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Sample records for ampt-induced monoamine depletion

  1. Monoamine depletion attenuates the REM sleep deprivation-induced increase in clonidine response in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Asakura, W; Matsumoto, K; Ohta, H; Watanabe, H

    1994-09-01

    Effect of monoamine depletion on the REM sleep (REMs) deprivation-induced increase in clonidine response in the forced swimming test was investigated. Mice were deprived of REMs by the small pedestal method. Clonidine HCl (10-1000 micrograms/kg, IP), an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, dose dependently increased swimming activities in group-housed and socially isolated mice used as the control groups. The dose-response relationship shifted to the left following REMs deprivation (ED50 values in the group-housed, isolated, and REMs-deprived mice were 250, 200, and 27 micrograms/kg, respectively). Monoamine depletion, induced by reserpine (5 mg/kg, IP) plus alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (250 mg/kg, IP), did not produce any changes in the effects of clonidine in the control groups. However, in REMs-deprived mice, monoamine depletion significantly decreased the effect of 100 micrograms/kg clonidine, but not that of 300 micrograms/kg clonidine on swimming activity. These results indicate that clonidine-induced increase in swimming activity in the forced swimming test is mainly mediated by postsynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptor, and that endogenous noradrenaline in the brain plays an important role in the increase of clonidine response following REMs deprivation treatment. The neuronal mechanism of the increase in clonidine response is discussed.

  2. Depletion of rat cortical norepinephrine and the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine uptake by xylamine does not require monoamine oxidase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of monoamine oxidase A through pretreatment of rats with clorgyline or the pro-drug MDL 72,394 did not block the amine-depleting action of xylamine. Xylamine treatment resulted in a loss of approximately 60% of the control level of norepinephrine in the cerebral cortex. A 1-hr pretreatment, but not a 24-hr pretreatment, with the monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, L-deprenyl, prevented the depletion of norepinephrine by xylamine. In addition, pretreatment with MDL 72,974, a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor without amine-releasing or uptake - inhibiting effects, did not prevent cortical norepinephrine levels. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase by either MDL 72,974 or MDL 72,394 did not prevent the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes by xylamine. These data indicate that monoamine oxidase does not mediate the amine-releasing or uptake inhibiting properties of xylamine. The protection afforded by L-deprenyl following a 1-hr pretreatment most probably was due to accumulation of its metabolite, L-amphetamine, which would inhibit the uptake carrier. A functional carrier is required for depletion since desipramine administered 1 hr prior to xylamine, was also able to prevent depletion of norepinephrine.

  3. Central administration of methamphetamine synergizes with metabolic inhibition to deplete striatal monoamines.

    PubMed

    Burrows, K B; Nixdorf, W L; Yamamoto, B K

    2000-03-01

    These studies examined, in vivo, the effect of local intrastriatal perfusion of methamphetamine (MA) on dopamine (DA) and glutamate release in relation to changes in striatal DA and serotonin (5-HT) content measured 1 week after treatment. Interactions between the inhibition of energy metabolism and the direct perfusion of MA on long-term decreases in DA and 5-HT content also were investigated. MA (100 microM), the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate, or the combination of MA and malonate was reverse-dialyzed into the striatum for 8 h. The continuous local perfusion of MA alone increased DA release by 30-fold, similar to that seen after systemic administration, but did not increase glutamate or body temperature, and did not deplete neurotransmitter content. Malonate perfusion increased both DA and glutamate overflow, and dose dependently decreased DA content. 5-HT content was not as affected by malonate perfusions (200 mM malonate depleted DA by 66% and 5-HT by 40%). When MA was coperfused with 200 mM malonate, DA content was reduced by 80% and to a greater extent compared with malonate alone. Coperfusion of MA and 200 mM malonate did not enhance 5-HT loss. Overall, the present findings provide evidence that energy metabolism plays an important role in MA toxicity and that striatal dopaminergic terminals are more vulnerable than 5-HT terminals to damage after metabolic stress.

  4. Chloride Requirement for Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the Cl− requirement for dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine (DA, 5-HT, and NE) transport and induced current via the transporters for these transmitters, DAT, SERT, and NET. Indirect evidence exists for the passage of Cl− ions through monoamine transporters; however, direct evidence is sparse. An unanswered question is why in some preparations, notably native neurons, it appears that Cl− ions carry the current through DAT, whereas in heterologous expression systems Na+ ions carry the current often referred to as the uncoupled current. It is suggested that different functional states in monoamine transporters represent conformational states that carry dominantly Cl− or Na+. Structures of monoamine transporters contribute enormously to structure-function relationships; however, thus far no structural features support the functionally relevant ionic currents that are known to exist in monoamine transporters. PMID:26794730

  5. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  6. Dietary inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A.

    PubMed

    Dixon Clarke, Sarah E; Ramsay, Rona R

    2011-07-01

    Inhibition of monoamine oxidase is one way to treat depression and anxiety. The information now available on the pharmacokinetics of flavonoids and of the components of tobacco prompted an exploration of whether a healthy diet (with or without smoking) provides active compounds in amounts sufficient to partially inhibit monoamine oxidase. A literature search was used to identify dietary monoamine oxidase inhibitors, the levels of these compounds in foods, the pharmacokinetics of the absorption and distribution, and tissue levels observed. An estimated daily intake and the expected tissue concentrations were compared with the measured efficacies of the compounds as inhibitors of monoamine oxidases. Norharman, harman and quercetin dietary presence, pharmacokinetics, and tissue levels were consistent with significant levels reaching neuronal monoamine oxidase from the diet or smoking; 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline, eugenol, 1-piperoylpiperidine, and coumarin were not. Quercetin was equipotent with norharman as a monoamine oxidase A inhibitor and its metabolite, isorhamnetin, also inhibits. Total quercetin was the highest of the compounds in the sample diet. Although bioavailability was variable depending on the source, a healthy diet contains amounts of quercetin that might give sufficient amounts in brain to induce, by monoamine oxidase A inhibition, a small decrease in neurotransmitter breakdown.

  7. Effects of 071031B, a novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on monoamine system in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Xue, Rui; He, Xin-Hua; Yuan, Li; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Li-Ming; Yong, Zheng; Yu, Gang; Fan, Shi-Yong; Li, Yun-Feng; Zhong, Bo-Hua; Zhang, You-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that 071031B, a novel potential serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, showed robust antidepressant activity in multiple depression models, and could simultaneously inhibit 5-HT and NE reuptake in vitro. The present study was to evaluate the effects of 071031B on monoamine system in vivo, by using pharmacological models, including 5-HTP induced head-twitch test, yohimbine toxicity potentiation test, and reserpine induced hypothermia test, and determining monoamine transmitter levels in reserpine induced monoamine depletion model or chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) model. Results in pharmacological models indicated that acute administration of 071031B at 5-20 mg/kg significantly enhanced 5-HTP induced head-twitch behavior, potentiated yohimbine induced lethal rate, and reversed reserpine induced hypothermia. Further monoamine assays demonstrated that acute or chronic administration of 071031B at 10 or 20 mg/kg increased 5-HT and/or NE levels in various brain regions in reserpine or CUS induced monoamine depletion models, respectively, without effect on DA and its metabolites. Our results revealed that 071031B produces potent inhibition of 5-HT and NE reuptake in vivo.

  8. [Monoamines stimulations in experimental carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Popov, I; Spuzić, I; Rakić, Lj

    1994-01-01

    Facts about the role of CNS monoamines in cancerogenesis have been accumulated for many years. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of interaction of psychoactive drug (Piracetam) and other treatments on survival time of tumour-bearing rats. 138 Wistar rats were used in the experiment. The animals were injected 1% 3--Methilcholantren suspension in 10% Tylose, s.c. under the dorsal skin of the neck in a dose of 3 mg/animal. Within 4-9 months after a single injection, the rats developed tumours at the site of injection. The surgical removal was performed when tumours reached the size of 1-3 cm. After surgical extirpation of tumours different groups of animals were treated by cyclophosphamide (s.c. one-time dose of 50 mg/kg for female and 100 mg/kg for male) or by psychoactive drug (Piracetam) administrated by GE tube 5 time/week, 100 mg/kg. Autopsy and histological examinations were carried out in all animals. Survival time (> 120 days) was the greatest in group B (Piracetam, after surgical removal of tumours) 81.2%, and group C (Cyclophosphamid, after surgical removal of tumours) 68.8% and in group A (only surgical removal of tumours) 50%. In group B the incidence of metastases was the smallest (87.1% of animals were without metastases), compared with group C (45.4% of animals were without metastases) and group A (27.3% of animals were without metastases). The diference is statistically significant. The mechanism of antineoplastic effect of Piracetam consisted of the interaction of influences both on metabolism of the Central nervous system and the tumour. Probably, it is the neurotransmitter modulation that had its effect on carcinogenesis not only by regulation/disregulation of brain homeostasis, but also via direct effect on intracellular processes during cell development and differentation.

  9. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  10. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  11. Monoamine pharmacology of the lobster cardiac ganglion.

    PubMed

    Berlind, A

    2001-03-01

    Monoamine agonists and antagonists were applied to the lobster cardiac ganglion in an attempt to clarify the different actions of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) and dopamine (DA) on this rhythmic pattern generator. Experiments were designed to determine whether the similar responses to 5HT and DA applied to the anterior region of the ganglion could be separated by pharmacological approaches, and whether the different responses to 5HT applied to the anterior and posterior regions of the ganglion could be attributed to mediation by different receptors. A small number of the 5HT agonists which were tested mimic the effects of 5HT, in that they increase the frequency of bursting and decrease burst duration when applied to the whole ganglion, but decrease burst frequency and increase burst duration when applied only to the posterior half. Other 5HT agonists decrease frequency and prolong bursts when applied to the whole ganglion. Of the DA agonists tested, none acts as DA itself does. Rather, they mimic the effects of 5HT applied to the posterior ganglion, by slowing bursting and prolonging bursts. The actions of agonists do not correspond in any clear way to the receptor specificities as defined in vertebrates. Most antagonists tested do not show similar specificities to their effects in vertebrates. In particular, most of the DA antagonists tested are more effective in blocking exogenous 5HT than DA. One monoamine agonist directly alters the properties of endogenous burst-organizing potentials (driver potentials) in the motorneurons of the ganglion.

  12. Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 2 and the Acute and Long-Term Response to 3,4-(±)-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Lizarraga, Lucina E.; Cholanians, Aram B.; Phan, Andy V.; Herndon, Joseph M.; Lau, Serrine S.; Monks, Terrence J.

    2015-01-01

    3,4-(±)-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) is a ring-substituted amphetamine derivative with potent psychostimulant properties. The neuropharmacological effects of MDMA are biphasic in nature, initially causing synaptic monoamine release, primarily of serotonin (5-HT). Conversely, the long-term effects of MDMA manifest as prolonged depletions in 5-HT, and reductions in 5-HT reuptake transporter (SERT), indicative of serotonergic neurotoxicity. MDMA-induced 5-HT efflux relies upon disruption of vesicular monoamine storage, which increases cytosolic 5-HT concentrations available for release via a carrier-mediated mechanism. The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is responsible for packaging monoamine neurotransmitters into cytosolic vesicles. Thus, VMAT2 is a molecular target for a number of psychostimulant drugs, including methamphetamine and MDMA. We investigated the effects of depressed VMAT2 activity on the adverse responses to MDMA, via reversible inhibition of the VMAT2 protein with Ro4-1284. A single dose of MDMA (20 mg/kg, subcutaneous) induced significant hyperthermia in rats. Ro4-1284 (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) pretreatment prevented the thermogenic effects of MDMA, instead causing a transient decrease in body temperature. MDMA-treated rats exhibited marked increases in horizontal velocity and rearing behavior. In the presence of Ro4-1284, MDMA-mediated horizontal hyperlocomotion was delayed and attenuated, whereas rearing activity was abolished. Finally, Ro4-1284 prevented deficits in 5-HT content in rat cortex and striatum, and reduced depletions in striatal SERT staining, 7 days after MDMA administration. In summary, acute inhibition of VMAT2 by Ro4-1284 protected against MDMA-mediated hyperthermia, hyperactivity, and serotonergic neurotoxicity. The data suggest the involvement of VMAT2 in the thermoregulatory, behavioral, and neurotoxic effects of MDMA. PMID:25370842

  13. Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and the acute and long-term response to 3,4-(±)-methylenedioxymethamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Lucina E; Cholanians, Aram B; Phan, Andy V; Herndon, Joseph M; Lau, Serrine S; Monks, Terrence J

    2015-01-01

    3,4-(±)-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) is a ring-substituted amphetamine derivative with potent psychostimulant properties. The neuropharmacological effects of MDMA are biphasic in nature, initially causing synaptic monoamine release, primarily of serotonin (5-HT). Conversely, the long-term effects of MDMA manifest as prolonged depletions in 5-HT, and reductions in 5-HT reuptake transporter (SERT), indicative of serotonergic neurotoxicity. MDMA-induced 5-HT efflux relies upon disruption of vesicular monoamine storage, which increases cytosolic 5-HT concentrations available for release via a carrier-mediated mechanism. The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is responsible for packaging monoamine neurotransmitters into cytosolic vesicles. Thus, VMAT2 is a molecular target for a number of psychostimulant drugs, including methamphetamine and MDMA. We investigated the effects of depressed VMAT2 activity on the adverse responses to MDMA, via reversible inhibition of the VMAT2 protein with Ro4-1284. A single dose of MDMA (20 mg/kg, subcutaneous) induced significant hyperthermia in rats. Ro4-1284 (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) pretreatment prevented the thermogenic effects of MDMA, instead causing a transient decrease in body temperature. MDMA-treated rats exhibited marked increases in horizontal velocity and rearing behavior. In the presence of Ro4-1284, MDMA-mediated horizontal hyperlocomotion was delayed and attenuated, whereas rearing activity was abolished. Finally, Ro4-1284 prevented deficits in 5-HT content in rat cortex and striatum, and reduced depletions in striatal SERT staining, 7 days after MDMA administration. In summary, acute inhibition of VMAT2 by Ro4-1284 protected against MDMA-mediated hyperthermia, hyperactivity, and serotonergic neurotoxicity. The data suggest the involvement of VMAT2 in the thermoregulatory, behavioral, and neurotoxic effects of MDMA.

  14. [An endogenous inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A (tribulin A) from brain: purification and structure identification].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, A E; Kamyshanskaia, N S; Halket, J; Glover, V; Sandler, A

    1995-05-01

    The endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitor, tribulin, contains several components which selectively (or nonselectively) inhibit monoamine oxidases A and B. The pig brain tribulin component selectively inhibiting monoamine oxidase A was purified and identified as 4-hydroxyphenylethanol using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This compound was also found in the rabbit brain tribulin fraction which selectively inhibits monoamine oxidase A but has no influence on monoamine oxidase B. 4-Hydroxyphenylethanol inhibits monoamine oxidase A in an incompetitive manner with respect to the substrate, serotonin (Ki = 1.4 mM). Possible pathways of 4-hydroxyphenylethanol synthesis and its biological importance as the monoamine oxidase A inhibiting component of tribulin are discussed.

  15. Selective transport of monoamine neurotransmitters by human plasma membrane monoamine transporter and organic cation transporter 3.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haichuan; Wang, Joanne

    2010-12-01

    The plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) and organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3) are the two most prominent low-affinity, high-capacity (i.e., uptake(2)) transporters for endogenous biogenic amines. Using the Flp-in system, we expressed human PMAT (hPMAT) and human OCT3 (hOCT3) at similar levels in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Parallel and detailed kinetics analysis revealed distinct and seemingly complementary patterns for the two transporters in transporting monoamine neurotransmitters. hPMAT is highly selective toward serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine, with the rank order of transport efficiency (V(max)/K(m)) being: dopamine, 5-HT ≫ histamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine. The substrate preference of hPMAT toward these amines is substantially driven by large (up to 15-fold) distinctions in its apparent binding affinities (K(m)). In contrast, hOCT3 is less selective than hPMAT toward the monoamines, and the V(max)/K(m) rank order for hOCT3 is: histamine > norepinephrine, epinephrine > dopamine >5-HT. It is noteworthy that hOCT3 demonstrated comparable (≤2-fold difference) K(m) toward all amines, and distinctions in V(max) played an important role in determining its differential transport efficiency toward the monoamines. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that hPMAT is expressed at much higher levels than hOCT3 in most human brain areas, whereas hOCT3 is selectively and highly expressed in adrenal gland and skeletal muscle. Our results suggest that hOCT3 represents a major uptake(2) transporter for histamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. hPMAT, on the other hand, is a major uptake(2) transporter for 5-HT and dopamine and may play a more important role in transporting these two neurotransmitters in the central nervous system.

  16. Visualization of monoamine oxidase in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Pappas, N.; Shea, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Logan, J.

    1996-12-31

    Monoamine oxidase is a flavin enzyme which exists in two subtypes, MAO A and MAO B. In human brain MAO B predominates and is largely compartmentalized in cell bodies of serotonergic neurons and glia. Regional distribution of MAO B was determined by positron computed tomography with volunteers after the administration of deuterium substituted [11C]L-deprenyl. The basal ganglia and thalamus exhibited the greatest concentrations of MAO B with intermediate levels in the frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus while lowest levels were observed in the parietal and temporal cortices and cerebellum. We observed that brain MAO B increases with are in health normal subjects, however the increases were generally smaller than those revealed with post-mortem studies.

  17. Sex-specific development of cortical monoamine levels in mouse.

    PubMed

    Connell, Shelley; Karikari, Collins; Hohmann, Christine F

    2004-07-19

    Several mental health disorders exhibit sex differences in monoamine levels associated with dimorphic cortical ontogeny. Studies in rodents support the notion that monoamines can profoundly modulate morphogenesis. Here, we show significant sex and hemisphere differences in BALB/cByJ mice on postnatal day 3 for dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-TH), supporting the notion that sex differences in early monoaminergic ontogeny may result in dimorphic cortical development. Such sex differences may also influence differential behavioral and/or clinical outcomes.

  18. Alterations in Brain Monoamine Neurotransmitter Release at High Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    exposure results from a general imbalance of encephalopathies. Parkinson’s Syndrome, MPTP the three monoamine neurotransmitter systems toxicity . or...the [3 H]monoamines by Dopamine release, on the other hand, was reduced synaptosomes isolated from the CNS. 5-A n 4 A Pn5 p<.05 0.05 LI * 4- U) 4...Lffect of’ pressure of 3.4-miethylenledioxy-miethamiiphetamnine ( MDMA ) and re- on the release of radioaetive glycine and (IABA from spinal lated

  19. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    DOE PAGES

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; ...

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variablesmore » which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.« less

  20. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

  1. Leflunomide, a Reversible Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél

    2016-01-01

    A screening study aimed at identifying inhibitors of the enzyme, monoamine oxidase (MAO), among clinically used drugs have indicated that the antirheumatic drug, leflunomide, is an inhibitor of both MAO isoforms. Leflunomide inhibits human MAO-A and MAO-B and exhibits IC50 values of 19.1 μM and 13.7 μM, respectively. The corresponding Ki values are 17.7 μM (MAO-A) and 10.1 μM (MAO-B). Dialyses of mixtures of the MAO enzymes and leflunomide show that inhibition of the MAOs by leflunomide is reversible. The principal metabolite of leflunomide, teriflunomide (A77 1726), in contrast is not an MAO inhibitor. This study concludes that, although leflunomide is only moderately potent as an MAO inhibitor, isoxazole derivatives may represent a general class of MAO inhibitors and this heterocycle may find application in MAO inhibitor design. In this respect, MAO inhibitors are used in the clinic for the treatment of depressive illness and Parkinson's disease, and are under investigation as therapy for certain types of cancer, Alzheimer's disease and age-related impairment of cardiac function.

  2. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  3. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  4. Involvement of monoamines and proinflammatory cytokines in mediating the anti-stress effects of Panax quinquefolium.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Naila; Tyagi, Ethika; Ahmad, Ausaf; Siripurapu, Kiran Babu; Lahiri, Shawon; Shukla, Rakesh; Palit, Gautam

    2008-05-08

    Panax quinquefolium (PQ) is well acclaimed in literature for its effects on central and peripheral nervous system. The present study explores the effects of PQ on stress induced changes of corticosterone level in plasma, monoamines (NA, DA and 5-HT) and interleukin (IL-2 and IL-6) levels in cortex and hippocampus regions of brain and also indicate their possible roles in modulating stress. Mice subjected to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS, for 7 days) showed significant increase in plasma corticosterone level and depletion of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels in cortex and hippocampal regions along with an increased level of IL-2 and IL-6 in the same areas. Aqueous suspension of PQ was administered daily at a dose of 100 and 200mg/kg p.o. prior to the stress regimen and its effects on selected stress markers in plasma and brain was evaluated. PQ at a dose of 200mg/kg p.o. was found to be effective in normalizing the CUS induced elevation of plasma corticosterone and IL-2, IL-6 levels in brain. Moreover, it was significantly effective in reinstating the CUS induced depletion of NA, DA and 5-HT in hippocampus, while NA and 5-HT in cortex of brain. However, PQ at a dose of 100mg/kg p.o. was found ineffective in regulating any of these CUS induced changes. Present study provides an insight into the possible role of PQ on hyperactive HPA axis in the regulation of immediate stress effectors like corticosterone, cytokines and brain monoamines. In this study, PQ has emerged as a potential therapeutic in the cure of stress related disorders and needs to be evaluated in clinical studies to ascertain its efficacy.

  5. Monoamine Transporter Inhibitors and Substrates as Treatments for Stimulant Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Leonard L.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    The acute and chronic effects of abused psychostimulants on monoamine transporters and associated neurobiology have encouraged development of candidate medications that target these transporters. Monoamine transporters in general, and dopamine transporters in particular, are critical molecular targets that mediate abuse-related effects of psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Moreover, chronic administration of psychostimulants can cause enduring changes in neurobiology reflected in dysregulation of monoamine neurochemistry and behavior. The current review will evaluate evidence for the efficacy of monoamine transporter inhibitors and substrates to reduce abuse-related effects of stimulants in preclinical assays of stimulant self-administration, drug discrimination and reinstatement. In considering deployment of monoamine transport inhibitors and substrates as agonist-type medications to treat stimulant abuse, the safety and abuse liability of the medications are an obvious concern, and this will also be addressed. Future directions in drug discovery should identify novel medications that retain efficacy to decrease stimulant use but possess lower abuse liability, and evaluate the degree to which efficacious medications can attenuate or reverse neurobiological effects of chronic stimulant use. PMID:24484977

  6. Monoamine transporter inhibitors and substrates as treatments for stimulant abuse.

    PubMed

    Howell, Leonard L; Negus, S Stevens

    2014-01-01

    The acute and chronic effects of abused psychostimulants on monoamine transporters and associated neurobiology have encouraged development of candidate medications that target these transporters. Monoamine transporters, in general, and dopamine transporters, in particular, are critical molecular targets that mediate abuse-related effects of psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Moreover, chronic administration of psychostimulants can cause enduring changes in neurobiology reflected in dysregulation of monoamine neurochemistry and behavior. The current review will evaluate evidence for the efficacy of monoamine transporter inhibitors and substrates to reduce abuse-related effects of stimulants in preclinical assays of stimulant self-administration, drug discrimination, and reinstatement. In considering deployment of monoamine transport inhibitors and substrates as agonist-type medications to treat stimulant abuse, the safety and abuse liability of the medications are an obvious concern, and this will also be addressed. Future directions in drug discovery should identify novel medications that retain efficacy to decrease stimulant use but possess lower abuse liability and evaluate the degree to which efficacious medications can attenuate or reverse neurobiological effects of chronic stimulant use.

  7. Monoamine oxidase inhibitory components from Cayratia japonica.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiang Hua; Hong, Seong Su; Hwang, Ji Sang; Lee, Myung Koo; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Ro, Jai Seup

    2007-01-01

    Seven flavonoids were isolated from the whole plants and fruits of Cayratia japonica through the activity-guided isolation of a methanol extract using a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition assay as a monitor. The chemical structures of the isolates were assigned as apigenin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside (1), apigenin (2), luteolin (3), luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), (+)-dihydroquercetin (taxifolin) (5), (+)-dihydrokaempferol (aromadendrin) (6) and quercetin (7). Among the isolated compounds, flavones such as apigenin (2) and luteolin (3), as well as the flavonol, quercetin (7) showed potent inhibitory effects against the MAO activity with IC50 values of 6.5, 22.6, and 31.6 microM, respectively. However, the flavone glycosides, apigenin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside (1) and luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), showed mild MAO inhibition (IC50 values: 81.7 and 118.6 microM, respectively). The flavanonol derivatives, taxifolin (5) and aromadendrin (6), also showed weak inhibition (IC50 values: 154.7 and 153.1 microM, respectively). Furthermore, quercetin (7) had a more potent inhibitory effect on MAO-A (IC50 value: 2.8 microM) than MAO-B (IC50 value: 90.0 microM). Apigenin (2) and luteolin (3) also preferentially inhibited MAO-A (IC50 values: 1.7 and 4.9 microM, respectively) compared with MAO-B (IC50 values: 12.8 and 59.7 microM, respectively).

  8. Predominant role of plasma membrane monoamine transporters in monoamine transport in 1321N1, a human astrocytoma-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Fumito; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Nakamura, Tadaho; Iida, Tomomitsu; Harada, Ryuichi; Mohsen, Attayeb S; Miura, Yamato; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitters should be immediately removed from the synaptic cleft to avoid excessive neuronal activity. Recent studies have shown that astrocytes and neurons are involved in monoamine removal. However, the mechanism of monoamine transport by astrocytes is not entirely clear. We aimed to elucidate the transporters responsible for monoamine transport in 1321N1, a human astrocytoma-derived cell line. First, we confirmed that 1321N1 cells transported dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, and histamine in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Kinetics analysis suggested the involvement of low-affinity monoamine transporters, such as organic cation transporter (OCT) 2 and 3 and plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT). Monoamine transport in 1321N1 cells was not Na(+) /Cl(-) dependent but was inhibited by decynium-22, an inhibitor of low-affinity monoamine transporters, which supported the importance of low-affinity transporters. RT-PCR assays revealed that 1321N1 cells expressed OCT3 and PMAT but no other neurotransmitter transporters. Another human astrocytoma-derived cell line, U251MG, and primary human astrocytes also exhibited the same gene expression pattern. Gene-knockdown assays revealed that 1321N1 and primary human astrocytes could transport monoamines predominantly through PMAT and partly through OCT3. These results might indicate that PMAT and OCT3 in human astrocytes are involved in monoamine clearance.

  9. Ruthenium-catalyzed selective monoamination of vicinal diols.

    PubMed

    Bähn, Sebastian; Tillack, Annegret; Imm, Sebastian; Mevius, Kathleen; Michalik, Dirk; Hollmann, Dirk; Neubert, Lorenz; Beller, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The monoamination of vicinal diols in the presence of in situ generated ruthenium catalysts has been investigated. Among the various phosphines tested in combination with [Ru(3)(CO)(12)], N-phenyl-2-(dicyclohexyl-phosphanyl)pyrrole showed the best performance. After optimization of the reaction conditions this system was applied to different secondary amines and anilines as well as a number of vicinal diols. With the exception of ethylene glycol, monoamination of the vicinal diols occurred selectively and the corresponding amino alcohols were obtained in good yields, producing water as the only side product.

  10. Effect of Alkaloids Isolated from Phyllodium pulchellum on Monoamine Levels and Monoamine Oxidase Activity in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lu; Wang, Chao; Dong, Pei-pei; Zhang, Bao-jing; Zhang, Hou-Li; Huang, Shan-shan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Sheng-ming; Zhong, Ming; Ma, Xiao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodium pulchellum (P. pulchellum) is a folk medicine with a significant number of bioactivities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects displayed by alkaloids fractions, isolated from the roots of P. pulchellum, on neurotransmitters monoamine levels and on monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity. Six alkaloids, which had indolealkylamine or β-carboline skeleton, were obtained by chromatographic technologies and identified by spectroscopic methods such as NMR and MS. After treatment with alkaloids of P. pulchellum, the reduction of DA levels (54.55%) and 5-HT levels (35.01%) in rat brain was observed by HPLC-FLD. The effect of alkaloids on the monoamines metabolism was mainly related to MAO inhibition, characterized by IC50 values of 37.35 ± 6.41 and 126.53 ± 5.39 μg/mL for MAO-A and MAO-B, respectively. The acute toxicity indicated that P. pulchellum extract was nontoxic. PMID:27195015

  11. Effects of exposure to amphetamine derivatives on passive avoidance performance and the central levels of monoamines and their metabolites in mice: correlations between behavior and neurochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Murnane, Kevin Sean; Perrine, Shane Alan; Finton, Brendan James; Galloway, Matthew Peter; Howell, Leonard Lee; Fantegrossi, William Edward

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Considerable evidence indicates that amphetamine derivatives can deplete brain monoaminergic neurotransmitters. However, the behavioral and cognitive consequences of neurochemical depletions induced by amphetamines are not well established. Objectives In this study, mice were exposed to dosing regimens of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methamphetamine (METH), or para-chloroamphetamine (PCA) known to deplete the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin, and the effects of these dosing regimens on learning and memory were assessed. Methods In the same animals, we determined deficits in learning and memory via passive avoidance (PA) behavior and changes in tissue content of monoamine neurotransmitters and their primary metabolites in the striatum, frontal cortex, cingulate, hippocampus, and amygdala via ex vivo high pressure liquid chromatography. Results Consistent with previous studies, significant reductions in tissue content of dopamine and serotonin were readily apparent. In addition, exposure to METH and PCA impaired PA performance and resulted in significant depletions of dopamine, serotonin, and their metabolites in several brain regions. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the tissue concentration of dopamine in the anterior striatum was the strongest predictor of PA performance, with an additional significant contribution by the tissue concentration of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the cingulate. In contrast to the effects of METH and PCA, exposure to MDMA did not deplete anterior striatal dopamine levels or cingulate levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and it did not impair PA performance. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that certain amphetamines impair PA performance in mice and that these impairments may be attributable to specific neurochemical depletions. PMID:21993877

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  13. [Monoamine-hormonal interactions in the pathogenesis of anxious depression].

    PubMed

    Uzbekov, M G; Maksimova, N M

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical aspects of the relationship between monoaminergic and hormonal systems in the pathogenesis of anxious depression are analyzed on the basis of literature and own results published earlier. Significant alterations in biogenic monoamine metabolism and changes in the hormonal status, that reflects homeostasis disturbance in whole, are inherent to anxious depression. The biochemical mechanisms of imbalance between serotonergic and noradrenergic systems and a role of cortisol in this process are discussed.

  14. Designing modulators of monoamine transporters using virtual screening techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Ole V.; Kortagere, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    The plasma-membrane monoamine transporters (MATs), including the serotonin (SERT), norepinephrine (NET) and dopamine (DAT) transporters, serve a pivotal role in limiting monoamine-mediated neurotransmission through the reuptake of their respective monoamine neurotransmitters. The transporters are the main target of clinically used psychostimulants and antidepressants. Despite the availability of several potent and selective MAT substrates and inhibitors the continuing need for therapeutic drugs to treat brain disorders involving aberrant monoamine signaling provides a compelling reason to identify novel ways of targeting and modulating the MATs. Designing novel modulators of MAT function have been limited by the lack of three dimensional structure information of the individual MATs. However, crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial homolog of MATs, in a substrate-bound occluded, substrate-free outward-open, and an apo inward-open state and also with competitive and non-competitive inhibitors have been determined. In addition, several structures of the Drosophila DAT have also been resolved. Together with computational modeling and experimental data gathered over the past decade, these structures have dramatically advanced our understanding of several aspects of SERT, NET, and DAT transporter function, including some of the molecular determinants of ligand interaction at orthosteric substrate and inhibitor binding pockets. In addition progress has been made in the understanding of how allosteric modulation of MAT function can be achieved. Here we will review all the efforts up to date that has been made through computational approaches employing structural models of MATs to design small molecule modulators to the orthosteric and allosteric sites using virtual screening techniques. PMID:26483692

  15. Monoamine-containing fiber plexuses in the spinal cord of guinea pigs during paralysis, recovery and relapse stages of chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    White, S R; Vyas, D; Bieger, D; Samathanam, G

    1989-05-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques were used to examine the morphology and distribution of monoamine- and substance P-containing fibers in the spinal cords of guinea pigs in acute paralytic, remission and relapse stages of chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. During the initial paralytic attack, focal regions of axonal distortion appeared in the white matter of the cervical and thoracic cord; and axon terminal depletion in the gray matter of the caudal spinal cord was pronounced. This neuropathology persisted throughout remission and was exacerbated during relapse of paralysis. These results suggest that axonal damage is an important component of the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease.

  16. Quantitative distribution of monoamine oxidase A in brainstem monoamine nuclei is normal in major depression.

    PubMed

    Ordway, G A; Farley, J T; Dilley, G E; Overholser, J C; Meltzer, H Y; Balraj, E K; Stockmeier, C A; Klimek, V

    1999-11-13

    An abnormal expression of noradrenergic proteins (e.g., tyrosine hydroxylase, norepinephrine transporters) in the locus coeruleus has recently been demonstrated in subjects with major depression and/or victims of suicide. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) is a key enzyme in the catabolism of biogenic amines and is expressed in brain noradrenergic neurons. In this study, the binding of [3H]Ro41-1049 to MAO-A was measured by quantitative autoradiography at multiple levels along the rostral-caudal axis of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus from subjects with major depression and age- and postmortem interval-matched control subjects who were psychiatrically normal. [3H]Ro41-1049 binding to MAO-A was unevenly distributed along the axis of the locus coeruleus, paralleling an uneven number of neuromelanin-containing (noradrenergic) neurons throughout the nucleus. Accordingly, there was a significant correlation between the number of neuromelanin-containing neurons per section and the specific binding of [3H]Ro41-1049 at any particular level of the locus coeruleus in control subjects (r(2)=0.25; p<0.001) and in subjects with major depression (r(2)=0.14; p<0. 001). Moderate levels of [3H]Ro41-1049 binding were observed in regions surrounding the locus coeruleus, including the central gray and the dorsal and median raphe nuclei. No significant differences in [3H]Ro41-1049 binding to MAO-A were observed at any level of the locus coeruleus, or raphe nuclei, comparing subjects with major depression to psychiatrically normal control subjects. These findings demonstrate that the pathophysiology of major depression is not likely to involve abnormalities in MAO-A.

  17. Water Depletion Threatens Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauman, K. A.; Richter, B. D.; Postel, S.; Floerke, M.; Malsy, M.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the human activity that has by far the largest impact on water, constituting 85% of global water consumption and 67% of global water withdrawals. Much of this water use occurs in places where water depletion, the ratio of water consumption to water availability, exceeds 75% for at least one month of the year. Although only 17% of global watershed area experiences depletion at this level or more, nearly 30% of total cropland and 60% of irrigated cropland are found in these depleted watersheds. Staple crops are particularly at risk, with 75% of global irrigated wheat production and 65% of irrigated maize production found in watersheds that are at least seasonally depleted. Of importance to textile production, 75% of cotton production occurs in the same watersheds. For crop production in depleted watersheds, we find that one half to two-thirds of production occurs in watersheds that have not just seasonal but annual water shortages, suggesting that re-distributing water supply over the course of the year cannot be an effective solution to shortage. We explore the degree to which irrigated production in depleted watersheds reflects limitations in supply, a byproduct of the need for irrigation in perennially or seasonally dry landscapes, and identify heavy irrigation consumption that leads to watershed depletion in more humid climates. For watersheds that are not depleted, we evaluate the potential impact of an increase in irrigated production. Finally, we evaluate the benefits of irrigated agriculture in depleted and non-depleted watersheds, quantifying the fraction of irrigated production going to food production, animal feed, and biofuels.

  18. Monoamine mediation of the morphine-induced activation of mice

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Bernard J.; Sharp, Peter T.

    1972-01-01

    1. The dose-response relationship for hyperactivity in grouped mice following the injection of morphine sulphate has been established. 2. The activation response can be modified by drugs which affect either catecholamines or indoleamines. 3. The monoamine precursors L-DOPA and 5-hydroxytryptophan potentiate the response. 4. The monoamine synthesis inhibitors α-methyl-p-tyrosine and p-chlorophenylalanine reduce the response. 5. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase activity by pargyline caused a great increase in the response. The simultaneous administration of reserpine resulted in a further potentiation. 6. Reserpine blocked the response whenever it was given alone, either before, with or after the injection of morphine. 7. Blockade of α-adrenoceptors with phentolamine or phenoxybenzamine reduced the response. 8. Blockade of tryptaminergic receptors with methysergide or cinanserin also antagonized the response. 9. The major tranquillizers haloperidol and chlorpromazine reduced the response. Haloperidol was especially effective in this regard. 10. The tricyclic antidepressant drug imipramine potentiated the response. 11. The morphine antagonist nalorphine completely prevented the response. 12. The anticholinergic agent atropine and the antihistaminic drug mepyramine did not affect the response. 13. We conclude that dopamine, noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine are all involved in the normal activation response of grouped mice to morphine, with dopaminergic mechanisms being of primary importance. PMID:4263794

  19. Stereoselective effects of MDMA on inhibition of monoamine uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, T.D.; Nichols, D.E.; Yim, G.K.W.

    1986-03-05

    The R(-)-isomers of hallucinogenic phenylisopropylamines are most active, whereas the S(+)-enantiomers of amphetamine (AMPH) and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) are more potent centrally. To determine if MDMA exhibits stereoselective effects at the biochemical level that resemble either those of amphetamine or the potent hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM), the ability of the isomers of MDMA, AMPH and DOM to inhibit uptake of radiolabelled monoamines into synaptosomes was measured. AMPH was more potent than MDMA in inhibiting uptake of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine (NE) into hypothalamic synaptosomes and /sup 3/H-dopamine (DA) into striatal synaptosomes. The S(+)-isomer was more active in each case. MDMA was more potent than AMPH in inhibiting uptake of /sup 3/H-serotonin (5-HT) into hippocampal synaptosomes and exhibited a high degree of stereoselectivity, in favor of the S(+)-isomer. DOM showed only minimal activity in inhibiting uptake of any monoamine (IC/sub 50/ > 10/sup -5/M). These results suggest that MDMA exhibits stereoselective effects similar to those of amphetamine on monoamine uptake inhibition, a parameter that is unrelated to the mechanism of action of the hallucinogen DOM.

  20. Revisiting the Monoamine Hypothesis of Depression: A New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joel S; Bell, Clifton E; Pollard, David A

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of depression increases, depression continues to inflict additional suffering to individuals and societies and better therapies are needed. Based on magnetic resonance spectroscopy and laboratory findings, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) may be intimately involved in the pathophysiology of depression. The isoelectric point of GABA (pI = 7.3) closely approximates the pH of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). This may not be a trivial observation as it may explain preliminary spectrophotometric, enzymatic, and HPLC data that monoamine oxidase (MAO) deaminates GABA. Although MAO is known to deaminate substrates such as catecholamines, indoleamines, and long chain aliphatic amines all of which contain a lipophilic moiety, there is very good evidence to predict that a low concentration of a very lipophilic microspecies of GABA is present when GABA pI = pH as in the CSF. Inhibiting deamination of this microspecies of GABA could explain the well-established successful treatment of refractory depression with MAO inhibitors (MAOI) when other antidepressants that target exclusively levels of monoamines fail. If further experimental work can confirm these preliminary findings, physicians may consider revisiting the use of MAOI for the treatment of non-intractable depression because the potential benefits of increasing GABA as well as the monoamines may outweigh the risks associated with MAOI therapy. PMID:24737931

  1. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  2. Battery depletion monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.S.

    1982-01-26

    A cmos inverter is used to compare pacemaker battery voltage to a referenced voltage. When the reference voltage exceeds the measured battery voltage, the inverter changes state to indicate battery depletion.

  3. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  4. Depleted Uranium: Technical Brief

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical brief provides accepted data and references to additional sources for radiological and chemical characteristics, health risks and references for both the monitoring and measurement, and applicable treatment techniques for depleted uranium.

  5. Effect of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation on rat brain monoamine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, M; Mallick, B N

    1993-08-01

    Monoamine oxidase, monoamine oxidase-A, and monoamine oxidase-B activities were compared in free moving, rapid eye movement sleep-deprived, recovered, and control rat brains. The activities were estimated in the whole brain, cerebrum, cerebellum, whole brainstem, medulla, pons, and midbrain. The flowerpot method was used for continuing deprivation for one, two, or four days. Monoamine oxidase activity decreased significantly in the cerebrum and the cerebellum of the sleep-deprived rats, whereas monoamine oxidase-A and monoamine oxidase-B were differentially affected. Medullary MAO-A was the first to be affected, showing an increase after just one day of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation, while longer deprivation decreased its activity. The activity of monoamine oxidase-B was not significantly affected in any brain areas of the deprived rats until after two days of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation. All the altered enzyme activities returned to control levels after recovery. Control experiments suggest that the decrease was primarily caused by the rapid eye movement sleep deprivation and was not due to nonspecific effects. These findings are consistent with past studies and may help to explain earlier observations. The results support the involvement of aminergic mechanisms in rapid eye movement sleep. The plausible reasons for the changes in the activities of monoamine oxidases, after rapid eye movement sleep deprivation, are discussed.

  6. [Monoamine synthesis by non-monoaminergic neurons: illusion of reality].

    PubMed

    Ugriumov, M V

    2009-03-01

    Apart from monoaminergic neurons possessing the whole set of enzymes of monoamine synthesis from the precursor amino acid, the neurons expressing individual enzymes of monoamine synthesis have been discovered in the mid-eighties. Most numerous monoenzymatic neurons express individual enzymes of dopamine (DA), thyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). Functional characteristics and the functional significance of the monoenzymatic neurons have been evaluated in a series of our studies, mainly of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (AN), one of the most important DA-ergic centers of the brain. It has been demonstrated that the AN of rats contains numerous monoenzymatic neurons. Their portion among the neurons expressing enzymes of DA synthesis exceeded 99 % whereas it decreased continuously in postnatal period still reaching 50 % in adulthood. It was shown that the monoenzymatic neurons expressing complementary enzymes of DNA synthesis produce this neurotransmitter in cooperation. In this case, L-tyrosine is transformed to L-DOPA in TH containing neurons that is followed by L-DOPA release and uptake to AADC containing neurons with a semi-specific membrane transporter of large neutral amino acids for DA synthesis. Turning on the expression of enzymes of DA synthesis in non-dopaminergic neurons is an adaptive reaction under the functional insufficiency of DA-ergic neurons. So, hyperprolactinemia that is developed under the degeneration of DA-ergic neurons of the AN and the deficiency of DA, the prolactin-inhibiting neurohormone, was compensated in due time to increase in number of monoenzymatic neurons and the strengthening of cooperative synthesis of DA in the nucleus. The same compensatory cooperative synthesis if DA is supposed to be turned on under the degeneration of DA-ergic neurons of the nigrostriatal system that was manifested by appearance of the neurons expressing enzymes of DA synthesis in the deafferentiated striatum in rats

  7. Maladaptive defensive behaviours in monoamine oxidase A-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Godar, Sean C.; Bortolato, Marco; Frau, Roberto; Dousti, Mona; Chen, Kevin; Shih, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Rich evidence indicates that monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, the major enzyme catalysing the degradation of monoamine neurotransmitters, plays a key role in emotional regulation. Although MAOA deficiency is associated with reactive aggression in humans and mice, the involvement of this enzyme in defensive behaviour remains controversial and poorly understood. To address this issue, we tested MAOA knockout (KO) mice in a spectrum of paradigms and settings associated with variable degrees of threat. The presentation of novel inanimate objects induced a significant reduction in exploratory approaches and increase in defensive behaviours, such as tail-rattling, biting and digging. These neophobic responses were context-dependent and particularly marked in the home cage. In the elevated plus- and T-mazes, MAOA KO mice and wild-type (WT) littermates displayed equivalent locomotor activity and time in closed and open arms; however, MAOA KO mice featured significant reductions in risk assessment, as well as unconditioned avoidance and escape. No differences between genotypes were observed in the defensive withdrawal and emergence test. Conversely, MAOA KO mice exhibited a dramatic reduction of defensive and fear-related behaviours in the presence of predator-related cues, such as predator urine or an anaesthetized rat, in comparison with those observed in their WT littermates. The behavioural abnormalities in MAOA KO mice were not paralleled by overt alterations in sensory and microvibrissal functions. Collectively, these results suggest that MAOA deficiency leads to a general inability to appropriately assess contextual risk and attune defensive and emotional responses to environmental cues. PMID:21156093

  8. BEHAVIORAL OUTCOMES OF MONOAMINE OXIDASE DEFICIENCY: PRECLINICAL AND CLINICAL EVIDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Bortolato, Marco; Shih, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) isoenzymes A and B are mitochondrial-bound proteins, catalyzing the oxidative deamination of monoamine neurotransmitters as well as xenobiotic amines. Although they derive from a common ancestral progenitor gene, are located at X-chromosome and display 70% structural identity, their substrate preference, regional distribution, and physiological role are divergent. In fact, while MAO-A has high affinity for serotonin and norepinephrine, MAO-B primarily serves the catabolism of 2-phenylethylamine (PEA) and contributes to the degradation of other trace amines and dopamine. Convergent lines of preclinical and clinical evidence indicate that variations in MAO enzymatic activity—due to either genetic or environmental factors—can exert a profound influence on behavioral regulation and play a role in the pathophysiology of a large spectrum of mental and neurodegenerative disorders, ranging from antisocial personality disorder to Parkinson’s disease. Over the past few years, numerous advances have been made in our understanding of the phenotypical variations associated with genetic polymorphisms and mutations of the genes encoding for both isoenzymes. In particular, novel findings on the phenotypes of MAO-deficient mice are highlighting novel potential implications of both isoenzymes in a broad spectrum of mental disorders, ranging from autism and anxiety to impulse-control disorders and ADHD. These studies will lay the foundation for future research on the neurobiological and neurochemical bases of these pathological conditions, as well as the role of gene × environment interactions in the vulnerability to several mental disorders. PMID:21971001

  9. Social modulation of brain monoamine levels in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Dahlbom, S Josefin; Winberg, Svante; Oliveira, Rui F

    2013-09-15

    In social species animals tend to adjust their social behaviour according to the available social information in the group, in order to optimize and improve their one social status. This changing environment requires for rapid and transient behavioural changes that relies primarily on biochemical switching of existing neural networks. Monoamines and neuropeptides are the two major candidates to mediate these changes in brain states underlying socially behavioural flexibility. In the current study we used zebrafish (Danio rerio) males to study the effects of acute social interactions on rapid regional changes in brain levels of monoamines (serotonin and dopamine). A behavioural paradigm under which male zebrafish consistently express fighting behaviour was used to investigate the effects of different social experiences: winning the interaction, losing the interaction, or fighting an unsolved interaction (mirror image). We found that serotonergic activity is significantly higher in the telencephalon of winners and in the optic tectum of losers, and no significant changes were observed in mirror fighters suggesting that serotonergic activity is differentially regulated in different brain regions by social interactions. Dopaminergic activity it was also significantly higher in the telencephalon of winners which may be representative of social reward. Together our data suggests that acute social interactions elicit rapid and differential changes in serotonergic and dopaminergic activity across different brain regions.

  10. Monoamine oxidase A mediates prostate tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shao, Chen; Li, Xiangyan; Li, Qinlong; Hu, Peizhen; Shi, Changhong; Li, Yang; Chen, Yi-Ting; Yin, Fei; Liao, Chun-Peng; Stiles, Bangyan L.; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Shih, Jean C.; Chung, Leland W.K.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors from patients with high-grade aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) exhibit increased expression of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), a mitochondrial enzyme that degrades monoamine neurotransmitters and dietary amines. Despite the association between MAOA and aggressive PCa, it is unclear how MAOA promotes PCa progression. Here, we found that MAOA functions to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stabilize the transcription factor HIF1α, which mediates hypoxia through an elevation of ROS, thus enhancing growth, invasiveness, and metastasis of PCa cells. Knockdown and overexpression of MAOA in human PCa cell lines indicated that MAOA induces EMT through activation of VEGF and its coreceptor neuropilin-1. MAOA-dependent activation of neuropilin-1 promoted AKT/FOXO1/TWIST1 signaling, allowing FOXO1 binding at the TWIST1 promoter. Importantly, the MAOA-dependent HIF1α/VEGF-A/FOXO1/TWIST1 pathway was activated in high-grade PCa specimens, and knockdown of MAOA reduced or even eliminated prostate tumor growth and metastasis in PCa xenograft mouse models. Pharmacological inhibition of MAOA activity also reduced PCa xenograft growth in mice. Moreover, high MAOA expression in PCa tissues correlated with worse clinical outcomes in PCa patients. These findings collectively characterize the contribution of MAOA in PCa pathogenesis and suggest that MAOA has potential as a therapeutic target in PCa. PMID:24865426

  11. Ammonia causes decreased brain monoamines in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ronan, Patrick J.; Gaikowski, Mark P.; Hamilton, Steven J.; Buhl, Kevin J.; Summers, Cliff H.

    2007-01-01

    Hyperammonemia, arising from variety of disorders, leads to severe neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms of ammonia toxicity in brain are not completely understood. This study investigated the effects of ammonia on monoaminergic systems in brains of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish serve as a good model system to investigate hyperammonemic effects on brain function since no liver manipulations are necessary to increase endogenous ammonia concentrations. Using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, monoamines and some associated metabolites were measured from whole brain homogenate. Adult males were exposed for 48 h to six different concentrations of ammonia (0.01–2.36 mg/l unionized) which bracketed the 96-h LC50 for this species. Ammonia concentration-dependent decreases were found for the catecholamines (norepinephrine and dopamine) and the indoleamine serotonin (5-HT). After an initial increase in the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan it too decreased with increasing ammonia concentrations. There were also significant increases in the 5-HIAA/5-HT and DOPAC/DA ratios, often used as measures of turnover. There were no changes in epinephrine (Epi) or monoamine catabolites (DOPAC, 5-HIAA) at any ammonia concentrations tested. Results suggest that ammonia causes decreased synthesis while also causing increased release and degradation. Increased release may underlie behavioral reactions to ammonia exposure in fish. This study adds weight to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that ammonia leads to dysfunctional monoaminergic systems in brain which may underlie neurological symptoms associated with human disorders such as hepatic encephalopathy.

  12. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) inhibitors decrease glioma progression

    PubMed Central

    Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Kota, Rajesh; Chen, Kevin; Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Jhaveri, Niyati; Groshen, Susan L.; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Chen, Thomas C.; Hofman, Florence M.; Shih, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor which is currently treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Tumors usually become resistant to TMZ and recur; no effective therapy is then available. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAO A) oxidizes monoamine neurotransmitters resulting in reactive oxygen species which cause cancer. This study shows that MAO A expression is increased in human glioma tissues and cell lines. MAO A inhibitors, clorgyline or the near-infrared-dye MHI-148 conjugated to clorgyline (NMI), were cytotoxic for glioma and decreased invasion in vitro. Using the intracranial TMZ-resistant glioma model, clorgyline or NMI alone or in combination with low-dose TMZ reduced tumor growth and increased animal survival. NMI was localized specifically to the tumor. Immunocytochemistry studies showed that the MAO A inhibitor reduced proliferation, microvessel density and invasion, and increased macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, we have identified MAO A inhibitors as potential novel stand-alone drugs or as combination therapy with low dose TMZ for drug-resistant gliomas. NMI can also be used as a non-invasive imaging tool. Thus has a dual function for both therapy and diagnosis. PMID:26871599

  13. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  14. Effects of taurine deficiency and chronic methanol administration on rat retina, optic nerve and brain amino acids and monoamines.

    PubMed

    González-Quevedo, A; Obregón, F; Urbina, M; Roussó, T; Lima, L

    2003-08-01

    A chronic methanol (MeOH) intoxication scheme (2 g/kg/day ip for 2 weeks) was carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats, previously depleted of folates with methotrexate (MTX). beta-Alanine (beta-Ala), 5%, was also administered to some animals in the drinking water. Amino acids were determined in plasma, retina, optic nerve, hippocampus and posterior cortex by HPLC with fluorescence detection and monoamines in retina, hippocampus and posterior cortex by electrochemical detection. Beta-Ala administration reduced taurine (Tau) levels in plasma, hippocampus and posterior cortex, but not in retina and optic nerve. Aspartate (Asp) concentration in the optic nerve was increased in MTX-MeOH treated animals, and the administration of beta-Ala did not modify this elevation. The association of beta-Ala with MTX-MeOH produced an increase of threonine, and a decrease of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the retina without modifying 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, whereas in the hippocampus an elevation of asparagine was observed. We conclude that, in the retina, beta-Ala in combination with MTX-MeOH increased serotonin and decreased dopamine (DA) turnover rate, and resulted in changes in the amino acid balance, that could affect glycinergic activity. On the other hand, in the hippocampus, Asp metabolism could be affected by Tau depletion with beta-Ala.

  15. Effects of high-dose fenfluramine treatment on monoamine uptake sites in rat brain: Assessment using quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, N.M.; Mitchell, W.M.; Contrera, J.F.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Fenfluramine is an amphetamine derivative that in humans is used primarily as an anorectic agent in the treatment of obesity. In rats, subchronic high-dose d,l-fenfluramine treatment (24 mg/kg subcutaneously, twice daily for 4 days) causes long-lasting decreases in brain serotonin (5HT), its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and high-affinity 5HT uptake sites. Moreover, this high-dose treatment regimen causes both selective long-lasting decreases in fine-caliber 5HT-immunoreactive axons and appearance of other 5HT-immunoreactive axons with morphology characteristic of degenerating axons. Determination of the potential neurotoxic effects of fenfluramine treatment using immunohistochemistry is limited from the perspectives that staining is difficult to quantify and that it relies on presence of the antigen (in this case 5HT), and the 5HT-depleting effects of fenfluramine are well known. In the present study, we used quantitative in vitro autoradiography to assess, in detail, the density and regional distribution of (3H)paroxetine-labeled 5HT and (3H)mazindol-labeled catecholamine uptake sites in response to the high-dose fenfluramine treatment described above. Because monoamine uptake sites are concentrated on monoamine-containing nerve terminals, decreases in uptake site density would provide a quantitative assessment of potential neurotoxicity resulting from this fenfluramine treatment regimen. Marked decreases in densities of (3H)paroxetine-labeled 5HT uptake sites occurred in brain regions in which fenfluramine treatment decreased the density of 5HT-like immunostaining when compared to saline-treated control rats. These included cerebral cortex, caudate putamen, hippocampus, thalamus, and medial hypothalamus.

  16. Disorders of consciousness and pharmaceuticals that act on oxygen based amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitter pathways of the brain.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen based neurotransmitters in the synapses of the brain are proposed to play an important role in the generation of consciousness. They include the amino acids glutamate and GABA which use Krebs cycle precursors for their synthesis, and the monoamines dopamine, noradrenalin, adrenalin and serotonin, which are derived from tyrosine and tryptophan. During ischemia after an acute brain injury, a GABA surge often initiates brain suppression. It has been proposed that with chronic ischemia, a secondary, possibly epigenetic response occurs when neurotransmitters deplete, a glucose and oxygen saving mechanism termed neurodormancy that may invoke alternative long term low energy metabolic pathways in the brain, encountered in Disorders of Consciousness. Some medications can reverse Disorders of Consciousness in some patients. Virtually all of them act on neurotransmitter systems that use oxygen as a building block or as an energy source within the brain. Pharmaceuticals that act in the oxygen based amino acid systems of the brain include the GABAergic medications zolpidem and baclofen, while those that act in the monoamine axes include the dopaminergic medications L Dopa, amantadine, bromocriptine, apomorphine and methylphenidate, and the noradrenergic and serotonergic medications desipramine, amitriptyline, protriptyline and fluoxetine. Another group are the cholinesterase inhibitors, responsible for increasing acetylcholine, which is synthesized from the Krebs cycle initiator, acetyl CoA. It appears that pharmaceuticals that are active in the oxygen based neurotransmitter pathways of the brain are successful to arouse to consciousness patients that suffer from its disorders. Research needs to be supported as foundation to understand the biochemical mechanisms that are involved in consciousness disorders and to explore further the pharmacological treatment possibilities for these devastating neurological conditions.

  17. Brofaromine: a monoamine oxidase-A and serotonin uptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Waldmeier, P C; Glatt, A; Jaekel, J; Bittiger, H

    1993-01-01

    Brofaromine is a tight-binding, reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A), with concomitant serotonin (5-HT) uptake-inhibiting properties. In psychopharmacologic investigations, the compound shows the properties expected of an MAO inhibitor, antagonizing the effects of reserpine, tetrabenazine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan in rats and mice, and suppressing rapid eye movement sleep in cats. Brofaromine showed antidepressant-like activity in a rat social conflict test. In radioligand binding assays, brofaromine exhibited weak or no interaction with alpha 1- and alpha 2-noradrenergic, 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, cholinergic, histamine H1 and H2, mu-opiate, GABAA, benzodiazepine, adenosine, neurotensin, and substance P receptors. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo potencies to inhibit 5-HT uptake with those of reference drugs, and direct evidence in patients and volunteers suggest that 5-HT uptake inhibition plays a role in the clinical profile of brofaromine.

  18. Amphetamines, new psychoactive drugs and the monoamine transporter cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In monoaminergic neurons, the vesicular transporters and the plasma membrane transporters operate in a relay. Amphetamine and its congeners target this relay to elicit their actions: most amphetamines are substrates, which pervert the relay to elicit efflux of monoamines into the synaptic cleft. However, some amphetamines act as transporter inhibitors. Both compound classes elicit profound psychostimulant effects, which render them liable to recreational abuse. Currently, a surge of new psychoactive substances occurs on a global scale. Chemists bypass drug bans by ingenuous structural variations, resulting in a rich pharmacology. A credible transport model must account for their distinct mode of action and link this to subtle differences in activity and undesired, potentially deleterious effects. PMID:25542076

  19. Aggression and personality: association with amino acids and monoamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E; Mortensen, E L; Breum, L; Alling, C; Larsen, O G; Bøge-Rasmussen, T; Jensen, C; Bennicke, K

    1996-03-01

    Associations in 52 normal individuals were examined between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine, and concentrations of monoamine metabolites in the CSF, and scores on an aggression questionnaire, the Kinsey Institute Reaction List II, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. There was a significantly positive correlation between CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels and extroverted aggression scores, and a significantly negative correlation between CSF 5-HIAA levels and introverted aggression scores. Males showed higher plasma Trp concentrations than females, and significantly positive correlations between plasma Trp concentrations and scores on extroverted aggression and the Eysenck E scale. Males, furthermore, showed a significantly negative correlation between CSF Trp levels and scores on the Eysenck P scale, and a significantly positive correlation between concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol in CSF and scores on moral aggression. These results suggest that central serotonin influences aggression in normal individuals through effects on personality.

  20. Translational neuroimaging: positron emission tomography studies of monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Joanna S; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using radiotracers with high molecular specificity is an important scientific tool in studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO), an important enzyme in the regulation of the neurotransmitters dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin as well as the dietary amine, tyramine. MAO occurs in two different subtypes, MAO A and MAO B, which have different substrate and inhibitor specificity and which are different gene products. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies of special value. MAO A and B can be imaged in the human brain and certain peripheral organs using PET and carbon-11 (half-life 20.4 minutes) labeled mechanism-based irreversible inhibitors, clorgyline and L -deprenyl, respectively. In this article we introduce MAO and describe the development of these radiotracers and their translation from preclinical studies to the investigation of variables affecting MAO in the human brain and peripheral organs.

  1. Amphetamines, new psychoactive drugs and the monoamine transporter cycle.

    PubMed

    Sitte, Harald H; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In monoaminergic neurons, the vesicular transporters and the plasma membrane transporters operate in a relay. Amphetamine and its congeners target this relay to elicit their actions: most amphetamines are substrates, which pervert the relay to elicit efflux of monoamines into the synaptic cleft. However, some amphetamines act as transporter inhibitors. Both compound classes elicit profound psychostimulant effects, which render them liable to recreational abuse. Currently, a surge of new psychoactive substances occurs on a global scale. Chemists bypass drug bans by ingenuous structural variations, resulting in a rich pharmacology. A credible transport model must account for their distinct mode of action and link this to subtle differences in activity and undesired, potentially deleterious effects.

  2. Black bile: are elevated monoamines an etiological factor in some cases of major depression?

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Paul J

    2013-06-01

    It was hypothesized decades ago that reduced levels of brain monoamines such as serotonin or norepinephrine form, at least in part, a pathophysiological basis for major depression. Consistent with this hypothesis, a conventional strategy used, with varying success, to treat major depression involves administering antidepressant drugs that are thought to boost the synaptic concentration of serotonin and/or norepinephrine. While the reduced monoamine hypothesis is well known but highly controversial and widely considered to be incomplete or simply incorrect, the possibility that elevated monoamines are an etiological factor in some cases of major depression (rather than or in addition to hypomania or mania) has received little attention at all. This paper puts forth the novel hypothesis elevated brain levels of three monoamines - serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine - are each etiological factors in some cases of major depression. In support of this hypothesis, the paper very briefly reviews relevant data on each of these neurotransmitter systems, including: transporter knockout mice, human genetic association studies, and pharmaceutical studies that enhance or diminish transmitter signaling in either rodents or humans. While all of the published data do not support the hypothesis, there are studies that do for each of the three transmitter systems. The etiological basis of the putative effect of monoamines on depression may be mediated both through genetics and exposure to psychological stress. If the elevated monoamine hypothesis is correct for some persons, pharmaceutical treatment of depression may be significantly improved if the particular elevated monoamine(s) could be identified and then altered on a personalized basis, or perhaps for different putative subtypes of depression. One possibility is that atypical depression involves elevated noradrenergic signaling.

  3. [Comparative study of bacterial agmatinase inhibition by derivatives of putrescine and aliphatic monoamines].

    PubMed

    Khramov, V A

    1977-03-01

    Aliphatic monoamines and some putrescine derivatives (10(-3) M) are found to inhibit agmatinase from Proteus vulgaris. Constants and the type of inhibition are determined. Investigation of the temperature effect on the inhibition has revealed an exotermic character of this process. Some thermodinamic parameters of agmatinase-anylamine binding reaction are calculated. 1-Guanidobutane is obtained by means of 1-amidobutane guanidilation, and it is found to be more efficient inhibitor than monoamines.

  4. Tank depletion flow controller

    DOEpatents

    Georgeson, Melvin A.

    1976-10-26

    A flow control system includes two bubbler tubes installed at different levels within a tank containing such as radioactive liquid. As the tank is depleted, a differential pressure transmitter monitors pressure differences imparted by the two bubbler tubes at a remote, shielded location during uniform time intervals. At the end of each uniform interval, balance pots containing a dense liquid are valved together to equalize the pressures. The resulting sawtooth-shaped signal generated by the differential pressure transmitter is compared with a second sawtooth signal representing the desired flow rate during each time interval. Variations in the two signals are employed by a control instrument to regulate flow rate.

  5. Validity of urinary monoamine assay sales under the "spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model".

    PubMed

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Uncini, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Spot baseline urinary monoamine assays have been used in medicine for over 50 years as a screening test for monoamine-secreting tumors, such as pheochromocytoma and carcinoid syndrome. In these disease states, when the result of a spot baseline monoamine assay is above the specific value set by the laboratory, it is an indication to obtain a 24-hour urine sample to make a definitive diagnosis. There are no defined applications where spot baseline urinary monoamine assays can be used to diagnose disease or other states directly. No peer-reviewed published original research exists which demonstrates that these assays are valid in the treatment of individual patients in the clinical setting. Since 2001, urinary monoamine assay sales have been promoted for numerous applications under the "spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model". There is no published peer-reviewed original research that defines the scientific foundation upon which the claims for these assays are made. On the contrary, several articles have been published that discredit various aspects of the model. To fill the void, this manuscript is a comprehensive review of the scientific foundation and claims put forth by laboratories selling urinary monoamine assays under the spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model.

  6. Depletion of intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Seipt, D.; Heinzl, T.; Marklund, M.

    2017-03-01

    The problem of backreaction of quantum processes on the properties of the background field still remains on the list of outstanding questions of high intensity particle physics. Usually, photon emission by an electron or positron, photon decay into electron-positron pairs in strong electromagnetic fields, or electron-positron pair production by such fields are described in the framework of the external field approximation. It is assumed that the external field has infinite energy and is not affected by these processes. However, the above-mentioned processes have a multi-photon nature, i.e., they occur with the absorption of a significant number of field photons. As a result, the interaction of an intense electromagnetic field with either a highly charged electron bunch or a fast growing population of electrons, positrons, and gamma photons (as in the case of an electromagnetic cascade) may lead to a depletion of the field energy, thus making the external field approximation invalid. Taking the multi-photon Compton process as an example, we estimate the threshold of depletion and find it to become significant at field strengths (a0˜103) and electron bunch charge of about tens of nC.

  7. 3-Coumaranone derivatives as inhibitors of monoamine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyk, Adriaan S; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Legoabe, Lesetja J

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory properties of a series of 20 3-coumaranone [benzofuran-3(2H)-one] derivatives. The 3-coumaranone derivatives are structurally related to series of α-tetralone and 1-indanone derivatives, which have recently been shown to potently inhibit MAO, with selectivity for MAO-B (in preference to the MAO-A isoform). 3-Coumaranones are similarly found to selectively inhibit human MAO-B with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.004–1.05 µM. Nine compounds exhibited IC50<0.05 µM for the inhibition of MAO-B. For the inhibition of human MAO-A, IC50 values ranged from 0.586 to >100 µM, with only one compound possessing an IC50<1 µM. For selected 3-coumaranone derivatives, it is established that MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition are reversible since dialysis of enzyme–inhibitor mixtures almost completely restores enzyme activity. On the basis of the selectivity profiles and potent action, it may be concluded that the 3-coumaranone derivatives are suitable leads for the development of selective MAO-B inhibitors as potential treatment for disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26491258

  8. Reye's syndrome: salicylate and mitochondrial monoamine oxidase function

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, B.A.; Caplan, D.; Lolies, P.

    1986-03-01

    It has been suggested that aspirin is somehow linked with the onset of Reye's syndrome (RS). A general feature of Reye's syndrome is severe impairment of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) function. The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of salicylate on platelet mitochondrial MAO activity in three groups: group A (healthy children, n = 21) and group C (healthy adults, n = 10). Platelet MAO was measured by radio-enzymatic technique with /sup 14/C-tyramine as a substrate. The results showed that salicyclate (10 mM) had a 20 to 60 percent inhibitory effect on platelet MAO function in only 1, 3 and 2 of the subjects in group A, B and C. Furthermore, there was an association between low enzyme activity and salicylate MAO inhibitory effect in these subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that salicylate may induce deterioration in mitochondrial function in susceptible individuals and that the assessment of salicylate MAO inhibitory effect may identify those who may be at risk to develop aspirin poisoning and Reye's syndrome.

