or splitting (>10x). Fiber amplifiers such as the erbium-doped fiber amplifier have revolutionized the fiber-optics industry and are enjoying widespread use. Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are an alternative technology that complements the fiber amplifiers in cost and performance. One obstacle to the widespread use of SOAs is the severity of the inevitable noise output resulting from amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). Spectral filtering is often used to reduce ASE noise, but this constrains the source spectrally, and improvement is typically limited to about 10 dB. The extra components also add cost and complexity to the final assembly. The goal of this project was to analyze, design, and take significant steps toward the realization of an innovative, low-noise SOA based on the concept of ''distributed spatial filtering'' (DSF). In DSF, we alternate active SOA segments with passive free-space diffraction regions. Since spontaneous emission radiates equally in all directions, the free-space region lengthens the amplifier for a given length of gain region, narrowing the solid angle into which the spontaneous emission is amplified [1,2]. Our innovation is to use spatial filtering in a differential manner across many segments, thereby enhancing the effect when wave-optical effects are included [3]. The structure quickly and effectively strips the ASE into the higher-order modes, quenching the ASE gain relative to the signal.

  11. Phase noise in RF and microwave amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Rubiola, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    Understanding amplifier phase noise is a critical issue in many fields of engineering and physics, such as oscillators, frequency synthesis, telecommunication, radar, and spectroscopy; in the emerging domain of microwave photonics; and in exotic fields, such as radio astronomy, particle accelerators, etc. Focusing on the two main types of base noise in amplifiers, white and flicker, the power spectral density of the random phase φ(t) is Sφ(f) = b(0) + b(-1)/f. White phase noise results from adding white noise to the RF spectrum in the carrier region. For a given RF noise level, b(0) is proportional to the reciprocal of the carrier power P(0). By contrast, flicker results from a near-dc 1/f noise-present in all electronic devices-which modulates the carrier through some parametric effect in the semiconductor. Thus, b(-1) is a parameter of the amplifier, constant in a wide range of P(0). The consequences are the following: Connecting m equal amplifiers in parallel, b(-1) is 1/m times that of one device. Cascading m equal amplifiers, b(-1) is m times that of one amplifier. Recirculating the signal in an amplifier so that the gain increases by a power of m (a factor of m in decibels) as a result of positive feedback (regeneration), we find that b(-1) is m(2) times that of the amplifier alone. The feedforward amplifier exhibits extremely low b(-1) because the carrier is ideally nulled at the input of its internal error amplifier. Starting with an extensive review of the literature, this article introduces a system-oriented model which describes the phase flickering. Several amplifier architectures (cascaded, parallel, etc.) are analyzed systematically, deriving the phase noise from the general model. There follow numerous measurements of amplifiers using different technologies, including some old samples, and in a wide frequency range (HF to microwaves), which validate the theory. In turn, theory and results provide design guidelines and give suggestions for CAD and

  12. Diode amplifier of modulated optical beam power

    SciTech Connect

    D'yachkov, N V; Bogatov, A P; Gushchik, T I; Drakin, A E

    2014-11-30

    Analytical relations are obtained between characteristics of modulated light at the output and input of an optical diode power amplifier operating in the highly saturated gain regime. It is shown that a diode amplifier may act as an amplitude-to-phase modulation converter with a rather large bandwidth (∼10 GHz). The low sensitivity of the output power of the amplifier to the input beam power and its high energy efficiency allow it to be used as a building block of a high-power multielement laser system with coherent summation of a large number of optical beams. (lasers)

  13. Self-Amplified Optical Pattern Recognizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1993-01-01

    Self-amplified optical pattern recognizers developed for use in recognition of patterns, in optical computing, and in optoelectronic neural networks. In recognizer, photorefractive crystal serves as medium in which one holographically records diffraction-grating filter representing pattern with which recognition sought. Apparatus "self-amplified" because signal amplified within filter to many orders of magnitude greater than in prior optical pattern recognizers. Basic principle of operation applicable to many types of correlation filters, including (but not limited to) Vander Lugt matched filters, joint-transform filters, and phase-only filters.

  14. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert

    2004-01-01

    This paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  15. Achieving and maintaining cleanliness in NIF amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A. K.; Horvath, J. A.; Letts, S. A.; Menapace, J. A.; Stowers, I. F.

    1998-07-28

    Cleanliness measurements made on AMPLAB prototype National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser amplifiers during assembly, cassette transfer, and amplifier operation are summarized. These measurements include particle counts from surface cleanliness assessments using filter swipe techniques and from airborne particle monitoring. Results are compared with similar measurements made on the Beamlet and Nova lasers and in flashlamp test fixtures. Observations of Class 100,000 aerosols after flashlamp firings are discussed. Comparisons are made between typical damage densities on laser amplifier optics from Novette, NOVA, Beamlet, and AMPLAB.

