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Sample records for amusic brain lost

  1. The amusic brain: lost in music, but not in space.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, Barbara; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Ishihara, Masami; Gosselin, Nathalie; Bertrand, Olivier; Rossetti, Yves; Peretz, Isabelle

    2010-04-21

    Congenital amusia is a neurogenetic disorder of music processing that is currently ascribed to a deficit in pitch processing. A recent study challenges this view and claims the disorder might arise as a consequence of a general spatial-processing deficit. Here, we assessed spatial processing abilities in two independent samples of individuals with congenital amusia by using line bisection tasks (Experiment 1) and a mental rotation task (Experiment 2). Both amusics and controls showed the classical spatial effects on bisection performance and on mental rotation performance, and amusics and controls did not differ from each other. These results indicate that the neurocognitive impairment of congenital amusia does not affect the processing of space.

  2. The Amusic Brain: In Tune, Out of Key, and Unaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peretz, Isabelle; Brattico, Elvira; Jarvenpaa, Miika; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2009-01-01

    Like language, music engagement is universal, complex and present early in life. However, approximately 4% of the general population experiences a lifelong deficit in music perception that cannot be explained by hearing loss, brain damage, intellectual deficiencies or lack of exposure. This musical disorder, commonly known as tone-deafness and now…

  3. California Amusement Rides and Liability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Adam

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-three-year-old Cristina Moreno traveled from Spain to California for her honeymoon in 2000. As part of her visit, she rode the Indiana Jones amusement ride at Disneyland with her new husband. On June 25, 2000, she suffered a brain injury, and she eventually died on September 1, 2000, as a result of injuries allegedly sustained while riding…

  4. An Amusement Park Physics Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moll, Rachel F.

    2010-01-01

    Amusement park physics is a popular way to reinforce physics concepts and to motivate physics learners. This article describes a novel physics competition where students use simple tools to take amusement park ride measurements and use the data to answer challenging exam questions. Research into the impact of participating in the competition…

  5. Brain Drain in Higher Education: Lost Hope or Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odhiambo, George

    2012-01-01

    The flight of human capital is a phenomenon that has been of concern to academics and development practitioners for decades but unfortunately, there is no systematic record of the number of skilled professionals that many African countries have continued to lose to the developed world. Termed the "brain drain", it represents the loss of…

  6. An amusement park physics competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Rachel F.

    2010-07-01

    Amusement park physics is a popular way to reinforce physics concepts and to motivate physics learners. This article describes a novel physics competition where students use simple tools to take amusement park ride measurements and use the data to answer challenging exam questions. Research into the impact of participating in the competition reveals positive effects such as the acquisition of experimentation skills and improved attitudes towards physics.

  7. Designing an Amusement Park Ride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.; Robles, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    To improve access to STEM curriculum, an activity was planned that presents the opportunity to design and build using gears and other tools. In this challenge, preservice elementary school teachers were asked to mathematically analyze gears and create an amusement park ride that uses gears to spin. Although this lesson was implemented with…

  8. Legacy of Lost Canyon: A Curious Cave Conundrum. BrainLink: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Barbara; Cutler, Paula; Denk, James; Moreno, Nancy

    Reading Links were created as ready-to-use reading and writing activities that directly correlate to the Brainlink adventure stories. The activities are related to reading objectives common to many curricula and cover a range of grades and ability levels. The book features a story called "Legacy of Lost Canyon, a Curious Cave Conundrum." Students…

  9. Accelerometer Measurements in the Amusement Park.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reno, Charles; Speers, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of the Texas Instruments' calculator-based laboratory (CBL) and Vernier accelerometer for measuring the vector sum of the gravitational field and the acceleration of amusement park rides. (JRH)

  10. 25 CFR 141.13 - Amusement company licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amusement company licenses. 141.13 Section 141.13 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Licensing Requirements and Procedures § 141.13 Amusement company... companies where the contract between the tribe and the amusement company provides for the payment of a...

  11. 25 CFR 141.13 - Amusement company licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amusement company licenses. 141.13 Section 141.13 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Licensing Requirements and Procedures § 141.13 Amusement company... companies where the contract between the tribe and the amusement company provides for the payment of a...

  12. 25 CFR 141.13 - Amusement company licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Amusement company licenses. 141.13 Section 141.13 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Licensing Requirements and Procedures § 141.13 Amusement company... companies where the contract between the tribe and the amusement company provides for the payment of a...

  13. 25 CFR 141.13 - Amusement company licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amusement company licenses. 141.13 Section 141.13 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Licensing Requirements and Procedures § 141.13 Amusement company... companies where the contract between the tribe and the amusement company provides for the payment of a...

  14. 25 CFR 141.13 - Amusement company licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amusement company licenses. 141.13 Section 141.13 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Licensing Requirements and Procedures § 141.13 Amusement company... companies where the contract between the tribe and the amusement company provides for the payment of a...

  15. Amusics Can Imitate What They Cannot Discriminate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Sean; Peretz, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    A longstanding issue in psychology is the relationship between how we perceive the world and how we act upon it. Pitch deafness provides an interesting opportunity to test for the independence of perception and production abilities in the speech domain. We tested eight amusics and eight matched controls for their ability to perceive pitch shifts…

  16. Lost highway(s): barriers to postnatal cortical neurogenesis and implications for brain repair.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J

    2015-01-01

    The genesis of the cerebral cortex is a highly complex and tightly-orchestrated process of cell division, migration, maturation, and integration. Developmental missteps often have catastrophic consequences on cortical function. Further, the cerebral cortex, in which neurogenesis takes place almost exclusively prenatally, has a very poor capacity for replacement of neurons lost to injury or disease. A multitude of factors underlie this deficit, including the depletion of radial glia, the gliogenic switch which mitigates continued neurogenesis, diminished neuronal migratory streams, and inflammatory processes associated with disease. Despite this, there are glimmers of hope that new approaches may allow for more significant cortical repair. Herein, we review corticogenesis from the context of regeneration and detail the strategies to promote neurogenesis, including interneuron transplants and glial reprogramming. Such strategies circumvent the "lost highways" which are critical for cortical development but are absent in the adult. These new approaches may provide for the possibility of meaningful clinical regeneration of elements of cortical circuitry lost to trauma and disease.

  17. Lost highway(s): barriers to postnatal cortical neurogenesis and implications for brain repair

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    The genesis of the cerebral cortex is a highly complex and tightly-orchestrated process of cell division, migration, maturation, and integration. Developmental missteps often have catastrophic consequences on cortical function. Further, the cerebral cortex, in which neurogenesis takes place almost exclusively prenatally, has a very poor capacity for replacement of neurons lost to injury or disease. A multitude of factors underlie this deficit, including the depletion of radial glia, the gliogenic switch which mitigates continued neurogenesis, diminished neuronal migratory streams, and inflammatory processes associated with disease. Despite this, there are glimmers of hope that new approaches may allow for more significant cortical repair. Herein, we review corticogenesis from the context of regeneration and detail the strategies to promote neurogenesis, including interneuron transplants and glial reprogramming. Such strategies circumvent the “lost highways” which are critical for cortical development but are absent in the adult. These new approaches may provide for the possibility of meaningful clinical regeneration of elements of cortical circuitry lost to trauma and disease. PMID:26136658

  18. [Post-traumatic brain injury behavioural sequelae: the man who lost his charm].

    PubMed

    Mattos, Paulo; Saboya, Eloisa; Araujo, Cátia

    2002-06-01

    We portray a case of traumatic brain injury followed by symptoms of disexecutive or frontal lobe syndrome: apathy, lack of pragmatism and loss of previous abilities, specially those concerning social interaction - in particular with opposite sex - resulting in impairment of his characteristic charm. The results of the neuropsychological examination included retrieval anemic deficits with normal recognition, impaired motor dexterity and cognitive flexibility in the presence of normal intelligence. The cognitive-behavioural symptomatology contrasted with a normal neurologic examination.

  19. Pth4, an ancient parathyroid hormone lost in eutherian mammals, reveals a new brain-to-bone signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Bregua, Paula; Torres-Nuñez, Eva; Saxena, Ankur; Guerreiro, Pedro; Braasch, Ingo; Prober, David A; Moran, Paloma; Cerda-Reverter, Jose Miguel; Du, Shao Jun; Adrio, Fatima; Power, Deborah M; Canario, Adelino V M; Postlethwait, John H; Bronner, Marianne E; Cañestro, Cristian; Rotllant, Josep

    2017-02-01

    Regulation of bone development, growth, and remodeling traditionally has been thought to depend on endocrine and autocrine/paracrine modulators. Recently, however, brain-derived signals have emerged as key regulators of bone metabolism, although their mechanisms of action have been poorly understood. We reveal the existence of an ancient parathyroid hormone (Pth)4 in zebrafish that was secondarily lost in the eutherian mammals' lineage, including humans, and that is specifically expressed in neurons of the hypothalamus and appears to be a central neural regulator of bone development and mineral homeostasis. Transgenic fish lines enabled mapping of axonal projections leading from the hypothalamus to the brainstem and spinal cord. Targeted laser ablation demonstrated an essential role for of pth4-expressing neurons in larval bone mineralization. Moreover, we show that Runx2 is a direct regulator of pth4 expression and that Pth4 can activate cAMP signaling mediated by Pth receptors. Finally, gain-of-function experiments show that Pth4 can alter calcium/phosphorus levels and affect expression of genes involved in phosphate homeostasis. Based on our discovery and characterization of Pth4, we propose a model for evolution of bone homeostasis in the context of the vertebrate transition from an aquatic to a terrestrial lifestyle.-Suarez-Bregua, P., Torres-Nuñez, E., Saxena, A., Guerreiro, P., Braasch, I., Prober, D. A., Moran, P., Cerda-Reverter, J. M., Du, S. J., Adrio, F., Power, D. M., Canario, A. V. M., Postlethwait, J. H., Bronner, M E., Cañestro, C., Rotllant, J. Pth4, an ancient parathyroid hormone lost in eutherian mammals, reveals a new brain-to-bone signaling pathway.

  20. Brain implants for substituting lost motor function: state of the art and potential impact on the lives of motor-impaired seniors.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, N F; Aarnoutse, E J; Vansteensel, M J

    2014-01-01

    Recent scientific achievements bring the concept of neural prosthetics for reinstating lost motor function closer to medical application. Current research involves severely paralyzed people under the age of 65, but implications for seniors with stroke or trauma-induced impairments are clearly on the horizon. Demographic changes will lead to a shortage of personnel to care for an increasing population of senior citizens, threatening maintenance of an acceptable level of care and urging ways for people to live longer at their home independent from personal assistance. This is particularly challenging when people suffer from disabilities such as partial paralysis after stroke or trauma, where daily personal assistance is required. For some of these people, neural prosthetics can reinstate some lost motor function and/or lost communication, thereby increasing independence and possibly quality of life. In this viewpoint article, we present the state of the art in decoding brain activity in the service of brain-computer interfacing. Although some noninvasive applications produce good results, we focus on brain implants that benefit from better quality brain signals. Fully implantable neural prostheses for home use are not available yet, but clinical trials are being prepared. More sophisticated systems are expected to follow in the years to come, with capabilities of interest for less severe paralysis. Eventually the combination of smart robotics and brain implants is expected to enable people to interact well enough with their environment to live an independent life in spite of motor disabilities.

  1. Brain implants for substituting lost motor function: state of the art and potential impact on lives of motor-impaired seniors

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, NF; Aarnoutse, EJ; Vansteensel, MJ

    2017-01-01

    Recent scientific achievements bring the concept of neural prosthetics for reinstating lost motor function closer to medical application. Current research involves severely paralyzed people under 65, but implications for seniors with stroke or trauma-induced impairments are clearly on the horizon. Demographic changes will lead to a shortage of personnel to care for an increasing population of senior citizens, threatening maintenance of an acceptable level of care and urging ways for people to live longer at their home independent from personal assistance. This is particularly challenging when people suffer from disabilities such as partial paralysis after stroke or trauma, where daily personal assistance is required. For some of these people, neural prosthetics can reinstate some lost motor function and/or lost communication, thereby increasing independence and possibly quality of life. In this viewpoint article we present the state of the art in decoding brain activity in the service of Brain-Computer Interfacing (BCI). Although some non-invasive applications produce good results, we focus on brain implants which benefit from better quality brain signals. Fully implantable neural prostheses for home use are not available yet, but clinical trials are being prepared. More sophisticated systems are expected to follow in the years to come, with capabilities of interest for less severe paralysis. Eventually the combination of smart robotics and brain implants is expected to enable people to interact well enough with their environment to live an independent life in spite of motor disabilities. PMID:24642607

  2. SPS Outreach with Amusement Park Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geise, Kathleen; Iona, Steven; Stencel, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The Department of Physics and Astronomy helps host an annual outreach event at a local amusement park for students in grades 6-12. The Physics Night Program is made up of several parts primarily focused on having students apply physics principles and estimate measurements at the park. That evening, DU sponsors undergraduate student volunteers in queue lines to discuss physics concepts with students, and the Society of Physics Student (SPS) chapter stages a more elaborate collection of physics demonstrations at a central gathering place. In 2006, we expanded our outreach efforts to include interactive data collection and on-site interpretation of data. A team of graduate and undergraduate DU SPS students outfitted high school volunteers with vests and hardware designed to return three-axis acceleration information. Students wore the sensors on the rides, returned the equipment to the staging area, and received immediate feedback about the accelerations their hardware recorded. We hope to expand the range of experiential sensing to include more physiological as well as physical data collection, and to provide greater accuracy utilizing the technology we are implementing at the park.

  3. Analyzing Forces on Amusement Park Rides with Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieyra, Rebecca E.; Vieyra, Chrystian

    2014-03-01

    Mobile device accelerometers are a simple and easy way for students to collect accurate and detailed data on an amusement park ride. The resulting data can be graphed to assist in the creation of force diagrams to help students explain their physical sensations while on the ride. This type of activity can help students overcome some of the conceptual difficulties often associated with understanding centripetal force and typical "elevator-type problems" that are inherent in so many amusement park rides that move, lift, and drop riders. This article provides some sample data and examples from a visit to Six Flags Great America.

  4. Years of potential life lost for brain and CNS tumors relative to other cancers in adults in the United States, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Chaturia; Gittleman, Haley; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Kruchko, Carol; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Years of potential life lost (YPLL) complement incidence and survival rates by measuring how much a patient's life is likely to be shortened by his or her cancer. In this study, we examine the impact of death due to brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors compared to other common cancers in adults by investigating the YPLL of adults in the United States. Methods Mortality and life table data were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics Vital Statistics Data for 2010. The study population included individuals aged 20 years or older at death who died from one of the selected cancers. YPLL was calculated by taking an individual's age at death and finding the corresponding expected remaining years of life using life table data. Results The cancers with the greatest mean YPLL were other malignant CNS tumors (20.65), malignant brain tumors (19.93), and pancreatic cancer (15.13) for males and malignant brain tumors (20.31), breast cancer (18.78), and other malignant CNS tumors (18.36) for females. For both sexes, non-Hispanic whites had the lowest YPLL, followed by non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics. Conclusion Malignant brain and other CNS tumors have the greatest mean YPLL, thereby reflecting their short survival time post diagnosis. These findings will hopefully motivate more research into mitigating the impact of these debilitating tumors. PMID:26459813

  5. Analyzing Forces on Amusement Park Rides with Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieyra, Rebecca E.; Vieyra, Chrystian

    2014-01-01

    Mobile device accelerometers are a simple and easy way for students to collect accurate and detailed data on an amusement park ride. The resulting data can be graphed to assist in the creation of force diagrams to help students explain their physical sensations while on the ride. This type of activity can help students overcome some of the…

  6. Science 101: How Do People Design Safe Amusement Park Rides?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2015-01-01

    To address the question of how people design safe amusement park rides, Bill Robertson focuses on the factors designers must consider so that human bodies don't experience too large an acceleration (any change in speed and/or direction) or "g-force" (the acceleration an object undergoes while freely falling, with no air resistance, under…

  7. Neil Postman's Amusement: The Enemy with a Smiling Face.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longrie, Michael

    The first reading assignment one educator gives his first-year composition students helps answer their questions about what college work will be like. For this reason, he gives them Neil Postman's "Amusing Ourselves to Death" to read, a book which shows that the late 20th century is undergoing a vast epistemological shift, moving from…

  8. An Apparatus to Simulate an Amusement Park Rotor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saraiva, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The rotor is a device that can be found in many amusement parks. In the literature there are various articles about this topic. The rotor is a hollow cylindrical room, covered inside with canvas and which can be rotated about the central vertical axis. People stand upright, with their backs against the internal face of the device. When it reaches…

  9. Amusement Arcades Help Identify Teen Needs. Research Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Debra J.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews research on youth motivation for visiting amusement arcades and on the relationship among the school achievement, socioeconomic status, and self-esteem of fourth graders. Implications for camp involve providing adolescents with unstructured leisure time with little overt adult supervision and providing early intervention for low-achieving…

  10. US pediatric injuries involving amusement rides, 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Meghan C; Chounthirath, Thiphalak; Xiang, Huiyun; Smith, Gary A

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates pediatric injuries involving amusement rides treated in US emergency departments by retrospectively analyzing data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. From 1990 to 2010, an estimated 92 885 children ≤17 years sought treatment in US hospital emergency departments for injuries involving amusement rides, yielding an annual average of 4423 injuries. The average annual injury rate was 6.24 injuries per 100 000 US children, and the mean patient age was 8.73 years. The head and neck was the most commonly injured body region (28.0%), and the most common type of injury was a soft tissue injury (29.4%). Falling in, on, off, or against the ride was the most frequent mechanism of injury (31.7%). Only 1.5% of injuries resulted in hospitalization. An improved national system for monitoring injuries involving amusement rides is needed. There are opportunities to improve the safety of amusement rides for children, especially to prevent injuries from falls.