  9. 2-acetylphenol analogs as potent reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Legoabe, Lesetja J; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2015-01-01

    Based on a previous report that substituted 2-acetylphenols may be promising leads for the design of novel monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, a series of C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs (15) and related compounds (two) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B. Generally, the study compounds exhibited inhibitory activities against both MAO-A and MAO-B, with selectivity for the B isoform. Among the compounds evaluated, seven compounds exhibited IC50 values <0.01 µM for MAO-B inhibition, with the most selective compound being 17,000-fold selective for MAO-B over the MAO-A isoform. Analyses of the structure–activity relationships for MAO inhibition show that substitution on the C5 position of the 2-acetylphenol moiety is a requirement for MAO-B inhibition, and the benzyloxy substituent is particularly favorable in this regard. This study concludes that C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs are potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, appropriate for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26203229

  10. Alcohol and violence: neuropeptidergic modulation of monoamine systems

    PubMed Central

    Miczek, Klaus A.; DeBold, Joseph F.; Hwa, Lara S.; Newman, Emily L.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurobiological processes underlying the epidemiologically-established link between alcohol and several types of social, aggressive, and violent behavior remain poorly understood. Acute low doses of alcohol, as well as withdrawal from long-term alcohol use, may lead to escalated aggressive behavior in a subset of individuals. An urgent task will be to disentangle the host of interacting genetic and environmental risk factors in individuals that are predisposed to engage in escalated aggressive behavior. The modulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine impulse flow by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, acting via distinct ionotropic and metabotropic receptor subtypes in the dorsal raphe nucleus during alcohol consumption, is of critical significance in the suppression and escalation of aggressive behavior. In anticipation and reaction to aggressive behavior, neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, opioid peptides, and vasopressin interact with monoamines, GABA, and glutamate to attenuate and amplify aggressive behavior in alcohol-consuming individuals. These neuromodulators represent novel molecular targets for intervention that await clinical validation. Intermittent episodes of brief social defeat during aggressive confrontations are sufficient to cause long-lasting neuroadaptations that can lead to the escalation of alcohol consumption. PMID:26285061

  11. The effects of two chronic intermittent stressors on brain monoamines.

    PubMed

    Campmany, L; Pol, O; Armario, A

    1996-03-01

    The effects of chronic exposure (27 days) to two different stressors on brain monoaminergic activity was studied in adult male rats. The stressors used were restraint in tubes (RES) and immobilization in wooden boards (IMO). Both chronically stressed and stress naive (control) rats were subjected to 0, 15, and 60 min of the same stressor to which they were chronically exposed. Previous chronic exposure to either RES or IMO significantly reduced ACTH response to the same stressor. Monoaminergic response to these stressors was studied by measuring the levels of noradrenaline (NA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites: 3-methoxy,4-hydroxyphenyletileneglycol sulfate (MHPG-SO4) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), respectively. The regions studied were: pons plus medulla, midbrain, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and frontal cortex. Previous chronic exposure to the stressors induced only few changes in the resting levels of the monoamines and their metabolites. In addition, monoaminergic response to the same stressor to which they were chronically exposed was always similar in control and chronically stressed rats. These data indicate that brain NA and 5-HT metabolism is less sensitive than ACTH to the process of habituation to a repeated stressor, at least in the gross areas of the brain analyzed in the present study.

  12. Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase by Stilbenes from Rheum palmatum

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bo; Yang, Zhong-Duo; Shi, Dan-Feng; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Ming-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Seven stilbenes and one catechin were bioactivity-guidedly isolated from the rhizomes of Rheum palmatem. Their structures were identified as piceatannol (1), resveratrol (2), piceid (3), rhapontigenin (4), piceatannol-3´-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5), rhaponticin (6), catechin (7) and desoxyrhapontigenin (8). Anti-monoamine oxidase (MAO) activities of compounds 1–8 were tested. Compounds 1 and 8 showed significant MAO inhibitory activities with IC50 values 16.4 ± 1.5 μM and 11.5 ± 1.1, respectively, when the IC50 value of iproniazid as a standard was 6.5 ± 0.5 μM. The selectivity of compounds 1-8 against MAO-A and MAO-B were also evaluated. The results showed that compounds 4˴6˴8 preferred to inhibit MAO-A rather than MAO-B with selectivity values ([IC50 of MAO-B]/ [IC50 of MAO-A]) of 4.74, 10.01 and 9.42, respectively. The preliminary structure–activity relationships (SARs) of these compounds were discussed and the molecular modeling was also performed to explore the binding mode of inhibitors at the active site of MAO-A and MAO-B. PMID:28243286

  13. Alcohol and violence: neuropeptidergic modulation of monoamine systems.

    PubMed

    Miczek, Klaus A; DeBold, Joseph F; Hwa, Lara S; Newman, Emily L; de Almeida, Rosa M M

    2015-09-01

    Neurobiological processes underlying the epidemiologically established link between alcohol and several types of social, aggressive, and violent behavior remain poorly understood. Acute low doses of alcohol, as well as withdrawal from long-term alcohol use, may lead to escalated aggressive behavior in a subset of individuals. An urgent task will be to disentangle the host of interacting genetic and environmental risk factors in individuals who are predisposed to engage in escalated aggressive behavior. The modulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine impulse flow by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, acting via distinct ionotropic and metabotropic receptor subtypes in the dorsal raphe nucleus during alcohol consumption, is of critical significance in the suppression and escalation of aggressive behavior. In anticipation and reaction to aggressive behavior, neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, opioid peptides, and vasopressin interact with monoamines, GABA, and glutamate to attenuate and amplify aggressive behavior in alcohol-consuming individuals. These neuromodulators represent novel molecular targets for intervention that await clinical validation. Intermittent episodes of brief social defeat during aggressive confrontations are sufficient to cause long-lasting neuroadaptations that can lead to the escalation of alcohol consumption.

  14. Monoamine oxidases as sources of oxidants in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Kaludercic, Nina; Mialet-Perez, Jeanne; Paolocci, Nazareno; Parini, Angelo; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress can be generated at several sites within the mitochondria. Among these, monoamine oxidases (MAO) have been described as a prominent source. MAO are mitochondrial flavoenzymes responsible for the oxidative deamination of catecholamines, serotonin and biogenic amines, and during this process they generate H2O2 and aldehyde intermediates. The role of MAO in cardiovascular pathophysiology has only recently gathered some attention since it has been demonstrated that both H2O2 and aldehydes may target mitochondrial function and consequently affect function and viability of the myocardium. In the present review, we will discuss the role of MAO in catecholamine and serotonin clearance and cycling in relation to cardiac structure and function. The relevant contribution of each MAO isoform (MAO-A or -B) will be discussed in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial injury. Finally, we will examine both beneficial effects of their pharmacological or genetic inhibition along with potential adverse effects observed at baseline in MAO knockout mice, as well as the deleterious effects following their over-expression specifically at cardiomyocyte level. PMID:24412580

  15. Monoamine oxidases and alcoholism. II. Studies in alcoholic families

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, B.K.; Hampe, C.L.; Parsian, A.; Cloninger, C.R.

    1995-10-09

    Thirty-five alcoholic families have been studied to investigate the relationship between DNA markers at the monoamine oxidase (MAO) loci and (1) platelet activity levels and (2) alcoholism. A quantitative linkage analysis failed to reveal any evidence that the variation in activity levels cosegregates with the DNA markers. A sib-pair analysis did not reveal a significant excess of MAO haplotype sharing among alcoholic sibs, although the deviation from random sharing was in the direction consistent with an X-linked component. A reanalysis of platelet MAO activity levels in a subset of these families revealed that the lower levels previously found in alcoholics is more likely due to the differences between males and females. Only among males and only when a {open_quotes}broad{close_quotes} definition of alcoholism is used (and MAO activity levels are transformed to normality) does it appear that alcoholics have depressed activities compared to nonalcoholics. Finally, when the confounding due to gender difference is removed, no differences between type I and type II alcoholics are found in these families. 63 refs., 6 tabs.

  16. A rational approach to elucidate human monoamine oxidase molecular selectivity.

    PubMed

    Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Alberga, Domenico; Pisani, Leonardo; Gadaleta, Domenico; Trisciuzzi, Daniela; Farina, Roberta; Carotti, Andrea; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Catto, Marco; Nicolotti, Orazio

    2017-04-01

    Designing highly selective human monoamine oxidase (hMAO) inhibitors is a challenging goal on the road to a more effective treatment of depression and anxiety (inhibition of hMAO-A isoform) as well as neurodegenerative diseases (inhibition of hMAO-B isoform). To uncover the molecular rationale of hMAOs selectivity, two recently prepared 2H-chromene-2-ones, namely compounds 1 and 2, were herein chosen as molecular probes being highly selective toward hMAO-A and hMAO-B, respectively. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) studies on four different complexes, cross-simulating one at a time the two hMAO-isoforms (dimer embedded in a lipid bilayer) with the two considered probes. Our comparative analysis on the obtained 100ns trajectories discloses a stable H-bond interaction between 1 and Gln215 as crucial for ligand selectivity toward hMAO-A whereas a water-mediated interaction might explain the observed hMAO-B selectivity of compound 2. Such hypotheses are further supported by binding free energy calculations carried out applying the molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method and allowing us to evaluate the contribution of each residue to the observed isoform selectivity. Taken as whole, this study represents the first attempt to explain at molecular level hMAO isoform selectivity and a valuable yardstick for better addressing the design of new and highly selective MAO inhibitors.

  17. Monoamine oxidases as sources of oxidants in the heart.

    PubMed

    Kaludercic, Nina; Mialet-Perez, Jeanne; Paolocci, Nazareno; Parini, Angelo; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-08-01

    Oxidative stress can be generated at several sites within the mitochondria. Among these, monoamine oxidase (MAO) has been described as a prominent source. MAOs are mitochondrial flavoenzymes responsible for the oxidative deamination of catecholamines, serotonin and biogenic amines, and during this process they generate H2O2 and aldehyde intermediates. The role of MAO in cardiovascular pathophysiology has only recently gathered some attention since it has been demonstrated that both H2O2 and aldehydes may target mitochondrial function and consequently affect function and viability of the myocardium. In the present review, we will discuss the role of MAO in catecholamine and serotonin clearance and cycling in relation to cardiac structure and function. The relevant contribution of each MAO isoform (MAO-A or -B) will be discussed in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial injury. Finally, we will examine both beneficial effects of their pharmacological or genetic inhibition along with potential adverse effects observed at baseline in MAO knockout mice, as well as the deleterious effects following their over-expression specifically at cardiomyocyte level. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Redox Signalling in the Cardiovascular System".

  18. Ethanol Dependence Abolishes Monoamine and GIRK (Kir3) Channel Inhibition of Orbitofrontal Cortex Excitability.

    PubMed

    Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Lopez, Marcelo F; Mulholland, Patrick J; Woodward, John J

    2017-03-15

    Alcohol abuse disorders are associated with dysfunction of frontal cortical areas including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). The OFC is extensively innervated by monoamines, and drugs that target monoamine receptors have been used to treat a number of neuropsychiatric diseases, including alcoholism. However, little is known regarding how monoamines affect OFC neuron excitability or whether this modulation is altered by chronic exposure to ethanol. In this study, we examined the effect of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin on lateral OFC neuronal excitability in naive mice and in those exposed to chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment. All three monoamines decreased current-evoked spike firing of lOFC neurons and this action required Giα-coupled D2, α2-adrenergic, and 5HT1A receptors, respectively. Inhibition of firing by dopamine or the D2 agonist quinpirole, but not norepinephrine or serotonin, was prevented by the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin. GABA-mediated tonic current was enhanced by dopamine or the D1 agonist SKF81297 but not quinpirole, whereas the amplitude of spontaneous IPSCs was increased by quinpirole but not dopamine. Spiking was also inhibited by the direct GIRK channel activator ML297, whereas blocking these channels with barium increased firing and eliminated the inhibitory actions of monoamines. In the presence of ML297 or the G-protein blocker GDP-β-S, DA induced a further decrease in spike firing, suggesting the involvement of a non-GIRK channel mechanism. In neurons from CIE-treated mice, spike frequency was nearly doubled and inhibition of firing by monoamines or ML297 was lost. These effects occurred in the absence of significant changes in expression of Gi/o or GIRK channel proteins. Together, these findings show that monoamines are important modulators of lOFC excitability and suggest that disruption of this process could contribute to various deficits associated with alcohol dependence.Neuropsychopharmacology advance

  19. Monoamine Oxidase-A Occupancy by Moclobemide and Phenelzine: Implications for the Development of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chiuccariello, Lina; Cooke, Robert G; Miler, Laura; Levitan, Robert D; Baker, Glen B; Kish, Stephen J; Kolla, Nathan J; Rusjan, Pablo M; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are being developed for major depressive disorder, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s Disease. Newer MAOIs have minimal sensitivity to tyramine, but a key limitation for optimizing their development is that standards for in vivo monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) occupancy in humans are not well established. The objectives were to determine the dose-occupancy relationship of moclobemide and the occupancy of phenelzine at typical clinical dosing. Methods: Major depressive episode (MDE) subjects underwent [11C]harmine positron emission tomography scanning prior to and following 6 weeks of treatment with moclobemide or phenelzine. Results: Mean brain MAO-A occupancies were 74.23±8.32% for moclobemide at 300–600mg daily (n = 11), 83.75±5.52% for moclobemide at 900–1200mg daily (n = 9), and 86.82±6.89% for phenelzine at 45–60mg daily (n = 4). The regional dose-occupancy relationship of moclobemide fit a hyperbolic function [F(x) = a(x/[b + x]); F(1,18) = 5.57 to 13.32, p = 0.002 to 0.03, mean ‘a’: 88.62±2.38%, mean ‘b’: 69.88±4.36 mg]. Multivariate analyses of variance showed significantly greater occupancy of phenelzine (45–60mg) and higher-dose moclobemide (900–1200mg) compared to lower-dose moclobemide [300–600mg; F(7,16) = 3.94, p = 0.01]. Conclusions: These findings suggest that for first-line MDE treatment, daily moclobemide doses of 300–600mg correspond to a MAO-A occupancy of 74%, whereas for treatment-resistant MDE, either phenelzine or higher doses of moclobemide correspond to a MAO-A occupancy of at least 84%. Therefore, novel MAO inhibitor development should aim for similar thresholds. The findings provide a rationale in treatment algorithm design to raise moclobemide doses to inhibit more MAO-A sites, but suggest switching from high-dose moclobemide to phenelzine is best justified by binding to additional targets. PMID:26316187

  20. 12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM CASTING OPERATIONS CEASED IN 1988. (11/14/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  1. The effects of non-medically used psychoactive drugs on monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Fumiko; Nonaka, Ryouichi; Satoh Hisashi Kamimura, Kanako

    2007-03-22

    We developed a reproducible, simple, and small-scale method for determining the re-uptake and release of monoamines (dopamine, serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine) using rat brain synaptosomes. These assays were then applied to study the effects of different kinds of non-medically used psychoactive drugs on monoamine re-uptake and release. The phenethylamine derivatives, 4-fluoroamphetamine, 2-methylamino-3,4-methylene-dioxy-propiophenone (methylone), 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine (BDB), and N-methyl-1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine (MBDB), had strong inhibitory effects on the re-uptake of dopamine, 5-HT and norepinephrine. 4-Fluoroamphetamine, methylone and BDB also strongly increased the release of the three monoamines, but MBDB increased 5-HT and norepinephrine release, but had little effect on dopamine release. However, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine (2C-I), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylphenethylamine (2C-E), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-chlorophenethylamine (2C-C), 2,4,5-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA-2) and 2,4,6-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA-6), which are methoxylated phenethylamine derivatives, slightly influenced the re-uptake and release of monoamines. Alpha-metyltryptamine (AMT), a tryptamine derivative, was one of the strongest re-uptake inhibitors and releasers of the three monoamines. The tryptamine derivative, 5-methoxy-alpha-methyltryptamine (5-MeO-AMT), also strongly inhibited re-uptake and increased the release of the three monoamines. N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT), 5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-DIPT), 5-methoxy-N,N-methylisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-MIPT), and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) inhibited monoamine re-uptake, but had a few effects on monoamine release. 1-(3-Chlorophenyl)piperazine (3CPP) and 1-(methoxyphenyl)piperazine (4MPP), which are piperazine derivatives, inhibited monoamine re-uptake and accelerated their release. The results suggest that some designer drugs strongly act on the central nerve system to the same

  2. Depleted Uranium in Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M.J.; Croff, A.G.

    1997-12-31

    For uranium to be useful in most fission nuclear reactors, it must be enriched (i.e. the concentration of the fissile isotope 235U must be increased). Therefore, depleted uranium (DU)-uranium which has less than naturally occurring concentrations of 235U-is a co-product of the enrichment process. Four to six tons of DU exist for every ton of fresh light water reactor fuel. There were 407,006 MgU 407,000 metric tons (t) of DU stored on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites as of July 1993. If this DU were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and emplaced in a near surface disposal facility, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. However, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated that near surface disposal of large quantities of DU tails is not appropriate. Thus, there is the possibility that disposition via disposal will be in a deep geological repository. One alternative that may significantly reduce the cost of DU disposition is to use it beneficially. In fact, DOE has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large scale uses of DU and to encourage its reuse. Several beneficial uses, many of which involve applications in the repository per se or in managing the wastes to go into the repository, are discussed in this report.

  3. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    PubMed Central

    Briner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed. PMID:20195447

  4. Ego depletion impairs implicit learning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kelsey R; Sanchez, Daniel J; Wesley, Abigail H; Reber, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing) can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent.

  5. Targeting monoamine oxidase A in advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Flamand, Vincent; Zhao, Hongjuan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), a mitochondrial enzyme that degrades neurotransmitters including serotonin and norepinephrine, are commonly used to treat neurological conditions including depression. Recently, we and others identified high expression of MAOA in normal basal prostatic epithelium and high-grade primary prostate cancer (PCa). In contrast, MAOA is low in normal secretory prostatic epithelium and low-grade PCa. An irreversible inhibitor of MAOA, clorgyline, induced secretory differentiation in primary cultures of normal basal epithelial cells and high-grade PCa. Furthermore, clorgyline inhibited several oncogenic pathways in PCa cells, suggesting clinical value of MAOA inhibitors as a pro-differentiation and anti-oncogenic therapy for high-risk PCa. Here, we extended our studies to a model of advanced PCa, VCaP cells, which were derived from castration-resistant metastatic PCa and express a high level of MAOA. Methods Growth of VCaP cells in the presence or absence of clorgyline was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Gene expression changes in response to clorgyline were determined by microarray and validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Treatment with clorgyline in vitro inhibited growth and altered the transcriptional pattern of VCaP cells in a manner consistent with the pro-differentiation and anti-oncogenic effects seen in treated primary PCa cells. Src, beta-catenin, and MAPK oncogenic pathways, implicated in androgen-independent growth and metastasis, were significantly downregulated. Clorgyline treatment of mice bearing VCaP xenografts slowed tumor growth and induced transcriptome changes similar to those noted in vitro. Conclusion Our results support the possibility that anti-depressant drugs that target MAOA might find a new application in treating PCa. PMID:20204405

  6. Predicting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity through Ligand-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Ferino, Giulio; Quezada, Elias; Santana, Lourdes; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of bio- and cheminformatics associated with the development of specialized software and increasing computer power has produced a great interest in theoretical in silico methods applied in drug rational design. These techniques apply the concept that “similar molecules have similar biological properties” that has been exploited in Medicinal Chemistry for years to design new molecules with desirable pharmacological profiles. Ligand-based methods are not dependent on receptor structural data and take into account two and three-dimensional molecular properties to assess similarity of new compounds in regards to the set of molecules with the biological property under study. Depending on the complexity of the calculation, there are different types of ligand-based methods, such as QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) with 2D and 3D descriptors, CoMFA (Comparative Molecular Field Analysis) or pharmacophoric approaches. This work provides a description of a series of ligand-based models applied in the prediction of the inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The controlled regulation of the enzymes’ function through the use of MAO inhibitors is used as a treatment in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as depression, anxiety, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. For this reason, multiple scaffolds, such as substituted coumarins, indolylmethylamine or pyridazine derivatives were synthesized and assayed toward MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition. Our intention is to focus on the description of ligand-based models to provide new insights in the relationship between the MAO inhibitory activity and the molecular structure of the different inhibitors, and further study enzyme selectivity and possible mechanisms of action. PMID:23231398

  7. Mesocorticolimbic monoamine correlates of methamphetamine sensitization and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Lominac, Kevin D.; McKenna, Courtney L.; Schwartz, Lisa M.; Ruiz, Paige N.; Wroten, Melissa G.; Miller, Bailey W.; Holloway, John J.; Travis, Katherine O.; Rajasekar, Ganesh; Maliniak, Dan; Thompson, Andrew B.; Urman, Lawrence E.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Szumlinski, Karen K.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a highly addictive psychomotor stimulant, with life-time prevalence rates of abuse ranging from 5–10% world-wide. Yet, a paucity of research exists regarding MA addiction vulnerability/resiliency and neurobiological mediators of the transition to addiction that might occur upon repeated low-dose MA exposure, more characteristic of early drug use. As stimulant-elicited neuroplasticity within dopamine neurons innervating the nucleus accumbens (NAC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) is theorized as central for addiction-related behavioral anomalies, we used a multi-disciplinary research approach in mice to examine the interactions between sub-toxic MA dosing, motivation for MA and mesocorticolimbic monoamines. Biochemical studies of C57BL/6J (B6) mice revealed short- (1 day), as well as longer-term (21 days), changes in extracellular dopamine, DAT and/or D2 receptors during withdrawal from 10, once daily, 2 mg/kg MA injections. Follow-up biochemical studies conducted in mice selectively bred for high vs. low MA drinking (respectively, MAHDR vs. MALDR mice), provided novel support for anomalies in mesocorticolimbic dopamine as a correlate of genetic vulnerability to high MA intake. Finally, neuropharmacological targeting of NAC dopamine in MA-treated B6 mice demonstrated a bi-directional regulation of MA-induced place-conditioning. These results extend extant literature for MA neurotoxicity by demonstrating that even subchronic exposure to relatively low MA doses are sufficient to elicit relatively long-lasting changes in mesocorticolimbic dopamine and that drug-induced or idiopathic anomalies in mesocorticolimbic dopamine may underpin vulnerability/resiliency to MA addiction. PMID:24847220

  8. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  9. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules.

  10. Brain monoamine metabolism is altered in rats following spontaneous, long-distance running.

    PubMed

    Elam, M; Svensson, T H; Thorén, P

    1987-06-01

    Brain monoamine metabolism in rats was studied during spontaneous, long-term running in a microprocessor-controlled wheel cage. Immediately after heavy spontaneous exercise, DOPA accumulation was decreased in dopamine-rich brain regions such as the limbic forebrain and corpus striatum, indicating a decreased rate of synthesis of dopamine in brain. In contrast, DOPA accumulation was increased in the noradrenaline-predominated region of the brain stem, indicating an increased synthesis of noradrenaline in this region. Alterations in brain monoamine metabolism were normalized in exercising animals analysed 24 h after the last running period. Changes in brain monoamine metabolism may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the clinically observed psychological effects of physical exercise.

  11. [Hydrazine derivative modification of the activity of brain mitochondrial monoamine oxidases].

    PubMed

    Kalninia, I E; Baumanas, E A; Kaĭrane, Ch B; Gorkin, V Z

    1981-01-01

    Treatment of bovine brain stem mitochondria with hydrazine derivatives, which inhibited the monoamine oxidase activity (substrate: 5-hydroxytryptamine), was accompanied by appearance of the properties to deaminate histamine and cadaverine at a high rate. The same phenomenon was observed in vivo after treatment of mice with the hydrazine derivatives. The dramatic increase in histamine deaminating activity in brain was accompanied by a decrease in the tissue concentration of histamine. The hydrazine derivatives are considered as prooxidants stimulating via a free-radical mechanism lipid peroxidation in methyloleate solutions and in biomembranes (ref. 5) and causing qualitative alteration (transformation) in catalytic properties of monoamine oxidases of the tyre A, which acquire the histamine deaminating activity. A certain correlation was noted between the prooxidant effect of the hydrazine derivatives and the modification of catalytic properties of the membrane bound monoamine oxidases of brain mitochondria in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Testing fully depleted CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Ricard; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Jorge; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The focal plane of the PAU camera is composed of eighteen 2K x 4K CCDs. These devices, plus four spares, were provided by the Japanese company Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. with type no. S10892-04(X). These detectors are 200 μm thick fully depleted and back illuminated with an n-type silicon base. They have been built with a specific coating to be sensitive in the range from 300 to 1,100 nm. Their square pixel size is 15 μm. The read-out system consists of a Monsoon controller (NOAO) and the panVIEW software package. The deafualt CCD read-out speed is 133 kpixel/s. This is the value used in the calibration process. Before installing these devices in the camera focal plane, they were characterized using the facilities of the ICE (CSIC- IEEC) and IFAE in the UAB Campus in Bellaterra (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain). The basic tests performed for all CCDs were to obtain the photon transfer curve (PTC), the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) using X-rays and the EPER method, linearity, read-out noise, dark current, persistence, cosmetics and quantum efficiency. The X-rays images were also used for the analysis of the charge diffusion for different substrate voltages (VSUB). Regarding the cosmetics, and in addition to white and dark pixels, some patterns were also found. The first one, which appears in all devices, is the presence of half circles in the external edges. The origin of this pattern can be related to the assembly process. A second one appears in the dark images, and shows bright arcs connecting corners along the vertical axis of the CCD. This feature appears in all CCDs exactly in the same position so our guess is that the pattern is due to electrical fields. Finally, and just in two devices, there is a spot with wavelength dependence whose origin could be the result of a defectous coating process.

  13. Catalytic Amine Oxidation under Ambient Aerobic Conditions: Mimicry of Monoamine Oxidase B**

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Alexander T; Dowley, Myles J H; Pradaux-Caggiano, Fabienne; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Fielding, Alistair J; Tuna, Floriana; Hendon, Christopher H; Walsh, Aron; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C; John, Matthew P; Carbery, David R

    2015-01-01

    The flavoenzyme monoamine oxidase (MAO) regulates mammalian behavioral patterns by modulating neurotransmitters such as adrenaline and serotonin. The mechanistic basis which underpins this enzyme is far from agreed upon. Reported herein is that the combination of a synthetic flavin and alloxan generates a catalyst system which facilitates biomimetic amine oxidation. Mechanistic and electron paramagnetic (EPR) spectroscopic data supports the conclusion that the reaction proceeds through a radical manifold. This data provides the first example of a biorelevant synthetic model for monoamine oxidase B activity. PMID:26087676

  14. Catalytic Amine Oxidation under Ambient Aerobic Conditions: Mimicry of Monoamine Oxidase B.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexander T; Dowley, Myles J H; Pradaux-Caggiano, Fabienne; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Fielding, Alistair J; Tuna, Floriana; Hendon, Christopher H; Walsh, Aron; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C; John, Matthew P; Carbery, David R

    2015-07-27

    The flavoenzyme monoamine oxidase (MAO) regulates mammalian behavioral patterns by modulating neurotransmitters such as adrenaline and serotonin. The mechanistic basis which underpins this enzyme is far from agreed upon. Reported herein is that the combination of a synthetic flavin and alloxan generates a catalyst system which facilitates biomimetic amine oxidation. Mechanistic and electron paramagnetic (EPR) spectroscopic data supports the conclusion that the reaction proceeds through a radical manifold. This data provides the first example of a biorelevant synthetic model for monoamine oxidase B activity.

  15. Transequatorial Propagation and Depletion Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bust, G. S.; Kaeppler, S. R.; Frissell, N. A.; Paxton, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    The bottomside equatorial ionosphere in the afternoon and evening sector frequently evolves rapidly from smoothly stratified to violently unstable with large wedges of depleted plasma growing through to the topside on timescales of a few tens of minutes. These depletions have numerous practical impacts on radio propagation, including amplitude scintillation, field-aligned irregularity scatter, HF blackouts, and long-distance transequatorial propagation at frequencies above the MUF. Practical impacts notwithstanding, the pathways and conditions under which depletions form remain a topic of vigorous inquiry some 80 years after their first report. Structuring of the pre-sunset ionosphere---morphology of the equatorial anomalies and long-wavelength undulations of the isodensity contours on the bottomside---are likely to hold some clues to conditions that are conducive to depletion formation. The Conjugate Depletion Experiment is an upcoming transequatorial forward-scatter HF/VHF experiment to investigate pre-sunset undulations and their connection with depletion formation. We will present initial results from the Conjugate Depletion Experiment, as well as a companion analysis of a massive HF propagation data set.

  16. Ciproxifan, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist, reversibly inhibits monoamine oxidase A and B

    PubMed Central

    Hagenow, S.; Stasiak, A.; Ramsay, R. R.; Stark, H.

    2017-01-01

    Ciproxifan is a well-investigated histamine H3 receptor (H3R) inverse agonist/antagonist, showing an exclusively high species-specific affinity at rodent compared to human H3R. It is well studied as reference compound for H3R in rodent models for neurological diseases connected with neurotransmitter dysregulation, e.g. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or Alzheimer’s disease. In a screening for potential monoamine oxidase A and B inhibition ciproxifan showed efficacy on both enzyme isoforms. Further characterization of ciproxifan revealed IC50 values in a micromolar concentration range for human and rat monoamine oxidases with slight preference for monoamine oxidase B in both species. The inhibition by ciproxifan was reversible for both human isoforms. Regarding inhibitory potency of ciproxifan on rat brain MAO, these findings should be considered, when using high doses in rat models for neurological diseases. As the H3R and monoamine oxidases are all capable of affecting neurotransmitter modulation in brain, we consider dual targeting ligands as interesting approach for treatment of neurological disorders. Since ciproxifan shows only moderate activity at human targets, further investigations in animals are not of primary interest. On the other hand, it may serve as starting point for the development of dual targeting ligands. PMID:28084411

  17. Age-related ultrastructural and monoamine oxidase changes in the rat optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Taurone, S; Ripandelli, G; Minni, A; Lattanzi, R; Miglietta, S; Pepe, N; Fumagalli, L; Micera, A; Pastore, F S; Artico, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the morphology and the distribution of the monoamine oxidase enzymatic system in the optic nerve of 4 month-old Wistar (young) and 28 month-old Wistar (old) rats. The optic nerve was harvested from 20 young and old rats. The segment of optic nerve was divided longitudinally into two pieces, each 0.1 mm in length. The first piece was used for transmission electron microscopy. The second piece was stained with histochemical reaction for monoamine oxidase. The agerelated changes in the optic nerve of rats include micro-anatomical details, ultrastructure and monoamine oxidase histochemical staining. A strong decrease of the thin nerve fibers and a swelling of the thick ones can be observed in optic nerve fibers of old rats. Increased monoamine oxidase histochemical staining of the optic nerve of aged rats is well demonstrated. The increase of meningeal shealth and the decrease of thin nerve fibers of the optic nerve in old rats are well documented. Morphological, ultrastructural and histochemical changes observed in optic nerve fibers of the old rats show a close relation with aging.

  18. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) disrupting effects of Glycyrrhiza glabra extract in mice: a possible role of monoamines.

    PubMed

    Michel, Haidy E; Tadros, Mariane G; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Khalifa, Amani E

    2013-06-07

    Liquorice extract was reported to have nootropic and/or antiamnestic effects. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle response is a multimodal, cross-species phenomenon used as a measure of sensorimotor gating. Previous studies indicated that liquorice/its constituents augmented mouse brain monoamine levels. Increased brain monoamines' transmission was suggested to underlie PPI disruption. However, the effect of antiamnestic dose(s) of the extract on PPI has not been investigated despite the coexistence of impaired memory and PPI deficit in some neurological disorders. The effect of administration of the antiamnestic dose of the extract (150 mg/kg for 7 days) was tested on PPI of acoustic startle response in mice. It resulted in PPI disruption and therefore its effect on monoamines' levels was investigated in a number of mouse brain areas involved in PPI response mediation. Results demonstrated that the extract antiamnestic dose augmented cortical, hippocampal and striatal monoamine levels. It was therefore concluded that liquorice extract (150 mg/kg)-induced PPI deficit was mediated through augmenting monoaminergic transmission in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum. These findings can be further investigated in experimental models for autism, psychosis and Huntington's disease to decide the safety of using liquorice extract in ameliorating memory disturbance in disorders manifesting PPI deficit.

  19. Beyond Monoamines-Novel Targets for Treatment-Resistant Depression: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblat, Christian; McIntyre, Roger S.; Alves, Gilberto S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Carvalho, André F.

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Current first line therapies target modulation of the monoamine system. A large variety of agents are currently available that effectively alter monoamine levels; however, approximately one third of MDD patients remain treatment refractory after adequate trials of multiple monoamine based therapies. Therefore, patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) may require modulation of pathways outside of the classic monoamine system. The purpose of this review was thus to discuss novel targets for TRD, to describe their potential mechanisms of action, the available clinical evidence for these targets, the limitations of available evidence as well as future research directions. Several alternate pathways involved in the patho-etiology of TRD have been uncovered including the following: inflammatory pathways, the oxidative stress pathway, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the metabolic and bioenergetics system, neurotrophic pathways, the glutamate system, the opioid system and the cholinergic system. For each of these systems, several targets have been assessed in preclinical and clinical models. Preclinical models strongly implicate these pathways in the patho-etiology of MDD. Clinical trials for TRD have been conducted for several novel targets; however, most of the trials discussed are small and several are uncontrolled. Therefore, further clinical trials are required to assess the true efficacy of these targets for TRD. As well, several promising novel agents have been clinically tested in MDD populations, but have yet to be assessed specifically for TRD. Thus, their applicability to TRD remains unknown. PMID:26467412

  20. Ciproxifan, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist, reversibly inhibits monoamine oxidase A and B.

    PubMed

    Hagenow, S; Stasiak, A; Ramsay, R R; Stark, H

    2017-01-13

    Ciproxifan is a well-investigated histamine H3 receptor (H3R) inverse agonist/antagonist, showing an exclusively high species-specific affinity at rodent compared to human H3R. It is well studied as reference compound for H3R in rodent models for neurological diseases connected with neurotransmitter dysregulation, e.g. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or Alzheimer's disease. In a screening for potential monoamine oxidase A and B inhibition ciproxifan showed efficacy on both enzyme isoforms. Further characterization of ciproxifan revealed IC50 values in a micromolar concentration range for human and rat monoamine oxidases with slight preference for monoamine oxidase B in both species. The inhibition by ciproxifan was reversible for both human isoforms. Regarding inhibitory potency of ciproxifan on rat brain MAO, these findings should be considered, when using high doses in rat models for neurological diseases. As the H3R and monoamine oxidases are all capable of affecting neurotransmitter modulation in brain, we consider dual targeting ligands as interesting approach for treatment of neurological disorders. Since ciproxifan shows only moderate activity at human targets, further investigations in animals are not of primary interest. On the other hand, it may serve as starting point for the development of dual targeting ligands.

  1. Whole brain monoamine detection and manipulation in a stalk-eyed fly.

    PubMed

    Bubak, Andrew N; Swallow, John G; Renner, Kenneth J

    2013-09-30

    Understanding the physiological mechanisms that influence conflict resolution is of great importance because the outcome of contests over limited resources such as mates, territories, and food has significant fitness consequences. Male stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni) compete over territory and mates and provide an excellent model system to study aggression. To investigate potential effects of serotonin (5-HT) on aggressive behavior in these flies, we developed a dissection and sample preparation method sufficiently sensitive to measure monoamine concentrations from whole brain samples of small insects. This new method allows the detection of monoamines from a single fly brain using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The method allows for the detection and quantification of octopamine (OA), 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), tyramine (TA), and serotonin (5-HT) and provides a means for assessing changes in stalk-eyed fly brain monoamine concentrations in response to drug administration in food media. We successfully elevated 5-HT levels approximately 8-fold that of control levels in stalk-eyed fly brains by oral administration of the 5-HT precursor 5-HTP. Furthermore, in size-matched competitions for a food resource, flies that had elevated 5-HT in response to 5-HTP pretreatment exhibited a high probability of winning the contests. These results suggest that 5-HT enhances aggression in the stalk-eyed fly and highlight the potential of our method for testing putative roles of monoamines in modulating self and rival assessment in conflict resolution.

  2. A combination of mirtazapine and milnacipran augments the extracellular levels of monoamines in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Miki; Imanishi, Taiichiro; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2012-06-01

    Mirtazapine, an antidepressant, antagonizes α(2)-adrenergic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, which leads to enhanced noradrenergic and serotonergic transmission without inhibiting monoamine transporters. Using a microdialysis technique, we investigated whether co-administration of mirtazapine and a serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), milnacipran, augments the effects of each drug on the extracellular levels of monoamines by pharmacological synergy. Mirtazapine increased the extracellular levels of noradrenaline and serotonin in the dorsal hippocampus. In contrast, it increased the levels of noradrenaline and dopamine without changing serotonin levels in the prefrontal cortex. Milnacipran increased the levels of all monoamines evaluated in both areas, and the combined treatment with mirtazapine augmented these changes. The combined treatment with idazoxan, an α(2) adrenoceptor antagonist, and milnacipran also increased all monoamine levels in the prefrontal cortex. Ketanserin, a serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist, showed no effect in combination with milnacipran, while SB242084, a 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist, augmented the effects of milnacipran on the levels of serotonin and dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. These results suggest that combined treatment with mirtazapine and milnacipran augments the extracellular levels of noradrenaline, serotonin and dopamine through the blockade of α(2) adrenoceptors without regional specificity, whereas mirtazapine enhances serotonergic transmission in a region-specific manner. 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonism may also partly contribute to the amplification effects of mirtazapine on serotonin and dopamine levels. These neurochemical changes could play a role in reported advantageous clinical effects in patients treated with an SNRI and mirtazapine.

  3. Double-staining techniques allows electrophysiological identification of monoamine-containing neurons.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, T E; Audesirk, G J

    1985-08-01

    Electrophysiological recording provides important evidence for positive identification of many neurons in gastropods. We describe a technique which combines intracellular recording and injection of a persistent, non-fluorescent dye (Fast Green) with subsequent histofluorescence treatment using a modification of the wholemount glyoxylic acid procedure developed by Barber (1983) to establish the presence or absence of monoamine transmitters in positively identified single gastropod neurons.

  4. In vivo relationship between monoamine oxidase type B and alcohol dehydrogenase: effects of ethanol and phenylethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Aliyu, S.U.; Upahi, L.

    1988-01-01

    The role of acute ethanol and phenylethylamine on the brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activities, hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase, redox state and motor behavior were studied in male rats. Ethanol on its own decreased the redox couple ratio, as well as, alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the liver while at the same time it increased brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activity due to lower Km with no change in Vmax. The elevation in both brain and platelet MAO activity was associated with ethanol-induced hypomotility in the rats. Co-administration of phenylethylamine and ethanol to the animals, caused antagonism of the ethanol-induced effects described above. The effects of phenylethylamine alone, on the above mentioned biochemical and behavioral indices, are more complex. Phenylethylamine on its own, like ethanol, caused reduction of the cytosolic redox, ratio and elevation of monoamine oxidase activity in the brain and platelets. However, in contrast to ethanol, this monoamine produced hypermotility and activation of the hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the animals.

  5. Discovery of two new classes of potent monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors by tricky chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cagide, F; Silva, T; Reis, J; Gaspar, A; Borges, F; Gomes, L R; Low, J N

    2015-02-18

    The discovery of potent and selective monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors for the management of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases is still a challenging endeavor. Herein, we report the discovery of two new classes of potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors based on chromane-2,4-dione and chromone-3-carboxamide scaffolds.

  6. Monoamine Oxidase a Promoter Gene Associated with Problem Behavior in Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Michael E.; Srour, Ali; Hedges, Lora K.; Lightfoot, David A.; Phillips, John A., III; Blakely, Randy D.; Kennedy, Craig H.

    2009-01-01

    A functional polymorphism in the promoter of the gene encoding monoamine oxidase A has been associated with problem behavior in various populations. We examined the association of MAOA alleles in adult males with intellectual/developmental disabilities with and without established histories of problem behavior. These data were compared with a…

  7. Depleting depletion: Polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Debashish; Marques, Carlos; Stuehn, Torsten; Kremer, Kurt

    A polymer collapses in a solvent when the solvent particles dislike monomers more than the repulsion between monomers. This leads to an effective attraction between monomers, also referred to as depletion induced attraction. This attraction is the key factor behind standard polymer collapse in poor solvents. Strikingly, even if a polymer exhibits poor solvent condition in two different solvents, it can also swell in mixtures of these two poor solvents. This collapse-swelling-collapse scenario is displayed by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in aqueous alcohol. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a thermodynamically consistent generic model and theoretical arguments, we unveil the microscopic origin of this phenomenon. Our analysis suggests that a subtle interplay of the bulk solution properties and the local depletion forces reduces depletion effects, thus dictating polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures.

  8. Insulin modulates cocaine-sensitive monoamine transporter function and impulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Schoffelmeer, Anton N M; Drukarch, Benjamin; De Vries, Taco J; Hogenboom, François; Schetters, Dustin; Pattij, Tommy

    2011-01-26

    Because insulin acutely enhances the function of dopamine transporters, the tyrosine kinase receptors activated by this hormone may modulate transporter-dependent neurochemical and behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs. In this respect, we examined the effects of insulin on exocytotic monoamine release and the efficacy of the monoamine transporter blocker cocaine in rat nucleus accumbens. Whereas insulin reduced electrically evoked exocytotic [(3)H]dopamine release in nucleus accumbens slices, the hormone potentiated the release-enhancing effect of cocaine thereon. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 abolished these effects, indicating the involvement of insulin receptors. Similar insulin effects were observed on the release of [(3)H]norepinephrine in nucleus accumbens slices, but not on that of [(3)H]serotonin, and were also apparent in medial prefrontal cortex slices. As might then be expected, insulin also potentiated the dopamine and norepinephrine release-enhancing effects of the selective monoamine uptake inhibitors GBR12909 and desmethylimipramine, respectively. In subsequent behavioral experiments, we investigated the role of insulin in motor impulsivity that depends on monoamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. Intracranial administration of insulin in the nucleus accumbens alone reduced premature responses in the five-choice serial reaction time task and enhanced the stimulatory effect of peripheral cocaine administration on impulsivity, resembling the observed neurochemical effects of the hormone. In contrast, cocaine-induced locomotor activity remained unchanged by intra-accumbal insulin application. These data reveal that insulin presynaptically regulates cocaine-sensitive monoamine transporter function in the nucleus accumbens and, as a consequence, impulsivity. Therefore, insulin signaling proteins may represent targets for the treatment of inhibitory control deficits such as addictive behaviors.

  9. Alterations in central monoamine systems after postnatal lead acetate treatment in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Luthman, J. Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO ); Lindqvist, E.; Olson, L. ); Gerhardt, G.A.; Hoffer, B.H. )

    1994-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of postnatal lead exposure on central monoamine systems. Newborn male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 1 or 8 mg/kg lead acetate intraperitoneally for 20 days postnatally. Two groups of control rats received sodium acetate, or sodium acetate in oversized litters to compensate for lead-induced malnutrition in the high lead dose group, while nontreated animals also served as controls. At Day 21 or 51 regional tissue levels of monoamines were determined using HPLC techniques. No major changes were seen after the lead exposures in the levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin, or metabolites of dopamine and serotonin, when compared to respective control groups. On the other hand, in the control group given sodium acetate in oversized litters some alterations of the monoamine levels were observed in frontal cortex and striatum at Day 21 compared to controls. At Day 51, the striatal homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels were higher in the low lead dose group compared to those in the controls, No other changes in the monoamine levels were seen at Day 51. At 50-70 days postnatally, potassium-stimulated dopamine overflow was studied in striatum with in vivo chronoamperometry. In the high lead dose group the amplitudes of signals were lower in both the dorsal and ventral striatum compared to the controls, while no difference was seen in the clearance time of dopamine. The capacity of the dopamine terminals to respond to repeated stimulation was not affected by the lead exposure. Thus, the steady-state levels of monoamines were essentially unaltered after postnatal lead exposure in rats, while functional aspects of striatal dopamine transmission were affected after exposure to the higher dose of lead. These findings support the hypothesis that lead-induced changes in motor skills and exploratory behavior may be related to altered dopamine neurotransmission. 77 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Fully depleted back illuminated CCD

    DOEpatents

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2001-01-01

    A backside illuminated charge coupled device (CCD) is formed of a relatively thick high resistivity photon sensitive silicon substrate, with frontside electronic circuitry, and an optically transparent backside ohmic contact for applying a backside voltage which is at least sufficient to substantially fully deplete the substrate. A greater bias voltage which overdepletes the substrate may also be applied. One way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is by physically connecting the voltage source to the ohmic contact. An alternate way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is to physically connect the voltage source to the frontside of the substrate, at a point outside the depletion region. Thus both frontside and backside contacts can be used for backside biasing to fully deplete the substrate. Also, high resistivity gaps around the CCD channels and electrically floating channel stop regions can be provided in the CCD array around the CCD channels. The CCD array forms an imaging sensor useful in astronomy.

  11. Behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal is altered after prefrontocortical dopamine depletion in rats: monoaminergic correlates.

    PubMed

    Espejo, E F; Serrano, M I; Caillé, S; Stinus, L

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the effects of prefrontocortical dopamine depletion on opiate withdrawal and prefrontocortical neurochemical changes elicited by morphine dependence and withdrawal. The dopaminergic content was also measured in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal, in order to detect reactive changes induced by prefrontocortical lesion. Withdrawal was induced by naloxone in morphine-dependent rats. Monoamine levels were analyzed post-mortem by high performance liquid cromatography. The results showed that chronic morphine dependence did not modify basal levels of monoamines in sham rats, revealing neuroadaptation of prefrontocortical dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin systems to chronic morphine. The neuroadaptive phenomenon remained after prefrontocortical lesion (> 79% dopamine depletion). On the other hand, a strong increase of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin contents in the medial prefrontal cortex of sham rats was detected during opiate withdrawal. However, in lesioned rats, the increase of prefrontocortical dopamine and serotonin content, but not that of noradrenaline, was much lower. In the nucleus accumbens, prefrontocortical lesion reactively enhanced the dopaminergic tone and, although opiate withdrawal reduced dopaminergic activity in both sham and lesioned rats, this reduction was less intense in the latter group. At a behavioral level, some symptoms of physical opiate withdrawal were exacerbated in lesioned rats (writhing, mastication, teeth-chattering, global score) and exploration was reduced. The findings hence indicate that: (i) prefrontocortical monoaminergic changes play a role in the behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal; (ii) the severity of some withdrawal signs are related to the dopaminergic and serotonergic tone of the medial prefrontal cortex rather than to the noradrenergic one, and (iii) an inverse relationship between mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems exists.

  12. Impaired reward learning and intact motivation after serotonin depletion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Carlos, Kathleen; Ostrander, Serena; Rodriguez, Danilo; McCall-Craddolph, Aaron; Yagnik, Gargey; Zhou, Feimeng

    2012-01-01

    Aside from the well-known influence of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) on emotional regulation, more recent investigations have revealed the importance of this monoamine in modulating cognition. Parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA) depletes 5-HT by inhibiting tryptophan hydroxylase, the enzyme required for 5-HT synthesis and, if administered at sufficiently high doses, can result in a depletion of at least 90% of the brain s 5-HT levels. The present study assessed the long-lasting effects of widespread 5-HT depletions on two tasks of cognitive flexibility in Long Evans rats: effort discounting and reversal learning. We assessed performance on these tasks after administration of either 250 or 500 mg/kg PCPA or saline (SAL) on two consecutive days. Consistent with a previous report investigating the role of 5-HT on effort discounting, pretreatment with either dose of PCPA resulted in normal effortful choice: All rats continued to climb tall barriers to obtain large rewards and were not work-averse. Additionally, rats receiving the lower dose of PCPA displayed normal reversal learning. However, despite intact motivation to work for food rewards, rats receiving the largest dose of PCPA were unexpectedly impaired relative to SAL rats on the pretraining stages leading up to reversal learning, ultimately failing to approach and respond to the stimuli associated with reward. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection confirmed 5-HT, and not dopamine, levels in the ventromedial frontal cortex were correlated with this measure of associative reward learning. PMID:22652392

  13. [Liver monoamine oxidase activity of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. the substrate-inhibitory specificity].

    PubMed

    Iagodina, O V; Basova, I N

    2013-01-01

    Based on data of substrate-inhibitory analysis with use of specific inhibitors--deprenyl, chlorgi-lin--and specific substrates--serotonin, noradrenalin, benzylamine, beta-phenylethylamine, and N-methylhistamine--a suggestion is put forward about the possible existence of one molecular form of monoamine oxidase (MAO) in liver of mature individuals of the European lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. There are determined kinetic parameters of monoamine oxidase deamination of eight substrates, which indicates the large spectrum of substrate specificity of the lamprey liver MAO. The studied enzyme does not deaminate histamine and putrescine and is not sensitive to 10(-2) M semicarbaside. Results of study of the substrate-inhibitor specificity allow us to suggest some resemblance of catalytic properties of the lamprey liver MAO and the mammalian form A MAO. The revealed low activity of the enzyme at deamination of all used substrates seems to be connected with low detoxational functional of the lamprey liver.

  14. Abnormal behavior associated with a point mutation in the structural gene for monoamine oxidase A

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, H.G. ); Nelen, M.; Ropers, H.H.; van Oost, B.A. )

    1993-10-22

    Genetic and metabolic studies have been done on a large kindred in which several males are affected by a syndrome of borderline mental retardation and abnormal behavior. The types of behavior that occurred include impulsive aggression, arson, attempted rape, and exhibitionism. Analysis of 24-hour urine samples indicated markedly disturbed monoamine metabolism. This syndrome was associated with a complete and selective deficiency of enzymatic activity of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). In each of five affected males, a point mutation was identified in the eighth exon of the MAOA structural gene, which changes a glutamine to a termination codon. Thus, isolated complete MAOA deficiency in this family is associated with a recognizable behavioral phenotype that includes disturbed regulation of impulsive aggression.

  15. Distinct effects of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors milnacipran and venlafaxine on rat pineal monoamines.

    PubMed

    Muneoka, Katsumasa; Kuwagata, Makiko; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Shioda, Seiji

    2015-06-17

    Monoamine systems are involved in the pathology and therapeutic mechanism of depression. The pineal gland contains large amounts of serotonin as a precursor for melatonin, and its activity is controlled by noradrenergic sympathetic nerves. Pineal diurnal activity and its release of melatonin are relevant to aberrant states observed in depression. We investigated the effects on pineal monoamines of serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, which are widely used antidepressants. Four days of milnacipran treatment led to an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin levels, whereas 4 days of venlafaxine treatment reduced 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels; both agents induced an increase in dopamine levels. Our data suggest that milnacipran increases levels of the precursor for melatonin synthesis by facilitating the noradrenergic regulation of pineal activity and that venlafaxine inhibits serotonin reuptake into noradrenergic terminals on the pineal gland.

  16. The neuroprotective role of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Yulug, Burak; Hanoglu, Lutfu; Kilic, Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    Neuropharmacological relation of religious belief supports the role of dopaminergic activation as the leading neurochemical feature. However, vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) has been shown to be responsible for removing of neurotransmitters such as dopamine that may secondarily lead to a neuroprotective activity by different neurodegeneration models. Moreover, there are interesting data showing that VMAT-2 may play an important role during religious belief and experience. In the light of these findings, we aimed to review the preclinical and clinical neuroprotective data of Vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT-2) in different neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. In respect of rapidly increasing evidences about the neurobiological and neuroimaging correlates of religious belief, we hypothesized that there is a link between belief and neuroprotection.

  17. Evidence for a genetic association between alleles of monoamine oxidase A gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.C.C.; Sham, P.; Castle, D.

    1995-08-14

    We present evidence of a genetic association between bipolar disorder and alleles at 3 monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) markers, but not with alleles of a monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) polymorphism. The 3 MAOA markers, including one associated with low MAOA activity, show strong allelic association with each other but surprisingly not with MAOB. Our results are significantly only for females, though the number of males in our sample is too small to draw any definite conclusions. Our data is consistent with recent reports of reduced MAOA activity in patients with abnormal behavioral phenotypes. The strength of the association is weak, but significant, which suggests that alleles at the MAOA locus contribute to susceptibility to bipolar disorder rather than being a major determinant. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Altered monoamine and acylcarnitine metabolites in HIV-positive and HIV-negative subjects with depression

    PubMed Central

    Cassol, Edana; Misra, Vikas; Morgello, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is a frequent comorbidity in HIV infection that has been associated with worse treatment outcomes and increased mortality. Recent studies suggest that increased innate immune activation and tryptophan catabolism are associated with higher risk of depression in HIV infection and other chronic inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms leading to depression remain poorly understood. Methods The severity of depressive symptoms was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory or Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Untargeted metabolomic profiling of plasma from 104 subjects (68 HIV-positive and 36 HIV-negative) across three independent cohorts was performed using liquid or gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry. Cytokine profiling was by Bioplex array. Bioinformatic analysis was performed in Metaboanalyst and R. Results Decreased monoamine metabolites (phenylacetate, 4-hydroxyphenylacetate) and acylcarnitines (propionylcarnitine, isobutyrylcarnitine, isovalerylcarnitine, 2-methylbutyrylcarnitine) in plasma distinguished depressed subjects from controls in HIV-positive and HIV-negative cohorts, and these alterations correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms. In HIV-positive subjects, acylcarnitines and other markers of mitochondrial function correlated inversely with tryptophan catabolism, a marker of IFN responses, suggesting inter-relationships between inflammatory pathways, tryptophan catabolism, and metabolic alterations associated with depression. Altered metabolites mapped to pathways involved in monoamine metabolism, mitochondrial function, and inflammation, suggesting a model in which complex relationships between monoamine metabolism and mitochondrial bioenergetics contribute to biological mechanisms involved in depression that may be augmented by inflammation during HIV infection. Conclusions Integrated approaches targeting inflammation, monoamine metabolism, and mitochondrial pathways may be important for

  19. Potent and Selective Inhibition of Plasma Membrane Monoamine Transporter by HIV Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Haichuan; Hu, Tao; Foti, Robert S.; Pan, Yongmei; Swaan, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) is a major uptake-2 monoamine transporter that shares extensive substrate and inhibitor overlap with organic cation transporters 1–3 (OCT1–3). Currently, there are no PMAT-specific inhibitors available that can be used in in vitro and in vivo studies to differentiate between PMAT and OCT activities. In this study, we showed that IDT307 (4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium iodide), a fluorescent analog of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), is a transportable substrate for PMAT and that IDT307-based fluorescence assay can be used to rapidly identify and characterize PMAT inhibitors. Using the fluorescent substrate-based assays, we analyzed the interactions of eight human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) with human PMAT and OCT1–3 in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells stably transfected with individual transporters. Our data revealed that PMAT and OCTs exhibit distinct sensitivity and inhibition patterns toward HIV PIs. PMAT is most sensitive to PI inhibition whereas OCT2 and OCT3 are resistant. OCT1 showed an intermediate sensitivity and a distinct inhibition profile from PMAT. Importantly, lopinavir is a potent PMAT inhibitor and exhibited >120 fold selectivity toward PMAT (IC50 = 1.4 ± 0.2 µM) over OCT1 (IC50 = 174 ± 40 µM). Lopinavir has no inhibitory effect on OCT2 or OCT3 at maximal tested concentrations. Lopinavir also exhibited no or much weaker interactions with uptake-1 monoamine transporters. Together, our results reveal that PMAT and OCTs have distinct specificity exemplified by their differential interaction with HIV PIs. Further, we demonstrate that lopinavir can be used as a selective PMAT inhibitor to differentiate PMAT-mediated monoamine and organic cation transport from those mediated by OCT1–3. PMID:26285765

  20. Peripheral blood gene expression profiles linked to monoamine metabolite levels in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Luykx, J J; Olde Loohuis, L M; Neeleman, M; Strengman, E; Bakker, S C; Lentjes, E; Borgdorff, P; van Dongen, E P A; Bruins, P; Kahn, R S; Horvath, S; de Jong, S; Ophoff, R A

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier separates circulating blood from the central nervous system (CNS). The scope of this barrier is not fully understood which limits our ability to relate biological measurements from peripheral to central phenotypes. For example, it is unknown to what extent gene expression levels in peripheral blood are reflective of CNS metabolism. In this study, we examine links between central monoamine metabolite levels and whole-blood gene expression to better understand the connection between peripheral systems and the CNS. To that end, we correlated the prime monoamine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with whole-genome gene expression microarray data from blood (N=240 human subjects). We additionally applied gene-enrichment analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) to identify modules of co-expressed genes in blood that may be involved with monoamine metabolite levels in CSF. Transcript levels of two genes were significantly associated with CSF serotonin metabolite levels after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing: THAP7 (P=2.8 × 10−8, β=0.08) and DDX6 (P=2.9 × 10−7, β=0.07). Differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched for genes expressed in the brain tissue (P=6.0 × 10−52). WGCNA revealed significant correlations between serotonin metabolism and hub genes with known functions in serotonin metabolism, for example, HTR2A and COMT. We conclude that gene expression levels in whole blood are associated with monoamine metabolite levels in the human CSF. Our results, including the strong enrichment of brain-expressed genes, illustrate that gene expression profiles in peripheral blood can be relevant for quantitative metabolic phenotypes in the CNS. PMID:27959337

  1. Tianeptine in combination with monoamine oxidase inhibitors for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Edward H

    2012-10-09

    Major depressive disorder may respond to monotherapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) or tianeptine. Literature search showed no reports of MAOIs combined with tianeptine. The method included was clinical case history. A 59-year-old woman had partial improvement of depression with the MAOI tranylcypromine combined with topiramate, trazodone and ziprasidone. The patient had further improvement of depression symptoms after addition of tianeptine. No adverse events were evident. The combination of MAIOs and tianeptine may be effective for refractory major depressive disorder.

  2. Cognitive abnormalities and hippocampal alterations in monoamine oxidase A and B knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chanpreet; Bortolato, Marco; Bali, Namrata; Godar, Sean C; Scott, Anna L; Chen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard F; Shih, Jean C

    2013-07-30

    The monoamine oxidase isoenzymes (MAOs) A and B play important roles in the homeostasis of monoaminergic neurotransmitters. The combined deficiency of MAO A and B results in significantly elevated levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), norepinephrine, dopamine, and β-phenylethylamine; in humans and mice, these neurochemical changes are accompanied by neurodevelopmental perturbations as well as autistic-like responses. Ample evidence indicates that normal levels of monoamines in the hippocampus, amygdala, frontal cortex, and cerebellum are required for the integrity of learning and memory. Thus, in the present study, the cognitive status of MAO A/B knockout (KO) mice was examined with a wide array of behavioral tests. In comparison with male wild-type littermates, MAO A/B KO mice exhibited abnormally high and overgeneralized fear conditioning and enhanced eye-blink conditioning. These alterations were accompanied by significant increases in hippocampal long-term potentiation and alterations in the relative expression of NMDA glutamate receptor subunits. Our data suggest that chronic elevations of monoamines, because of the absence of MAO A and MAO B, cause functional alterations that are accompanied with changes in the cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory. The characteristics exhibited by MAO A/B KO mice highlight the potential of these animals as a useful tool to provide further insight into the molecular bases of disorders associated with abnormal monoaminergic profiles.

  3. Monoamine oxidases (MAO) in the pathogenesis of heart failure and ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Kaludercic, Nina; Carpi, Andrea; Menabò, Roberta; Lisa, Fabio Di; Paolocci, Nazareno

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence highlights monoamine oxidases (MAO) as another prominent source of oxidative stress. MAO are a class of enzymes located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, deputed to the oxidative breakdown of key neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine, and in the process generate H2O2. All these monoamines are endowed with potent modulatory effects on myocardial function. Thus, when the heart is subjected to chronic neuro-hormonal and/or peripheral hemodynamic stress, the abundance of circulating/tissue monoamines can make MAO-derived H2O2 production particularly prominent. This is the case of acute cardiac damage due to ischemia/reperfusion injury or, on a more chronic stand, of the transition from compensated hypertrophy to overt ventricular dilation/pump failure. Here, we will first briefly discuss mitochondrial status and contribution to acute and chronic cardiac disorders. We will illustrate possible mechanisms by which MAO activity affects cardiac biology and function, along with a discussion as to their role as a prominent source of reactive oxygen species. Finally, we will speculate on why MAO inhibition might have therapeutic value for treating cardiac affections of ischemic and non-ischemic origin. PMID:20869994

  4. Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (Vmat2) knockdown elicits anxiety-like behavior in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yali; Li, Siyue; Liu, Wenwen; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Zhong, Zhao-Min; Wang, Han; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-02-19

    Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (Vmat2) is widely distributed in the central nervous system, and responsible for uptaking transmitters into the vesicles. However, whether Vmat2-deficiency is related to the anxiety is rarely investigated, especially in zebrafish. Here, we reported Vmat2 heterzygous mutant zebrafish displayed anxiety-like behavior. The mutants spent less time in the top area and took longer latency to the top in the novel tank test. Consistently, they showed dark avoidance in the light/dark box test, with longer duration in the light zone and increased number of crossing between the two zones. Monoamine concentration analysis showed that the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters including dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE), as well as their metabolites were decreased in VMAT mutants. Taken together, these findings suggest that Vmat2 heterzygous mutant zebrafish may serve as a new model of anxiety, which may be related with the low level of DA, 5-HT and NE.

  5. A Peroxidase-linked Spectrophotometric Assay for the Detection of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Kangkang; Yang, Zhongduo; Sheng, Jie; Shu, Zongmei; Shi, Yin

    2016-01-01

    To develop a new more accurate spectrophotometric method for detecting monoamine oxidase inhibitors from plant extracts, a series of amine substrates were selected and their ability to be oxidized by monoamine oxidase was evaluated by the HPLC method and a new substrate was used to develop a peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. 4-(Trifluoromethyl) benzylamine (11) was proved to be an excellent substrate for peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. Therefore, a new peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay was set up. The principle of the method is that the MAO converts 11 into aldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. In the presence of peroxidase, the hydrogen peroxide will oxidize 4-aminoantipyrine into oxidised 4-aminoantipyrine which can condense with vanillic acid to give a red quinoneimine dye. The production of the quinoneimine dye was detected at 490 nm by a microplate reader. The ⊿OD value between the blank group and blank negative control group in this new method is twice as much as that in Holt's method, which enables the procedure to be more accurate and avoids the produce of false positive results. The new method will be helpful for researchers to screening monoamine oxidase inhibitors from deep-color plant extracts.

  6. The monoamine hypothesis for the pathophysiology of paraphilic disorders: an update.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Martin P

    2003-06-01

    A monoamine hypothesis for the pathophysiology of paraphilic disorders was first articulated in 1997 by Kafka. This hypothesis was based on four converging lines of empirical evidence. First, the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin serve a modulatory role in human and mammalian sexual motivation, appetitive, and consummatory behavior. Second, the sexual effects of pharmacological agents that affect monoamine neurotransmitters can have both significant facilitative and inhibitory effects on sexual behavior. Third, paraphilic disorders appear to have Axis I comorbid associations with nonsexual psychopathologies that are associated with monoaminergic dysregulation. Last, pharmacological agents that enhance central serotonergic function in particular, have been reported to ameliorate paraphilic sexual arousal and behavior. Contemporary data supporting or refuting a monoaminergic hypothesis as a biological component associated with paraphilic sex offending behaviors will be reviewed. Particular attention will be given to pharmacological-metabolic probe studies, reports of Axis I comorbidity, the proposed role of disinhibited sexual motivation or sexual appetitive behavior, and cumulative pharmacological treatment data sets.

  7. A Peroxidase-linked Spectrophotometric Assay for the Detection of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Kangkang; Yang, Zhongduo; Sheng, Jie; Shu, Zongmei; Shi, Yin

    2016-01-01

    To develop a new more accurate spectrophotometric method for detecting monoamine oxidase inhibitors from plant extracts, a series of amine substrates were selected and their ability to be oxidized by monoamine oxidase was evaluated by the HPLC method and a new substrate was used to develop a peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. 4-(Trifluoromethyl) benzylamine (11) was proved to be an excellent substrate for peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. Therefore, a new peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay was set up. The principle of the method is that the MAO converts 11 into aldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. In the presence of peroxidase, the hydrogen peroxide will oxidize 4-aminoantipyrine into oxidised 4-aminoantipyrine which can condense with vanillic acid to give a red quinoneimine dye. The production of the quinoneimine dye was detected at 490 nm by a microplate reader. The ⊿OD value between the blank group and blank negative control group in this new method is twice as much as that in Holt’s method, which enables the procedure to be more accurate and avoids the produce of false positive results. The new method will be helpful for researchers to screening monoamine oxidase inhibitors from deep-color plant extracts. PMID:27610153

  8. Ozone depletion, paradigms, and politics

    SciTech Connect

    Iman, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    The destruction of the Earth`s protective ozone layer is a prime environmental concern. Industry has responded to this environmental problem by: implementing conservation techniques to reduce the emission of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs); using alternative cleaning solvents that have lower ozone depletion potentials (ODPs); developing new, non-ozone-depleting solvents, such as terpenes; and developing low-residue soldering processes. This paper presents an overview of a joint testing program at Sandia and Motorola to evaluate a low-residue (no-clean) soldering process for printed wiring boards (PWBs). Such processes are in widespread use in commercial applications because they eliminate the cleaning operation. The goal of this testing program was to develop a data base that could be used to support changes in the mil-specs. In addition, a joint task force involving industry and the military has been formed to conduct a follow-up evaluation of low-residue processes that encompass the concerns of the tri-services. The goal of the task force is to gain final approval of the low-residue technology for use in military applications.

  9. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  10. (/sup 11/C)clorgyline and (/sup 11/C)-L-deprenyl and their use in measuring functional monoamine oxidase activity in the brain using positron emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1986-04-17

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging the activity of the enzyme monoamine oxidase in the living body by using /sup 11/C-labeled enzyme inhibitors which bind irreversibly to an enzyme as a result of catalysis. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  11. The mitochondrial monoamine oxidase-aldehyde dehydrogenase pathway: a potential site of action of daidzin.