  16. The 60 GHz solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclymonds, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new amplifier architecture was developed during this contract that is superior to any other solid state approach. The amplifier produced 6 watts with 4 percent efficiency over a 2 GHz band at 61.5 GHz. The unit was 7 x 9 x 3 inches in size, 5.5 pounds in weight, and the conduction cooling through the baseplate is suitable for use in space. The amplifier used high efficiency GaAs IMPATT diodes which were mounted in 1-diode circuits, called modules. Eighteen modules were used in the design, and power combining was accomplished with a proprietary passive component called a combiner plate.

  17. The history, present status and future trends of high power microwave amplifiers for satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuken, R. E.

    During the early days of commercial satellite communications (satcom) service in the mid-1960s, high power amplifier (HPAs) designs were modifications of high power troposcatter amplifiers. However, the very broad band requirements of satcom service, as compared to troposcatter amplifiers, required the development of broadband klystrons. These requirements led to the development of traveling-wave tubes which were capable of amplifying carriers over the entire 500 MHz allocated bandwidth. In the early 1970s it was found that power levels for HPAs could be reduced considerably in most types of service. The decade from the early 1970s to today has been one of substantial maturation of the HPA industry. Attention is given to a typical HPA design, aspects of intermodulaton distortion, controls monitoring and protection, power supplies, electromechanical regulation, vacuum tube regulation, magnetic amplifier regulation, cost, and future trends.

  18. Triple-mode single-transistor graphene amplifier and its applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuebei; Liu, Guanxiong; Balandin, Alexander A; Mohanram, Kartik

    2010-10-26

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a triple-mode single-transistor graphene amplifier utilizing a three-terminal back-gated single-layer graphene transistor. The ambipolar nature of electronic transport in graphene transistors leads to increased amplifier functionality as compared to amplifiers built with unipolar semiconductor devices. The ambipolar graphene transistors can be configured as n-type, p-type, or hybrid-type by changing the gate bias. As a result, the single-transistor graphene amplifier can operate in the common-source, common-drain, or frequency multiplication mode, respectively. This in-field controllability of the single-transistor graphene amplifier can be used to realize the modulation necessary for phase shift keying and frequency shift keying, which are widely used in wireless applications. It also offers new opportunities for designing analog circuits with simpler structure and higher integration densities for communications applications.

  19. The Characteristic Curves of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumaier, Arnold; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2016-09-01

    In 1960, E. H. Brown defined a set of characteristic curves (also known as ideal curves) of pure fluids, along which some thermodynamic properties match those of an ideal gas. These curves are used for testing the extrapolation behaviour of equations of state. This work is revisited, and an elegant representation of the first-order characteristic curves as level curves of a master function is proposed. It is shown that Brown's postulate—that these curves are unique and dome-shaped in a double-logarithmic p, T representation—may fail for fluids exhibiting a density anomaly. A careful study of the Amagat curve (Joule inversion curve) generated from the IAPWS-95 reference equation of state for water reveals the existence of an additional branch.

  20. Shaped curve by blending two circular arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Wan Zafira Ezza Wan; Ali, Jamaludin Md

    2014-07-01

    Segments of two given circular arcs can be blended to produce a segment of a new curve. The new curve that been produced which also known as blending curve is form in a C-shape. That's mean the two circular arcs are blend at the same endpoints. Bezier Curve refer to [1] is the main application in this construction of blending curve. As the two circular arcs are create using the Rational Bezier Curve for the shape refer to [2]. First degree of Bezier Curve is use in blending function along with functionH(t). Blending can provide a smooth transition from one curve to another and can give various degrees of smoothness at the endpoints of the blend, where the smoothness is measured analogously to parametric continuity, Cn and geometric continuity, Gn. The accuracy of the approximation to a best blending curve obtained by different blending formulas is compared via analysis. Two types of blending formula introduced, which are Blend A and B. Blend A which involve only parametric continuity, C0, C1 and C2 Blend A. Next, new blending formula known as Blend B which actually a correction to the C0 Blend A. So, some correction term are added to the blending function in C0 Blend A for obtaining parametric continuity, C1 and C2 Blend B. Then, geometric continuity use for Blend B by increasing the smoothness of blending curve that result in parametric continuity. Some free parameter are added to the original blending function of C1 and C2 Blend B and secure to be G1 and G2 Blend B. Finally, the curvature which measures how quickly a tangent line turns on a curve is applied. So, appropriate result of blending curve can be obtained through the observation of the shape which lies within the convex hull of their control points and its curvature value at the start and end points equal to the curvature of the two circular arcs that are being blended.