  11. Intraspinal Rewiring of the Corticospinal Tract Requires Target-Derived Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Compensates Lost Function after Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Masaki; Hayano, Yasufumi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2012-01-01

    Brain injury that results in an initial behavioural deficit is frequently followed by spontaneous recovery. The intrinsic mechanism of this functional recovery has never been fully understood. Here, we show that reorganization of the corticospinal tract induced by target-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor is crucial for spontaneous recovery…

  12. Changing Patterns of Organ Donation: Brain Dead Donors Are Not Being Lost by Donation After Circulatory Death.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Helen M; Glazier, Alexandra K; Delmonico, Francis L

    2016-02-01

    The clinical characteristics of all New England Organ Bank (NEOB) donors after circulatory death (DCD) donors were analyzed between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2014. During that 5-year period, there were 494 authorized medically suitable potential DCDs that the NEOB evaluated, constituting more than 30% of deceased donors coordinated annually by the NEOB. From the cohort of 494 authorized potential DCDs, 331 (67%) became actual DCD, 82 (17%) were attempted as a DCD but did not progress to donation, and 81 (16%) transitioned to an actual donor after brain death (DBD). Two hundred seventy-six organs were transplanted from the 81 donors that transitioned from DCD to actual DBD, including 24 heart, 70 liver, 12 single and 14 bilateral lung, and 12 pancreas transplants. When patients with devastating brain injury admitted to the intensive care units are registered donors, the Organ Procurement Organization staff should share the patient's donation decision with the health care team and the patient's family, as early as possible after the comfort measures only discussion has been initiated. The experience of the NEOB becomes an important reference of the successful implementation of DCD that enables an expansion of deceased donation (inclusive of DBD).

  13. Lost in laterality: interpreting ''preferred side of the head during mobile phone use and risk of brain tumour'' associations.

    PubMed

    Schüz, Joachim

    2009-08-01

    Due to the highly localized exposure from mobile phones, the preferred side of the head during their use is important information when investigating a possible link with brain tumour risk, but at the same time, error and bias hamper the assessment of this information in case-control studies. Current studies provide evidence of reporting bias insofar as cases appear to over-report the side of the head where the tumour occurred as the one that they preferred in the past when using mobile phones. More refined methods of analysis among only cases or prospective studies with an assessment of the laterality of mobile phone use before the diagnosis of disease are needed to evaluate whether associations seen in some studies are entirely due to reporting bias or a mixture of reporting bias and a causal effect.

  14. Coherent with laughter: subjective experience, behavior, and physiological responses during amusement and joy.

    PubMed

    Herring, David R; Burleson, Mary H; Roberts, Nicole A; Devine, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Emotion research historically has adopted a fairly homogeneous view of positive emotions. The aim of the current study was to explore how two positive emotions, amusement and joy, differ in subjective, behavioral, cardiovascular, and respiratory characteristics. Thirty-nine participants viewed two film clips, each selected to elicit amusement or joy. As predicted, participants reported more amusement, showed more positive facial expressions and laughter, and exhibited less heart rate deceleration and a larger increase in respiratory amplitude in response to the amusement clip than in response to the joy clip. In addition, subjective, behavioral, and physiological indicators were more closely related in amusement than joy, which was largely attributable to laughter during amusement. The current study adds to a growing literature suggesting the importance of adopting a more nuanced conceptualization of positive emotion.

  15. Intraspinal rewiring of the corticospinal tract requires target-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor and compensates lost function after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Masaki; Hayano, Yasufumi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2012-04-01

    Brain injury that results in an initial behavioural deficit is frequently followed by spontaneous recovery. The intrinsic mechanism of this functional recovery has never been fully understood. Here, we show that reorganization of the corticospinal tract induced by target-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor is crucial for spontaneous recovery of motor function following brain injury. After destruction of unilateral sensorimotor cortex, intact-side corticospinal tract formed sprouting fibres into the specific lamina of the denervated side of the cervical spinal cord, and made new contact with two types of spinal interneurons-segmental and propriospinal neurons. Anatomical and electrophysiological analyses revealed that this rewired corticospinal tract functionally linked to motor neurons and forelimb muscles. This newly formed corticospinal circuit was necessary for motor recovery, because transection of the circuit led to impairment of recovering forelimb function. Knockdown of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the spinal neurons or its receptor in the intact corticospinal neurons diminished fibre sprouting of the corticospinal tract. Our findings establish the anatomical, functional and molecular basis for the intrinsic capacity of neurons to form compensatory neural network following injury.

  16. Does going to an amusement park alleviate low back pain? A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Wang, Zhuo; Kasai, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Background Low back pain is often called nonspecific pain. In this type of low back pain, various emotions and stress are known to strongly affect pain perception. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the degree of low back pain changes in people with chronic mild low back pain when they are inside and outside of an amusement park where people are supposed to have physical and psychological enjoyment. Methods The subjects were 23 volunteers (13 males and 10 females) aged 18 to 46 years old with a mean age of 24.0 years who had chronic low back pain. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores of low back pain and salivary amylase levels (kIU/L) of all subjects were measured at five time points: immediately after getting on the bus heading for the amusement park; 10 minutes, 1 hour (immediately after boarding the roller coaster), and 3 hours (immediately after exiting the haunted house) after arriving at the amusement park; and immediately before getting off the bus returning from the park. Results The three VAS values in the amusement park (10 minutes, 1 hour, and 3 hours after arriving at the amusement park) measured were significantly lower (P < 0.05) when compared with the other two values measured immediately after getting on the bus heading for the amusement park and immediately before getting off the return bus. In salivary amylase levels, there were no statistically significant differences among the values measured at the five time points. Conclusion Low back pain was significantly alleviated when the subjects were in the amusement park, which demonstrated that enjoyable activities, though temporarily, alleviated their low back pain. PMID:23118550

  17. Organizational Learning from near Misses, Incidents, Accidents, and Fatalities: A Multiple Case Study of the USA Amusement Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kathleen Horner

    2011-01-01

    Accidents and fatalities at USA amusement parks are rare, yet when they do occur, they can injure, maim, and even kill. This dissertation sheds light on how three family-owned amusement parks learned and improved as organizations from their own and others' failure experience. Using a multiple case study design, 18 participants were interviewed.…

  18. Fatal Amusements: Contemplating the Tempest of Contemporary Media and American Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strate, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Our use of the electronic media to conduct serious discourse raises the question of whether "we are amusing ourselves to death," as Neil Postman argued. The approach known as "media ecology," the study of media as environments, which emphasizes the need to understand context and find balance, provides a basis for the analysis…

  19. Cost and Effectiveness of Litter Removal Procedures in an Amusement Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, LaDeane; Lloyd, Margaret

    1977-01-01

    Children were offered complimentary tickets for amusement park rides contingent upon collection of bags of litter in the park. Cost and effect analysis showed that this particular reinforcement program for litter removal was approximately two-and-one-half times as effective at about the same cost as traditional salaried maintenance. (Author/MA)

  20. Changing pattern of organ donation at a single center: are potential brain dead donors being lost to donation after cardiac death?

    PubMed

    Saidi, R F; Bradley, J; Greer, D; Luskin, R; O'Connor, K; Delmonico, F; Kennealey, P; Pathan, F; Schuetz, C; Elias, N; Ko, D S C; Kawai, T; Hertl, M; Cosimi, A B; Markmann, J F

    2010-11-01

    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has proven effective at increasing the availability of organs for transplantation.We performed a retrospective examination of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) records of all 201 donors from 1/1/98 to the 11/2008, including 54 DCD, 115 DBD and 32 DCD candidates that did not progress to donation (DCD-dnp). Comparing three time periods, era 1 (01/98-12/02), era 2 (01/03-12/05) and era 3 (01/06-11/08), DCD’s comprised 14.8,48.4% and 60% of donors, respectively (p = 0.002). A significant increase in the incidence of cardiovascular/cerebrovascular as cause of death was evident in era 3 versus eras 1 and 2; 74% versus 57.1% (p<0.001),as was a corresponding decrease in the incidence of traumatic death. Interestingly, we noted an increase in utilization of aggressive neurological management over time, especially in the DCD group.We detected significant changes in the make-up of the donor pool over the past decade. That the changes in diagnosis over time did not differ between DCD and DBD groups suggests this difference is not responsible for the increase in DCD rates. Instead, we suggest that changes in clinical practice, especially in management of patients with severe brain injury may account for the increased proportion of DCD.

  1. "Paradise Lost" Aloud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, John K.

    1994-01-01

    Two methods of reading "Paradise Lost" aloud were used in a college course: (1) round robin reading observing the poet's own divisions of the material and spread over 10 days; and (2) round robin reading of the entire poem continuously taking up an entire day. Both approaches were effective in emphasizing the poem's oral dimension. (MSE)

  2. Crowdsourcing Lost Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stathopoulou, E. K.; Georgopoulos, A.; Panagiotopoulos, G.; Kaliampakos, D.

    2015-08-01

    Cultural Heritage all over the world is at high risk. Natural and human activities endanger the current state of monuments and sites, whereas many of them have already been destroyed especially during the last years. Preventive actions are of utmost importance for the protection of human memory and the prevention of irreplaceable. These actions may be carried out either in situ or virtually. Very often in situ preventive, or protective or restoration actions are difficult or even impossible, as e.g. in cases of earthquakes, fires or war activity. Digital preservation of cultural heritage is a challenging task within photogrammetry and computer vision communities, as efforts are taken to collect digital data, especially of the monuments that are at high risk. Visit to the field and data acquisition is not always feasible. To overcome the missing data problem, crowdsourced imagery is used to create a visual representation of lost cultural heritage objects. Such digital representations may be 2D or 3D and definitely help preserve the memory and history of the lost heritage. Sometimes they also assist studies for their reconstruction. An initiative to collect imagery data from the public and create a visual 3D representation of a recently destroyed stone bridge almost 150 years old is being discussed in this study. To this end, a crowdsourcing platform has been designed and the first images collected have been processed with the use of SfM algorithms.

  3. Lost in Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lass, Wiebke; Reusswig, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    Lost in Translation? Introducing Planetary Boundaries into Social Systems. Fritz Reusswig, Wiebke Lass Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany Identifying and quantifying planetary boundaries by interdisciplinary science efforts is a challenging task—and a risky one, as the 1972 Limits to Growth publication has shown. Even if we may be assured that scientific understanding of underlying processes of the Earth system has significantly improved since then, the challenge of translating these findings into the social systems of the planet remains crucial for any kind of action, and in many respects far more challenging. We would like to conceptualize what could also be termed a problem of coupling social and natural systems as a nested set of social translation processes, well aware of the limited applicability of the language-related translation metaphor. Societies must, first, perceive these boundaries, and they have to understand their relevance. This includes, among many other things, the organization of transdisciplinary scientific cooperation. They will then have to translate this understood perception into possible actions, i.e. strategies for different local bodies, actors, and institutional settings. This implies a lot of 'internal' translation processes, e.g. from the scientific subsystem to the mass media, the political and the economic subsystem. And it implies to develop subsystem-specific schemes of evaluation for these alternatives, e.g. convincing narratives, cost-benefit analyses, or ethical legitimacy considerations. And, finally, societies do have to translate chosen action alternatives into monitoring and evaluation schemes, e.g. for agricultural production or renewable energies. This process includes the continuation of observing and re-analyzing the planetary boundary concept itself, as a re-adjustment of these boundaries in the light of new scientific insights cannot be excluded. Taken all together, societies may well

  4. Lost in Fathoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondeur, Anaïs; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, at the very point where two continents collided, the island of Nuuk disappeared without trace. At the same time, in Brisbane, the 34th International Geological Congress advanced a new era-the Anthropocene: an age where mankind has become a global telluric force. Was the disappearance of Nuuk island a one-off or a direct consequence of the emergence of the Anthropocene? This project was developed during a year of research as an artist-in-residence at LadHyX and has evolved from an expedition of the emergent part of the Mid-Atlantic ridge and the region of deep oceanic water dive. This talk will present Lost In fathoms a narratives composed of installations, drawings and photographs by the means of which we investigate the causes involved in the disappearance of Nuuk island. It challenges the perception of oceanic and geologic time scales and human's impact on the environment. This project is exhibited from October 16th to November 29th 2014, at GV Art Gallery in London, a contemporary art gallery devoted to art and science shows. Acknowledgment: GV Art Gallery London, Chaire DDX École Polytechnique, LaSIPS Université Paris-Saclay.

  5. Lost Circulation Technology Development Status

    SciTech Connect

    Glowka, David A.; Schafer, Diane M.; Loeppke, Glen E.; Scott, Douglas D.; Wernig, Marcus D.; Wright, Elton K.

    1992-03-24

    Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30-50% through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April, 1991-March, 1992.

  6. The lost children.

    PubMed

    Smith, S

    1999-03-01

    Women who have lost children to perinatal complications, are subjected to pain and grief continuously; however their agony increases on remembrance days such as birthdate, or on Mother's Day. Fathers, siblings and grandparents suffer too. Common disorders of pregnancy, such as pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), or the more serious pre-eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or eclampsia, can lead to devastating effects such as miscarriage, stillbirth, or neonatal death; or at the very least, a sick infant. With many of these consequences, the loss of the dreams, hopes and plans that parents have made is imminent. The investigation of the psychosocial aspects of 'high-risk' pregnancy has never been fully addressed. However, the threat of loss, or the actual experience, may provoke the onset of a potential psychological crisis during the perinatal period. Therefore, it is important that these issues be addressed by the nurse in order to aid the development of coping mechanisms to enable women and their families to deal with what may happen. This may be done by predicting the stages of the bereavement process experienced by these women and their family members, as outlined in the Kubler-Ross model of bereavement (1969), which is indicative of many types of grief reactions. Other issues including the restriction in activity, uncertainty of pregnancy outcomes, disruption in work or career activities, financial strains, and reduced labour and birthing options, become concerns for high-risk pregnant women. The way women deal with these issues and the pathways nurses can take to help these women develop effective coping strategies, will be addressed also.

  7. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  8. 26 CFR 1.274-2 - Disallowance of deductions for certain expenses for entertainment, amusement, recreation, or travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disallowance of deductions for certain expenses for entertainment, amusement, recreation, or travel. 1.274-2 Section 1.274-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.274-2...

  9. 29 CFR 516.29 - Employees employed by a private entity operating an amusement or recreational establishment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amusement or recreational establishment located in a national park or national forest or on land in the National Wildlife Refuge System who are partially exempt from overtime pay requirements pursuant to section... park or national forest or on land in the National Wildlife Refuge System who are partially exempt...

  10. 29 CFR 516.29 - Employees employed by a private entity operating an amusement or recreational establishment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... amusement or recreational establishment located in a national park or national forest or on land in the National Wildlife Refuge System who are partially exempt from overtime pay requirements pursuant to section... park or national forest or on land in the National Wildlife Refuge System who are partially exempt...

  11. 29 CFR 516.29 - Employees employed by a private entity operating an amusement or recreational establishment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... amusement or recreational establishment located in a national park or national forest or on land in the National Wildlife Refuge System who are partially exempt from overtime pay requirements pursuant to section... park or national forest or on land in the National Wildlife Refuge System who are partially exempt...

  12. 29 CFR 516.29 - Employees employed by a private entity operating an amusement or recreational establishment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... amusement or recreational establishment located in a national park or national forest or on land in the National Wildlife Refuge System who are partially exempt from overtime pay requirements pursuant to section... park or national forest or on land in the National Wildlife Refuge System who are partially exempt...

  13. 29 CFR 516.29 - Employees employed by a private entity operating an amusement or recreational establishment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... amusement or recreational establishment located in a national park or national forest or on land in the National Wildlife Refuge System who are partially exempt from overtime pay requirements pursuant to section... park or national forest or on land in the National Wildlife Refuge System who are partially exempt...

  14. An integrated approach to water management in Kayseri: rainwater collection and use in an amusement park.

    PubMed

    Karakoçak, B B; Yenigün, O; Toraman, R T

    2013-01-01

    Water management in urban areas of developing countries is a major environmental challenge for the future. Within the framework of the IWA Cities of the Future Programme, current water and wastewater management systems are investigated in Kayseri, Turkey, with the purpose of bringing water into the center of city life by a reformed pilot project. In order to assess both the quantity and dynamics of water to be utilized in the Kayseri Amusement Park, the US Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA) Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) 5.0 was used. The obtained results demonstrated that after 3 years, 38,039 m(3) of rainwater could be stored in the two proposed underground storage tanks. Forty three per cent of the water-ski lake with a volume of 90,000 m(3) could be recharged with the stored rainwater.