    PubMed

    Rooke, N; Li, D J; Li, J; Keung, W M

    2000-11-02

    Recent studies showed that daidzin suppresses ethanol intake in ethanol-preferring laboratory animals. In vitro, it potently and selectively inhibits the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2). Further, it inhibits the conversion of monoamines such as serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) into their respective acid metabolites, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in isolated hamster or rat liver mitochondria. Studies on the suppression of ethanol intake and inhibition of 5-HIAA (or DOPAC) formation by six structural analogues of daidzin suggested a potential link between these two activities. This, together with the finding that daidzin does not affect the rates of mitochondria-catalyzed oxidative deamination of these monoamines, raised the possibility that the ethanol intake-suppressive (antidipsotropic) action of daidzin is not mediated by the monoamines but rather by their reactive biogenic aldehyde intermediates such as 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetaldehyde (5-HIAL) and/or 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) which accumulate in the presence of daidzin. To further evaluate this possibility, we synthesized more structural analogues of daidzin and tested and compared their antidipsotropic activities in Syrian golden hamsters with their effects on monoamine metabolism in isolated hamster liver mitochondria using 5-HT as the substrate. Effects of daidzin and its structural analogues on the activities of monoamine oxidase (MAO) and ALDH-2, the key enzymes involved in 5-HT metabolism in the mitochondria, were also examined. Results from these studies reveal a positive correlation between the antidipsotropic activities of these analogues and their abilities to increase 5-HIAL accumulation during 5-HT metabolism in isolated hamster liver mitochondria. Daidzin analogues that potently inhibit ALDH-2 but have no or little effect on MAO are most antidipsotropic, whereas those that also potently inhibit MAO exhibit little, if

  12. Kinetics of Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase Using Curcumin and Ellagic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Dharmendra Kumar; Juvekar, Archana Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcumin and ellagic are the natural polyphenols having a wide range of pharmacological actions. They have been reported to have their use in various neurological disorders. Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin and ellagic acid on the activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO), the enzyme responsible for metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters which are pivotal for neuronal development and function. Materials and Methods: The in vitro effects of these selected polyphenols on MAO activities in mitochondria isolated from rat brains were examined. Brain mitochondria were assayed for MAO type-B (MAO-B) using benzylamine as substrates. Rat brain mitochondrial MAO preparation was used to study the kinetics of enzyme inhibition using double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plot. Results: MAO activity was inhibited by curcumin and ellagic acid; however, higher half maximal inhibitory concentrations of curcumin (500.46 nM) and ellagic acid (412.24 nM) were required compared to the known MAO-B inhibitor selegiline. It is observed that the curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the MAO activity with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Conclusions: Curcumin and ellagic acid can be considered a possible source of MAO inhibitor used in the treatment of Parkinson's and other neurological disorders. SUMMARY Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is involved in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD)Curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the monoamine oxidase activityEllagic acid revealed more potent MAO type-B (MAO-B) inhibitory activity than curcuminKinetic studies of MAO inhibition using different concentrations of curcumin and ellagic acid were plotted as double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plotThe mode of inhibition of both compounds toward MAO-B is mixed (competitive and uncompetitive) type of inhibition with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Abbreviations used: MAO: Monoamine oxidase

  13. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  14. The Case of Ozone Depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambright, W. Henry

    2005-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is widely perceived as a space agency, since its inception NASA has had a mission dedicated to the home planet. Initially, this mission involved using space to better observe and predict weather and to enable worldwide communication. Meteorological and communication satellites showed the value of space for earthly endeavors in the 1960s. In 1972, NASA launched Landsat, and the era of earth-resource monitoring began. At the same time, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the environmental movement swept throughout the United States and most industrialized countries. The first Earth Day event took place in 1970, and the government generally began to pay much more attention to issues of environmental quality. Mitigating pollution became an overriding objective for many agencies. NASA's existing mission to observe planet Earth was augmented in these years and directed more toward environmental quality. In the 1980s, NASA sought to plan and establish a new environmental effort that eventuated in the 1990s with the Earth Observing System (EOS). The Agency was able to make its initial mark via atmospheric monitoring, specifically ozone depletion. An important policy stimulus in many respects, ozone depletion spawned the Montreal Protocol of 1987 (the most significant international environmental treaty then in existence). It also was an issue critical to NASA's history that served as a bridge linking NASA's weather and land-resource satellites to NASA s concern for the global changes affecting the home planet. Significantly, as a global environmental problem, ozone depletion underscored the importance of NASA's ability to observe Earth from space. Moreover, the NASA management team's ability to apply large-scale research efforts and mobilize the talents of other agencies and the private sector illuminated its role as a lead agency capable of crossing organizational boundaries as well as the science-policy divide.

  15. Protective effect of puerarin on lead-induced mouse cognitive impairment via altering activities of acetyl cholinesterase, monoamine oxidase and nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chan-Min; Zheng, Gui-Hong; Ming, Qing-Lei; Sun, Jian-Mei; Cheng, Chao

    2013-05-01

    Puerarin (PU), a natural flavonoid, has been reported to have many benefits and medicinal properties. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of puerarin on neurotoxicity in mice exposed to lead. ICR mice were exposed to lead acetate in the drinking water (500 ppm) with or without puerarin coadministration (100 and 200 mgPU/kg intragastrically once daily) for three months. We found puerarin significantly prevented Pb-induced neurotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, indicated by behavioral indicators. Puerarin also decreased Pb contents in blood and brain. Puerarin increased activities of acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and monoamine oxidase (MAO) in brain of Pb-treated mice. Moreover, Pb-induced profound elevation of oxidative stress, as evidenced by increasing of lipid peroxidation level and depleting of total antioxidant capacity in brain, were suppressed by treatment with puerarin. Puerarin markedly increased NO production and PKA activity in brain of Pb-treated mice. Western blot analysis showed that puerarin dramatically increased the expression levels of nNOS, eNOS and phosphor-Akt in brains of Pb-treated mice. In conclusion, these results suggested that puerarin can inhibit Pb-induced neurotoxicity, at least in part, by suppressing oxidative stress, reversing the Pb-induced alterations in transmitters and enzymes and modulating the PKA/Akt/NOS signaling pathway.

  16. Action orientation overcomes the ego depletion effect.

    PubMed

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Shi, Yucai; Mao, Lihua

    2015-04-01

    It has been consistently demonstrated that initial exertion of self-control had negative influence on people's performance on subsequent self-control tasks. This phenomenon is referred to as the ego depletion effect. Based on action control theory, the current research investigated whether the ego depletion effect could be moderated by individuals' action versus state orientation. Our results showed that only state-oriented individuals exhibited ego depletion. For individuals with action orientation, however, their performance was not influenced by initial exertion of self-control. The beneficial effect of action orientation against ego depletion in our experiment results from its facilitation for adapting to the depleting task.

  17. Biomedical consequences of ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    1994-07-01

    It is widely agreed that a portion of the earth's protective stratospheric ozone layer is being depleted. The major effect of this ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation (UV reaching the biosphere. This increase will be completely contained within the UVB (290nm - 320nm). It is imperative that assessments be made of the effects of this additional UVB on living organisms. This requires a detailed knowledge of the UVB photobiology of these life forms. One analytical technique to aid in the approximations is the construction of UV action spectra for such important biological end-points as human skin cancer, cataracts, immune suppression; plant photosynthesis and crop yields; and aquatic organism responses to UVB, especially the phytoplankton. Combining these action spectra with the known solar spectrum (and estimates for various ozone depletion scenarios) can give rise to a series of effectiveness spectra for these parameters. This manuscript gives a first approximation, rough estimate, for the effectiveness spectra for some of these bioresponses, and a series of crude temporary values for how a 10% ozone loss would affect the above end-points. These are not intended to masquerade as final answers, but rather, to serve as beginning attempts for a process which should be continually refined. It is hoped that these estimates will be of some limited use to agencies, such as government and industry, that have to plan now for changes in human activities that might alter future atmospheric chemistry in a beneficial manner.

  18. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system.

  19. Monoamine transporter contributions to l-DOPA effects in hemi-parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Conti, Melissa M; Meadows, Samantha M; Melikhov-Sosin, Mitchell; Lindenbach, David; Hallmark, Joy; Werner, David F; Bishop, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    l-DOPA is the standard treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), but chronic treatment typically leads to abnormal involuntary movement or dyskinesia (LID) development. Although poorly understood, dyskinetic mechanisms involve a complex interaction between the remaining dopamine system and the semi-homologous serotonin and norepinephrine systems. Serotonin and norepinephrine transporters (SERT and NET, respectively) have affinity for dopamine uptake especially when dopamine transporters (DAT) are scant. Monoamine reuptake inhibitors have been reported to modulate l-DOPA's anti-parkinsonian effects, but DAT, SERT, and NET's contribution to dyskinesia has not been well delineated. The current investigation sought to uncover the differential expression and function of DAT, SERT, and NET in the l-DOPA-treated hemi-parkinsonian rat. Protein analysis of striatal monoamine transporters in unilateral sham or 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats treated with l-DOPA (0 or 6 mg/kg) showed lesion-induced DAT loss and l-DOPA-induced gain in SERT:DAT and NET:DAT ratios in lesioned rats which positively correlated with dyskinesia expression, suggesting functional shifts among monoamine transporters in the dyskinetic state. SERT blockade with citalopram (3, 5 mg/kg) reduced LID while DAT and NET blockade with GBR-12909 (5, 10 mg/kg) and nisoxetine (5, 10 mg/kg), respectively, mildly exacerbated dyskinesia expression. Transporter inhibition did not significantly alter l-DOPA's ability to reverse motor deficit. Overall, DA and DAT loss with l-DOPA treatment appear to precipitate gain in SERT and NET function. Strong correlations with LID and direct behavioral comparisons of selective transporter blockade reveal novel implications for SERT, DAT, and NET as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in the hemi-parkinsonian model and dyskinetic PD patients.

  20. High dose sapropterin dihydrochloride therapy improves monoamine neurotransmitter turnover in murine phenylketonuria (PKU).

    PubMed

    Winn, Shelley R; Scherer, Tanja; Thöny, Beat; Harding, Cary O

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) deficiencies of the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric dysfunction in phenylketonuria (PKU). Increased brain phenylalanine concentration likely competitively inhibits the activities of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), the rate limiting steps in dopamine and serotonin synthesis respectively. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a required cofactor for TH and TPH activity. Our hypothesis was that treatment of hyperphenylalaninemic Pah(enu2/enu2) mice, a model of human PKU, with sapropterin dihydrochloride, a synthetic form of BH4, would stimulate TH and TPH activities leading to improved dopamine and serotonin synthesis despite persistently elevated brain phenylalanine. Sapropterin (20, 40, or 100mg/kg body weight in 1% ascorbic acid) was administered daily for 4 days by oral gavage to Pah(enu2/enu2) mice followed by measurement of brain biopterin, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan and monoamine neurotransmitter content. A significant increase in brain biopterin content was detected only in mice that had received the highest sapropterin dose, 100mg/kg. Blood and brain phenylalanine concentrations were unchanged by sapropterin therapy. Sapropterin therapy also did not alter the absolute amounts of dopamine and serotonin in brain but was associated with increased homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), dopamine and serotonin metabolites respectively, in both wild type and Pah(enu2/enu2) mice. Oral sapropterin therapy likely does not directly affect central nervous system monoamine synthesis in either wild type or hyperphenylalaninemic mice but may stimulate synaptic neurotransmitter release and subsequent metabolism.

  1. Binding Mode Selection Determines the Action of Ecstasy Homologs at Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Sandtner, Walter; Stockner, Thomas; Hasenhuetl, Peter S.; Partilla, John S.; Seddik, Amir; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Cao, Jianjing; Holy, Marion; Steinkellner, Thomas; Rudnick, Gary; Baumann, Michael H.; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2016-01-01

    Determining the structural elements that define substrates and inhibitors at the monoamine transporters is critical to elucidating the mechanisms underlying these disparate functions. In this study, we addressed this question directly by generating a series of N-substituted 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs that differ only in the number of methyl substituents on the terminal amine group. Starting with 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N-dimethylamphetamine (MDDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N,N-trimethylamphetamine (MDTMA) were prepared. We evaluated the functional activities of the compounds at all three monoamine transporters in native brain tissue and cells expressing the transporters. In addition, we used ligand docking to generate models of the respective protein-ligand complexes, which allowed us to relate the experimental findings to available structural information. Our results suggest that the 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs bind at the monoamine transporter orthosteric binding site by adopting one of two mutually exclusive binding modes. 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine adopt a high-affinity binding mode consistent with a transportable substrate, whereas MDDMA and MDTMA adopt a low-affinity binding mode consistent with an inhibitor, in which the ligand orientation is inverted. Importantly, MDDMA can alternate between both binding modes, whereas MDTMA exclusively binds to the low-affinity mode. Our experimental results are consistent with the idea that the initial orientation of bound ligands is critical for subsequent interactions that lead to transporter conformational changes and substrate translocation. PMID:26519222

  2. X-linked borderline mental retardation with prominent behavioral disturbance: Phenotype, genetic localization, and evidence for disturbed monoamine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, H.G.; Nelen, M.R.; Zandvoort, P. van; Abeling, N.G.G.M.; Gennip, A.H. van; Ropers, H.H.; Oost, B.A. van ); Wolters, E.C.; Kuiper, M.A. )

    1993-06-01

    The authors have identified a large Dutch kindred with a new form of X-linked nondysmorphic mild mental retardation. All affected males in this family show very characteristic abnormal behavior, in particular aggressive and sometimes violent behavior. Other types of impulsive behavior include arson, attempted rape, and exhibitionism. Attempted suicide has been reported in a single case. The locus for this disorder could be assigned to the Xp11-21 interval between DXS7 and DXS77 by linkage analysis using markers spanning the X chromosome. A maximal multipoint lod score of 3.69 was obtained at the monoamine oxidase type A (MAOA) monoamine metabolism. These data are compatible with a primary defect in the structural gene for MAOA and/or monoamine oxidase type B (MAOB). Normal platelet MAOB activity suggests that the unusual behavior pattern in this family may be caused by isolated MAOA deficiency. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Noncovalent Complexation of Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Related Ammonium Ions by Tetramethoxy Tetraglucosylcalix[4]arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torvinen, Mika; Kalenius, Elina; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Jänis, Janne

    2012-02-01

    The noncovalent complexation of monoamine neurotransmitters and related ammonium and quaternary ammonium ions by a conformationally flexible tetramethoxy glucosylcalix[4]arene was studied by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry. The glucosylcalixarene exhibited highest binding affinity towards serotonin, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine. Structural properties of the guests, such as the number, location, and type of hydrogen bonding groups, length of the alkyl spacer between the ammonium head-group and the aromatic ring structure, and the degree of nitrogen substitution affected the complexation. Competition experiments and guest-exchange reactions indicated that the hydroxyl groups of guests participate in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the glucocalixarene.

  4. Immunocytochemical Localization of Monoamine Oxidase Type B in Rat's Peripheral Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Hui; Tan, Xiao; Liu, Shu Hui; Yan, Fen

    2015-11-01

    Immunohistochemistry is used to investigate subcellular localization of monoamine oxidase type B (MAOB) in the axon of the rat's peripheral nervous system. Through light and electron microscopy, the presence of MAOB-immunoreactive structures in the propria lamina of tongue and on the outer membranes of mitochondria in both myelinated and unmyelinated axons can be detected. As a result, MAOB may potentially play a crucial role in the axons of the rat's peripheral nervous system and may be closely associated with both axonal transport and nerve conduction.

  5. Monoamine oxidase B inhibitors from the fruits of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten.

    PubMed

    Han, Y N; Choo, Y; Lee, Y C; Moon, Y I; Kim, S D; Choi, J W

    2001-02-01

    Three varieties of methyl citrate and 1-methyl malate were isolated from the fruits of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten Makino through in vitro bioassay-guided isolation for the inhibition on monoamine oxidase(MAO). The IC50 values for MAO-B of 1-monomethyl citrate, 1,3-dimethyl citrate, trimethyl citrate and 1-methyl malate were 0.19, 0.23, 0.61 and 0.25 mM, respectively. However, on MAO-A, their inhibitions showed only marginal activity.

  6. Monoamine oxidase A regulates neural differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Chen, Kevin; Ying, Qi-long; Li, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) A is the major metabolizing enzyme of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) which regulates early brain development. In this study, wild-type (WT) and MAO Aneo embryonic stem (ES) cell lines were established from the inner cell mass of murine blastocysts and their characteristics during ES and differentiating stages were studied. Our results show that the differentiation to neural cells in MAO Aneo ES cells was reduced compared to WT, suggesting MAO A played a regulatory role in stem cells neural differentiation. PMID:21607742

  7. Sex-dependent effects of maternal separation on plasma corticosterone and brain monoamines in response to chronic ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, S E; Quadros, I M H; Machado, R B; Suchecki, D

    2013-12-03

    Prolonged and repeated periods of maternal separation produce behavioral phenotype of increased vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders and drug abuse. Most of the changes in behavior, corticosterone (CORT) and monoamine levels induced by long maternal separation (LMS) are observed after a challenge, but not in basal conditions. LMS increases ethanol-induced locomotor response and self-administration, possibly due to changes in CORT release and/or monoamine concentrations. This study examined the effects of LMS in association with chronic ethanol treatment on plasma CORT and brain monoamine concentrations in male and female Swiss mice, which were kept undisturbed (animal facility rearing - AFR) or separated from their mothers for 3h/day, from 2 to 14 days of age (LMS). As adults, one set of male and female mice received no drug treatment to assess the effect of LMS per se. Another set of animals received saline injections for 20 days and one ethanol injection (2.2g/kg, i.p.) on day 21 (acute) or ethanol for 21 days (chronic). Locomotor activity, plasma CORT levels and monoamines in the frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus of AFR and LMS mice were evaluated in non-treated, acute and chronic ethanol-treated animals. In non-treated mice, no differences were found in CORT or locomotor activity, with small changes in monoamines content. In LMS females, chronic ethanol increased dopamine and serotonin concentrations in the frontal cortex, relative to acute ethanol LMS and to chronic ethanol-treated AFR groups (p<0.05). In LMS males, chronic ethanol increased hippocampal noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin and metabolites when compared to respective AFR controls, as well as acute LMS. Moreover, chronic ethanol treatment resulted in higher CORT concentrations in LMS than in AFR males. Overall, these results indicate that LMS mice were more susceptible to the effects of chronic ethanol administration on CORT and brain monoamine concentrations, and that these effects

  8. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.

    2011-04-27

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  9. High-voltage-compatible, fully depleted CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Stephen E.; Bebek, Chris J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Emes, JohnE.; Fabricius, Max H.; Fairfield, Jessaym A.; Groom, Don E.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, William F.; Palaio, Nick P.; Roe, Natalie A.; Wang, Guobin

    2006-05-15

    We describe charge-coupled device (CCD) developmentactivities at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).Back-illuminated CCDs fabricated on 200-300 mu m thick, fully depleted,high-resistivity silicon substrates are produced in partnership with acommercial CCD foundry.The CCDs are fully depleted by the application ofa substrate bias voltage. Spatial resolution considerations requireoperation of thick, fully depleted CCDs at high substrate bias voltages.We have developed CCDs that are compatible with substrate bias voltagesof at least 200V. This improves spatial resolution for a given thickness,and allows for full depletion of thicker CCDs than previously considered.We have demonstrated full depletion of 650-675 mu m thick CCDs, withpotential applications in direct x-ray detection. In this work we discussthe issues related to high-voltage operation of fully depleted CCDs, aswell as experimental results on high-voltage-compatible CCDs.

  10. Potential of Natural Products of Herbal Origin as Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO, E.C. 1.4.3.4) is a flavin-adenine type of enzyme with two isoforms referred to MAO-A and MAO-B that function for oxidation of monoamines. While MAO-A inhibitors are effective as antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs (e.g. chlorgyline, moclobemide, and lazabemide), inhibitors of MAO-B (e.g. Ldeprenyl, pargyline, and rasagiline) are used against neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Considering the need for novel MAO inhibitors due to side effects of the current ones, natural products have become attractive targets for researchers. Up till now, many studies revealed strong MAO inhibitory activity of flavonoid, xanthone, alkaloid, and coumarin derivatives from herbal sources, which also become good models for the synthetic MAO inhibitors. For this purpose, the present review focuses on examples of in vitro and in vivo MAO-inhibiting natural compounds of plant origin from a wide variety of chemical classes isolated mainly between 2000 - 2015.

  11. Parasite manipulation of brain monoamines in California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) by the trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, J.C.; Korzan, W.J.; Carpenter, R.E.; Kuris, A.M.; Lafferty, K.D.; Summers, C.H.; Overli, O.

    2009-01-01

    California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) infected with the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis display conspicuous swimming behaviours rendering them more susceptible to predation by avian final hosts. Heavily infected killifish grow and reproduce normally, despite having thousands of cysts inside their braincases. This suggests that E. californiensis affects only specific locomotory behaviours. We hypothesised that changes in the serotonin and dopamine metabolism, essential for controlling locomotion and arousal may underlie this behaviour modification. We employed micropunch dissection and HPLC to analyse monoamine and monoamine metabolite concentrations in the brain regions of uninfected and experimentally infected fish. The parasites exerted density-dependent changes in monoaminergic activity distinct from those exhibited by fish subjected to stress. Specifically, E. californiensis inhibited a normally occurring, stress-induced elevation of serotonergic metabolism in the raphae nuclei. This effect was particularly evident in the experimentally infected fish, whose low-density infections were concentrated on the brainstem. Furthermore, high E. californiensis density was associated with increased dopaminergic activity in the hypothalamus and decreased serotonergic activity in the hippocampus. In conclusion, the altered monoaminergic metabolism may explain behavioural differences leading to increased predation of the infected killifish by their final host predators. ?? 2008 The Royal Society.

  12. Antidepressive-Like Property of Dichloromethane Fraction of Pimenta pseudocaryophyllus and Relevance of Monoamine Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Fajemiroye, James Oluwagbamigbe; Martins, José Luís Rodrigues; Ghedini, Paulo César; Galdino, Pablinny Morreira; de Paula, Joelma Abadia Marciano; Realino de Paula, José; Da Rocha, Fabio Fagundes; Costa, Elson Alves

    2013-01-01

    Pimenta pseudocaryophyllus popularly referred to as craveiro is considered as a calming agent in different local preparations. The present study attempted to examine antidepressant-like effect of dichloromethane fraction (DF) and role of monoamine oxidase (MAO), tryptophan, and tyrosine hydroxylase. Based on the research focus, tail suspension (TS), forced swimming (FS), and open field (OF) tests were conducted after oral administration of DF (125, 250, or 500 mg/Kg). Ex vivo assay of MAO was also conducted to evaluate inhibitory effect of DF (250 mg/Kg). Administration of DF elicits antidepressant-like response in the TS and FS. However, DF 500 mg/Kg did not alter mice performance in these models. The data obtained in the OF showed a reduction in total crossing and rearing activity; these effects suggest motor interference in TS and FS performance. Mice pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (PCPA) (100 mg/kg, i.p.—serotonin biosynthesis inhibitor) for 4 consecutive days or acute administration of α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) (100 mg/kg, i.p.—catecholamine synthesis inhibitor) blocked anti-immobility effect of DF in the FS. In ex vivo assay of MAO, DF did not inhibit catabolic activity of MAO. Our findings support antidepressant-like activity of DF and suggest an effect that depends on monoamine biosynthesis. PMID:23365611

  13. Parasite manipulation of brain monoamines in California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) by the trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J.C.; Korzan, W.J.; Carpenter, R.E.; Kuris, A.M.; Lafferty, K.D.; Summers, C.H.; Øverli, Ø.

    2008-01-01

    California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) infected with the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis display conspicuous swimming behaviours rendering them more susceptible to predation by avian final hosts. Heavily infected killifish grow and reproduce normally, despite having thousands of cysts inside their braincases. This suggests that E. californiensis affects only specific locomotory behaviours. We hypothesised that changes in the serotonin and dopamine metabolism, essential for controlling locomotion and arousal may underlie this behaviour modification. We employed micropunch dissection and HPLC to analyse monoamine and monoamine metabolite concentrations in the brain regions of uninfected and experimentally infected fish. The parasites exerted density-dependent changes in monoaminergic activity distinct from those exhibited by fish subjected to stress. Specifically, E. californiensis inhibited a normally occurring, stress-induced elevation of serotonergic metabolism in the raphae nuclei. This effect was particularly evident in the experimentally infected fish, whose low-density infections were concentrated on the brainstem. Furthermore, high E. californiensis density was associated with increased dopaminergic activity in the hypothalamus and decreased serotonergic activity in the hippocampus. In conclusion, the altered monoaminergic metabolism may explain behavioural differences leading to increased predation of the infected killifish by their final host predators. PMID:19129105

  14. An HPLC-ECD method for monoamines and metabolites quantification in cuttlefish (cephalopod) brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Bidel, Flavie; Corvaisier, Sophie; Jozet-Alves, Christelle; Pottier, Ivannah; Dauphin, François; Naud, Nadège; Bellanger, Cécile

    2016-08-01

    The cuttlefish belongs to the mollusk class Cephalopoda, considered as the most advanced marine invertebrates and thus widely used as models to study the biology of complex behaviors and cognition, as well as their related neurochemical mechanisms. Surprisingly, methods to quantify the biogenic monoamines and their metabolites in cuttlefish brain remain sparse and measure a limited number of analytes. This work aims to validate an HPLC-ECD method for the simultaneous quantification of dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine and their main metabolites in cuttlefish brain. In comparison and in order to develop a method suitable to answer both ecological and biomedical questions, the validation was also carried out on a phylogenetically remote species: mouse (mammals). The method was shown to be accurate, precise, selective, repeatable and sensitive over a wide range of concentrations for 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, serotonin, dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and norepinephrine in the both extracts of cuttlefish and mouse brain, though with low precision and recovery for 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylethylene glycol. Homovanillic acid, accurately studied in rodents, was not detectable in the brain of cuttlefish. Overall, we described here the first fully validated HPLC method for the routine measurement of both monoamines and metabolites in cuttlefish brain. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. A Perspective on Monoamine Oxidase Enzyme as Drug Target: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bhupinder; Gupta, Vivek Prakash; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-01-01

    The monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzyme is responsible for the deamination of monoamine neurotransmitters and regulates their concentration in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Imbalance in the concentration of neurotransmitters in the brain and central nervous system is linked with the biochemical pathology of various neurogenic disorders. Irreversible MAO inhibitors were the first line drugs developed for the management of severe depression but most of these were withdrawn from the clinical practice due to their fatal side effects including food-drug interactions. New generations of MAO inhibitors were developed which were reversible and selective for one of the enzyme isoform and showed improved pharmacological profile. The discovery of crystal structure of MAO-A & MAO-B isoforms helped in understanding the drug-receptor interactions at the molecular level and designing of ligands with selectivity for either of the isoforms. The current article provides an overview on the MAO enzyme as potential drug target for different disease states. The article describes catalytic mechanism of MAO enzyme, crystal structures of the two MAO isoforms, traditional MAO inhibitors and various problems associated with their use, new developments in the MAO inhibitors and their potential as therapeutic agents especially in neurological disorders.

  16. Selection for increased voluntary wheel-running affects behavior and brain monoamines in mice.

    PubMed

    Waters, R Parrish; Pringle, R B; Forster, G L; Renner, K J; Malisch, J L; Garland, T; Swallow, J G

    2013-05-01

    Selective-breeding of house mice for increased voluntary wheel-running has resulted in multiple physiological and behavioral changes. Characterizing these differences may lead to experimental models that can elucidate factors involved in human diseases and disorders associated with physical inactivity, or potentially treated by physical activity, such as diabetes, obesity, and depression. Herein, we present ethological data for adult males from a line of mice that has been selectively bred for high levels of voluntary wheel-running and from a non-selected control line, housed with or without wheels. Additionally, we present concentrations of central monoamines in limbic, striatal, and midbrain regions. We monitored wheel-running for 8 weeks, and observed home-cage behavior during the last 5 weeks of the study. Mice from the selected line accumulated more revolutions per day than controls due to increased speed and duration of running. Selected mice exhibited more active behaviors than controls, regardless of wheel access, and exhibited less inactivity and grooming than controls. Selective-breeding also influenced the longitudinal patterns of behavior. We found statistically significant differences in monoamine concentrations and associated metabolites in brain regions that influence exercise and motivational state. These results suggest underlying neurochemical differences between selected and control lines that may influence the observed differences in behavior. Our results bolster the argument that selected mice can provide a useful model of human psychological and physiological diseases and disorders.

  17. Increased reactivity and monoamine dysregulation following stress in triploid Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Fraser, Thomas William Kenneth; Vindas, Marco Antonio; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Winberg, Svante; Thörnqvist, Per-Ove; Øverli, Øyvind; Skjæraasen, Jon-Egil; Hansen, Tom Jonny; Mayer, Ian

    2015-07-01

    Artificial triploid salmonids are sterile and therefore commercially bred to prevent genetic interactions between wild and domestic fish strains. The full biological effects of having an extra chromosome set are largely unknown, but triploids are considered to be more sensitive to sub-optimal environmental conditions and to be stressed by the presence of diploid conspecifics. Brain serotonergic and dopaminergic activity are known to regulate the stress response in vertebrates, but monoamine systems in diploid and triploid fish have yet to be compared. Here we study monoamine neurochemistry in the telencephalon and brain stem of juvenile diploid and triploid Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in response to stress (unstressed vs stressed individuals) and holding (separate- vs mixed-ploidy) conditions. Both diploids and triploids showed an increase in serotonergic activity following stress, but the increase was significantly greater in the telencephalon of triploids compared to diploids. Furthermore, while telencephalic dopaminergic activity was significantly increased in diploids following stress, there was no response in triploids. Holding conditions had a significant effect on dopaminergic activity in the brain stem of diploids only, with lower values in mixed- compared to separate-ploidy conditions. These results suggest artificially produced triploids experience increased reactivity and monoaminergic dysregulation following stress that may impede their welfare and performance.

  18. Functionally Important Carboxyls in a Bacterial Homologue of the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter (VMAT)*

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, Dana; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Shuster, Yonatan; Listov, Dina; Meena, Sitaram; Singh, Satinder K.; Forrest, Lucy R.; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    Transporters essential for neurotransmission in mammalian organisms and bacterial multidrug transporters involved in antibiotic resistance are evolutionarily related. To understand in more detail the evolutionary aspects of the transformation of a bacterial multidrug transporter to a mammalian neurotransporter and to learn about mechanisms in a milieu amenable for structural and biochemical studies, we identified, cloned, and partially characterized bacterial homologues of the rat vesicular monoamine transporter (rVMAT2). We performed preliminary biochemical characterization of one of them, Brevibacillus brevis monoamine transporter (BbMAT), from the bacterium B. brevis. BbMAT shares substrates with rVMAT2 and transports them in exchange with >1H+, like the mammalian transporter. Here we present a homology model of BbMAT that has the standard major facilitator superfamily fold; that is, with two domains of six transmembrane helices each, related by 2-fold pseudosymmetry whose axis runs normal to the membrane and between the two halves. The model predicts that four carboxyl residues, a histidine, and an arginine are located in the transmembrane segments. We show here that two of the carboxyls are conserved, equivalent to the corresponding ones in rVMAT2, and are essential for H+-coupled transport. We conclude that BbMAT provides an excellent experimental paradigm for the study of its mammalian counterparts and bacterial multidrug transporters. PMID:25336661

  19. Platelet monoamine oxidase activity predicts alcohol sensitivity and voluntary alcohol intake in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wargelius, Hanna-Linn; Fahlke, Claudia; Suomi, Stephen J; Oreland, Lars; Higley, James Dee

    2010-02-01

    Platelet monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) has been proposed to be a biological marker for the properties of monoamine systems, with low activity being associated with vulnerability for high scores on personality traits such as sensation seeking, monotony avoidance, and impulsiveness, as well as for vulnerability for alcoholism. In the present study, platelet MAO-B activity was analysed in 78 rhesus macaques, and its relation to voluntary alcohol intake and behaviours after intravenous alcohol administration was observed. Monkeys with low platelet MAO-B activity had low levels of 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid in cerebrospinal fluid and showed excessive aggression after alcohol administration. A novel finding was that animals with low platelet MAO-B activity showed less intoxication following alcohol administration. As we have shown previously, they also voluntarily consumed more alcohol. We here replicate results from studies on both humans and non-human primates, showing the utility of platelet MAO as a marker for risk behaviours and alcohol abuse. Furthermore, we link platelet MAO activity to alcohol sensitivity.

  20. Effects of Neonatal Methamphetamine and Stress on Brain Monoamines and Corticosterone in Preweanling Rats.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Sarah A; Graham, Devon L; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2017-02-01

    Neonatal exposure to methamphetamine (MA) and developmental chronic stress significantly alter neurodevelopmental profiles that show a variety of long-term physiological and behavioral effects. In the current experiment, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to one of two housing conditions along with MA. Rats were given 0 (saline), 5, or 7.5 mg/kg MA, four times per day from postnatal day (P)11 to 15 or P11 to 20. Half of the litters were reared in cages with standard bedding and half with no bedding. Separate litters were assessed at P15 or P20 for organ weights (adrenals, spleen, thymus); corticosterone; and monoamine assessments (dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine) and their metabolites within the neostriatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Findings show neonatal MA altered monoamines, corticosterone, and organ characteristics alone, and as a function of developmental age and stress compared with controls. These alterations may in part be responsible for MA and early life stress-induced long-term learning and memory deficits.

  1. Monoamine oxidase B and free radical scavenging activities of natural flavonoids in Melastoma candidum D. Don.

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Lin, R D; Shen, L Y; Yang, L L; Yen, K Y; Hou, W C

    2001-11-01

    Monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) activity and free radicals are elevated in certain neurological diseases. Four natural flavonoids, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, rutin, and quercetin, were isolated for the first time from the leaves of Melastoma candidum D. Don. They exhibited an inhibitory effect on MAO-B. These potent flavonoids were purified using bioassay-guided fractionation and were separated by Diaion, Sephadex LH-20, and MCI CHP20P columns. The IC(50) values of the four potent flavonoids, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, rutin, and quercetin on monoamine oxidase were 19.06, 11.64, 3.89, and 10.89 microM and enzyme kinetics analysis revealed apparent inhibition constants (K(i)) of 21.01, 2.72, 1.83, and 7.95 microM, respectively, on the substrate, benzylamine. The four potent compounds also exhibited hydroxyl radical scavenging activity as determined using a spin trapping electron spin resonance method. This suggests that the four flavonoids from M. candidum possess both MAO-B inhibitory and free radical scavenging activities. These important properties may be used for preventing some neurodegenerative diseases in the future.

  2. Potent Selective Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase A by Alternariol Monomethyl Ether Isolated from Alternaria brassicae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Kim, Yeon Ji; Nam, Sang-Jip; Kim, Hoon

    2017-02-28

    Alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), a dibenzopyrone derivative, was isolated from Alternaria brassicae along with altertoxin II (ATX-II). The compounds were tested for the inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO), which catalyzes neurotransmitting monoamines. AME was found to be a highly potent and selective inhibitor of human MAO-A with an IC50 value of 1.71 µM; however, it was found to be ineffective for MAO-B inhibition. ATX-II was not effective for the inhibition of either MAO-A or MAO-B. The inhibition of MAO-A using AME was apparently instantaneous. MAO-A activity was almost completely recovered after the dilution of the inhibited enzyme with an excess amount of AME, suggesting AME is a reversible inhibitor. AME showed mixed inhibition for MAO-A in Lineweaver-Burk plots with a Ki value of 0.34 µM. The findings of this study suggest that microbial metabolites and dibenzopyrone could be potent MAO inhibitors. In addition, AME could be a useful lead compound for developing reversible MAO-A inhibitors to treat depression, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Ego depletion increases risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Asal, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how the availability of self-control resources affects risk-taking inclinations and behaviors. We proposed that risk-taking often occurs from suboptimal decision processes and heuristic information processing (e.g., when a smoker suppresses or neglects information about the health risks of smoking). Research revealed that depleted self-regulation resources are associated with reduced intellectual performance and reduced abilities to regulate spontaneous and automatic responses (e.g., control aggressive responses in the face of frustration). The present studies transferred these ideas to the area of risk-taking. We propose that risk-taking is increased when individuals find themselves in a state of reduced cognitive self-control resources (ego-depletion). Four studies supported these ideas. In Study 1, ego-depleted participants reported higher levels of sensation seeking than non-depleted participants. In Study 2, ego-depleted participants showed higher levels of risk-tolerance in critical road traffic situations than non-depleted participants. In Study 3, we ruled out two alternative explanations for these results: neither cognitive load nor feelings of anger mediated the effect of ego-depletion on risk-taking. Finally, Study 4 clarified the underlying psychological process: ego-depleted participants feel more cognitively exhausted than non-depleted participants and thus are more willing to take risks. Discussion focuses on the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  4. CO depletion in the Gould Belt clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, H.; Viti, S.; Yates, J.; Hatchell, J.; Fuller, G. A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Buckle, J. V.; Graves, S.; Roberts, J.; Nutter, D.; Davis, C.; White, G. J.; Hogerheijde, M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Butner, H.; Richer, J.; Di Francesco, J.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical comparison of CO depletion in a set of local molecular clouds within the Gould Belt using Sub-millimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) and Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme (HARP) data. This is the most wide-ranging study of depletion thus far within the Gould Belt. We estimate CO column densities assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and, for a selection of sources, using the radiative transfer code RADEX in order to compare the two column density estimation methods. High levels of depletion are seen in the centres of several dust cores in all the clouds. We find that in the gas surrounding protostars, levels of depletion are somewhat lower than for starless cores with the exception of a few highly depleted protostellar cores in Serpens and NGC 2024. There is a tentative correlation between core mass and core depletion, particularly in Taurus and Serpens. Taurus has, on average, the highest levels of depletion. Ophiuchus has low average levels of depletion which could perhaps be related to the anomalous dust grain size distribution observed in this cloud. High levels of depletion are often seen around the edges of regions of optical emission (Orion) or in more evolved or less dynamic regions such as the bowl of L1495 in Taurus and the north-western region of Serpens.

  5. Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.; Croff, A.G.; Haire, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring uranium contains 0.71 wt% {sup 235}U. In order for the uranium to be useful in most fission reactors, it must be enriched the concentration of the fissile isotope {sup 235}U must be increased. Depleted uranium (DU) is a co-product of the processing of natural uranium to produce enriched uranium, and DU has a {sup 235}U concentration of less than 0.71 wt%. In the United States, essentially all of the DU inventory is in the chemical form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and is stored in large cylinders above ground. If this co-product material were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and disposed, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. Only small amounts of DU have at this time been beneficially reused. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large-scale uses of DU and encourage its reuse for the primary purpose of potentially reducing the cost and expediting the disposition of the DU inventory. This paper discusses the inventory of DU and its rate of increase; DU disposition options; beneficial use options; a preliminary cost analysis; and major technical, institutional, and regulatory issues to be resolved.

  6. Depleted argon from underground sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  7. Effects of ractopamine feeding, gender and social rank on aggressiveness and monoamine concentrations in different brain areas of finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effects of the feed additive ractopamine (RAC), gender and social rank on aggressiveness and brain monoamines levels of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA), their metabolites, norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EP) in finishing pigs. Thirty-two pigs (16 barrows/16 gilts) were a...

  8. Monoamine content during the reproductive cycle of Perna perna depends on site of origin on the Atlantic Coast of Morocco.

    PubMed

    Klouche, Mounia S; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe; Dellu-Hagedorn, Françoise; Lakhdar-Ghazal, Nouria; Benomar, Soumaya

    2015-09-09

    Bivalve molluscs such as Perna perna display temporal cycles of reproduction that result from the complex interplay between endogenous and exogenous signals. The monoamines serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline represent possible endocrine and neuronal links between these signals allowing the molluscs to modulate reproductive functions in conjunction with environmental constraints. Here, we report a disruption of the reproductive cycle of mussels collected from two of three sites along the Moroccan atlantic coast soiled by industrial or domestic waste. Using high pressure liquid chromatography, we show that the temporal pattern of monoamine content in the gonads, pedal and cerebroid ganglia varied throughout the reproductive cycle (resting, developing, maturing, egg-laying) of mussels from the unpolluted site. Marked modification of monoamine tissue content was found between sites, notably in noradrenaline content of the gonads. Discriminant statistics revealed a specific impact of mussel location on the temporal variations of noradrenaline and serotonin levels in gonads and cerebroid ganglia. Correlation analyses showed profound and temporal changes in the monoamine content between organs and ganglia, at the two sites where the reproduction was disrupted. We suggest that environmental constraints lead to profound changes of monoaminergic systems, which thereby compromises the entry of mussels into their reproductive cycle.

  9. Monoamine content during the reproductive cycle of Perna perna depends on site of origin on the Atlantic Coast of Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Klouche, Mounia S.; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe; Dellu-Hagedorn, Françoise; Lakhdar-Ghazal, Nouria; Benomar, Soumaya

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs such as Perna perna display temporal cycles of reproduction that result from the complex interplay between endogenous and exogenous signals. The monoamines serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline represent possible endocrine and neuronal links between these signals allowing the molluscs to modulate reproductive functions in conjunction with environmental constraints. Here, we report a disruption of the reproductive cycle of mussels collected from two of three sites along the Moroccan atlantic coast soiled by industrial or domestic waste. Using high pressure liquid chromatography, we show that the temporal pattern of monoamine content in the gonads, pedal and cerebroid ganglia varied throughout the reproductive cycle (resting, developing, maturing, egg-laying) of mussels from the unpolluted site. Marked modification of monoamine tissue content was found between sites, notably in noradrenaline content of the gonads. Discriminant statistics revealed a specific impact of mussel location on the temporal variations of noradrenaline and serotonin levels in gonads and cerebroid ganglia. Correlation analyses showed profound and temporal changes in the monoamine content between organs and ganglia, at the two sites where the reproduction was disrupted. We suggest that environmental constraints lead to profound changes of monoaminergic systems, which thereby compromises the entry of mussels into their reproductive cycle. PMID:26349428

  10. Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease revealed in an animal model with reduced monoamine storage capacity

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Tonya N.; Caudle, W. Michael; Shepherd, Kennie R.; Noorian, AliReza; Jackson, Chad R.; Iuvone, P. Michael; Weinshenker, David; Greene, James G.; Miller, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, culminating in severe motor symptoms, including: resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability. In addition to motor deficits, there are a variety of non-motor symptoms associated with PD. These symptoms generally precede the onset of motor symptoms, sometimes by years, and include anosmia, problems with gastrointestinal motility, sleep disturbances, sympathetic denervation, anxiety, and depression. Previously, we have shown that mice with a 95% genetic reduction in vesicular monoamine transporter expression (VMAT2-deficient, VMAT2 LO) display progressive loss of striatal dopamine, L-DOPA responsive motor deficits, α-synuclein accumulation, and nigral dopaminergic cell loss. We hypothesized that since these animals exhibit deficits in other monoamine systems (norepinephrine, serotonin), which are known to regulate some of these behaviors that the VMAT2-deficient mice may display some of the non-motor symptoms associated with PD. Here we report that the VMAT2-deficient mice demonstrate progressive deficits in olfactory discrimination, delayed gastric emptying, altered sleep latency, anxiety-like behavior, and age-dependent depressive behavior. These results suggest that the VMAT2-deficient mice may be a useful model of the non-motor symptoms of PD. Furthermore, monoamine dysfunction may contribute to many of the non-motor symptoms of PD and interventions aimed at restoring monoamine function may be beneficial in treating the disease. PMID:19553450

  11. Genetic variation in the effect of monoamines on female mating receptivity and oviposition in the adzuki bean beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Female mate choice after mating is a strong force in sexual selection and could lead to coevolution of mating traits between the sexes. How females of different genotypes respond to substances in the male ejaculate should be mediated by females’ mate choices. Monoamines regulate animal physiology and behavior, including the post-mating behavior of females of the adzuki bean beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). This study examined differences in females’ response to four monoamines (dopamine, octopamine, tyramine, serotonin) between strains from different populations of C. chinensis. Results Injection with either octopamine or tyramine, two kinds of monoamines significantly reduced female receptivity in two strains with low remating frequencies. None of the four monoamines reduced female receptivity in one strain with high remating frequencies. However, all monoamines reduced it in another strain with high remating frequencies. Oviposition was activated by tyramine on days 1–5 or by serotonin on days 4 and 5 in the two strains with low remating frequencies, but only on day 1 or day 4 in the strains with high remating frequencies. Conclusion These differences in female response to monoamines, especially tyramine and serotonin, correspond with results of previous studies. They indicate differences in female response to male substances that reduce receptivity and activate oviposition. These findings suggest relationships between the differences in female response to male substances among populations and mutations in the pathways of monoamine biosynthesis or transmission, which in turn determine female mate choice in response to male substances. PMID:25098756

  12. Antidepressant-like activity of sildenafil following acute and subchronic treatment in the forced swim test in mice: effects of restraint stress and monoamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Pieróg, Mateusz; Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Wyska, Elżbieta; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    Sildenafil is a highly effective oral agent for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of multiple etiologies. Although in clinical practice sildenafil is often used in depressed patients, its influence on the pathophysiology of depression remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antidepressant-like activity following acute and subchronic treatment with sildenafil in naïve mice as well as in mice with reserpine- and restraint stress-induced depressive-like behavior. Since corticosterone is released in response to acute stress, we also aimed to assess the influence of sildenafil on serum corticosterone level in non-stressed and stressed animals. The antidepressant activity of sildenafil was assessed in the forced swim test. Corticosterone serum level was determined by using ELISA method, while brain and serum sildenafil level via HPLC method. Sildenafil administered acutely exerted an antidepressant-like effect. Subchronic (14 days) administration of sildenafil resulted only in a weak antidepressant-like effect when evaluated 24 h after the last dose. Acute but not subchronic sildenafil administration reversed the reserpine- and stress-induced immobility in the forced swim test. The lack of effects of sildenafil after subchronic treatment could have been related to its complete elimination from the brain within 24 h from the last injection. Interestingly, acute administration of sildenafil produced a marked increase in serum corticosterone level in both non-stressed and stressed animals. Sildenafil exerts differential effects in the forced swim test after acute and subchronic administration. Further studies on the antidepressant activity of sildenafil are required.

  13. Depleted uranium--the growing concern.

    PubMed

    Abu-Qare, Aqel W; Abou-Donia, Mohamed B

    2002-01-01

    Recently, several studies have reported on the health and environmental consequences of the use of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is a heavy metal that is also radioactive. It is commonly used in missiles as a counterweight because of its very high density (1.6 times more than lead). Immediate health risks associated with exposure to depleted uranium include kidney and respiratory problems, with conditions such as kidney stones, chronic cough and severe dermatitis. Long-term risks include lung and bone cancer. Several published reports implicated exposure to depleted uranium in kidney damage, mutagenicity, cancer, inhibition of bone, neurological deficits, significant decrease in the pregnancy rate in mice and adverse effects on the reproductive and central nervous systems. Acute poisoning with depleted uranium elicited renal failure that could lead to death. The environmental consequences of its residue will be felt for thousands of years. It is inhaled and passed through the skin and eyes, transferred through the placenta into the fetus, distributed into tissues and eliminated in urine. The use of depleted uranium during the Gulf and Kosovo Wars and the crash of a Boeing airplane carrying depleted uranium in Amsterdam in 1992 were implicated in a health concern related to exposure to depleted uranium.

  14. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI—LC–MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte. PMID:26182429

  15. Gulf war depleted uranium risks.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Albert C

    2008-01-01

    US and British forces used depleted uranium (DU) in armor-piercing rounds to disable enemy tanks during the Gulf and Balkan Wars. Uranium particulate is generated by DU shell impact and particulate entrained in air may be inhaled or ingested by troops and nearby civilian populations. As uranium is slightly radioactive and chemically toxic, a number of critics have asserted that DU exposure has resulted in a variety of adverse health effects for exposed veterans and nearby civilian populations. The study described in this paper used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to DU during the 1991 Gulf War for both US troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. The analysis indicated that only a few ( approximately 5) US veterans in vehicles accidentally targeted by US tanks received significant exposure levels, resulting in about a 1.4% lifetime risk of DU radiation-induced fatal cancer (compared with about a 24% risk of a fatal cancer from all other causes). These veterans may have also experienced temporary kidney damage. Iraqi children playing for 500 h in DU-destroyed vehicles are predicted to incur a cancer risk of about 0.4%. In vitro and animal tests suggest the possibility of chemically induced health effects from DU internalization, such as immune system impairment. Further study is needed to determine the applicability of these findings for Gulf War exposure to DU. Veterans and civilians who did not occupy DU-contaminated vehicles are unlikely to have internalized quantities of DU significantly in excess of normal internalization of natural uranium from the environment.

  16. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion.

    PubMed

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J

    2015-04-28

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI-LC-MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte.

  17. Specification for the VERA Depletion Benchmark Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kang Seog

    2015-12-17

    CASL-X-2015-1014-000 iii Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CASL neutronics simulator MPACT is under development for the neutronics and T-H coupled simulation for the pressurized water reactor. MPACT includes the ORIGEN-API and internal depletion module to perform depletion calculations based upon neutron-material reaction and radioactive decay. It is a challenge to validate the depletion capability because of the insufficient measured data. One of the detoured methods to validate it is to perform a code-to-code comparison for benchmark problems. In this study a depletion benchmark suite has been developed and a detailed guideline has been provided to obtain meaningful computational outcomes which can be used in the validation of the MPACT depletion capability.

  18. Effect of aspartame on oxidative stress and monoamine neurotransmitter levels in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Salem, Neveen A; Hussein, Jihan Seid

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of the sweetener aspartame on oxidative stress and brain monoamines in normal circumstances and after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) in mice. Aspartame (0.625-45 mg/kg) was given via subcutaneous route at the time of endotoxin administration. Mice were euthanized 4 h later. Reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances; TBARS), and nitrite concentrations were measured in brain and liver. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and glucose were determined in brain. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured in liver. The administration of only aspartame (22.5 and 45 mg/kg) increased brain TBARS by 17.7-32.8%, decreased GSH by 25.6-31.6%, and increased TNF-α by 16.7-44%. Aspartame caused dose-dependent inhibition of brain serotonin, noradrenaline, and dopamine. Aspartame did not alter liver TBARS, nitrite, GSH, AST, ALT, or ALP. The administration of LPS increased nitrite in brain and liver by 26.8 and 37.1%, respectively; decreased GSH in brain and liver by 21.6 and 31.1%, respectively; increased brain TNF-α by 340.4%, and glucose by 39.9%, and caused marked increase in brain monoamines. LPS increased AST, ALT, and ALP in liver tissue by 84.4, 173.7, and 258.9%, respectively. Aspartame given to LPS-treated mice at 11.25 and 22.5 mg/kg increased brain TBARS by 15.5-16.9%, nitrite by 12.6-20.1%, and mitigated the increase in monoamines. Aspartame did not alter liver TBARS, nitrite, GSH, ALT, AST, or ALP. Thus, the administration of aspartame alone or in the presence of mild systemic inflammatory response increases oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain, but not in the liver.

  19. Effect of dietary restriction on peripheral monoamines and anxiety symptoms in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Ramírez, María J; Zulet, M Ángeles; Martinez, J Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    Reduced circulating monoamines may have a role in the development of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is becoming a major health problem worldwide. Moreover, an association between anxiety disorder and MetS has been reported; however, it is not clear whether weight loss can diminish anxiety. This investigation is aimed to examine the effects of a weight loss intervention on peripheral monoamines levels and anxiety symptoms in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS). The study population encompassed subjects with MetS (age: 50±10 y.o. and BMI: 35.8±4.3 kg/m2) selected from the RESMENA study after they had completed the 6-month weight loss intervention (-30% energy). Anthropometric measurements, dietary records, anxiety symptoms, and blood monoamines levels were analysed before and after the intervention. Dopamine (DA) (+18.2%; 95% confidence interval (CI): -51.2 to -0.5) and serotonin (5-HT) (+16.1%; 95% CI: -26.3 to -2.2) blood levels were significantly increased after the intervention. Higher DA blood concentrations at the end of the study were inversely related with the carbohydrate intake during the study (B=-3.3; 95% CI: -8.4 to -0.4) and basal DA levels predicted a greater decrease in body weight and anthropometric parameters. Subjects with higher 5-HT concentrations after the weight loss intervention also showed a lower energy intake during the intervention (B=-0.04; 95% CI: -0.07 to -0.01). Additionally, anxiety symptoms decreased after the weight loss treatment (-28.3%; 95% CI: 6.2-20.4), which was parallel to a greater decrease in body weight and anthropometric markers, being related to lower 5-HT basal levels. Dietary restriction in patients with MetS may help in reducing anxiety symptoms, and also in increasing 5-HT and DA blood levels. These results provide further insights regarding emotional and neurological factors behind weight loss.

  20. Monoamines tissue content analysis reveals restricted and site-specific correlations in brain regions involved in cognition.

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, A; Dellu-Hagedorn, F; De Deurwaerdère, P

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine (DA), noradrenalin (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) monoaminergic systems are deeply involved in cognitive processes via their influence on cortical and subcortical regions. The widespread distribution of these monoaminergic networks is one of the main difficulties in analyzing their functions and interactions. To address this complexity, we assessed whether inter-individual differences in monoamine tissue contents of various brain areas could provide information about their functional relationships. We used a sensitive biochemical approach to map endogenous monoamine tissue content in 20 rat brain areas involved in cognition, including 10 cortical areas and examined correlations within and between the monoaminergic systems. Whereas DA content and its respective metabolite largely varied across brain regions, the NA and 5-HT contents were relatively homogenous. As expected, the tissue content varied among individuals. Our analyses revealed a few specific relationships (10%) between the tissue content of each monoamine in paired brain regions and even between monoamines in paired brain regions. The tissue contents of NA, 5-HT and DA were inter-correlated with a high incidence when looking at a specific brain region. Most correlations found between cortical areas were positive while some cortico-subcortical relationships regarding the DA, NA and 5-HT tissue contents were negative, in particular for DA content. In conclusion, this work provides a useful database of the monoamine tissue content in numerous brain regions. It suggests that the regulation of these neuromodulatory systems is achieved mainly at the terminals, and that each of these systems contributes to the regulation of the other two.

  1. Improved Method for HPLC Analysis of Polyamines, Agmatine and Aromatic Monoamines in Plant Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Slocum, Robert D.; Flores, Hector E.; Galston, Arthur W.; Weinstein, Leonard H.

    1989-01-01

    The high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method of Flores and Galston (1982 Plant Physiol 69: 701) for the separation and quantitation of benzoylated polyamines in plant tissues has been widely adopted by other workers. However, due to previously unrecognized problems associated with the derivatization of agmatine, this important intermediate in plant polyamine metabolism cannot be quantitated using this method. Also, two polyamines, putrescine and diaminopropane, also are not well resolved using this method. A simple modification of the original HPLC procedure greatly improves the separation and quantitation of these amines, and further allows the simulation analysis of phenethylamine and tyramine, which are major monoamine constituents of tobacco and other plant tissues. We have used this modified HPLC method to characterize amine titers in suspension cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf tissues. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:11537449

  2. Monoamines and sexual function in rats bred for increased catatonic reactivity.

    PubMed

    Klochkov, D V; Alekhina, T A; Kuznetsova, E G; Barykina, N N

    2009-07-01

    Body weight, ovary and uterus weight, the nature of estral cycles, and hypothalamus dopamine and noradrenaline levels and plasma testosterone levels were studied in female GC rats, bred for increased catatonic reactivity, at different stages of the estral cycle (estrus, proestrus). The outbred Wistar strain served as controls. On the background of decreased body weight, GC females showed impairments to the morphological cyclical changes in the ovaries and uterus, with a reduction in ovary weight in diestrus (p < 0.01) and a smaller estrogen-dependent increase in uterus weight in estrus as compared with Wistar females. On the background of decreases in dopamine and noradrenaline contents in the hypothalamus, GC rats showed higher levels of these monoamines in estrus and lower levels in diestrus. Plasma testosterone levels in female GC rats were higher in diestrus than in estrus and in Wistar rats.

  3. “Ping-pong gaze” secondary to monoamine oxidase inhibitor overdose

    PubMed Central

    Attaway, Amy; Sroujieh, Laila; Mersfelder, Tracey L.; Butler, Christopher; Ouellette, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An infrequent manifestation of monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) toxicity is “ping-pong gaze” (PPG). We describe the case of a 26-year-old female who was found unresponsive after taking 40 tablets of phenelzine. On presentation to the hospital, her eyes were moving in characteristic “ping pong” fashion. After 6 hours her gaze terminated. The following day her neurologic exam was benign and she had no long-term sequelae. While the etiology of PPG is unknown, it is most often seen with irreversible structural brain damage. However, a detailed literature review revealed that previous cases of MAOI toxicity where the patient survived have all had complete neurologic recovery. PMID:27127395

  4. Combination monoamine oxidase inhibitor and beta-blocker treatment of migraine, with anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Merikangas, K R; Merikangas, J R

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a study comparing the effectiveness of a beta-adrenergic blocking agent, atenolol, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAO-I), phenelzine, and the combination in treatment of 61 adults with migraine headache. The goals of the study are (1) to investigate the safety of concomitant treatment of migraine with beta-blockers and phenelzine, (2) to assess whether orthostatic hypertension and other side effects would be relieved, and (3) to compare the results of this open trial of phenelzine to those of a previous study using similar methods. Phenelzine was associated with a large decrease in the frequency and severity of migraine attacks. Anxiety and depression were also reduced by phenelzine both alone, and in combination with a beta-blocker. The results show that the combination of MAO-I's and beta-blockers can be administered safely, and can lead to the reduction in the side effects with either drug alone.

  5. Improved method for HPLC analysis of polyamines, agmatine and aromatic monoamines in plant tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Flores, H. E.; Galston, A. W.; Weinstein, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    The high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method of Flores and Galston (1982 Plant Physiol 69: 701) for the separation and quantitation of benzoylated polyamines in plant tissues has been widely adopted by other workers. However, due to previously unrecognized problems associated with the derivatization of agmatine, this important intermediate in plant polyamine metabolism cannot be quantitated using this method. Also, two polyamines, putrescine and diaminopropane, also are not well resolved using this method. A simple modification of the original HPLC procedure greatly improves the separation and quantitation of these amines, and further allows the simulation analysis of phenethylamine and tyramine, which are major monoamine constituents of tobacco and other plant tissues. We have used this modified HPLC method to characterize amine titers in suspension cultured carrot (Daucas carota L.) cells and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf tissues.

  6. Exclusion of close linkage between the synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter locus and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Persico, A.M.; Uhl, G.R.; Wang, Zhe Wu

    1995-12-18

    The principal brain synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) is responsible for the reuptake of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and histamine from the cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles, thus contributing to determination of the size of releasable neurotransmitter vesicular pools. Potential involvement of VMAT2 gene variants in the etiology of schizophrenia and related disorders was tested using polymorphic VMAT2 gene markers in 156 subjects from 16 multiplex pedigrees with schizophrenia, schizophreniform, schizoaffective, and schizotypal disorders and mood incongruent psychotic depression. Assuming genetic homogeneity, complete ({theta} = 0.0) linkage to the schizophrenia spectrum was excluded under both dominant and recessive models. Allelic variants at the VMAT2 locus do not appear to provide major genetic contributions to the etiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in these pedigrees. 16 refs.

  7. Monoamine oxidase B layer-by-layer film fabrication and characterization toward dopamine detection.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Celina Massumi; Pereira, Tamyris Paschoal; Mascagni, Daniela Branco Tavares; de Moraes, Marli Leite; Ferreira, Marystela

    2016-01-01

    In this work nanostructured film composites of the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) enzyme, free or encapsulated in liposomes, were fabricated by the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique, employing polyethylene imine (PEI) as polycation. Initially, the MAO-B enzyme was incorporated into liposomes in order to preserve its enzymatic structure ensuring their activity and catalytic stability. The LbL film growth was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) by gold resonance angle shift analysis after each bilayer deposition. Subsequently, the films were applied as amperometric biosensors for dopamine detection using Prussian Blue (PB) as the electron mediator. The biosensor fabricated by MAO-B incorporated into liposomes composed of DPPG:POPG in the ratio (1:4) (w/w) showed the best performance with a sensitivity of 0.86 (μA cm(-2))/(mmol L(-1)) and a detection limit of 0.33 mmol L(-1).

  8. [Comparative sensitivity of liver monoamine oxidases of frog and whitefish to some tricyclic compounds].

    PubMed

    Basova, I N; Iagodina, O V

    2011-01-01

    There is performed a comparative analysis of action of four acridine derivatives and of one xanthene derivative (pyronine G) on activity of liver monoamine oxidase (MAO) of two species of poikilothermal freshwater animals: a representative of amphibians--the common frog Rana temnporaria and a representative of the order Salmonidae--the European whitefish Coregonus lavaretus. The studied synthetic hexamerous tricyclic compounds show the irreversible character of inhibition of intermediate potency towards the enzyme from both biological sources. There are obtained qualitative and quantitative differences in the reactional ability and selectivity of action of the studied inhibitors for liver MAO of frog and whitefish. The obtained data of the inhibitory analysis with use of specific substrates are an indirect proof for the existence in liver of the studies frog species of two molecular forms, whereas in the whitefish liver--single molecular MAO form.

  9. [CATALITICAL PROPERTIES OF LIVER MONOAMINE OXIDASE IN THE CHUM SALMON ONCORHYNCHUS KETA].

    PubMed

    Basova, I N; Basova, N E; Yagodina, O V

    2015-01-01

    The substrate and inhibitory specificity of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) in the liver of males of the summer form of the chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta was studied. As to the spectrum of deaminated substrates, the hepatic MAO of the chum salmon is similar to MAO of most terrestrial mammals, for eight classical MAO substrates similarity in their substrate characteristics were found. Analysis of the antimonoamine oxidase activity of two derivaties of 2-propinilamine, five derivatives of acridine as well as of pyronine G revealed significant qualitative and quantitative differences as compared to the hepatic enzyme of tuna and whitefish. The compounds tested manifested themselves as irreversible inhibitors of chum salmon's hepatic MAO possessing various efficacy, but lacking the selectivity of action as dependent on the deaminated substrate. The obtained data on the substrate and inhibitory analysis provide an indirect evidence for the presence of a single molecular form of MAO in the chum salmon liver.

  10. Association analysis of the functional monoamine oxidase A gene promotor polymorphism in migraine.

    PubMed

    Marziniak, M; Mössner, R; Benninghoff, J; Syagailo, Y V; Lesch, K-P; Sommer, C

    2004-05-01

    Migraine affects about 15% of the adult population. Serotonergic and dopaminergic systems are believed to be involved in its pathophysiology. One of the key enzymes in the degradation of serotonin and to a lesser extent of dopamine is monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A). In this study we investigated a functionally relevant gene-linked polymorphic repetitive sequence (LPR) located approximately 1.2 kb upstream of the ATG codon in the MAO-A-promotor gene. 119 patients with migraine and 229 controls were tested. The allelic distribution of the controls and the migraine patients did not show significant differences with respect to the low- and high-activity alleles. Moreover, effectiveness of the potent serotonergic antimigraine agents, triptans, which are metabolized by MAO-A, was clinically not affected by the MAO-A-LPR in our patients. These findings thus indicate that there is no association between the functional MAO-A-LPR and susceptibility to migraine.

  11. Monoamine Oxidase A Gene (MAOA) Associated with Attitude Towards Longshot Risks

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Songfa; Israel, Salomon; Xue, Hong; Ebstein, Richard P.; Chew, Soo Hong

    2009-01-01

    Decision making often entails longshot risks involving a small chance of receiving a substantial outcome. People tend to be risk preferring (averse) when facing longshot risks involving significant gains (losses). This differentiation towards longshot risks underpins the markets for lottery as well as for insurance. Both lottery and insurance have emerged since ancient times and continue to play a useful role in the modern economy. In this study, we observe subjects' incentivized choices in a controlled laboratory setting, and investigate their association with a widely studied, promoter-region repeat functional polymorphism in monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA). We find that subjects with the high activity (4-repeat) allele are characterized by a preference for the longshot lottery and also less insurance purchasing than subjects with the low activity (3-repeat) allele. This is the first result to link attitude towards longshot risks to a specific gene. It complements recent findings on the neurobiological basis of economic risk taking. PMID:20046877

  12. [Substrate-inhibitory analysis of monoamine oxidase from hepatopancreas of the octopus Bathypolypus arcticus].

    PubMed

    Basova, I N; Iagodina, O V

    2012-01-01

    Study of the substrate-inhibitory specificity of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) of hepatopancreas of the octopus Bathypolypus arcticus revealed distinctive peculiarities of catalytic properties of this enzyme. The studied enzyme, on one hand, like the classic MAO of homoiothermal animals, is able to deaminate tyramine, serotonin, benzylamine, tryptamine, beta-phenylethylamine, while, on the other hand, deaminates histamine and does not deaminate putrescine--classic substrates of diamine oxidase (DAO). Results of the substrate-inhibitory analysis with use of chlorgiline and deprenyl are indirect proofs of the existence in the octopus hepatopancreas of one molecular MAO form. Semicarbazide and pyronine G turned out to be weak irreversible inhibitors, four derivatives of acridine--irreversible inhibitors of the intermediate effectiveness with respect to the octopus hepatopancreas MAO; specificity of action of inhibitors at deamination of different substrates was equal.

  13. Inhibition of Human Monoamine Oxidase: Biological and Molecular Modeling Studies on Selected Natural Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Simone; Gidaro, Maria Concetta; Petzer, Anél; Costa, Giosuè; Guglielmi, Paolo; Chimenti, Paola; Alcaro, Stefano; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2016-11-30

    Naturally occurring flavonoids display a plethora of different biological activities, but emerging evidence suggests that this class of compounds may also act as antidepressant agents endowed with multiple mechanisms of action in the central nervous system, increasing central neurotransmission, limiting the reabsorption of bioamines by synaptosomes, and modulating the neuroendocrine and GABAA systems. Due to their presence in foods, food-derived products, and nutraceuticals, we established their role and structure-activity relationships as reversible and competitive human monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. In addition, molecular modeling studies, which evaluated their modes of MAO inhibition, are presented. These findings could provide pivotal implications in the quest of novel drug-like compounds and for the establishment of harmful drug-dietary supplement interactions commonly reported in the therapy with antidepressant agents.

  14. A brief history of the development of antidepressant drugs: From monoamines to glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Hillhouse, Todd M.; Porter, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a chronic, recurring, and debilitating mental illness that is the most common mood disorder in the United States. It has been almost 50 years since the monoamine hypothesis of depression was articulated, and just over 50 years since the first pharmacological treatment for MDD was discovered. Several monoamine-based pharmacological drug classes have been developed and approved for the treatment of MDD; however, remission rates are low (often less than 60%) and there is a delayed onset before remission of depressive symptoms is achieved. As a result of a “proof-of-concept” study in 2000 with the noncompetitive NMDA antagonist ketamine, a number of studies have examined the glutamatergic systems as viable targets for the treatment of MDD. This review will provide a brief history on the development of clinically available antidepressant drugs, and then review the possible role of glutamatergic systems in the pathophysiology of MDD. Specifically, the glutamatergic review will focus on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and the efficacy of drugs that target the NMDA receptor for the treatment of MDD. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, which has consistently produced rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in MDD patients in a number of clinical studies, has shown the most promise as a novel glutamatergic-based treatment for MDD. However, compounds that target other glutamatergic mechanisms, such as GLYX-13 (a glycine-site partial agonist at NMDA receptors) appear promising in early clinical trials. Thus, the clinical findings to date are encouraging and support the continued search for and the development of novel compounds that target glutamatergic mechanisms. PMID:25643025

  15. DRD4 dopamine receptor genotype and CSF monoamine metabolites in Finnish alcoholics and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.D.; Dean, M.; Goldman, D.