  1. Ku-band high efficiency GaAs MMIC power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tserng, H. Q.; Witkowski, L. C.; Wurtele, M.; Saunier, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The development of Ku-band high efficiency GaAs MMIC power amplifiers is examined. Three amplifier modules operating over the 13 to 15 GHz frequency range are to be developed. The first MMIC is a 1 W variable power amplifier (VPA) with 35 percent efficiency. On-chip digital gain control is to be provided. The second MMIC is a medium power amplifier (MPA) with an output power goal of 1 W and 40 percent power-added efficiency. The third MMIC is a high power amplifier (HPA) with 4 W output power goal and 40 percent power-added efficiency. An output power of 0.36 W/mm with 49 percent efficiency was obtained on an ion implanted single gate MESFET at 15 GHz. On a dual gate MESFET, an output power of 0.42 W/mm with 27 percent efficiency was obtained. A mask set was designed that includes single stage, two stage, and three stage single gate amplifiers. A single stage 600 micron amplifier produced 0.4 W/mm output power with 40 percent efficiency at 14 GHz. A four stage dual gate amplifier generated 500 mW of output power with 20 dB gain at 17 GHz. A four-bit digital-to-analog converter was designed and fabricated which has an output swing of -3 V to +/- 1 V.

  2. Preliminary Investigation of Curved Liner Sample in the NASA LaRC Curved Duct Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Jones, Michael G.; Brown, Martha C.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the preliminary investigation of the curved liner sample in the NASA LaRC Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR). It reviews the purpose of the Curved Duct Test Rig. Its purpose is to develop capability to investigate acoustic and aerodynamic properties in ducts. It has several features to accomplish that purpose: (1) Large scale (2) Flow rate to M = 0.275 (3) Higher order mode control (4) Curved flow path (5) Adaptable test section (6) Flexible test configurations. The liner has minimal effect on turbulence or boundary layer growth in duct. The curved duct sample attenuation is affected by mode scattering. In conclusion, the CDTR is valid tool for aerodynamic and acoustic evaluation of duct treatment

  3. First pulse effect self-suppression picosecond regenerative amplifier (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haitao; Chang, Liang; Zhang, Yi; Yao, Siyi; Lu, Wei; Yang, Xiaohong

    2017-03-01

    First pulse effect, commonly seen in nanosecond cavity-dumped lasers and picosecond regenerative amplifiers, not only leads to degradation of processing quality, but also acts as potential threat to optical switching elements. Several methods have been developed to suppress that effect, including electronic controls, polarization controls, and diffraction controls. We present a new way for first pulse self-suppression without any additional components. By carefully arranging the cavity mirror of a regenerative amplifier, we realized `parasitic lasing like' radiation. When the regenerative amplifier works in `operation ready' status, the parasitic lasing occurs and prevents the gain crystal from saturation. When the regenerative amplifier starts working and amplifying pulses, the first pulse in a pulse train will not get much more gain and energy than pulses following it. As parasitic lasing disappears at the same time, the average output power of the amplifier does not significantly reduce. This cost effective method does not require any additional component. In addition, as it is not polarization dependent, this method is widely suitable for different kinds of regenerative amplifiers. It's the easiest and cheapest way to suppress first pulse effect, to the best of our knowledge.

  4. All-fiber phase actuator based on an erbium-doped fiber amplifier for coherent beam combining at 1064 nm.

    PubMed

    Tünnermann, Henrik; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar; Wessels, Peter

    2011-02-15

    Active phase control in fiber amplifiers is of considerable interest for low-noise single-frequency amplifiers and for coherent beam combining. We demonstrate phase control at 1064 nm by use of an erbium-doped fiber. We investigated the phase shift by guiding the beam through an erbium-doped fiber amplifier in a Mach-Zehnder configuration and applied the results to stabilize the relative phase of two ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of an all-fiber coherent beam combining at 1064 nm employing an erbium-doped fiber as a phase actuator.

  5. Multipulse phase resetting curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Giri P.; Bazhenov, Maxim; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce and study systematically, in terms of phase response curves, the effect of dual-pulse excitation on the dynamics of an autonomous oscillator. Specifically, we test the deviations from linear summation of phase advances resulting from two small perturbations. We analytically derive a correction term, which generally appears for oscillators whose intrinsic dimensionality is >1. The nonlinear correction term is found to be proportional to the square of the perturbation. We demonstrate this effect in the Stuart-Landau model and in various higher dimensional neuronal models. This deviation from the superposition principle needs to be taken into account in studies of networks of pulse-coupled oscillators. Further, this deviation could be used in the verification of oscillator models via a dual-pulse excitation.

  6. Quantum relative Lorenz curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscemi, Francesco; Gour, Gilad

    2017-01-01

    The theory of majorization and its variants, including thermomajorization, have been found to play a central role in the formulation of many physical resource theories, ranging from entanglement theory to quantum thermodynamics. Here we formulate the framework of quantum relative Lorenz curves, and show how it is able to unify majorization, thermomajorization, and their noncommutative analogs. In doing so, we define the family of Hilbert α divergences and show how it relates with other divergences used in quantum information theory. We then apply these tools to the problem of deciding the existence of a suitable transformation from an initial pair of quantum states to a final one, focusing in particular on applications to the resource theory of athermality, a precursor of quantum thermodynamics.