  15. AMUSE-Field. II. Nucleation of early-type galaxies in the field versus cluster environment

    SciTech Connect

    Baldassare, Vivienne F.; Gallo, Elena; Miller, Brendan P.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Valluri, Monica; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2014-08-20

    The optical light profiles of nearby early-type galaxies are known to exhibit a smooth transition from nuclear light deficits to nuclear light excesses with decreasing galaxy mass, with as much as 80% of the galaxies with stellar masses below 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} hosting a massive nuclear star cluster (NSC). At the same time, while all massive galaxies are thought to harbor nuclear supermassive black holes (SMBHs), observational evidence for SMBHs is slim at the low end of the mass function. Here, we explore the environmental dependence of the nucleation fraction by comparing two homogeneous samples of nearby field versus cluster early-type galaxies with uniform Hubble Space Telescope (HST) coverage. Existing Chandra X-ray Telescope data for both samples yield complementary information on low-level accretion onto nuclear SMBHs. Specifically, we report on dual-band (F475W and F850LP) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging data for 28 out of the 103 field early-type galaxies that compose the AMUSE-Field Chandra survey, and compare our results against the companion HST and Chandra surveys for a sample of 100 Virgo Cluster early-types (ACS Virgo Cluster and AMUSE-Virgo surveys, respectively). We model the two-dimensional light profiles of the field targets to identify and characterize NSCs, and find a field nucleation fraction of 26%{sub −11%}{sup +17%} (at the 1σ level), consistent with the measured Virgo nucleation fraction across a comparable mass distribution (30%{sub −12%}{sup +17%}). Coupled with the Chandra result that SMBH activity is higher for the field, our findings indicate that, since the last epoch of star formation, the funneling of gas to the nuclear regions has been inhibited more effectively for Virgo galaxies, arguably via ram pressure stripping.

  16. DOE lost circulation technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Glowka, D.A.; Staller, G.E.; Sattler, A.R.

    1996-09-01

    Lost circulation is a problem common in both the geothermal and the solution mining industries. In both cases, drilling is on a relatively large scale (geothermal holes can be as large as 26 inches). Lost circulation technology development for geothermal drilling has been in progress at Sandia National Laboratories for more than 15 years. The initial work centered on lost circulation materials, but testing and modeling indicated that if the aperture of a loss zone is very large (larger than the drill bit nozzles) it cannot be plugged by simply adding materials to the drilling fluid. Thus, the lost circulation work evolved to include: (1) Development of metering techniques that accurately measure and characterize drilling fluid inflow and outflow for rapid diagnosis of los circulation and/or fluid balance while drilling. (2) Construction of a laboratory facility for testing drillable straddle packers (to improve the plugging efficiency of cementing operations) and the actual testing of components of the straddle packer. (3) Construction of a laboratory facility for the testing of candidate porous fabrics as a part of a program to develop a porous packer that places polyurethane foam into a loss zone. (4) Implementing (with Halliburton and CalEnergy Company), a program to test cementitious lost circulation material as an alternative to Portland cement.

  17. Pluralism Lost: Sustainability's Unfortunate Fall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimberley, Edward T.

    2010-01-01

    "Paradise Lost" explores the themes of human frailty, failure, and redemption following humanity's "original sin," eating of the tree of knowledge in the Garden of Eden. This original sin resulted in human beings being banished from an earthly paradise and compelled to wander eternally a world fraught with danger, despair,…

  18. Lost Men on Campus. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebleton, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Elizabeth Redden, author of the "Inside Higher Ed" article, "Lost Men on Campus," succinctly articulated the growing concerns about many college men at postsecondary institutions. Her review of results and issues presented at the "ND Conference on College Men" highlighted decreased rates of enrollment for men, underrepresentation of men in campus…

  19. AMUSE: an advanced ATM platform for residential interactive and distributive television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Concetto, M.; Gallassi, G.; Rosa, C.

    1996-12-01

    There is presently a strong expectation for the opportunities offered by the deployment of new and sophisticated telecommunication services with increasing interactivity, ranging from distributive to highly interactive, covering heterogeneous areas, like entertainment, tourism, commercial and information. The Project AMUSE (Advanced MUltimedia SErvices to residential users), which s being carried out in the framework of the Advanced Communication Technologies and Services Programme sponsored by the European Union, is proposing effective solutions to various open issues related to the implementation and provisioning of new multimedia services. After an overview of the project and the relevant platform, the paper will introduce a description of the advanced services the project is going to provide to real residential users by means of a state-of-then-art Asynchronous Transfer Mode end-to-end infrastructure. Emphasis will be put on the outcomes of the experiences gained during the first project year, stemming from the implementation and deployment of complex multimedia services developed by means of innovative authoring tools. Particular attention will be paid to the facts and findings resulting from the activities so far performed in the Italian trial island. In particular, the role of contents provisioning and service design, as well as the monitoring of service acceptance and usability by the final users are emerging as outstanding topics, even beyond network technological issues. Finally, an outline of major unsolved problems in the area of interactive multimedia s presented.

  20. Potential risk and sodium content of children's ready-to-eat foods distributed at major amusement parks in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, N-Y; Park, S-Y; Lee, Y-M; Choi, S-Y; Jeong, S-H; Chung, M-S; Chang, Y-S; Choi, S-H; Bae, D-H; Ha, S-D

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to help better understand the current sodium intake of Korean children and to establish children's good eating habits through investigation of the sodium content of ready-to-eat foods collected from nine major amusement parks in Korea. The sodium content of a total of 322 products was analysed by using ICP and then the potential risk based on the recommended daily intake of sodium as described in the Korean dietary reference intakes was determined. The results showed that sodium content was the lowest in muffins (245 mg/100 g) and the highest in seasoned dried filefish (1825 mg/100 g). The average amounts of sodium per serving of seasoned dried filefish, tteokbokki and fish paste were 1150, 1248 and 1097 mg, respectively. The values were above 50% of the daily intake of sodium recommended by the Korean dietary reference intake. The ready-to-eat foods were also classified into high, medium and low sodium content on the basis of standards recommended by the Korean Food and Drug Administration. Most snacks were classified as high sodium foods because they exceeded "300 mg (84.5% of the total daily allowance)". Furthermore, the meal substitution foods such as kimbab, tteokbokki, mandus, sandwiches and hamburgers exceeded "600 mg (90.3% of the total daily allowance)" and were also classified as high sodium foods. In addition, ready-to-eat foods in amusement parks are similar to foods eaten on streets and foods around school zones, which contain high sodium content; thus, the intake frequency might be high, which would induce high risk to children health. Koreans already consume a high amount of sodium daily via their usual diets. So, the sodium content in snacks and substitution foods needs to be reduced. Consequently, this study noted that parents and guardians should carefully consider their children's consumption of ready-to-eat foods from Korean amusement parks.

  1. LOST CREEK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muffler, L.J. Patrick; Campbell, Harry W.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and mineral-resource investigations identified no mineral-resource potential in the Lost Creek Roadless Area, California. Sand and gravel have been mined from alluvial flood-plain deposits less than 1 mi outside the roadless area; these deposits are likely to extend into the roadless area beneath a Holocene basalt flow that may be as much as 40 ft thick. An oil and gas lease application which includes the eastern portion of the roadless area is pending. Abundant basalt in the area can be crushed and used as aggregate, but similar deposits of volcanic cinders or sand and gravel in more favorable locations are available outside the roadless area closer to major markets. No indication of coal or geothermal energy resources was identified.

  2. AMUSE-Virgo. II. Down-sizing in Black Hole Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Elena; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; Woo, Jong-Hak; Leipski, Christian; Antonucci, Robert

    2010-05-01

    We complete the census of nuclear X-ray activity in 100 early-type Virgo galaxies observed by the Chandra X-ray Telescope as part of the AMUSE-Virgo survey, down to a (3σ) limiting luminosity of 3.7 × 1038 erg s-1 over 0.5-7 keV. The stellar mass distribution of the targeted sample, which is mostly composed of formally "inactive" galaxies, peaks below 1010 M sun, a regime where the very existence of nuclear supermassive black holes (SMBHs) is debated. Out of 100 objects, 32 show a nuclear X-ray source, including 6 hybrid nuclei which also host a massive nuclear cluster as visible from archival Hubble Space Telescope images. After carefully accounting for contamination from nuclear low-mass X-ray binaries based on the shape and normalization of their X-ray luminosity function (XLF), we conclude that between 24% and 34% of the galaxies in our sample host an X-ray active SMBH (at the 95% confidence level). This sets a firm lower limit to the black hole (BH) occupation fraction in nearby bulges within a cluster environment. The differential logarithmic XLF of active SMBHs scales with the X-ray luminosity as L X -0.4±0.1 up to 1042 erg s-1. At face value, the active fraction—down to our luminosity limit—is found to increase with host stellar mass. However, taking into account selection effects, we find that the average Eddington-scaled X-ray luminosity scales with BH mass as M BH ^{-0.62^{+0.13}_{-0.12}}, with an intrinsic scatter of 0.46+0.08 -0.06 dex. This finding can be interpreted as observational evidence for "down-sizing" of BH accretion in local early types, that is, low-mass BHs shine relatively closer to their Eddington limit than higher mass objects. As a consequence, the fraction of active galaxies, defined as those above a fixed X-ray Eddington ratio, decreases with increasing BH mass.

  3. Preserved appreciation of aesthetic elements of speech and music prosody in an amusic individual: A holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Loutrari, Ariadne; Lorch, Marjorie Perlman

    2017-03-31

    We present a follow-up study on the case of a Greek amusic adult, B.Z., whose impaired performance on scale, contour, interval, and meter was reported by Paraskevopoulos, Tsapkini, and Peretz in 2010, employing a culturally-tailored version of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia. In the present study, we administered a novel set of perceptual judgement tasks designed to investigate the ability to appreciate holistic prosodic aspects of 'expressiveness' and emotion in phrase length music and speech stimuli. Our results show that, although diagnosed as a congenital amusic, B.Z. scored as well as healthy controls (N=24) on judging 'expressiveness' and emotional prosody in both speech and music stimuli. These findings suggest that the ability to make perceptual judgements about such prosodic qualities may be preserved in individuals who demonstrate difficulties perceiving basic musical features such as melody or rhythm. B.Z.'s case yields new insights into amusia and the processing of speech and music prosody through a holistic approach. The employment of novel stimuli with relatively fewer non-naturalistic manipulations, as developed for this study, may be a useful tool for revealing unexplored aspects of music and speech cognition and offer the possibility to further the investigation of the perception of acoustic streams in more authentic auditory conditions.

  4. Simulating star clusters with the AMUSE software framework. I. Dependence of cluster lifetimes on model assumptions and cluster dissolution modes

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, Alfred J.; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Vesperini, Enrico; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2013-12-01

    We perform a series of simulations of evolving star clusters using the Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment (AMUSE), a new community-based multi-physics simulation package, and compare our results to existing work. These simulations model a star cluster beginning with a King model distribution and a selection of power-law initial mass functions and contain a tidal cutoff. They are evolved using collisional stellar dynamics and include mass loss due to stellar evolution. After studying and understanding that the differences between AMUSE results and results from previous studies are understood, we explored the variation in cluster lifetimes due to the random realization noise introduced by transforming a King model to specific initial conditions. This random realization noise can affect the lifetime of a simulated star cluster by up to 30%. Two modes of star cluster dissolution were identified: a mass evolution curve that contains a runaway cluster dissolution with a sudden loss of mass, and a dissolution mode that does not contain this feature. We refer to these dissolution modes as 'dynamical' and 'relaxation' dominated, respectively. For Salpeter-like initial mass functions, we determined the boundary between these two modes in terms of the dynamical and relaxation timescales.

  5. Open laminoforaminotomy: A lost art?

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Open cervical laminoforaminotomy (CLF) provides safe and effective decompression/excision of lateral/foraminal disc herniations/spurs contributing to nerve root compression. CLF's advantages over anterior cervical discectomy/fusion (ACDF) include the lack of risk to anterior structures (esophagus, trachea, carotid, and recurrent laryngeal nerve) and the avoidance of a fusion. Further, advantages over minimally invasive surgery CLF (MIS CLF) include a lower incidence of dural tears, infections, and neural injury. Furthermore, complications are now more often reported in medicolegal suits rather than the spinal surgical literature. Methods: Here, in a select review of the spinal literature in which we specifically focused on the benefits, risks, and complication of open CLF versus the various MIS CLS techniques. Results: Open CLF is a unique posterior cervical surgical technique that is technically demanding. When using an MIS CLF approach that provides limited visualization and maneuverability while incurring greater morbidity (e.g., risks more dural tears, infection, and neural damage). Conclusions: Why not utilize open CLF, adequately and safely, to decompress lateral/foraminally compromised cervical nerve roots, and avoid the risks of MIS CLF or ACDF? Presently, too many spine surgeons automatically choose MIS CLF or ACDF over open CLF; is this because it is a “lost art”? PMID:26693388

  6. Comparison of the Internal Energy Deposition of Venturi-Assisted Electrospray Ionization and a Venturi-Assisted Array of Micromachined UltraSonic Electrosprays (AMUSE)

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Christina Y.; Silvestri, Catherine J.; Forbes, Thomas P.; Varady, Mark J.; Meacham, J. Mark; Fedorov, Andrei G.; Degertekin, F. Levent; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2008-01-01

    The internal energy deposition of a Venturi-assisted array of micromachined ultrasonic electrosprays (AMUSE), with and without the application of a DC charging potential, is compared with equivalent experiments for Venturi-assisted electrospray ionization (ESI) using the “survival yield” method on a series of para-substituted benzylpyridinium salts. Under conditions previously shown to provide maximum ion yields for standard compounds, the observed mean internal energies were nearly identical (1.93–2.01eV). Operation of AMUSE without nitrogen flow to sustain the air amplifier focusing effect generated energetically-colder ions with mean internal energies that were up to 39% lower than those for ESI. A balance between improved ion transfer, adequate desolvation and favorable ion energetics was achieved by selection of optimum operational ranges for the parameters that most strongly influence the ion population, namely the air amplifier gas flow rate and API capillary temperature. Examination of the energy landscapes obtained for combinations of these parameters showed that a low internal energy region (≤ 1.0 eV) was present at nitrogen flow rates between 2 – 4 L min−1 and capillary temperatures up to 250°C using ESI (9% of all parameter combinations tested). Using AMUSE, this region was present at nitrogen flow rates up to 2.5 L min−1 and all capillary temperatures (13% of combinations tested). The signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the intact p-methylbenzylpyridinium ion obtained from a 5 μM mixture of thermometer compounds using AMUSE at the extremes of the studied temperature range was at least 5 times higher than that of ESI demonstrating the potential of AMUSE ionization as a soft method for the characterization of labile species by mass spectrometry. PMID:18650100

  7. Comparison of the internal energy deposition of Venturi-assisted electrospray ionization and a Venturi-assisted array of micromachined ultrasonic electrosprays (AMUSE).

    PubMed

    Hampton, Christina Y; Silvestri, Catherine J; Forbes, Thomas P; Varady, Mark J; Meacham, J Mark; Fedorov, Andrei G; Degertekin, F Levent; Fernández, Facundo M

    2008-09-01

    The internal energy deposition of a Venturi-assisted array of micromachined ultrasonic electrosprays (AMUSE), with and without the application of a DC charging potential, is compared with equivalent experiments for Venturi-assisted electrospray ionization (ESI) using the "survival yield" method on a series of para-substituted benzylpyridinium salts. Under conditions previously shown to provide maximum ion yields for standard compounds, the observed mean internal energies were nearly identical (1.93-2.01 eV). Operation of AMUSE without nitrogen flow to sustain the air amplifier focusing effect generated energetically colder ions with mean internal energies that were up to 39% lower than those for ESI. A balance between improved ion transfer, adequate desolvation, and favorable ion energetics was achieved by selection of optimum operational ranges for the parameters that most strongly influence the ion population: the air amplifier gas flow rate and API capillary temperature. Examination of the energy landscapes obtained for combinations of these parameters showed that a low internal energy region (AMUSE, this region was present at nitrogen flow rates up to 2.5 L min(-1) and all capillary temperatures (13% of combinations tested). The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of the intact p-methylbenzylpyridinium ion obtained from a 5 microM mixture of thermometer compounds using AMUSE at the extremes of the studied temperature range was at least fivefold higher than that of ESI, demonstrating the potential of AMUSE ionization as a soft method for the characterization of labile species by mass spectrometry.

  8. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  9. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, D.A.

    1994-09-06

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drill string in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drill string at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone. 6 figs.