    1995-06-19

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is thus far unique among neurotransmitter receptors in having a highly polymorphic gene structure that has been reported to produce altered receptor functioning. These allelic variations are caused by a 48-bp segment in exon III of the coding region which may be repeated from 2-10 times. Varying the numbers of repeated segments changes the length, structure, and, possibly, the functional efficiency of the receptor, which makes this gene an intriguing candidate for variations in dopamine-related behaviors, such as alcoholism and drug abuse. Thus far, these DRD4 alleles have been investigated for association with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Parkinson`s disease, and chronic alcoholism, and all have been largely negative for a direct association. We evaluated the DRD4 genotype in 226 Finish adult males, 113 of whom were alcoholics, many of the early onset type with features of impulsivity and antisocial traits. Genotype frequencies were compared to 113 Finnish controls who were free of alcohol abuse, substance abuse, and major mental illness. In 70 alcoholics and 20 controls, we measured CSF homovanillic acid (HVA), the major metabolite of dopamine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). No association was found between a particular DRD4 dopamine receptor allele and alcoholism. CSF concentrations of the monoamine metabolites showed no significant difference among the DRD4 genotypes. This study of the DRD4 dopamine receptor in alcoholics is the first to be conducted in a clinically and ethnically homogeneous population and to relate the DRD4 genotype to CSF monoamine concentrations. The results indicate that there is no association of the DRD4 receptor with alcoholism. 52 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Nicotine-induced monoamine neurotransmitter changes in the brain of young rats.

    PubMed

    Shearman, E; Fallon, S; Sershen, H; Lajtha, A

    2008-08-15

    A number of studies in various species including man indicated a greater risk of drug preference and addictive behavior in young as compared to adults. Such age dependent preference was also found with nicotine. To examine possible mechanisms for this difference in our continuing study of reward mechanisms, we compared nicotine-induced neurotransmitter changes in the brain regions of adult and young Sprague-Dawley rats, assaying the transmitters via microdialysis in conscious freely moving animals. In general, nicotine-induced changes were significantly less in the regions measured in the young. Nicotine-induced effects on dopamine in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus (VH), prefrontal and medial temporal cortex, and superior cerebral peduncle were lower in the young than in adult, the same in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and lateral septal nucleus (LS), and somewhat higher in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAccS). Norepinephrine levels in the young were lower in all areas except in the VH where they were the same, and serotonin levels were lower except in the VTA and LS where they remained the same, and higher in the NAccS. Age-dependent differences in the metabolites measured were more mixed. We conclude that the greater nicotine preference in young is not paralleled by a greater effect of nicotine on the release of monoamines at least in most of the brain areas assayed. Thus, increases of nicotine reward are not likely due to increases of monoamines in reward and cognitive areas. The small increase of dopamine (DA) and more significant increase of serotonin (5-HT) only in the NAccS are of significance, and would indicate a more significant role of 5-HT than of DA at least in the age difference in nicotine preference. Developmental changes in receptor composition and distribution involving several transmitter systems and other components such as neuropeptides are also likely to play a role.

  17. [Effects of Kaixin San formulas on behavioristics and central monoamine neurotransmitters of chronic stress rats].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-wan; Xu, Lu; Dong, Xian-zhe; Tan, Xiao; Wang, Shi; Zhu, Wei-yu; Liu, Ping

    2015-06-01

    The efficacy of Chinese herbal formula in treating depression has been proved in many studies. In this study, six different Kaixin San formulas were compared to investigate their effects on central monoamine neurotransmitters of chronic stress rats and against depression based on their different components in plasma, in order to discuss the efficacy-comparability relationship and the possible efficacy mechanism. The classic isolation method and the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) depression model were combined to investigate the changes in contents in hippocampus and monoamine neurotransmitters (NE, DA, 5-HT) and the components of some formulas in plasma with HPLC and UPLC-Q-TOF-MSE methods. As a result, Dingzhi Xiaowan recorded in Essential Recipes for Emergent Use Worth A Thousand significantly increased the behavioral scores, NE and 5-HT contents in hippocampus and NE, DA and 5-HT contents in cortex, with the best anti-depressant effect. Dingzhi Xiaowan recorded in Complete Records of Ancient and Modern Medical Works showed a notable increase in sucrose preference and open field score in model rats, NE content in hippocampus and NE, DA and 5-HT contents in cortex, with a certain anti anti-depressant effect. Kaixin San recorded in Ishinpo showed remarkable rise in weight of model rats. NE content in hippocampus and DA content in cortex. Puxin Decoction recorded in A Supplement to Recipes Worth A Thousand Gold showed 5-HT content in hippocampus and DA content in cortex. Kaixin San recorded in Yimenfang only showed DA content in cortex. Kaixin Wan recorded in Essential Recipes for Emergent Use Worth A Thousand did not mention the antidepressant effect. According to the results, the formulas' different anti-depressant effects may be related to the different plasma components.

  18. Brain-encysting trematodes and altered monoamine activity in naturally infected killifish Fundulus parvipinnis.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J C; Øverli, Ø

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents novel evidence to address mechanisms by which trematode parasites effect behavioural changes in naturally infected fish hosts. California killifish Fundulus parvipinnis infected with the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis display conspicuous swimming behaviours that render them 30 times more likely to be eaten by birds, the parasite's final host. Prevalence of E. californiensis reaches nearly 100% in most F. parvipinnis populations, with parasite biomass constituting almost 2% of F. parvipinnis biomass in some locations. Despite having thousands of cysts on their brains, infected fish grow and mature at rates comparable to those of uninfected populations. The lack of general pathology combined with the specificity of the altered behaviours suggests that the behavioural changes are due to parasite manipulation. The monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine, which control locomotion and social behaviour in fishes and other vertebrates, were examined to explore the underlying mechanisms of this behaviour modification. Whereas previous studies were similarly conducted with experimentally infected fish, in this study, brain dopaminergic and serotonergic activity were analysed in naturally infected fish to assess how E. californiensis may alter F. parvipinnis monoamines in a naturally occurring system. A parasite density-associated decrease in serotonergic activity occurred in the hippocampus of naturally infected fish, as well as a decrease in dopaminergic activity in the raphe nuclei, suggesting that E. californiensis inhibits serotonin and dopamine signaling in naturally infected F. parvipinnis. The neurochemical profile of infected fish is consistent with the hypothesis that E. californiensis affects brain monoaminergic systems in order to induce impulse-driven, active, and aggressive behaviour in its hosts.

  19. Phase I metabolites of mephedrone display biological activity as substrates at monoamine transporters

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, F P; Wimmer, L; Dillon‐Carter, O; Partilla, J S; Burchardt, N V; Mihovilovic, M D; Baumann, M H

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose 4‐Methyl‐N‐methylcathinone (mephedrone) is a synthetic stimulant that acts as a substrate‐type releaser at transporters for dopamine (DAT), noradrenaline (NET) and 5‐HT (SERT). Upon systemic administration, mephedrone is metabolized to several phase I compounds: the N‐demethylated metabolite, 4‐methylcathinone (nor‐mephedrone); the ring‐hydroxylated metabolite, 4‐hydroxytolylmephedrone (4‐OH‐mephedrone); and the reduced keto‐metabolite, dihydromephedrone. Experimental Approach We used in vitro assays to compare the effects of mephedrone and synthetically prepared metabolites on transporter‐mediated uptake and release in HEK293 cells expressing human monoamine transporters and in rat brain synaptosomes. In vivo microdialysis was employed to examine the effects of i.v. metabolite injection (1 and 3 mg·kg−1) on extracellular dopamine and 5‐HT levels in rat nucleus accumbens. Key Results In cells expressing transporters, mephedrone and its metabolites inhibited uptake, although dihydromephedrone was weak overall. In cells and synaptosomes, nor‐mephedrone and 4‐OH‐mephedrone served as transportable substrates, inducing release via monoamine transporters. When administered to rats, mephedrone and nor‐mephedrone produced elevations in extracellular dopamine and 5‐HT, whereas 4‐OH‐mephedrone did not. Mephedrone and nor‐mephedrone, but not 4‐OH‐mephedrone, induced locomotor activity. Conclusions and Implications Our results demonstrate that phase I metabolites of mephedrone are transporter substrates (i.e. releasers) at DAT, NET and SERT, but dihydromephedrone is weak in this regard. When administered in vivo, nor‐mephedrone increases extracellular dopamine and 5‐HT in the brain whereas 4‐OH‐mephedrone does not, suggesting the latter metabolite does not penetrate the blood–brain barrier. Future studies should examine the pharmacokinetics of nor‐mephedrone to determine its possible

  20. Reduced vesicular monoamine transport disrupts serotonin signaling but does not cause serotonergic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Alter, Shawn P; Stout, Kristen A; Lohr, Kelly M; Taylor, Tonya N; Shepherd, Kennie R; Wang, Minzheng; Guillot, Thomas S; Miller, Gary W

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mice with reduced expression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2 LO) undergo age-related degeneration of the catecholamine-producing neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta and locus ceruleus and exhibit motor disturbances and depressive-like behavior. In this work, we investigated the effects of reduced vesicular transport on the function and viability of serotonin neurons in these mice. Adult (4-6 months of age), VMAT2 LO mice exhibit dramatically reduced (90%) serotonin release capacity, as measured by fast scan cyclic voltammetry. We observed changes in serotonin receptor responsivity in in vivo pharmacological assays. Aged (months) VMAT2 LO mice exhibited abolished 5-HT1A autoreceptor sensitivity, as determined by 8-OH-DPAT (0.1 mg/kg) induction of hypothermia. When challenged with the 5HT2 agonist, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (1 mg/kg), VMAT2 LO mice exhibited a marked increase (50%) in head twitch responses. We observed sparing of serotonergic terminals in aged mice (18-24 months) throughout the forebrain by SERT immunohistochemistry and [(3)H]-paroxetine binding in striatal homogenates of aged VMAT2 LO mice. In contrast to their loss of catecholamine neurons of the substantia nigra and locus ceruleus, aged VMAT2 LO mice do not exhibit a change in the number of serotonergic (TPH2+) neurons within the dorsal raphe, as measured by unbiased stereology at 26-30 months. Collectively, these data indicate that reduced vesicular monoamine transport significantly disrupts serotonergic signaling, but does not drive degeneration of serotonin neurons.

  1. Valeriana wallichii root extract improves sleep quality and modulates brain monoamine level in rats.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Surajit; Ray, Koushik; Yogendra Kumar, M S; Gupta, Shilpa; Kauser, Hina; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mishra, Kshipra; Panjwani, Usha

    2012-07-15

    The present study was performed to investigate the effects of Valeriana wallichi (VW) aqueous root extract on sleep-wake profile and level of brain monoamines on Sprague-Dawley rats. Electrodes and transmitters were implanted to record EEG and EMG in freely moving condition and the changes were recorded telemetrically after oral administration of VW in the doses of 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight. Sleep latency was decreased and duration of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep was increased in a dose dependent manner. A significant decrease of sleep latency and duration of wakefulness were observed with VW at doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg. Duration of NREM sleep as well as duration of total sleep was increased significantly after treatment with VW at the doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg. VW also increased EEG slow wave activity during NREM sleep at the doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg. Level of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), serotonin (5-HT) and hydroxy indole acetic acid (HIAA) were measured in frontal cortex and brain stem after VW treatment at the dose of 200mg/kg. NE and 5HT level were decreased significantly in both frontal cortex and brain stem. DA and HIAA level significantly decreased only in cortex. DOPAC level was not changed in any brain region studied. In conclusion it can be said that VW water extract has a sleep quality improving effect which may be dependent upon levels of monoamines in cortex and brainstem.

  2. Fully Depleted Charge-Coupled Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Stephen E.

    2006-05-15

    We have developed fully depleted, back-illuminated CCDs thatbuild upon earlier research and development efforts directed towardstechnology development of silicon-strip detectors used inhigh-energy-physics experiments. The CCDs are fabricated on the same typeof high-resistivity, float-zone-refined silicon that is used for stripdetectors. The use of high-resistivity substrates allows for thickdepletion regions, on the order of 200-300 um, with corresponding highdetection efficiency for near-infrared andsoft x-ray photons. We comparethe fully depleted CCD to thep-i-n diode upon which it is based, anddescribe the use of fully depleted CCDs in astronomical and x-ray imagingapplications.

  3. Possible ozone depletions following nuclear explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Turco, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    The degree of depletion of the ozone layer ensuing after delivery of strategic nuclear warheads (5000 and 10,000 Mton) due to production of nitrogen oxides is theoretically assessed. Strong depletions are calculated for 16-km and 26-km altitudes, peaking 1-2 months after detonation and lasting for three years, while a significant depletion at 36 km would peak after one year. Assuming the explosions occur between 30 and 70 deg N, these effects should be much more pronounced in this region than over the Northern Hemisphere as a whole. It is concluded that Hampson's concern on this matter (1974) is well-founded.-

  4. Exhaustible Resource Depletion: A Modified Graphical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisato, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Presents a graphical analysis of the exhaustible resource depletion problem. Applies Hotelling's "r percent rule" as a new approach that operates in an "N"-period context. Includes two figures illustrating the approach. (CFR)

  5. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  6. A definition of depletion of fish stocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oosten, John

    1949-01-01

    Attention was focused on the need of a common and better understanding of the term depletion as applied to the fisheries in order to eliminate if possible the existing inexactness of thought on the subject. Depletion has been confused at various times with at least ten different ideas associated with it but which, as has has heen pointed out, are not synonymous at all. In defining depletion we must recognize that the term represents a condition and must not he confounded with the cause (overfishing) that leads to this condition or with the symptoms that identify it. Depletion was defined as a reduction, through overfishing, in the level of abundance of the exploitable segment of a stock that prevents the realization of the maximum productive capacity.

  7. Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

  8. Anatomy of Depleted Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocher, M.; Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zhao, L.; Manchester, W. B., IV

    2017-01-01

    We report a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) containing distinct periods of anomalous heavy-ion charge state composition and peculiar ion thermal properties measured by ACE/SWICS from 1998 to 2011. We label them “depleted ICMEs,” identified by the presence of intervals where C6+/C5+ and O7+/O6+ depart from the direct correlation expected after their freeze-in heights. These anomalous intervals within the depleted ICMEs are referred to as “Depletion Regions.” We find that a depleted ICME would be indistinguishable from all other ICMEs in the absence of the Depletion Region, which has the defining property of significantly low abundances of fully charged species of helium, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Similar anomalies in the slow solar wind were discussed by Zhao et al. We explore two possibilities for the source of the Depletion Region associated with magnetic reconnection in the tail of a CME, using CME simulations of the evolution of two Earth-bound CMEs described by Manchester et al.

  9. The MAO-B inhibitor deprenyl reduces the oral tremor and the dopamine depletion induced by the VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine.

    PubMed

    Podurgiel, Samantha J; Yohn, Samantha E; Dortche, Kristina; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-02-01

    Tetrabenazine (TBZ) is prescribed for the treatment of chorea associated with Huntington's disease. Via inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT-2), TBZ blocks dopamine (DA) storage and depletes striatal DA; this drug also has been shown to induce Parkinsonian motor side effects in patients. Recently, TBZ was shown to induce tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) in rats and mice. TJMs are an oral tremor that has many of the characteristics of Parkinsonian tremor in humans. The present study focused upon the ability of the well-established antiparkinsonian agent deprenyl to attenuate the behavioral and neurochemical effects of 2.0mg/kg TBZ. Deprenyl is a selective and irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-B, and administration of deprenyl produced a dose-related suppression of TBZ-induced TJMs. A second experiment employed in vivo microdialysis to examine extracellular DA levels in the ventrolateral striatum, the neostriatal region most closely associated with the production of TJMs, after administration of TBZ and deprenyl. Consistent with the behavioral data, TBZ alone produced a biphasic effect on extracellular DA, with an initial increases followed by a prolonged decrease during the period in which TJMs are displayed. Co-administration of deprenyl with TBZ increased DA levels compared to rats treated with TBZ alone. These results provide support for use of TBZ as a rodent model of Parkinsonism, and future studies should utilize this model to evaluate putative anti-Parkinsonian agents.

  10. [Changes in the monoamine content in different parts of hypothalamus depending on the stages of the estrous cycle].

    PubMed

    Babichev, V N; Adamskaia, E I

    1976-01-01

    Fluorimetric determination of monoamines in various regions of the hypothalamus and at different stages of the estral cycle in rats showed that the serotonin, noradrenaline, and particularly dophamine content changed both in the course of the cycle and at different time (10, 15 and 18 hours) of the same stage of the cycle. Dophamine concentration in the arcuate area--the centre of the tonic activity--reached its maximum at 18 hours of the diestrus-2 (D2) and fell to the minimum at 10 hours of the proestrus (P). Noradrenaline level in the preoptic area increased at 18 hours of the D2 and fell at 10 hours of the P. It is supposed that in the hypothalamic regulation of the estral cycle at least two monoamines (dopamine and noradrenaline) took part; the trigger role belongs to noradrenaline of the preoptic area (the cyclic centre).

  11. Structural insights into monoamine oxidase inhibitory potency and selectivity of 7-substituted coumarins from ligand- and target-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Catto, Marco; Nicolotti, Orazio; Leonetti, Francesco; Carotti, Andrea; Favia, Angelo Danilo; Soto-Otero, Ramón; Méndez-Alvarez, Estefanía; Carotti, Angelo

    2006-08-10

    A new series of 3-, 4-, 7-polysubstituted coumarins have been designed and evaluated for their monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B (MAO-A and MAO-B) inhibitory potency. Substituents at position 7 consisted of a bridge of different physicochemical nature linking a phenyl ring to the coumarin scaffold. Structure-affinity and structure-selectivity relationships, derived through CoMFA-GOLPE and docking studies, revealed the key physicochemical interactions responsible for the observed MAO-B and MAO-A inhibitory potency and suggested the main structural determinants for high selectivity toward one of the two enzymatic isoforms. The predictive power of our models was proved with the design of a new inhibitor demonstrating an outstanding MAO-B affinity (pIC50 = 8.29) and the highest MAO-B selectivity (DeltapIC50 = 3.39) within the entire series of ligands examined herein.

  12. The influence of manganese supplementation on seizure onset and severity, and brain monoamines in the genetically epilepsy prone rat.

    PubMed

    Critchfield, J W; Carl, G F; Keen, C L

    1993-01-01

    Human and experimental animal studies suggest a relationship between low Mn status and seizures. The genetically epilepsy prone rat (GEPR), which has low tissue Mn levels, was studied in the context of Mn supplementation. Manganese was provided at 45 micrograms/g diet (control) or 1000 micrograms/g diet (supplemented) to dams during pregnancy and lactation, then to the offspring after weaning. Offspring were tested for seizure susceptibility as young adults; tissue trace elements, brain monoamines and brain glutamine synthetase activity were measured as endpoint biochemical indices. Supplementation, although developmentally encompassing and highly effective in elevating tissue Mn levels, had no effect on seizure latency or severity. Similarly, brain monoamine concentrations and glutamine synthetase activities were resistant to Mn supplementation. Notably, the GEPR was confirmed to have low whole brain glutamine synthetase activity. These findings suggest that seizure activity in the GEPR does not stem from an increased nutritional/metabolic need for Mn.

  13. Effect of disease and drug treatment on blood serotonin and monoamine oxidase B activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    van Kempen, G M; Janjua, R; Roos, R A

    1995-05-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) content and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity were determined in whole blood of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) with and without drug treatment and compared with controls. From that comparison a significant reduction in platelet 5HT became apparent in PD. Selegiline, which was always used in combination with L-dopa, not only inhibited MAO activity, as expected, but it also appeared to induce an increase in 5HT content.

  14. Linezolid-induced serotonin toxicity in a patient not taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors or serotonin receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Jacob; Stroup, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic with weak monoamine oxidase (MAO) type A and MAO type B inhibitory effects. Linezolid has been associated with serotonin toxicity when used concomitantly with multiple medications that are known to increase serotonin concentrations. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with signs and symptoms of serotonin toxicity following administration of linezolid for treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia. PMID:27034576

  15. [Effect of hypothalamic implants changing monoamine levels on continuous estrus in rats induced by androgen treatment in the neonatal period].

    PubMed

    Tournigant, J C; Arnaud, O; Passouant-Fontaine, T

    1975-01-01

    The constant estrus induced by neonatal androgenization in the female rat may be disrupted following a drug-induced change of the monoamine levels in the preoptic area and arcuate nucleus of the median eminence. The most precise effect is obtained with 5-HT. This is in favour of a predominant alteration of the serotonergic system which seems to be involved in the sexual differentiation of the brain.

  16. New Approach For Prediction Groundwater Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Current approaches to quantify groundwater depletion involve water balance and satellite gravity. However, the water balance technique includes uncertain estimation of parameters such as evapotranspiration and runoff. The satellite method consumes time and effort. The work reported in this paper proposes using failure theory in a novel way to predict groundwater saturated thickness depletion. An important issue in the failure theory proposed is to determine the failure point (depletion case). The proposed technique uses depth of water as the net result of recharge/discharge processes in the aquifer to calculate remaining saturated thickness resulting from the applied pumping rates in an area to evaluate the groundwater depletion. Two parameters, the Weibull function and Bayes analysis were used to model and analyze collected data from 1962 to 2009. The proposed methodology was tested in a nonrenewable aquifer, with no recharge. Consequently, the continuous decline in water depth has been the main criterion used to estimate the depletion. The value of the proposed approach is to predict the probable effect of the current applied pumping rates on the saturated thickness based on the remaining saturated thickness data. The limitation of the suggested approach is that it assumes the applied management practices are constant during the prediction period. The study predicted that after 300 years there would be an 80% probability of the saturated aquifer which would be expected to be depleted. Lifetime or failure theory can give a simple alternative way to predict the remaining saturated thickness depletion with no time-consuming processes such as the sophisticated software required.

  17. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury with Social Defeat Stress Alters Anxiety, Contextual Fear Extinction, and Limbic Monoamines in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Daniel R.; Olson, Dawne; Meyer, Danielle L.; Scholl, Jamie L.; Watt, Michael J.; Manzerra, Pasquale; Renner, Kenneth J.; Forster, Gina L.

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) produces symptoms similar to those typifying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in humans. We sought to determine whether a rodent model of stress concurrent with mTBI produces characteristics of PTSD such as impaired contextual fear extinction, while also examining concurrent alterations to limbic monoamine activity in brain regions relevant to fear and anxiety states. Male rats were exposed to social stress or control conditions immediately prior to mTBI induction, and 6 days later were tested either for anxiety-like behavior using the elevated plus maze (EPM), or for contextual fear conditioning and extinction. Brains were collected 24 h after EPM testing, and tissue from various limbic regions analyzed for content of monoamines, their precursors and metabolites using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Either social defeat or mTBI alone decreased time spent in open arms of the EPM, indicating greater anxiety-like behavior. However, this effect was enhanced by the combination of treatments. Further, rats exposed to both social defeat and mTBI exhibited greater freezing within extinction sessions compared to all other groups, suggesting impaired contextual fear extinction. Social defeat combined with mTBI also had greater effects on limbic monoamines than either insult alone, particularly with respect to serotonergic effects associated with anxiety and fear learning. The results suggest social stress concurrent with mTBI produces provides a relevant animal model for studying the prevention and treatment of post-concussive psychobiological outcomes. PMID:27147992

  18. Monoamines in the albumen gland, plasma, and central nervous system of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata during egg-laying.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Jon P; Yoshino, Timothy P

    2002-06-01

    The potential role of selected biogenic monoamines and related compounds in the reproductive physiology of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata was investigated. Extracts of the albumen gland (AG), plasma, and central nervous system (CNS) were subjected to high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED), and under the extraction and separation conditions employed the following amines were detected: tyrosine, dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), dopamine, and tryptophan in the AG; DOPA, tyrosine, and tryptophan in the plasma; DOPA, tyrosine, dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the CNS. These compounds were then quantified in individual samples taken from snails known to be in a particular stage of the egg-laying process. AG dopamine levels were highest in snails in the first stage of the reproductive process, when the AG is secreting perivitelline fluid around each fertilized ovum. Significant decreases in AG protein content during the later stages of the egg-laying process were also evident. Plasma tyrosine and DOPA levels were lowest in snails that contained a fully packaged egg mass, while no changes in monoamine content were observed in the CNS. These data provide insights into the role(s) that monoamines, especially catecholamine-related compounds, may play in B. glabrata reproductive physiology.

  19. Two-step production of monoamines in monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord: a different control strategy of neurotransmitter supply?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mengliang

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitters play an important role in the modulation of sensory, motor and autonomic functions in the spinal cord. Although traditionally it is believed that in mammalian spinal cord, monoamine neurotransmitters mainly originate from the brain, accumulating evidence indicates that especially when the spinal cord is injured, they can also be produced in the spinal cord. In this review, I will present evidence for a possible pathway for two-step synthesis of dopamine and serotonin in the spinal cord. Published data from different sources and unpublished data from my own ongoing projects indicate that monoenzymatic cells expressing aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) are present in the spinal cord and that these TH and THP cells often lie in close proximity to AADC cells. Prompted by the above evidence, I hypothesize that dopamine and serotonin could be synthesized sequentially in two monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord via a TH-AADC and a TPH-AADC cascade respectively. The monoamines synthesized through this pathway may compensate for lost neurotransmitters following spinal cord injury and also may play specific roles in the recovery of sensory, motor and autonomic functions. PMID:28197177

  20. CSF monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactate in the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (normal pressure hydrocephalus) related to CSF hydrodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Adolfsson, R; Wester, P

    1991-03-01

    Monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactic acid in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated on patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (idiopathic normal pressure syndrome; AHS, n = 15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 14), multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 13) and controls (n = 21). Patients had clinical and CSF hydrodynamic investigations. Monoamine concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, cholinesterases and lactate were determined photometrically. In the AHS patients, CSF monoamine concentrations were not significantly different compared with controls, AD or MID patients. AHS and AD patients showed a similar reduction of CSF acetylcholinesterase activity compared with controls. Positive correlations were found in concentrations of CSF homovanillic acid, CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and CSF lactic acid versus CSF outflow conductance (that is, resistance against CSF outflow) in the AHS patients. A similar pattern was observed in a subgroup of MID patients characterised by dilated ventricles and disturbed CSF hydrodynamics. These data suggest that a low CSF outflow conductance may facilitate the clearance of acidic substances from the arachnoid space at the probenecid sensitive active transport site. Alternative explanations would be that a pathologically low CSF outflow conductance is accompanied by an inverse caudorostral flow of CSF or a compromised trans-ependymal diffusion.

  1. CSF monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactate in the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (normal pressure hydrocephalus) related to CSF hydrodynamic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Adolfsson, R; Wester, P

    1991-01-01

    Monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactic acid in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated on patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (idiopathic normal pressure syndrome; AHS, n = 15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 14), multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 13) and controls (n = 21). Patients had clinical and CSF hydrodynamic investigations. Monoamine concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, cholinesterases and lactate were determined photometrically. In the AHS patients, CSF monoamine concentrations were not significantly different compared with controls, AD or MID patients. AHS and AD patients showed a similar reduction of CSF acetylcholinesterase activity compared with controls. Positive correlations were found in concentrations of CSF homovanillic acid, CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and CSF lactic acid versus CSF outflow conductance (that is, resistance against CSF outflow) in the AHS patients. A similar pattern was observed in a subgroup of MID patients characterised by dilated ventricles and disturbed CSF hydrodynamics. These data suggest that a low CSF outflow conductance may facilitate the clearance of acidic substances from the arachnoid space at the probenecid sensitive active transport site. Alternative explanations would be that a pathologically low CSF outflow conductance is accompanied by an inverse caudorostral flow of CSF or a compromised trans-ependymal diffusion. PMID:1709421

  2. Changes in Brain Monoamines Underlie Behavioural Disruptions after Zebrafish Diet Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Environmental Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Vignet, Caroline; Trenkel, Verena M.; Vouillarmet, Annick; Bricca, Giampiero; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Cousin, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish were exposed through diet to two environmentally relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mixtures of contrasted compositions, one of pyrolytic (PY) origin and one from light crude oil (LO). Monoamine concentrations were quantified in the brains of the fish after six month of exposure. A significant decrease in noradrenaline (NA) was observed in fish exposed to both mixtures, while a decrease in serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) was observed only in LO-exposed fish. A decrease in metabolites of 5HT and DA was observed in fish exposed to both mixtures. Several behavioural disruptions were observed that depended on mixtures, and parallels were made with changes in monoamine concentrations. Indeed, we observed an increase in anxiety in fish exposed to both mixtures, which could be related to the decrease in 5HT and/or NA, while disruptions of daily activity rhythms were observed in LO fish, which could be related to the decrease in DA. Taken together, these results showed that (i) chronic exposures to PAHs mixtures disrupted brain monoamine contents, which could underlie behavioural disruptions, and that (ii) the biological responses depended on mixture compositions. PMID:28273853

  3. Changes in Brain Monoamines Underlie Behavioural Disruptions after Zebrafish Diet Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Environmental Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Vignet, Caroline; Trenkel, Verena M; Vouillarmet, Annick; Bricca, Giampiero; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Cousin, Xavier

    2017-03-04

    Zebrafish were exposed through diet to two environmentally relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mixtures of contrasted compositions, one of pyrolytic (PY) origin and one from light crude oil (LO). Monoamine concentrations were quantified in the brains of the fish after six month of exposure. A significant decrease in noradrenaline (NA) was observed in fish exposed to both mixtures, while a decrease in serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) was observed only in LO-exposed fish. A decrease in metabolites of 5HT and DA was observed in fish exposed to both mixtures. Several behavioural disruptions were observed that depended on mixtures, and parallels were made with changes in monoamine concentrations. Indeed, we observed an increase in anxiety in fish exposed to both mixtures, which could be related to the decrease in 5HT and/or NA, while disruptions of daily activity rhythms were observed in LO fish, which could be related to the decrease in DA. Taken together, these results showed that (i) chronic exposures to PAHs mixtures disrupted brain monoamine contents, which could underlie behavioural disruptions, and that (ii) the biological responses depended on mixture compositions.

  4. Analysis of microdialysate monoamines, including noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin, using capillary ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Barbara; Gifu, Elena-Patricia; Sandu, Ioana; Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical methods are very often used to detect catecholamine and indolamine neurotransmitters separated by conventional reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The present paper presents the development of a chromatographic method to detect monoamines present in low-volume brain dialysis samples using a capillary column filled with sub-2μm particles. Several parameters (repeatability, linearity, accuracy, limit of detection) for this new ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method with electrochemical detection were examined after optimization of the analytical conditions. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin, dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine were separated in 1μL of injected sample volume; they were detected above concentrations of 0.5-1nmol/L, with 2.1-9.5% accuracy and intra-assay repeatability equal to or less than 6%. The final method was applied to very low volume dialysates from rat brain containing monoamine traces. The study demonstrates that capillary UHPLC with electrochemical detection is suitable for monitoring dialysate monoamines collected at high sampling rate.

  5. Two-step production of monoamines in monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord: a different control strategy of neurotransmitter supply?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengliang

    2016-12-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitters play an important role in the modulation of sensory, motor and autonomic functions in the spinal cord. Although traditionally it is believed that in mammalian spinal cord, monoamine neurotransmitters mainly originate from the brain, accumulating evidence indicates that especially when the spinal cord is injured, they can also be produced in the spinal cord. In this review, I will present evidence for a possible pathway for two-step synthesis of dopamine and serotonin in the spinal cord. Published data from different sources and unpublished data from my own ongoing projects indicate that monoenzymatic cells expressing aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) are present in the spinal cord and that these TH and THP cells often lie in close proximity to AADC cells. Prompted by the above evidence, I hypothesize that dopamine and serotonin could be synthesized sequentially in two monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord via a TH-AADC and a TPH-AADC cascade respectively. The monoamines synthesized through this pathway may compensate for lost neurotransmitters following spinal cord injury and also may play specific roles in the recovery of sensory, motor and autonomic functions.

  6. Blood Levels of Monoamine Precursors and Smoking in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Ashwin Jacob; Kanwar, Jyoti; Okusaga, Olaoluwa; Fuchs, Dietmar; Lowry, Christopher A.; Peng, Xiaoqing; Giegling, Ina; Hartmann, Annette M.; Konte, Bettina; Friedl, Marion; Gragnoli, Claudia; Reeves, Gloria M.; Groer, Maureen W.; Rosenthal, Richard N.; Rujescu, Dan; Postolache, Teodor T.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and exerts a negative impact on cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Smoking has complex interactions with monoamine metabolism through the ability of cigarette smoke to suppress Type 1 T helper cell (Th1) type immunity, the immunophenotype that is implicated in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) dysfunction and tryptophan (Trp) breakdown to kynurenine (Kyn) via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Nicotine also induces tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression, leading to increased synthesis of catecholamines. Furthermore, there is evidence for PAH dysfunction in schizophrenia. This study aimed to compare the plasma levels of selected monoamine precursors and their metabolites in smokers vs. non-smokers in a large sample of patients with schizophrenia. We measured plasma phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), Trp, and Kyn levels using high-performance liquid chromatography and calculated Phe:Tyr and Kyn:Trp ratios in 920 patients with schizophrenia. Analysis of variance and linear regression analyses were used to compare these endpoints between three groups of patients with schizophrenia: (1) current smokers, (2) past smokers, and (3) non-smokers. There were significant differences among the three groups with regards to Tyr levels [F(2,789) = 3.77, p = 0.02], with current smokers having lower Tyr levels when compared with non-smokers (p = 0.02). Kyn levels and Kyn:Trp ratio were different among the three groups [F(2,738) = 3.17, p = 0.04, F(2,738) = 3.61, p = 0.03] with current smokers having lower Kyn levels (p = 0.04) and higher Kyn:Trp ratio (p = 0.02) when compared with past smokers. These findings need to be replicated with protocols that include healthy controls to further elucidate the neurobiological underpinnings of altered Tyr and Kyn levels in smokers. Results do suggest potential molecular links between schizophrenia and smoking that may represent biomarkers and

  7. Monoamine Oxidase and Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Inhibitors from the Fruits of Gardenia jasminoides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Ho; Kim, Gun Hee; Hwang, Keum Hee

    2012-01-01

    This research was designed to determine what components of Gardenia jasminoides play a major role in inhibiting the enzymes related antidepressant activity of this plant. In our previous research, the ethyl acetate fraction of G. jasminosides fruits inhibited the activities of both monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) and monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B), and oral administration of the ethanolic extract slightly increased serotonin concentrations in the brain tissues of rats and decreased MAO-B activity. In addition, we found through in vitro screening test that the ethyl acetate fraction showed modest inhibitory activity on dopamine-β hydroxylase (DBH). The bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of five bio-active compounds, protocatechuic acid (1), geniposide (2), 6'-O-trans-p-coumaroylgeniposide (3), 3,5-d-ihydroxy-1,7-bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) heptanes (4), and ursolic acid (5), from the ethyl acetate fraction of G. jasminoides fruits. The isolated compounds showed different inhibitory potentials against MAO-A, -B, and DBH. Protocatechuic acid showed potent inhibition against MAO-B (IC50 300 μmol/L) and DBH (334 μmol/L), exhibiting weak MAO-A inhibition (2.41 mmol/L). Two iridoid glycosides, geniposide (223 μmol/L) and 6'-O-trans-p-coumaroylgeniposide (127μmol/L), were selective MAO-B inhibitor. Especially, 6'-O-trans-p-coumaroylgeniposide exhibited more selective MAO-B inhibition than deprenyl, well-known MAO-B inhibitor for the treatment of early-stage Parkinson’s disease. The inhibitory activity of 3,5-di-hydroxy-1,7-bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) heptane was strong for MAO-B (196 μmol/L), modest for MAO-A (400 μmol/L), and weak for DBH (941 μmol/L). Ursolic acid exhibited significant inhibition of DBH (214 μmol/L), weak inhibition of MAO-B (780 μmol/L), and no inhibition against MAO-A. Consequently, G. jasminoides fruits are considerable for development of biofunctional food materials for the combination treatment of depression and neurodegenerative disorders

  8. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; James, Michael R.; Hendricks, John S.; Goorley, John T.

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  9. The new MCNP6 depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; James, M. R.; Hendricks, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.

    2012-07-01

    The first MCNP based in-line Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology. (authors)

  10. Ego depletion in visual perception: Ego-depleted viewers experience less ambiguous figure reversal.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Marina C; Stirk, Steven; Hancock, Peter J B

    2017-02-22

    This study examined the effects of ego depletion on ambiguous figure perception. Adults (N = 315) received an ego depletion task and were subsequently tested on their inhibitory control abilities that were indexed by the Stroop task (Experiment 1) and their ability to perceive both interpretations of ambiguous figures that was indexed by reversal (Experiment 2). Ego depletion had a very small effect on reducing inhibitory control (Cohen's d = .15) (Experiment 1). Ego-depleted participants had a tendency to take longer to respond in Stroop trials. In Experiment 2, ego depletion had small to medium effects on the experience of reversal. Ego-depleted viewers tended to take longer to reverse ambiguous figures (duration to first reversal) when naïve of the ambiguity and experienced less reversal both when naïve and informed of the ambiguity. Together, findings suggest that ego depletion has small effects on inhibitory control and small to medium effects on bottom-up and top-down perceptual processes. The depletion of cognitive resources can reduce our visual perceptual experience.

  11. The modality effect of ego depletion: Auditory task modality reduces ego depletion.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-08-01

    An initial act of self-control that impairs subsequent acts of self-control is called ego depletion. The ego depletion phenomenon has been observed consistently. The modality effect refers to the effect of the presentation modality on the processing of stimuli. The modality effect was also robustly found in a large body of research. However, no study to date has examined the modality effects of ego depletion. This issue was addressed in the current study. In Experiment 1, after all participants completed a handgrip task, one group's participants completed a visual attention regulation task and the other group's participants completed an auditory attention regulation task, and then all participants again completed a handgrip task. The ego depletion phenomenon was observed in both the visual and the auditory attention regulation task. Moreover, participants who completed the visual task performed worse on the handgrip task than participants who completed the auditory task, which indicated that there was high ego depletion in the visual task condition. In Experiment 2, participants completed an initial task that either did or did not deplete self-control resources, and then they completed a second visual or auditory attention control task. The results indicated that depleted participants performed better on the auditory attention control task than the visual attention control task. These findings suggest that altering task modality may reduce ego depletion.

  12. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  13. Self-regulation, ego depletion, and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Roy F

    2014-12-01

    Inhibition is a major form of self-regulation. As such, it depends on self-awareness and comparing oneself to standards and is also susceptible to fluctuations in willpower resources. Ego depletion is the state of reduced willpower caused by prior exertion of self-control. Ego depletion undermines inhibition both because restraints are weaker and because urges are felt more intensely than usual. Conscious inhibition of desires is a pervasive feature of everyday life and may be a requirement of life in civilized, cultural society, and in that sense it goes to the evolved core of human nature. Intentional inhibition not only restrains antisocial impulses but can also facilitate optimal performance, such as during test taking. Self-regulation and ego depletion- may also affect less intentional forms of inhibition, even chronic tendencies to inhibit. Broadly stated, inhibition is necessary for human social life and nearly all societies encourage and enforce it.

  14. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup −3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 μs. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  15. Novel psychoactive substances (designer drugs): overview and pharmacology of modulators of monoamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Liechti, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Novel psychoactive substances are newly used designer drugs ("internet drugs", "research chemicals", "legal highs") potentially posing similar health risks to classic illicit substances. Chemically, many novel psychoactive substances can be classified as phenethylamines, amphetamines, synthetic cathinones, piperazines, pipradrols/piperidines, aminoindanes benzofurans, and tryptamines. Pharmacologically, these substances interact with various monoaminergic targets. Typically, stimulants inhibit the transport of dopamine and noradrenaline (pipradrols, pyrovalerone cathinones) or induce the release of these monoamines (amphetamines and methamphetamine-like cathinones), entactogens predominantly enhance serotonin release (phenylpiperazines, aminoindanes, para-substituted amphetamines, and MDMA-like cathinones) similar to MDMA (ecstasy), and hallucinogens (tryptamines, hallucinogenic phenethylamines) are direct agonists at serotonergic 5-HT2A receptors. Synthetic cannabinoids are another group of novel substances which all act as agonists at the cannabinoid CB1 receptor similar to THC but are chemically diverse. In particular, the relative serotonergic vs dopaminergic activity (determined by the dopamine/serotonin transporter inhibition ratio in vitro) can be helpful to predict the desired psychotropic but also the toxic effects of novel substances as well as their potential for addiction. Although the use of novel psychoactive substances mostly produces minor or moderate poisonings, serious complications occur. Serotonergic drugs (entactogens and hallucinogens) are associated with acute serotonin syndrome, hyperthermia, seizures, and hyponatremia. Dopaminergic drugs are highly addictive and acute toxicity includes prolonged stimulation, insomnia, agitation, and psychosis. Agitation, anxiety, paranoia, hypertension, and rarely myocardial infarction and renal failure are seen with synthetic cannabinoids. Treatment is supportive.

  16. Successful Treatment of Intracranial Glioblastoma Xenografts With a Monoamine Oxidase B-Activated Pro-Drug

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Martyn A.; Livingston, Andrew D.; Gist, Taylor L.; Ghosh, Pardip; Han, Junyan; Baskin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The last major advance in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was the introduction of temozolomide in 1999. Treatment with temozolomide following surgical debulking extends survival rate compared to radiotherapy and debulking alone. However, virtually all glioblastoma patients experience disease progression within 7 to 10 months. Although many salvage treatments, including bevacizumab, rechallenge with temozolomide, and other alkylating agents, have been evaluated, none of these clearly improves survival. Monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) is highly expressed in glioblastoma cell mitochondria, and mitochondrial function is intimately tied to treatment-resistant glioblastoma progression. These glioblastoma properties provide a strong rationale for pursuing a MAOB-selective pro-drug treatment approach that, upon drug activation, targets glioblastoma mitochondria, especially mitochondrial DNA. MP-MUS is the lead compound in a family of pro-drugs designed to treat GBM that is converted into the mature, mitochondria-targeting drug, P+-MUS, by MAOB. We show that MP-MUS can successfully kill primary gliomas in vitro and in vivo mouse xenograft models. PMID:26501110

  17. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  18. Monoamine Oxidase Is Overactivated in Left and Right Ventricles from Ischemic Hearts: An Intriguing Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Manni, Maria Elena; Borchi, Elisabetta; Bargelli, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play a key role in human heart failure (HF). Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is emerging as a major ROS source in several cardiomyopathies. However, little is known about MAO activity in human failing heart and its relationship with redox imbalance. Therefore, we measured MAO activity in the left (LV) and in the right (RV) ventricle of human nonfailing (NF) and in end-stage ischemic (IHD) and nonischemic failing hearts. We found that both MAO isoforms (MAO-A/B) significantly increased in terms of activity and expression levels only in IHD ventricles. Catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 activities (ALDH-2), both implicated in MAO-catalyzed catecholamine catabolism, were significantly elevated in the failing LV, whereas, in the RV, statistical significance was observed only for ALDH-2. Oxidative stress markers levels were significantly increased only in the failing RV. Actin oxidation was significantly elevated in both failing ventricles and related to MAO-A activity and to functional parameters. These data suggest a close association between MAO-A-dependent ROS generation, actin oxidation, and ventricular dysfunction. This latter finding points to a possible pathogenic role of MAO-A in human myocardial failure supporting the idea that MAO-A could be a new therapeutic target in HF. PMID:28044091

  19. The separate and combined effects of monoamine oxidase A inhibition and nicotine on resting state EEG.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dylan M; Fisher, Derek; Blier, Pierre; Ilivitsky, Vadim; Knott, Verner

    2016-01-01

    While nicotine is often associated with the neuropsychological effects of tobacco smoke, the robust monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition observed in chronic smokers is also likely to play a role. Electroencephalographically-indexed alterations in baseline neural oscillations by nicotine have previously been reported in both smokers and non-smokers, however, little is known about the effects of MAO inhibition in combination with nicotine on resting state EEG. In a sample of 24 healthy non-smoking males, the effects of 6 mg nicotine gum, as well as MAO-A inhibition via 75 mg moclobemide, were investigated in separate and combined conditions over four separate test sessions. Drug effects were observed in the alpha2, beta2, and theta band frequencies. Nicotine increased alpha2 power, and moclobemide decreased beta2 power. Theta power was decreased most robustly by the combination of both drugs. Therefore, this study demonstrated that the nicotinic and MAO inhibiting properties of tobacco may differentially influence fast-wave oscillations (alpha2 and beta2), while acting in synergy to influence theta oscillations.

  20. Monoamine-Sensitive Developmental Periods Impacting Adult Emotional and Cognitive Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Deepika; Teixeira, Cátia M; Cagliostro, Martha K Caffrey; Mahadevia, Darshini; Ansorge, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Development passes through sensitive periods, during which plasticity allows for genetic and environmental factors to exert indelible influence on the maturation of the organism. In the context of central nervous system development, such sensitive periods shape the formation of neurocircuits that mediate, regulate, and control behavior. This general mechanism allows for development to be guided by both the genetic blueprint as well as the environmental context. While allowing for adaptation, such sensitive periods are also vulnerability windows during which external and internal factors can confer risk to disorders by derailing otherwise resilient developmental programs. Here we review developmental periods that are sensitive to monoamine signaling and impact adult behaviors of relevance to psychiatry. Specifically, we review (1) a serotonin-sensitive period that impacts sensory system development, (2) a serotonin-sensitive period that impacts cognition, anxiety- and depression-related behaviors, and (3) a dopamine- and serotonin-sensitive period affecting aggression, impulsivity and behavioral response to psychostimulants. We discuss preclinical data to provide mechanistic insight, as well as epidemiological and clinical data to point out translational relevance. The field of translational developmental neuroscience has progressed exponentially providing solid conceptual advances and unprecedented mechanistic insight. With such knowledge at hand and important methodological innovation ongoing, the field is poised for breakthroughs elucidating the developmental origins of neuropsychiatric disorders, and thus understanding pathophysiology. Such knowledge of sensitive periods that determine the developmental trajectory of complex behaviors is a necessary step towards improving prevention and treatment approaches for neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25178408

  1. Release of (/sup 3/H)-monoamines from superfused rat striatal slices by methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, J.A.; Schmidt, C.J.; Lovenberg, W.

    1986-03-05

    MDMA is a phenylisopropylamine which is reported to have unique behavioral effects in man. Because of its structural similarities to the amphetamines the authors have compared the effects of MDMA and two related amphetamines on the spontaneous release of tritiated dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) from superfused rat striatal slices. At concentrations of 10/sup -7/ - 10/sup -5/M MDMA and the serotonergic neurotoxin, p-chloroamphetamine, were equipotent releasers of (/sup 3/H)5HT being approximately 10x more potent than methamphetamine. However, methamphetamine was the more potent releaser of (/sup 3/H)DA by a factor of approximately 10x. MDMA-induced release of both (/sup 5/H)5HT and (/sup 3/H)DA was Ca/sup 2 +/-independent and inhibited by selective monoamine uptake blockers suggesting a carrier-dependent release mechanism. Synaptosomal uptake experiments with (+)(/sup 3/H)MDMA indicated no specific uptake of the drug further suggesting the effect of uptake blockers may be to inhibit the carrier-mediated export of amines displaced by MDMA.

  2. Switch in treatment from tricyclic antidepressants to moclobemide: a new generation monoamine oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dingemanse, J; Kneer, J; Fotteler, B; Groen, H; Peeters, P A; Jonkman, J H

    1995-02-01

    The combination of classic monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressant drugs (TCAs) has been associated with a variety of adverse events. A switch in treatment from TCAs to moclobemide, a reversible and selective inhibitor of MAO-A, was investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers. Two groups of 12 subjects were treated with either amitriptyline (75 mg/day) or clomipramine (100 mg/day) until steady-state conditions had been attained (14 days). Treatment with the TCAs was discontinued abruptly and switched to either a therapeutic dose regimen of moclobemide (300 mg/day) or placebo. The tolerability and safety pattern did not reveal any clinically relevant differences between moclobemide and placebo recipients, nor was there any sign of a pharmacokinetic interaction between the TCAs and moclobemide. In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest that therapeutic doses of moclobemide up to 300 mg daily can be given 24 hours after the last dose of treatment with either amitriptyline or clomipramine without major risks.

  3. Deviant peer affiliation and antisocial behavior: interaction with Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) genotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steve S

    2011-04-01

    Although genetic and environmental factors are separately implicated in the development of antisocial behavior (ASB), interactive models have emerged relatively recently, particularly those incorporating molecular genetic data. Using a large sample of male Caucasian adolescents and young adults from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), the association of deviant peer affiliation, the 30-base pair variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in promoter region of the monoamine oxidase-A (MAOA) gene, and their interaction, with antisocial behavior (ASB) was investigated. Weighted analyses accounting for over-sampling and clustering within schools as well as controlling for age and wave suggested that deviant peer affiliation and MAOA genotype were each significantly associated with levels of overt ASB across a 6-year period. Only deviant peer affiliation was significantly related to covert ASB, however. Additionally, there was evidence suggestive of a gene-environment interaction (G × E) where the influence of deviant peer affiliation on overt ASB was significantly stronger among individuals with the high-activity MAOA genotype than the low-activity genotype. MAOA was not significantly associated with deviant peer affiliation, thus strengthening the inference of G × E rather than gene-environment correlation (rGE). Different forms of gene-environment interplay and implications for future research on ASB are discussed.

  4. Modulation of monoamine neurotransmitters in fighting fish Betta splendens exposed to waterborne phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2010-12-01

    Endogenous estrogens are known to affect the activity of monoamine neurotransmitters in vertebrate animals, but the effects of exogenous estrogens on neurotransmitters are relatively poorly understood. We exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses of three phytoestrogens that are potential endocrine disruptors in wild fish populations: genistein, equol, and β-sitosterol. We also exposed fish to two doses of the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol, which we selected as a positive control because phytoestrogens are putative estrogen mimics. Our results were variable, but the effects were generally modest. Genistein increased dopamine levels in the forebrains of B. splendens at both environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses. The environmentally relevant dose of equol increased dopamine levels in B. splendens forebrains, and the pharmacological dose decreased norepinephrine (forebrain), dopamine (hindbrain), and serotonin (forebrain) levels. The environmentally relevant dose of β-sitosterol decreased norepinephrine and dopamine in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Our results suggest that sources of environmental phytoestrogens, such as runoff or effluent from agricultural fields, wood pulp mills, and sewage treatment plants, have the potential to modulate neurotransmitter activity in free-living fishes in a way that could interfere with normal behavioral processes.

  5. In vitro evaluation of Bacopa monniera extract and individual constituents on human recombinant monoamine oxidase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajbir; Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Bhateria, Manisha; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar

    2014-09-01

    Bacopa monniera is a traditional Ayurvedic medicinal plant that has been used worldwide for its nootropic action. Chemically standardized extract of B. monniera is now available as over the counter herbal remedy to enhance memory in children and adults. Considering the nootropic action of B. monniera, we evaluated the effect of clinically available B. monniera extract and six of B. monniera constituents (bacoside A3, bacopaside I, bacopaside II, bacosaponin C, bacosine, and bacoside A mixture) on recombinant human monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The effect of B. monniera extract and individual constituents on human recombinant MAO-A and MAO-B enzymes was evaluated using MAO-Glo(TM) assay kit (Promega Corporation, USA), following the instruction manual. IC50 and mode of inhibition were measured for MAO enzymes. Bacopaside I and bacoside A mixture inhibited the MAO-A and MAO-B enzymes. Bacopaside I exhibited mixed mode of inhibition with IC50 and Ki values of 17.08 ± 1.64 and 42.5 ± 3.53 µg/mL, respectively, for MAO-A enzyme. Bacopaside I is the major constituent of B. monniera, which inhibited the MAO-A enzyme selectively.

  6. Interactions Between Monoamine Oxidase A and Punitive Discipline in African American and Caucasian Men's Antisocial Behavior.

    PubMed

    Choe, Daniel Ewon; Shaw, Daniel S; Hyde, Luke W; Forbes, Erika E

    2014-09-01

    Although previous studies have shown that interactions between monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype and childhood maltreatment predict Caucasian boys' antisocial behavior, the generalizability of this gene-environment interaction to more diverse populations and more common parenting behaviors, such as punitive discipline in early childhood, is not clearly understood. Among 189 low-income men (44% African American, 56% Caucasian) who underwent rigorous assessments of family behavior and social context longitudinally across 20 years, those men with the low activity MAOA allele who experienced more punitive discipline at ages 1.5, 2, and 5 years showed more antisocial behavior from ages 15 through 20 years. Effects of punitive discipline on antisocial behavior differed by caregiver and age at which it occurred, suggesting sensitive periods throughout early childhood in which low MAOA activity elevated boys' vulnerability to harsh parenting and risk for antisocial behavior. This genetic vulnerability to punitive discipline-and not just extreme, maltreatment experiences-may generalize to other male populations at risk for antisocial behavior.

  7. Binding models of reversible inhibitors to type-B monoamine oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrieri, Antonio; Carotti, Andrea; Barreca, M. Letizia; Altomare, Cosimo

    2002-11-01

    Interest in the inhibitors of type-B monoamine oxidase has grown in recent years, due to the evidence for multiple roles of one such agent (selegiline) in the pharmacological management of neurodegenerative disorders. A set of 130 reversible and selective inhibitors of MAO-B (including tetrazole, oxadiazolone, and oxadiazinone derivatives) were taken from the literature and subjected to a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) study, using CoMFA and GOLPE procedures. The steric and lipophilic fields, alone and in combination, provided us with informative models and satisfactory predictions (q2=0.73). The validity of these models was checked against the 3D X-ray structure of human MAO-B. Flexible docking calculations, performed by using a new approach which took advantage from QXP and GRID computational tools, showed the diverse inhibitors to interact with MAO-B in a similar binding mode, irrespective of the heterocycle characterizing them. A significant trend of correlation was observed between estimated energies of the complexes and the experimental inhibition data.

  8. Monoamine oxidases are novel sources of cardiovascular oxidative stress in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sturza, Adrian; Duicu, Oana M; Vaduva, Adrian; Dănilă, Maria D; Noveanu, Lavinia; Varró, András; Muntean, Danina M

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is widely recognized as the most severe metabolic disease associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major event causally linked to the development of cardiovascular complications throughout the evolution of DM. Recently, monoamine oxidases (MAOs) at the outer mitochondrial membrane, with 2 isoforms, MAO-A and MAO-B, have emerged as novel sources of constant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production in the cardiovascular system via the oxidative deamination of biogenic amines and neurotransmitters. Whether MAOs are mediators of endothelial dysfunction in DM is unknown, and so we studied this in a streptozotocin-induced rat model of diabetes. MAO expression (mRNA and protein) was increased in both arterial samples and hearts isolated from the diabetic animals. Also, H2O2 production (ferrous oxidation - xylenol orange assay) in aortic samples was significantly increased, together with an impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation (organ-bath studies). MAO inhibitors (clorgyline and selegiline) attenuated ROS production by 50% and partially normalized the endothelium-dependent relaxation in diseased vessels. In conclusion, MAOs, in particular the MAO-B isoform, are induced in aortas and hearts in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model and contribute, via the generation of H2O2, to the endothelial dysfunction associated with experimental diabetes.

  9. Simultaneous determination of cadaverine and putrescine using a disposable monoamine oxidase based biosensor.

    PubMed

    Henao-Escobar, Wilder; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Asunción Alonso-Lomillo, M; Julia Arcos-Martínez, M

    2013-12-15

    The selective and simultaneous amperometric determination of putrescine (Put) and cadaverine (Cad) has been carried out using a novel design of screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) with two working electrodes connected in array mode. A mixture of 3% of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), as mediator, and carbon ink was used for the construction of the screen-printed working electrode. The employment of different amounts of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzyme on these modified TTF/SPCEs and the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) allowed performing the simultaneous determination of both analytes. The amperometric detection has been performed by measuring the oxidation current of the mediator at a potential of+250 mV vs. screen-printed Ag/AgCl reference electrode. A linear response in the Cad concentration range from 19.6 till 107.1 µM and from 9.9 till 74.1 μM for Put was obtained at the MAO/AuNPs/TTF/SPCE biosensor. This device showed a capability of detection of 9.9 and 19.9±0.9 µM (n=4 α=β=0.05) and a precision of 4.9% and 10.3% in terms of relative standard deviation for Put and Cad, respectively. The developed biosensor was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of Put and Cad in octopus samples.

  10. Phentermine inhibition of recombinant human liver monoamine oxidases A and B.

    PubMed

    Nandigama, Ravi K; Newton-Vinson, Paige; Edmondson, Dale E

    2002-03-01

    Recent studies with rat tissue preparations have suggested that the anorectic drug phentermine inhibits serotonin degradation by inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO) A with a K(I) value of 85-88 microM, a potency suggested to be similar to that of other reversible MAO inhibitors (Ulus et al., Biochem Pharmacol 2000;59:1611-21). Since there are known differences between rats and humans in substrate and inhibitor specificities of MAOs, the interactions of phentermine with recombinant human purified preparations of MAO A and MAO B were determined. Human MAO A was competitively inhibited by phentermine with a K(I) value of 498+/-60 microM, a value approximately 6-fold weaker than that observed for the rat enzyme. Phentermine was also observed to be a competitive inhibitor of recombinant human liver MAO B with a K(I) value of 375+/-42 microM, a value similar to that observed with the rat enzyme (310-416 microM). In contrast to the behavior with rat tissue preparations, no slow time-dependent behavior was observed for phentermine inhibition of purified soluble human MAO preparations. Difference absorption spectral studies showed similar perturbations of the covalent FAD moieties of both human MAO A and MAO B, which suggests a similar mode of binding in both enzymes. These data suggest that phentermine inhibition of human MAO A (or of MAO B) is too weak to be of pharmacological relevance.

  11. Effect of PCB and DES on rat monoamine oxidase, acetylcholinesterase, testosterone, and estradiol ontogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, D.R.; Bradshaw, W.S.; Booth, G.M.; Seegmiller, R.E.; Allen, S.D.

    1992-06-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) have been documented as potentially hazardous environmental agents. In utero exposure to DES produces human vaginal adenocarcinoma, male reproductive tract lesions in mice, and has been correlated with personality changes in human males. PCB (Kanechlor) was found to be the major toxin in the {open_quotes}Yusho{close_quotes} rice oil poisoning in Japan in 1968. Other investigators have shown in rats that PCB (Arochlor) causes liver adenofibrosis, thyroid dysfunction, atypical mitochondria, and dilation of both smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum. Matthews et al. (1978) also reported that 4, 4{prime} chlorinated biphenyl was the most potent inducer of monooxygenases, irrespective of chlorination at other sites. Although these compounds have been studied extensively in mammals, there is a paucity of data examining their effects when non-fetotoxic amounts are administered chronically and orally during gestation. The present study is part of a larger effort designed to establish a protocol for testing the developmental effects of xenobiotics such as DES and PCB. Levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were measured as an indicator of the integrity of nerve transmission in the central nervous system. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is a marker for the outer mitochondrial membrane and is an important amine metabolizing enzyme. Testosterone and estradiol are important sex steroids in mammals, and effects upon levels of the two hormones may signal anomalies in development of sex characteristics. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The development of a MIP-optosensor for the detection of monoamine naphthalenes in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Valero-Navarro, Angel; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Fernández-Sánchez, Jorge F; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Mallavia, Ricardo; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2009-03-15

    To enhance the advantages of fluorescent flow-through sensing for drinking water we have designed a novel sensing matrix based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The synergic combination of a tailor-made MIP recognition with a selective room temperature fluorescence detection is a novel concept for optosensing devices and is assessed here for the simple and selective determination of pollutants in water. We describe a simple approach to preparing synthetic receptors for monoamine naphthalene compounds (MA-NCs) using non-covalent molecular imprinting techniques and naphthalene as template. We examine in detail the binding characteristics of the imprinted polymer and describe the flow-through sensor of MA-NCs by solid-surface fluorescence. Its detection limits for recognizing 1-naphthylamine (1-NA) and 2-naphthylamine (2-NA) separately are 26 ngmL(-1) and 50 ngmL(-1), respectively, and it also determines 1-NA and 2-NA simultaneously with a detection limit of 45 ngmL(-1). All the instrumental, chemical and flow variables were carefully optimized and an interference study was carried out to demonstrate its applicability and selectivity. Finally, we applied it to the analysis of 1-NA and 2-NA in tap and mineral waters, obtaining a 98% average recovery rate.

  13. The properties of B-form monoamine oxidase in mitochondria from monkey platelet.

    PubMed

    Obata, Toshio; Aomine, Masahiro

    The present study was examined the effect of the properties of monkey platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) based on inhibitor sensitivity. Monkey platelet showed a high MAO activity with beta-phenylethylamine (beta-PEA) as substrate and a very low A-form MAO activity with 5 hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) as substrate. Moreover, monkey platelet MAO was sensitive to the drugs deprenyl as B-form MAO inhibitor and less sensitive to clorgyline and harmaline as A form MAO inhibitor with beta-PEA as the B-form MAO substrate. B-form MAO from monkey platelet was more stable against heat treatment at 55 degrees C than B-form MAO in brain. After digestion with trypsin at 37 degrees C for 4 hrs, it was found that MAO from platelet was inhibited about 70% with beta-PEA as substrate with brain. The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and nortriptyline inhibited B-form MAO activity more potency than B-form MAO in brain. However, when the noncyclic antidepressant nomifensine was used, monkey platelet B-form MAO activities were less potently inhibited. All these reagents were noncompetitive inhibitors of B form MAO in monkey platelet. The present studies demonstrated that monkey platelet MAO is a single of B-form MAO and sensitive to tricyclic antidepressants.

  14. Psychological traits and platelet monoamine oxidase activity in eating disorder patients: their relationship and stability.

    PubMed

    Podar, Iris; Jaanisk, Maiken; Allik, Jüri; Harro, Jaanus

    2007-01-30

    Self-reported behavior and attitudes towards eating [Eating Disorder Inventory-2; Garner DM (1991). Eating Disorder Inventory-2: Professional Manual. Odessa, Fl.: Psychological Assessment Resources; Estonian version Podar I, Hannus A, Allik J (1999). Personality and Affectivity Characteristics Associated With Eating Disorders: a Comparison of Eating Disordered, Weight-Preoccupied, and Normal Samples. J Pers Assess; 73(1), 133-147] and the activity of platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) was studied in 11 patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), 43 patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and a healthy control group (n=138). Nineteen patients filled in the EDI-2 questionnaire and donated blood samples three times with three month intervals in order to determine platelet MAO activity. Eating disordered (ED) patients scored higher on all EDI-2 subscales and had lower MAO activity compared to the control group. They also scored higher than the control group on the Neuroticism domain but lower on the Extraversion, Openness, and Conscientiousness domains of the NEO-PI-R questionnaire. The average stability of MAO on different occasions (r=.56) was slightly smaller than the stability of the EDI-2 scores (r=.70). The lack of correlations between personality dispositions and MAO activity indicates that they have independent influence on eating disorders. A possible relationship between neurochemical mechanisms and psychological symptoms of eating disordered behavior is discussed.

  15. Red emission fluorescent probes for visualization of monoamine oxidase in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-Ling; Li, Kun; Liu, Yan-Hong; Xu, Hao-Ran; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Here we report two novel red emission fluorescent probes for the highly sensitive and selective detection of monoamine oxidase (MAO) with large Stokes shift (227 nm). Both of the probes possess solid state fluorescence and can accomplish the identification of MAO on test papers. The probe MAO-Red-1 exhibited a detection limit down to 1.2 μg mL−1 towards MAO-B. Moreover, the cleavage product was unequivocally conformedby HPLC and LCMS and the result was in accordance with the proposed oxidative deamination mechanism. The excellent photostability of MAO-Red-1 was proved both in vitro and in vivo through fluorescent kinetic experiment and laser exposure experiment of confocal microscopy, respectively. Intracellular experiments also confirmed the low cytotoxity and exceptional cell imaging abilities of MAO-Red-1. It was validated both in HeLa and HepG2 cells that MAO-Red-1 was capable of reporting MAO activity through the variation of fluorescence intensity. PMID:27499031

  16. Alterations of monoamine metabolites and neurobehavioral function in lead-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Tang, H W; Liang, Y X; Hu, X H; Yang, H G

    1995-03-01

    Neurobehavioral and neurochemical effects of occupational lead exposure were investigated by WHO Neurobehavioral Core Test Battery (NCTB) testing and a series of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites analyzing in workers from lead smeltery and storage-battery manufacturing factory and matched controls. Indicators of lead exposure, the blood lead (PbB) and zinc protophorphyrin (ZPP) levels were found significantly higher in the exposed group compared with that of the controls (70.55 micrograms/dL vs 3.67 micrograms/dL; and 294.92 micrograms/dL vs 38.32 micrograms/dL, respectively). Furthermore, elevated urinary homovanillic acid (HVA) and impairment of certain neurobehavioral performances were also found in the lead exposed workers; the latter included attention/response speed, manual dexterity, perceptual-motor speed, visual perception/memory, and motor speed/steadiness. Positive or negative correlations were observed between certain parameters. Thus, homovanillic acid (HVA) is positively correlated with PbB and ZPP; dopamine (DA) negatively correlated with Benton visual retention (BVR); and HVA negatively correlated with digit symbol (DSy), BVR, and pursuit aiming (PA). It is suggested that the alterations of dopamine and its metabolites HVA in urine associated with impairment of neurobehavioral function might be served as biomarkers of lead-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Methylphenidate and its ethanol transesterification metabolite ethylphenidate: brain disposition, monoamine transporters and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Williard, Robin L; Middaugh, Lawrence D; Zhu, Hao-Jie B; Patrick, Kennerly S

    2007-02-01

    Ethylphenidate is formed by metabolic transesterification of methylphenidate and ethanol. Study objectives were to (a) establish that ethylphenidate is formed in C57BL/6 (B6) mice; (b) compare the stimulatory effects of ethylphenidate and methylphenidate enantiomers; (c) determine methylphenidate and ethylphenidate plasma and brain distribution and (d) establish in-vitro effects of methylphenidate and ethylphenidate on monoamine transporter systems. Experimental results were that: (a) coadministration of ethanol with the separate methylphenidate isomers enantioselectively produced l-ethylphenidate; (b) d and dl-forms of methylphenidate and ethylphenidate produced dose-responsive increases in motor activity with stimulation being less for ethylphenidate; (c) plasma and whole-brain concentrations were greater for ethylphenidate than methylphenidate and (d) d and DL-methylphenidate and ethylphenidate exhibited comparably potent low inhibition of the dopamine transporter, whereas ethylphenidate was a less potent norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. These experiments establish the feasibility of the B6 mouse model for examining the interactive effects of ethanol and methylphenidate. As reported for humans, concurrent exposure of B6 mice to methylphenidate and ethanol more readily formed l-ethylphenidate than d-ethylphenidate, and the l-isomers of both methylphenidate and ethylphenidate were biologically inactive. The observed reduced stimulatory effect of d-ethylphenidate relative to d-methylphenidate appears not to be the result of brain dispositional factors, but rather may be related to its reduced inhibition of the norepinephrine transporter, perhaps altering the interaction of dopaminergic and noradrenergic neural systems.