  7. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  8. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  9. Generating Entangled State with Parametric Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian

    2017-04-01

    We present a scheme for generating entangled state with parametric amplifier with different initial states. Its shown that the entangled state is always generated except some special cases by adjusting the coupling strength and the total number of photons.

  10. Operational Amplifier Experiments for the Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    Provides details of experiments that deal with the use of operational amplifiers and are part of a course in instrumental analysis. These experiments are performed after the completion of a set of electricity and electronics experiments. (DDR)

  11. Noise in phase-preserving linear amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Shashank; Jiang, Zhang; Combes, Joshua; Caves, Carlton M.

    2014-12-04

    The purpose of a phase-preserving linear amplifier is to make a small signal larger, so that it can be perceived by instruments incapable of resolving the original signal, while sacrificing as little as possible in signal-to-noise. Quantum mechanics limits how well this can be done: the noise added by the amplifier, referred to the input, must be at least half a quantum at the operating frequency. This well-known quantum limit only constrains the second moments of the added noise. Here we provide the quantum constraints on the entire distribution of added noise: any phasepreserving linear amplifier is equivalent to a parametric amplifier with a physical state σ for the ancillary mode; σ determines the properties of the added noise.

  12. Cryogenic Amplifier Based Receivers at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Reck, Theodore and; Schlecht, Erich; Lin, Robert; Deal, William

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based amplifiers has moved well in the submillimeter-wave frequencies over the last couple of years. Working amplifiers with usable gain in waveguide packages has been reported beyond 700 GHz. When cooled cryogenically, they have shown substantial improvement in their noise temperature. This has opened up the real possibility of cryogenic amplifier based heterodyne receivers at submillimeter wavelengths for ground-based, air-borne, and space-based instruments for astrophysics, planetary, and Earth science applications. This paper provides an overview of the science applications at submillimeter wavelengths that will benefit from this technology. It also describes the current state of the InP HEMT based cryogenic amplifier receivers at submillimeter wavelengths.

  13. High bandwidth differential amplifier for shock experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P. W.; Tran, V.; Chau, R.

    2012-10-01

    We developed a high bandwidth differential amplifier for gas gun shock experiments of low-resistance metals. The circuit has a bandwidth up to 1 GHz, and is capable of measuring signals of ≤1.5 V with a common mode rejection of 250 V. Conductivity measurements of gas gun targets are measured by flowing high currents through the targets. The voltage is measured across the target using a technique similar to a four-point probe. Because of the design of the current source and load, the target voltage is ˜250 V relative to ground. Since the expected voltage change in the target is <1 V, the differential amplifier must have a large common mode rejection. Various amplifying designs are shown, although the increased amplification decreases bandwidth. Bench tests show that the amplifier can withstand significant common mode dc voltage and measure 10 ns, and 50 mV signals.

  14. How to characterize the nonlinear amplifier?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallistratova, Dmitri Kouznetsov; Cotera, Carlos Flores

    1994-01-01

    The conception of the amplification of the coherent field is formulated. The definition of the coefficient of the amplification as the relation between the mean value of the field at the output to the value at the input and the definition of the noise as the difference between the number of photons in the output mode and square of the modulus of the mean value of the output amplitude are considered. Using a simple example it is shown that by these definitions the noise of the nonlinear amplifier may be less than the noise of the ideal linear amplifier of the same amplification coefficient. Proposals to search another definition of basic parameters of the nonlinear amplifiers are discussed. This definition should enable us to formulate the universal fundamental lower limit of the noise which should be valid for linear quantum amplifiers as for nonlinear ones.

  15. Tester periodically registers dc amplifier characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cree, D.; Wenzel, G. E.

    1966-01-01

    Motor-driven switcher-recorder periodically registers the zero drift and gain drift signals of a dc amplifier subjected to changes in environment. A time coding method is used since several measurements are shared on a single recorder trace.

  16. Signal amplifier-shapers for multiwire detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushnin, Yu. B.; Konoplyannikov, A. K.

    Circuit diagram and specification of 8 and 16 channel modules of amplifier-shapers are described for multiwire detectors. The modules have input impedance 200 Ohm sensitivity threshold 1.5 micro-A, output pulse width 80 nsec.

  17. Ku band low noise parametric amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A low noise, K sub u-band, parametric amplifier (paramp) was developed. The unit is a spacecraft-qualifiable, prototype, parametric amplifier for eventual application in the shuttle orbiter. The amplifier was required to have a noise temperature of less than 150 K. A noise temperature of less than 120 K at a gain level of 17 db was achieved. A 3-db bandwidth in excess of 350 MHz was attained, while deviation from phase linearity of about + or - 1 degree over 50 MHz was achieved. The paramp operates within specification over an ambient temperature range of -5 C to +50 C. The performance requirements and the operation of the K sub u-band parametric amplifier system are described. The final test results are also given.