  10. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  11. Maurice Ravel's illness: a tragedy of lost creativity

    PubMed Central

    Henson, R A

    1988-01-01

    Maurice Ravel had been subject to psychiatric disorder for many years when signs of organic brain disease appeared at the age of 52. Aphasia, apraxia, agraphia, and alexia became established some five years later. Musical creativity was lost. Alajouanine diagnosed cerebral atrophy with bilateral ventricular enlargement. Though Ravel's condition deteriorated progressively, generalised dementia was not apparent. He died in December 1937, after a craniotomy performed by Clovis Vincent, possibly from a subdural haematoma. Vincent's operative findings are described here. The likely cause of Ravel's illness was a restricted form of cerebral degeneration. PMID:3135020

  12. Geothermal Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Lost circulation is an expensive and often encountered problem when drilling into geothermal formations. A method is needed to more accurately describe loss zones encountered during geothermal drilling to allow for more realistic testing since present testing techniques are inadequate. A Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool (LCZMT) is being developed that will quickly locate a loss zone and then provide a visual image of this zone as it intersects the wellbore. A modified Sandia high temperature Acoustic Borehole Televiewer should allow modeling of geothermal loss zones, which would in turn lead to testing that can be performed to evaluate lost circulation materials under simulated downhole conditions. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  13. AMUSE-Field I: NUCLEAR X-RAY PROPERTIES OF LOCAL FIELD AND GROUP SPHEROIDS ACROSS THE STELLAR MASS SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2012-03-01

    We present the first results from AMUSE-Field, a Chandra survey designed to characterize the occurrence and intensity of low-level accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at the center of local early-type field galaxies. This is accomplished by means of a Large Program targeting a distance-limited (<30 Mpc) sample of 103 early types spanning a wide range in stellar masses. We acquired new ACIS-S observations for 61 objects down to a limiting (0.3-10 keV) luminosity of 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, and we include an additional 42 objects with archival (typically deeper) coverage. A nuclear X-ray source is detected in 52 out of the 103 galaxies. After accounting for potential contamination from low-mass X-ray binaries, we estimate that the fraction of accreting SMBHs within the sample is 45% {+-} 7%, which sets a firm lower limit on the occupation fraction within the field. The measured nuclear X-ray luminosities are invariably highly sub-Eddington, with L{sub X}/L{sub Edd} ratios between {approx}10{sup -4} and 10{sup -8}. As also found in a companion survey targeting Virgo early types, the active fraction increases with increasing host galaxy stellar mass, reflective of 'Eddington incompleteness' within the lower-mass objects. For the Field sample, the average nuclear X-ray luminosity scales with the host stellar mass as M{sup 0.71{+-}0.10}{sub star}, with an intrinsic scatter of 0.73 {+-} 0.09 dex. Qualitatively similar results hold for morphologically homogeneous (type E) or uniform sensitivity (new observations only) subsets. A majority of the AMUSE-Field galaxies (78%) inhabit groups, enabling us to investigate the influence of group richness on nuclear activity. We see no evidence for a positive correlation between nuclear X-ray luminosity, normalized to host properties, and galaxy density. Rather, while the scatter is substantial, it appears that the Eddington-scaled X-ray luminosity of group members may be slightly lower than for

  14. AMUSE-Field I: Nuclear X-Ray Properties of Local Field and Group Spheroids across the Stellar Mass Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2012-03-01

    We present the first results from AMUSE-Field, a Chandra survey designed to characterize the occurrence and intensity of low-level accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at the center of local early-type field galaxies. This is accomplished by means of a Large Program targeting a distance-limited (<30 Mpc) sample of 103 early types spanning a wide range in stellar masses. We acquired new ACIS-S observations for 61 objects down to a limiting (0.3-10 keV) luminosity of 2.5 × 1038 erg s-1, and we include an additional 42 objects with archival (typically deeper) coverage. A nuclear X-ray source is detected in 52 out of the 103 galaxies. After accounting for potential contamination from low-mass X-ray binaries, we estimate that the fraction of accreting SMBHs within the sample is 45% ± 7%, which sets a firm lower limit on the occupation fraction within the field. The measured nuclear X-ray luminosities are invariably highly sub-Eddington, with L X/L Edd ratios between ~10-4 and 10-8. As also found in a companion survey targeting Virgo early types, the active fraction increases with increasing host galaxy stellar mass, reflective of "Eddington incompleteness" within the lower-mass objects. For the Field sample, the average nuclear X-ray luminosity scales with the host stellar mass as M 0.71 ± 0.10 star, with an intrinsic scatter of 0.73 ± 0.09 dex. Qualitatively similar results hold for morphologically homogeneous (type E) or uniform sensitivity (new observations only) subsets. A majority of the AMUSE-Field galaxies (78%) inhabit groups, enabling us to investigate the influence of group richness on nuclear activity. We see no evidence for a positive correlation between nuclear X-ray luminosity, normalized to host properties, and galaxy density. Rather, while the scatter is substantial, it appears that the Eddington-scaled X-ray luminosity of group members may be slightly lower than for isolated galaxies, and that this trend continues to cluster early types.

  15. The Lost Colony and Jamestown droughts.

    PubMed

    Stahle, D W; Cleaveland, M K; Blanton, D B; Therrell, M D; Gay, D A

    1998-04-24

    Tree-ring data from Virginia indicate that the Lost Colony of Roanoke Island disappeared during the most extreme drought in 800 years (1587-1589) and that the alarming mortality and the near abandonment of Jamestown Colony occurred during the driest 7-year episode in 770 years (1606-1612). These extraordinary droughts can now be implicated in the fate of the Lost Colony and in the appalling death rate during the early occupations at Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in America.

  16. Concern about Lost Talent: Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikora, Joanna; Saha, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Lost talent? The occupational ambitions and attainments of young Australians", and is an added resource for further information. The purpose of this supplement is to provide greater detail about the background of research into the topic of human talent in…

  17. The Lost Acting Treatise of Charles Macklin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Barbara

    This paper examines the career of Charles Macklin of London, an 18th-century actor/director/teacher, whose treatise on his performative approach and pedagogical techniques, "On the Science of Acting," was lost at sea in a 1772 shipwreck. Citing two letters Macklin received from his actress daughter, Maria, and fragments of his own…

  18. Paradigms Lost: Academic Practice and Exteriorising Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Ray

    2006-01-01

    Using Milton's "Paradise Lost" as metaphor, this article examines shifting positions of authority, and the role of technology, in higher education practice. As higher education becomes caught up in the performative agendas of globalised market rationalism, technology is mobilised in a specific way which sits uncomfortably with…

  19. Modeling Being "Lost": Imperfect Situation Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Victor E.

    2011-01-01

    Being "lost" is an exemplar of imperfect Situation Awareness/Situation Understanding (SA/SU) -- information/knowledge that is uncertain, incomplete, and/or just wrong. Being "lost" may be a geo-spatial condition - not knowing/being wrong about where to go or how to get there. More broadly, being "lost" can serve as a metaphor for uncertainty and/or inaccuracy - not knowing/being wrong about how one fits into a larger world view, what one wants to do, or how to do it. This paper discusses using agent based modeling (ABM) to explore imperfect SA/SU, simulating geo-spatially "lost" intelligent agents trying to navigate in a virtual world. Each agent has a unique "mental map" -- its idiosyncratic view of its geo-spatial environment. Its decisions are based on this idiosyncratic view, but behavior outcomes are based on ground truth. Consequently, the rate and degree to which an agent's expectations diverge from ground truth provide measures of that agent's SA/SU.

  20. 'Lost' Ladybugs Found Again in South Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this article is to give a first-person account of involvement in research directly related to the NSF-sponsored Lost Ladybug Project. I have summarized research findings in in which three previously common kinds of lady beetles have become difficult to detect in eastern states, but c...

  1. Kaiser retools to fight for lost ground.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, L

    1995-07-17

    In the face of mounting competition, the country's oldest not-for-profit HMO is retooling to fight for lost ground. Kaiser, headed by David Lawrence, M.D., is focusing on regaining robust growth in profits and enrollment by improving its roll as an industry leader.

  2. 2. Overview of the Lost River Diversion Dam House complex ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Overview of the Lost River Diversion Dam House complex taken from west edge of horseshoe-shaped Lost River Diversion Dam. Interior of east side of dam in the foreground. Facing East. - Klamath Basin Project, Lost River Diversion Dam House, Lost River near intersection of State Highway 140 & Hill Road, Klamath Falls, Klamath County, OR

  3. Nonparametric inference on quantile lost lifespan.

    PubMed

    Balmert, Lauren; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon

    2017-03-01

    In this article, the existing concept of reversed percentile residual life, or percentile inactivity time, is recast to show that it can be used for routine analysis of time-to-event data under right censoring to summarize "life lost," which poses several advantages over the existing methods for survival analysis. An estimating equation approach is adopted to avoid estimation of the probability density function of the underlying time-to-event distribution to estimate the variance of the quantile estimator. Additionally a K-sample test statistic is proposed to test the ratio of the quantile lost lifespans. Simulation studies are performed to assess finite properties of the proposed K-sample statistic in terms of coverage probability and power. The proposed method is illustrated with a real data example from a breast cancer study.

  4. Lost lake - restoration of a Carolina bay

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlin, H.G.; McLendon, J.P.; Wike, L.D. |; Dietsch, B.M. |

    1994-09-01

    Carolina bays are shallow wetland depressions found only on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Although these isolated interstream wetlands support many types of communities, they share the common features of having a sandy margin, a fluctuating water level, an elliptical shape, and a northwest to southeast orientation. Lost Lake, an 11.3 hectare Carolina bay, was ditched and drained for agricultural production before establishment of the Savannah River Site in 1950. Later it received overflow from a seepage basin containing a variety of chemicals, primarily solvents and some heavy metals. In 1990 a plan was developed for the restoration of Lost Lake, and restoration activities were complete by mid-1991. Lost Lake is the first known project designed for the restoration and recovery of a Carolina bay. The bay was divided into eight soil treatment zones, allowing four treatments in duplicate. Each of the eight zones was planted with eight species of native wetland plants. Recolonization of the bay by amphibians and reptiles is being evaluated by using drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboard arrays in each of the treatment zones. Additional drift fences in five upland habitats were also established. Hoop turtle traps, funnel minnow traps, and dip nets were utilized for aquatic sampling. The presence of 43 species common to the region has been documented at Lost Lake. More than one-third of these species show evidence of breeding populations being established. Three species found prior to the restoration activity and a number of species common to undisturbed Carolina bays were not encountered. Colonization by additional species is anticipated as the wetland undergoes further succession.

  5. Redeeming the lost voice of the ancestors.

    PubMed

    Troudart, Michal

    2012-09-01

    The Holocaust of the Jews in World War II involved not only the murder of 6 million Jews but also the traumatic destruction and wipe-out of whole communities, with their rich culture and tradition which had existed for centuries. In places where no one survived, it was almost impossible to reconstruct the collective memory of those communities. The voice of the ancestors was lost. As a daughter of Holocaust survivors, I have always felt the strong presence of the loss, not only of the murdered family members but also of the ancient colourful world of Eastern European Jews. I have always felt compelled to link back to that lost world. In the past three years, my journey to the pre-war past has become more intense. This article describes the double role of my journey: it is both an attempt to reconstruct, redeem and preserve the memory of the lost ancestors, and a personal journey to the echoes of my ancestors' voices within my soul.

  6. Lost City and the Search For Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Since their discovery in 1979, high-temperature hot springs fueled by submarine volcanoes have served as models in the search for life elsewhere in the solar system. The early recognition of hot microbial biospheres associated with active volcanism along global mid-ocean ridges fundamentally shifted concepts of how planets and life co-evolve. These metal-rich, acidic systems were thought to represent the most extreme conditions on Earth, hosting novel life based on chemosynthesis. In 2000, this paradigm was profoundly impacted by the discovery of the Lost City hydrothermal field, characterized by conditions never before seen. Here, 60 m-tall limestone chimneys vent pH 10-11, metal-poor, 90°C fluids rich in hydrogen and abiotically-produced methane and formate. The fluid chemistry is driven, not by volcanic heat, but by fluid-rock reactions in underlying ultramafic basement at up to ~ 200°C. These peridotite-hosted biotopes differ significantly from volcanic-hosted vent systems in which carbon dioxide is a dominant volatile species. Instead, serpentinzation reactions yield high hydrogen and low molecular-weight hydrocarbons that result in energy-rich habitats with cell concentrations that reach 109cells/gram carbonate. The absence of volcanism, and on-going serpentinization reactions result in a remarkably stable system with venting active for >150,000 years. With the discovery of Lost City, it is clear that high temperature volcanic activity is not a prerequisite for life. Exothermic serpentinization reactions occur under a wide-range of temperatures and can result in up to a 40% volume of expansion, which may both close and open fractures. Hence, Lost City may serve as a model in the search for life on other planets and moons with rocky, undifferentiated terranes and overlying oceans. Within such systems, interior cooling, coupled with tidally-induced heating may induce hydrothermal flow, and perhaps life-sustaining environments in the absence of volcanism.

  7. Finding long-lost Comet Lexell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Comet D/1770 L1 (Lexell) made the closest observed pass by a comet to the Earth at approximately 0.015 AU on 1 July 1770. A naked-eye object observed by many astronomers of the time, it was subsequently lost: the best contemporary estimates had it removed from its 1770 orbit by Jupiter in 1779 and sent to the outer Solar System.Near-Earth asteroid 2010 JL33 has an orbit similar to that followed by Lexell's comet during its observed apparition. However, this NEA's nominal orbit, which is well-known on the basis of a decade-long arc which includes radar observations, does not approach the Earth at the correct time to be Lexell's comet. That is, unless modest non-gravitational forces are applied, in which case the famous near-miss can be reproduced.Modern measurements of 2010 JL33 together with those Lexell's comet made in the 18th century -which include motion exceeding 40 degrees per day on the sky at closest approach- provide exquisite constraints on the dynamical processes at work, cometary, Yarkovsky or other. I will discuss the implications of and the conditions required for asteroid 2010 JL33 to be, in fact, long-lost comet Lexell.

  8. Ben Franklin's Scientific Amusements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, Dudley

    2003-04-01

    As an American icon, Benjamin Franklin is often portrayed as wise and canny in business and politics, earnestly pursuing and extolling diligence, sensible conduct, pragmatism, and good works. Also legendary are some of his inventions, particularly the lightning rod, bifocals, and an efficient wood-burning stove. The iconic image is misleading in major respects. Today, surprisingly few people appreciate that, in the 18th century, Franklin was greatly esteemed throughout Europe as a scientist (termed then a "natural philosopher.") He was hailed as the "Newton of Electricity." Indeed, until Franklin, electricity seemed more mysterious than had gravity in Newton's time, and lightning was considered the wrath of God. By his own account, Franklin's studies of electricity and many other phenomena were prompted not by practical aims, but by his playful curiosity--which often became obsessive. Also not generally appreciated is the importance of Franklin's scientific reputation in enhancing his efforts to obtain French support for the American Revolution.

  9. 12 CFR 7.2018 - Lost stock certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lost stock certificates. 7.2018 Section 7.2018... Corporate Practices § 7.2018 Lost stock certificates. If a national bank does not provide for replacing lost, stolen, or destroyed stock certificates in its articles of association or bylaws, the bank may...

  10. 12 CFR 7.2018 - Lost stock certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lost stock certificates. 7.2018 Section 7.2018... Corporate Practices § 7.2018 Lost stock certificates. If a national bank does not provide for replacing lost, stolen, or destroyed stock certificates in its articles of association or bylaws, the bank may...

  11. 12 CFR 7.2018 - Lost stock certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lost stock certificates. 7.2018 Section 7.2018... Corporate Practices § 7.2018 Lost stock certificates. If a national bank does not provide for replacing lost, stolen, or destroyed stock certificates in its articles of association or bylaws, the bank may...

  12. 12 CFR 7.2018 - Lost stock certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lost stock certificates. 7.2018 Section 7.2018... Corporate Practices § 7.2018 Lost stock certificates. If a national bank does not provide for replacing lost, stolen, or destroyed stock certificates in its articles of association or bylaws, the bank may...

  13. 12 CFR 7.2018 - Lost stock certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lost stock certificates. 7.2018 Section 7.2018... Corporate Practices § 7.2018 Lost stock certificates. If a national bank does not provide for replacing lost, stolen, or destroyed stock certificates in its articles of association or bylaws, the bank may...

  14. Lost Talent? The Occupational Ambitions and Attainments of Young Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikora, Joanna; Saha, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    Given ongoing interest in increasing productivity and participation in the workforce, understanding when talent is lost is a useful exercise. The term "lost talent" describes the underutilisation or wastage of human potential. Focusing on young people, Sikora and Saha define lost talent as occurring when students in the top 50% of…

  15. 21 CFR 1305.26 - Lost electronic orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lost electronic orders. 1305.26 Section 1305.26... CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Electronic Orders § 1305.26 Lost electronic orders. (a) If a purchaser determines that an unfilled electronic order has been lost before or after receipt, the purchaser must provide,...

  16. 50 CFR 25.22 - Lost and found articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lost and found articles. 25.22 Section 25.22 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Lost and found articles. Lost articles or money found on a national wildlife refuge are to...

  17. 50 CFR 25.22 - Lost and found articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lost and found articles. 25.22 Section 25.22 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Lost and found articles. Lost articles or money found on a national wildlife refuge are to...