  18. Relationship between pancreatic vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and insulin expression in human pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Saisho, Yoshifumi; Harris, Paul E.; Butler, Alexandra E.; Galasso, Ryan; Gurlo, Tatyana; Rizza, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is expressed in pancreatic beta cells and has recently been proposed as a target for measurement of beta cell mass in vivo. We questioned, (1) What proportion of beta cells express VMAT2? (2) Is VMAT2 expressed by other pancreatic endocrine or non-endocrine cells? (3) Is the relationship between VMAT2 and insulin expression disturbed in type 1 (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM)? Human pancreas (7 non-diabetics, 5 T2DM, 10 T1DM) was immunostained for insulin, VMAT2 and other pancreatic hormones. Most beta cells expressed VMAT2. VMAT2 expression was not changed by the presence of diabetes. In tail of pancreas VMAT2 immunostaining closely correlated with insulin staining. However, VMAT2 was also expressed in some pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cells. Although VMAT2 was not excluded as a target for beta cell mass measurement, expression of VMAT2 in PP cells predicts residual VMAT2 expression in human pancreas even in the absence of beta cells. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10735-008-9195-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18791800

  19. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Kelly M; Bernstein, Alison I; Stout, Kristen A; Dunn, Amy R; Lazo, Carlos R; Alter, Shawn P; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M; Goldstein, David S; Guillot, Thomas S; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W

    2014-07-08

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease.

  20. Biosensor based on inhibition of monoamine oxidases A and B for detection of β-carbolines.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Maria-Cristina; Bucur, Madalina-Petruta; Bucur, Bogdan; Radu, Gabriel Lucian

    2015-05-01

    β-Carbolines are inhibitors of monoamine oxidases (MAO-A and MAO-B) and can be found in foods, hallucinogenic plant or various drugs. We have developed a fast analysis method for β-carbolines based on the inhibition of MAO. The enzymes were immobilized on screen-printed electrodes modified with a stabilized film of Prussian blue that contain also copper. We have used benzylamine as substrate for the enzymatic reaction and the hydrogen peroxide was measured amperometrically at -50 mV. The detection limits obtained were 5.0 µM for harmane and 2.5 µM for both harmaline and norharmane. The MAO-A is inhibited by all three tested β-carbolines (harmane, norharmane, and harmaline) while MAO-B is inhibited only by norharmane. The presence of norharmane in mixtures of β-carbolines can be identified based on the difference between the cumulative inhibition of MAO-A by all β-carbolines and MAO-B inhibition. The developed biosensors were used for food analysis.

  1. Inhibition of rat fat cell lipolysis by monoamine oxidase and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase substrates.

    PubMed

    Visentin, Virgile; Prévot, Danielle; Marti, Luc; Carpéné, Christian

    2003-04-18

    It has been demonstrated that amine oxidase substrates stimulate glucose transport in cardiomyocytes and adipocytes, promote adipogenesis in pre-adipose cell lines and lower blood glucose in diabetic rats. These insulin-like effects are dependent on amine oxidation by semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase or by monoamine oxidase. The present study aimed to investigate whether amine oxidase substrates also exhibit another insulin-like property, the inhibition of lipolysis. We therefore tested the influence of tyramine and benzylamine on lipolytic activity in rat adipocytes. These amines did not modify basal lipolysis but dose-dependently counteracted the stimulation induced by lipolytic agents. The response to 10 nM isoprenaline was totally inhibited by tyramine 1 mM. The blockade produced by inhibition of amine oxidase activity or by 1 mM glutathione suggested that the generation of oxidative species, which occurs during amine oxidation, was involved in tyramine antilipolytic effect. Among the products resulting from amine oxidation, only hydrogen peroxide was antilipolytic in a manner that was potentiated by vanadate, as for tyramine or benzylamine. Antilipolytic responses to tyramine and to insulin were sensitive to wortmannin. These data suggest that inhibition of lipolysis is a novel insulin-like effect of amine oxidase substrates which is mediated by hydrogen peroxide generated during amine oxidation.

  2. Indazole- and indole-5-carboxamides: selective and reversible monoamine oxidase B inhibitors with subnanomolar potency.

    PubMed

    Tzvetkov, Nikolay T; Hinz, Sonja; Küppers, Petra; Gastreich, Marcus; Müller, Christa E

    2014-08-14

    Indazole- and indole-carboxamides were discovered as highly potent, selective, competitive, and reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B). The compounds are easily accessible by standard synthetic procedures with high overall yields. The most potent derivatives were N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-methyl-1H-indazole-5-carboxamide (38a, PSB-1491, IC50 human MAO-B 0.386 nM, >25000-fold selective versus MAO-A) and N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1H-indole-5-carboxamide (53, PSB-1410, IC50 human MAO-B 0.227 nM, >5700-fold selective versus MAO-A). Replacement of the carboxamide linker with a methanimine spacer leading to (E)-N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-(1H-indazol-5-yl)methanimine (58) represents a further novel class of highly potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors (IC50 human MAO-B 0.612 nM, >16000-fold selective versus MAO-A). In N-(3,4-difluorophenyl-1H-indazole-5-carboxamide (30, PSB-1434, IC50 human MAO-B 1.59 nM, selectivity versus MAO-A>6000-fold), high potency and selectivity are optimally combined with superior physicochemical properties. Computational docking studies provided insights into the inhibitors' interaction with the enzyme binding site and a rationale for their high potency despite their small molecular size.

  3. Successful Treatment of Intracranial Glioblastoma Xenografts With a Monoamine Oxidase B-Activated Pro-Drug.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Martyn A; Livingston, Andrew D; Gist, Taylor L; Ghosh, Pardip; Han, Junyan; Baskin, David S

    2015-09-01

    The last major advance in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was the introduction of temozolomide in 1999. Treatment with temozolomide following surgical debulking extends survival rate compared to radiotherapy and debulking alone. However, virtually all glioblastoma patients experience disease progression within 7 to 10 months. Although many salvage treatments, including bevacizumab, rechallenge with temozolomide, and other alkylating agents, have been evaluated, none of these clearly improves survival. Monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) is highly expressed in glioblastoma cell mitochondria, and mitochondrial function is intimately tied to treatment-resistant glioblastoma progression. These glioblastoma properties provide a strong rationale for pursuing a MAOB-selective pro-drug treatment approach that, upon drug activation, targets glioblastoma mitochondria, especially mitochondrial DNA. MP-MUS is the lead compound in a family of pro-drugs designed to treat GBM that is converted into the mature, mitochondria-targeting drug, P(+)-MUS, by MAOB. We show that MP-MUS can successfully kill primary gliomas in vitro and in vivo mouse xenograft models.

  4. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Kelly M.; Bernstein, Alison I.; Stout, Kristen A.; Dunn, Amy R.; Lazo, Carlos R.; Alter, Shawn P.; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J.; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M.; Goldstein, David S.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease. PMID:24979780

  5. Serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and monoamine oxidase (MAOA) promoter polymorphisms in women with severe alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Gokturk, Camilla; Schultze, Stefan; Nilsson, Kent W; von Knorring, Lars; Oreland, Lars; Hallman, Jarmila

    2008-12-01

    The serotonin system is known to play a pivotal role for mood, behaviour and psychic illness as e.g. alcoholism. Alcoholism in both males and females has been associated with polymorphisms in genes encoding for proteins of importance for central serotonergic function. Genotyping of two functional polymorphisms in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase-A, respectively, (5-HTT-LPR and MAOA-VNTR), was performed in a group of women with severe alcohol addiction. A large sample of adolescent females from a normal population was used as controls. A significantly higher frequency of the LL 5-HTT genotype (high activity) was found in female addicts without a known co-morbid psychiatric disorder than in the controls. Genotype of the MAOA-VNTR polymorphism did not differ significantly between addicts and controls. However, within the group of alcoholics, when the patients with known co-morbid psychiatric disorders were excluded, aggressive anti-social behaviour was significantly linked to the presence of the high activity MAOA allele. The pattern of associations between genotypes of 5-HTT-LPR and MAOA-VNTR in women with severe alcoholism differs from most corresponding studies on males.

  6. beta-Carboline alkaloids in Peganum harmala and inhibition of human monoamine oxidase (MAO).

    PubMed

    Herraiz, T; González, D; Ancín-Azpilicueta, C; Arán, V J; Guillén, H

    2010-03-01

    Peganum harmala L. is a multipurpose medicinal plant increasingly used for psychoactive recreational purposes (Ayahuasca analog). Harmaline, harmine, harmalol, harmol and tetrahydroharmine were identified and quantified as the main beta-carboline alkaloids in P. harmala extracts. Seeds and roots contained the highest levels of alkaloids with low levels in stems and leaves, and absence in flowers. Harmine and harmaline accumulated in dry seeds at 4.3% and 5.6% (w/w), respectively, harmalol at 0.6%, and tetrahydroharmine at 0.1% (w/w). Roots contained harmine and harmol with 2.0% and 1.4% (w/w), respectively. Seed extracts were potent reversible and competitive inhibitors of human monoamine oxidase (MAO-A) with an IC(50) of 27 microg/l whereas root extracts strongly inhibited MAO-A with an IC(50) of 159 microg/l. In contrast, they were poor inhibitors of MAO-B. Inhibition of MAO-A by seed extracts was quantitatively attributed to harmaline and harmine whereas inhibition by root extracts came from harmine with no additional interferences. Stems and leaves extracts were poor inhibitors of MAO. The potent inhibition of MAO-A by seed and root extracts of P. harmala containing beta-carbolines should contribute to the psychopharmacological and toxicological effects of this plant and could be the basis for its purported antidepressant actions.

  7. Regulation of the Dopamine and Vesicular Monoamine Transporters: Pharmacological Targets and Implications for Disease

    PubMed Central

    German, Christopher L.; Baladi, Michelle G.; McFadden, Lisa M.; Hanson, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) plays a well recognized role in a variety of physiologic functions such as movement, cognition, mood, and reward. Consequently, many human disorders are due, in part, to dysfunctional dopaminergic systems, including Parkinson’s disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and substance abuse. Drugs that modify the DA system are clinically effective in treating symptoms of these diseases or are involved in their manifestation, implicating DA in their etiology. DA signaling and distribution are primarily modulated by the DA transporter (DAT) and by vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT)-2, which transport DA into presynaptic terminals and synaptic vesicles, respectively. These transporters are regulated by complex processes such as phosphorylation, protein–protein interactions, and changes in intracellular localization. This review provides an overview of 1) the current understanding of DAT and VMAT2 neurobiology, including discussion of studies ranging from those conducted in vitro to those involving human subjects; 2) the role of these transporters in disease and how these transporters are affected by disease; and 3) and how selected drugs alter the function and expression of these transporters. Understanding the regulatory processes and the pathologic consequences of DAT and VMAT2 dysfunction underlies the evolution of therapeutic development for the treatment of DA-related disorders. PMID:26408528

  8. Beta-phenylethylamine alters monoamine transporter function via trace amine-associated receptor 1: implication for modulatory roles of trace amines in brain.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihua; Miller, Gregory M

    2008-05-01

    Brain monoamines include common biogenic amines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin) and trace amines [beta-phenylethylamine (beta-PEA), tyramine, tryptamine, and octopamine]. Common biogenic amines are well established as neurotransmitters, but the roles and functional importance of trace amines remain elusive. Here, we re-evaluated the interaction of trace amines with trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) and investigated effects of beta-PEA on monoamine transporter function and influence of monoamine autoreceptors on TAAR1 signaling. We confirmed that TAAR1 was activated by trace amines and demonstrated that TAAR1 activation by beta-PEA significantly inhibited uptake and induced efflux of [3H]dopamine, [3H]norepinephrine, and [3H]serotonin in transfected cells. In brain synaptosomes, beta-PEA significantly inhibited uptake and induced efflux of [3H]dopamine and [3H]serotonin in striatal and [3H]norepinephrine in thalamic synaptosomes of rhesus monkeys and wild-type mice, but it lacked the same effects in synaptosomes of TAAR1 knockout mice. The effect of beta-PEA on efflux was blocked by transporter inhibitors in either the transfected cells or wild-type mouse synaptosomes. We also demonstrated that TAAR1 signaling was not affected by monoamine autoreceptors at exposure to trace amines that we show to have poor binding affinity for the autoreceptors relative to common biogenic amines. These results reveal that beta-PEA alters monoamine transporter function via interacting with TAAR1 but not monoamine autoreceptors. The functional profile of beta-PEA may reveal a common mechanism by which trace amines exert modulatory effects on monoamine transporters in brain.

  9. Simplified dietary acute tryptophan depletion: effects of a novel amino acid mixture on the neurochemistry of C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Cristina L.; Van Swearingen, Amanda E. D.; Arrant, Andrew E.; Biskup, Caroline S.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Zepf, Florian D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diet and nutrition can impact on the biological processes underpinning neuropsychiatric disorders. Amino acid (AA) mixtures lacking a specific neurotransmitter precursor can change the levels of brain serotonin (5-HT) or dopamine (DA) in the central nervous system. The availability of these substances within the brain is determined by the blood–brain barrier (BBB) that restricts the access of peripheral AA into the brain. AA mixtures lacking tryptophan (TRP) compete with endogenous TRP for uptake into the brain across the BBB, which in turn leads to a decrease in central nervous 5-HT synthesis. Objective The present study compared the effects of a simplified acute tryptophan depletion (SATD) mixture in mice on blood and brain serotonergic and dopaminergic metabolites to those of a commonly used acute tryptophan depletion mixture (ATD Moja-De) and its TRP-balanced control (BAL). Design The SATD formula is composed of only three large neutral AAs: phenylalanine (PHE), leucine (LEU), and isoleucine (ILE). BAL, ATD Moja-De, or SATD formulas were delivered to adult male C57BL/6J mice by gavage. TRP, monoamines, and their metabolites were quantified in blood and brain regions (hippocampus, frontal cortex, amygdala, caudate putamen, and nucleus accumbens). Results Both ATD Moja-De and SATD significantly decreased levels of serum and brain TRP, as well as brain 5-HIAA and 5-HT compared with BAL. SATD reduced HVA levels in caudate but did not alter total DA levels or DOPAC. SATD decreased TRP and serotonergic metabolites comparably to ATD Moja-De administration. Conclusion A simplified and more palatable combination of AAs can manipulate serotonergic function and might be useful to reveal underlying monoamine-related mechanisms contributing to different neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26278978

  10. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means...

  11. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means...

  12. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means...

  13. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means...

  14. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means...

  15. Dissolution Treatment of Depleted Uranium Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gates-Anderson, D D; Laue, C A; Fitch, T E

    2004-02-09

    Researchers at LLNL have developed a 3-stage process that converts pyrophoric depleted uranium metal turnings to a solidified final product that can be transported to and buried at a permitted land disposal site. The three process stages are: (1) pretreatment; (2) dissolution; and (3) solidification. Each stage was developed following extensive experimentation. This report presents the results of their experimental studies.

  16. Demonstration of jackhammer incorporating depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, L E; Hoard, R W; Carter, D L; Saculla, M D; Wilson, G V

    2000-04-01

    The United States Government currently has an abundance of depleted uranium (DU). This surplus of about 1 billion pounds is the result of an enrichment process using gaseous diffusion to produce enriched and depleted uranium. The enriched uranium has been used primarily for either nuclear weapons for the military or nuclear fuel for the commercial power industry. Most of the depleted uranium remains at the enrichment process plants in the form of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}). The Department of Energy (DOE) recently began a study to identify possible commercial applications for the surplus material. One of these potential applications is to use the DU in high-density strikers/hammers in pneumatically driven tools, such as jack hammers and piledrivers to improve their impulse performance. The use of DU could potentially increase tunneling velocity and excavation into target materials with improved efficiency. This report describes the efforts undertaken to analyze the particulars of using DU in two specific striking applications: the jackhammer and chipper tool.

  17. Contrasts between Antarctic and Arctic ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan; Portmann, Robert W; Thompson, David W J

    2007-01-09

    This work surveys the depth and character of ozone depletion in the Antarctic and Arctic using available long balloon-borne and ground-based records that cover multiple decades from ground-based sites. Such data reveal changes in the range of ozone values including the extremes observed as polar air passes over the stations. Antarctic ozone observations reveal widespread and massive local depletion in the heart of the ozone "hole" region near 18 km, frequently exceeding 90%. Although some ozone losses are apparent in the Arctic during particular years, the depth of the ozone losses in the Arctic are considerably smaller, and their occurrence is far less frequent. Many Antarctic total integrated column ozone observations in spring since approximately the 1980s show values considerably below those ever observed in earlier decades. For the Arctic, there is evidence of some spring season depletion of total ozone at particular stations, but the changes are much less pronounced compared with the range of past data. Thus, the observations demonstrate that the widespread and deep ozone depletion that characterizes the Antarctic ozone hole is a unique feature on the planet.

  18. Neutral depletion versus repletion due to ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Makrinich, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Liard, L.; Rax, J.-M.; Chabert, P.

    2008-05-15

    Recent theoretical analyses which predicted unexpected effects of neutral depletion in both collisional and collisionless plasmas are reviewed. We focus on the depletion of collisionless neutrals induced by strong ionization of a collisionless plasma and contrast this depletion with the effect of strong ionization on thermalized neutrals. The collisionless plasma is analyzed employing a kinetic description. The collisionless neutrals and the plasma are coupled through volume ionization and wall recombination only. The profiles of density and pressure both of the plasma and of the neutral-gas and the profile of the ionization rate are calculated. It is shown that for collisionless neutrals the ionization results in neutral depletion, while when neutrals are thermalized the ionization induces a maximal neutral-density at the discharge center, which we call neutral repletion. The difference between the two cases stems from the relation between the neutral density and pressure. The pressure of the collisionless neutral-gas turns out to be maximal where its density is minimal, in contrast to the case of a thermalized neutral gas.

  19. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  20. Direct Visualization of an Impurity Depletion Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alex A.; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan Ma; Thomas, Bill R.

    2000-01-01

    When a crystal incorporates more impurity per unit of its volume than the impurity concentration in solution, the solution in vicinity of the growing crystal is depleted with respect to the impurity I,2. With a stagnant solution, e. g. in microgravity or gels, an impurity depletion zone expands as the crystal grows and results in greater purity in most of the outer portion of the crystal than in the core. Crystallization in gel provides an opportunity to mimic microgravity conditions and visualize the impurity depletion zone. Colorless, transparent apoferritin (M congruent to 450 KDa) crystals were grown in the presence of red holoferritin dimer as a microheterogeneous impurity (M congruent to 900 KDa) within agarose gel by counterdiffusion with Cd(2+) precipitant. Preferential trapping of dimers, (distribution coefficient K = 4 (exp 1,2)) results in weaker red color around the crystals grown in the left tube in the figure as compared to the control middle tube without crystals. The left and the middle tubes contain colored ferritin dimers, the right tube contains colored trimers. The meniscus in the left tube separate gel (below) and liquid solution containing Cd(2+) (above). Similar solutions, though without precipitants, were present on top of the middle and right tube allowing diffusion of dimers and trimers. The area of weaker color intensity around crystals directly demonstrates overlapped impurity depletion zones.

  1. How Depleted is the MORB mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. W.; Hart, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the degree of mantle depletion of highly incompatible elements is critically important for assessing Earth's internal heat production and Urey number. Current views of the degree of MORB source depletion are dominated by Salters and Stracke (2004), and Workman and Hart (2005). The first is based on an assessment of average MORB compositions, whereas the second considers trace element data of oceanic peridotites. Both require an independent determination of one absolute concentration, Lu (Salters & Stracke), or Nd (Workman & Hart). Both use parent-daughter ratios Lu/Hf, Sm/Nd, and Rb/Sr calculated from MORB isotopes combined with continental-crust extraction models, as well as "canonical" trace element ratios, to boot-strap the full range of trace element abundances. We show that the single most important factor in determining the ultimate degree of incompatible element depletion in the MORB source lies in the assumptions about the timing of continent extraction, exemplified by continuous extraction versus simple two-stage models. Continued crust extraction generates additional, recent mantle depletion, without affecting the isotopic composition of the residual mantle significantly. Previous emphasis on chemical compositions of MORB and/or peridotites has tended to obscure this. We will explore the effect of different continent extraction models on the degree of U, Th, and K depletion in the MORB source. Given the uncertainties of the two most popular models, the uncertainties of U and Th in DMM are at least ±50%, and this impacts the constraints on the terrestrial Urey ratio. Salters, F.J.M. and Stracke, A., 2004, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 5, Q05004. Workman, R.K. and Hart, S.R., 2005, EPSL 231, 53-72.

  2. In vivo study on the monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites change in the striatum of Parkinsonian rats by liquid chromatography with an acetylene black nanoparticles modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Yang, Jie; Lin, Ruipo; Yu, Li; Gao, Hongchang; Yang, Shulin; Li, Xiaokun

    2013-01-01

    The variation in the concentration of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in an experimental Parkinsonian animal model established by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine administration was studied. For the purpose of detecting monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites more sensitively, an acetylene black nanoparticles modified electrode was fabricated and used as the working electrode for an electrochemical detector in HPLC. The results indicated that the modified electrode exhibited efficiently electrocatalytic oxidation for monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites with relatively high sensitivity, long life, and stability. The linear ranges spanned four orders of magnitude (r>0.998) and the detectability was on the level of 0.1 nmolL(-1). The percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) for each compound at all concentration levels was lower than 2.57% and 1.94% for intra-day and inter-day precision, respectively. The mean recovery values were between 98.75% and 105.25%, and the %RSD was found to be less than 1.02%. Coupled with in vivo microdialysis sampling, the validated method was successfully applied to measure monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in both sides of the striatum of conscious and freely moving Parkinsonian rats, and the extracellular monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the lesioned-side striatum of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats were lower than that in the intact side striatum or in the striatum of control rats.

  3. Online micro-solid-phase extraction based on boronate affinity monolithic column coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of monoamine neurotransmitters in human urine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoting; Hu, Yufei; Li, Gongke

    2014-05-16

    Quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters is very important in diagnosing and monitoring of patients with neurological disorders. We developed an online analytical method to selectively determine urinary monoamine neurotransmitters, which coupled the boronate affinity monolithic column micro-solid-phase extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The boronate affinity monolithic column was prepared by in situ polymerization of vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBAA) in a stainless capillary column. The prepared monolithic column showed good permeability, high extraction selectivity and capacity. The column-to-column reproducibility was satisfactory and the enrichment factors were 17-243 for four monoamine neurotransmitters. Parameters that influence the online extraction efficiency, including pH of sample solution, flow rate of extraction and desorption, extraction volume and desorption volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the developed method exhibited low limit of detection (0.06-0.80μg/L), good linearity (with R(2) between 0.9979 and 0.9993). The recoveries in urine samples were 81.0-105.5% for four monoamine neurotransmitters with intra- and inter-day RSDs of 2.1-8.2% and 3.7-10.6%, respectively. The online analytical method was sensitive, accurate, selective, reliable and applicable to analysis of trace monoamine neurotransmitters in human urine sample.

  4. Comparison of the monoamine oxidase inhibiting properties of two reversible and selective monoamine oxidase-A inhibitors moclobemide and toloxatone, and assessment of their effect on psychometric performance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, I; Zimmer, R; Thiede, H M; Payan, C; Hergueta, T; Robin, L; Puech, A J

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of two reversible, predominantly monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) inhibitors, moclobemide (150 mg three times daily) and toloxatone (400-200-400 mg day-1) on monoamine metabolites and psychometric performance were compared in a double-blind placebo controlled crossover study in 12 healthy subjects. 2. After 7 days of moclobemide/toloxatone/placebo administration subjects were hospitalized for 24 h on day 8. Blood samples were drawn every 2 h for determination of plasma noradrenaline (NA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA). Urine was collected for measurements of normetanephrine and 3-methoxytyramine excretion. Psychometric performance (short- and long-term memory, critical flicker fusion frequency, choice reaction time) and subjective feelings were assessed before each drug intake (in the morning, at noon, in the evening). 3. Compared with placebo, both reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors decreased the plasma concentration of DHPG and HVA. The overall fall in DHPG (AUC from 0 to 24 h) was 44% during moclobemide and 12% during toloxatone (P less than 0.001) and the overall decrease in HVA was 38% and 20% (P less than 0.005) on moclobemide and toloxatone, respectively. 4. Before the next drug intake, MAO-A inhibition, as judged by the decrease of plasma DHPG concentration, was significantly different from placebo with moclobemide but not with toloxatone. 5. Moclobemide, but not toloxatone, exerted a moderate, but significant inhibition of the deamination of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) as judged by the fall in plasma 5-HIAA concentration. Neither drug influenced plasma NA concentration. 6. A significant rise in urinary excretion of normetanephrine was observed on moclobemide and to a lesser extent on toloxatone. The urinary excretion of 3-methoxytyramine was significantly raised by moclobemide but not by toloxatone. 7. Neither moclobemide nor toloxatone altered memory function, vigilance

  5. Effects of apomorphine on locomotive activity and monoamine metabolism: a dose related study.

    PubMed

    Ikram, Huma; Ahmad, Shoaib; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2011-07-01

    We have monitored dose dependent effects of apomorphine on motor activity and monoamine metabolism. Behavioral sensitization and craving, which develop upon repeated treatment with dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine, are major limitations of the therapeutic use of apomorphine in Parkinson's patients. Effects of single (intraperitoneal) injection of apomorphine at different doses (i.e., 1.0, 2.0 & 4.0 mg/kg) on exploration in a novel environment (open field) and locomotion in a familiar environment (home cage) were investigated. Results show significantly enhanced activity in home cage (monitored 5min post injection) in a dose dependent manner. However, no significant influence of apomorphine on exploration of open field was observed in the present study (monitored 15 min and 40 min post injection). Animals were decapitated 1 hr post apomorphine injection and whole brains of animals were collected and stored at -70°C. Biogenic amines (i.e., 5-Hydroxytryptamine and dopamine) and metabolites (i.e., Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, Homovanillic acid & 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid) were estimated by reverse phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography with electrochemical detector (HPLC-EC). Effect of low (1.0mg/kg) dose of apomorphine was found to be non-significant on 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and dopamine (DA) levels. Moderate (2.0 mg/kg) dose of drug increased (p<0.05) levels of Homovanillic acid (HVA). Whereas, high (4.0 mg/kg) dose of apomorphine decreased Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels. Results could be helpful in elucidating the effect of apomorphine at different doses and its implication for extending therapeutics in Parkinson's and related disorders.

  6. High throughput Screening to Identify Natural Human Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, E; Deiab, S; Park, K; Soliman, KFA

    2012-01-01

    Age-related increase in monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) may contribute to CNS neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, MAO-B inhibitors are used in the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson disease as preliminary monotherapy or adjunct therapy with L-dopa. To date, meager natural sources of MAO-B inhibitors have been identified, and the relative strength, potency and rank of many plants relative to standard drugs such as Selegiline (L-deprenyl, Eldepryl) are not known. In this work, we developed and utilized a high throughput enzyme microarray format to screen and evaluate 905 natural product extracts (0.025–.7 mg/ml) to inhibit human MAO-B derived from BTI-TN-5B1-4 cells infected with recombinant baculovirus. The protein sequence of purified enzyme was confirmed using 1D gel electrophoresis-matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-tandem mass spectroscopy, and enzyme activity was confirmed by [1] substrate conversion (3-mM benzylamine) to H202 and [2] benzaldehyde. Of the 905 natural extracts tested, the lowest IC50s [<0.07 mg/ml] were obtained with extracts of Amur Corktree (Phellodendron amurense), Bakuchi Seed(Cyamopsis psoralioides), Licorice Root (Glycyrrhiza glabra/uralensis), Babchi (Psoralea corylifolia seed). The data also show, albeit to a lesser extent, inhibitory properties of herbs originating from the mint family (Lamiaceae) and Turmeric, Comfrey, Bringraj, Skullcap, Kava-kava, Wild Indigo, Gentian and Green Tea. In conclusion, the data reflect relative potency information by rank of commonly used herbs and plants that contain human MAO-B inhibitory properties in their natural form. PMID:22887993

  7. The monoamine oxidase inhibition properties of selected structural analogues of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Delport, Anzelle; Harvey, Brian H; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2017-04-01

    The thionine dye, methylene blue (MB), is a potent inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, a property that may, at least in part, mediate its antidepressant effects in humans and animals. The central inhibition of MAO-A by MB has also been linked to serotonin toxicity (ST) which may arise when MB is used in combination with serotonergic drugs. Structural analogues and the principal metabolite of MB, azure B, have also been reported to inhibit the MAO enzymes, with all compounds exhibiting specificity for the MAO-A isoform. To expand on the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of MAO inhibition by MB analogues, the present study investigates the human MAO inhibition properties of five MB analogues: neutral red, Nile blue, new methylene blue, cresyl violet and 1,9-dimethyl methylene blue. Similar to MB, these analogues also are specific MAO-A inhibitors with cresyl violet (IC50=0.0037μM), Nile blue (IC50=0.0077μM) and 1,9-dimethyl methylene blue (IC50=0.018μM) exhibiting higher potency inhibition compared to MB (IC50=0.07μM). Nile blue also represents a potent MAO-B inhibitor with an IC50 value of 0.012μM. From the results it may be concluded that non-thionine MB analogues (e.g. cresyl violet and Nile blue) also may exhibit potent MAO inhibition, a property which should be considered when using these compounds in pharmacological studies. Benzophenoxazines such as cresyl violet and Nile blue are, similar to phenothiazines (e.g. MB), representative of high potency MAO-A inhibitors with a potential risk of ST.

  8. Serotonin produces monoamine oxidase-dependent oxidative stress in human heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jordan D.; Chu, Yi; Heistad, Donald D.

    2009-01-01

    Heart valve disease and pulmonary hypertension, in patients with carcinoid tumors and people who used the fenfluramine-phentermine combination for weight control, have been associated with high levels of serotonin in blood. The mechanism by which serotonin induces valvular changes is not well understood. We recently reported that increased oxidative stress is associated with valvular changes in aortic valve stenosis in humans and mice. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that serotonin induces oxidative stress in human heart valves, and examined mechanisms by which serotonin may increase reactive oxygen species. Superoxide (O2·−) was measured in heart valves from explanted human hearts that were not used for transplantation. O2·− levels (lucigenin-enhanced chemoluminescence) were increased in homogenates of cardiac valves and blood vessels after incubation with serotonin. A nonspecific inhibitor of flavin-oxidases (diphenyliodonium), or inhibitors of monoamine oxidase [MAO (tranylcypromine and clorgyline)], prevented the serotonin-induced increase in O2·−. Dopamine, another MAO substrate that is increased in patients with carcinoid syndrome, also increased O2·− levels in heart valves, and this effect was attenuated by clorgyline. Apocynin [an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase] did not prevent increases in O2·− during serotonin treatment. Addition of serotonin to recombinant human MAO-A generated O2·−, and this effect was prevented by an MAO inhibitor. In conclusion, we have identified a novel mechanism whereby MAO-A can contribute to increased oxidative stress in human heart valves and pulmonary artery exposed to serotonin and dopamine. PMID:19666839

  9. Evaluation of the Inhibitory Effects of Bavachinin and Bavachin on Human Monoamine Oxidases A and B

    PubMed Central

    Zarmouh, Najla O.; Mazzio, Elizabeth A.; Elshami, Faisel M.; Messeha, Samia S.; Eyunni, Suresh V. K.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase B inhibitors (MAO-BIs) are used in the early management of Parkinson's disease (PD). Long-term suspected side effects of MAO-B classical inhibitors established the need for safer alternative therapeutic agents. In our study, the flavanone bavachinin (BNN) and its analog bavachin (BVN) found in the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. ethanolic extract (PCSEE) were investigated for their human MAO-A and MAO-B (hMAO-A and hMAO-B) inhibition. Both PCSEE and BNN effectively reduced hMAO-B activity more than hMAO-A while BVN had activating effects. BNN showed selective hMAO-B inhibition (IC50 ~ 8.82 μM) more than hMAO-A (IC502009;~ 189.28 μM). BNN in the crude extract was determined by HPLC, also validated by TLC showing a yield of 0.21% PCSEE dry weight. BNN competitively inhibited hMAO-A and hMAO-B, with a lower hMAO-B Ki than hMAO-A Ki by 10.33-fold, and reduced hMAO-B Km/Vmax efficiency ratio to be comparable to the standard selegiline. Molecular docking examination of BNN and BVN predicted an indirect role of BNN C7-methoxy group for its higher affinity, selectivity, and reversibility as an MAO-BI. These findings suggest that BNN, which is known to be a potent PPAR-γ agonist, is a selective and competitive hMAO-B inhibitor and could be used in the management of PD. PMID:26557867

  10. Lobelane inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release via inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Justin R; Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Norrholm, Seth; Deaciuc, Gabriela; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2010-02-01

    Lobeline is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as a methamphetamine abuse treatment. Lobeline interacts with nicotinic receptor subtypes, dopamine transporters (DATs), and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2s). Methamphetamine inhibits VMAT2 and promotes dopamine (DA) release from synaptic vesicles, resulting ultimately in increased extracellular DA. The present study generated structure-activity relationships by defunctionalizing the lobeline molecule and determining effects on [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding, inhibition of [(3)H]DA uptake into striatal synaptic vesicles and synaptosomes, the mechanism of VMAT2 inhibition, and inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Compared with lobeline, the analogs exhibited greater potency inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) function. Saturated analogs, lobelane and nor-lobelane, exhibited high potency (K(i) = 45 nM) inhibiting vesicular [(3)H]DA uptake, and lobelane competitively inhibited VMAT2 function. Lobeline and lobelane exhibited 67- and 35-fold greater potency, respectively, in inhibiting VMAT2 function compared to DAT function. Lobelane potently decreased (IC(50) = 0.65 microM; I(max) = 73%) methamphetamine-evoked DA overflow, and with a greater maximal effect compared with lobeline (IC(50) = 0.42 microM, I(max) = 56.1%). These results provide support for VMAT2 as a target for inhibition of methamphetamine effects. Both trans-isomers and demethylated analogs of lobelane had reduced or unaltered potency inhibiting VMAT2 function and lower maximal inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release compared with lobelane. Thus, defunctionalization, cis-stereochemistry of the side chains, and presence of the piperidino N-methyl are structural features that afford greatest inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release and enhancement of selectivity for VMAT2. The current results reveal that lobelane, a selective VMAT2 inhibitor, inhibits methamphetamine-evoked DA release and is a promising lead for

  11. Evaluation of the Isoflavone Genistein as Reversible Human Monoamine Oxidase-A and -B Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zarmouh, Najla O.; Messeha, Samia S.; Elshami, Faisel M.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective therapeutic drugs for managing Parkinson's disease (PD) and depression. However, their irreversibility may lead to rare but serious side effects. As finding safer and reversible MAOIs is our target, we characterized the recombinant human (h) MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition potentials of two common natural isoflavones, genistein (GST) and daidzein (DZ) using luminescence assay. The results obtained showed that DZ exhibits partial to no inhibition of the isozymes examined while GST inhibited hMAO-B (IC50 of 6.81 μM), and its hMAO-A inhibition was more potent than the standard deprenyl. Furthermore, the reversibility, mode of inhibition kinetics, and tyramine oxidation of GST were examined. GST was a time-independent reversible and competitive hMAO-A and hMAO-B inhibitor with a lower Ki of hMAO-B (1.45 μM) than hMAO-A (4.31 μM). GST also inhibited hMAO-B tyramine oxidation and hydrogen peroxide production more than hMAO-A. Docking studies conducted indicated that the GST reversibility and hMAO-B selectivity of inhibition may relate to C5-OH effects on its orientation and its interactions with the threonine 201 residue of the active site. It was concluded from this study that the natural product GST has competitive and reversible MAOs inhibitions and may be recommended for further investigations as a useful therapeutic agent for Parkinson's disease. PMID:27118978

  12. Preliminary Evidence of Apathetic-Like Behavior in Aged Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 2 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Aron; Moreira, Carlos G.; Morawska, Marta M.; Masneuf, Sophie; Baumann, Christian R.; Noain, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Apathy is considered to be a core feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and has been associated with a variety of states and symptoms of the disease, such as increased severity of motor symptoms, impaired cognition, executive dysfunction and dementia. Apart from the high prevalence of apathy in PD, which is estimated to be about 40%, the underlying pathophysiology remains poorly understood and current treatment approaches are unspecific and proved to be only partially effective. In animal models, apathy has been sub-optimally modeled, mostly by means of pharmacological and stress-induced methods, whereby concomitant depressive-like symptoms could not be ruled out. In the context of PD only a few studies on toxin-based models (i.e., 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)) claimed to have determined apathetic symptoms in animals. The assessment of apathetic symptoms in more elaborated and multifaceted genetic animal models of PD could help to understand the pathophysiological development of apathy in PD and eventually advance specific treatments for afflicted patients. Here we report the presence of behavioral signs of apathy in 12 months old mice that express only ~5% of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2). Apathetic-like behavior in VMAT2 deficient (LO) mice was evidenced by impaired burrowing and nest building skills, and a reduced preference for sweet solution in the saccharin preference test, while the performance in the forced swimming test was normal. Our preliminary results suggest that VMAT2 deficient mice show an apathetic-like phenotype that might be independent of depressive-like symptoms. Therefore VMAT2 LO mice could be a useful tool to study the pathophysiological substrates of apathy and to test novel treatment strategies for apathy in the context of PD. PMID:27917116

  13. Monoamine Oxidase B Prompts Mitochondrial and Cardiac Dysfunction in Pressure Overloaded Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Kaludercic, Nina; Carpi, Andrea; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sivakumaran, Vidhya; Zhu, Guangshuo; Lai, Edwin W.; Bedja, Djahida; De Mario, Agnese; Chen, Kevin; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.; Lindsey, Merry L.; Pacak, Karel; Takimoto, Eiki; Shih, Jean C.; Kass, David A.; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Monoamine oxidases (MAOs) are mitochondrial flavoenzymes responsible for neurotransmitter and biogenic amines catabolism. MAO-A contributes to heart failure progression via enhanced norepinephrine catabolism and oxidative stress. The potential pathogenetic role of the isoenzyme MAO-B in cardiac diseases is currently unknown. Moreover, it is has not been determined yet whether MAO activation can directly affect mitochondrial function. Results: In wild type mice, pressure overload induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) resulted in enhanced dopamine catabolism, left ventricular (LV) remodeling, and dysfunction. Conversely, mice lacking MAO-B (MAO-B−/−) subjected to TAC maintained concentric hypertrophy accompanied by extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activation, and preserved LV function, both at early (3 weeks) and late stages (9 weeks). Enhanced MAO activation triggered oxidative stress, and dropped mitochondrial membrane potential in the presence of ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin both in neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes. The MAO-B inhibitor pargyline completely offset this change, suggesting that MAO activation induces a latent mitochondrial dysfunction, causing these organelles to hydrolyze ATP. Moreover, MAO-dependent aldehyde formation due to inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity also contributed to alter mitochondrial bioenergetics. Innovation: Our study unravels a novel role for MAO-B in the pathogenesis of heart failure, showing that both MAO-driven reactive oxygen species production and impaired aldehyde metabolism affect mitochondrial function. Conclusion: Under conditions of chronic hemodynamic stress, enhanced MAO-B activity is a major determinant of cardiac structural and functional disarrangement. Both increased oxidative stress and the accumulation of aldehyde intermediates are likely liable for these adverse morphological and mechanical changes by directly targeting mitochondria. Antioxid. Redox

  14. Reducing the Burden of Difficult-to-Treat Major Depressive Disorder: Revisiting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Difficult-to-treat depression (eg, depression with atypical or anxious symptoms, treatment-resistant depression, or depression with frequent recurrence) is a challenging real-world health issue. This critical review of the literature focuses on monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) therapy and difficult-to-treat forms of depression. Data Sources: A PubMed literature search was performed in November 2012 and refreshed through January 2013 with no date restrictions using key search terms including MAO inhibitor therapy or MAOI and depression and anxiety, atypical, treatment-resistant, recurrent, relapse, or refractory. Study Selection: Articles were selected to summarize the current needs in difficult-to-treat depression as well as the use of MAOI therapies in this area. Results: Two strategies have fallen out of favor in the care of patients with major depressive disorder. The first is the use of MAOI therapy and the second is the proactive recognition of difficult-to-treat depression that may not respond as well to more frequently used antidepressants. The infrequent use of MAOIs stems from the perception that other oral therapies for depression are safer and easier to use than oral MAOIs; however, transdermal delivery is one potential strategy to improve the safety of this class of agents. Although food-related interactions with transdermal delivery of MAOI therapy can be lessened, clinicians still need to be vigilant for drug-drug interactions and serotonin syndrome. Conclusions: Clinicians should consider MAOIs for patients who have had several unsuccessful trials of antidepressants. Guidelines generally reserve MAOIs as third- and fourth-line treatments due to concerns over safety and tolerability; however, transdermal delivery of an MAOI may allay some of the safety and tolerability concerns. Patients should be provided education about MAOIs and their risks. PMID:24511450

  15. Monoamine oxidase A polymorphism moderates stability of attention problems and susceptibility to life stress during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Zohsel, K; Bianchi, V; Mascheretti, S; Hohm, E; Schmidt, M H; Esser, G; Brandeis, D; Banaschewski, T; Nobile, M; Laucht, M

    2015-11-01

    Attention problems affect a substantial number of children and adolescents and are predictive of academic underachievement and lower global adaptive functioning. Considerable variability has been observed with regard to the individual development of attention problems over time. In particular, the period of adolescence is characterized by substantial maturation of executive functioning including attentional processing, with the influence of genetic and environmental factors on individual trajectories not yet well understood. In the present investigation, we evaluated whether the monoamine oxidase A functional promoter polymorphism, MAOA-LPR, plays a role in determining continuity of parent-rated attention problems during adolescence. At the same time, a potential effect of severe life events (SLEs) was taken into account. A multi-group path analysis was used in a sample of 234 adolescents (149 males, 85 females) who took part in an epidemiological cohort study at the ages of 11 and 15 years. Attention problems during early adolescence were found to be a strong predictor of attention problems in middle adolescence. However, in carriers of the MAOA-LPR low-activity variant (MAOA-L), stability was found to be significantly higher than in carriers of the high-activity variant (MAOA-H). Additionally, only in MAOA-L carriers did SLEs during adolescence significantly impact on attention problems at the age of 15 years, implying a possible gene × environment interaction. To conclude, we found evidence that attention problems during adolescence in carriers of the MAOA-L allele are particularly stable and malleable to life stressors. The present results underline the usefulness of applying a more dynamic GxE perspective.

  16. In Vitro Effects of Cognitives and Nootropics on Mitochondrial Respiration and Monoamine Oxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2016-09-23

    Impairment of mitochondrial metabolism, particularly the electron transport chain (ETC), as well as increased oxidative stress might play a significant role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Some effects of drugs used for symptomatic AD treatment may be related to their direct action on mitochondrial function. In vitro effects of pharmacologically different cognitives (galantamine, donepezil, rivastigmine, 7-MEOTA, memantine) and nootropic drugs (latrepirdine, piracetam) were investigated on selected mitochondrial parameters: activities of ETC complexes I, II + III, and IV, citrate synthase, monoamine oxidase (MAO), oxygen consumption rate, and hydrogen peroxide production of pig brain mitochondria. Complex I activity was decreased by galantamine, donepezil, and memantine; complex II + III activity was increased by galantamine. None of the tested drugs caused significant changes in the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption, even at high concentrations. Except galantamine, all tested drugs were selective MAO-A inhibitors. Latrepirdine, donepezil, and 7-MEOTA were found to be the most potent MAO-A inhibitors. Succinate-induced mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production was not significantly affected by the drugs tested. The direct effect of cognitives and nootropics used in the treatment of AD on mitochondrial respiration is relatively small. The safest drugs in terms of disturbing mitochondrial function appear to be piracetam and rivastigmine. The MAO-A inhibition by cognitives and nootropics may also participate in mitochondrial neuroprotection. The results support the future research aimed at measuring the effects of currently used drugs or newly synthesized drugs on mitochondrial functioning in order to understand their mechanism of action.

  17. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and nerve injury: restoring an imbalance between descending monoamine inhibitions and facilitations.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Kirsty; Patel, Ryan; Goncalves, Leonor; Townson, Louisa; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNICs) utilize descending inhibitory controls through poorly understood brain stem pathways. The human counterpart, conditioned pain modulation, is reduced in patients with neuropathy aligned with animal data showing a loss of descending inhibitory noradrenaline controls together with a gain of 5-HT3 receptor-mediated facilitations after neuropathy. We investigated the pharmacological basis of DNIC and whether it can be restored after neuropathy. Deep dorsal horn neurons were activated by von Frey filaments applied to the hind paw, and DNIC was induced by a pinch applied to the ear in isoflurane-anaesthetized animals. Spinal nerve ligation was the model of neuropathy. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control was present in control rats but abolished after neuropathy. α2 adrenoceptor mechanisms underlie DNIC because the antagonists, yohimbine and atipamezole, markedly attenuated this descending inhibition. We restored DNIC in spinal nerve ligated animals by blocking 5-HT3 descending facilitations with the antagonist ondansetron or by enhancing norepinephrine modulation through the use of reboxetine (a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, NRI) or tapentadol (μ-opioid receptor agonist and NRI). Additionally, ondansetron enhanced DNIC in normal animals. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls are reduced after peripheral nerve injury illustrating the central impact of neuropathy, leading to an imbalance in descending excitations and inhibitions. Underlying noradrenergic mechanisms explain the relationship between conditioned pain modulation and the use of tapentadol and duloxetine (a serotonin, NRI) in patients. We suggest that pharmacological strategies through manipulation of the monoamine system could be used to enhance DNIC in patients by blocking descending facilitations with ondansetron or enhancing norepinephrine inhibitions, so possibly reducing chronic pain.

  18. meso-Transdiene analogs inhibit vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function and methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Norrholm, Seth D; Culver, John P; Hojahmat, Marhaba; Beckmann, Joshua S; Harrod, Steven B; Deaciuc, Agripina G; Bardo, Michael T; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2011-03-01

    Lobeline, a nicotinic receptor antagonist and neurotransmitter transporter inhibitor, is a candidate pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse. meso-Transdiene (MTD), a lobeline analog, lacks nicotinic receptor affinity, retains affinity for vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), and, surprisingly, has enhanced affinity for dopamine (DA) and serotonin transporters [DA transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT), respectively]. In the current study, MTD was evaluated for its ability to decrease methamphetamine self-administration in rats relative to food-maintained responding. MTD specifically decreased methamphetamine self-administration, extending our previous work. Classical structure-activity relationships revealed that more conformationally restricted MTD analogs enhanced VMAT2 selectivity and drug likeness, whereas affinity at the dihydrotetrabenazine binding and DA uptake sites on VMAT2 was not altered. Generally, MTD analogs exhibited 50- to 1000-fold lower affinity for DAT and were equipotent or had 10-fold higher affinity for SERT, compared with MTD. Representative analogs from the series potently and competitively inhibited [(3)H]DA uptake at VMAT2. (3Z,5Z)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-106), the 3Z,5Z-2,4-dichlorophenyl MTD analog, had improved selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT and importantly inhibited methamphetamine-evoked DA release from striatal slices. In contrast, (3Z,5E)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-105), the 3Z,5E-geometrical isomer, inhibited DA uptake at VMAT2, but did not inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Taken together, these results suggest that these geometrical isomers interact at alternate sites on VMAT2, which are associated with distinct pharmacophores. Thus, structural modification of the MTD molecule resulted in analogs exhibiting improved drug likeness and improved selectivity for VMAT2, as well as the ability to decrease methamphetamine-evoked DA release

  19. Monoamine Release during Unihemispheric Sleep and Unihemispheric Waking in the Fur Seal

    PubMed Central

    Lyamin, Oleg I.; Lapierre, Jennifer L.; Kosenko, Peter O.; Kodama, Tohru; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Korneva, Svetlana M.; Peever, John H.; Mukhametov, Lev M.; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Our understanding of the role of neurotransmitters in the control of the electroencephalogram (EEG) has been entirely based on studies of animals with bilateral sleep. The study of animals with unihemispheric sleep presents the opportunity of separating the neurochemical substrates of waking and sleep EEG from the systemic, bilateral correlates of sleep and waking states. Methods: The release of histamine (HI), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5HT) in cortical and subcortical areas (hypothalamus, thalamus and caudate nucleus) was measured in unrestrained northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) using in vivo microdialysis, in combination with, polygraphic recording of EEG, electrooculogram, and neck electromyogram. Results: The pattern of cortical and subcortical HI, NE, and 5HT release in fur seals is similar during bilaterally symmetrical states: highest in active waking, reduced in quiet waking and bilateral slow wave sleep, and lowest in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Cortical and subcortical HI, NE, and 5HT release in seals is highly elevated during certain waking stimuli and behaviors, such as being sprayed with water and feeding. However, in contrast to acetylcholine (ACh), which we have previously studied, the release of HI, NE, and 5HT during unihemispheric sleep is not lateralized in the fur seal. Conclusions: Among the studied neurotransmitters most strongly implicated in waking control, only ACh release is asymmetric in unihemispheric sleep and waking, being greatly increased on the activated side of the brain. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 491. Citation: Lyamin OI, Lapierre JL, Kosenko PO, Kodama T, Bhagwandin A, Korneva SM, Peever JH, Mukhametov LM, Siegel JM. Monoamine release during unihemispheric sleep and unihemispheric waking in the fur seal. SLEEP 2016;39(3):625–636. PMID:26715233

  20. (-)-Deprenyl reduces neuronal apoptosis and facilitates neuronal outgrowth by altering protein synthesis without inhibiting monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tatton, W G; Wadia, J S; Ju, W Y; Chalmers-Redman, R M; Tatton, N A

    1996-01-01

    (-)-Deprenyl stereospecifically reduces neuronal death even after neurons have sustained seemingly lethal damage at concentrations too small to cause monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibition. (-)-Deprenyl can also influence the process growth of some glial and neuronal populations and can reduce the concentrations of oxidative radicals in damaged cells at concentrations too small to inhibit MAO. In accord with the earlier work of others, we showed that (-)-deprenyl alters the expression of a number mRNAs or proteins in nerve and glial cells and that the alterations in gene expression/protein synthesis are the result of a selective action on transcription. The alterations in gene expression/protein synthesis are accompanied by a decrease in DNA fragmentation characteristic of apoptosis and the death of responsive cells. The onco-proteins Bcl-2 and Bax and the scavenger proteins Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD2) are among the 40-50 proteins whose synthesis is altered by (-)-deprenyl. Since mitochondrial ATP production depends on mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial failure has been shown to be one of the earliest events in apoptosis, we used confocal laser imaging techniques in living cells to show that the transcriptional changes induced by (-)-deprenyl are accompanied by a maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, a decrease in intramitochondrial calcium and a decrease in cytoplasmic oxidative radical levels. We therefore propose that (-)-deprenyl acts on gene expression to maintain mitochondrial function and to decrease cytoplasmic oxidative radical levels and thereby to reduce apoptosis. An understanding of the molecular steps by which (-)-deprenyl selectively alters transcription may contribute to the development of new therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Synthetic and Natural Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors as Potential Lead Compounds for Effective Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Srivastava, Amit K; Singour, Pradeep K; Gouda, Panchanan

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases A and B (MAO-A and B) play a critical role in the metabolism of intracellular neurotransmitters of the central nervous system. For decades, MAO inhibitors have proven their clinical efficacy as potential drug targets for several neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Use of first generation non selective MAO inhibitors as neuropsychiatric drugs elicited several side effects like hypertensive crisis and cheese reaction. Therefore their use is now limited due to non-selectivity towards MAO isoforms and inhibition of metabolizing enzymes like cytochrome P450. Development of selective and specific MAO inhibitors like moclobemide, toloxatone improves their efficacy as disease-modifying effects in monotherapy as well as adjunctive therapy. Recently a lot of research has been done to elucidate the pharmacological potential of medicinal plants and their isolated bioactive constituents having MAO inhibitory activity. Herbs containing MAO inhibitors are extensively used for the development of potent synthetic drugs and as safe and effective alternatives to the available synthetic drugs in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as depression, Parkinson and Alzheimer's. In several diseases like Parkinson natural MAO inhibitors prevented the neuron denaturalization by their dual action via enhancing neurotransmission of dopamine as well as lowering the generation of free radicals and toxins. Currently development of selective MAO inhibitors is still under study to achieve more effective therapies by using Computer Aided Drug Designing, Ligand-based models and structure-activity hypothesis. These approaches also facilitate understanding the interaction of newly designed molecule with MAO enzymes and the rationalization of probable mechanisms of action.

  2. The N terminus of monoamine transporters is a lever required for the action of amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Sucic, Sonja; Dallinger, Stefan; Zdrazil, Barbara; Weissensteiner, René; Jørgensen, Trine N; Holy, Marion; Kudlacek, Oliver; Seidel, Stefan; Cha, Joo Hwan; Gether, Ulrik; Newman, Amy H; Ecker, Gerhard F; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H

    2010-04-02

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates neurotransmission by removing serotonin from the synaptic cleft. In addition, it is the site of action of antidepressants (which block the transporter) and of amphetamines (which induce substrate efflux). We explored the functional importance of the N terminus in mediating the action of amphetamines by focusing initially on the highly conserved threonine residue at position 81, a candidate site for phosphorylation by protein kinase C. Molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type SERT, compared with its mutations SERT(T81A) and SERT(T81D), suggested structural changes in the inner vestibule indicative of an opening of the inner vestibule. Predictions from this model (e.g. the preferential accumulation of SERT(T81A) in the inward conformation, its reduced turnover number, and a larger distance between its N and C termini) were verified. Most importantly, SERT(T81A) (and the homologous mutations in noradrenaline and dopamine) failed to support amphetamine-induced efflux, and this was not remedied by aspartate at this position. Amphetamine-induced currents through SERT(T81A) were comparable with those through the wild type transporter. Both abundant Na(+) entry and accumulation of SERT(T81A) in the inward facing conformation ought to favor amphetamine-induced efflux. Thus, we surmised that the N terminus must play a direct role in driving the transporter into a state that supports amphetamine-induced efflux. This hypothesis was verified by truncating the first 64 amino acids and by tethering the N terminus to an additional transmembrane helix. Either modification abolished amphetamine-induced efflux. We therefore conclude that the N terminus of monoamine transporters acts as a lever that sustains reverse transport.

  3. Comparative Modeling of the Human Monoamine Transporters: Similarities in Substrate Binding

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The amino acid compositions of the substrate binding pockets of the three human monoamine transporters are compared as is the orientation of the endogenous substrates, serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, bound in these. Through a combination of homology modeling, induced fit dockings, molecular dynamics simulations, and uptake experiments in mutant transporters, we propose a common binding mode for the three substrates. The longitudinal axis of the substrates is similarly oriented with these, forming an ionic interaction between the ammonium group and a highly conserved aspartate, Asp98 (serotonin transporter, hSERT), Asp79 (dopamine transporter, hDAT), and Asp75 (norepinephrine transporter, hNET). The 6-position of serotonin and the para-hydroxyl groups of dopamine and norepinephrine were found to face Ala173 in hSERT, Gly153 in hDAT, and Gly149 in hNET. Three rotations of the substrates around the longitudinal axis were identified. In each mode, an aromatic hydroxyl group of the substrates occupied equivalent volumes of the three binding pockets, where small changes in amino acid composition explains the differences in selectivity. Uptake experiments support that the 5-hydroxyl group of serotonin and the meta-hydroxyl group norepinephrine and dopamine are placed in the hydrophilic pocket around Ala173, Ser438, and Thr439 in hSERT corresponding to Gly149, Ser419, Ser420 in hNET and Gly153 Ser422 and Ala423 in hDAT. Furthermore, hDAT was found to possess an additional hydrophilic pocket around Ser149 to accommodate the para-hydroxyl group. Understanding these subtle differences between the binding site compositions of the three transporters is imperative for understanding the substrate selectivity, which could eventually aid in developing future selective medicines. PMID:23421681

  4. Monoamine oxidases and alcoholism: studies in unrelated alcoholics, normal controls and alcoholic families.

    PubMed

    Parsian, A; Suarez, B K; Tabakoff, B; Hoffman, P; Ovchinnikova, L; Fisher, L; Cloninger, C R

    1994-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases (A and B) are of great interest in connection with alcoholism. Low MAO activity has been found in the brains and the platelets of alcoholics and their relatives supporting the hypothesis that low MAO activity is a biological marker for vulnerability to misuse. In order to determine the role of the MAO genes in alcoholism we have measured MAO-B activity and typed two simple sequence repeats (one in the MAO-A gene and one in the MAO-B gene) in a sample of 133 unrelated alcoholics, 300 subjects from 30 two- and three-generation pedigrees ascertained through an alcoholic proband, and 92 normal controls. The unrelated alcoholic group did not differ in MAO-B activity from normal controls nor were there significant differences between subtypes. We did, however, find significant differences between alcoholic males and females (t = 2.836, p = .005), a difference that was not present in controls. A two-way analysis of variance of MAO-B activity as a function of the allelic variation of each marker locus and diagnosis among male subjects was performed. There was no evidence for mean differences in activity levels for different alleles. The distribution of MAO-A and MAO-B "alleles" in the alcoholic sample differed from that of the control sample. Affected sib pair linkage analysis of MAO genes and alcoholism showed no evidence for an excess of concordant affected sib pairs suggesting that this region of the X-chromosome does not harbor a susceptibility locus.

  5. A new stress model, a scream sound, alters learning and monoamine levels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lili; Yang, Juan; Song, Tusheng; Hou, Ni; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Xiaoge; Zhang, Dianzeng; Wang, Lumin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Chen

    2014-01-17

    Most existing animal models for stress involve the simultaneous application of physical and psychological stress factors. In the current study, we described and used a novel psychological stress model (scream sound stress). To study the validity of it, we carried out acute and chronic scream sound stress. First, adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into white noise, stress and background groups. The white noise group and stress group were treated with white noise and scream sound for 4h in the morning respectively. Compared with white noise and background groups, exposure to acute scream sound increased corticosterone (CORT) level and decreased latency in Morris water maze (MWM) test. The levels of noradrenaline (NE), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were altered in the striatum, hypothalamus and hippocampus of stress rats. Second, adult SD rats were randomly divided into background and stress groups, which were treated with scream sound for three weeks. Exposure to chronic scream sound suppressed body weight gain, increased corticosterone (CORT) level, influenced the morphology of adrenal gland, improved spleen and thymus indices, and decreased latency in MWM test. NE, DA, DOPAC, HVA and 5-HIAA levels were also altered in the brain of stress rats. Our results suggested that scream sound, as a novel stressor, facilitated learning ability, as well as altered monoamine levels in the rat brain. Moreover, scream sound is easy to apply and can be applied in more animals at the same time.

  6. High throughput screening of CO2 solubility in aqueous monoamine solutions.

    PubMed

    Porcheron, Fabien; Gibert, Alexandre; Mougin, Pascal; Wender, Aurélie

    2011-03-15

    Post-combustion Carbon Capture and Storage technology (CCS) is viewed as an efficient solution to reduce CO(2) emissions of coal-fired power stations. In CCS, an aqueous amine solution is commonly used as a solvent to selectively capture CO(2) from the flue gas. However, this process generates additional costs, mostly from the reboiler heat duty required to release the carbon dioxide from the loaded solvent solution. In this work, we present thermodynamic results of CO(2) solubility in aqueous amine solutions from a 6-reactor High Throughput Screening (HTS) experimental device. This device is fully automated and designed to perform sequential injections of CO(2) within stirred-cell reactors containing the solvent solutions. The gas pressure within each reactor is monitored as a function of time, and the resulting transient pressure curves are transformed into CO(2) absorption isotherms. Solubility measurements are first performed on monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, and methyldiethanolamine aqueous solutions at T = 313.15 K. Experimental results are compared with existing data in the literature to validate the HTS device. In addition, a comprehensive thermodynamic model is used to represent CO(2) solubility variations in different classes of amine structures upon a wide range of thermodynamic conditions. This model is used to fit the experimental data and to calculate the cyclic capacity, which is a key parameter for CO(2) process design. Solubility measurements are then performed on a set of 50 monoamines and cyclic capacities are extracted using the thermodynamic model, to asses the potential of these molecules for CO(2) capture.

  7. Inhibition of the bioactivation of the neurotoxin MPTP by antioxidants, redox agents and monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Tomás; Guillén, Hugo

    2011-08-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes located in human mitochondria oxidize neurotransmitters and bioactivate the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) by oxidation to directly-acting neurotoxic pyridinium cations (MPDP⁺/MPP⁺) that produce Parkinsonism. Antioxidants and MAO inhibitors are useful as neuroprotectants. Naturally-occurring substances, antioxidants and redox agents were assessed as inhibitors of the oxidation (bioactivation) of MPTP by human mitochondria and MAO enzymes. Methylene blue, 5-nitroindazole, norharman (β-carboline), 9-methylnorharman (9-methyl-β-carboline) and menadione (vitamin-K analogue) highly inhibited the oxidation of MPTP to the neurotoxic species, MPDP⁺/MPP⁺, in human mitochondria (IC₅₀ of 0.18, 3.1, 9.9, 7.3, and 12.6 μM, respectively). Inhibition by methylene blue was similar to R-deprenyl (IC₅₀ of 0.15 μM), a known neuroprotectant. The naturally-occurring β-carbolines, harmine, harmaline and tetrahydro-β-carboline, and the antioxidants, melatonin, resveratrol, quercetin and catechin showed little or no inhibition. Oxidation of MPTP in mitochondria was performed by human MAO-B and the above active compounds were also inhibitors of this isozyme. Norharman and 5-nitroindazole were competitive inhibitors of MAO-B whereas methylene blue inhibited MPTP oxidation (IC₅₀ of 50 nM) under a mixed type and predominantly uncompetitive mechanism. Methylene blue, 5-nitroindazole, norharman, 9-methylnorharman and menadione inhibit MAO-B in mitochondria and afford protective effects, as suggested by a reduced conversion of MPTP to neurotoxic species.

  8. Sex-dependent changes in anxiety, memory, and monoamines following one week of stress.

    PubMed

    Bowman, R E; Micik, R; Gautreaux, C; Fernandez, L; Luine, V N

    2009-04-20

    Chronic restraint stress alters performance of rats on cognitive tasks, and anxiety measurements, and these stress-induced behavioral alterations are sexually dimorphic. Following a long stress period (21 days restraint) males show cognitive impairments while females are either not affected or enhanced on the same tasks. The current study examined whether sexually differentiated responses are also induced following shorter restraint stress durations. Male and female Sprague Dawley rats, aged 2.5 months, served as controls or received restraint stress (6 h/day, 7 days) and were tested for anxiety (plus maze), non-spatial memory (object recognition), and spatial memory (object placement). Plus maze performance was altered by sex and stress exposure. Stress impaired male object recognition but did not affect female performance. Stress did not affect male spatial memory; however, control females could not significantly discriminate between the old and new locations, but stress exposure enhanced female performance. Following behavioral testing, monoamines and metabolites were measured in prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (CA1, CA3), and amygdala. Notably, PFC and CA3 indices for noradrenergic activity (MHPG levels and MHPG/NE ratios) were increased in stress females, but decreased in males, and similar changes were found in CA1 and BLA dopaminergic indices. Thus, these sexually dimorphic neurochemical changes following stress may underlie the behavioral differences. Current results show that short-term restraint elicits sex-dependent behavioral and neural changes different from those previously reported for longer term stresses and suggest that the temporal relationship between the change from adaptive to maladaptive responses to stress is shorter in male than female rats.

  9. Monoamine oxidase A and childhood adversity as risk factors for conduct disorder in females

    PubMed Central

    Prom-Wormley, E. C.; Eaves, L. J.; Foley, D. L.; Gardner, C. O.; Archer, K. J.; Wormley, B. K.; Maes, H. H.; Riley, B. P.; Silberg, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies among males have reported a genotype-environment interaction (G × E) in which low-activity alleles at the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) locus conferred greater sensitivity to the effects of childhood adversity on risk for conduct disorder (CD). So far, few studies of females have controlled for gene-environment correlation or used females heterozygous for this X-linked gene. Method Logistic regression analysis of a sample of 721 females ages 8-17 years from the longitudinal Virginia Twin Study of Adolescent Behavioral Development (VTSABD) assessed the additive effects of MAOA genotypes on risk for CD, together with the main effect of childhood adversity and parental antisocial personality disorder (ASP), as well as the interaction of MAOA with childhood adversity on risk for CD. Results A significant main effect of genotype on risk for CD was detected, where low-activity MAOA imparted the greatest risk to CD in girls while controlling for the significant effects of maternal ASP and childhood adversity. Significant G × E with weak effect was detected when environmental exposure was untransformed, indicating a higher sensitivity to childhood adversity in the presence of the high-activity MAOA allele. The interaction was no longer statistically significant after applying a ridit transformation to reflect the sample sizes exposed at each level of childhood adversity. Conclusions The main effect of MAOA on risk for CD in females, its absence in males and directional difference of interaction is suggestive of genotype-sex interaction. As the effect of G × E on risk for CD was weak, its inclusion is not justified. PMID:18752729

  10. Effects of monoamine oxidase inhibitor and cytochrome P450 2D6 status on 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Wu; Wu, Chao; Jiang, Xi-Ling; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2010-07-01

    5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) is a natural psychoactive indolealkylamine drug that has been used for recreational purpose. Our previous study revealed that polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) catalyzed 5-MeO-DMT O-demethylation to produce active metabolite bufotenine, while 5-MeO-DMT is mainly inactivated through deamination pathway mediated by monoamine oxidase (MAO). This study, therefore, aimed to investigate the impact of CYP2D6 genotype/phenotype status and MAO inhibitor (MAOI) on 5-MeO-DMT metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Enzyme kinetic studies using recombinant CYP2D6 allelic isozymes showed that CYP2D6.2 and CYP2D6.10 exhibited 2.6- and 40-fold lower catalytic efficiency (V(max)/K(m)), respectively, in producing bufotenine from 5-MeO-DMT, compared with wild-type CYP2D6.1. When co-incubated with MAOI pargyline, 5-MeO-DMT O-demethylation in 10 human liver microsomes showed significantly strong correlation with bufuralol 1'-hydroxylase activities (R(2)=0.98; P<0.0001) and CYP2D6 contents (R(2)=0.77; P=0.0007), whereas no appreciable correlations with enzymatic activities of other P450 enzymes. Furthermore, concurrent MAOI harmaline sharply reduced 5-MeO-DMT depletion and increased bufotenine formation in human CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer hepatocytes. In vivo studies in wild-type and CYP2D6-humanized (Tg-CYP2D6) mouse models showed that Tg-CYP2D6 mice receiving the same dose of 5-MeO-DMT (20mg/kg, i.p.) had 60% higher systemic exposure to metabolite bufotenine. In addition, pretreatment of harmaline (5mg/kg, i.p.) led to 3.6- and 4.4-fold higher systemic exposure to 5-MeO-DMT (2mg/kg, i.p.), and 9.9- and 6.1-fold higher systemic exposure to bufotenine in Tg-CYP2D6 and wild-type mice, respectively. These findings indicate that MAOI largely affects 5-MeO-DMT metabolism and pharmacokinetics, as well as bufotenine formation that is mediated by CYP2D6.