  18. Operational Amplifier Experiments for the Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    Provides details of experiments that deal with the use of operational amplifiers and are part of a course in instrumental analysis. These experiments are performed after the completion of a set of electricity and electronics experiments. (DDR)

  19. Defibrillator-embedded rapid recovery electrocardiogram amplifier.

    PubMed

    Neycheva, T; Krasteva, V

    2003-01-01

    One of the most important performances of the defibrillator-embedded amplifier-monitor-recorder tract, connected to defibrillator electrodes, is its rapid recovery after the application of the shock pulse. Practically near-immediate restoration of the signal trace is mandatory for studies of post-shock effects on the myocardium. Automatic analysis of the electrocardiogram signal in public-access defibrillation, aiming for about 100% correct recognition of shockable and non-shockable rhythms, now requires fast amplifier settling, as the decision time should not exceed 10-20 s. Two circuits of post-shock amplifier transient suppressors were developed with non-linear feedback, resulting in second-order high-pass filtering, with gradual return to normally accepted first-order response. Simulation and testing in real conditions resulted in recovery periods in the range of 1-2 s for an amplifier tract of 1-30 Hz bandwidth, depending on the pulse waveform and electrode type.

  20. Patch-clamp amplifiers on a chip.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, Pujitha; Culurciello, Eugenio; Yang, Youshan; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Kindlmann, Peter J; Sigworth, Fred J

    2010-10-15

    We present the first, fully integrated, two-channel implementation of a patch-clamp measurement system. With this "PatchChip" two simultaneous whole-cell recordings can be obtained with rms noise of 8pA in a 10kHz bandwidth. The capacitance and series-resistance of the electrode can be compensated up to 10pF and 100MΩ respectively under computer control. Recordings of hERG and Na(v) 1.7 currents demonstrate the system's capabilities, which are on par with large, commercial patch-clamp instrumentation. By reducing patch-clamp amplifiers to a millimeter size micro-chip, this work paves the way to the realization of massively parallel, high-throughput patch-clamp systems for drug screening and ion-channel research. The PatchChip is implemented in a 0.5μm silicon-on-sapphire process; its size is 3×3mm(2) and the power consumption is 5mW per channel with a 3.3V power supply.

  1. Patch-clamp amplifiers on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Weerakoon, Pujitha; Culurciello, Eugenio; Yang, Youshan; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Kindlmann, Peter J.; Sigworth, Fred J.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first, fully-integrated, two-channel implementation of a patch-clamp measurement system. With this “PatchChip” two simultaneous whole-cell recordings can be obtained with rms noise of 8 pA in a 10 kHz bandwidth. The capacitance and series-resistance of the electrode can be compensated up to 10 pF and 100 MΩ respectively under computer control. Recordings of hERG and Nav 1.7 currents demonstrate the system's capabilities, which are on par with large, commercial patch-clamp instrumentation. By reducing patch-clamp amplifiers to a millimeter size micro-chip, this work paves the way to the realization of massively-parallel, high-throughput patch-clamp systems for drug screening and ion-channel research. The PatchChip is implemented in a 0.5 μm silicon-on-sapphire process; its size is 3 × 3 mm2 and the power consumption is 5 mW per channel with a 3.3 V power supply. PMID:20637803

  2. Amplifiers of free-space terahertz radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Kao, Tsung -Yu; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2017-07-20

    Here, amplifiers of free-space radiation are quite useful, especially in spectral ranges where the radiation is weak and sensitive detectors are hard to come by. A preamplification of the said weak radiation signal will significantly boost the S/N ratio in remote sensing and imaging applications. This is especially true in the terahertz (THz) range where the radiation signal is often weak and sensitive detectors require the cooling of liquid helium. Although quantum cascade structures are promising for providing amplification in the terahertz band from 2 to 5 THz, a THz amplifier has been demonstrated in an integrated form, in whichmore » the source is in close proximity to the amplifier, which will not be suitable for the aforementioned applications. Here we demonstrate what we believe is a novel approach to achieve significant amplification of free-space THz radiation using an array of short-cavity, surface-emitting THz quantum cascade lasers operating marginally below the lasing threshold as a Fabry–Perot amplifier. This free-space “slow light” amplifier provides 7.5 dB(×5.6) overall gain at ~3.1 THz. The proposed devices are suitable for low-noise pre-amplifiers in heterodyne detection systems and for THz imaging systems. With the sub-wavelength pixel size of the array, the reflective amplifier can also be categorized as active metasurface, with the ability to amplify or absorb specific frequency components of the input THz signal.« less

  3. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In Heon; Stock, Larry V.