  18. 50 CFR 25.22 - Lost and found articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lost and found articles. 25.22 Section 25.22 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Lost and found articles. Lost articles or money found on a national wildlife refuge are to...

  19. 50 CFR 25.22 - Lost and found articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lost and found articles. 25.22 Section 25.22 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Lost and found articles. Lost articles or money found on a national wildlife refuge are to...

  20. 50 CFR 25.22 - Lost and found articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lost and found articles. 25.22 Section 25.22 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Lost and found articles. Lost articles or money found on a national wildlife refuge are to...

  1. 21 CFR 1305.26 - Lost electronic orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lost electronic orders. 1305.26 Section 1305.26... CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Electronic Orders § 1305.26 Lost electronic orders. (a) If a purchaser determines that an unfilled electronic order has been lost before or after receipt, the purchaser must provide,...

  2. 78 FR 28897 - Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project; Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project; Sweetwater County, Wyoming AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Environmental assessment and finding of no...

  3. 76 FR 29721 - Lost River and Challis-Yankee Fork Ranger Districts, Salmon-Challis National Forest; ID; Lost...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ...; Lost River/Lemhi Grazing Allotments Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION... proposed to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Lost River/Lemhi Grazing Allotments on.... This notice terminates the environmental analysis process for the Lost River/Lemhi Grazing...

  4. Lost circulation control materials. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    Work in FY 94 continued to investigate the use of calcium phosphate cements as lost circulation control materials for geothermal wells. The calcium phosphate cements were produced by reacting calcium aluminate cement with sodium phosphate compounds. Pumpable formulations with thickening times up to two hours at temperatures between 25 to 90{degrees}C were developed and characterized. The materials showed rapid set behaviour, early strength development, low permeability and acceptable durability in hydrothermal environments. Strengths up to 4 MPa were achieved four hours after mixing and water permeabilities were of the order of 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} cm/s at 24 hours. Partial replacement of calcium aluminate cement with ground granulated blast furnace slag was found to reduce the amount of borax retarder required to maintain pumpability at elevated temperatures and pressures.

  5. Sociology: a lost connection in social psychology.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Kesebir, Selin; Snyder, Benjamin H

    2009-11-01

    For the first half of the 20th century, sociology was one of the closest allies of social psychology. Over the past four decades, however, the connection with sociology has weakened, whereas new connections with neighboring disciplines (e.g., biology, economics, political science) have formed. Along the way, the sociological perspective has been largely lost in mainstream social psychology in the United States. Most social psychologists today are not concerned with collective phenomena and do not investigate social structural factors (e.g., residential mobility, socioeconomic status, dominant religion, political systems). Even when the social structural factors are included in the analysis, psychologists typically treat them as individual difference variables. Sociologist C. Wright Mills famously promoted sociological imagination, or the ability to see distal yet important social forces operating in a larger societal context. By comparing sociological perspectives to psychological perspectives, this article highlights the insights that the sociological perspective and sociological imagination can bring to social psychology.

  6. Lost in the mall: misrepresentations and misunderstandings.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Elizabeth F

    1999-01-01

    Readers of Ethics and Behavior have been treated to a misrepresentation of my research on planting false memories, to a misstatement of the actual empirical finidngs, and to a distortion of the history of the development of the idea for this line of research. The partisan essay by Crook and Dean which appears in this issue ("'Lost in a Shopping Mall' -- A Breach of Professional Ethics") is disturbing not only because of its errors, exaggerations, and omissions, but because, in some instances, the quality of the argument makes one wonder whether these were innocent mistakes or a deliberate attempt to distort my work. Some of these errors can be explained by simple lack of scientific competence. However, others are sufficiently bizarre that they cast doubt on the process that led to the acceptance of a manuscript written by an individual who has continually made her animosity toward me very publicly known (e.g., Boerner, 1996; Neimark, 1996).

  7. The lost honour of Henrietta Leavitt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Puerto, C.

    2011-11-01

    The first scene opens with the music of Shirley Bassey. The astronomer Henrietta Swan Leavitt is writing a diary when visited by the famous CBS reporter Edward Roscoe Murrow. Henrietta is surprised that this American television channel should want to pay such a tribute to her, but she agrees to be interviewed. Annie Jump Cannon, her friend and colleague from Harvard College Observatory, accompanies her during most of the sessions. Everything goes so well that the journalist tries to touch on certain issues that Henrietta seems to want to keep secret, such as her relationship with Edward Charles Pickering, Director of the Observatory, and the reason why she failed to get the recognition for her work that she deserved.This is the argument of the play The Lost Honor of Henrietta Leavitt, a project of the Museo de la Ciencia y el Cosmos (Museum of Science and the Cosmos), run by the Organismo Autonomo de Museos y Centros of Cabildo de Tenerife (Autonomous Organism of Museums and Centres of the island government, Cabildo of Tenerife), with funding from the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT) and designed for the International Year of Astronomy 2009. The play, written and directed by the author, Carmen del Puerto, has been staged eight times in Tenerife and Pamplona. The poster values this experience as a resource for scientific popularization.

  8. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology - Phase V

    SciTech Connect

    Wanliang Sun; Harry E. Littleton; Charles E. Bates

    2004-04-29

    Previous research, conducted under DOE Contracts DE-FC07-89ID12869, DE-FC07-93ID12230 and DE-FC07-95ID113358 made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional developments were needed to improve the process and make it more functional in industrial environments. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--Computational Model for the Process and Data Base to Support the Model; Task 2--Casting Dimensional Accuracy; Task 3--Pattern Production; Task 4--Improved Pattern Materials; Task 5--Coating Control; Task 6--In-Plant Case Studies; Task 7--Energy and the Environmental Data; and Task 8--Technology Transfer. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2004. The results obtained in each task and subtask are summarized in this Executive Summary and details are provided in subsequent sections of the report.

  9. Progress in The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Wright, E.K.

    1991-01-01

    Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50{percent} through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April, 1990--March, 1991. 4 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Lost in Translation (LiT)

    PubMed Central

    Dollery, Colin T

    2014-01-01

    Translational medicine is a roller coaster with occasional brilliant successes and a large majority of failures. Lost in Translation 1 (‘LiT1’), beginning in the 1950s, was a golden era built upon earlier advances in experimental physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology, with a dash of serendipity, that led to the discovery of many new drugs for serious illnesses. LiT2 saw the large-scale industrialization of drug discovery using high-throughput screens and assays based on affinity for the target molecule. The links between drug development and university sciences and medicine weakened, but there were still some brilliant successes. In LiT3, the coverage of translational medicine expanded from molecular biology to drug budgets, with much greater emphasis on safety and official regulation. Compared with R&D expenditure, the number of breakthrough discoveries in LiT3 was disappointing, but monoclonal antibodies for immunity and inflammation brought in a new golden era and kinase inhibitors such as imatinib were breakthroughs in cancer. The pharmaceutical industry is trying to revive the LiT1 approach by using phenotypic assays and closer links with academia. LiT4 faces a data explosion generated by the genome project, GWAS, ENCODE and the ‘omics’ that is in danger of leaving LiT4 in a computerized cloud. Industrial laboratories are filled with masses of automated machinery while the scientists sit in a separate room viewing the results on their computers. Big Data will need Big Thinking in LiT4 but with so many unmet medical needs and so many new opportunities being revealed there are high hopes that the roller coaster will ride high again. PMID:24428732

  11. The Monogenean Which Lost Its Clamps

    PubMed Central

    Justine, Jean-Lou; Rahmouni, Chahrazed; Gey, Delphine; Schoelinck, Charlotte; Hoberg, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Ectoparasites face a daily challenge: to remain attached to their hosts. Polyopisthocotylean monogeneans usually attach to the surface of fish gills using highly specialized structures, the sclerotized clamps. In the original description of the protomicrocotylid species Lethacotyle fijiensis, described 60 years ago, the clamps were considered to be absent but few specimens were available and this observation was later questioned. In addition, genera within the family Protomicrocotylidae have either clamps of the “gastrocotylid” or the “microcotylid” types; this puzzled systematists because these clamp types are characteristic of distinct, major groups. Discovery of another, new, species of the genus Lethacotyle, has allowed us to explore the nature of the attachment structures in protomicrocotylids. Lethacotyle vera n. sp. is described from the gills of the carangid Caranx papuensis off New Caledonia. It is distinguished from Lethacotyle fijiensis, the only other species of the genus, by the length of the male copulatory spines. Sequences of 28S rDNA were used to build a tree, in which Lethacotyle vera grouped with other protomicrocotylids. The identity of the host fish was confirmed with COI barcodes. We observed that protomicrocotylids have specialized structures associated with their attachment organ, such as lateral flaps and transverse striations, which are not known in other monogeneans. We thus hypothesized that the clamps in protomicrocotylids were sequentially lost during evolution, coinciding with the development of other attachment structures. To test the hypothesis, we calculated the surfaces of clamps and body in 120 species of gastrocotylinean monogeneans, based on published descriptions. The ratio of clamp surface: body surface was the lowest in protomicrocotylids. We conclude that clamps in protomicrocotylids are vestigial organs, and that occurrence of “gastrocotylid” and simpler “microcotylid” clamps within the same family are

  12. The monogenean which lost its clamps.

    PubMed

    Justine, Jean-Lou; Rahmouni, Chahrazed; Gey, Delphine; Schoelinck, Charlotte; Hoberg, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    Ectoparasites face a daily challenge: to remain attached to their hosts. Polyopisthocotylean monogeneans usually attach to the surface of fish gills using highly specialized structures, the sclerotized clamps. In the original description of the protomicrocotylid species Lethacotyle fijiensis, described 60 years ago, the clamps were considered to be absent but few specimens were available and this observation was later questioned. In addition, genera within the family Protomicrocotylidae have either clamps of the "gastrocotylid" or the "microcotylid" types; this puzzled systematists because these clamp types are characteristic of distinct, major groups. Discovery of another, new, species of the genus Lethacotyle, has allowed us to explore the nature of the attachment structures in protomicrocotylids. Lethacotyle vera n. sp. is described from the gills of the carangid Caranx papuensis off New Caledonia. It is distinguished from Lethacotyle fijiensis, the only other species of the genus, by the length of the male copulatory spines. Sequences of 28S rDNA were used to build a tree, in which Lethacotyle vera grouped with other protomicrocotylids. The identity of the host fish was confirmed with COI barcodes. We observed that protomicrocotylids have specialized structures associated with their attachment organ, such as lateral flaps and transverse striations, which are not known in other monogeneans. We thus hypothesized that the clamps in protomicrocotylids were sequentially lost during evolution, coinciding with the development of other attachment structures. To test the hypothesis, we calculated the surfaces of clamps and body in 120 species of gastrocotylinean monogeneans, based on published descriptions. The ratio of clamp surface: body surface was the lowest in protomicrocotylids. We conclude that clamps in protomicrocotylids are vestigial organs, and that occurrence of "gastrocotylid" and simpler "microcotylid" clamps within the same family are steps in an

  13. 42 CFR 110.32 - Benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benefits for lost employment income. 110.32 Section 110.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES COUNTERMEASURES INJURY COMPENSATION PROGRAM Available Benefits § 110.32 Benefits for lost employment income....

  14. 42 CFR 110.32 - Benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benefits for lost employment income. 110.32 Section 110.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES COUNTERMEASURES INJURY COMPENSATION PROGRAM Available Benefits § 110.32 Benefits for lost employment income....

  15. 42 CFR 110.32 - Benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benefits for lost employment income. 110.32 Section 110.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES COUNTERMEASURES INJURY COMPENSATION PROGRAM Available Benefits § 110.32 Benefits for lost employment income....

  16. 42 CFR 110.32 - Benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benefits for lost employment income. 110.32 Section 110.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES COUNTERMEASURES INJURY COMPENSATION PROGRAM Available Benefits § 110.32 Benefits for lost employment income....

  17. 20 CFR 322.6 - Pay for time lost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pay for time lost. 322.6 Section 322.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT REMUNERATION § 322.6 Pay for time lost. (a) Definition. The term “pay for time lost” means any payment made...

  18. 20 CFR 322.6 - Pay for time lost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Pay for time lost. 322.6 Section 322.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT REMUNERATION § 322.6 Pay for time lost. (a) Definition. The term “pay for time lost” means any payment made...

  19. 20 CFR 322.6 - Pay for time lost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pay for time lost. 322.6 Section 322.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT REMUNERATION § 322.6 Pay for time lost. (a) Definition. The term “pay for time lost” means any payment made...

  20. 20 CFR 322.6 - Pay for time lost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Pay for time lost. 322.6 Section 322.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT REMUNERATION § 322.6 Pay for time lost. (a) Definition. The term “pay for time lost” means any payment made...

  1. Lost circulation technology workshop, October 9-10, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, B.C.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the presentations and discussions of a workshop on lost circulation technology. The workshop identified and defined lost circulation problem areas in field operations, materials, mud effects, and standards. Problem solution needs were also categorized as requiring analytical evaluation and procedure, instrument, and material development.

  2. Design and evaluation of lost circulation materials for severe environments

    SciTech Connect

    Loeppke, G.E.; Glowka, D.A.; Wright, E.K.

    1988-01-01

    An independent analysis of lost circulation materials for geothermal applications has been completed using unique laboratory tools developed for the purpose. Test results of commercial materials as well as mathematical models for evaluating their performance are presented. Physical attributes that govern the performance of lost circulation materials are identified and correlated with test results. 9 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. 20 CFR 322.6 - Pay for time lost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pay for time lost. 322.6 Section 322.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT... lost. The amount of a payment for personal injury that is apportioned to factors other than time...

  4. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket...

  5. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket...

  6. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket...

  7. 27 CFR 46.117 - Lost or destroyed stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Lost or destroyed stamps. 46.117 Section 46.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Rules for Special (Occupational) Tax Special Tax Stamps § 46.117 Lost...

  8. 36 CFR 327.16 - Lost and found articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lost and found articles. 327... CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.16 Lost and found articles. All articles found shall be deposited by the finder at the Manager's office or with a ranger. All such articles shall be disposed of in accordance...

  9. 36 CFR 327.16 - Lost and found articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Lost and found articles. 327... CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.16 Lost and found articles. All articles found shall be deposited by the finder at the Manager's office or with a ranger. All such articles shall be disposed of in accordance...

  10. 36 CFR 327.16 - Lost and found articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lost and found articles. 327... CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.16 Lost and found articles. All articles found shall be deposited by the finder at the Manager's office or with a ranger. All such articles shall be disposed of in accordance...

  11. 36 CFR 327.16 - Lost and found articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lost and found articles. 327... CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.16 Lost and found articles. All articles found shall be deposited by the finder at the Manager's office or with a ranger. All such articles shall be disposed of in accordance...

  12. 36 CFR 327.16 - Lost and found articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lost and found articles. 327... CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.16 Lost and found articles. All articles found shall be deposited by the finder at the Manager's office or with a ranger. All such articles shall be disposed of in accordance...

  13. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket...

  14. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket...

  15. 5 CFR 293.309 - Reconstruction of lost OPFs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reconstruction of lost OPFs. 293.309 Section 293.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... necessary precautions to safeguard all OPFs. In the event of a lost or destroyed OPF, the current (or...

  16. 5 CFR 293.309 - Reconstruction of lost OPFs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reconstruction of lost OPFs. 293.309 Section 293.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL RECORDS Official Personnel Folder § 293.309 Reconstruction of lost OPFs. Agencies will...