  11. Iron isotope composition of depleted MORB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labidi, J.; Sio, C. K. I.; Shahar, A.

    2015-12-01

    In terrestrial basalts, iron isotope ratios are observed to weakly fractionate as a function of olivine and pyroxene crystallization. However, a ~0.1‰ difference between chondrites and MORB had been reported (Dauphas et al. 2009, Teng et al. 2013 and ref. therein). This observation could illustrate an isotope fractionation occurring during partial melting, as a function of the Fe valence in melt versus crystals. Here, we present high-precision Fe isotopic data measured by MC-ICP-MS on well-characterized samples from the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge (PAR, n=9) and from the Garrett Transform Fault (n=8). These samples allow exploring the Fe isotope fractionation between melt and magnetite, and the role of partial melting on Fe isotope fractionation. Our average δ56Fe value is +0.095±0.013‰ (95% confidence, n=17), indistinguishable from a previous estimate of +0.105±0.006‰ (95% confidence, n=43, see ref. 2). Our δ56Fe values correlate weakly with MgO contents, and correlate positively with K/Ti ratios. PAC1 DR10 shows the largest Ti and Fe depletion after titanomagnetite fractionation, with a δ56Fe value of +0.076±0.036‰. This is ~0.05‰ below other samples at a given MgO. This may illustrate a significant Fe isotope fractionation between the melt and titanomagnetite, in agreement with experimental determination (Shahar et al. 2008). GN09-02, the most incompatible-element depleted sample, has a δ56Fe value of 0.037±0.020‰. This is the lowest high-precision δ56Fe value recorded for a MORB worldwide. This basalt displays an incompatible-element depletion consistent with re-melting beneath the transform fault of mantle source that was depleted during a first melting event, beneath the ridge axis (Wendt et al. 1999). The Fe isotope observation could indicate that its mantle source underwent 56Fe depletion after a first melting event. It could alternatively indicate a lower Fe isotope fractionation during re-melting, if the source was depleted of its Fe3

  12. Engrailed-2 (En2) deletion produces multiple neurodevelopmental defects in monoamine systems, forebrain structures and neurogenesis and behavior.

    PubMed

    Genestine, Matthieu; Lin, Lulu; Durens, Madel; Yan, Yan; Jiang, Yiqin; Prem, Smrithi; Bailoor, Kunal; Kelly, Brian; Sonsalla, Patricia K; Matteson, Paul G; Silverman, Jill; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Millonig, James H; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2015-10-15

    Many genes involved in brain development have been associated with human neurodevelopmental disorders, but underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain undefined. Human genetic and mouse behavioral analyses suggest that ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders, especially autism spectrum disorder. In mouse, En2 exhibits dynamic spatiotemporal expression in embryonic mid-hindbrain regions where monoamine neurons emerge. Considering their importance in neuropsychiatric disorders, we characterized monoamine systems in relation to forebrain neurogenesis in En2-knockout (En2-KO) mice. Transmitter levels of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine (NE) were dysregulated from Postnatal day 7 (P7) to P21 in En2-KO, though NE exhibited the greatest abnormalities. While NE levels were reduced ∼35% in forebrain, they were increased 40 -: 75% in hindbrain and cerebellum, and these patterns paralleled changes in locus coeruleus (LC) fiber innervation, respectively. Although En2 promoter was active in Embryonic day 14.5 -: 15.5 LC neurons, expression diminished thereafter and gene deletion did not alter brainstem NE neuron numbers. Significantly, in parallel with reduced NE levels, En2-KO forebrain regions exhibited reduced growth, particularly hippocampus, where P21 dentate gyrus granule neurons were decreased 16%, suggesting abnormal neurogenesis. Indeed, hippocampal neurogenic regions showed increased cell death (+77%) and unexpectedly, increased proliferation. Excess proliferation was restricted to early Sox2/Tbr2 progenitors whereas increased apoptosis occurred in differentiating (Dcx) neuroblasts, accompanied by reduced newborn neuron survival. Abnormal neurogenesis may reflect NE deficits because intra-hippocampal injections of β-adrenergic agonists reversed cell death. These studies suggest that disruption of hindbrain patterning genes can alter monoamine system development and thereby produce forebrain defects that are relevant to human

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and monoamine transporter activity of the new psychoactive substance 3′,4′-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR)

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Gavin; Morris, Noreen; Kavanagh, Pierce V.; Power, John D.; Twamley, Brendan; O’Brien, John; Talbot, Brian; Dowling, Geraldine; Mahony, Olivia; Brandt, Simon D.; Patrick, Julian; Archer, Roland P.; Partilla, John S.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    The recent occurrence of deaths associated with the psychostimulant cis-4,4′-dimethylaminorex (4,4′-DMAR) in Europe indicated the presence of a newly emerged psychoactive substance on the market. Subsequently, the existence of 3,4-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR) has come to the authors’ attention and this study describes the synthesis of cis- and trans-MDMAR followed by extensive characterization by chromatographic, spectroscopic, mass spectrometric platforms and crystal structure analysis. MDMAR obtained from an online vendor was subsequently identified as predominantly the cis-isomer (90%). Exposure of the cis-isomer to the mobile phase conditions (acetonitrile/water 1:1 with 0.1% formic acid) employed for high performance liquid chromatography analysis showed an artificially induced conversion to the trans-isomer, which was not observed when characterized by gas chromatography. Monoamine release activities of both MDMAR isomers were compared with the non-selective monoamine releasing agent (+)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) as a standard reference compound. For additional comparison, both cis- and trans-4,4′-DMAR, were assessed under identical conditions. cis-MDMAR, trans-MDMAR, cis-4,4′-DMAR and trans-4,4′-DMAR were more potent than MDMA in their ability to function as efficacious substrate-type releasers at the dopamine (DAT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in rat brain tissue. While cis-4,4′-DMAR, cis-MDMAR and trans-MDMAR were fully efficacious releasing agents at the serotonin transporter (SERT), trans-4,4′-DMAR acted as a fully efficacious uptake blocker. Currently, little information is available about the presence of MDMAR on the market but the high potency of ring-substituted methylaminorex analogues at all three monoamine transporters investigated here might be relevant when assessing the potential for serious side-effects after high dose exposure. PMID:25331619

  14. Engrailed-2 (En2) deletion produces multiple neurodevelopmental defects in monoamine systems, forebrain structures and neurogenesis and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Genestine, Matthieu; Lin, Lulu; Durens, Madel; Yan, Yan; Jiang, Yiqin; Prem, Smrithi; Bailoor, Kunal; Kelly, Brian; Sonsalla, Patricia K.; Matteson, Paul G.; Silverman, Jill; Crawley, Jacqueline N.; Millonig, James H.; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    Many genes involved in brain development have been associated with human neurodevelopmental disorders, but underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain undefined. Human genetic and mouse behavioral analyses suggest that ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders, especially autism spectrum disorder. In mouse, En2 exhibits dynamic spatiotemporal expression in embryonic mid-hindbrain regions where monoamine neurons emerge. Considering their importance in neuropsychiatric disorders, we characterized monoamine systems in relation to forebrain neurogenesis in En2-knockout (En2-KO) mice. Transmitter levels of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine (NE) were dysregulated from Postnatal day 7 (P7) to P21 in En2-KO, though NE exhibited the greatest abnormalities. While NE levels were reduced ∼35% in forebrain, they were increased 40–75% in hindbrain and cerebellum, and these patterns paralleled changes in locus coeruleus (LC) fiber innervation, respectively. Although En2 promoter was active in Embryonic day 14.5–15.5 LC neurons, expression diminished thereafter and gene deletion did not alter brainstem NE neuron numbers. Significantly, in parallel with reduced NE levels, En2-KO forebrain regions exhibited reduced growth, particularly hippocampus, where P21 dentate gyrus granule neurons were decreased 16%, suggesting abnormal neurogenesis. Indeed, hippocampal neurogenic regions showed increased cell death (+77%) and unexpectedly, increased proliferation. Excess proliferation was restricted to early Sox2/Tbr2 progenitors whereas increased apoptosis occurred in differentiating (Dcx) neuroblasts, accompanied by reduced newborn neuron survival. Abnormal neurogenesis may reflect NE deficits because intra-hippocampal injections of β-adrenergic agonists reversed cell death. These studies suggest that disruption of hindbrain patterning genes can alter monoamine system development and thereby produce forebrain defects that are relevant to human

  15. Effect of Low-Intensity Microwave Radiation on Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Their Key Regulating Enzymes in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin S; Ravi, Alok K; Tripathi, Ashok K; Abegaonkar, Mahesh P; Banerjee, Basu D

    2015-09-01

    The increasing use of wireless communication devices has raised major concerns towards deleterious effects of microwave radiation on human health. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the effect of low-intensity microwave radiation on levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and gene expression of their key regulating enzymes in brain of Fischer rats. Animals were exposed to 900 MHz and 1800 MHz microwave radiation for 30 days (2 h/day, 5 days/week) with respective specific absorption rates as 5.953 × 10(-4) and 5.835 × 10(-4) W/kg. The levels of monoamine neurotransmitters viz. dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and serotonin (5-HT) were detected using LC-MS/MS in hippocampus of all experimental animals. In addition, mRNA expression of key regulating enzymes for these neurotransmitters viz. tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) (for DA, NE and E) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH1 and TPH2) (for serotonin) was also estimated. Results showed significant reduction in levels of DA, NE, E and 5-HT in hippocampus of microwave-exposed animals in comparison with sham-exposed (control) animals. In addition, significant downregulation in mRNA expression of TH, TPH1 and TPH2 was also observed in microwave-exposed animals (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the results indicate that low-intensity microwave radiation may cause learning and memory disturbances by altering levels of brain monoamine neurotransmitters at mRNA and protein levels.

  16. Song Competition Affects Monoamine Levels in Sensory and Motor Forebrain Regions of Male Lincoln's Sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii)

    PubMed Central

    Sewall, Kendra B.; Caro, Samuel P.; Sockman, Keith W.

    2013-01-01

    Male animals often change their behavior in response to the level of competition for mates. Male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii) modulate their competitive singing over the period of a week as a function of the level of challenge associated with competitors' songs. Differences in song challenge and associated shifts in competitive state should be accompanied by neural changes, potentially in regions that regulate perception and song production. The monoamines mediate neural plasticity in response to environmental cues to achieve shifts in behavioral state. Therefore, using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we compared levels of monoamines and their metabolites from male Lincoln's sparrows exposed to songs categorized as more or less challenging. We compared levels of norepinephrine and its principal metabolite in two perceptual regions of the auditory telencephalon, the caudomedial nidopallium and the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM), because this chemical is implicated in modulating auditory sensitivity to song. We also measured the levels of dopamine and its principal metabolite in two song control nuclei, area X and the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), because dopamine is implicated in regulating song output. We measured the levels of serotonin and its principal metabolite in all four brain regions because this monoamine is implicated in perception and behavioral output and is found throughout the avian forebrain. After controlling for recent singing, we found that males exposed to more challenging song had higher levels of norepinephrine metabolite in the CMM and lower levels of serotonin in the RA. Collectively, these findings are consistent with norepinephrine in perceptual brain regions and serotonin in song control regions contributing to neuroplasticity that underlies socially-induced changes in behavioral state. PMID:23555809

  17. Exposure to (12)C particles alters the normal dynamics of brain monoamine metabolism and behaviour in rats.

    PubMed

    Belov, Oleg V; Belokopytova, Ksenia V; Bazyan, Ara S; Kudrin, Vladimir S; Narkevich, Viktor B; Ivanov, Aleksandr A; Severiukhin, Yury S; Timoshenko, Gennady N; Krasavin, Eugene A

    2016-09-01

    Planning of the deep-space exploration missions raises a number of questions on the radiation protection of astronauts. One of the medical concerns is associated with exposure of a crew to highly energetic particles of galactic cosmic rays. Among many other health disorders, irradiation with these particles has a substantial impact on the central nervous system (CNS). Although radiation damage to CNS has been addressed extensively during the last years, the mechanisms underlying observed impairments remain mostly unknown. The present study reveals neurochemical and behavioural alterations induced in rats by 1Gy of 500MeV/u (12)C particles with a relatively moderate linear energy transfer (10.6keV/μm). It is found that exposure to carbon ions leads to significant modification of the normal monoamine metabolism dynamics as well as the locomotor, exploratory, and anxiety-like behaviours during a two-month period. The obtained results indicate an abnormal redistribution of monoamines and their metabolites in different brain regions after exposure. The most pronounced impairments are detected in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and hypothalamus that illustrate the sensitivity of these brain regions to densely ionizing radiations. It is also shown that exposure to (12)C particles enhances the anxiety in animals and accelerates the age-related reduction in their exploratory capability. The observed monoamine metabolism pattern may indicate the presence of certain compensatory mechanisms being induced in response to irradiation and capable of partial restoration of monoaminergic systems' functions. Overall, these findings support a possibility of CNS damage by space-born particles of a relatively moderate linear energy transfer.

  18. Monoamine transporter and receptor interaction profiles of novel psychoactive substances: para-halogenated amphetamines and pyrovalerone cathinones.

    PubMed

    Rickli, Anna; Hoener, Marius C; Liechti, Matthias E

    2015-03-01

    The pharmacology of novel psychoactive substances is mostly unknown. We evaluated the transporter and receptor interaction profiles of a series of para-(4)-substituted amphetamines and pyrovalerone cathinones. We tested the potency of these compounds to inhibit the norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT) transporters (NET, DAT, and SERT, respectively) using human embryonic kidney 293 cells that express the respective human transporters. We also tested the substance-induced efflux of NE, DA, and 5-HT from monoamine-loaded cells, binding affinities to monoamine receptors, and 5-HT2B receptor activation. Para-(4)-substituted amphetamines, including 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone), 4-ethylmethcathinone, 4-fluoroamphetamine, 4-fluoromethamphetamine, 4-fluoromethcatinone (flephedrone), and 4-bromomethcathinone, were relatively more serotonergic (lower DAT:SERT ratio) compared with their analogs amphetamine, methamphetamine, and methcathinone. The 4-methyl, 4-ethyl, and 4-bromo groups resulted in enhanced serotonergic properties compared with the 4-fluoro group. The para-substituted amphetamines released NE and DA. 4-Fluoramphetamine, 4-flouromethamphetamine, 4-methylmethcathinone, and 4-ethylmethcathinone also released 5-HT similarly to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine. The pyrovalerone cathinones 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone, pyrovalerone, α-pyrrolidinovalerophenone, 3,4-methylenedioxy-α-pyrrolidinopropiophenone, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-α-pyrrolidinobutiophenone potently inhibited the NET and DAT but not the SERT. Naphyrone was the only pyrovalerone that also inhibited the SERT. The pyrovalerone cathinones did not release monoamines. Most of the para-substituted amphetamines exhibited affinity for the 5-HT2A receptor but no relevant activation of the 5-HT2B receptor. All the cathinones exhibited reduced trace amine-associated receptor 1 binding compared with the non-β-keto-amphetamines. In conclusion, para-substituted amphetamines exhibited

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and monoamine transporter activity of the new psychoactive substance 3',4'-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR).

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Gavin; Morris, Noreen; Kavanagh, Pierce V; Power, John D; Twamley, Brendan; O'Brien, John; Talbot, Brian; Dowling, Geraldine; Mahony, Olivia; Brandt, Simon D; Patrick, Julian; Archer, Roland P; Partilla, John S; Baumann, Michael H

    2015-07-01

    The recent occurrence of deaths associated with the psychostimulant cis-4,4'-dimethylaminorex (4,4'-DMAR) in Europe indicated the presence of a newly emerged psychoactive substance on the market. Subsequently, the existence of 3,4-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR) has come to the authors' attention and this study describes the synthesis of cis- and trans-MDMAR followed by extensive characterization by chromatographic, spectroscopic, mass spectrometric platforms and crystal structure analysis. MDMAR obtained from an online vendor was subsequently identified as predominantly the cis-isomer (90%). Exposure of the cis-isomer to the mobile phase conditions (acetonitrile/water 1:1 with 0.1% formic acid) employed for high performance liquid chromatography analysis showed an artificially induced conversion to the trans-isomer, which was not observed when characterized by gas chromatography. Monoamine release activities of both MDMAR isomers were compared with the non-selective monoamine releasing agent (+)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) as a standard reference compound. For additional comparison, both cis- and trans-4,4'-DMAR, were assessed under identical conditions. cis-MDMAR, trans-MDMAR, cis-4,4'-DMAR and trans-4,4'-DMAR were more potent than MDMA in their ability to function as efficacious substrate-type releasers at the dopamine (DAT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in rat brain tissue. While cis-4,4'-DMAR, cis-MDMAR and trans-MDMAR were fully efficacious releasing agents at the serotonin transporter (SERT), trans-4,4'-DMAR acted as a fully efficacious uptake blocker. Currently, little information is available about the presence of MDMAR on the market but the high potency of ring-substituted methylaminorex analogues at all three monoamine transporters investigated here might be relevant when assessing the potential for serious side-effects after high dose exposure.

  20. Glucocorticoid and androgen activation of monoamine oxidase A is regulated differently by R1 and Sp1.

    PubMed

    Ou, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Kevin; Shih, Jean C

    2006-07-28

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) A is a key enzyme for the degradation of neurotransmitters serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. There are three consensus glucocorticoid/androgen response elements and four Sp1-binding sites in the human monoamine oxidase A 2-kb promoter. A novel transcription factor R1 (RAM2/CDCA7L) interacts with Sp1-binding sites and represses MAO A gene expression. Luciferase assays show that glucocorticoid (dexamethasone) and androgen (R1881) increase MAO A promoter and catalytic activities in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells. Gel-shift analysis demonstrates that glucocorticoid/androgen receptors interact directly with the third glucocorticoid/androgen response element. Glucocorticoid/androgen receptors also interact with Sp1-binding sites indirectly via transcription factor Sp1. In addition, dexamethasone induces R1 translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus in a time-dependent manner in both the neuroblastoma and wild-type UW228 cell lines but not in R1 knock-down UW228 cells. In summary, this study shows that glucocorticoid enhances monoamine oxidase A gene expression by 1) regulation of R1 translocation; 2) direct interaction of the glucocorticoid receptor with the third glucocorticoid/androgen response element; and 3) indirect interaction of glucocorticoid receptor with the Sp1 or R1 transcription factor on Sp1-binding sites of the MAO A promoter. Androgen also up-regulates MAO A gene expression by direct interaction of androgen receptor with the third glucocorticoid/androgen response element. Androgen receptor indirectly interacts with the Sp1, but not R1 transcription factor, on Sp1-binding sites. This study provides new insights on the differential regulation of MAO A by glucocorticoid and androgen.

  1. Catechol O-methyltransferase and monoamine oxidase A genotypes, and plasma catecholamine metabolites in bipolar and schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Zumárraga, Mercedes; Dávila, Ricardo; Basterreche, Nieves; Arrue, Aurora; Goienetxea, Biotza; Zamalloa, María I; Erkoreka, Leire; Bustamante, Sonia; Inchausti, Lucía; González-Torres, Miguel A; Guimón, José

    2010-01-01

    Metabolites of dopamine and norepinephrine measured in the plasma have long been associated with symptomatic severity and response to treatment in schizophrenic, bipolar and other psychiatric patients. Plasma concentrations of catecholamine metabolites are genetically regulated. The genes encoding enzymes that are involved in the synthesis and degradation of these monoamines are candidate targets for this genetic regulation. We have studied the relationship between the Val158Met polymorphism in catechol O-methyltransferase gene, variable tandem repeat polymorphisms in the monoamine oxidase A gene promoter, and plasma concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in healthy control subjects as well as in untreated schizophrenic and bipolar patients. We found that the Val158Met substitution in catechol O-methyltransferase gene influences the plasma concentrations of homovanillic and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acids. Although higher concentrations of plasma homovanillic acid were found in the high-activity ValVal genotype, this mutation did not affect the plasma concentration of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid concentrations were higher in the low-activity MetMet genotype. Interestingly, plasma values 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol were greater in schizophrenic patients and in bipolar patients than in healthy controls. Our results are compatible with the previously reported effect of the Val158Met polymorphism on catechol O-methyltransferase enzymatic activity. Thus, our results suggest that this polymorphism, alone or associated with other polymorphisms, could have an important role in the genetic control of monoamine concentration and its metabolites.

  2. Influence of parenting style on the offspring's behaviour and CSF monoamine metabolite levels in crossfostered and noncrossfostered female rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Maestripieri, Dario; McCormack, Kai; Lindell, Stephen G; Higley, J Dee; Sanchez, Mar M

    2006-11-25

    We investigated the association between variation in parenting style and the offspring's behaviour and CSF monoamine metabolite (5-HIAA, HVA, and MHPG) levels in rhesus monkeys. Study subjects were 25 two-year-old females reared by their biological mothers and 15 same-aged females that were crossfostered at birth and reared by unrelated mothers. Subjects that were rejected more by their mothers in the first 6 months of life engaged in more solitary play and had lower CSF concentrations of 5-HIAA than subjects that were rejected less. The relation between these variables was generally similar in crossfostered and noncrossfostered females. CSF levels of 5-HIAA were negatively correlated with rates of scratching, a behavioural indicator of anxiety. These results suggest that that early exposure to high rates of maternal rejection can result in higher anxiety later in life, and that this effect may be mediated by serotonergic mechanisms. Variation in maternal protectiveness did not affect offspring behaviour and neither protectiveness nor rejection affected CSF levels of HVA and MHPG. CSF levels of MHPG, however, were negatively correlated with solitary play behaviour and avoidance of other individuals, suggesting that individuals with lower CSF MHPG were more fearful and socially phobic than those with higher CSF MHPG. Taken together, these findings suggest that individual differences in anxiety and fearfulness in young rhesus monkeys are accounted for, at least in part, by variation in CSF levels of monoamine metabolites, and that the development of brain monoamine systems, particularly serotonin, can be affected by early exposure to variable maternal behaviour.

  3. The role of the monoamine oxidase A gene in moderating the response to adversity and associated antisocial behavior: a review

    PubMed Central

    Buades-Rotger, Macià; Gallardo-Pujol, David

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary factors are increasingly attracting the interest of behavioral scientists and practitioners. Our aim in the present article is to introduce some state-of-the-art topics in behavioral genetics, as well as selected findings in the field, in order to illustrate how genetic makeup can modulate the impact of environmental factors. We focus on the most-studied polymorphism to date for antisocial responses to adversity: the monoamine oxidase A gene. Advances, caveats, and promises of current research are reviewed. We also discuss implications for the use of genetic information in applied settings. PMID:25114607

  4. Copenhagen delegates advance phaseout of ozone depleters

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, E.

    1992-12-09

    As expected, delegates at the United Nations Ozone Layer Conference in Copenhagen sped up ozone depleter phaseouts from the 1987 Montreal Protocol and the 1990 London amendments. The changes bring the worldwide production phaseout of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone depleters in developed countries in line with U.S. and European plans announced earlier this year. Adjustments to the protocol, which are binding on the signatories, change the phaseout for CFC, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform production and consumption to January 1, 1996 from 2000. The 75% reduction of 1986 levels from CFCs by January 1, 1994 is a compromise between European pressure for an 85% cut and the US goal of 70%. Halon production is to end January 1, 1994, as anticipated. Developing countries continue to have a 10-year grace period. Friends of the Earth ozone campaign director Liz Cook counters that the phaseout dates were scheduled with concern for the chemical industry, not for the ozone layer.

  5. Endoplasmic-Reticulum Calcium Depletion and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B.; De Smedt, Humbert; Missiaen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an intracellular Ca2+ store not only sets up cytosolic Ca2+ signals, but, among other functions, also assembles and folds newly synthesized proteins. Alterations in ER homeostasis, including severe Ca2+ depletion, are an upstream event in the pathophysiology of many diseases. On the one hand, insufficient release of activator Ca2+ may no longer sustain essential cell functions. On the other hand, loss of luminal Ca2+ causes ER stress and activates an unfolded protein response, which, depending on the duration and severity of the stress, can reestablish normal ER function or lead to cell death. We will review these various diseases by mainly focusing on the mechanisms that cause ER Ca2+ depletion. PMID:21441595

  6. Ozone depletion in tropospheric volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Alan; McGonigle, Andrew J. S.; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Stith, Jeffrey L.; Turnbull, Kate; von Glasow, Roland

    2010-11-01

    We measured ozone (O3) concentrations in the atmospheric plumes of the volcanoes St. Augustine (1976), Mt. Etna (2004, 2009) and Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and found O3 to be strongly depleted compared to the background at each volcano. At Mt. Etna O3 was depleted within tens of seconds from the crater, the age of the St. Augustine plumes was on the order of hours, whereas the O3 destruction in the plume of Eyjafjallajökull was maintained in 1-9 day old plumes. The most likely cause for this O3 destruction are catalytic bromine reactions as suggested by a model that manages to reproduce the very early destruction of O3 but also shows that O3 destruction is ongoing for several days. Given the observed rapid and sustained destruction of O3, heterogeneous loss of O3 on ash is unlikely to be important.

  7. Replacements For Ozone-Depleting Foaming Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, Elana; Sharpe, Jon B.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorinated ethers used in place of chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Replacement necessary because CFC's and HCFC's found to contribute to depletion of ozone from upper atmosphere, and manufacture and use of them by law phased out in near future. Two fluorinated ethers do not have ozone-depletion potential and used in existing foam-producing equipment, designed to handle liquid blowing agents soluble in chemical ingredients that mixed to make foam. Any polyurethane-based foams and several cellular plastics blown with these fluorinated ethers used in processes as diverse as small batch pours, large sprays, or double-band lamination to make insulation for private homes, commercial buildings, shipping containers, and storage tanks. Fluorinated ethers proved useful as replacements for CFC refrigerants and solvents.

  8. Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study

    SciTech Connect

    Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

    1994-12-01

    A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF{sub 6}, of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF{sub 6} processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete.

  9. Relative contributions of norepinephrine and serotonin transporters to antinociceptive synergy between monoamine reuptake inhibitors and morphine in the rat formalin model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fei; Tsuruda, Pamela R; Smith, Jacqueline A M; Obedencio, Glenmar P; Martin, William J

    2013-01-01

    Multimodal analgesia is designed to optimize pain relief by coadministering drugs with distinct mechanisms of action or by combining multiple pharmacologies within a single molecule. In clinical settings, combinations of monoamine reuptake inhibitors and opioid receptor agonists have been explored and one currently available analgesic, tapentadol, functions as both a µ-opioid receptor agonist and a norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. However, it is unclear whether the combination of selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibition and µ-receptor agonism achieves an optimal antinociceptive synergy. In this study, we assessed the pharmacodynamic interactions between morphine and monoamine reuptake inhibitors that possess different affinities and selectivities for norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. Using the rat formalin model, in conjunction with measurements of ex vivo transporter occupancy, we show that neither the norepinephrine-selective inhibitor, esreboxetine, nor the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, produce antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Atomoxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher levels of norepinephrine than serotonin transporter occupancy, exhibited robust antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Similarly, a fixed-dose combination of esreboxetine and fluoxetine which achieves comparable levels of transporter occupancy potentiated the antinociceptive response to morphine. By contrast, duloxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher serotonin than norepinephrine transporter occupancy, failed to potentiate the antinociceptive response to morphine. However, when duloxetine was coadministered with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, potentiation of the antinociceptive response to morphine was revealed. These results support the notion that inhibition of both serotonin and norepinephrine transporters is required for monoamine reuptake inhibitor and opioid-mediated antinociceptive

  10. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, T.R.

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  11. Alternatives for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Waste.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    originating activity by DTIC. Address your request for additional copies to: Defense Technical Information Center Cameron Station Alexandria, Virginia 22314 0...LIST OF TABLES Table Title Page 1 Specific Activity of Depleted Uranium Sand Mixture ......... .................. 8 2 Disposal at Department of Energy...exceed the allowable limits for on-site disposal. This material must be disposed of at a commercial low-level radio- active waste disposal site. Because

  12. Carbon sequestration in depleted oil shale deposits

    DOEpatents

    Burnham, Alan K; Carroll, Susan A

    2014-12-02

    A method and apparatus are described for sequestering carbon dioxide underground by mineralizing the carbon dioxide with coinjected fluids and minerals remaining from the extraction shale oil. In one embodiment, the oil shale of an illite-rich oil shale is heated to pyrolyze the shale underground, and carbon dioxide is provided to the remaining depleted oil shale while at an elevated temperature. Conditions are sufficient to mineralize the carbon dioxide.

  13. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

  14. Depletion modeling of liquid dominated geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, G.

    1984-06-01

    Depletion models for liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs are derived and presented. The depletion models are divided into two categories: confined and unconfined. For both cases depletion models with no recharge (or influx), and depletion models including recharge, are used to match field data from the Svartsengi high temperature geothermal field in Iceland. The influx models included with the mass and energy balances are adopted from the petroleum engineering literature. The match to production data from Svartsengi is improved when influx was included. The Schilthuis steady-state influx gives a satisfactory match. The finite aquifer method of Fetkovitch, and the unsteady state method of Hurst gave reasonable answers, but not as good. The best match is obtained using Hurst simplified solution when lambda = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} m{sup -1}. From the match the cross-sectional area of the aquifer was calculated as 3.6 km{sup 2}. The drawdown was predicted using the Hurst simplified method, and compared with predicted drawdown from a boiling model and an empirical log-log model. A large difference between the models was obtained. The predicted drawdown using the Hurst simplified method falls between the other two. Injection has been considered by defining the net rate as being the production rate minus the injection rate. No thermal of transient effects were taken into account. Prediction using three different net rates shows that the pressure can be maintained using the Hurst simplified method if there is significant fluid reinjection. 32 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Renal cortical pyruvate depletion during AKI.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Becker, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    Pyruvate is a key intermediary in energy metabolism and can exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the fate of pyruvate during AKI remains unknown. Here, we assessed renal cortical pyruvate and its major determinants (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pyruvate dehydrogenase [PDH], and H2O2 levels) in mice subjected to unilateral ischemia (15-60 minutes; 0-18 hours of vascular reflow) or glycerol-induced ARF. The fate of postischemic lactate, which can be converted back to pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase, was also addressed. Ischemia and glycerol each induced persistent pyruvate depletion. During ischemia, decreasing pyruvate levels correlated with increasing lactate levels. During early reperfusion, pyruvate levels remained depressed, but lactate levels fell below control levels, likely as a result of rapid renal lactate efflux. During late reperfusion and glycerol-induced AKI, pyruvate depletion corresponded with increased gluconeogenesis (pyruvate consumption). This finding was underscored by observations that pyruvate injection increased renal cortical glucose content in AKI but not normal kidneys. AKI decreased PDH levels, potentially limiting pyruvate to acetyl CoA conversion. Notably, pyruvate therapy mitigated the severity of AKI. This renoprotection corresponded with increases in cytoprotective heme oxygenase 1 and IL-10 mRNAs, selective reductions in proinflammatory mRNAs (e.g., MCP-1 and TNF-α), and improved tissue ATP levels. Paradoxically, pyruvate increased cortical H2O2 levels. We conclude that AKI induces a profound and persistent depletion of renal cortical pyruvate, which may induce additional injury.

  16. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, James E. Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2016-01-14

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  17. Pumping test evaluation of stream depletion parameters.

    PubMed

    Lough, Hilary K; Hunt, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions are given of a pumping test and a corresponding analysis that permit calculation of all five hydrogeological parameters appearing in the Hunt (2003) solution for stream depletion caused by ground water abstraction from a well beside a stream. This solution assumes that flow in the pumped aquifer is horizontal, flow in the overlying aquitard or system of aquitards is vertical, and the free surface in the top aquitard is allowed to draw down. The definition of an aquitard in this paper is any layer with a vertical hydraulic conductivity much lower than the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the pumped aquifer. These "aquitards" may be reasonably permeable layers but are distinguished from the pumped aquifer by their hydraulic conductivity contrast. The pumping test requires a complete set of drawdown measurements from at least one observation well. This well must be deep enough to penetrate the pumped aquifer, and pumping must continue for a sufficient time to ensure that depleted streamflow becomes a significant portion of the well abstraction rate. Furthermore, two of the five parameters characterize an aquitard that overlies the pumped aquifer, and values for these parameters are seen to be dependent upon the initial water table elevation in the aquitard. The field test analyzed herein used a total of eight observation wells screened in the pumped aquifer, and measurements from these wells gave eight sets of parameters that are used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the relative importance of each parameter in the stream depletion calculations.

  18. Fluoxetine Administration Exacerbates Oral Tremor and Striatal Dopamine Depletion in a Rodent Pharmacological Model of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Podurgiel, Samantha J; Milligan, Meredith N; Yohn, Samantha E; Purcell, Laura J; Contreras-Mora, Hector M; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) include resting tremor, akinesia, bradykinesia, and rigidity, and these motor abnormalities can be modeled in rodents by administration of the VMAT-2 (type-2 vesicular monoamine transporter) inhibitor tetrabenazine (9,10-dimethoxy-3-(2-methylpropyl)-1,3,4,6,7, 11b hexahydrobenzo[a]quinolizin-2-one; TBZ). Depression is also commonly associated with PD, and clinical data indicate that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine ((±)-N-methyl-γ-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]benzenepropanamine hydrochloride; FLX) are frequently used to treat depression in PD patients. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effect of FLX on the motor dysfunctions induced by a low dose of TBZ (0.75 mg/kg), and investigate the neural mechanisms involved. This low dose of TBZ was selected based on studies with rat models of depressive symptoms. In rats, coadministration of FLX (2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 mg/kg) increased TBZ-induced oral tremor (tremulous jaw movements), and decreased locomotor activity compared with administration of TBZ alone. Coadministration of the serotonin 5-HT2A/2C antagonist mianserin (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) attenuated the increase in oral tremor induced by coadministration of TBZ (0.75 mg/kg) with FLX (5.0 mg/kg). Consistent with these behavioral data, coadministration of TBZ and FLX decreased DA tissue levels in the rat ventrolateral neostriatum compared with TBZ alone, and coadministration of mianserin with TBZ and FLX attenuated this effect, increasing DA tissue levels compared with the TBZ/FLX condition. These data suggest that SSRI administration in PD patients may result in worsening of motor symptoms, at least in part, by exacerbating existing DA depletions through 5-HT2A/2C-mediated modulation of DA neurotransmission. PMID:25759301

  19. Calcitriol protects against the dopamine- and serotonin-depleting effects of neurotoxic doses of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Cass, Wayne A; Smith, Michael P; Peters, Laura E

    2006-08-01

    Repeated methamphetamine (METH) administration to animals can result in long-lasting decreases in brain dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) content. Calcitriol, the active metabolite of vitamin D, has potent effects on brain cells, both in vitro and in vivo, including the ability to upregulate trophic factors and protect against various lesions. The present experiments were designed to examine the ability of calcitriol to protect against METH-induced reductions in striatal and nucleus accumbens levels of DA and 5-HT. Male Fischer-344 rats were administered vehicle or calcitriol (1 microg/kg, s.c.) once a day for eight consecutive days. After the seventh day of treatment the animals were given METH (5 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline four times in 1 day at 2-h intervals. Seven days later the striata and accumbens were harvested from the animals for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of monoamines and metabolites. In animals treated with vehicle and METH, there were significant reductions in DA, 5-HT, and their metabolites in both the striatum and accumbens. In animals treated with calcitriol and METH, the magnitude of the METH-induced reductions in DA, 5-HT, and metabolites was substantially and significantly attenuated. The calcitriol treatments did not reduce the hyperthermia associated with multiple injections of METH, indicating that the neuroprotective effects of calcitriol are not due to the prevention of increases in body temperature. These results suggest that calcitriol can provide significant protection against the DA- and 5-HT-depleting effects of neurotoxic doses of METH.

  20. Neurotoxic compound N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4) depletes endogenous norepinephrine and enhances release of (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine from rat cortical slices

    SciTech Connect

    Landa, M.E.; Rubio, M.C.; Jaim-Etcheverry, G.

    1984-10-01

    The alkylating compound N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4) injected to rodents blocks norepinephrine (NE) uptake and reduces endogenous NE levels in the central nervous system and in the periphery. To investigate the processes leading to these alterations, rat cortical slices were incubated in the presence of DSP4. Cortical NE was depleted by 40% after incubation of slices in 10(-5) M DSP4 for 60 min and this was blocked by desipramine. The spontaneous outflow of radioactivity from cortical slices labeled previously with (/sup 3/H)NE was enhanced markedly both during exposure to DSP4 and during the subsequent washings, suggesting that NE depletion could be due to this stimulation of NE release. The radioactivity released by DSP4 was accounted for mainly by NE and its deaminated metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol. The enhanced release, independent of external Ca++, apparently originated from the vesicular pool as it was absent after reserpine pretreatment. Activities of the enzymes related to NE synthesis were not altered by DSP4 in vitro and only monoamine oxidase activity was inhibited at high concentrations. Thus, the depletion of endogenous NE produced by DSP4 is probably due to a persistent enhancement of its release from the vesicular pool. Fixation of DSP4 to the NE transport system is necessary but not sufficient to produce the acute NE depletion and the characteristic long-term actions of the compound.

  1. The monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor rasagiline in the treatment of Parkinson disease: is tyramine a challenge?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jack J; Wilkinson, Jayne R

    2012-05-01

    Rasagiline is an irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitor indicated for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of idiopathic Parkinson disease as initial monotherapy and as adjunct therapy to levodopa. Pharmacologic inhibition of monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A), but not MAO-B, poses a risk of the "cheese effect," a hypertensive response to excess dietary tyramine, a biogenic sympathomimetic amine. Tyramine challenge studies, conducted to characterize rasagiline selectivity for the MAO-B enzyme and tyramine sensitivity, demonstrate that rasagiline, when used at the recommended dose, is selective for MAO-B and is not associated with heightened tyramine sensitivity. This conclusion is also supported by safety results from large clinical trials of rasagiline in Parkinson disease involving 2066 rasagiline-treated patients who did not require dietary tyramine restriction per protocol. In late 2009, US labeling for rasagiline was modified to state that dietary tyramine restrictions are not ordinarily required when rasagiline is administered at recommended doses. In addition, because rasagiline has been demonstrated to be selective for MAO-B at the approved dose of up to 1 mg/d, contraindications regarding concomitant use with sympathomimetic amines, use of sympathomimetic vasopressors in conjunction with general or local anesthesia, and use in patients with pheochromocytoma also were removed.

  2. Biogenic aldehyde(s) derived from the action of monoamine oxidase may mediate the antidipsotropic effect of daidzin.

    PubMed

    Keung, W M

    2001-01-30

    Daidzin, a major active principle of an ancient herbal treatment for 'alcohol addiction', was first shown to suppress ethanol intake in Syrian golden hamsters. Since then this activity has been confirmed in Wistar rats, Fawn hooded rats, genetically bred alcohol preferring P rats and African green moneys under various experimental conditions, including two-level operant, two-bottle free-choice, limited access, and alcohol-deprivation paradigms. In vitro, daidzin is a potent and selective inhibitor of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2). However, in vivo, it does not affect overall acetaldehyde metabolism in golden hamsters. Using isolated hamster liver mitochondria and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) as the substrates, we demonstrated that daidzin inhibits the second but not the first step of the MAO/ALDH-2 pathway, the major pathway that catalyzes monoamine metabolism in mitochondria. Correlation studies using structural analogs of daidzin led to the hypothesis that the mitochondrial MAO/ALDH-2 pathway may be the site of action of daidzin and that one or more biogenic aldehydes such as 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetaldehyde (5-HIAL) and/or DOPAL derived from the action of monoamine oxidase (MAO) may be mediators of its antidipsotropic action.

  3. Effect of a novel neurotensin analog, NT69L, on nicotine-induced alterations in monoamine levels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanqi; Boules, Mona; Shaw, Amanda M; Williams, Katrina; Fredrickson, Paul; Richelson, Elliott

    2008-09-22

    NT69L, is a novel neurotensin (8-13) analog that participates in the modulation of the dopaminergic pathways implicated in addiction to psychostimulants. NT69L blocks nicotine-induced hyperactivity as well as the initiation and expression of sensitization in rats. Recent evidence suggests that stimulation of mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, with influences from the other monoamine systems, e.g. norepinephrine and serotonin, is involved in nicotine's reinforcing properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with NT69L on nicotine-induced changes in monoamine levels in the rat brain using in vivo microdialysis. Acute or chronic (0.4 mg/kg, sc, once daily for 2 weeks) administration of nicotine elicited increases in extracellular levels of dopamine, dopamine metabolites, norepinephrine, or serotonin in medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens shell, and core of rats. Pretreatment with NT69L (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, ip) administered 40 min before nicotine injection significantly attenuated the acute nicotine-evoked increases in norepinephrine levels in medial prefrontal cortex, dopamine and serotonin in nucleus accumbens shell. After chronic nicotine administration, pretreatment of NT69L markedly reversed the increase in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens core. NT69L's attenuation of some of the biochemical effects of acute and chronic nicotine is consistent with this peptide's attenuation of nicotine-induced behavioral effects. These data further support a role for NT69L or other neurotensin receptor agonists to treat nicotine addiction.

  4. A Strategy to Employ Clitoria ternatea as a Prospective Brain Drug Confronting Monoamine Oxidase (MAO) Against Neurodegenerative Diseases and Depression.

    PubMed

    Margret, A Anita; Begum, T Nargis; Parthasarathy, S; Suvaithenamudhan, S

    2015-12-01

    Ayurveda is a renowned traditional medicine practiced in India from ancient times and Clitoria ternatea is one such prospective medicinal herb incorporated as an essential constituent in a brain tonic called as medhya rasayan for treating neurological disorders. This work emphasises the significance of the plant as a brain drug there by upholding Indian medicine. The phytochemicals from the root extract were extricated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay and molecular docking against the protein Monoamine oxidase was performed with four potential compounds along with four reference compounds of the plant. This persuades the prospect of C. ternatea as a remedy for neurodegenerative diseases and depression. The in silico assay enumerates that a major compound (Z)-9,17-octadecadienal obtained from the chromatogram with a elevated retention time of 32.99 furnished a minimum binding affinity energy value of -6.5 kcal/mol against monoamine oxidase (MAO-A). The interactions with the amino acid residues ALA 68, TYR 60 and TYR 69 were analogous to the reference compound kaempferol-3-monoglucoside with a least score of -13.90/-12.95 kcal/mol against the isoforms (MAO) A and B. This study fortifies the phytocompounds of C. ternatea as MAO-inhibitors and to acquire a pharmaceutical approach in rejuvenating Ayurvedic medicine.

  5. Path Integral Simulation of the H/D Kinetic Isotope Effect in Monoamine Oxidase B Catalyzed Decomposition of Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Mavri, Janez; Matute, Ricardo A; Chu, Zhen T; Vianello, Robert

    2016-04-14

    Brain monoamines regulate many centrally mediated body functions, and can cause adverse symptoms when they are out of balance. A starting point to address challenges raised by the increasing burden of brain diseases is to understand, at atomistic level, the catalytic mechanism of an essential amine metabolic enzyme-monoamine oxidase B (MAO B). Recently, we demonstrated that the rate-limiting step of MAO B catalyzed conversion of amines into imines represents the hydride anion transfer from the substrate α-CH2 group to the N5 atom of the flavin cofactor moiety. In this article we simulated for MAO B catalyzed dopamine decomposition the effects of nuclear tunneling by the calculation of the H/D kinetic isotope effect. We applied path integral quantization of the nuclear motion for the methylene group and the N5 atom of the flavin moiety in conjunction with the QM/MM treatment on the empirical valence bond (EVB) level for the rest of the enzyme. The calculated H/D kinetic isotope effect of 12.8 ± 0.3 is in a reasonable agreement with the available experimental data for closely related biogenic amines, which gives strong support for the proposed hydride mechanism. The results are discussed in the context of tunneling in enzyme centers and advent of deuterated drugs into clinical practice.

  6. [Effects of some extenders and monoamines on sperm cryopreservation in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri)].

    PubMed

    Ping, Shu-Huang; Wang, Cai-Yun; Tang, Wen-Ru; Luo, Ying; Yang, Shi-Hua

    2012-02-01

    The tree shrew may be an important experimental animal for disease models in humans. The effects of some extenders and momamines on sperm cryopreservation will provide helpful data for experimentation of strains and conservation of genetic resources in tree shrews. Epididymal sperm were surgically harvested from male tree shrews captured around Kunming, China and sperm motility, acrosome integrity and fertility were assessed during cryopreservation. In Experiment 1 eight extenders (TTE, TCG, TCF, TTG, BWW, BTS, DM, and SR) supplemented with 0.4 mol/L DMSO were used to dilute the sperm: only TTE, DM and SR showed no differences in motility and acrosome integrity compared to fresh controls after equilibration. After freezing and thawing, sperm in any extender showed lower motility than fresh control and sperm in DM showed higher motility than other groups. However, BWW produced the lowest motility. For acrosome integrity, TTE and DM showed higher than BWW, BTS and SR after equilibration. The parameter in DM was higher than other groups (except TTE) after thawing. In Experiment 2 four penetrating cryoprotectant agents (CPA) [dimethyl-formamide (DF), formamide (F), dimethylacetamide (DA), and acetamide (A)] at 0.2 mol/L, 0.4 mol/L, 0.8 mol/L, and 1.2 mol/L, respectively were added to the DM extender. Motility showed no difference among CPA groups and non-CPA group (control) after equilibration, but all thawed sperm showed lower values in motility and acrosome integrity than pre-freezing groups. However, sperm in 0.8 mol/L DF and 0.4 mol/L DMSO showed higher values in both parameters than that in other CPA groups (P>0.05). In Experiment 3 the fertilization rate of oocytes inseminated with 0.4mol/L DMSO (50%) were higher than that with 0.8mol/L DF (16%). In conclusion, non-ion extenders supplemented with egg yolk may be better for sperm cryopreservation in tree shrews and cryoprotectant effects of monoamines agents should be further studied in this species.

  7. Natural Products Screening for the Identification of Selective Monoamine Oxidase-B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zarmouh, Najla O.; Messeha, Samia S.; Elshami, Faisel M.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors (MAO-BIs) are used for the initial therapy of Parkinson’s disease. Also, MAO-BIs have shown to be effective neuroprotective agents in several neurodegenerative diseases. However, some concerns exist regarding the long-term use of these compounds. Meanwhile, natural compounds showed potential MAO-B selective inhibitions. To date, few selective natural MAO-BIs have been identified. Therefore, the current study is designed to identify plants with potent and specific MAO-B inhibition. Study Design In this work, we utilized high throughput screening to evaluate the different plants ethanolic extract for their effectiveness to inhibit recombinant human (h)MAO-A and hMAO-B and to determine the relative selectivity of the top MAO-BI. Methodology Recombinant human isozymes were verified by Western blotting, and the 155 plants were screened. A continuous fluorometric screening assay was performed followed by two separate hMAO-A and hMAO-B microtiter screenings and IC50 determinations for the top extracts. Results In the screened plants, 9% of the extracts showed more than 1.5-fold relative inhibition of hMAO-B (RIB) and another 9% showed more than 1.5-fold relative inhibition of hMAO-A. The top extracts with the most potent RIBs were Psoralea corylifolia seeds, Phellodendron amurense bark, Glycyrrhiza uralensis roots, and Ferula assafoetida roots, with the highest RIB of 5.9-fold. Furthermore, extensive maceration of the promising extracts led to increase inhibitory effects with a preserved RIB as confirmed with luminescence assay. The top four extracts hMAO-BIs were equally potent (IC50= 1.3 to 3.8 μg/mL) with highly significant relative selectivities to inhibit hMAO-B (4.1- to 13.4-fold). Conclusion The obtained results indicate that Psoralea corylifolia seeds, Ferula assafoetida, Glycyrrhiza uralensis roots, and Phellodendron amurense ethanolic extracts have selective inhibitions for human MAO-B. Investigating these plant extracts as

  8. [Synthesis of monoamines by non-monoaminergic neurons: illusion or reality?].

    PubMed

    Ugrumov, Mikhail V

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to monoaminergic (MA-ergic) neurons possessing the whole set of the enzymes for MA synthesis from the precursor amino-acid, some, mostly peptidergic, neurons co-express only one of the enzymes of monoamine synthesis. They are widely distributed in the brain, being particularly numerous in ontogenesis and, in adulthood, under certain physiological conditions. Most monoenzymatic neurons possess one of the enzymes for dopamine (DA) synthesis, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). TH and AADC are enzymatically active in a substantial number of monoenzymatic neurons, where they are capable of converting L-tyrosine to L-3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) and L-DOPA to dopamine (DA) (or 5-hydroxy-tryptophan, 5-HTP to serotonin), respectively. According to our data L-DOPA synthesized in monoenzymatic TH-neurons is released and taken up by monoenzymatic AADC-neurons for DA synthesis. Moreover, L-DOPA captured by dopaminergic neurons and serotoninergic neurons serves to stimulate dopamine synthesis in the former and to start DA synthesis in the latter. Cooperative synthesis of MAs is considered as a compensatory reaction under a failure of MA-ergic neurons, e.g. in neurodegenerative diseases like hyperprolactinemia and Parkinson's disease, which are developed primarily because of degeneration of DA-ergic neurons of the tuberoinfundibular system and the nigrostriatal system, respectively. Noteworthy, the neurotoxin-induced increase of prolactin secretion returns with time to a normal level due to the stimulation of DA synthesis by the tuberoinfundibular most probably monoenzymatic neurons. The same compensatory mechanism is supposed to be used under the failure of the nigrostriatal DA-ergic system that is manifested by an increased number of monoenzymatic neurons in the striatum of animals with neurotoxin-induced parkinsonism and in humans with Parkinson's disease. Expression of the enzymes of MA synthesis in non

  9. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion; general rule. (a) In general. In the case of a taxpayer computing the deduction for depletion under section 611... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Percentage depletion; general rule....

  10. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion; general rule. (a) In general. In the case of a taxpayer computing the deduction for depletion under section 611... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Percentage depletion; general rule....

  11. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion; general rule. (a) In general. In the case of a taxpayer computing the deduction for depletion under section 611... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Percentage depletion; general rule....

  12. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion; general rule. (a) In general. In the case of a taxpayer computing the deduction for depletion under section 611... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Percentage depletion; general rule....

  13. 26 CFR 52.4682-1 - Ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ozone-depleting chemicals. 52.4682-1 Section 52... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL TAXES § 52.4682-1 Ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Overview. This section provides rules relating to the tax imposed on ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs) under section...

  14. 26 CFR 52.4682-1 - Ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ozone-depleting chemicals. 52.4682-1 Section 52... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL TAXES § 52.4682-1 Ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Overview. This section provides rules relating to the tax imposed on ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs) under section...

  15. 26 CFR 52.4682-1 - Ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ozone-depleting chemicals. 52.4682-1 Section 52... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL TAXES § 52.4682-1 Ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Overview. This section provides rules relating to the tax imposed on ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs) under section...

  16. 26 CFR 52.4682-1 - Ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ozone-depleting chemicals. 52.4682-1 Section 52... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL TAXES § 52.4682-1 Ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Overview. This section provides rules relating to the tax imposed on ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs) under section...

  17. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  18. 26 CFR 1.642(e)-1 - Depreciation and depletion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Depreciation and depletion. 1.642(e)-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(e)-1 Depreciation and depletion. An estate or trust is allowed the deductions for depreciation and depletion, but only to the extent...

  19. A modern depleted uranium manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zagula, T.A.

    1995-07-01

    The Specific Manufacturing Capabilities (SMC) Project located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and operated by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. (LMIT) for the Department of Energy (DOE) manufactures depleted uranium for use in the U.S. Army MIA2 Abrams Heavy Tank Armor Program. Since 1986, SMC has fabricated more than 12 million pounds of depleted uranium (DU) products in a multitude of shapes and sizes with varying metallurgical properties while maintaining security, environmental, health and safety requirements. During initial facility design in the early 1980`s, emphasis on employee safety, radiation control and environmental consciousness was gaining momentum throughout the DOE complex. This fact coupled with security and production requirements forced design efforts to focus on incorporating automation, local containment and computerized material accountability at all work stations. The result was a fully automated production facility engineered to manufacture DU armor packages with virtually no human contact while maintaining security, traceability and quality requirements. This hands off approach to handling depleted uranium resulted in minimal radiation exposures and employee injuries. Construction of the manufacturing facility was complete in early 1986 with the first armor package certified in October 1986. Rolling facility construction was completed in 1987 with the first certified plate produced in the fall of 1988. Since 1988 the rolling and manufacturing facilities have delivered more than 2600 armor packages on schedule with 100% final product quality acceptance. During this period there was an annual average of only 2.2 lost time incidents and a single individual maximum radiation exposure of 150 mrem. SMC is an example of designing and operating a facility that meets regulatory requirements with respect to national security, radiation control and personnel safety while achieving production schedules and product quality.

  20. Correlation between cosmic rays and ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q-B

    2009-03-20

    This Letter reports reliable satellite data in the period of 1980-2007 covering two full 11-yr cosmic ray (CR) cycles, clearly showing the correlation between CRs and ozone depletion, especially the polar ozone loss (hole) over Antarctica. The results provide strong evidence of the physical mechanism that the CR-driven electron-induced reaction of halogenated molecules plays the dominant role in causing the ozone hole. Moreover, this mechanism predicts one of the severest ozone losses in 2008-2009 and probably another large hole around 2019-2020, according to the 11-yr CR cycle.

  1. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Malhotra, Renu

    1997-01-01

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  2. Ozone depletion: implications for the veterinarian.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, K E

    1978-09-15

    Man has inadvertently modified the stratosphere. There is a good possibility that the ozone layer is being depleted by the use of jet aircraft (SST), chlorofluoromethane propellants, and nitrogen fertilizers. Under unpolluted conditions, the production of ozone equals its destruction. By man's intervention, however, the destruction may exceed the production. The potential outcome is increased intensity of solar ultraviolet (280-400 nm) radiation and penetration to the earth's surface of previously absorbed wavelengths below about 280 nm. The increased ultraviolet radiation would increase the likelihood of skin cancer in man and ocular squamous cell carcinoma in cattle. The climate also might be modified, possibly in an undesirable way.

  3. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  4. Commercialisation of full depletion scientific CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorden, Paul; Ball, Kevin; Bell, Ray; Burt, David; Guyatt, Neil; Hadfield, Kevin; Jerram, Paul; Pool, Peter; Pike, Andrew; Holland, Andrew; Murray, Neil

    2006-06-01

    Following successful manufacture of small-format trial devices we have now designed and manufactured large-format scientific CCDs in high resistivity silicon ('high-rho'). These devices are intended for 'full depletion' operation as backside illuminated sensors for very high red wavelength sensitivity and X-ray imaging spectroscopy at extended energies. Devices of 2k*512 and 2k*4k format, with both single and dual stage output circuits have been manufactured and tested. Design considerations, test results, and commercial manufacturing considerations will be addressed.

  5. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and the influence of changes in chemical composition of the radiative balance of the climate system. Specifically, since the last international scientific review (1989), there have been five major advances: (1) global ozone decreases; (2) polar ozone; (3) ozone and industrial halocarbons; (4) ozone and climate relations; and (5) ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) and global warming potentials (GWP's). These topics and others are discussed.

  6. Simulations and observations of plasma depletion, ion composition, and airglow emissions in two auroral ionospheric depletion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, A. W.; Whalen, B. A.; Harris, F. R.; Gattinger, R. L.; Pongratz, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of plasma depletion, ion composition modification, and airglow emissions in the Waterhole experiments are presented. The detailed ion chemistry and airglow emission processes related to the ionospheric hole formation in the experiment are examined, and observations are compared with computer simulation results. The latter indicate that the overall depletion rates in different parts of the depletion region are governed by different parameters.

  7. Effects of the monoamine uptake inhibitors RTI-112 and RTI-113 on cocaine- and food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Negus, S S; Mello, N K; Kimmel, H L; Howell, L L; Carroll, F I

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine blocks uptake of the monoamines dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine, and monoamine uptake inhibitors constitute one class of drugs under consideration as candidate "agonist" medications for the treatment of cocaine abuse and dependence. The pharmacological selectivity of monoamine uptake inhibitors to block uptake of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine is one factor that may influence the efficacy and/or safety of these compounds as drug abuse treatment medications. To address this issue, the present study compared the effects of 7-day treatment with a non-selective monoamine uptake inhibitor (RTI-112) and a dopamine-selective uptake inhibitor (RTI-113) on cocaine- and food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys. Monkeys (N=3) were trained to respond for cocaine injections (0.01 mg/kg/inj) and food pellets under a second-order schedule [FR2(VR16:S)] during alternating daily components of cocaine and food availability. Both RTI-112 (0.0032-0.01 mg/kg/hr) and RTI-113 (0.01-0.056 mg/kg/h) produced dose-dependent, sustained and nearly complete elimination of cocaine self-administration. However, for both drugs, the potency to reduce cocaine self-administration was similar to the potency to reduce food-maintained responding. These findings do not support the hypothesis that pharmacological selectivity to block dopamine uptake is associated with behavioral selectivity to decrease cocaine- vs. food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys.

  8. Ego depletion results in an increase in spontaneous false memories.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Alberts, Hugo; Cuppens, Lesly

    2012-12-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to examine whether depleted cognitive resources might have ramifications for the formation of neutral and negative spontaneous false memories. To examine this, participants received neutral and negative Deese/Roediger-McDermott false memory wordlists. Also, for half of the participants, cognitive resources were depleted by use of an ego depletion manipulation (solving difficult calculations while being interfered with auditory noise). Our chief finding was that depleted cognitive resources made participants more vulnerable for the production of false memories. Our results shed light on how depleted cognitive resources affect neutral and negative correct and errant memories.

  9. Decline and depletion rates of oil production: a comprehensive investigation.

    PubMed

    Höök, Mikael; Davidsson, Simon; Johansson, Sheshti; Tang, Xu

    2014-01-13

    Two of the most fundamental concepts in the current debate about future oil supply are oilfield decline rates and depletion rates. These concepts are related, but not identical. This paper clarifies the definitions of these concepts, summarizes the underlying theory and empirically estimates decline and depletion rates for different categories of oilfield. A database of 880 post-peak fields is analysed to determine typical depletion levels, depletion rates and decline rates. This demonstrates that the size of oilfields has a significant influence on decline and depletion rates, with generally high values for small fields and comparatively low values for larger fields. These empirical findings have important implications for oil supply forecasting.

  10. Imaging neurotransmitter uptake and depletion in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W. |; Haydon, P.G.; Yeung, E.S.

    1997-08-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) laser-based optical microscope and charge-coupled device (CCD) detection system was used to obtain chemical images of biological cells. Subcellular structures can be easily seen in both optical and fluorescence images. Laser-induced native fluorescence detection provides high sensitivity and low limits of detection, and it does not require coupling to fluorescent dyes. We were able to quantitatively monitor serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual astrocytes on the basis of its native fluorescence. Different regions of the cells took up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of uptake kinetics. Similarly, we observed different serotonin depletion dynamics in different astrocyte regions. There were also some astrocyte areas where no serotonin uptake or depletion was observed. Potential applications include the mapping of other biogenic species in cells as well as the ability to image their release from specific regions of cells in response to external stimuli. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  11. Halocarbon ozone depletion and global warming potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Richard A.; Wuebbles, D.; Atkinson, R.; Connell, Peter S.; Dorn, H. P.; Derudder, A.; Derwent, Richard G.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Fisher, D.; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Concern over the global environmental consequences of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has created a need to determine the potential impacts of other halogenated organic compounds on stratospheric ozone and climate. The CFCs, which do not contain an H atom, are not oxidized or photolyzed in the troposphere. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere where they decompose and can lead to chlorine catalyzed ozone depletion. The hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs or HFCs), in particular those proposed as substitutes for CFCs, contain at least one hydrogen atom in the molecule, which confers on these compounds a much greater sensitivity toward oxidation by hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere, resulting in much shorter atmospheric lifetimes than CFCs, and consequently lower potential for depleting ozone. The available information is reviewed which relates to the lifetime of these compounds (HCFCs and HFCs) in the troposphere, and up-to-date assessments are reported of the potential relative effects of CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, and halons on stratospheric ozone and global climate (through 'greenhouse' global warming).

  12. Stratospheric ozone depletion and animal health.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S J

    1992-08-08

    There is an increasing concern over ozone depletion and its effects on the environment and human health. However, the increase in ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) that would result from significant losses of ozone is also potentially harmful to animals. Any increase in disease in domestic species would not only have serious animal welfare implications but may also be economically important. The diseases which are likely to increase if ozone depletion continues include the squamous cell carcinomas of the exposed, non-pigmented areas of cats, cattle, sheep and horses. Uberreiter's syndrome in dogs is also associated with exposure to UV-B and may be expected to increase, as may the severity of conditions such as infectious keratoconjunctivitis (New Forest eye) in cattle. Aquaculture systems in which fish often have little or no protection by shading may also be at risk. Cataracts and skin lesions have been associated with the exposure of farmed fish to ultraviolet radiation and have resulted in significant losses.

  13. Simultaneous determination of biogenic monoamines in rat brain dialysates using capillary high-performance liquid chromatography with photoluminescence following electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Moon Chul; Shi, Guoyue; Borland, Laura; Michael, Adrian C; Weber, Stephen G

    2006-03-15

    Simultaneous determination of biogenic monoamines such as dopamine, serotonin, and 3-methoxytyramine in brain is important in understanding neurotransmitter activity. This study presents a sensitive determination of biogenic monoamines in rat brain striatum microdialysates using capillary high-performance liquid chromatography with the photoluminescence following electron-transfer detection technique. Separation conditions were optimized by changing the concentration of an ion-interaction agent and the percentage of an organic modifier. The high concentration of ion-interaction agent enabled the amines as a class to be separated from interfering acids, but also made the separation very long. To shorten the separation time, 10% (v/v) acetonitrile was used as the organic modifier. Eight chromatographic runs during a 3-h period were analyzed in terms of retention times, peak heights, and peak widths. Chromatograms are very reproducible, with less than 1% changes in peak height over 3 h. Typical concentration detection limits at the optimum separation conditions were less than 100 pM for metabolic acids and approximately 200 pM for monoamines. The injection volume of the sample was 500 nL. Thus, the mass detection limits were less than 50 amol for metabolic acids and approximately 100 amol for monoamines. Typical separation time was less than 10 min. To validate the technique, the separation method was applied to the observation of drug-induced changes of monoamine concentrations in rat brain microdialysis samples. Local perfusion of tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, into the striatum of an anesthetized rat decreased dopamine, 3-methoxytyramine, and serotonin concentrations in dialysates. Successive monitoring of striatal dialysates at a temporal resolution of 7.7 min showed that the injection of nomifensine transiently increased dopamine and 3-methoxytyramine concentrations in rat brain dialysate.

  14. Policies on global warming and ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Green, B.

    1987-04-01

    The recent discovery of a dramatic seasonal drop in the amount of ozone over Antarctica has catalyzed concern for protection of stratospheric ozone, the layer of gas that shields the entire planet from excess ultraviolet radiation. Conservative scientific models predict about a 5% reduction in the amount of global ozone by the middle of the next century, with large local variations. The predicted global warming from increased emissions of greenhouse gases will also have differing effects on local climate and weather conditions and consequently on agriculture. Although numerous uncertainties are associated with both ozone depletion and a global warming, there is a consensus that world leaders need to address the problems. The US Congress is now beginning to take note of the task. In this article, one representative outlines some perceptions of the problems and the policy options available to Congress.

  15. Arctic Ozone Depletion from UARS MLS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of ozone during four Arctic winters are compared. The evolution of ozone in the lower stratosphere is related to temperature, chlorine monoxide (also measured by MLS), and the evolution of the polar vortex. Lagrangian transport calculations using winds from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's Stratosphere-Troposphere Data Assimilation system are used to estimate to what extent the evolution of lower stratospheric ozone is controlled by dynamics. Observations, along with calculations of the expected dynamical behavior, show evidence for chemical ozone depletion throughout most of the Arctic lower stratospheric vortex during the 1992-93 middle and late winter, and during all of the 1994-95 winter that was observed by MLS. Both of these winters were unusually cold and had unusually cold and had unusually strong Arctic polar vortices compared to meteorological data over the past 17 years.

  16. Tylosin depletion from edible pig tissues.

    PubMed

    Prats, C; El Korchi, G; Francesch, R; Arboix, M; Pérez, B

    2002-12-01

    The depletion of tylosin from edible pig tissues was studied following 5 days of intramuscular (i.m.) administration of 10 mg/kg of tylosin to 16 crossbreed pigs. Animals were slaughtered at intervals after treatment and samples of muscle, kidney, liver, skin+fat, and injection site were collected and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Seven days after the completion of treatment, the concentration of tylosin in kidney, skin+fat, and at the injection site was higher than the European Union maximal residue limit (MRL) of 100 microg/kg. Tylosin residues in all tissues were below the quantification limit (50 microg/kg) at 10 and 14 days post-treatment.

  17. Processing depleted uranium quad alloy penetrator rods

    SciTech Connect

    Bokan, S.L.

    1987-02-19

    Two depleted uranium (DU) quad alloys were cast, extruded and rolled to produce penetrator rods. The two alloy combinations were (1) 1 wt % molybdenum (Mo), 1 wt % niobium (Nb), and 0.75 wt % titanium (Ti); and (2) 1 wt % tantalum (Ta), 1 wt % Nb, and 0.75 wt % Ti. This report covers the processing and results with limited metallographic information available. The two alloys were each vacuum induction melted (VIM) into an 8-in. log, extruded into a 3-in. log, then cut into 4 logs and extruded at 4 different temperatures into 0.8-in. bars. From the 8 conditions (2 alloys, 4 extrusion temperatures each), 10 to 13 16-in. rods were cut for rolling and swaging. Due to cracking problems, the final processing changed from rolling and swaging to limited rolling and heat treating. The contracted work was completed with the delivery of 88 rods to Dr. Zabielski. 28 figs.

  18. Chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D; Otten, Edward J

    2004-03-01

    A by-product of the uranium enrichment process, depleted uranium (DU) contains approximately 40% of the radioactivity of natural uranium yet retains all of its chemical properties. After its use in the 1991 Gulf War, public concern increased regarding its potential radiotoxicant properties. Whereas in vitro and rodent data have suggested the potential for uranium-induced carcinogenesis, human cohort studies assessing the health effects of natural and DU have failed to validate these findings. Heavy-metal nephrotoxicity has not been noted in either animal studies or Gulf War veteran cohort studies despite markedly elevated urinary uranium excretion. No significant residual environmental contamination has been found in geographical areas exposed to DU. As such, although continued surveillance of exposed cohorts and environments (particularly water sources) are recommended, current data would support the position that DU poses neither a radiological nor chemical threat.