    1989-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers the period from September 1, 1988 to February 28, 1989 under NASA grant NAG-1-441 entitled, Direct Solar-Pumped Iodine Laser Amplifier. During this period, the research effort was concentrated on the solar pumped master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system using n-C3F7I. In the experimental work, the amplification measurement was conducted to identify the optimum conditions for amplification of the center's Vortek solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier. A modeling effort was also pursued to explain the experimental results in the theoretical work. The amplification measurement of the solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier is the first amplification experiment on the continuously pumped amplifier. The small signal amplification of 5 was achieved for the triple pass geometry of the 15 cm long solar simulator pumped amplifier at the n-C3F7I pressure of 20 torr, at the flow velocity of 6 m/sec and at the pumping intensity of 1500 solar constants. The XeCl laser pumped iodine laser oscillator, which was developed in the previous research, was employed as the master oscillator for the amplification measurement. In the theoretical work, the rate equations of the amplifier was established and the small signal amplification was calculated for the solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier. The amplification calculated from the kinetic equations with the previously measured rate coefficients reveals very large disagreement with experimental measurement. Moreover, the optimum condition predicted by the kinetic equation is quite discrepant with that measured by experiment. This fact indicates the necessity of study in the measurement of rate coefficients of the continuously pumped iodine laser system.

  4. MMIC Amplifiers for 90 to 130 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Pukala, David; Peralta, Alejandro; Bryerton, Eric; Morgan, Matt; Boyd, T.; Hu, Ming; Schmitz, Adele

    2007-01-01

    This brief describes two monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifier chips optimized to function in the frequency range of 90 to 130 GHz, covering nearly all of F-band (90 - 140 GHz). These amplifiers were designed specifically for local-oscillator units in astronomical radio telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). They could also be readily adapted for use in electronic test equipment, automotive radar systems, and communications systems that operate between 90 and 130 GHz.

  5. Bolometers - Ultimate sensitivity, optimization, and amplifier coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical expressions for Johnson noise and thermal noise in bolometers are considered, and optimization with respect to thermal conductivity and bias power is performed. Numerical approximations are given for the ultimate NEP of bolometers as a function of material parameters and compared with photon noise including photon correlations. A resonating capacitor is shown to improve the coupling to an amplifier, so that the amplifier need not limit performance even for very low temperature bolometers.

  6. Testing methodologies and systems for semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieckowski, Michael

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA's) are gaining increased prominence in both optical communication systems and high-speed optical processing systems, due primarily to their unique nonlinear characteristics. This in turn, has raised questions regarding their lifetime performance reliability and has generated a demand for effective testing techniques. This is especially critical for industries utilizing SOA's as components for system-in-package products. It is important to note that very little research to date has been conducted in this area, even though production volume and market demand has continued to increase. In this thesis, the reliability of dilute-mode InP semiconductor optical amplifiers is studied experimentally and theoretically. The aging characteristics of the production level devices are demonstrated and the necessary techniques to accurately characterize them are presented. In addition, this work proposes a new methodology for characterizing the optical performance of these devices using measurements in the electrical domain. It is shown that optical performance degradation, specifically with respect to gain, can be directly qualified through measurements of electrical subthreshold differential resistance. This metric exhibits a linear proportionality to the defect concentration in the active region, and as such, can be used for prescreening devices before employing traditional optical testing methods. A complete theoretical analysis is developed in this work to explain this relationship based upon the device's current-voltage curve and its associated leakage and recombination currents. These results are then extended to realize new techniques for testing semiconductor optical amplifiers and other similarly structured devices. These techniques can be employed after fabrication and during packaged operation through the use of a proposed stand-alone testing system, or using a proposed integrated CMOS self-testing circuit. Both methods are capable

  7. Curved film cooling admission tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Papell, S. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Effective film cooling to protect a wall surface from a hot fluid which impinges on or flows along the surface is provided. A film of cooling fluid having increased area is provided by changing the direction of a stream of cooling fluid through an angle of from 135 deg. to 165 deg. before injecting it through the wall into the hot flowing gas. The 1, cooling fluid is injected from an orifice through a wall into a hot flowing gas at an angle to form a cooling fluid film. Cooling fluid is supplied to the orifice from a cooling fluid source via a turbulence control passageway having a curved portion between two straight portions. The angle through which the direction of the cooling fluid is turned results in less mixing of the cooling fluid with the hot gas, thereby substantially increasing the length of the film in a downstream direction.

  8. Linearized traveling wave amplifier with hard limiter characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A dynamic velocity taper is provided for a traveling wave tube with increased linearity to avoid intermodulation of signals being amplified. In a traveling wave tube, the slow wave structure is a helix including a sever. A dynamic velocity taper is provided by gradually reducing the spacing between the repeating elements of the slow wave structure which are the windings of the helix. The reduction which takes place coincides with the ouput point of helix. The spacing between the repeating elements of the slow wave structure is ideally at an exponential rate because the curve increases the point of maximum efficiency and power, at an exponential rate. A coupled cavity traveling wave tube having cavities is shown. The space between apertured discs is gradually reduced from 0.1% to 5% at an exponential rate. Output power (or efficiency) versus input power for a commercial tube is shown.