  17. The cognitive cost of sleep lost

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, John G.; Strecker, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial body of literature supports the intuitive notion that a good night’s sleep can facilitate human cognitive performance the next day. Deficits in attention, learning & memory, emotional reactivity, and higher-order cognitive processes, such as executive function and decision making, have all been documented following sleep disruption in humans. Thus, whilst numerous clinical and experimental studies link human sleep disturbance to cognitive deficits, attempts to develop valid and reliable rodent models of these phenomena are fewer, and relatively more recent. This review focuses primarily on the cognitive impairments produced by sleep disruption in rodent models of several human patterns of sleep loss/sleep disturbance. Though not an exclusive list, this review will focus on four specific types of sleep disturbance: total sleep deprivation, experimental sleep fragmentation, selective REM sleep deprivation, and chronic sleep restriction. The use of rodent models can provide greater opportunities to understand the neurobiological changes underlying sleep loss induced cognitive impairments. Thus, this review concludes with a description of recent neurobiological findings concerning the neuroplastic changes and putative brain mechanisms that may underlie the cognitive deficits produced by sleep disturbances. PMID:21875679

  18. Idiopathic focal epilepsies: the "lost tribe".

    PubMed

    Pal, Deb K; Ferrie, Colin; Addis, Laura; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Caraballo, Roberto; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Fejerman, Natalio; Guerrini, Renzo; Hamandi, Khalid; Helbig, Ingo; Ioannides, Andreas A; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Lal, Dennis; Lesca, Gaetan; Muhle, Hiltrud; Neubauer, Bernd A; Pisano, Tiziana; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Shibata, Takashi; Smith, Anna; Striano, Pasquale; Strug, Lisa J; Szepetowski, Pierre; Valeta, Thalia; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Koutroumanidis, Michalis

    2016-09-01

    The term idiopathic focal epilepsies of childhood (IFE) is not formally recognised by the ILAE in its 2010 revision (Berg et al., 2010), nor are its members and boundaries precisely delineated. The IFEs are amongst the most commonly encountered epilepsy syndromes affecting children. They are fascinating disorders that hold many "treats" for both clinicians and researchers. For example, the IFEs pose many of the most interesting questions central to epileptology: how are functional brain networks involved in the manifestation of epilepsy? What are the shared mechanisms of comorbidity between epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders? How do focal EEG discharges impact cognitive functioning? What explains the age-related expression of these syndromes? Why are EEG discharges and seizures so tightly locked to slow-wave sleep? In the last few decades, the clinical symptomatology and the respective courses of many IFEs have been described, although they are still not widely appreciated beyond the specialist community. Most neurologists would recognise the core syndromes of IFE to comprise: benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes or Rolandic epilepsy (BECTS/RE); Panayiotopoulos syndrome; and the idiopathic occipital epilepsies (Gastaut and photosensitive types). The Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the related (idiopathic) epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves in sleep (CSWS or ESES) are also often included, both as a consequence of the shared morphology of the interictal discharges and their potential evolution from core syndromes, for example, CSWS from BECTS. Atypical benign focal epilepsy of childhood also has shared electro-clinical features warranting inclusion. In addition, a number of less well-defined syndromes of IFE have been proposed, including benign childhood seizures with affective symptoms, benign childhood epilepsy with parietal spikes, benign childhood seizures with frontal or midline spikes, and benign focal seizures of adolescence. The

  19. An ancient bottleneck in the Lost Pines of central Texas.

    PubMed

    Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad A; Williams, Claire G

    2004-05-01

    The retreating edge hypothesis for species responding to climate change predicts severe bottlenecks and eventual extinction. The disjunct Lost Pines population at the westernmost edge of the widespread Pinus taeda range is well suited for testing this prediction. The occurrence of one or more genetic bottlenecks in the Lost Pines population was tested using 34 nuclear microsatellite markers and a control sample from the larger, more continuous east Texas P. taeda forests. The Lost Pines population has undergone drastic contractions in effective population size between 3000 and 30 000 years bp. These results were supported by: (i) detection of transient heterozygosity excess, (ii) a mode-shift indicator of allele frequencies, and (iii) a ratio of allele number to allele size range. No bottleneck was detected for the east Texas control using any of the three methods. The distribution of allele frequencies was skewed for the Lost Pines population compared to the control, indicating a loss of rare alleles. However, allelic diversity was similar between the Lost Pines population and its east Texas control; the mean allele number per locus was 5.29 and 5.38, respectively. It is proposed that the Lost Pines population was the western refugium for P. taeda during Pleistocene glaciation and that East Texas P. taeda forests descended from the bottlenecked Lost Pines population.

  20. How the ventral pathway got lost: and what its recovery might mean.

    PubMed

    Weiller, Cornelius; Bormann, Tobias; Saur, Dorothee; Musso, Mariachristina; Rijntjes, Michel

    2011-07-01

    Textbooks dealing with the anatomical representation of language in the human brain display two language-related zones, Broca's area and Wernicke's area, connected by a single dorsal fiber tract, the arcuate fascicle. This classical model is incomplete. Modern imaging techniques have identified a second long association tract between the temporal and prefrontal language zones, taking a ventral course along the extreme capsule. This newly identified ventral tract connects brain regions needed for language comprehension, while the well-known arcuate fascicle is used for "sensorimotor mapping" during speech production. More than 130 years ago, Carl Wernicke already described a ventral connection for language, almost identical to the present results, but during scientific debate in the following decades either its function or its existence were rejected. This article tells the story of how this knowledge was lost and how the ventral connection, and in consequence the dual system, fits into current hypotheses and how language relates to other systems.

  1. Dylan and Jamie and the Lost Ladybug Project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A narrated coloring book has been developed to emphasize the citizen science aspects of the Lost Ladybug Project. The text focuses on the various common lady beetles that might be found, as well as how to identify less common species....

  2. Lost conservation opportunities in the Pacific Northwest irrigation sector

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Hattrup, M.P.

    1987-06-01

    Initial efforts in the study were focused on identifying potential lost opportunities. Results of these efforts resulted in the following measures being identified as potential lost opportunities in the irrigation sector: pumping plant efficiency improvements on both existing and new sprinkler irrigated acres, low-pressure irrigation on new sprinkler acres, and mainline modification and fittings redesign on new sprinkler acres. All of these potential lost opportunities except fittings design were subject to more detailed analyses through a survey of irrigation equipment dealers, pump repairers and country extension agents. Fittings design was omitted from the survey. Results of the survey indicated that only high-efficiency electric motors and correct pump selection methods on existing and new sprinkler systems and low-pressure irrigation on new handmove/sideroll systems should be considered lost opportunities.

  3. 3. Photocopy of 1977 photograph (original negative lost) 2307 (AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of 1977 photograph (original negative lost) 2307 (AT EXTREME RIGHT) THROUGH 2319 CHAPLINE STREET - Chapline Street Row Historic District, 2301-2319 Chapline Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  4. Sinus Trouble Can Lead to Depression, Lost Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_164035.html Sinus Trouble Can Lead to Depression, Lost Work For people with chronic nasal problems, ... or otherwise -- the severity of depressed mood and depression symptomatology was the predominant factor associated with how ...

  5. [Work days lost due to health problems in industry].

    PubMed

    Yano, Sylvia Regina Trindade; Santana, Vilma Sousa

    2012-05-01

    This cross-sectional study estimated the prevalence of work days lost due to health problems and associated factors among industrial workers. The study population was a simple random cluster sample of 3,403 workers from 16 to 65 years of age in the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Data were collected with individual home interviews. Among industrial workers, one-year prevalence of work days lost to health problems was 12.5%, of which 5.5% were directly work-related and 4.1% aggravated by work. There were no statistically significant differences when compared to other worker categories. Self-perceived workplace hazards, history of work-related injury, and poor self-rated health were associated with work days lost due to work-related injuries/diseases. The findings showed that work days lost are common among both industrial and non-industrial workers, thereby affecting productivity and requiring prevention programs.

  6. 8 CFR 324.3 - Women, citizens of the United States at birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship by marriage and whose marriage has terminated... MARRIAGE AND FORMER CITIZENS WHOSE NATURALIZATION IS AUTHORIZED BY PRIVATE LAW § 324.3 Women, citizens of the United States at birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship by marriage and...

  7. 8 CFR 324.3 - Women, citizens of the United States at birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship by marriage and whose marriage has terminated... MARRIAGE AND FORMER CITIZENS WHOSE NATURALIZATION IS AUTHORIZED BY PRIVATE LAW § 324.3 Women, citizens of the United States at birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship by marriage and...

  8. 8 CFR 324.3 - Women, citizens of the United States at birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship by marriage and whose marriage has terminated... MARRIAGE AND FORMER CITIZENS WHOSE NATURALIZATION IS AUTHORIZED BY PRIVATE LAW § 324.3 Women, citizens of the United States at birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship by marriage and...

  9. 8 CFR 324.3 - Women, citizens of the United States at birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship by marriage and whose marriage has terminated... MARRIAGE AND FORMER CITIZENS WHOSE NATURALIZATION IS AUTHORIZED BY PRIVATE LAW § 324.3 Women, citizens of the United States at birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship by marriage and...

  10. Neural Plasticity and Neurorehabilitation: Teaching the New Brain Old Tricks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleim, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Following brain injury or disease there are widespread biochemical, anatomical and physiological changes that result in what might be considered a new, very different brain. This adapted brain is forced to reacquire behaviors lost as a result of the injury or disease and relies on neural plasticity within the residual neural circuits. The same…

  11. (A)musicality in Williams syndrome: examining relationships among auditory perception, musical skill, and emotional responsiveness to music.

    PubMed

    Lense, Miriam D; Shivers, Carolyn M; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder, is of keen interest to music cognition researchers because of its characteristic auditory sensitivities and emotional responsiveness to music. However, actual musical perception and production abilities are more variable. We examined musicality in WS through the lens of amusia and explored how their musical perception abilities related to their auditory sensitivities, musical production skills, and emotional responsiveness to music. In our sample of 73 adolescents and adults with WS, 11% met criteria for amusia, which is higher than the 4% prevalence rate reported in the typically developing (TD) population. Amusia was not related to auditory sensitivities but was related to musical training. Performance on the amusia measure strongly predicted musical skill but not emotional responsiveness to music, which was better predicted by general auditory sensitivities. This study represents the first time amusia has been examined in a population with a known neurodevelopmental genetic disorder with a range of cognitive abilities. Results have implications for the relationships across different levels of auditory processing, musical skill development, and emotional responsiveness to music, as well as the understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in individuals with WS and TD individuals with and without amusia.

  12. Static slot testing of conventional lost circulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Behr, V.L.; Wilde, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the utility of conventional lost circulation materials and testing methods was performed using a modified API slot tester. Five lost circulation materials were evaluated in 266 tests at both room temperature and temperature-aged conditions simulating expected geothermal environments. A large variation in the maximum pressure (or sealing pressure) the plug could withstand was attributed to nonrepeatability in plug strengths. Plugs were composed to multiple or single particle bridges, with the latter providing stronger, better sealing plugs. Seals occurred on the upstream surface of the slots in all cases. Sealing pressures generally decreased with increasing slot widths and decreasing solids concentration. When the slot width was less than the size of the largest rigid particle in the lost circulation slurry, sealing pressure was maximized. When the slot width was greater than three times the maximum rigid particle size, no significant sealing ability was observed with the conventional materials tested. Additionally, cellulosic lost circulation materials are severely degraded by temperature aging. Mud gellation provided no significant improvement in lost circulation material sealing ability.

  13. On the 'lost' crops of the neolithic Near East.

    PubMed

    Abbo, Shahal; Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Heun, Manfred; Gopher, Avi

    2013-02-01

    The claim that the 'classic' eight 'founder crop' package (einkorn wheat, emmer wheat, barley, lentil, pea, chickpea, bitter vetch, and flax) underlying the emergence of agriculture in the Near East is a relic of a larger number of domesticated species is addressed. The 'lost' crops concept relies on the idea that additional taxa were at certain points in time and in certain locations genuine crops, which were later abandoned. The issue is highly relevant to the debate concerning mono- versus polyphyletic domestication, because if there were numerous 'false starts' that were subsequently lost, this implies that plant domestication occurred over a protracted time period, and across a wide geographic range. Different criteria were used for declaring those taxa as 'lost' crops, including, but not limited to (i) identification in archaeobotanical assemblages of grains from species which are not known as crops at present; (ii) identification of such grains in what is interpreted to have been Neolithic storage facilities; and (iii) recent botanical observations on populations of crop wild relatives in disturbed habitats. The evidence for four presumed 'lost' crops (wild oat, rambling vetch, rye, and wild black lentil) and the broad bean is evaluated, and discussed in light of data on Croatian and Israeli wild pea, and Moroccan wild lentil in disturbed habitats. Based on present knowledge, the broad bean might emerge as a founder crop (without an identified wild progenitor). The same may hold true for rye, which was never lost since its adoption in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period in Anatolia. In the remaining three cases, there are alternative, more likely, explanations for the archaeological finds or the recent botanical observations rather than 'lost' domestication episodes.

  14. Brain herniation

    MedlinePlus

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  15. 42 CFR 102.32 - Benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 102.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX... smallpox vaccine recipients or vaccinia contacts may be able to receive benefits for loss of employment... may pay benefits for lost employment income to the estate of a deceased smallpox vaccine recipient...

  16. 42 CFR 102.32 - Benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 102.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX... smallpox vaccine recipients or vaccinia contacts may be able to receive benefits for loss of employment... may pay benefits for lost employment income to the estate of a deceased smallpox vaccine recipient...

  17. 42 CFR 102.32 - Benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 102.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX... smallpox vaccine recipients or vaccinia contacts may be able to receive benefits for loss of employment... may pay benefits for lost employment income to the estate of a deceased smallpox vaccine recipient...

  18. 42 CFR 102.32 - Benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 102.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX... smallpox vaccine recipients or vaccinia contacts may be able to receive benefits for loss of employment... may pay benefits for lost employment income to the estate of a deceased smallpox vaccine recipient...

  19. 42 CFR 102.32 - Benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 102.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX... smallpox vaccine recipients or vaccinia contacts may be able to receive benefits for loss of employment... may pay benefits for lost employment income to the estate of a deceased smallpox vaccine recipient...

  20. 27 CFR 479.141 - Stolen or lost firearms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stolen or lost firearms. 479.141 Section 479.141 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES,...

  1. 27 CFR 479.141 - Stolen or lost firearms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stolen or lost firearms. 479.141 Section 479.141 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES,...

  2. 27 CFR 479.141 - Stolen or lost firearms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Stolen or lost firearms. 479.141 Section 479.141 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES,...

  3. 27 CFR 479.142 - Stolen or lost documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stolen or lost documents. 479.142 Section 479.142 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES,...

  4. 27 CFR 479.141 - Stolen or lost firearms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Stolen or lost firearms. 479.141 Section 479.141 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES,...

  5. 27 CFR 479.142 - Stolen or lost documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Stolen or lost documents. 479.142 Section 479.142 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES,...

  6. 27 CFR 479.142 - Stolen or lost documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stolen or lost documents. 479.142 Section 479.142 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES,...

  7. 27 CFR 479.141 - Stolen or lost firearms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stolen or lost firearms. 479.141 Section 479.141 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES,...

  8. 27 CFR 479.142 - Stolen or lost documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Stolen or lost documents. 479.142 Section 479.142 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES,...

  9. 27 CFR 479.142 - Stolen or lost documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stolen or lost documents. 479.142 Section 479.142 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES,...

  10. Lost Hills Field Trial - incorporating new technology for resevoir management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielding, E. J.; Brink, J. L.; Patzek, T. W.; Silin, D. B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will discuss how Chevron U.S.A. Production Company is implementing a field trial that will use Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA)on injection wells, in conjunction with satellite images to measure ground elevation changes, to perform real-time resevoir management in the Lost Hills Field.

  11. 32 CFR 310.50 - Lost, stolen, or compromised information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.50 Lost, stolen, or compromised... reported to: (1) The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US CERT) within one hour of...., computer incident, theft, loss of material, etc.) shall continue to be reported in accordance...

  12. 32 CFR 310.50 - Lost, stolen, or compromised information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.50 Lost, stolen, or compromised... reported to: (1) The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US CERT) within one hour of...., computer incident, theft, loss of material, etc.) shall continue to be reported in accordance...

  13. AmeriFlux US-Los Lost Creek

    DOE Data Explorer

    Desai, Ankur [University of Wisconsin

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Los Lost Creek. Site Description - Shrub wetland site, chosen to be representative of the wetlands within the WLEF tall tower flux footprint. This is a deciduous shrub wetland. Coniferous and grassy stands also exist within the WLEF flux footprint. Solar power. The site has excellent micrometeorological characteristics.

  14. 7 CFR 27.41 - Lost certificate; duplicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Cotton Class Certificates § 27.41 Lost certificate; duplicate. Upon the written request of the last holder of a valid cotton class... cotton and without a new Micronaire determination for the cotton. Such new certificate shall bear...

  15. 7 CFR 27.41 - Lost certificate; duplicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Cotton Class Certificates § 27.41 Lost certificate; duplicate. Upon the written request of the last holder of a valid cotton class... cotton and without a new Micronaire determination for the cotton. Such new certificate shall bear...

  16. 7 CFR 27.41 - Lost certificate; duplicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Cotton Class Certificates § 27.41 Lost certificate; duplicate. Upon the written request of the last holder of a valid cotton class... cotton and without a new Micronaire determination for the cotton. Such new certificate shall bear...

  17. Cinema and Choric Connection: "Lost in Translation" as Sensual Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Brian L.; Keeling, Diane Marie

    2011-01-01

    The rise of the new information technologies, and corresponding proliferation of signs, images, and information, has contributed to a growing sense of alienation and dislocation. For many, the contemporary moment is an unending and disorienting sea of sensory-symbolic excesses. "Lost in Translation" is a film addressed to these anxieties. Engaging…

  18. 36 CFR 520.17 - Lost and found.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 520.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.17 Lost and found... Smithsonian Institution. Such articles or money shall be transferred to the Treasurer of the...

  19. 36 CFR 520.17 - Lost and found.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 520.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.17 Lost... abandoned to the Smithsonian Institution. Such articles or money shall be transferred to the Treasurer...

  20. Unmanned Research Vessel Lost on Deep Sea Dive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-05-01

    Nereus, a one-of-a-kind unmanned hybrid remotely operated vehicle (HROV) that had allowed scientists to explore the deepest parts of the ocean, was confirmed lost at 2:00 p.m. local New Zealand time on 10 May, according to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), which designed and operated the vehicle.