  19. Anxiety, ego depletion, and sports performance.

    PubMed

    Englert, Chris; Bertrams, Alex

    2012-10-01

    In the present article, we analyzed the role of self-control strength and state anxiety in sports performance. We tested the hypothesis that self-control strength and state anxiety interact in predicting sports performance on the basis of two studies, each using a different sports task (Study 1: performance in a basketball free throw task, N = 64; Study 2: performance in a dart task, N = 79). The patterns of results were as expected in both studies: Participants with depleted self-control strength performed worse in the specific tasks as their anxiety increased, whereas there was no significant relation for participants with fully available self-control strength. Furthermore, different degrees of available self-control strength did not predict performance in participants who were low in state anxiety, but did in participants who were high in state anxiety. Thus increasing self-control strength could reduce the negative anxiety effects in sports and improve athletes' performance under pressure.

  20. Structure-based design and synthesis of Harmine derivatives with different selectivity profiles in kinase vs monoamine oxidase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Balint, Balazs; Weber, Csaba; Cruzalegui, Francisco; Burbridge, Mike; Kotschy, Andras

    2017-03-06

    DYRK1A is an emerging biological target with implications in diverse therapeutic areas such as neurological disorders (Down syndrome in particular), metabolism, and oncology. Harmine, a natural product that selectively inhibits DYRK1A amongst kinases could serve as a tool compound to better understand the biological processes that arise from DYRK1A inhibition. On the other hand harmine is also a potent inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A). Using structure-based design we have synthesized a collection of harmine analogs with tunable selectivity towards these two enzymes. Modifications in position 7 typically decreased affinity for DYRK1A while substitution in position 9 had a similar effect on MAO-A inhibition while maintaining DYRK1A inhibition. The resulting collection of compounds can help to understand the biological role of DYRK1A and also to assess the interference in the biological effect originating in MAO-A inhibition.

  1. [Effect of phenibut on the content of monoamines, their metabolites, and neurotransmitter amino acids in rat brain structures].

    PubMed

    Borodkina, L E; Kudrin, V S; Klodt, P M; Narkevich, V B; Tiurenkov, I N

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the nootropic drug phenibut, which is a structural analog of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), on the content of monoamines, their metabolites, and neurotransmitter amino acids in brain structures have been studied on Wistar rats. It is established that a single administration of phenibut in a dose of 25 mg/kg (i.p.) produces a statistically significant increase in the content of dopamine metabolite (3,4-dioxyphenylacetic acid) and the retarding amino acid taurine in striatum. At the same time, phenibut did not significantly influence the levels of GABA, serotonin, and dopamine in various brain structures and produce a moderate decrease in the level of norepinephrine in the hippocampus.

  2. Platelet monoamine oxidase in healthy 9- and 15-years old children: the effect of gender, smoking and puberty.

    PubMed

    Harro, M; Eensoo, D; Kiive, E; Merenäkk, L; Alep, J; Oreland, L; Harro, J

    2001-11-01

    1. The effect of gender, smoking and pubertal development on platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity was described in a randomly selected, large sample of 9- and 15-years old healthy children. 2. Platelet MAO activity was measured in 1129 children by a radioenzymatic method with beta-phenylethylamine as the substrate. Smoking habits were reported in an anonymous questionnaire. Pubertal status was assessed visually using Tanner's stages. 3. Boys, younger children and smokers had significantly lower platelet MAO activity than girls, older children and non-smokers, respectively. Girls in Tanner's stage V for breast and pubic hair development had significantly lower MAO than girls in stage IV. 4. Differences in gender, age, pubertal status and smoking habits must be taken into account if the relationship between platelet MAO activity, personality and psychiatric disorders is studied in children.

  3. Hydralazine is involved in tele-methylhistamine metabolism by inhibiting monoamine oxidase B in pregnancy-associated hypertensive mice.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Shohei; Kako, Koichiro; Nagashima, Yusuke; Kanou, Akihiko; Ishida, Junji; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2017-01-07

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy globally affect 6-8% of gestation and remain a major cause of both foetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. However, the antihypertensive medications for the patients of this disease are strictly limited due to the teratogenic potentials. Here, we found that tele-methylhistamine (tMH) increased in response to the administration of hydralazine (Hdz), a vasodilative agent, in the pregnancy-associated hypertensive (PAH) mice. Hdz abrogated the degradation of tMH catalyzed by monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) in vitro These results suggested that Hdz inhibited the MAO-B activity and consequently tMH increased in the maternal circulation of PAH mice.

  4. New insights into the biological properties of Crocus sativus L.: chemical modifications, human monoamine oxidases inhibition and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    De Monte, Celeste; Carradori, Simone; Chimenti, Paola; Secci, Daniela; Mannina, Luisa; Alcaro, Francesca; Petzer, Anél; N'Da, Clarina I; Gidaro, Maria Concetta; Costa, Giosuè; Alcaro, Stefano; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2014-07-23

    Although there are clinical trials and in vivo studies in literature regarding the anxiolytic and antidepressant activities of the components of Crocus sativus L., their effects on the human monoamine oxidases (hMAO-A and hMAO-B), enzymes which are involved in mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases, have not yet been investigated. We have thus examined the hMAO inhibitory activities of crocin and safranal (the most important active principles in saffron) and, subsequently, designed a series of safranal derivatives to evaluate which chemical modifications confer enhanced inhibition of the hMAO isoforms. Docking simulations were performed in order to identify key molecular recognitions of these inhibitors with both isoforms of hMAO. In this regard, different mechanisms of action were revealed. This study concludes that safranal and crocin represent useful leads for the discovery of novel hMAO inhibitors for the clinical management of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Modelling chemical depletion profiles in regolith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, S.L.; Bandstra, J.; Moore, J.; White, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical or mineralogical profiles in regolith display reaction fronts that document depletion of leachable elements or minerals. A generalized equation employing lumped parameters was derived to model such ubiquitously observed patterns:C = frac(C0, frac(C0 - Cx = 0, Cx = 0) exp (??ini ?? over(k, ??) ?? x) + 1)Here C, Cx = 0, and Co are the concentrations of an element at a given depth x, at the top of the reaction front, or in parent respectively. ??ini is the roughness of the dissolving mineral in the parent and k???? is a lumped kinetic parameter. This kinetic parameter is an inverse function of the porefluid advective velocity and a direct function of the dissolution rate constant times mineral surface area per unit volume regolith. This model equation fits profiles of concentration versus depth for albite in seven weathering systems and is consistent with the interpretation that the surface area (m2 mineral m- 3 bulk regolith) varies linearly with the concentration of the dissolving mineral across the front. Dissolution rate constants can be calculated from the lumped fit parameters for these profiles using observed values of weathering advance rate, the proton driving force, the geometric surface area per unit volume regolith and parent concentration of albite. These calculated values of the dissolution rate constant compare favorably to literature values. The model equation, useful for reaction fronts in both steady-state erosional and quasi-stationary non-erosional systems, incorporates the variation of reaction affinity using pH as a master variable. Use of this model equation to fit depletion fronts for soils highlights the importance of buffering of pH in the soil system. Furthermore, the equation should allow better understanding of the effects of important environmental variables on weathering rates. ?? 2008.

  6. Human podocyte depletion in association with older age and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Puelles, Victor G; Cullen-McEwen, Luise A; Taylor, Georgina E; Li, Jinhua; Hughson, Michael D; Kerr, Peter G; Hoy, Wendy E; Bertram, John F

    2016-04-01

    Podocyte depletion plays a major role in the development and progression of glomerulosclerosis. Many kidney diseases are more common in older age and often coexist with hypertension. We hypothesized that podocyte depletion develops in association with older age and is exacerbated by hypertension. Kidneys from 19 adult Caucasian American males without overt renal disease were collected at autopsy in Mississippi. Demographic data were obtained from medical and autopsy records. Subjects were categorized by age and hypertension as potential independent and additive contributors to podocyte depletion. Design-based stereology was used to estimate individual glomerular volume and total podocyte number per glomerulus, which allowed the calculation of podocyte density (number per volume). Podocyte depletion was defined as a reduction in podocyte number (absolute depletion) or podocyte density (relative depletion). The cortical location of glomeruli (outer or inner cortex) and presence of parietal podocytes were also recorded. Older age was an independent contributor to both absolute and relative podocyte depletion, featuring glomerular hypertrophy, podocyte loss, and thus reduced podocyte density. Hypertension was an independent contributor to relative podocyte depletion by exacerbating glomerular hypertrophy, mostly in glomeruli from the inner cortex. However, hypertension was not associated with podocyte loss. Absolute and relative podocyte depletion were exacerbated by the combination of older age and hypertension. The proportion of glomeruli with parietal podocytes increased with age but not with hypertension alone. These findings demonstrate that older age and hypertension are independent and additive contributors to podocyte depletion in white American men without kidney disease.

  7. Not All Antidepressants Are Created Equal: Differential Effects of Monoamine Uptake Inhibitors on Effort-Related Choice Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yohn, Samantha E; Collins, Samantha L; Contreras-Mora, Hector M; Errante, Emily L; Rowland, Margaret A; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-01-01

    Motivated behavior can be characterized by behavioral activation and high work output. Moreover, people with depression and other disorders show effort-related motivational symptoms, such as anergia, psychomotor retardation, and fatigue. Effort-based decision making is studied using tasks offering choices between high effort options leading to highly valued reinforcers vs low effort/low reward options, and such tasks could be useful as animal models of motivational symptoms. In the present studies the effort-related effects of the vesicular monoamine transport (VMAT-2) inhibitor tetrabenazine (TBZ) were investigated. TBZ blocks vesicular storage and also produces depressive symptoms in humans. Moreover, TBZ alters effort-based choice in rats, biasing animals toward low effort alternatives. The present studies investigated the ability of acute administration of various monoamine uptake inhibitors to reverse the effects of TBZ. Effort-related effects of TBZ were attenuated by the catecholamine uptake inhibitor and antidepressant bupropion, and this effect of bupropion was reversed by either D1 or D2 family antagonism. The effort-related effects of TBZ were also attenuated by the selective dopamine uptake blocker GBR12909. The 5-HT uptake inhibitor fluoxetine and the norepinephrine uptake inhibitor desipramine failed to reverse the effects of TBZ, and higher doses of these drugs, given alone or in combination with TBZ, led to further behavioral impairments. These results indicate that drugs acting on dopamine transmission are relatively effective at reversing the effort-related effects of TBZ, and are consistent with the hypothesis that drugs that enhance dopamine transmission may be effective at treating effort-related psychiatric symptoms in humans. PMID:26105139

  8. The monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor tranylcypromine enhances nicotine self-administration in rats through a mechanism independent of MAO inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Arnold, Monica M; Hogenkamp, Derk J; Gee, Kelvin W; Belluzzi, James D; Leslie, Frances M

    2011-01-01

    Our current study aims to evaluate the mechanisms of tranylcypromine (TCP)-mediated enhancement of nicotine self-administration. We replicated our previous findings which demonstrate that 1 h pretreatment with TCP (3 mg/kg, i.p.) enhances nicotine self-administration (7.5 μg/kg/inj, i.v.) when compared with vehicle-treated rodents. We tested whether TCP-mediated enhancement of nicotine self-administration was due to MAO inhibition or off-target effects by (i) extending the TCP pretreatment time from 1 to 20 h, and (ii) evaluating the role of the individual TCP stereoisomers in nicotine self-administration studies. While 20 h and (-)TCP pretreatment induced significant inhibition of MAO (60-90%), animals found nicotine only weakly reinforcing. Furthermore, while both (+) and (±)TCP treatment induced nearly 100% MAO inhibition, (+)TCP pretreated animals took longer to acquire nicotine self-administration compared to (±)TCP pretreated animals. Stable nicotine self-administration in (+)TCP pretreated animals was influenced by nicotinic receptor activation but not nicotine-paired cues. The opposite was found in (±)TCP pretreated animals. Treatment with (-) or (±)TCP increased dopamine and serotonin overflow, while the (+) and (±)TCP treatment enhanced monoamine overflow subsequent to nicotine. Together, our data suggests TCP enhancement of nicotine self-administration are mediated through mechanisms independent of MAO inhibition, including nicotine-paired cues and monoamine uptake inhibition.

  9. Selective suppression of cocaine- versus food-maintained responding by monoamine releasers in rhesus monkeys: benzylpiperazine, (+)phenmetrazine, and 4-benzylpiperidine.

    PubMed

    Negus, S S; Baumann, M H; Rothman, R B; Mello, N K; Blough, B E

    2009-04-01

    Monoamine releasers constitute one class of drugs currently under investigation as potential agonist medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence. The efficacy and safety of monoamine releasers as candidate medications may be influenced in part by their relative potency to release dopamine and serotonin, and we reported previously that releasers with approximately 30-fold selectivity for dopamine versus serotonin release may be especially promising. The present study examined the effects of the releasers benzylpiperazine, (+)phenmetrazine, and 4-benzylpiperidine, which have 20- to 48-fold selectivity in vitro for releasing dopamine versus serotonin. In an assay of cocaine discrimination, rhesus monkeys were trained to discriminate 0.4 mg/kg i.m. cocaine from saline in a two-key, food-reinforced procedure. Each of the releasers produced a dose- and time-dependent substitution for cocaine. 4-Benzylpiperidine had the most rapid onset and shortest duration of action. Phenmetrazine and benzylpiperazine had slower onsets and longer durations of action. In an assay of cocaine self-administration, rhesus monkeys were trained to respond for cocaine injections and food pellets under a second order schedule. Treatment for 7 days with each of the releasers produced a dose-dependent and selective reduction in self-administration of cocaine (0.01 mg/kg/injection). The most selective effects were produced by phenmetrazine. Phenmetrazine also produced a downward shift in the cocaine self-administration dose effect curve, virtually eliminating responding maintained by a 30-fold range of cocaine doses (0.0032-0.1 mg/kg/injection) while having only small and transient effects on food-maintained responding. These findings support the potential utility of dopamine-selective releasers as candidate treatments for cocaine dependence.

  10. The effect of venlafaxine on behaviour, body weight and striatal monoamine levels on sleep-deprived female rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Ricardo A; Cunha, Geanne M A; Borges, Karla Daisy M; de Bruin, Gabriela S; dos Santos-Filho, Emídio A; Viana, Glauce S B; de Bruin, Veralice M S

    2004-11-01

    Partial sleep deprivation is clinically associated with fatigue, depressive symptoms and reduced memory. Previously, it has been demonstrated that venlafaxine, an atypical antidepressant, increases the levels of noradrenaline and serotonin in rat hippocampus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of venlafaxine on depression, anxiety, locomotor activity and memory in a model of REM sleep (REMs) deprivation in rats. We have also studied the influence of venlafaxine on monoamine levels in the striatum. Six groups of animals (N=20 each) were treated with saline or venlafaxine (1 or 10 mg/kg) during 10 days, submitted or not to REMs deprivation and studied with the forced swimming test of Porsolt (STP), plus-maze, passive avoidance and open-field tests right after sleep deprivation. Animals were also studied for passive avoidance 24 h later (rebound period). Brain samples for monoamine measurements were collected either immediately after REMs deprivation or after 24 h. Both REMs deprivation and venlafaxine showed an antidepressant effect. An anxiolytic effect was also observed after REMs deprivation. Previous treatment with venlafaxine blocked the antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of REMs deprivation. REMs deprivation alone and treatment with venlafaxine 10 mg/kg increased locomotor activity, and this effect was inhibited by venlafaxine in REMs deprived rats. Both venlafaxine treatment and REMs deprivation induced weight loss. Venlafaxine treatment, but not REMs deprivation, induced an increase in striatal dopamine (DA) levels. The combination of REMs deprivation and venlafaxine treatment was associated with an increase in serotonin turnover 24 h after rebound sleep. In this study, venlafaxine treatment hindered most behavioral effects of REMs deprivation and was associated with an interference on dopamine and serotonin systems in the striatum.

  11. Metformin Transport by a Newly Cloned Proton-Stimulated Organic Cation Transporter (Plasma Membrane Monoamine Transporter) Expressed in Human Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mingyan; Xia, Li; Wang, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used oral antihyperglycemic drug for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. The intestinal absorption of metformin is dose-dependent and involves an active, saturable uptake process. Metformin has been shown to be transported by the human organic cation transporters 1 and 2 (hOCT1–2). We recently cloned and characterized a novel proton-activated organic cation transporter, plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT). We previously showed that PMAT transports many classic organic cations (e.g., monoamine neurotransmitters, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium) in a pH-dependent manner and its mRNA is expressed in multiple human tissues. The goal of this study is to investigate whether metformin is a substrate of PMAT and whether PMAT plays a role in the intestinal uptake of metformin. Using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells stably expressing human PMAT, we showed that metformin is avidly transported by PMAT, with an apparent affinity (Km = 1.32 mM) comparable to those reported for hOCT1–2. Interestingly, the concentration-velocity profile of PMAT-mediated metformin uptake is sigmoidal, with a Hill coefficient of 2.64. PMAT-mediated metformin transport is greatly stimulated by acidic pH, with the uptake rate being ~4-fold higher at pH 6.6 than at pH 7.4. Using a polyclonal antibody against PMAT, we showed that the PMAT protein (58 kDa) was expressed in human small intestine and concentrated on the tips of the mucosal epithelial layer. Taken together, our results suggest that PMAT transports metformin, is expressed in human intestine, and may play a role in the intestinal absorption of metformin and possibly other cationic drugs. PMID:17600084

  12. Decreased vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and dopamine transporter (DAT) function in knockout mice affects aging of dopaminergic systems

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. S.; Itokawa, K.; Schmitt, A.; Moessner, R.; Sora, I.; Lesch, K. P.; Uhl, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is accumulated and compartmentalized by the dopamine transporter (DAT; SLC3A6) and the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; SLC18A2). These transporters work at the plasma and vesicular membranes of dopaminergic neurons, respectively, and thus regulate levels of DA in neuronal compartments that include the extravesicular cytoplasmic compartment. DA in this compartment has been hypothesized to contribute to oxidative damage that can reduce the function of dopaminergic neurons in aging brains and may contribute to reductions in dopaminergic neurochemical markers, locomotor behavior and responses to dopaminergic drugs that are found in aged animals. The studies reported here examined aged mice with heterozygous deletions of VMAT2 or of DAT, which each reduce transporter expression to about 50% of levels found in wild-type (WT) mice. Aged mice displayed reduced locomotor responses under a variety of circumstances, including in response to locomotor stimulants, as well as changes in monoamine levels and metabolites in a regionally dependent manner. Several effects of aging were more pronounced in heterozygous VMAT2 knockout (KO) mice, including aging induced reductions in locomotion and reduced locomotor responses to cocaine. By contrast, some effects of aging were reduced or not observed in heterozygous DAT KO mice. These findings support the idea that altered DAT and VMAT2 expression affect age-related changes in dopaminergic function. These effects are most likely mediated by alterations in DA compartmentalization, and might be hypothesized to be more exacerbated by other factors that affect the metabolism of cytosolic DA. PMID:23978383

  13. Type A and B monoamine oxidase in age-related neurodegenerative disorders: their distinct roles in neuronal death and survival.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Makoto; Maruyama, Wakako; Inaba-Hasegawa, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, type B monoamine oxidase (MAO-B) has been proposed to play a primary role though generating reactive oxygen species in oxidation of monoamine substrates. MAO-B oxidizes MPTP into MPP+, and an MAO-B inhibitor, deprenyl, prevents the MPTP oxidation and also MPP+neutotoxicity. These results suggest the association of MAO-B with neuronal death in neurodegenerative disorders. On the other hand, deprenyl and rasagiline, selective MAO-B inhibitors, have been proved to protect neuronal cells in cellular and animal models of neurodegeneration. These inhibitors decrease oxidation of the substrates, scavenge oxygen radicals, intervene apoptosis signal pathway in mitochondria and induce pro-survival genes coding anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors. However, the association of MAO-B itself with the neuroprotective function of MAO-B inhibitors remains enigmatic. Recently, the involvement of type A MAO (MAO-A) in neuronal death has been shown by upregulation MAO-A expression in cellular models. MAO-A is a target of an endogenous neurotoxin, Nmethyl( R)salsolinol, and MAO-A knockdown (KO) with short interfering (si)RNA protects neuronal death from apoptosis. In addition, MAO-A mediates the increased expression of genes for anti-apoptotic, pro-survival Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors by MAO-B inhibitors, whereas MAO-B doe not. In this review, we present our recent results on the novel role of MAO-A and MAO-B in neuronal death and also in the neuroprotective gene induction by MAO inhibitors. The future development of new series of neuroprotective drugs is discussed among compounds, which have high affinity to MAO-A and can induce pro-survival genes. MAO-A is expected to play a role in disease-modifying therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. Not All Antidepressants Are Created Equal: Differential Effects of Monoamine Uptake Inhibitors on Effort-Related Choice Behavior.

    PubMed

    Yohn, Samantha E; Collins, Samantha L; Contreras-Mora, Hector M; Errante, Emily L; Rowland, Margaret A; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-02-01

    Motivated behavior can be characterized by behavioral activation and high work output. Moreover, people with depression and other disorders show effort-related motivational symptoms, such as anergia, psychomotor retardation, and fatigue. Effort-based decision making is studied using tasks offering choices between high effort options leading to highly valued reinforcers vs low effort/low reward options, and such tasks could be useful as animal models of motivational symptoms. In the present studies the effort-related effects of the vesicular monoamine transport (VMAT-2) inhibitor tetrabenazine (TBZ) were investigated. TBZ blocks vesicular storage and also produces depressive symptoms in humans. Moreover, TBZ alters effort-based choice in rats, biasing animals toward low effort alternatives. The present studies investigated the ability of acute administration of various monoamine uptake inhibitors to reverse the effects of TBZ. Effort-related effects of TBZ were attenuated by the catecholamine uptake inhibitor and antidepressant bupropion, and this effect of bupropion was reversed by either D1 or D2 family antagonism. The effort-related effects of TBZ were also attenuated by the selective dopamine uptake blocker GBR12909. The 5-HT uptake inhibitor fluoxetine and the norepinephrine uptake inhibitor desipramine failed to reverse the effects of TBZ, and higher doses of these drugs, given alone or in combination with TBZ, led to further behavioral impairments. These results indicate that drugs acting on dopamine transmission are relatively effective at reversing the effort-related effects of TBZ, and are consistent with the hypothesis that drugs that enhance dopamine transmission may be effective at treating effort-related psychiatric symptoms in humans.

  15. Ropren(®) treatment reverses anxiety-like behavior and monoamines levels in gonadectomized rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fedotova, Julia; Soultanov, Vagif; Nikitina, Tamara; Roschin, Victor; Ordyan, Natalia; Hritcu, Lucian

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies indicated that reduced androgen levels may contribute to both physical and cognitive disorders in men, including Alzheimer's disease. New drug candidates for Alzheimer's disease in patients with androgen deficiency should ideally be able to act not only on multiple brain targets but also to correct impaired endocrine functions in hypogonadal men with Alzheimer's disease. Ropren(®) is one such candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in men with an imbalance of androgens. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to examine the effects of long-term Ropren(®) administration (8.6mg/kg, orally, once daily, for 28 days) on the anxiety-like behavior and monoamines levels in the rat hippocampus using a β-amyloid (25-35) rat model of Alzheimer's disease following gonadectomy. Ropren(®) was administered to the gonadectomized (GDX) rats and GDX rats treated with testosterone propionate (TP, 0.5mg/kg, subcutaneous, once daily, for 28 days). Anxiety-like behavior was assessed in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and the light-dark test (LDT), locomotor and grooming activities were assessed in the open field test (OFT). Ropren(®) alone or in combination with TP-induced anxiolytic effects as evidenced in the EPM and in the LDT and increased locomotor activity in the OFT. Additionally, it was observed that dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels increased while 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA)/5-HT ratio in the hippocampus decreased. Our results indicate that Ropren(®) has a marked anxiolytic-like action due to an increase in the monoamines levels in the experimental rat model of Alzheimer's disease with altered levels of androgens.

  16. Brief mindfulness induction could reduce aggression after depletion.

    PubMed

    Yusainy, Cleoputri; Lawrence, Claire

    2015-05-01

    Many experiments have shown that one's ability to refrain from acting on aggressive impulses is likely to decrease following a prior act of self-control. This temporary state of self-control failure is known as ego-depletion. Although mindfulness is increasingly used to treat and manage aggressive behaviour, the extent to which mindfulness may counteract the depletion effect on aggression is yet to be determined. This study (N=110) investigated the effect of a laboratory induced one-time mindfulness meditation session on aggression following depletion. Aggression was assessed by the intensity of aversive noise blast participants delivered to an opponent on a computerised task. Depleted participants who received mindfulness induction behaved less aggressively than depleted participants with no mindfulness induction. Mindfulness also improved performance on a second measure of self-control (i.e., handgrip perseverance); however, this effect was independent of depletion condition. Motivational factors may help explain the dynamics of mindfulness, self-control, and aggression.

  17. ELEMENTAL DEPLETIONS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS AND THE EVOLUTION OF DEPLETIONS WITH METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Meixner, Margaret; Seale, Jonathan; Fox, Andrew; Friedman, Scott D.; Dwek, Eli; Galliano, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    We present a study of the composition of gas and dust in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) using UV absorption spectroscopy. We measure P ii and Fe ii along 84 spatially distributed sightlines toward the MCs using archival Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer observations. For 16 of those sightlines, we also measure Si ii, Cr ii, and Zn ii from new Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations. We analyze these spectra using a new spectral line analysis technique based on a semi-parametric Voigt profile model. We have combined these measurements with H i and H{sub 2} column densities and reference stellar abundances from the literature to derive gas-phase abundances, depletions, and gas-to-dust ratios (GDRs). Of our 84 P and 16 Zn measurements, 80 and 13, respectively, are depleted by more than 0.1 dex, suggesting that P and Zn abundances are not accurate metallicity indicators at and above the metallicity of the SMC. Si, Cr, and Fe are systematically less depleted in the SMC than in the Milky Way (MW) or LMC. The minimum Si depletion in the SMC is consistent with zero. We find GDR ranges of 190–565 in the LMC and 480–2100 in the SMC, which is broadly consistent with GDRs from the literature. These ranges represent actual location to location variation and are evidence of dust destruction and/or growth in the diffuse neutral phase of the interstellar medium. Where they overlap in metallicity, the gas-phase abundances of the MW, LMC, and SMC and damped Lyα systems evolve similarly with metallicity.

  18. Gas generation matrix depletion quality assurance project plan

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to provide the necessary expertise, experience, equipment and instrumentation, and management structure to: Conduct the matrix depletion experiments using simulated waste for quantifying matrix depletion effects; and Conduct experiments on 60 cylinders containing simulated TRU waste to determine the effects of matrix depletion on gas generation for transportation. All work for the Gas Generation Matrix Depletion (GGMD) experiment is performed according to the quality objectives established in the test plan and under this Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP).

  19. Producing, Importing, and Exporting Ozone-Depleting Substances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Overview page provides links to information on producing, importing, and exporting ozone-depleting substances, including information about the HCFC allowance system, importing, labeling, recordkeeping and reporting.

  20. Regret causes ego-depletion and finding benefits in the regrettable events alleviates ego-depletion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongmei; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fang; Xu, Yan; Hong, Ying-Yi; Jiang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that experiencing regret would result in ego-depletion, while finding benefits (i.e., "silver linings") in the regret-eliciting events counteracted the ego-depletion effect. Using a modified gambling paradigm (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and a retrospective method (Experiments 3 and 5), five experiments were conducted to induce regret. Results revealed that experiencing regret undermined performance on subsequent tasks, including a paper-and-pencil calculation task (Experiment 1), a Stroop task (Experiment 2), and a mental arithmetic task (Experiment 3). Furthermore, finding benefits in the regret-eliciting events improved subsequent performance (Experiments 4 and 5), and this improvement was mediated by participants' perceived vitality (Experiment 4). This study extended the depletion model of self-regulation by considering emotions with self-conscious components (in our case, regret). Moreover, it provided a comprehensive understanding of how people felt and performed after experiencing regret and after finding benefits in the events that caused the regret.

  1. If ego depletion cannot be studied using identical tasks, it is not ego depletion.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that human self-control capacities are fueled by glucose has been challenged on multiple grounds. A recent study by Lange and Eggert adds to this criticism by presenting two powerful but unsuccessful attempts to replicate the effect of sugar drinks on ego depletion. The dual-task paradigms employed in these experiments have been criticized for involving identical self-control tasks, a methodology that has been argued to reduce participants' willingness to exert self-control. The present article addresses this criticism by demonstrating that there is no indication to believe that the study of glucose effects on ego depletion should be restricted to paradigms using dissimilar acts of self-control. Failures to observe such effects in paradigms involving identical tasks pose a serious problem to the proposal that self-control exhaustion might be reversed by rinsing or ingesting glucose. In combination with analyses of statistical credibility, the experiments by Lange and Eggert suggest that the influence of sugar on ego depletion has been systematically overestimated.

  2. Thermal stress depletes energy reserves in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Klepsatel, Peter; Gáliková, Martina; Xu, Yanjun; Kühnlein, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how environmental temperature affects metabolic and physiological functions is of crucial importance to assess the impacts of climate change on organisms. Here, we used different laboratory strains and a wild-caught population of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to examine the effect of temperature on the body energy reserves of an ectothermic organism. We found that permanent ambient temperature elevation or transient thermal stress causes significant depletion of body fat stores. Surprisingly, transient thermal stress induces a lasting “memory effect” on body fat storage, which also reduces survivorship of the flies upon food deprivation later after stress exposure. Functional analyses revealed that an intact heat-shock response is essential to protect flies from temperature-dependent body fat decline. Moreover, we found that the temperature-dependent body fat reduction is caused at least in part by apoptosis of fat body cells, which might irreversibly compromise the fat storage capacity of the flies. Altogether, our results provide evidence that thermal stress has a significant negative impact on organismal energy reserves, which in turn might affect individual fitness. PMID:27641694

  3. Ozone depletion: 20 Years after the alarm

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-15

    Scientific curiosity in 1973 led to the challenge of determining the ultimate atmospheric fate of the chlorofluoromethanes, CFC-11 (CCl[sub 3]F) and CFC-12 (CCl[sub 2]F[sub 2]), whose presence at measurable levels in surface air had been detected only two years earlier. In retrospect, the decision to pursue the chemistry of CFC molecules to their final destruction and beyond foreordained an unusual outcome because CFCs are chemically inert and easily survive under almost all natural conditions. By midsummer 1994, the world is well on its way in transition to a CFC-free economy, although not yet to a CFC-free atmosphere. The rates of increase in atmospheric concentration for the three major CFCs (CFC-11, -12, and -113) have all slowed markedly in response to the restrictions of the revised Montreal protocol. Because of their long lifetimes, however, significant but gradually diminishing quantities of CFCs will remain in the atmosphere throughout the 21st century. Atomic chlorine will continue to be released into the stratosphere as long as CFCs persist, and ozone depletion will follow. The existence of the Montreal protocol and the agreement among industrial, governmental, and university scientists on its wisdom offers considerable promise for the handling of future global environmental problems.

  4. Ichnologic signature of oxygen-depleted deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdale, A.A.; Mason, T.R.

    1987-05-01

    The sedimentologic record of oxygen-poor depositional environments commonly includes trace fossils, especially those produced by deposit-feeding organisms that must have had broad oxygen tolerances. Endostratal fodinichnial and pascichnial traces indicate lack of oxygen within the substrate. Complex fodinichnia, such as Chondrites and Zoophycos, may form in anoxic sediment some distance below the water-sediment interface. The deposit-feeding animals can circulate oxygenated bottom water from the sea floor down through semipermanent shafts to permit respiration while they feed on unoxidized organic matter in the subsurface. Endostratal pascichnia, such as Helminthoida and Spirophycus, typically lack a continuous connection with the water-sediment interface, so interstitial water cannot be totally devoid of oxygen or else the animals cannot respire. However, endostratal pascichnia normally do not occur in oxidized sediment where digestible organic detritus has decomposed completely. In totally oxidized substrates, which typify higher energy depositional environments, permanent dwellings (domichnia) of filter-feeding organisms predominate. The ichnologic signature of oxygen-depleted deposits is a very high-density, very low-diversity association of deposit-feeding trace fossils. They suggest an oxygen-controlled trace fossil model in which increasing oxygen concentration of the interstitial water parallels a transition from fodinichnia-dominated through pascichnia-dominated to domichnia-dominated trace fossil associations. This model provides an alternative to the more traditional depth-controlled trace fossil distribution model in certain situations.

  5. Levels of depleted uranium in Kosovo soils.

    PubMed

    Sansone, U; Stellato, L; Jia, G; Rosamilia, S; Gaudino, S; Barbizzi, S; Belli, M

    2001-01-01

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has performed a field survey at 11 sites located in Kosovo, where depleted uranium (DU) ammunitions were used by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) during the last Balkans conflict (1999). Soil sampling was performed to assess the spread of DU ground contamination around and within the NATO target sites and the migration of DU along the soil profile. The 234U/238U and 235U/238U activity concentration ratios have been used as an indicator of natural against anthropogenic sources of uranium. The results show that levels of 238U activity concentrations in soils above 100 Bq x kg(-1) can be considered a 'tracer' of the presence of DU in soils. The results also indicate that detectable ground surface contamination by DU is limited to areas within a few metres from localised points of concentrated contamination caused by penetrator impacts. Vertical distribution of DU along the soil profile is measurable up to a depth of 10-20 cm. This latter aspect is of particular relevance for the potential risk of future contamination of groundwater.

  6. Thermal stress depletes energy reserves in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Klepsatel, Peter; Gáliková, Martina; Xu, Yanjun; Kühnlein, Ronald P

    2016-09-19

    Understanding how environmental temperature affects metabolic and physiological functions is of crucial importance to assess the impacts of climate change on organisms. Here, we used different laboratory strains and a wild-caught population of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to examine the effect of temperature on the body energy reserves of an ectothermic organism. We found that permanent ambient temperature elevation or transient thermal stress causes significant depletion of body fat stores. Surprisingly, transient thermal stress induces a lasting "memory effect" on body fat storage, which also reduces survivorship of the flies upon food deprivation later after stress exposure. Functional analyses revealed that an intact heat-shock response is essential to protect flies from temperature-dependent body fat decline. Moreover, we found that the temperature-dependent body fat reduction is caused at least in part by apoptosis of fat body cells, which might irreversibly compromise the fat storage capacity of the flies. Altogether, our results provide evidence that thermal stress has a significant negative impact on organismal energy reserves, which in turn might affect individual fitness.

  7. Preventing NAD+ Depletion Protects Neurons against Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Pitta, Michael; Mattson, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Neurons are excitable cells that require large amounts of energy to support their survival and functions and are therefore prone to excitotoxicity, which involves energy depletion. By examining bioenergetic changes induced by glutamate, we found that the cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) level is a critical determinant of neuronal survival. The bioenergetic effects of mitochondrial uncoupling and caloric restriction were also examined in cultured neurons and rodent brain. 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP) is a chemical mitochondrial uncoupler that stimulates glucose uptake and oxygen consumption on cultured neurons, which accelerates oxidation of NAD(P)H to NAD+ in mitochondria. The NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase sirtulin 1 (SIRT1) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) mRNA are upregulated mouse brain under caloric restriction. To examine whether NAD+ mediates neuroprotective effects, nicotinamide, a precursor of NAD+ and inhibitor of SIRT1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) (two NAD+-dependent enzymes), was employed. Nicotinamide attenuated excitotoxic death and preserved cellular NAD+ levels to support SIRT1 and PARP 1 activities. Our findings suggest that mild mitochondrial uncoupling and caloric restriction exert hormetic effects by stimulating bioenergetics in neurons thereby increasing tolerance of neurons to metabolic stress. PMID:19076449

  8. Recovery of Depleted Uranium Fragments from Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, C.P.; Alecksen, T.J.; Heronimus, R.S.; Simonds, M.H.; Farrar, D.R.; Baker, K.R.; Miller, M.L.

    2008-07-01

    A cost-effective method was demonstrated for recovering depleted uranium (DU) fragments from soil. A compacted clean soil pad was prepared adjacent to a pile of soil containing DU fragments. Soil from the contaminated pile was placed on the pad in three-inch lifts using conventional construction equipment. Each lift was scanned with an automatic scanning system consisting of an array of radiation detectors coupled to a detector positioning system. The data were downloaded into ArcGIS for data presentation. Areas of the pad exhibiting scaler counts above the decision level were identified as likely locations of DU fragments. The coordinates of these locations were downloaded into a PDA that was wirelessly connected to the positioning system. The PDA guided technicians to the locations where hand-held trowels and shovels were used to remove the fragments. After DU removal, the affected areas were re-scanned and the new data patched into the data base to replace the original data. This new data set along with soil sample results served as final status survey data. (authors)

  9. Podocyte Depletion in Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Su Q.; Afshinnia, Farsad; Kershaw, David; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    The proximate genetic cause of both Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome (AS) is abnormal α3, 4 and 5 collagen IV chains resulting in abnormal glomerular basement membrane (GBM) structure/function. We previously reported that podocyte detachment rate measured in urine is increased in AS, suggesting that podocyte depletion could play a role in causing progressive loss of kidney function. To test this hypothesis podometric parameters were measured in 26 kidney biopsies from 21 patients aged 2–17 years with a clinic-pathologic diagnosis including both classic Alport Syndrome with thin and thick GBM segments and lamellated lamina densa [n = 15] and Thin GBM cases [n = 6]. Protocol biopsies from deceased donor kidneys were used as age-matched controls. Podocyte depletion was present in AS biopsies prior to detectable histologic abnormalities. No abnormality was detected by light microscopy at <30% podocyte depletion, minor pathologic changes (mesangial expansion and adhesions to Bowman’s capsule) were present at 30–50% podocyte depletion, and FSGS was progressively present above 50% podocyte depletion. eGFR did not change measurably until >70% podocyte depletion. Low level proteinuria was an early event at about 25% podocyte depletion and increased in proportion to podocyte depletion. These quantitative data parallel those from model systems where podocyte depletion is the causative event. This result supports a hypothesis that in AS podocyte adherence to the GBM is defective resulting in accelerated podocyte detachment causing progressive podocyte depletion leading to FSGS-like pathologic changes and eventual End Stage Kidney Disease. Early intervention to reduce podocyte depletion is projected to prolong kidney survival in AS. PMID:27192434

  10. Podocyte Depletion in Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wickman, Larysa; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Wang, Su Q; Afshinnia, Farsad; Kershaw, David; Wiggins, Roger C

    2016-01-01

    The proximate genetic cause of both Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome (AS) is abnormal α3, 4 and 5 collagen IV chains resulting in abnormal glomerular basement membrane (GBM) structure/function. We previously reported that podocyte detachment rate measured in urine is increased in AS, suggesting that podocyte depletion could play a role in causing progressive loss of kidney function. To test this hypothesis podometric parameters were measured in 26 kidney biopsies from 21 patients aged 2-17 years with a clinic-pathologic diagnosis including both classic Alport Syndrome with thin and thick GBM segments and lamellated lamina densa [n = 15] and Thin GBM cases [n = 6]. Protocol biopsies from deceased donor kidneys were used as age-matched controls. Podocyte depletion was present in AS biopsies prior to detectable histologic abnormalities. No abnormality was detected by light microscopy at <30% podocyte depletion, minor pathologic changes (mesangial expansion and adhesions to Bowman's capsule) were present at 30-50% podocyte depletion, and FSGS was progressively present above 50% podocyte depletion. eGFR did not change measurably until >70% podocyte depletion. Low level proteinuria was an early event at about 25% podocyte depletion and increased in proportion to podocyte depletion. These quantitative data parallel those from model systems where podocyte depletion is the causative event. This result supports a hypothesis that in AS podocyte adherence to the GBM is defective resulting in accelerated podocyte detachment causing progressive podocyte depletion leading to FSGS-like pathologic changes and eventual End Stage Kidney Disease. Early intervention to reduce podocyte depletion is projected to prolong kidney survival in AS.

  11. Transient Treg depletion enhances therapeutic anti‐cancer vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Wayne J.; Chee, Jonathan; Khong, Andrea; Cleaver, Amanda L.; Solin, Jessica N.; Ma, Shaokang; Lesterhuis, W. Joost; Dick, Ian; Holt, Robert A.; Creaney, Jenette; Boon, Louis; Robinson, Bruce; Lake, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Regulatory T cells (Treg) play an important role in suppressing anti‐ immunity and their depletion has been linked to improved outcomes. To better understand the role of Treg in limiting the efficacy of anti‐cancer immunity, we used a Diphtheria toxin (DTX) transgenic mouse model to specifically target and deplete Treg. Methods Tumor bearing BALB/c FoxP3.dtr transgenic mice were subjected to different treatment protocols, with or without Treg depletion and tumor growth and survival monitored. Results DTX specifically depleted Treg in a transient, dose‐dependent manner. Treg depletion correlated with delayed tumor growth, increased effector T cell (Teff) activation, and enhanced survival in a range of solid tumors. Tumor regression was dependent on Teffs as depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells completely abrogated any survival benefit. Severe morbidity following Treg depletion was only observed, when consecutive doses of DTX were given during peak CD8 T cell activation, demonstrating that Treg can be depleted on multiple occasions, but only when CD8 T cell activation has returned to base line levels. Finally, we show that even minimal Treg depletion is sufficient to significantly improve the efficacy of tumor‐peptide vaccination. Conclusions BALB/c.FoxP3.dtr mice are an ideal model to investigate the full therapeutic potential of Treg depletion to boost anti‐tumor immunity. DTX‐mediated Treg depletion is transient, dose‐dependent, and leads to strong anti‐tumor immunity and complete tumor regression at high doses, while enhancing the efficacy of tumor‐specific vaccination at low doses. Together this data highlight the importance of Treg manipulation as a useful strategy for enhancing current and future cancer immunotherapies. PMID:28250921

  12. [Internal contamination with depleted uranium and health disorders].

    PubMed

    Pranjić, Nurka; Karamehić, Jasenko; Ljuca, Farid; Zigić, Zlata; Ascerić, Mensura

    2002-01-01

    In this review we used the published data on depleted uranium (experimental and epidemiological) from the current literature. Depleted uranium is a toxic heavy metal that in high dose may cause poisoning and health effects as those caused by lead, mercury, and chromium. It is slightly radioactive. The aim of this review was to select, to arrange, to present references of scientific papers, and to summarise the data in order to give a comprehensive image of the results of toxicological studies on depleted uranium that have been done on animals (including carcinogenic activity). We have also used epidemiological posted study results related to occupational and environmental exposure to depleted uranium. The toxicity of uranium has been studied extensively. The results of the studies indicated primarily its chemical toxicity, particularly renal effects, but depleted uranium is not radiological hazard. Uranium is not metal determined to be carcinogenic (the International Agency of Research on Cancer). The military use of depleted uranium will give additional insight into the toxicology of depleted uranium. The present controversy over the radiological and chemical toxicity of depleted uranium used in the Gulf War requests further experimental and clinical investigations of its effects on the biosphere and human beings.

  13. Whistler waves guided by density depletion ducts in a magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bakharev, P. V.; Zaboronkova, T. M.; Kudrin, A. V.; Krafft, C.

    2010-11-15

    The guided propagation of whistler waves along cylindrical density depletion ducts in a magneto-plasma is studied. It is shown that, under certain conditions, such ducts can support volume and surface eigenmodes. The dispersion properties and field structure of whistler modes guided by density depletion ducts are analyzed. The effect of collisional losses in the plasma on the properties of modes is discussed.

  14. Optimal Allocation of Sampling Effort in Depletion Surveys

    EPA Science Inventory

    We consider the problem of designing a depletion or removal survey as part of estimating animal abundance for populations with imperfect capture or detection rates. In a depletion survey, animals are captured from a given area, counted, and withheld from the population. This proc...

  15. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1 Section 1.613-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion;...

  16. Effects of indole-3-carbinol on clonidine-induced neurotoxicity in rats: Impact on oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis and monoamine levels.

    PubMed

    El-Naga, Reem N; Ahmed, Hebatalla I; Abd Al Haleem, Ekram N

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between inflammation, oxidative stress and the incidence of depression had been well studied. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural active compound found in cruciferous vegetables, was shown to have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential protective effects of I3C against clonidine-induced depression-like behaviors in rats. Also, the possible mechanisms underlying this neuroprotection; anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory as well as the modulatory effect on monoamine levels in brain tissues were investigated. I3C was given orally (50mg/kg) daily over 2 weeks starting 7 days before giving clonidine (0.8mg/kg i.p.). Fluoxetine was used as a standard anti-depressant. Open-field test and forced swimming test were carried out to assess exploratory activity and despair behavior, respectively. I3C showed a significant improvement in the behavioral changes induced by clonidine. As indicators of oxidative stress, clonidine induced a significant reduction in GSH and SOD levels as well as an increase lipid peroxidation level. Tissue levels of pro-inflammatory and apoptotic markers were significantly increased in clonidine group. In addition, monoamine levels; noradrenaline and serotonin, showed a drastic decrease in clonidine group. Also, neuron specific enolase (NSE) was significantly elevated in clonidine group. In contrast, I3C pre-treatment significantly attenuated clonidine-induced oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, decreased NSE expression and increased levels of monoamines. Fluoxetine was used as a standard. In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest that I3C protects against clonidine-induced depression. This neuroprotective effect is partially mediated by its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities as well as elevating monoamines levels.

  17. Combination of polymorphic variants in serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase-A genes may influence the risk for early-onset alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Bordukalo-Niksic, Tatjana; Stefulj, Jasminka; Matosic, Ana; Mokrovic, Gordana; Cicin-Sain, Lipa

    2012-12-30

    The combinatory effect of polymorphisms in serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase-A genes on the aetiopathogenesis of alcoholism was investigated in a sample of 714 individuals. Increased frequency of subjects having three 'suspected' genotypes (5-HTTLPR-LL, STin2-1010 and MAO-A 3-repeat allele) was found among type-2 alcoholic patients (P=0.0189). Results highlight serotonergic/genetic contribution to early-onset alcoholism.

  18. Depletion of Appalachian coal reserves - how soon?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Much of the coal consumed in the US since the end of the last century has been produced from the Pennsylvanian strata of the Appalachian basin. Even though quantities mined in the past are less than they are today, this basin yielded from 70% to 80% of the nation's annual coal production from the end of the last century until the early 1970s. During the last 25 years, the proportion of the nation's coal that was produced annually from the Appalachian basin has declined markedly, and today it is only about 40% of the total. The amount of coal produced annually in the Appalachian basin, however, has been rising slowly over the last several decades, and has ranged generally from 400 to 500 million tons (Mt) per year. A large proportion of Appalachian historical production has come from relatively few counties in southwestern Pennsylvania, northern and southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, Virginia and Alabama. Many of these counties are decades past their years of peak production and several are almost depleted of economic deposits of coal. Because the current major consumer of Appalachian coal is the electric power industry, coal quality, especially sulfur content, has a great impact on its marketability. High-sulfur coal deposits in western Pennsylvania and Ohio are in low demand when compared with the lower sulfur coals of Virginia and southern West Virginia. Only five counties in the basin that have produced 500 Mt or more exhibit increasing rates of production at relatively high levels. Of these, six are in the central part of the basin and only one, Greene County, Pennsylvania, is in the northern part of the basin. Decline rate models, based on production decline rates and the decline rate of the estimated, 'potential' reserve, indicate that Appalachian basin annual coal production will be 200 Mt or less by the middle of the next century. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.Much of the coal consumed in the US since the end of the last century has been produced

  19. Ozone Depletion Potential of CH3Br

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Stanley P.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Scott, Courtney; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.

    1998-01-01

    The ozone depletion potential (ODP) of methyl bromide (CH3Br) can be determined by combining the model-calculated bromine efficiency factor (BEF) for CH3Br and its atmospheric lifetime. This paper examines how changes in several key kinetic data affect BEF. The key reactions highlighted in this study include the reaction of BrO + H02, the absorption cross section of HOBr, the absorption cross section and the photolysis products of BrON02, and the heterogeneous conversion of BrON02 to HOBR and HN03 on aerosol particles. By combining the calculated BEF with the latest estimate of 0.7 year for the atmospheric lifetime of CH3Br, the likely value of ODP for CH3Br is 0.39. The model-calculated concentration of HBr (approximately 0.3 pptv) in the lower stratosphere is substantially smaller than the reported measured value of about I pptv. Recent publications suggested models can reproduce the measured value if one assumes a yield for HBr from the reaction of BrO + OH or from the reaction of BrO + H02. Although the DeAlore et al. evaluation concluded any substantial yield of HBr from BrO + HO2 is unlikely, for completeness, we calculate the effects of these assumed yields on BEF for CH3Br. Our calculations show that the effects are minimal: practically no impact for an assumed 1.3% yield of HBr from BrO + OH and 10% smaller for an assumed 0.6% yield from BrO + H02.

  20. Removal of depleted uranium from contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Choy, Christine Chin; Korfiatis, George P; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2006-08-10

    Contamination of soil and water with depleted uranium (DU) has increased public health concerns due to the chemical toxicity of DU at elevated dosages. For this reason, there is great interest in developing methods for DU removal from contaminated sources. Two DU laden soils, taken from U.S. Army sites, were characterized for particle size distribution, total uranium concentration and removable uranium. Soil A was found to be a well graded sand containing a total of 3210 mg/kg DU (3.99 x 10(4) Bq/kg, where a Becquerel (Bq) is a unit of radiation). About 83% of the DU in the fines fraction (particle diameter <0.075 mm, total DU 7732 mg/kg (9.61 x 10(4) Bq/kg)) was associated with the carbonate, iron and manganese oxide and organic matter fractions of the material. Soil B was classified as a sandy silt with total DU of 1560 mg/kg (1.94 x 10(4) Bq/kg). The DU content in the fines fraction was 5171 mg/kg (6.43 x 10(4) Bq/kg). Sequential extraction of the Soil B fines fraction indicated that 64% of the DU was present either as soluble U(VI) minerals or as insoluble U(IV). Citric acid, sodium bicarbonate and hydrogen peroxide were used in batch experiments to extract DU from the fines fraction of both soils. Citric acid and sodium bicarbonate were relatively successful for Soil A (50-60% DU removal), but not for Soil B (20-35% DU removal). Hydrogen peroxide was found to significantly increase DU extraction from both soils, attaining removals up to 60-80%.

  1. Impact of ozone depletion on immune function

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevan, A.; Kripke, M.L. . Dept. of Immunology)

    1993-06-01

    Depletion of stratospheric ozone is expected to lead to an increase in the amount of UV-B radiation present in sunlight. In addition to its well known ability to cause skin cancer, UV-B radiation has been shown to alter the immune system. The immune system is the body's primary defense mechanism against infectious diseases and protects against the development of certain types of cancer. Any impairment of immune function may jeopardize health by increasing susceptibility to infectious diseases, increasing the severity of infections, or delaying recovery for infections. In addition, impaired immune function can increase the incidence of certain cancers, particularly cancers of the skin. Research carried out with laboratory animals over the past 15 years has demonstrated that exposure of the skin to UV-B radiation can suppress certain types of immune responses. These include rejection of UV-induced skin cancers and melanomas, contact allergy reactions to chemicals, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to microbial and other antigens, and phagocytosis and elimination of certain bacteria from lymphoid tissues. Recent studies with mycobacterial infection of mice demonstrated that exposure to UV-B radiation decreased the delayed hypersensitivity response to mycobacterial antigens and increased the severity of infection. In humans, UV-B radiation has also been shown to impair the contact allergy response. These studies demonstrate that UV radiation can decrease immune responses in humans and laboratory and raise the possibility that increased exposure to UV-B radiation could adversely affect human health by increasing the incidence or severity of certain infectious diseases.

  2. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  3. Recovery of depleted uranium fragments from soil.

    PubMed

    Farr, C P; Alecksen, T J; Heronimus, R S; Simonds, M H; Farrar, D R; Miller, M L; Baker, K R

    2010-02-01

    A "proof of concept" was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a survey method for cost-effective recovery of depleted uranium (DU) fragments from contaminated soil piles at Sandia National Laboratories. First, DU fragments ranging from less than a gram up to 48 g were covered by various thicknesses of soil and used for detector efficiency measurements. The efficiencies were measured for three different sodium iodide detectors: a 5.1-cm by 5.1-cm (2-inch by 2-inch) detector, a 7.6-cm by 7.6-cm (3-inch by 3-inch) detector, and a Field Instrument for the Detection of Low Energy Radiation (FIDLER) detector. The FIDLER detector was found to be superior to the other detectors in each measurement. Next, multiple 7.6-cm (3-inch) layers of soil, taken from the contaminated piles, were applied to a clean pad of soil. Each layer was scanned by an array of eight FIDLER detectors pulled by a tractor. The array, moving 10.2 to 12.7 cm s(-1) (4 to 5 inches per second), automatically recorded radiation count data along with associated detector coordinates at 3-s intervals. The DU fragments were located and identified with a handheld system consisting of a FIDLER detector and a positioning system and then removed. After DU removal, the affected areas were re-scanned and a new lift of contaminated soil was applied. The detection capability of the system as a function of DU fragment mass and burial depth was modeled and determined to be sufficient to ensure that the dose-based site concentration goals would be met. Finally, confirmation soil samples were taken from random locations and from decontaminated soil areas. All samples had concentrations of U that met the goal of 400-500 pCi g(-1).

  4. The effect of ego depletion on sprint start reaction time.

    PubMed

    Englert, Chris; Bertrams, Alex

    2014-10-01

    In the current study, we consider that optimal sprint start performance requires the self-control of responses. Therefore, start performance should depend on athletes' self-control strength. We assumed that momentary depletion of self-control strength (ego depletion) would either speed up or slow down the initiation of a sprint start, where an initiation that was sped up would carry the increased risk of a false start. Applying a mixed between- (depletion vs. nondepletion) and within- (before vs. after manipulation of depletion) subjects design, we tested the start reaction times of 37 sport students. We found that participants' start reaction times decelerated after finishing a depleting task, whereas it remained constant in the nondepletion condition. These results indicate that sprint start performance can be impaired by unrelated preceding actions that lower momentary self-control strength. We discuss practical implications in terms of optimizing sprint starts and related overall sprint performance.

  5. The timing and mechanism of depletion in Lewisian granulites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, A. S.; Onions, R. K.; Ohara, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Large Ion Lithophile (LIL) depletion in Lewisian granulites is discussed. Severe depletions in U, Th, and other LIL have been well documented in Lewisan mafic and felsic gneisses, but new Pb isotopic analyses show little or no depletion in lithologies with high solidus temperatures, such as peridotite. This suggests that LIL transport in this terrane took place by removal of partial melts rather than by pervasive flooding with externally derived CO2. The Pb and Nd isotopic data gathered on these rocks show that the depletion and granulite metamorphism are distinct events about 250 Ma apart. Both fluid inclusions and cation exchange geothermometers date from the later metamorphic event and therefore have little bearing on the depletion event, suggesting a note of caution for interpretations of other granulite terranes.

  6. Extreme Vulnerability of IDH1 Mutant Cancers to NAD+ Depletion.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Kensuke; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Iafrate, A John; Tanaka, Shota; Loebel, Franziska; Lelic, Nina; Wiederschain, Dmitri; Bedel, Olivier; Deng, Gejing; Zhang, Bailin; He, Timothy; Shi, Xu; Gerszten, Robert E; Zhang, Yiyun; Yeh, Jing-Ruey J; Curry, William T; Zhao, Dan; Sundaram, Sudhandra; Nigim, Fares; Koerner, Mara V A; Ho, Quan; Fisher, David E; Roider, Elisabeth M; Kemeny, Lajos V; Samuels, Yardena; Flaherty, Keith T; Batchelor, Tracy T; Chi, Andrew S; Cahill, Daniel P

    2015-12-14

    Heterozygous mutation of IDH1 in cancers modifies IDH1 enzymatic activity, reprogramming metabolite flux and markedly elevating 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here, we found that 2-HG depletion did not inhibit growth of several IDH1 mutant solid cancer types. To identify other metabolic therapeutic targets, we systematically profiled metabolites in endogenous IDH1 mutant cancer cells after mutant IDH1 inhibition and discovered a profound vulnerability to depletion of the coenzyme NAD+. Mutant IDH1 lowered NAD+ levels by downregulating the NAD+ salvage pathway enzyme nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (Naprt1), sensitizing to NAD+ depletion via concomitant nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibition. NAD+ depletion activated the intracellular energy sensor AMPK, triggered autophagy, and resulted in cytotoxicity. Thus, we identify NAD+ depletion as a metabolic susceptibility of IDH1 mutant cancers.

  7. Effects of monoamine releasers with varying selectivity for releasing dopamine/norepinephrine versus serotonin on choice between cocaine and food in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Negus, S Stevens

    2011-12-01

    Monoamine releasers constitute one class of candidate medications for the treatment of cocaine abuse, and concurrent cocaine-versus-food choice procedures are potentially valuable as experimental tools to evaluate the efficacy and safety of candidate medications. This study assessed the choice between cocaine and food by rhesus monkeys during treatment with five monoamine releasers that varied in selectivity to promote the release of dopamine and norepinephrine versus serotonin (5HT) [m-fluoroamphetamine, (+)-phenmetrazine, (+)-methamphetamine, napthylisopropylamine and (±)-fenfluramine]. Rhesus monkeys (n=8) responded under a concurrent-choice schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed ratio 100 schedule) and cocaine injections (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection, fixed ratio 10 schedule). Cocaine choice dose-effect curves were determined daily during continuous 7-day treatment with saline or with each test compound dose. During saline treatment, cocaine maintained a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice, and the highest cocaine doses (0.032-0.1 mg/kg/injection) maintained almost exclusive cocaine choice. Efficacy of monoamine releasers to decrease cocaine choice corresponded to their pharmacological selectivity to release dopamine and norepinephrine versus 5HT. None of the releasers reduced cocaine choice or promoted reallocation of responding to food choice to the same extent as when saline was substituted for cocaine. These results extend the range of conditions across which dopamine and norepinephrine-selective releasers have been shown to reduce cocaine self-administration.

  8. Antidepressant like effects of hydrolysable tannins of Terminalia catappa leaf extract via modulation of hippocampal plasticity and regulation of monoamine neurotransmitters subjected to chronic mild stress (CMS).

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Y; Ramya, E M; Navya, K; Phani Kumar, G; Anilakumar, K R

    2017-02-01

    Terminalia catappa L. belonging to Combretaceae family is a folk medicine, known for its multiple pharmacological properties, but the neuro-modulatory effect of TC against chronic mild stress was seldom explored. The present study was designed to elucidate potential antidepressant-like effect of Terminalia cattapa (leaf) hydro-alcoholic extract (TC) by using CMS model for a period of 7 weeks. Identification of hydrolysable tannins was done by using LC-MS. After the CMS exposure, mice groups were administered with imipramine (IMP, 10mg/kg, i.p.) and TC (25, 50 and 100mg/kg of TC, p.o.). Behavioural paradigms used for the study included forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and sucrose preference test (SPT). After behavioural tests, monoamine neurotransmitter, cortisol, AchE, oxidative stress levels and mRNA expression studies relevant to depression were assessed. TC supplementation significantly reversed CMS induced immobility time in FST and other behavioural paradigms. Moreover, TC administration significantly restored CMS induced changes in concentrations of hippocampal neurotransmitters (5-HT, DA and NE) as well as levels of acetyl cholinesterase, cortisol, monoamine oxidases (MAO-A, MAO-B), BDNF, CREB, and p-CREB. It suggests that TC supplementation could supress stress induced depression by regulating monoamine neurotransmitters, CREB, BDNF, cortisol, AchE level as well as by amelioration of oxidative stress. Hence TC can be used as a complementary medicine against depression-like disorder.

  9. Differences in Monoamine Oxidase Activity in the Brain of Wistar and August Rats with High and Low Locomotor Activity: A Cytochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Sergutina, A V; Rakhmanova, V I

    2016-06-01

    Monoamine oxidase activity was quantitatively assessed by cytochemical method in brain structures (layers III and V of the sensorimotor cortex, caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens, hippocampal CA3 field) of rats of August line and Wistar population with high and low locomotor activity in the open fi eld test. Monoamine oxidase activity (substrate tryptamine) predominated in the nucleus accumbens of Wistar rats with high motor activity in comparison with rats with low locomotor activity. In August rats, enzyme activity (substrates tryptamine and serotonin) predominated in the hippocampus of animals with high motor activity. Comparison of August rats with low locomotor activity and Wistar rats with high motor activity (i.e. animals demonstrating maximum differences in motor function) revealed significantly higher activity of the enzyme (substrates tryptamine and serotonin) in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. The study demonstrates clear-cut morphochemical specificity of monoaminergic metabolism based on the differences in the cytochemical parameter "monoamine oxidase activity", in the studied brain structures, responsible for the formation and realization of goal-directed behavior in Wistar and August rats.

  10. Voltammetric characterization of the effect of monoamine uptake inhibitors and releasers on dopamine and serotonin uptake in mouse caudate-putamen and substantia nigra slices

    PubMed Central

    John, Carrie E.; Jones, Sara R.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is an electrochemical technique used to measure dynamics of transporter-mediated monoamine uptake in real time and provides a tool to evaluate the detailed effects of monoamine uptake inhibitors and releasers on dopamine and serotonin transporter function. We measured the effects of cocaine, methylphenidate, 2β-propanoyl–3β-(4tolyl) tropane (PTT), fluoxetine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), phentermine and fenfluramine on dopamine and serotonin uptake following electrically stimulated release in mouse caudate-putamen and substantia nigra pars reticulata slices. We determined rank orders of uptake inhibition effects based on two variables; increases in apparent Km for dopamine and serotonin uptake and inhibition constant (Ki) values. For example, the rank order of uptake inhibition based on apparent Km values at the dopamine transporter was amphetamine ≥ PTT ≥ methylphenidate ≫ methamphetamine = phentermine = MDMA > cocaine ≫ fluoxetine = fenfluramine, and at the serotonin transporter was fluoxetine = methamphetamine = fenfluramine = MDMA > amphetamine = cocaine = PTT ≥ methylphenidate > phentermine. Additionally, changes in electrically stimulated release were documented. This is the first study using voltammetry to measure the effects of a wide range of monoamine uptake inhibitors and releasers on dopamine and serotonin uptake in mouse brain slices. These studies also highlight methodological considerations for comparison of effects between heterogeneous brain regions. PMID:17459426

  11. Correlation of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine Neurotoxicity with Blood-Brain Barrier Monoamine Oxidase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaria, Rajesh N.; Mitchell, Mary Jo; Harik, Sami I.

    1987-05-01

    Systemic administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) causes parkinsonism in humans and subhuman primates, but not in rats and many other laboratory animals; mice are intermediate in their susceptibility. Since MPTP causes selective dopaminergic neurotoxicity when infused directly into rat substantia nigra, we hypothesized that systemic MPTP may be metabolized by monoamine oxidase and/or other enzymes in rat brain capillaries and possibly other peripheral organs and thus prevented from reaching its neuronal sites of toxicity. We tested this hypothesis by assessing monoamine oxidase in isolated cerebral microvessels of humans, rats, and mice by measuring the specific binding of [3H]pargyline, an irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitor, and by estimating the rates of MPTP and benzylamine oxidation. [3H]Pargyline binding to rat cerebral microvessels was about 10-fold higher than to human or mouse microvessels. Also, MPTP oxidation by rat brain microvessels was about 30-fold greater than by human microvessels; mouse microvessels yielded intermediate values. These results may explain, at least in part, the marked species differences in susceptibility to systemic MPTP. They also suggest the potential importance of ``enzyme barriers'' at the blood-brain interface that can metabolize toxins not excluded by structural barriers, and may provide biological bases for developing therapeutic strategies for the prevention of MPTP-induced neurotoxicity and other neurotoxic conditions including, possibly, Parkinson disease.

  12. Treatment with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline elevates monoamine neurotransmitter levels and improves affective phenotypes in a mouse model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Miralles, Marta; Ooi, Jolene; Ferrari Bardile, Costanza; Tan, Liang Juin; George, Maya; Drum, Chester L; Lin, Rachel Yanping; Hayden, Michael R; Pouladi, Mahmoud A

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO-A/B) activity and an imbalance in monoamine neurotransmitters have been suggested to underlie the pathobiology of depression, a major psychiatric symptom observed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington disease (HD). Increased MAO-A/B activity has been observed in brain tissue from patients with HD and in human and rodent HD neural cells. Using the YAC128 mouse model of HD, we studied the effect of an irreversible MAO-A inhibitor, clorgyline, on the levels of select monoamine neurotransmitters associated with affective function. We observed a decrease in striatal levels of the MAO-A/B substrates, dopamine and norepinephrine, in YAC128 HD mice compared with wild-type mice, which was accompanied by increased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour at five months of age. Treatment for 26 days with clorgyline restored dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine neurotransmitter levels in the striatum and reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour in YAC128 HD mice. This study supports a potential therapeutic use for MAO-A inhibitors in the treatment of depression and anxiety in patients with HD.

  13. Degeneration of dopaminergic neurons induced by thrombin injection in the substantia nigra of the rat is enhanced by dexamethasone: role of monoamine oxidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Argüelles, Sandro; Herrera, Antonio J; Carreño-Müller, Eloisa; de Pablos, Rocío M; Villarán, Ruth F; Espinosa-Oliva, Ana M; Machado, Alberto; Cano, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory strategies receive growing attention for their potential to prevent pathological deterioration in disorders such as Parkinson's disease, which is accompanied by inflammatory reactions that might play a critical role in the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons. We investigated the influence of dexamethasone - a potent synthetic member of the glucocorticoids class of steroid hormones that acts as an anti-inflammatory - on the degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons of rats observed after intranigral injection of thrombin, a serine protease that induces inflammation through microglia proliferation and activation. We evaluated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons as well as astroglial and microglial populations; dexamethasone prevented the loss of astrocytes but was unable to stop microglial proliferation induced by thrombin. Moreover, dexamethasone produced alterations in the levels of nexin and the thrombin receptor PAR-1, and facilitated accumulation of alpha-synuclein induced by thrombin in dopaminergic neurons. Dexamethasone increased oxidative stress and expression of monoamine oxidase A and B, along with changes on different MAP kinases related to degenerative processes, resulting in a bigger loss of dopaminergic neurons after intranigral injection of thrombin in dexamethasone-treated animals. It is interesting to ascertain that inhibition of monoamine oxidase by tranylcypromine prevented neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons, thus suggesting that the deleterious effects of dexamethasone might be mediated by monoamine oxidase.