  9. Breadboard Amplifier: Building and Using Simple Electrophysiology Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, Kevin M.; Lin, Hunter; Prosper, Issa

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiology is a valuable skill for the neuroscientist, but the learning curve for students can be steep. Here we describe a very simple electromyography (EMG) amplifier that can be built from scratch by students with no electronics experience in about 30 minutes, making it ideal for incorporating into a laboratory activity. With few parts and no adjustments except the gain, students can begin physiology experiments quickly while having the satisfaction of having built the equipment themselves. Because the output of the circuit goes to a computer sound card, students can listen to electrophysiological activity as they see it on the computer screen, a feature many of our students greatly appreciated. Various applications are discussed, including dual channel recording, using streaming media platforms with remote lab partners and acquiring data in the field on a smart phone. Our students reported that they enjoyed being able to build a working device and using it to record from their own muscles. PMID:27385921

  10. Breadboard Amplifier: Building and Using Simple Electrophysiology Equipment.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Kevin M; Lin, Hunter; Prosper, Issa

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiology is a valuable skill for the neuroscientist, but the learning curve for students can be steep. Here we describe a very simple electromyography (EMG) amplifier that can be built from scratch by students with no electronics experience in about 30 minutes, making it ideal for incorporating into a laboratory activity. With few parts and no adjustments except the gain, students can begin physiology experiments quickly while having the satisfaction of having built the equipment themselves. Because the output of the circuit goes to a computer sound card, students can listen to electrophysiological activity as they see it on the computer screen, a feature many of our students greatly appreciated. Various applications are discussed, including dual channel recording, using streaming media platforms with remote lab partners and acquiring data in the field on a smart phone. Our students reported that they enjoyed being able to build a working device and using it to record from their own muscles.

  11. Some Notes on Wideband Feedback Amplifiers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V.

    1949-03-16

    The extension of the passband of wideband amplifiers is a highly important problem to the designer of electronic circuits. Throughout the electronics industry and in many research programs in physics and allied fields where extensive use is made of video amplifiers, the foremost requirement is a passband of maximum width. This is necessary if it is desired to achieve a more faithful reproduction of transient wave forms, a better time resolution in physical measurements, or perhaps just a wider band gain-frequency response to sine wave signals. The art of electronics is continually faced with this omnipresent amplifier problem. In particular, the instrumentation techniques of nuclear physics require amplifiers with short rise times, a high degree of gain stability, and a linear response to high signal levels. While the distributed amplifier may solve the problems of those seeking only a wide passband, the requirements of stability and linearity necessitate using feedback circuits. This paper considers feedback amplifiers from the standpoint of high-frequency performance. The circuit conditions for optimum steady-state (sinusoidal) and transient response are derived and practical circuits (both interstage and output) are presented which fulfill these conditions. In general, the results obtained may be applied to the low-frequency end.

  12. V-band IMPATT power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schell, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    This program is the result of the continuing demand and future requirement for a high data rate 60-GHz communications link. A reliable solid-state transmitter which delivers the necessary power over a wide bandwidth using the present IMPATT diode technology required the development of combining techniques. The development of a 60-GHz IMPATT power combiner amplifier is detailed. The results form a basis from which future wideband, high-power IMPATT amplifiers may be developed. As a result, several state-of-the-art advancements in millimeter-wave components technology were achieved. Specific achievements for the amplifier integration were: development of a nonresonant divider/combiner circuit; reproducible multiple junction circulator assemblies; and reliable high power 60-GHz IMPATT diodes. The various design approaches and tradeoffs which lead to the final amplifier configuration are discussed. A detailed circuit design is presented for the various amplifier components, and the conical line combiner, radial line combiner, and circulator development are discussed. The performance of the amplifier, the overall achievement of the program, the implications of the results, and an assessment of future development needs and recommendations are examined.

  13. Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system

    DOEpatents

    George, Victor E. [Livermore, CA; Haas, Roger A. [Pleasanton, CA; Krupke, William F. [Pleasanton, CA; Schlitt, Leland G. [Livermore, CA

    1980-05-27

    The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation.

  14. Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system

    DOEpatents

    George, V.E.; Haas, R.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Schlitt, L.G.

    1980-05-27

    The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation. 11 figs.