  1. You Alone in the North Woods: The Lost Hunter's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Hampshire State Fish and Game Dept., Concord.

    Although designed for the lost hunter, this 4 by 5 1/2 inch handbook of survival guidelines is compact enough to be included in the backpack of anyone venturing on an outdoor, wilderness expedition in the north woods. Twenty-one major sections provide information and some illustrations about: what to include in a survival kit; the importance of…

  2. Satan's Temptation of Eve in "Paradise Lost": A Rhetorical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Dee Ann Duke

    John Milton employs classical rhetorical techniques in "Paradise Lost" to accomplish Satan's temptation of Eve which begins on line 524 and ends with line 732 of Book 9; however, Satan's oration resembles pejorative sophistry and Milton uses Ciceronian arrangement for Satan's argument. Milton envisions Satan as a clever, cunning creature…

  3. Reclaiming "Lost Prizes": An Interview with Ken McCluskey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bockern, Steve

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Ken McCluskey, Dean and Professor of Education at the University of Winnipeg. He is known internationally for his work in several areas including: (1) mentoring; (2) attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; (3) at-risk children and youth (where his "Lost Prizes" and related projects serve as…

  4. Paradise Lost: Introducing Students to Climate Change through Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennon, Brady

    2013-01-01

    "This country has been the basis of my being. And when it's no longer there, you know, it's unthinkable." Ueantabo Mackenzie's haunting words in the PBS NOW documentary "Paradise Lost" shook the author. He knew he wanted to teach a unit on global warming, especially after participating in the Portland-area Rethinking Schools…

  5. Why We Need Neil Simon's Lost in Yonkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    Nathan Coates, a high school teacher, describes the necessity of comedy in classrooms and also offers many points of discussion for approaching Neil Simon's play. Neil Simon's "Lost in Yonkers", which has won the Tony Award for the best play and the Pulitzer Award, both in 1991, tackles the toughest problems with the delicacy of a…

  6. Most Rural Towns Lost Physicians after Their Hospitals Closed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, L. Gary; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Between 1980 and 1988, 132 rural hospitals closed and as a result many rural towns also lost physicians, including 19 communities that were still without a physician 2 years after closure. Smaller, more remote towns had few physicians to begin with and were more likely than larger towns to lose physicians along with their hospitals. (LP)

  7. Multiple origins of methane at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Alexander S.; Summons, Roger E.

    2010-08-01

    The high concentrations of methane in the vent fluids of the Lost City Hydrothermal Field represent the sum of abiotic and biological sources and sinks. Stable isotopes of carbon are of limited value in discriminating between the various sources of methane because the isotope effects associated with the multiple processes forming and consuming methane are each poorly constrained, and the products of these processes are pooled. Furthermore, reservoir effects complicate interpretation: the near quantitative reduction of inorganic carbon to methane under highly reducing conditions limits the isotope effects associated with methanogenesis. However, the carbon isotope compositions of lipids derived from anaerobic methanotrophs suggest that more than one isotopically distinct pool of methane exists at Lost City. In this analysis we integrate multiple lines of evidence to constrain the relative contribution of various processes at Lost City. The processes that we consider here include i) Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) abiotic synthesis of methane and other hydrocarbons, ii) the Sabatier process for the abiotic synthesis of methane alone, iii) biological methane production by Methanosarcinales, and iv) biological methane consumption by anaerobic and aerobic methanotrophs. This analysis suggests that abiotic processes, particularly the Sabatier reaction, are likely to be the dominant source of methane at Lost City. Biological methane is present in the vent fluids, but does not compose a high fraction of the total methane pool. These observations imply that ultramafic systems could have supplied abundant reduced carbon to the early Earth, even without biological catalysis.

  8. 5 CFR 839.1003 - How will OPM compute the amount of lost earnings?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How will OPM compute the amount of lost... § 839.1003 How will OPM compute the amount of lost earnings? (a) Lost earnings will generally be computed in accordance with the Board's lost earnings regulations (5 CFR 1606 of chapter VI). However,...

  9. Polymer grouts for plugging lost circulation in geothermal wells.

    SciTech Connect

    Galbreath, D. (Green Mountain International, Waynesvile, NC); Mansure, Arthur James; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2004-12-01

    We have concluded a laboratory study to evaluate the survival potential of polymeric materials used for lost circulation plugs in geothermal wells. We learned early in the study that these materials were susceptible to hydrolysis. Through a systematic program in which many potential chemical combinations were evaluated, polymers were developed which tolerated hydrolysis for eight weeks at 500 F. The polymers also met material, handling, cost, and emplacement criteria. This screening process identified the most promising materials. A benefit of this work is that the components of the polymers developed can be mixed at the surface and pumped downhole through a single hose. Further strength testing is required to determine precisely the maximum temperature at which extrusion through fractures or voids causes failure of the lost circulation plug.

  10. Frontal brain asymmetry and transient cardiovascular responses to the perception of humor.

    PubMed

    Papousek, Ilona; Schulter, Günter; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Samson, Andrea C; Freudenthaler, H Harald; Lackner, Helmut K

    2013-04-01

    The study examined the relationship of individual differences in prefrontal brain asymmetry, measured by the EEG in resting conditions, to the individual's responsivity in the context of humor (n=42). Several weeks after the EEG recording, immediate cardiovascular responses to the perception of humor and behavioral indicators of humor processing were obtained in an experimental paradigm involving non-verbal cartoons. Relatively greater resting activity in the left than right prefrontal cortex, particularly at the ventrolateral positions, was associated with faster detection of humor, a more pronounced cardiac response to the perception of humor (heart rate and cardiac output), and more accessible internal positive affective states (indicated by faster reports of amusement levels). The study confirms and extends findings of the relevance of prefrontal brain asymmetry to affective responsivity, contributing evidence in the domain of positive affect and humor, and demonstrating relationships to the immediate cardiovascular response pattern to an emotional event.

  11. LOST COVE AND HARPER CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, NORTH CAROLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, W.R.; Crandall, T.M.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation indicated that a part of the Lost Cove and Harper Creek Roadless Areas, North Carolina has a probable mineral-resource potential for uranium, niobium, and beryllium. The study areas lie within the Blue Ridge physiographic province and are predominantly underlain by Precambrian plutonic and metasedimentary rocks of low metamorphic grade. The uranium occurs in vein-type deposits and in supergene-enriched foliated rocks. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil fuel resources.

  12. Restoration of Lost Lake, recovery of an impacted Carolina Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, L.D.; Gladden, J.B.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Rogers, V.A.

    1995-09-01

    Lost Lake is one of approximately 200 Carolina bays found on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Until 1984 Lost Lake was contaminated by heavy metals and solvents overflowing from a nearby settling basin. Up to 12 inches of surface soil and all vegetation was removed from the bay as part of a RCRA removal action. A plan for restoration was initiated in 1989 and implemented in 1990 and 1991. Extensive planning led to defined objectives, strategies, treatments, and monitoring programs allowing successful restoration of Lost Lake. The primary goal of the project was to restore the wetland ecosystem after a hazardous waste clean up operation. An additional goal was to study the progress of the project and the success of the restoration activity. Several strategy considerations were necessary in the restoration plan. The removal of existing organic soils had to have compensation, a treatment scheme for planting and the extent of manipulation of the substrate had to be considered, monitoring decisions had to be made, and the decision whether or not to actively control the hydrology of the restored system.

  13. Determination of Serum Lost Goodwill Target Proteome in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongming; Hu, Changchen; Zhang, Gangli; Ren, Jinrui; Tan, Yihu; Sun, Wenxiao; Wang, Junwen; Li, Jun; Liu, Hongchao; Xie, Ruifan; Hao, Zhipeng; Guo, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the biokinetics of LGT proteome, a potential biomarker of severe TBI, in serum of severe TBI patients. The LGT proteome presents in the serum of severe TBI patients. The abundance diversity of LGT proteome is closely associated with pathologic condition of TBI patients. Serum LGT proteome may be used as a promising marker for evaluating severity of severe TBI.

  14. Lost circulation in geothermal wells: survey and evaluation of industry experience

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.A.

    1981-07-01

    Lost circulation during drilling and completion of geothermal wells can be a severe problem, particularly in naturally fractured and/or vugular formations. Geothermal and petroleum operators, drilling service companies, and independent consultants were interviewed to assess the lost circulation problem in geothermal wells and to determine general practices for preventing lost circulation. This report documents the results and conclusions from the interviews and presents recommendations for needed research. In addition, a survey was also made of the lost circulation literature, of currently available lost circulation materials, and of existing lost circulation test equipment.

  15. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  16. Feature Extraction from Subband Brain Signals and Its Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukul, Manoj Kumar; Matsuno, Fumitoshi

    This paper considers both the non-stationarity as well as independence/uncorrelated criteria along with the asymmetry ratio over the electroencephalogram (EEG) signals and proposes a hybrid approach of the signal preprocessing methods before the feature extraction. A filter bank approach of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is used to exploit the non-stationary characteristics of the EEG signals and it decomposes the raw EEG signals into the subbands of different center frequencies called as rhythm. A post processing of the selected subband by the AMUSE algorithm (a second order statistics based ICA/BSS algorithm) provides the separating matrix for each class of the movement imagery. In the subband domain the orthogonality as well as orthonormality criteria over the whitening matrix and separating matrix do not come respectively. The human brain has an asymmetrical structure. It has been observed that the ratio between the norms of the left and right class separating matrices should be different for better discrimination between these two classes. The alpha/beta band asymmetry ratio between the separating matrices of the left and right classes will provide the condition to select an appropriate multiplier. So we modify the estimated separating matrix by an appropriate multiplier in order to get the required asymmetry and extend the AMUSE algorithm in the subband domain. The desired subband is further subjected to the updated separating matrix to extract subband sub-components from each class. The extracted subband sub-components sources are further subjected to the feature extraction (power spectral density) step followed by the linear discriminant analysis (LDA).

  17. Abnormal degree centrality of functional hubs associated with negative coping in older Chinese adults who lost their only child.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Liu, HuiJuan; Wei, Dongtao; Sun, Jiangzhou; Yang, Junyi; Meng, Jie; Wang, Lihong; Qiu, Jiang

    2015-12-01

    The loss of an only child is a negative life event and may potentially increase the risk of psychiatric disorders. However, the psychological consequences of the loss of an only child and the associated neural mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Degree centrality (DC), derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), was used to examine network communication in 22 older adults who lost their only child and 23 matched controls. The older adults who lost their only child exhibited an ineffective coping style. They also showed decreased distant and local DC in the precuneus and left inferior parietal lobule and decreased distant DC in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Furthermore, the decreased local and distant DC of these regions and the decreased DLPFC-precuneus connectivity strength were negatively correlated with negative coping scores in the loss group but not in the controls. Overall, the results suggested a model that the impaired neural network communication of brain hubs within the default mode network (DMN) and central executive network (CEN) were associated with a negative coping style in older adults who lost their only child. The decreased connectivity of the hubs can be identified as a neural risk factor that is related to future psychopathology.

  18. Earthworms lost from pesticides application in potato crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Santos, Glenda; Forrer, Karin; Binder, Claudia R.

    2010-05-01

    Bioturbation from earthworm's activity contributes to soil creep and soil carbon dynamics, and provide enough aeration conditions for agricultural practices all over the world. In developing countries where there is a long term misuse of pesticides for agricultural purposes, lost of these benefits from earthworms activity might already yielded negative effects in the current crop production. Little research has been performed on earthworms avoidance to pesticides in developing countries located in the tropics. Furthermore, the complete avoidance reaction (from attraction to 100% avoidance) from earthworms to most of the pesticides used in potato cultivation in developing countries like Colombia is incomplete as yet. Hence the aim of this study is to assess the lost of earthworm on the soils caused by different concentrations of pesticides and associated agricultural impacts caused by a lost in the soil bioturbation. As a first stage, we have studied earthworm's avoidance to pesticide concentration in a potato agricultural area located in Colombia. Local cultivated Eisenia fetida were exposed to four of the most frequent applied active ingredients in potato crops i.e. carbofuran, mancozeb, methamidophos and chlorpyriphos. Adult earthworm toxicity experiments were carried out in two soils, untreated grasslands under standard (ISO guidelines) and undisturbed conditions, and exposed to six different concentrations of the active ingredients. The results of the avoidance reaction on the standard soils were significant for carbofuran, mancoceb and chlorpyrifos. For each of the three active ingredients, we found i) overuse of pesticide, ii) applied dose of carbofuran, mancoceb and chlorpyrifos by the farmers potentially caused 20%, 11% and 9% of earthworms avoidance on the cultivated soils, respectively.

  19. Years of life lost due to infectious diseases in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Bryla, Marek; Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk, Elzbieta; Bryla, Pawel; Pikala, Malgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Purpose An evaluation of mortality due to infectious diseases in Poland in 1999–2012 and an analysis of standard expected years of life lost due to the above diseases. Methods The study material included a database created on the basis of 5,219,205 death certificates of Polish inhabitants, gathered between 1999 and 2012 and provided by the Central Statistical Office. Crude Death Rates (CDR), Standardized Death Rates (SDR) and Standard Expected Years of Life Lost (SEYLL) due to infectious and parasitic diseases were also evaluated in the study period as well as Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per living person (SEYLLp) and Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per dead person (SEYLLd). Time trends were evaluated with the application of joinpoint models and an annual percentage change in their values. Results Death certificates report that 38,261 people died due to infectious diseases in Poland in the period 1999–2012, which made up 0.73% of the total number of deaths. SDR caused by these diseases decreased, particularly in the male group: Annual Percentage Change (APC = -1.05; 95% CI:-2.0 to -0.2; p<0.05). The most positive trends were observed in mortality caused by tuberculosis (A15-A19) (APC = -5.40; 95% CI:-6.3 to -4.5; p<0.05) and also meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and encephalomyelitis (G03-G04) (APC = -3.42; 95% CI:-4.7 to -2.1; p<0.05). The most negative mortality trends were observed for intestinal infectious diseases (A00-A09) Annual Average Percentage Change (AAPC = 7.3; 95% CI:3.1 to 11.7; p<0.05). SDR substantially decreased in the first half of the study period, but then significantly increased in the second half. Infectious and parasitic diseases contributed to a loss of around 37,000 standard expected years of life in 1999 and more than 28,000 in 2012. During the study period, the SEYLLp index decreased from 9.59 to 7.39 per 10,000 population and the SEYLLd index decreased from 14.26 to 10.34 years (AAPC = 2.3; 95% CI:-2,9 to -1.7; p<0

  20. Brain surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  1. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  2. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  3. Measuring the societal burden of cancer: the cost of lost productivity due to premature cancer-related mortality in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hanly, Paul; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Sharp, Linda

    2015-02-15

    Every cancer-related death in someone of working age represents an economic loss to society. To inform priorities for cancer control, we estimated costs of lost productivity due to premature cancer-related mortality across Europe, for all cancers and by site, gender, region and country. Cancer deaths in 2008 were obtained from GLOBOCAN for 30 European countries across four regions. Costs were valued using the human capital approach. Years of productive life lost (YPLL) were computed by multiplying deaths between 15 and 64 years by working-life expectancy, then by country-, age- and gender-specific annual wages, corrected for workforce participation and unemployment. Lost productivity costs due to premature cancer-related mortality in Europe in 2008 were €75 billion. Male costs (€49 billion) were almost twice female costs (€26 billion). The most costly sites were lung (€17 billion; 23% of total costs), breast (€7 billion; 9%) and colorectum (€6 billion; 8%). Stomach cancer (in Southern and Central-Eastern Europe) and pancreatic cancer (in Northern and Western Europe) were also among the most costly sites. The average lost productivity cost per cancer death was €219,241. Melanoma had the highest cost per death (€312,798), followed by Hodgkin disease (€306,628) and brain and CNS cancer (€288,850). Premature mortality costs were 0.58% of 2008 European gross domestic product, highest in Central-Eastern Europe (0.81%) and lowest in Northern Europe (0.51%). Premature cancer-related mortality costs in Europe are significant. These results provide a novel perspective on the societal cancer burden and may be used to inform priority setting for cancer control.

  4. Symbiosis lost: imperfect vertical transmission of fungal endophytes in grasses.

    PubMed

    Afkhami, Michelle E; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2008-09-01

    Vertically transmitted symbionts associate with some of the most ecologically dominant species on Earth, and their fixation has led to major evolutionary transitions (e.g., the development of mitochondria). Theory predicts that exclusive vertical transmission should favor mutualism and generate high frequencies of symbiosis in host populations. However, host populations often support lower-than-expected symbiont frequencies. Imperfect transmission (i.e., symbiont is not transmitted to all offspring) can reduce symbiont frequency, but for most beneficial symbionts it is unknown whether vertical transmission can be imperfect or during which life-history stage the symbiont is lost. Using quantitative natural history surveys of fungal endophytes in grasses, we show that transmission was imperfect in at least one stage for all seven host species examined. Endophytes were lost at all possible stages: within adult plants, from adult tillers to seeds, and from seeds to seedlings. Despite this loss, uninfected seeds failed to germinate in some species, resulting in perfect transmission to seedlings. The type and degree of loss differed among host populations and species and between endophyte genera. Populations with lower endophyte frequencies had higher rates of loss. Our results indicate new directions for understanding cooperation and conflict in symbioses and suggest mechanisms for host sanctions against costly symbionts.