  14. Asenapine Effects on Cognitive and Monoamine Dysfunction Elicited by Subchronic Phencyclidine Administration

    PubMed Central

    Elsworth, John D.; Groman, Stephanie; Jentsch, J. David; Valles, Rodrigo; Shahid, Mohammed; Wong, Erik; Marston, Hugh; Roth, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    of administration and reaching significance after 2–4 weeks of dosing. In week 4, the improvement with asenapine 150 μg/kg (p=0.01) rendered the performance of PCP-exposed monkeys indistinguishable from that of normal monkeys without compromising fine motor function. Asenapine administration (150 μg/kg twice daily) produced an increase in dopamine and serotonin turnover in most brain regions of control monkeys and asenapine (50–150 μg/kg) increased dopamine and serotonin turnover in several brain regions of subchronic PCP-treated monkeys. No significant changes in the steady-state levels of dopamine or serotonin were observed in any brain region except for the central amygdala, in which a significant depletion of dopamine was observed in PCP-treated control monkeys; asenapine treatment reversed this dopamine depletion. A significant decrease in serotonin utilization was observed in the orbitofrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens in PCP monkeys, which may underlie poor reversal learning. In the same brain regions, dopamine utilization was not affected. Asenapine ameliorated this serotonin deficit in a dose-related manner that matched its efficacy for reversing the cognitive deficit. Conclusions In this model of cognitive dysfunction, asenapine produced substantial gains in executive functions that were maintained with long-term administration. The cognition-enhancing effects of asenapine and the neurochemical changes in serotonin and dopamine turnover seen in this study are hypothesized to be primarily related to its potent serotonergic and noradrenergic receptor binding properties, and support the potential for asenapine to reduce cognitive dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. PMID:21875607

  15. Modulation of monoamine oxidase (MAO) expression in neuropsychiatric disorders: genetic and environmental factors involved in type A MAO expression.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Makoto; Riederer, Peter; Maruyama, Wakako

    2016-02-01

    Monoamine oxidase types A and B (MAO-A, MAO-B) regulate the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain, and their dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis and influence the clinical phenotypes of neuropsychiatric disorders. Reversible MAO-A inhibitors, such as moclobemide and befloxatone, are currently employed in the treatment of emotional disorders by inhibiting the enzymatic degradation of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine in the central nervous system (CNS). It has been suggested that the irreversible MAO-B inhibitors selegiline and rasagiline exert a neuroprotective effect in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. This effect, however, is not related to their inhibition of MAO activity; in animal and cellular models, selegiline and rasagiline protect neuronal cells through their anti-apoptotic activity and induction of pro-survival genes. There is increasing evidence that MAO-A activity, but not that of MAO-B, is implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders, but also in gene induction by MAO-B inhibitors; on the other hand, selegiline and rasagiline increase MAO-A mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels. Taken together, these results suggest that each MAO subtype exerts effects that modulate the expression and activity of the other isoenzyme. The roles of MAO-A and -B in the CNS should therefore be re-evaluated with respect to the "type-specificity" of their inhibitors, which may not be unconditional during chronic treatment. Mao-a expression, in particular, may be implicated in pathogenesis and phenotypes in neuropsychiatric disorders. MAO-A expression is modified by mao polymorphisms affecting its transcriptional efficiency, as well as by mutations and polymorphism of parkin, Sirt1, FOXO, microRNA, presenilin-1, and other regulatory proteins. In addition, childhood maltreatment has been shown to have an impact upon adolescent social behavior in children with mao-a polymorphisms of low transcriptional activity. Low MAO

  16. Association between variation in the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 gene on chromosome 8p and anxiety-related personality traits.

    PubMed

    Lohoff, Falk W; Lautenschlager, Marion; Mohr, Johannes; Ferraro, Thomas N; Sander, Thomas; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2008-03-21

    Vesicular monoamine transporters are involved in the presynaptic packaging of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin into storage vesicles. The vesicles release their content upon arrival of an action potential into the synaptic cleft. Dysregulation of monoaminergic neurotransmission has been long postulated to play a relevant role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. The gene encoding the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1/SLC18A1) maps to chromosome 8p21, a region where several linkage peaks overlap between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and anxiety-related personality traits. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the missence variation Thr136Ile in the VMAT1/SLC18A1 gene is associated with anxiety-related personality traits. We tested a total of 337 unrelated subjects of German descent (167 male, 170 female). All participants were carefully screened for psychiatric disorders. The self-report State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was completed by all subjects. Genotypes were obtained for the Thr136Ile (rs1390938) variation in the VMAT1 gene for all subjects. Genotype effects on personality variables were computed with MANOVA including age as a co-variant and gender as independent factor (MANCOVA). Results show that STAI scores were significantly affected by genotype (F=3.108; d.f.=4,331; p=0.015) and age (F=7.233; d.f.=2,331; p=0.001) but not by gender. A gender-by-genotype effect was observed for both the STAI state (p=0.052) and trait score (p=0.035). Dissection of the group by gender and subsequent contrast analysis of the genotype effects performed within the female group showed significant results (STAI state: Thr/Ile vs. Ile/Ile: T=4.408, p=0.0004; STAI trait: Thr/Ile vs. Ile/Ile: T=3.074, p=0.009) but not in the male group. Our findings support the hypothesis that anxiety-related personality traits are associated with variation in the VMAT1/SLC18A1 gene.

  17. Dimethyltryptamine and other hallucinogenic tryptamines exhibit substrate behavior at the serotonin uptake transporter and the vesicle monoamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Nicholas V; Gopalakrishnan, Anupama; Anderson, Lyndsey L; Feih, Joel T; Shulgin, Alexander T; Daley, Paul F; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2009-12-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a potent plant hallucinogen that has also been found in human tissues. When ingested, DMT and related N,N-dialkyltryptamines produce an intense hallucinogenic state. Behavioral effects are mediated through various neurochemical mechanisms including activity at sigma-1 and serotonin receptors, modification of monoamine uptake and release, and competition for metabolic enzymes. To further clarify the pharmacology of hallucinogenic tryptamines, we synthesized DMT, N-methyl-N-isopropyltryptamine (MIPT), N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT), and N,N-diisopropyltryptamine. We then tested the abilities of these N,N-dialkyltryptamines to inhibit [(3)H]5-HT uptake via the plasma membrane serotonin transporter (SERT) in human platelets and via the vesicle monoamine transporter (VMAT2) in Sf9 cells expressing the rat VMAT2. The tryptamines were also tested as inhibitors of [(3)H]paroxetine binding to the SERT and [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding to VMAT2. Our results show that DMT, MIPT, DPT, and DIPT inhibit [(3)H]5-HT transport at the SERT with K ( I ) values of 4.00 +/- 0.70, 8.88 +/- 4.7, 0.594 +/- 0.12, and 2.32 +/- 0.46 microM, respectively. At VMAT2, the tryptamines inhibited [(3)H]5-HT transport with K ( I ) values of 93 +/- 6.8, 20 +/- 4.3, 19 +/- 2.3, and 19 +/- 3.1 muM, respectively. On the other hand, the tryptamines were very poor inhibitors of [(3)H]paroxetine binding to SERT and of [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding to VMAT2, resulting in high binding-to-uptake ratios. High binding-to-uptake ratios support the hypothesis that the tryptamines are transporter substrates, not uptake blockers, at both SERT and VMAT2, and also indicate that there are separate substrate and inhibitor binding sites within these transporters. The transporters may allow the accumulation of tryptamines within neurons to reach relatively high levels for sigma-1 receptor activation and to function as releasable transmitters.

  18. Behavioral and pharmacokinetic interactions between monoamine oxidase inhibitors and the hallucinogen 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt, Adam L

    2016-04-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are often ingested together with tryptamine hallucinogens, but relatively little is known about the consequences of their combined use. We have shown previously that monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) inhibitors alter the locomotor profile of the hallucinogen 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) in rats, and enhance its interaction with 5-HT2A receptors. The goal of the present studies was to investigate the mechanism for the interaction between 5-MeO-DMT and MAOIs, and to determine whether other behavioral responses to 5-MeO-DMT are similarly affected. Hallucinogens disrupt prepulse inhibition (PPI) in rats, an effect typically mediated by 5-HT2A activation. 5-MeO-DMT also disrupts PPI but the effect is primarily attributable to 5-HT1A activation. The present studies examined whether an MAOI can alter the respective contributions of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors to the effects of 5-MeO-DMT on PPI. A series of interaction studies using the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100,635 and the 5-HT2A antagonist MDL 11,939 were performed to assess the respective contributions of these receptors to the behavioral effects of 5-MeO-DMT in rats pretreated with an MAOI. The effects of MAO-A inhibition on the pharmacokinetics of 5-MeO-DMT and its metabolism to bufotenine were assessed using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-selective reaction monitoring-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-SRM-MS/MS). 5-MeO-DMT (1mg/kg) had no effect on PPI when tested 45-min post-injection but disrupted PPI in animals pretreated with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline or the MAO-A/B inhibitor pargyline. The combined effect of 5-MeO-DMT and pargyline on PPI was antagonized by pretreatment with either WAY-100,635 or MDL 11,939. Inhibition of MAO-A increased the level of 5-MeO-DMT in plasma and whole brain, but had no effect on the conversion of 5-MeO-DMT to bufotenine, which was found to be negligible. The present results confirm that 5-MeO-DMT can disrupt PPI by

  19. Neuroprotective and neurorestorative activities of a novel iron chelator-brain selective monoamine oxidase-A/monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor in animal models of Parkinson's disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Bar-Am, Orit; Amit, Tamar; Kupershmidt, Lana; Aluf, Yuval; Mechlovich, Danit; Kabha, Hoda; Danovitch, Lena; Zurawski, Vincent R; Youdim, Moussa B H; Weinreb, Orly

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we have designed and synthesized a novel multipotent, brain-permeable iron-chelating drug, VAR10303 (VAR), possessing both propargyl and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory moieties. The present study was undertaken to determine the multiple pharmacological activities of VAR in neurodegenerative preclinical models. We demonstrate that VAR affords iron chelating/iron-induced lipid-peroxidation inhibitory potency and brain selective MAO-A and MAO-B inhibitory effects, with only limited tyramine-cardiovascular potentiation of blood pressure. The results show that in 6-hydroxydopamine rat (neuroprotection) and in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse (neurorescue) Parkinson's disease models, VAR significantly attenuated the loss of striatal dopamine levels, markedly reduced dopamine turnover, and increased tyrosine-hydroxylase levels. Furthermore, chronic systemic treatment of aged rats with VAR improved cognitive behavior deficits and enhanced the expression levels of neurotrophic factors (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and nerve growth factor), Bcl-2 family members and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Our study indicates that the multitarget compound VAR exerted neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease and aging, further suggesting that a drug that can regulate multiple brain targets could be an ideal treatment-strategy for age-associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Serotonin and social norms: tryptophan depletion impairs social comparison and leads to resource depletion in a multiplayer harvesting game.

    PubMed

    Bilderbeck, Amy C; Brown, Gordon D A; Read, Judi; Woolrich, Mark; Cowen, Phillip J; Behrens, Tim E J; Rogers, Robert D

    2014-07-01

    How do people sustain resources for the benefit of individuals and communities and avoid the tragedy of the commons, in which shared resources become exhausted? In the present study, we examined the role of serotonin activity and social norms in the management of depletable resources. Healthy adults, alongside social partners, completed a multiplayer resource-dilemma game in which they repeatedly harvested from a partially replenishable monetary resource. Dietary tryptophan depletion, leading to reduced serotonin activity, was associated with aggressive harvesting strategies and disrupted use of the social norms given by distributions of other players' harvests. Tryptophan-depleted participants more frequently exhausted the resource completely and also accumulated fewer rewards than participants who were not tryptophan depleted. Our findings show that rank-based social comparisons are crucial to the management of depletable resources, and that serotonin mediates responses to social norms.

  1. Long-term groundwater depletion in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    2015-01-01

    The volume of groundwater stored in the subsurface in the United States decreased by almost 1000 km3 during 1900–2008. The aquifer systems with the three largest volumes of storage depletion include the High Plains aquifer, the Mississippi Embayment section of the Gulf Coastal Plain aquifer system, and the Central Valley of California. Depletion rates accelerated during 1945–1960, averaging 13.6 km3/year during the last half of the century, and after 2000 increased again to about 24 km3/year. Depletion intensity is a new parameter, introduced here, to provide a more consistent basis for comparing storage depletion problems among various aquifers by factoring in time and areal extent of the aquifer. During 2001–2008, the Central Valley of California had the largest depletion intensity. Groundwater depletion in the United States can explain 1.4% of observed sea-level rise during the 108-year study period and 2.1% during 2001–2008. Groundwater depletion must be confronted on local and regional scales to help reduce demand (primarily in irrigated agriculture) and/or increase supply.

  2. Adjoint simulation of stream depletion due to aquifer pumping.

    PubMed

    Neupauer, Roseanna M; Griebling, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    If an aquifer is hydraulically connected to an adjacent stream, a pumping well operating in the aquifer will draw some water from aquifer storage and some water from the stream, causing stream depletion. Several analytical, semi-analytical, and numerical approaches have been developed to estimate stream depletion due to pumping. These approaches are effective if the well location is known. If a new well is to be installed, it may be desirable to install the well at a location where stream depletion is minimal. If several possible locations are considered for the location of a new well, stream depletion would have to be estimated for all possible well locations, which can be computationally inefficient. The adjoint approach for estimating stream depletion is a more efficient alternative because with one simulation of the adjoint model, stream depletion can be estimated for pumping at a well at any location. We derive the adjoint equations for a coupled system with a confined aquifer, an overlying unconfined aquifer, and a river that is hydraulically connected to the unconfined aquifer. We assume that the stage in the river is known, and is independent of the stream depletion, consistent with the assumptions of the MODFLOW river package. We describe how the adjoint equations can be solved using MODFLOW. In an illustrative example, we show that for this scenario, the adjoint approach is as accurate as standard forward numerical simulation methods, and requires substantially less computational effort.

  3. Associative Interactions in Crowded Solutions of Biopolymers Counteract Depletion Effects.

    PubMed

    Groen, Joost; Foschepoth, David; te Brinke, Esra; Boersma, Arnold J; Imamura, Hiromi; Rivas, Germán; Heus, Hans A; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2015-10-14

    The cytosol of Escherichia coli is an extremely crowded environment, containing high concentrations of biopolymers which occupy 20-30% of the available volume. Such conditions are expected to yield depletion forces, which strongly promote macromolecular complexation. However, crowded macromolecule solutions, like the cytosol, are very prone to nonspecific associative interactions that can potentially counteract depletion. It remains unclear how the cytosol balances these opposing interactions. We used a FRET-based probe to systematically study depletion in vitro in different crowded environments, including a cytosolic mimic, E. coli lysate. We also studied bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments under identical crowded conditions as a probe for depletion interactions at much larger overlap volumes of the probe molecule. The FRET probe showed a more compact conformation in synthetic crowding agents, suggesting strong depletion interactions. However, depletion was completely negated in cell lysate and other protein crowding agents, where the FRET probe even occupied slightly more volume. In contrast, bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments proceeded as readily in E. coli lysate and other protein solutions as in synthetic crowding agents. Our experimental results and model suggest that, in crowded biopolymer solutions, associative interactions counterbalance depletion forces for small macromolecules. Furthermore, the net effects of macromolecular crowding will be dependent on both the size of the macromolecule and its associative interactions with the crowded background.

  4. Long-term groundwater depletion in the United States.

    PubMed

    Konikow, Leonard F

    2015-01-01

    The volume of groundwater stored in the subsurface in the United States decreased by almost 1000 km3 during 1900-2008. The aquifer systems with the three largest volumes of storage depletion include the High Plains aquifer, the Mississippi Embayment section of the Gulf Coastal Plain aquifer system, and the Central Valley of California. Depletion rates accelerated during 1945-1960, averaging 13.6 km3/year during the last half of the century, and after 2000 increased again to about 24 km3/year. Depletion intensity is a new parameter, introduced here, to provide a more consistent basis for comparing storage depletion problems among various aquifers by factoring in time and areal extent of the aquifer. During 2001-2008, the Central Valley of California had the largest depletion intensity. Groundwater depletion in the United States can explain 1.4% of observed sea-level rise during the 108-year study period and 2.1% during 2001-2008. Groundwater depletion must be confronted on local and regional scales to help reduce demand (primarily in irrigated agriculture) and/or increase supply.

  5. A Multilab Preregistered Replication of the Ego-Depletion Effect.

    PubMed

    Hagger, Martin S; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D; Alberts, Hugo; Anggono, Calvin Octavianus; Batailler, Cédric; Birt, Angela R; Brand, Ralf; Brandt, Mark J; Brewer, Gene; Bruyneel, Sabrina; Calvillo, Dustin P; Campbell, W Keith; Cannon, Peter R; Carlucci, Marianna; Carruth, Nicholas P; Cheung, Tracy; Crowell, Adrienne; De Ridder, Denise T D; Dewitte, Siegfried; Elson, Malte; Evans, Jacqueline R; Fay, Benjamin A; Fennis, Bob M; Finley, Anna; Francis, Zoë; Heise, Elke; Hoemann, Henrik; Inzlicht, Michael; Koole, Sander L; Koppel, Lina; Kroese, Floor; Lange, Florian; Lau, Kevin; Lynch, Bridget P; Martijn, Carolien; Merckelbach, Harald; Mills, Nicole V; Michirev, Alexej; Miyake, Akira; Mosser, Alexandra E; Muise, Megan; Muller, Dominique; Muzi, Milena; Nalis, Dario; Nurwanti, Ratri; Otgaar, Henry; Philipp, Michael C; Primoceri, Pierpaolo; Rentzsch, Katrin; Ringos, Lara; Schlinkert, Caroline; Schmeichel, Brandon J; Schoch, Sarah F; Schrama, Michel; Schütz, Astrid; Stamos, Angelos; Tinghög, Gustav; Ullrich, Johannes; Dellen, Michelle van; Wimbarti, Supra; Wolff, Wanja; Yusainy, Cleoputri; Zerhouni, Oulmann; Zwienenberg, Maria; Howe, Mark L

    2016-07-01

    Good self-control has been linked to adaptive outcomes such as better health, cohesive personal relationships, success in the workplace and at school, and less susceptibility to crime and addictions. In contrast, self-control failure is linked to maladaptive outcomes. Understanding the mechanisms by which self-control predicts behavior may assist in promoting better regulation and outcomes. A popular approach to understanding self-control is the strength or resource depletion model. Self-control is conceptualized as a limited resource that becomes depleted after a period of exertion resulting in self-control failure. The model has typically been tested using a sequential-task experimental paradigm, in which people completing an initial self-control task have reduced self-control capacity and poorer performance on a subsequent task, a state known as ego depletion Although a meta-analysis of ego-depletion experiments found a medium-sized effect, subsequent meta-analyses have questioned the size and existence of the effect and identified instances of possible bias. The analyses served as a catalyst for the current Registered Replication Report of the ego-depletion effect. Multiple laboratories (k = 23, total N = 2,141) conducted replications of a standardized ego-depletion protocol based on a sequential-task paradigm by Sripada et al. Meta-analysis of the studies revealed that the size of the ego-depletion effect was small with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) that encompassed zero (d = 0.04, 95% CI [-0.07, 0.15]. We discuss implications of the findings for the ego-depletion effect and the resource depletion model of self-control.

  6. Depletion of mesospheric sodium during extended period of pulsating aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Hosokawa, K.; Nozawa, S.; Tsuda, T. T.; Ogawa, Y.; Tsutsumi, M.; Hiraki, Y.; Fujiwara, H.; Kawahara, T. D.; Saito, N.; Wada, S.; Kawabata, T.; Hall, C.

    2017-01-01

    We quantitatively evaluated the Na density depletion due to charge transfer reactions between Na atoms and molecular ions produced by high-energy electron precipitation during a pulsating aurora (PsA). An extended period of PsA was captured by an all-sky camera at the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) radar Tromsø site (69.6°N, 19.2°E) during a 2 h interval from 00:00 to 02:00 UT on 25 January 2012. During this period, using the EISCAT very high frequency (VHF) radar, we detected three intervals of intense ionization below 100 km that were probably caused by precipitation of high-energy electrons during the PsA. In these intervals, the sodium lidar at Tromsø observed characteristic depletion of Na density at altitudes between 97 and 100 km. These Na density depletions lasted for 8 min and represented 5-8% of the background Na layer. To examine the cause of this depletion, we modeled the depletion rate based on charge transfer reactions with NO+ and O2+ while changing the R value which is defined as the ratio of NO+ to O2+ densities, from 1 to 10. The correlation coefficients between observed and modeled Na density depletion calculated with typical value R = 3 for time intervals T1, T2, and T3 were 0.66, 0.80, and 0.67, respectively. The observed Na density depletion rates fall within the range of modeled depletion rate calculated with R from 1 to 10. This suggests that the charge transfer reactions triggered by the auroral impact ionization at low altitudes are the predominant process responsible for Na density depletion during PsA intervals.

  7. Pressor response to intravenous tyramine in healthy subjects after safinamide, a novel neuroprotectant with selective, reversible monoamine oxidase B inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Carlo; Caccia, Carla; Marzo, Antonio; Maj, Roberto; Fariello, Ruggero G

    2003-01-01

    Safinamide is a novel neuroprotectant combining sodium and calcium channel blocking properties with selective, reversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO B) inhibition. Phase 1 studies have demonstrated that in healthy volunteers, the ED50 (a dose that inhibits enzyme activity by 50% in 50% of treated subjects) for MAO B inhibition is 87.5 microg/kg/day orally, and that no MAO A inhibition occurs after 10-mg/kg oral dosing. To assess the risk of inducing the "cheese effect," the effect of safinamide and placebo on the pressor response to tyramine was investigated in a group of healthy male volunteers. The study was an open, single-dose placebo-controlled trial with the 2 treatments in sequence. An increase of 30 mm Hg systolic blood pressure was obtained by intravenous tyramine administered by 0.5-mg incremental boluses injected at 15-minute intervals. The amount of tyramine necessary to achieve such a blood pressure increase was the same after the safinamide 2-mg/kg oral load compared with placebo. These results suggest that dietary restrictions for food with high tyramine content should not be required under safinamide treatment.

  8. The influence of monoamine oxidase variants on the risk of betel quid-associated oral and pharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping-Ho; Huang, Bin; Shieh, Tien-Yu; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Wu, Ju-Hui; Huang, Jhen-Hao; Chen, Chun-Chia; Lee, Ka-Wo

    2014-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) and areca nut (AN) (major BQ ingredient) are group I human carcinogens illustrated by International Agency for Research on Cancer and are closely associated with an elevated risk of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx. The primary alkaloid of AN, arecoline, can be metabolized via the monoamine oxidase (MAO) gene by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the variants of the susceptible candidate MAO genes are associated with OPMDs and oral and pharyngeal cancer. A significant trend of MAO-A mRNA expression was found in in vitro studies. Using paired human tissues, we confirmed the significantly decreased expression of MAO-A and MAO-B in cancerous tissues when compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues. Moreover, we determined that MAO-A single nucleotide polymorphism variants are significantly linked with oral and pharyngeal cancer patients in comparison to OPMDs patients [rs5953210 risk G-allele, odds ratio = 1.76; 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.01]. In conclusion, we suggested that susceptible MAO family variants associated with oral and pharyngeal cancer may be implicated in the modulation of MAO gene activity associated with ROS.

  9. Melanoma tumors alter proinflammatory cytokine production and monoamine brain function, and induce depressive-like behavior in male mice.

    PubMed

    Lebeña, Andrea; Vegas, Oscar; Gómez-Lázaro, Eneritz; Arregi, Amaia; Garmendia, Larraitz; Beitia, Garikoitz; Azpiroz, Arantza

    2014-10-01

    Depression is a commonly observed disorder among cancer patients; however, the mechanisms underlying the relationship between these disorders are not well known. We used an animal model to study the effects of tumor development on depressive-like behavior manifestation, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and central monoaminergic activity. Male OF1 mice were inoculated with B16F10 melanoma tumor cells and subjected to a 21-day behavioral evaluation comprising the novel palatable food (NPF) test and tail suspension test (TST). The mRNA expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), were measured in the hypothalamus and hippocampus and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were measured in the blood plasma. We similarly determined the monoamine turnover in various brain areas. The tumors resulted in increasing the immobility in TST and the expression level of IL-6 in the hippocampus. These increases corresponded with a decrease in dopaminergic activity in the striatum and a decrease in serotonin turnover in the prefrontal cortex. Similarly, a high level of tumor development produced increases in the brain expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and plasma levels of IL-6. Our findings suggest that these alterations in inflammatory cytokines and monoaminergic system function might be responsible for the manifestation of depressive-like behaviors in tumor-bearing mice.

  10. Stimulation of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 activity by DJ-1 in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Tanaka, Yuki; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2012-05-18

    Loss-of-functional mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson's disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. Dopamine is synthesized by two enzymes and then packed into synaptic vesicles by vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2). In this study, we found that knockdown of DJ-1 expression reduced the levels of mRNA and protein of VMAT2, resulting in reduced VMAT2 activity. Co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments revealed that DJ-1 directly bound to VMAT2, and DJ-1 was co-localized with VMAT2 in cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of wild-type DJ-1, but not that of L166P, M26I and C106S mutants of DJ-1, increased mRNA and protein levels of VMAT2 and VMAT2 activity. Since VMAT2 and a portion of DJ-1 are localized in the synaptic membrane, these results suggest that DJ-1, but not pathogenically mutated DJ-1, stimulates VMAT2 activity in the synapse by transactivation of the VMAT gene and by direct binding to VMAT2 and that cysteine 106 is necessary for the stimulating activity of DJ-1 toward VMAT2.

  11. Chemotherapy-induced monoamine oxidase expression in prostate carcinoma functions as a cytoprotective resistance enzyme and associates with clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ryan R; Wu, Mengchu; Huang, Chung-Ying; Harris, William P; Sim, Hong Gee; Lucas, Jared M; Coleman, Ilsa; Higano, Celestia S; Gulati, Roman; True, Lawrence D; Vessella, Robert; Lange, Paul H; Garzotto, Mark; Beer, Tomasz M; Nelson, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    To identify molecular alterations in prostate cancers associating with relapse following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical prostatectomy patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer were enrolled into a phase I-II clinical trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel and mitoxantrone followed by prostatectomy. Pre-treatment prostate tissue was acquired by needle biopsy and post-treatment tissue was acquired by prostatectomy. Prostate cancer gene expression measurements were determined in 31 patients who completed 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We identified 141 genes with significant transcript level alterations following chemotherapy that associated with subsequent biochemical relapse. This group included the transcript encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). In vitro, cytotoxic chemotherapy induced the expression of MAOA and elevated MAOA levels enhanced cell survival following docetaxel exposure. MAOA activity increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and increased the expression and nuclear translocation of HIF1α. The suppression of MAOA activity using the irreversible inhibitor clorgyline augmented the apoptotic responses induced by docetaxel. In summary, we determined that the expression of MAOA is induced by exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy, increases HIF1α, and contributes to docetaxel resistance. As MAOA inhibitors have been approved for human use, regimens combining MAOA inhibitors with docetaxel may improve clinical outcomes.

  12. Vanillin-induced amelioration of depression-like behaviors in rats by modulating monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinyong; Xu, Hui; Liu, Yang; He, Haihui; Li, Guangwu

    2015-02-28

    Olfaction plays an important role in emotions in our daily life. Pleasant odors are known to evoke positive emotions, inducing relaxation and calmness. The beneficial effects of vanillin on depressive model rats were investigated using a combination of behavioral assessments and neurotransmitter measurements. Before and after chronic stress condition (or olfactory bulbectomy), and at the end of vanillin or fluoxetine treatment, body weight, immobility time on the forced swimming test and sucrose consumption in the sucrose consumption test were measured. Changes in these assessments revealed the characteristic phenotypes of depression in rats. Neurotransmitters were measured using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography. Our results indicated that vanillin could alleviate depressive symptoms in the rat model of chronic depression via the olfactory pathway. Preliminary analysis of the monoamine neurotransmitters revealed that vanillin elevated both serotonin and dopamine levels in brain tissue. These results provide important mechanistic insights into the protective effect of vanillin against chronic depressive disorder via olfactory pathway. This suggests that vanillin may be a potential pharmacological agent for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

  13. Association of DNA methylation and monoamine oxidase A gene expression in the brains of different dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Eo, JungWoo; Lee, Hee-Eun; Nam, Gyu-Hwi; Kwon, Yun-Jeong; Choi, Yuri; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, Sang-Eun; Seo, Bohyun; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2016-04-15

    The monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene is an important candidate gene for human behavior that encodes an enzyme regulating the metabolism of key neurotransmitters. The regulatory mechanisms of the MAOA gene in dogs are yet to be elucidated. We measured MAOA gene transcription and analyzed the VNTR genotype and methylation status of the gene promoter region in different dog breeds to determine whether MAOA expression is correlated with the MAOA genotype or epigenetic modification in dogs. We found brain-specific expression of the MAOA gene and different transcription levels in different dog breeds including Beagle, Sapsaree, and German shepherd, and also a robust association of the DNA methylation of the gene promoter with mRNA levels. However, the 90 bp tandem repeats that we observed near the transcription start site were not variable, indicating no correlation with canine MAOA activity. These results show that differential DNA methylation in the MAOA promoter region may affect gene expression by modulating promoter activity. Moreover, the distinctive patterns of MAOA expression and DNA methylation may be involved in breed-specific or individual behavioral characteristics, such as aggression, because behavioral phenotypes are related to different physiological and neuroendocrine responses.

  14. Sleep patterns in male juvenile monkeys are influenced by gestational iron deprivation and monoamine oxidase A genotype.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E

    2014-11-14

    Individual differences in sleep patterns of children may have developmental origins. In the present study, two factors known to influence behavioural development, monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype and prenatal Fe-deficient (ID) diet, were examined for their influences on sleep patterns in juvenile rhesus monkeys. Sleep patterns were assessed based on a threshold for inactivity as recorded by activity monitors. Pregnant monkeys were fed diets containing either 100 parts per million (ppm) Fe (Fe sufficient, IS) or 10 ppm Fe (ID). At 3-4 months of age, male offspring were genotyped for polymorphisms of the MAOA gene that lead to high or low transcription. At 1 and 2 years of age, sleep patterns were assessed. Several parameters of sleep architecture changed with age. At 1 year of age, monkeys with the low-MAOA genotype demonstrated a trend towards more sleep episodes at night compared with those with the high-MAOA genotype. When monkeys reached 2 years of age, prenatal ID reversed this trend; ID in the low-MAOA group resulted in sleep fragmentation, more awakenings at night and more sleep episodes during the day when compared with prenatal IS in this genotype. The ability to consolidate sleep during the dark cycle was disrupted by prenatal ID, specifically in monkeys with the low-MAOA genotype.

  15. Sex differences in ischaemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury depends on the degradation of noradrenaline by monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryosuke; Yazawa, Maki; Morikawa, Yuri; Tsutsui, Hidenobu; Ohkita, Mamoru; Yukimura, Tokihito; Matsumura, Yasuo

    2017-03-01

    Ischaemic acute kidney injury (AKI) is a leading killer of both sexes; however, resistance to this injury is higher among women than men. We found that renal venous noradrenaline (NAd) overflow after reperfusion played important roles in the development of ischaemic AKI, and that the attenuation of AKI observed in female rats may be dependent on depressing the renal sympathetic nervous system with endogenous oestrogen. In the present study, we used male and female Sprague-Dawley rats to investigate whether sex differences in the pathogenesis of ischaemic AKI are related to the degradation of NAd by monoamine oxidase (MAO) in the kidney. Ischaemic AKI was achieved by clamping the left renal artery and vein for 45 minutes followed by reperfusion 2 weeks after contralateral nephrectomy. Renal injury was more severe in male rats than in female rats and renal venous plasma NAd levels after reperfusion were markedly elevated in males, but not in females. These sex differences were eliminated by a treatment with isatin, a non-selective MAO inhibitor, and moclobemide, a selective MAOA inhibitor, but not by selegiline, a selective MAOB inhibitor. Ischaemia decreased the mRNA expression levels of both MAOs in the kidney 1 day after reperfusion; however, MAOA mRNA expression levels were higher in female rats than in male rats. These results suggest that the degradation of NAd by MAOA in the kidney contributes to sex differences in the pathogenesis of ischaemia/reperfusion-induced AKI.

  16. Biodistribution of a positron-emitting suicide inactivator of monoamine oxidase, carbon-11 pargyline, in mice and a rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiwata, K.; Ido, T.; Yanai, K.; Kawashima, K.; Miura, Y.; Monma, M.; Watanuki, S.; Takahashi, T.; Iwata, R.

    1985-06-01

    Carbon-11 (/sup 11/C) pargyline, which is a suicide inactivator of Type B monoamine oxidase (MAO), was synthesized by the reaction of N-demethylpargyline with /sup 11/CH/sub 3/l. Biodistribution was investigated in mice, and positron tomographic images of the heart and lung in a rabbit were obtained. The distribution of /sup 11/C after administration of (/sup 11/C)pargyline was measured in several organs and blood at various time intervals. After 30 min its concentrations in the organs were constant. Subcellular distribution studies in the brain, lung, liver, and kidney showed that 59-70% of the /sup 11/C became acid-insoluble and 9-33% was present in the crude mitochondrial fraction at 60 min after injection. The uptakes of the /sup 11/C in each organ except for the kidney and spleen seemed to correlate with the in vitro enzymatic activity of Type B MAO. At high loading dose a nonspecific uptake was observed.

  17. Gene-Gene-Environment Interactions of Serotonin Transporter, Monoamine Oxidase A and Childhood Maltreatment Predict Aggressive Behavior in Chinese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Ming, Qing-sen; Yi, Jin-yao; Wang, Xiang; Chai, Qiao-lian; Yao, Shu-qiao

    2017-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions that moderate aggressive behavior have been identified independently in the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene and monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA). The aim of the present study was to investigate epistasis interactions between MAOA-variable number tandem repeat (VNTR), 5-HTTlinked polymorphism (LPR) and child abuse and the effects of these on aggressive tendencies in a group of otherwise healthy adolescents. A group of 546 Chinese male adolescents completed the Child Trauma Questionnaire and Youth self-report of the Child Behavior Checklist. Buccal cells were collected for DNA analysis. The effects of childhood abuse, MAOA-VNTR, 5-HTTLPR genotypes and their interactive gene-gene-environmental effects on aggressive behavior were analyzed using a linear regression model. The effect of child maltreatment was significant, and a three-way interaction among MAOA-VNTR, 5-HTTLPR and sexual abuse (SA) relating to aggressive behaviors was identified. Chinese male adolescents with high expression of the MAOA-VNTR allele and 5-HTTLPR “SS” genotype exhibited the highest aggression tendencies with an increase in SA during childhood. The findings reported support aggression being a complex behavior involving the synergistic effects of gene-gene-environment interactions. PMID:28203149

  18. Chemotherapy-Induced Monoamine Oxidase Expression in Prostate Carcinoma Functions as a Cytoprotective Resistance Enzyme and Associates with Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-Ying; Harris, William P.; Sim, Hong Gee; Lucas, Jared M.; Coleman, Ilsa; Higano, Celestia S.; Gulati, Roman; True, Lawrence D.; Vessella, Robert; Lange, Paul H.; Garzotto, Mark; Beer, Tomasz M.; Nelson, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    To identify molecular alterations in prostate cancers associating with relapse following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical prostatectomy patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer were enrolled into a phase I-II clinical trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel and mitoxantrone followed by prostatectomy. Pre-treatment prostate tissue was acquired by needle biopsy and post-treatment tissue was acquired by prostatectomy. Prostate cancer gene expression measurements were determined in 31 patients who completed 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We identified 141 genes with significant transcript level alterations following chemotherapy that associated with subsequent biochemical relapse. This group included the transcript encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). In vitro, cytotoxic chemotherapy induced the expression of MAOA and elevated MAOA levels enhanced cell survival following docetaxel exposure. MAOA activity increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and increased the expression and nuclear translocation of HIF1α. The suppression of MAOA activity using the irreversible inhibitor clorgyline augmented the apoptotic responses induced by docetaxel. In summary, we determined that the expression of MAOA is induced by exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy, increases HIF1α, and contributes to docetaxel resistance. As MAOA inhibitors have been approved for human use, regimens combining MAOA inhibitors with docetaxel may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25198178

  19. Brief Social Isolation in the Adolescent Wistar-Kyoto Rat Model of Endogenous Depression Alters Corticosterone and Regional Monoamine Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Reshma A; Sadananda, Monika

    2017-02-24

    The Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY) model has been suggested as a model of adult and adolescent depression though face, predictive and construct validities of the model to depression remain equivocal. The suitability of the WKY as a diathesis model that tests the double-hit hypothesis, particularly during critical periods of brain and behavioural development remains to be established. Here, effects of post-weaning social isolation were assessed during early adolescence (~30pnd) on behavioural despair and learned helplessness in the forced swim test (FST), plasma corticosterone levels and tissue monoamine concentrations in brain areas critically involved in depression, such as prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, striatum and hippocampus. Significantly increased immobility in the FST was observed in socially-isolated, adolescent WKY with a concomitant increase in corticosterone levels over and above the FST-induced stress. WKY also demonstrated a significantly increased release and utilization of dopamine, as manifested by levels of metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in nucleus accumbens, indicating that the large dopamine storage pool evident during adolescence induces greater dopamine release when stimulated. The serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid was also significantly increased in nucleus accumbens, indicating increased utilization of serotonin, along with norepinephrine levels which were also signficantly elevated in socially-isolated adolescent WKY. Differences in neurochemistry suggest that social or environmental stimuli during critical periods of brain and behavioural development can determine the developmental trajectories of implicated pathways.

  20. Retention behavior of C1-C6 aliphatic monoamines on anion-exchange and polymethacrylate resins with heptylamine as eluent.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Jin, Ji-Ye; Takeuchi, Toyohide; Fujimoto, Chuzo; Choi, Seong-Ho; Ryoo, Jae Jeong; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2004-06-11

    Retention behavior of C1-C6, aliphatic monoamines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, butylamine, amylamine and hexylamine) on columns (150 mm x 6 mm i.d.) packed with various anion-exchange resins (styrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) copolymer-based strongly basic anion-exchange resin: TSKgel SAX, polymethacrylate-based strongly basic anion-exchange resin: TSKgel SuperQ-5PW and polymethacrylate-based weakly basic anion-exchange resin: TSKgel DEAE-5PW) and unfunctionized polymethacrylate resins (TSKgel G5000PW and TSKgel G3000PWXL) was investigated with basic solutions (sodium hydroxide and heptylamine) as the eluents. Due to strongly electrostatic repulsion (ion-exclusion effect) between these anion-exchange resins and these amines, peak resolution between these amines on these anion-exchange resin columns was unsatisfactory with both sodium hydroxide and heptylamine as the eluents. In contrast, these polymethacrylate resins were successfully applied as the stationary phases for the separation of these C1-C6 amines with heptylamine as eluent, because of both small hydrophobicity and small cation-exchange ability of these resins. Excellent simultaneous separation, highly sensitive conductimetric detection and symmetrical peaks for these C1-C6 amines were achieved on the TSKgel G3000PWXL column in 35 min with 5 mM heptylamine at pH 11.1 as the eluent.

  1. Reversible and irreversible small molecule inhibitors of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) investigated by biophysical techniques.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rafael J; Edmondson, Dale E; Almos, Terri; Scott, Roderick; Massari, Mark E

    2015-02-15

    Monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) plays a key role in the metabolism of dopamine, a neurotransmitter critical for the maintenance of cognitive function. Consequently, MAO-B is an important therapeutic target for disorders characterized by a decline in dopaminergic neurotransmission, including Parkinson's disease (PD). An emerging strategy in drug discovery is to utilize the biophysical approaches of thermal shift and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to gain insight into binding modality and identify thermodynamically privileged chemical scaffolds. Described here is the development of such approaches for reversible and irreversible small molecule inhibitors of MAO-B. Investigation of soluble recombinant MAO-B revealed mechanism-based differences in the thermal shift and binding thermodynamic profiles of MAO-B inhibitors. Irreversible inhibitors demonstrated biphasic protein melt curves, large enthalpically favorable and entropically unfavorable binding, in contrast to reversible compounds, which were characterized by a dose-dependent increase in thermal stability and enthalpically-driven binding. The biophysical approaches described here aim to facilitate the discovery of next-generation MAO-B inhibitors.

  2. Gene-Gene-Environment Interactions of Serotonin Transporter, Monoamine Oxidase A and Childhood Maltreatment Predict Aggressive Behavior in Chinese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Ming, Qing-Sen; Yi, Jin-Yao; Wang, Xiang; Chai, Qiao-Lian; Yao, Shu-Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions that moderate aggressive behavior have been identified independently in the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene and monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA). The aim of the present study was to investigate epistasis interactions between MAOA-variable number tandem repeat (VNTR), 5-HTTlinked polymorphism (LPR) and child abuse and the effects of these on aggressive tendencies in a group of otherwise healthy adolescents. A group of 546 Chinese male adolescents completed the Child Trauma Questionnaire and Youth self-report of the Child Behavior Checklist. Buccal cells were collected for DNA analysis. The effects of childhood abuse, MAOA-VNTR, 5-HTTLPR genotypes and their interactive gene-gene-environmental effects on aggressive behavior were analyzed using a linear regression model. The effect of child maltreatment was significant, and a three-way interaction among MAOA-VNTR, 5-HTTLPR and sexual abuse (SA) relating to aggressive behaviors was identified. Chinese male adolescents with high expression of the MAOA-VNTR allele and 5-HTTLPR "SS" genotype exhibited the highest aggression tendencies with an increase in SA during childhood. The findings reported support aggression being a complex behavior involving the synergistic effects of gene-gene-environment interactions.

  3. Electrical activity of the visual cortex under conditions of change in the levels of monoamines in the brain of animals.

    PubMed

    Borob'ev, V V; Gal'chenko, A A; Deryugina, O N

    1991-01-01

    The changes in the electrograms of the visual cortex of awake animals under the influence of light stimulation in conditions of a pharmacological effect on the monoamine (MA) systems of the brain were investigated in experiments on 8 rabbits and 12 rats. The following was found following the administration of MA precursors (5-hydroxytryptophan and d,l-dihydroxyphenylalanine): a) a decrease in the amplitude of the averaged evoked potentials in response to rhythmical light stimuli (1-20 pulses/sec); b) intensification of rapid (15-25 Hz) oscillations in the spontaneous electrical activity of the cortex, as well as attenuation and modification of the effects of the blocker of MA synthesis, a-methyl-dihydroxyphenylalanine. A potentiation of the MA precursors was observed with light stimulation in the frequency spectra of the electrocorticograms. The specific characteristics of the action of the catecholamine precursor were manifested in the same conditions in the form of an intensification of the power of the 5-7 Hz rhythms, and an attenuation of the power of the 2-3 Hz rhythms.

  4. Interactions of the neurotoxic amine 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine with monoamine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Singer, T P; Salach, J I; Castagnoli, N; Trevor, A

    1986-05-01

    1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), a thermal breakdown product of a meperidine-like narcotic used by drug abusers as a heroin substitute, produces Parkinsonian symptoms in humans and primates. The nigrostriatal toxicity is not due to MPTP itself but to one or more oxidation products resulting from the action of monoamine oxidase (MAO) on this tertiary allylamine. Both MAO A and B catalyse the oxidation of MPTP to the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-2,3-dihydropyridinium species (MPDP+), which undergoes further oxidation to the fully aromatic 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium species (MPP+). These bio-oxidations are blocked by selective inhibitors of MAO A and B. Additionally, MPTP, MPDP+ and MPP+ are competitive inhibitors of MAO A and B. The A form of the enzyme is particularly sensitive to this type of reversible inhibition. Both MAO A and B also are irreversibly inactivated by MPTP and MPDP+, but not by MPP+. This inactivation obeys the characteristics of a mechanism-based or 'suicide' process. The inactivation, which is accompanied by the incorporation of radioactivity from methyl-labelled MPTP, is likely to result from covalent modification of the enzyme.

  5. Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel dual monoamine-cholinesterase inhibitors as potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Lang, Ming; Youdim, Moussa B H; Amit, Tamar; Sun, Yewei; Zhang, Zaijun; Wang, Yuqiang; Weinreb, Orly

    2016-10-01

    Current novel therapeutic approach suggests that multifunctional compounds with diverse biological properties and a single bioavailability and pharmacokinetic metabolism, will produce higher significant advantages in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Based on this rational, a new class of cholinesterase (ChE)-monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were designed and synthesized by amalgamating the propargyl moiety of the irreversible selective MAO-B inhibitor, neuroprotective/neurorestorative anti-Parkinsonian drug, rasagiline, into the "N-methyl" position of the ChE inhibitor, anti-AD drug rivastigmine. Initially, we examined the MAO and ChE inhibitory effect of these novel compounds, MT series in vitro and in vivo. Among MT series, MT-031 exhibited higher potency as a dual MAO-A and ChE inhibitor compared to other compounds in acute-treated mice. Additionally, MT-031 was found to increase the striatal levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE), and prevent the metabolism of DA and 5-HT. Finally, we have demonstrated that MT-031 exerted neuroprotective effect against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity and reactive oxygen species generation in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. These findings provide evidence that MT-031 is a potent brain permeable novel multifunctional, neuroprotective and MAO-A/ChE inhibitor, preserves in one molecule entity some of the beneficial properties of its parent drugs, rasagiline and rivastigmine, and thus may be indicated as novel therapeutic approach for AD.

  6. [Effects of amitriptyline, fluoxetine, and tianeptine on the content of monoamines and their metabolites in Wistar rat brain structures].

    PubMed

    Kudrin, V S; Mosin, V M; Klodt, P M; Narkevich, V B; Molodavkin, G M; Voronina, T A

    2010-03-01

    The effects of antidepressant drugs belonging to different pharmacological groups--amitriptyline, fluoxetine (prozac), and tianeptine (coaxyl)--on the content of monoamines and their metabolites in Wistar rat brain structures (frontal cortex, hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, striatum, and hippocamp) has been studied using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (10 mg/kg) was found to produce a moderate increase in the DOPAC/dopamine turnover index in nucleus accumbens, but did not influence the levels of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine, and its metabolites (5-HIAA, DOPAC, and HVA) in other brain structures studied (frontal cortex, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocamp). Fluoxetine (Prozac) (20 mg/kg) decreased both the 5-HIAA content and the 5-HIAA/5-HT (5-HT turnover index) in all brain structures of Wistar rats. In contrast, the effects of Prozac on the level of catecholamines and their metabolites in various brain regions was more complex. Tianeptine (Coaxyl) was demonstrated to increase both the 5-HIAA content and the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in all the structures studied (except for nucleus accumbens), in good agreement with the hypothesis concerning a two-phase mode of tianeptine action with enhanced 5-HT secretion in the synaptic gap in the first stage of pharmacological response.

  7. Azure B, a metabolite of methylene blue, is a high-potency, reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Petzer, Anél; Harvey, Brian H; Wegener, Gregers; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2012-02-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been shown to act at multiple cellular and molecular targets and as a result possesses diverse medical applications. Among these is a high potency reversible inhibition of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) that may, at least in part, underlie its adverse effects but also its psycho- and neuromodulatory actions. MB is metabolized to yield N-demethylated products of which azure B, the monodemethyl species, is the major metabolite. Similar to MB, azure B also displays a variety of biological activities and may therefore contribute to the pharmacological profile of MB. Based on these observations, the present study examines the interactions of azure B with recombinant human MAO-A and -B. The results show that azure B is a potent MAO-A inhibitor (IC₅₀=11 nM), approximately 6-fold more potent than is MB (IC₅₀=70 nM) under identical conditions. Measurements of the time-dependency of inhibition suggest that the interaction of azure B with MAO-A is reversible. Azure B also reversibly inhibits the MAO-B isozyme with an IC₅₀ value of 968 nM. These results suggest that azure B may be a hitherto under recognized contributor to the pharmacology and toxicology of MB by blocking central and peripheral MAO-A activity and as such needs to be considered during its use in humans and animals.

  8. Structural dynamics of the monoamine transporter homolog LeuT from accelerated conformational sampling and channel analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, James R; Gedeon, Patrick C; Madura, Jeffry D

    2014-10-01

    The bacterial leucine transporter LeuT retains significant secondary structure similarities to the human monoamine transporters (MAT) such as the dopamine and serotonin reuptake proteins. The primary method of computational study of the MATs has been through the use of the crystallized LeuT structure. Different conformations of LeuT can give insight into mechanistic details of the MAT family. A conformational sampling performed through accelerated molecular dynamics simulations testing different combinations of the leucine substrate and bound sodium ions revealed seven distinct conformational clusters. Further analysis has been performed to target salt-bridge residues R30-D404, Y108-F253, and R5-D369 and transmembrane domains on both the seven isolated structures and the total trajectories. In addition, solvent accessibility of LeuT and its substrate binding pockets has been analyzed using a program for calculating channel radii. Occupation of the Na2 site stabilizes the outward conformation and should bind to the open outward conformation before the leucine and Na1 sodium while two possible pathways were found to be available for intracellular transport.

  9. Challenges dealing with depleted uranium in Germany - Reuse or disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Kai D.

    2007-07-01

    During enrichment large amounts of depleted Uranium are produced. In Germany every year 2.800 tons of depleted uranium are generated. In Germany depleted uranium is not classified as radioactive waste but a resource for further enrichment. Therefore since 1996 depleted Uranium is sent to ROSATOM in Russia. However it still has to be dealt with the second generation of depleted Uranium. To evaluate the alternative actions in case a solution has to be found in Germany, several studies have been initiated by the Federal Ministry of the Environment. The work that has been carried out evaluated various possibilities to deal with depleted uranium. The international studies on this field and the situation in Germany have been analyzed. In case no further enrichment is planned the depleted uranium has to be stored. In the enrichment process UF{sub 6} is generated. It is an international consensus that for storage it should be converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The necessary technique is well established. If the depleted Uranium would have to be characterized as radioactive waste, a final disposal would become necessary. For the planned Konrad repository - a repository for non heat generating radioactive waste - the amount of Uranium is limited by the licensing authority. The existing license would not allow the final disposal of large amounts of depleted Uranium in the Konrad repository. The potential effect on the safety case has not been roughly analyzed. As a result it may be necessary to think about alternatives. Several possibilities for the use of depleted uranium in the industry have been identified. Studies indicate that the properties of Uranium would make it useful in some industrial fields. Nevertheless many practical and legal questions are open. One further option may be the use as shielding e.g. in casks for transport or disposal. Possible techniques for using depleted Uranium as shielding are the use of the metallic Uranium as well as the inclusion in concrete

  10. 10. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLD IN FOUNDRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLD IN FOUNDRY. (11/11/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  11. Individual differences in dopamine level modulate the ego depletion effect.

    PubMed

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Yumeng; Mao, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Initial exertion of self-control impairs subsequent self-regulatory performance, which is referred to as the ego depletion effect. The current study examined how individual differences in dopamine level, as indexed by eye blink rate (EBR), would moderate ego depletion. An inverted-U-shaped relationship between EBR and subsequent self-regulatory performance was found when participants initially engaged in self-control but such relationship was absent in the control condition where there was no initial exertion, suggesting individuals with a medium dopamine level may be protected from the typical ego depletion effect. These findings are consistent with a cognitive explanation which considers ego depletion as a phenomenon similar to "switch costs" that would be neutralized by factors promoting flexible switching.

  12. Stimulated Emission Depletion Lithography with Mercapto-Functional Polymers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Surface reactive nanostructures were fabricated using stimulated emission depletion (STED) lithography. The functionalization of the nanostructures was realized by copolymerization of a bifunctional metal oxo cluster in the presence of a triacrylate monomer. Ligands of the cluster surface cross-link to the monomer during the lithographic process, whereas unreacted mercapto functionalized ligands are transferred to the polymer and remain reactive after polymer formation of the surface of the nanostructure. The depletion efficiency in dependence of the cluster loading was investigated and full depletion of the STED effect was observed with a cluster loading exceeding 4 wt %. A feature size by λ/11 was achieved by using a donut-shaped depletion beam. The reactivity of the mercapto groups on the surface of the nanostructure was tested by incubation with mercapto-reactive fluorophores. PMID:26816204

  13. Depletion in Antarctic Ozone and Associated Climatic Change,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ANTARCTIC REGIONS, *CLIMATE, *DEPLETION, *OZONE, AGREEMENTS, ATMOSPHERES, ATMOSPHERICS, CARBON, CARBON DIOXIDE, COMPUTATIONS, DIOXIDES, GREENHOUSE ... EFFECT , GREENHOUSES, HIGH LATITUDES, LATITUDE, LOSSES, MEAN, METHANE, MODELS, NETS, NITROUS OXIDE, OBSERVATION, OXIDES, PERTURBATIONS, REGIONS, STEADY

  14. STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION: A FOCUS ON EPA'S RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In September of 1987 the United States, along with 26 other countries, signed a landmark treaty to limit and subsequently, through revisions, phase out the production of all significant ozone depleting substances. Many researchers suspected that these chemicals, especially chl...

  15. Hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion microscopy and methods of use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Timlin, Jerilyn A; Aaron, Jesse S

    2014-04-01

    A hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion ("STED") microscope system for high-resolution imaging of samples labeled with multiple fluorophores (e.g., two to ten fluorophores). The hyperspectral STED microscope includes a light source, optical systems configured for generating an excitation light beam and a depletion light beam, optical systems configured for focusing the excitation and depletion light beams on a sample, and systems for collecting and processing data generated by interaction of the excitation and depletion light beams with the sample. Hyperspectral STED data may be analyzed using multivariate curve resolution analysis techniques to deconvolute emission from the multiple fluorophores. The hyperspectral STED microscope described herein can be used for multi-color, subdiffraction imaging of samples (e.g., materials and biological materials) and for analyzing a tissue by Forster Resonance Energy Transfer ("FRET").

  16. Background suppression in fluorescence nanoscopy with stimulated emission double depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Prunsche, Benedikt; Zhou, Lu; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence nanoscopy is a powerful super-resolution imaging technique based on the confinement of fluorescence emission to the central subregion of an observation volume through de-excitation of fluorophores in the periphery via stimulated emission. Here, we introduce stimulated emission double depletion (STEDD) as a method to selectively remove artificial background intensity. In this approach, a first, conventional STED pulse is followed by a second, delayed Gaussian STED pulse that specifically depletes the central region, thus leaving only background. Thanks to time-resolved detection we can remove this background intensity voxel by voxel by taking the weighted difference of photons collected before and after the second STED pulse. STEDD thus yields background-suppressed super-resolved images as well as STED-based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data. Furthermore, the proposed method is also beneficial when considering lower-power, less redshifted depletion pulses.

  17. Atmosphere Assisted Machining of Depleted Uranium (DU) Penetrators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    tooling should be approximately $75,000 each. Lessons learned in the Vacuum Induction Remelt MM&T and the chip melts made on this program point out the...AD-E-401 528 Cutwator Report ARCCD-CR-6600S (V) ATMOSPHERE ASSISTED MACMINING DEPLETED URANIUM (DU) PENETRATORS DTic Charles E. Lathe"rOwn ELECTE...E-401 528 Contractor Report ARCCD-CR-86008 ATMOSPHERE ASSISTED MACHINING OF DEPLETED URANIUM (DU) PENETRATORS Charles E. Latham-Brown Frank Porter

  18. Lithium Depletion in the Beta Pictoris Moving Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Jennifer C.; Jensen, E. L.; Reaser, B. E.

    2006-12-01

    We present a study of lithium depletion in twelve late-type pre-main-sequence stars in the coeval Beta Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG). The age of this group ( 12 Myr) is well constrained because all of the stars in the sample have Hipparcos distances. We have determined Li abundances for these K and M stars using equivalent width measurements of the 6707.8 Angstrom Li I line from new high-resolution, high-S/N echelle spectra, and we compare these abundances to models of pre-main-sequence Li depletion by Baraffe et al. (1998), D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1997, 1998), and Siess, Dufour, & Forestini (2000). Significantly more lithium depletion is observed in the sample than is predicted for a group of this age. In particular, the discrepancy between the predicted and the observed lithium abundances increases with decreasing effective temperature, suggesting a problem with theories describing pre-main-sequence lithium depletion. Our data indicate that M stars deplete lithium more rapidly than predicted, which could make M-type post-T-Tauri stars difficult to identify. In addition, we compare our results to the work of Song, Bessell, & Zuckerman (2002) on HIP 112312. In contrast to that work, we did not observe the lithium depletion boundary of the BPMG; none of the three M4.5 stars in the sample showed evidence of lithium (log N(Li) < -0.5), indicating a lithium depletion boundary later than M4.5, further underscoring the gap between age estimates from lithium depletion and those from theoretical evolutionary tracks. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0307830.

  19. Observed and Simulated Depletion Layers with Southward IMF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    characteristics of an event on 12 March 2001, in ionosphere , follow magnetic field lines to near the mag- which a depletion layer was observed just...depletion layers 2153 region. The second type inhibits dayside merging and is a ionosphere /thermosphere. The simulations discussed here possible...mechanism for understanding the saturation of the contain specifically selected parameters and simplifying ap- ionospheric potential under strongly driven

  20. Retrieval of buried depleted uranium from the T-1 trench

    SciTech Connect

    Burmeister, M.; Castaneda, N.; Greengard, T. |; Hull, C.; Barbour, D.; Quapp, W.J.

    1998-07-01

    The Trench 1 remediation project will be conducted this year to retrieve depleted uranium and other associated materials from a trench at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The excavated materials will be segregated and stabilized for shipment. The depleted uranium will be treated at an offsite facility which utilizes a novel approach for waste minimization and disposal through utilization of a combination of uranium recycling and volume efficient uranium stabilization.

  1. Depletion optimization of lumped burnable poisons in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kodah, Z.H.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques were developed to construct a set of basic poison depletion curves which deplete in a monotonical manner. These curves were combined to match a required optimized depletion profile by utilizing either linear or non-linear programming methods. Three computer codes, LEOPARD, XSDRN, and EXTERMINATOR-2 were used in the analyses. A depletion routine was developed and incorporated into the XSDRN code to allow the depletion of fuel, fission products, and burnable poisons. The Three Mile Island Unit-1 reactor core was used in this work as a typical PWR core. Two fundamental burnable poison rod designs were studied. They are a solid cylindrical poison rod and an annular cylindrical poison rod with water filling the central region.These two designs have either a uniform mixture of burnable poisons or lumped spheroids of burnable poisons in the poison region. Boron and gadolinium are the two burnable poisons which were investigated in this project. Thermal self-shielding factor calculations for solid and annular poison rods were conducted. Also expressions for overall thermal self-shielding factors for one or more than one size group of poison spheroids inside solid and annular poison rods were derived and studied. Poison spheroids deplete at a slower rate than the poison mixture because each spheroid exhibits some self-shielding effects of its own. The larger the spheroid, the higher the self-shielding effects due to the increase in poison concentration.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form Enable Javascript to view ... Open All Close All Description TK2 -related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form ( TK2 -MDS) is an ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... All Close All Description MPV17 -related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome is an inherited disorder that can ...

  4. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies of tedizolid to assess the potential for peripheral or central monoamine oxidase interactions.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, S; Bartizal, K; Minassian, S L; Fang, E; Prokocimer, P

    2013-07-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is a novel oxazolidinone prodrug whose active moiety, tedizolid, has improved potency against Gram-positive pathogens and pharmacokinetics, allowing once-daily administration. Given linezolid warnings for drug-drug and drug-food interactions mediated by monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition, including sporadic serotonergic toxicity, these studies evaluated tedizolid for potential MAO interactions. In vitro, tedizolid and linezolid were reversible inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B; the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for tedizolid was 8.7 μM for MAO-A and 5.7 μM for MAO-B and 46.0 and 2.1 μM, respectively, with linezolid. Tedizolid phosphate was negative in the mouse head twitch model of serotonergic activity. Two randomized placebo-controlled crossover clinical studies assessed the potential of 200 mg/day tedizolid phosphate (at steady state) to enhance pressor responses to coadministered oral tyramine or pseudoephedrine. Sensitivity to tyramine was determined by comparing the concentration of tyramine required to elicit a ≥ 30-mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure (TYR30) when administered with placebo versus tedizolid phosphate. The geometric mean tyramine sensitivity ratio (placebo TYR30/tedizolid phosphate TYR30) was 1.33; a ratio of ≥ 2 is considered clinically relevant. In the pseudoephedrine study, mean maximum systolic blood pressure was not significantly different when pseudoephedrine was coadministered with tedizolid phosphate versus placebo. In summary, tedizolid is a weak, reversible inhibitor of MAO-A and MAO-B in vitro. Provocative testing in humans and animal models failed to uncover significant signals that would suggest potential for hypertensive or serotonergic adverse consequences at the therapeutic dose of tedizolid phosphate. Clinical studies are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01539473 (tyramine interaction study conducted at Covance Clinical Research Center, Evansville, IN) and NCT01577459

  5. Involvement of monoamine oxidase and diamine oxidase in the metabolism of the cell differentiating agent hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA).

    PubMed

    Conley, B A; Callery, P S; Egorin, M J; Subramanyam, B; Geelhaar, L A; Pan, S S

    1988-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a number of metabolites of hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) in the urine of patients treated with HMBA. These include N-acetyl-1,6-diaminohexane (NADAH), 6-acetamidohexanoic acid (6AcHA), 1,6-diaminohexane (DAH) and 6-aminohexanoic acid (6AmHA). Because these compounds have potential roles in the dose-limiting metabolic acidosis and neurotoxicity associated with HMBA therapy, and are similar in structure to known substrates of monoamine oxidase (MAO) and diamine oxidase (DAO), we investigated the activities of these enzymes in the metabolic interconversion of HMBA metabolites. NADAH (5 mM) was incubated with MAO and aldehyde dehydrogenase. 6AcHA production was verified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and quantified by gas chromatography. 6AcHA production was linear for up to 4 hr. Complete inhibition of MAO activity was observed with 2 mM tranyl-cypromine or pargyline. Mouse liver microsomes, which do not contain MAO, did not convert NADAH to 6AcHA and, in control experiments, did not degrade 6AcHA. The HMBA metabolite, DAH, was a substrate for DAO, producing 3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2H-azepine. Participation of DAO in the metabolism of HMBA implies potential interaction of HMBA and metabolites with polyamine metabolism and may represent a mechanism for HMBA's effects on cellular growth and differentiation. Metabolism of NADAH, also a differentiator, by MAO implies that concurrent use of HMBA and an MAO inhibitor may be clinically useful.

  6. Azure B, a metabolite of methylene blue, is a high-potency, reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Petzer, Anél; Harvey, Brian H.; Wegener, Gregers; Petzer, Jacobus P.

    2012-02-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been shown to act at multiple cellular and molecular targets and as a result possesses diverse medical applications. Among these is a high potency reversible inhibition of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) that may, at least in part, underlie its adverse effects but also its psycho- and neuromodulatory actions. MB is metabolized to yield N-demethylated products of which azure B, the monodemethyl species, is the major metabolite. Similar to MB, azure B also displays a variety of biological activities and may therefore contribute to the pharmacological profile of MB. Based on these observations, the present study examines the interactions of azure B with recombinant human MAO-A and -B. The results show that azure B is a potent MAO-A inhibitor (IC{sub 50} = 11 nM), approximately 6-fold more potent than is MB (IC{sub 50} = 70 nM) under identical conditions. Measurements of the time-dependency of inhibition suggest that the interaction of azure B with MAO-A is reversible. Azure B also reversibly inhibits the MAO-B isozyme with an IC{sub 50} value of 968 nM. These results suggest that azure B may be a hitherto under recognized contributor to the pharmacology and toxicology of MB by blocking central and peripheral MAO-A activity and as such needs to be considered during its use in humans and animals. Highlights: ► Methylene blue (MB) is a known potent MAO-A inhibitor. ► Azure B, the major metabolite of MB, is more potent as a MAO-A inhibitor. ► Azure B may be a contributor to the CNS pharmacology and toxicology of MB.

  7. Human neurons express the polyspecific cation transporter hOCT2, which translocates monoamine neurotransmitters, amantadine, and memantine.

    PubMed

    Busch, A E; Karbach, U; Miska, D; Gorboulev, V; Akhoundova, A; Volk, C; Arndt, P; Ulzheimer, J C; Sonders, M S; Baumann, C; Waldegger, S; Lang, F; Koepsell, H

    1998-08-01

    Recently, we cloned the human cation transporter hOCT2, a member of a new family of polyspecific transporters from kidney, and demonstrated electrogenic uptake of tetraethylammonium, choline, N1-methylnicotinamide, and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium. Using polymerase chain reaction amplification, cDNA sequencing, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry, we now show that hOCT2 message and protein are expressed in neurons of the cerebral cortex and in various subcortical nuclei. In Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing hOCT2, electrogenic transport of norepinephrine, histamine, dopamine, serotonin, and the antiparkinsonian drugs memantine and amantadine was demonstrated by tracer influx, tracer efflux, electrical measurements, or a combination. Apparent Km values of 1.9 +/- 0.6 mM (norepinephrine), 1.3 +/- 0.3 mM (histamine), 0.39 +/- 0.16 mM (dopamine), 80 +/- 20 microM (serotonin), 34 +/- 5 microM (memantine), and 27 +/- 3 microM (amantadine) were estimated. Measurement of trans-effects in depolarized oocytes and human embryonic kidney cells expressing hOCT2 suggests that there were different rates and specificities for cation influx and efflux. The hypothesis is raised that hOCT2 plays a physiological role in the central nervous system by regulating interstitial concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters that have evaded high affinity uptake mechanisms. We show that amantadine does not interact with the expressed human Na+/Cl- dopamine cotransporter. However, concentrations of amantadine that are effective for the treatment of Parkinson's disease may increase the interstitial concentrations of dopamine and other aminergic neurotransmitters by competitive inhibition of hOCT2.

  8. Limitation of adipose tissue enlargement in rats chronically treated with semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Carpéné, C; Abello, V; Iffiú-Soltész, Z; Mercier, N; Fève, Bruno; Valet, P

    2008-06-01

    Inhibition of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidases (SSAO) and monoamine oxidases (MAO) reduces fat deposition in obese rodents: chronic administration of the SSAO-inhibitor semicarbazide (S) in combination with pargyline (MAO-inhibitor) has been shown to reduce body weight gain in obese Zucker rats, while (E)-2-(4-fluorophenethyl)-3-fluoroallylamine, an SSAO- and MAO-B inhibitor, has been reported to limit weight gain in obese and diabetic mice. Our aim was to state whether such weight gain limitation could occur in non-obese, non-diabetic rats and to extend these observations to other amine oxidase inhibitors. Prolonged treatment of non-obese rats with a high dose of S (900 micromol kg(-1) day(-1)) reduced body weight gain and limited white adipose tissue enlargement. When chronically administered at a threefold lower dose, S also inhibited SSAO activity but not fat depot enlargement, suggesting that effects other than SSAO inhibition were involved in adipose tissue growth retardation. However, combined treatment of this lower dose of S with pargyline inhibited SSAO, MAO, energy intake, weight gain and fat deposition. Adipocytes from treated rats exhibited unchanged insulin responsiveness but impaired antilipolytic responses to amine oxidase substrates. Phenelzine clearly inhibited both MAO and SSAO when tested on adipocytes. Obese rats receiving phenelzine i.p. at 17 micromol kg(-1) day(-1) for 3 weeks, exhibited blunted MAO and SSAO activities in any tested tissue, diminished body weight gain and reduced intra-abdominal adipose tissue. Their adipocytes were less responsive to lipogenesis activation by tyramine or benzylamine. These observations suggest that SSAO inhibition is not sufficient to impair fat deposition. However, combined MAO and SSAO inhibition limits adiposity in non-obese as well as in obese rats.