  15. Low Noise Optically Pre-amplified Lightwave Receivers and Other Applications of Fiber Optic Parametric Amplifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-27

    noise performance, optical gain bandwidth, and power efficiency. An interesting alternative to the mature Erbium-doped fiber amplifier ( EDFA ) is the...fibers (HNLF) and high power booster EDFAs . The FOPA can provide a very wide gain bandwidth [2], very high gain (70 dB was demonstrated in [3]), and...amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise in EDFAs is also generated. It is sometimes referred to as amplified quantum noise. Maximum gain (at the gain

  16. Automated reasoning about cubic curves.

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, R.; McCune, W.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Manitoba

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that the n-ary morphisms defined on projective algebraic curves satisfy some strong local-to-global equational rules of derivation not satisfied in general by universal algebras. For example, every rationally defined group law on a cubic curve must be commutative. Here we extract from the geometry of curves a first order property (gL) satisfied by all morphisms defined on these curves such that the equational consequences known for projective curves can be derived automatically from a set of six rules (stated within the first-order logic with equality). First, the rule (gL) is implemented in the theorem-proving program Otter. Then we use Otter to automatically prove some incidence theorems on projective curves without any further reference to the underlying geometry or topology of the curves.

  17. Estimating power curves of flying vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Rayner, J M

    1999-12-01

    The power required for flight in any flying animal is a function of flight speed. The power curve that describes this function has become an icon of studies of flight mechanics and physiology because it encapsulates the accessible animal's flight performance. The mechanical or aerodynamic power curve, describing the increase in kinetic energy of the air due to the passage of the bird, is necessarily U-shaped, for aerodynamic reasons, and can be estimated adequately by lifting-line theory. Predictions from this and related models agree well with measured mechanical work in flight and with results from flow visualization experiments. The total or metabolic power curve also includes energy released by the animal as heat, and is more variable in shape. These curves may be J-shaped for smaller birds and bats, but are difficult to predict theoretically owing to uncertainty about internal physiological processes and the efficiency of the flight muscles. The limitations of some existing models aiming to predict metabolic power curves are considered. The metabolic power curve can be measured for birds or bats flying in wind tunnels at controlled speeds. Simultaneous determination in European starlings Sturnus vulgaris of oxygen uptake, total metabolic rate (using labelled isotopes), aerodynamic power output and heat released (using digital video thermography) enable power curves to be determined with confidence; flight muscle efficiency is surprisingly low (averaging 15-18 %) and increases moderately with flight speed, so that the metabolic power curve is shallower than predicted by models. Accurate knowledge of the power curve is essential since extensive predictions of flight behaviour have been based upon it. The hypothesis that the power curve may not in fact exist, in the sense that the cost of flight may not be perceived by a bird as a continuous smooth function of air speed, is advanced but has not yet formally been tested. This hypothesis is considered together with

  18. Birational maps that send biquadratic curves to biquadratic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John A. G.; Jogia, Danesh

    2015-02-01

    Recently, many papers have begun to consider so-called non-Quispel-Roberts-Thompson (QRT) birational maps of the plane. Compared to the QRT family of maps which preserve each biquadratic curve in a fibration of the plane, non-QRT maps send a biquadratic curve to another biquadratic curve belonging to the same fibration or to a biquadratic curve from a different fibration of the plane. In this communication, we give the general form of a birational map derived from a difference equation that sends a biquadratic curve to another. The necessary and sufficient condition for such a map to exist is that the discriminants of the two biquadratic curves are the same (and hence so are the j-invariants). The result allows existing examples in the literature to be better understood and allows some statements to be made concerning their generality.

  19. Real Time Calibration Method for Signal Conditioning Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Mata, Carlos T. (Inventor); Eckhoff, Anthony (Inventor); Perotti, Jose (Inventor); Lucena, Angel (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A signal conditioning amplifier receives an input signal from an input such as a transducer. The signal is amplified and processed through an analog to digital converter and sent to a processor. The processor estimates the input signal provided by the transducer to the amplifier via a multiplexer. The estimated input signal is provided as a calibration voltage to the amplifier immediately following the receipt of the amplified input signal. The calibration voltage is amplified by the amplifier and provided to the processor as an amplified calibration voltage. The amplified calibration voltage is compared to the amplified input signal, and if a significant error exists, the gain and/or offset of the amplifier may be adjusted as necessary.

  20. Real Time Calibration Method for Signal Conditioning Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Mata, Carlos T. (Inventor); Eckhoff, Anthony (Inventor); Perotti, Jose (Inventor); Lucena, Angel (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A signal conditioning amplifier receives an input signal from an input such as a transducer. The signal is amplified and processed through an analog to digital converter and sent to a processor. The processor estimates the input signal provided by the transducer to the amplifier via a multiplexer. The estimated input signal is provided as a calibration voltage to the amplifier immediately following the receipt of the amplified input signal. The calibration voltage is amplified by the amplifier and provided to the processor as an amplified calibration voltage. The amplified calibration voltage is compared to the amplified input signal, and if a significant error exists, the gain and/or offset of the amplifier may be adjusted as necessary.