  5. Lablab purpureus-A Crop Lost for Africa?

    PubMed

    Maass, Brigitte L; Knox, Maggie R; Venkatesha, S C; Angessa, Tefera Tolera; Ramme, Stefan; Pengelly, Bruce C

    2010-09-01

    In recent years, so-called 'lost crops' have been appraised in a number of reviews, among them Lablab purpureus in the context of African vegetable species. This crop cannot truly be considered 'lost' because worldwide more than 150 common names are applied to it. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this paper aims to put forward four theses, (i) Lablab is one of the most diverse domesticated legume species and has multiple uses. Although its largest agro-morphological diversity occurs in South Asia, its origin appears to be Africa. (ii) Crop improvement in South Asia is based on limited genetic diversity. (iii) The restricted research and development performed in Africa focuses either on improving forage or soil properties mostly through one popular cultivar, Rongai, while the available diversity of lablab in Africa might be under threat of genetic erosion. (iv) Lablab is better adapted to drought than common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) or cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), both of which have been preferred to lablab in African agricultural production systems. Lablab might offer comparable opportunities for African agriculture in the view of global change. Its wide potential for adaptation throughout eastern and southern Africa is shown with a GIS (geographic information systems) approach.

  6. The Two Lost-Work Statements and the Combined First- and Second-Law Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Nevers, Noel; Seader, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adoption and use of the lost-work concept has been strongly hindered by the existence in the literature of two different quantities which bear the name "lost work." These two different concepts are discussed, focusing on their similarities and differences. Also discussed are advantages of the lost-work approach over other approaches.…

  7. Risk Factors Associated with Children Lost to Care in a State Early Childhood Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannoni, Peggy P.; Kass, Philip H.

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted to identify risk factors associated with children lost to care, and their families, compared to those not lost to care within the California Early Start Program. The cohort included data on 8987 children enrolled in the Early Start Program in 1998. This cohort consisted of 2443 children lost to care, 6363…

  8. 21 CFR 1305.16 - Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. 1305.16 Section... II CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES DEA Form 222 § 1305.16 Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. (a) If a purchaser ascertains that an unfilled DEA Form 222 has been lost, he or she must execute another in triplicate...

  9. 21 CFR 1305.16 - Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. 1305.16 Section... II CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES DEA Form 222 § 1305.16 Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. (a) If a purchaser ascertains that an unfilled DEA Form 222 has been lost, he or she must execute another in triplicate...

  10. 21 CFR 1305.16 - Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. 1305.16 Section... II CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES DEA Form 222 § 1305.16 Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. (a) If a purchaser ascertains that an unfilled DEA Form 222 has been lost, he or she must execute another in triplicate...

  11. 21 CFR 1305.16 - Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. 1305.16 Section... II CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES DEA Form 222 § 1305.16 Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. (a) If a purchaser ascertains that an unfilled DEA Form 222 has been lost, he or she must execute another in triplicate...

  12. 21 CFR 1305.16 - Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. 1305.16 Section... II CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES DEA Form 222 § 1305.16 Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. (a) If a purchaser ascertains that an unfilled DEA Form 222 has been lost, he or she must execute another in triplicate...

  13. 38 CFR 12.24 - Operation of lost and found service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operation of lost and found service. 12.24 Section 12.24 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Operation of lost and found service. Unless maintained by the Public Buildings Service, the lost and...

  14. 38 CFR 12.24 - Operation of lost and found service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operation of lost and found service. 12.24 Section 12.24 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Operation of lost and found service. Unless maintained by the Public Buildings Service, the lost and...

  15. Stem Cell-Mediated Regeneration of the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury of the adult mammalian brain is often associated with persistent functional deficits as its potential for regeneration and capacity to rebuild lost neural structures is limited. However, the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) persist throughout life in discrete regions of the brain, novel approaches to induce the formation of neuronal and glial cells, and recently developed strategies to generate tissue for exogenous cell replacement strategies opened novel perspectives how to regenerate the adult brain. Here, we will review recently developed approaches for brain repair and discuss future perspectives that may eventually allow for developing novel treatment strategies in acute and chronic brain injury. PMID:27781019

  16. LOST2: A positioning system for underwater vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckman, Richard Robert

    2001-10-01

    The LOST2 system is a new accurate underwater positioning system that nonlinearly combines parts of dead-reckoning, acoustic-based positioning, and terrain-based positioning. The system is composed of two major subsystems, a system observer and a constrained extended Kalman filter. Inputs to the system are as follows: (1)high resolution bathymetry, (2)measured ocean depth at the position of the vessel, (3)measured or estimated vessel velocity, (4)slant range to and position of a known point, and (5)an initial prediction of the vessel's location. The system development, simulation studies, results from sea trials and some suggestions for future work are presented. The system is capable of providing position estimates with the same degree of accuracy as present methods, with significantly less hardware. These results prove the concept of the system as a new method to position underwater vessels.

  17. Blinded: Modern Art, Astronomy, and the Lost Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, G.

    2016-01-01

    For today's casual visual observer, the night sky has become lost. Pollution, light glare, and the constructed environment have created a blindness through which the night sky is only imperfectly seen, when seen at all. Can the night sky, then, still inspire art if it has become invisible? In this paper, I would like to explore the question of the inspiration of the night sky in the absence of direct observation. In particular, I suggest that the absence of the visual night sky has forced artists to consider the problems of representing an “invisible” subject from nature. The implications of this “invisible” sky are not just a matter of stylistic expression, but also of cultural interpretation.

  18. "Lost in a shopping mall" -- a breach of professional ethics.

    PubMed

    Crook, Lynn S; Dean, Martha C

    1999-01-01

    The "lost in a shopping mall" study has been cited to support claims that psychotherapists can implant memories of false autobiographical information of childhood trauma in their patients. The mall study originated in 1991 as 5 pilot experiments involving 3 children and 2 adult participants. The University of Washington Human Subjects Committee granted approval for the mall study on August 10, 1992. The preliminary results with the 5 pilot subjects were announced 4 days laters. An analysis of the mall study shows that beyond the external misrepresentions, internal scientific methodological errors cast doubt on the validity of the claims that have been attributed to the mall study within scholarly and legal arenas. The minimal involvement -- or, in some cases, negative impact -- of collegial consultation, acadmic supervision, and peer review throughout the evolution of the mall study are reviewed.

  19. A serpentinite-hosted ecosystem: the Lost City hydrothermal field.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Deborah S; Karson, Jeffrey A; Früh-Green, Gretchen L; Yoerger, Dana R; Shank, Timothy M; Butterfield, David A; Hayes, John M; Schrenk, Matthew O; Olson, Eric J; Proskurowski, Giora; Jakuba, Mike; Bradley, Al; Larson, Ben; Ludwig, Kristin; Glickson, Deborah; Buckman, Kate; Bradley, Alexander S; Brazelton, William J; Roe, Kevin; Elend, Mitch J; Delacour, Adélie; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Lilley, Marvin D; Baross, John A; Summons, Roger E; Sylva, Sean P

    2005-03-04

    The serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field is a remarkable submarine ecosystem in which geological, chemical, and biological processes are intimately interlinked. Reactions between seawater and upper mantle peridotite produce methane- and hydrogen-rich fluids, with temperatures ranging from <40 degrees to 90 degrees C at pH 9 to 11, and carbonate chimneys 30 to 60 meters tall. A low diversity of microorganisms related to methane-cycling Archaea thrive in the warm porous interiors of the edifices. Macrofaunal communities show a degree of species diversity at least as high as that of black smoker vent sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, but they lack the high biomasses of chemosynthetic organisms that are typical of volcanically driven systems.

  20. Advanced Lost Foam Casting technology: 1997 summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--pyrolysis defects and sand distortion; Task 2--bronze casting technology; Task 3--steel casting technology; Task 4--sand filling and compaction; Task 5--coating technology; Task 6--precision pattern production; Task 7--computational modeling; and Task 8--project management and technology transfer. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all eight tasks in the period of October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1997.

  1. Lost Dollars Threaten Research in Public Academic Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Henry R; Vermillion, Eric B

    2017-03-01

    The decrease of federal and state support threatens long-term sustainability of research in publicly supported academic health centers. In weathering these financial threats, research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), has undergone 3 substantial changes: institutional salary support goes preferentially to senior faculty, whereas the young increasingly depend on grants; private and government support for research grows apace in clinical departments but declines in basic science departments; and research is judged more on its quantity (numbers of investigators and federal and private dollars) than on its goals, achievements, or scientific quality. We propose specific measures to alleviate these problems. Other large public academic health centers probably confront similar issues, but-except for UCSF-such centers have not been subjected to detailed public analysis.-Bourne, H. R., Vermillion, E. B. Lost dollars threaten research in public academic health centers.

  2. Psychological distress in Ghana: associations with employment and lost productivity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Mental health disorders account for 13% of the global burden of disease, a burden that low-income countries are generally ill-equipped to handle. Research evaluating the association between mental health and employment in low-income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, is limited. We address this gap by examining the association between employment and psychological distress. Methods We analyzed data from the Ghana Socioeconomic Panel Survey using logistic regression (N = 5,391 adults). In multivariable analysis, we estimated the association between employment status and psychological distress, adjusted for covariates. We calculated lost productivity from unemployment and from excess absence from work that respondents reported was because of their feelings of psychological distress. Findings Approximately 21% of adults surveyed had moderate or severe psychological distress. Increased psychological distress was associated with increased odds of being unemployed. Men and women with moderate versus mild or no psychological distress had more than twice the odds of being unemployed. The association of severe versus mild or no distress with unemployment differed significantly by sex (P-value for interaction 0.004). Among men, the adjusted OR was 12.4 (95% CI: 7.2, 21.3), whereas the association was much smaller for women (adjusted OR = 3.8, 95% CI: 2.5, 6.0). Extrapolating these figures to the country, the lost productivity associated with moderate or severe distress translates to approximately 7% of the gross domestic product of Ghana. Conclusions Psychological distress is strongly associated with unemployment in Ghana. The findings underscore the importance of addressing mental health issues, particularly in low-income countries. PMID:23497536

  3. Burden of Fire Injuries in Finland: Lost Productivity and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Haikonen, Kari; Lillsunde, Pirjo M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the economic burden of fire-related injury from two perspectives: post-injury social security compensations and also productivity losses due to the lost productive time from a societal perspective induced by the injury. Design and methods: A cohort of 1503 inpatients who sustained fire-related injury during the period 2001–2005 was retrospectively followed up for 5-10 years until the end of 2010, using linkages between several administrative registers. The study process was started in 2015 and finalized on March 2016. Results: Annual productivity loss was on average EUR 5.72 million, giving a total for the five-year study period of EUR 28.6 million, with a mean value of EUR 19,070 per person. Mean/median disability time for those who received benefits was 572/63 days, ranging from 3 days to 36.5 years. Total average cost of benefits to the injured annually during the study period was EUR 1.03 million. This equates to EUR 3430 per patient for the whole cohort or EUR 14,860 for those who received benefits. Conclusions: The burden of fire-related injuries in terms of payment transfers and lost productivity due to periods of disability as indirect costs is high; in a population of 5.4 million, the annual loss exceeded EUR 5.7 million. The results could be used in planning preventive measures and therefore yield savings. Significance for public health There is little scientific knowledge about fire-related injuries and their consequences. This study addresses this public health problem and yields results potentially useful for designing preventive measures where costs are weighed against the benefits especially when augmented with direct costs. PMID:27747204

  4. Consciousness Lost and Found: Subjective Experiences in an Unresponsive State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noreika, Valdas; Jylhankangas, Leila; Moro, Levente; Valli, Katja; Kaskinoro, Kimmo; Aantaa, Riku; Scheinin, Harry; Revonsuo, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Anesthetic-induced changes in the neural activity of the brain have been recently utilized as a research model to investigate the neural mechanisms of phenomenal consciousness. However, the anesthesiologic definition of consciousness as "responsiveness to the environment" seems to sidestep the possibility that an unresponsive individual may have…

  5. Dark Galaxies and Lost Baryons (IAU S244)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Jonathan I.; Disney, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    Preface; Conference prelims; The HI that barked in the night M. J. Disney; The detection of dark galaxies in blind HI surveys J. I. Davies; Red haloes of galaxies - reservoirs of baryonic dark matter? E. Zackrisson, N. Bergvall, C. Flynn, G. Ostlin, G. Micheva and B. Baldwell; Constraints on dark and visible mass in galaxies from strong gravitational lensing S. Dye and S. Warren; Lost baryons at low redshift S. Mathur, F. Nicastro and R. Williams; Observed properties of dark matter on small spatial scales R. Wyse and G. Gilmore; The mass distribution in spiral galaxies P. Salucci; Connecting lost baryons and dark galaxies via QSO absorption lines T. Tripp; ALFALFA: HI cosmology in the local universe R. Giovanelli; The ALFALFA search for (almost) dark galaxies across the HI mass function M. Haynes; HI clouds detected towards Virgo with the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey B. Kent; Cosmic variance in the HI mass function S. Schneider; The Arecibo Galaxy Environments Survey - potential for finding dark galaxies and results so far R. Minchin et al.; Free-floating HI clouds in the M81 group E. Brinks, F. Walter and E. Skillman; Where are the stars in dark galaxies J. Rosenberg, J. Salzer and J. Cannon; The halo by halo missing baryon problem S. McGaugh; The local void is really empty R. Tully; Voids in the local volume: a limit on appearance of a galaxy in a dark matter halo A. Tikhonov and A. Klypin; Dim baryons in the cosmic web C. Impey; A census of baryons in galaxy clusters and groups A. Gonzalez, D. Zaritsky and A. Zabludo; Statistical properties of the intercluster light from SDSS image stacking S. Zibetti; QSO strong gravitational lensing and the detection of dark halos A. Maccio; Strong gravitational lensing: bright galaxies and lost dark-matter L. Koopmans; Mapping the distribution of luminous and dark matter in strong lensing galaxies I. Ferreras, P. Saha, L. Williams and S. Burles; Tidal debris posing as dark galaxies P. Duc, F. Bournaud and E. Brinks

  6. Ecosystem of silicon utilizing organisms in the lost world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.

    2010-12-01

    It was Charles Darwin who first conceived the idea of “the Lost World” which spanned more than 80% of Earth History. This is about the rocks of the Precambrian period, in which Charles Darwin did not find any fossils during his study in 1859. Although Logan’s Foraminosphere and The Cyanosphere were the proposed concepts of the possible Precambrian life, however, these studies were flawed with non-biological artifacts, post-depositional contamination etc. Although now scientists believe the ‘hydrothermal cradle for life’ following the important studies in deep-sea vents, this is still a hypothetic view. All important experiments on the origin of life which were done with a reducing atmosphere, were also not correct. Scientists recently opined that probably life originated as silicon utilizing coacervates spontaneously in cosmos, and are transferred on the Earth in the Precambrian. These silicon utilizing coacervates could originate spontaneously in the Interstellar Medium (ISM) dust particles containing silicates with carbon, many organic molecules, and with mantles of ices. Thus ultraviolet ray from molecular hydrogen after collision excitation by electrons produced by cosmic-ray ionization may initiate seeds of life with formation of silicon utilizing coacervates; which are then scattered throughout the Universe. Similarly they can also originate in the GMCs, which have the clouds of dust and gases. These were also probably the last common ancestor (LCA) of all living creatures on the Earth. They are also still entering the surface of the Earth in small numbers during volcanic eruptions, blue lightning etc., but are quickly lost in the thickly inhabited Earth surface with ~ 1,00,000 diversified earthly species. These coacervates showed a direct correlation with non-cultivable spherical clusters found in the stratosphere, and the unknown spheroid bodies in microfossils ( ~ 3,200 Ma to >3,700 Ma) recovered in Australia, Africa and in Greenland. Both

  7. Brain regeneration in anuran amphibians.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tetsuya; Yoshino, Jun; Kado, Koji; Tochinai, Shin

    2007-02-01

    Urodele amphibians are highly regenerative animals. After partial removal of the brain in urodeles, ependymal cells around the wound surface proliferate, differentiate into neurons and glias and finally regenerate the lost tissue. In contrast to urodeles, this type of brain regeneration is restricted only to the larval stages in anuran amphibians (frogs). In adult frogs, whereas ependymal cells proliferate in response to brain injury, they cannot migrate and close the wound surface, resulting in the failure of regeneration. Therefore frogs, in particular Xenopus, provide us with at least two modes to study brain regeneration. One is to study normal regeneration by using regenerative larvae. In this type of study, the requirement of reconnection between a regenerating brain and sensory neurons was demonstrated. Functional restoration of a regenerated telencephalon was also easily evaluated because Xenopus shows simple responses to the stimulus of a food odor. The other mode is to compare regenerative larvae and non-regenerative adults. By using this mode, it is suggested that there are regeneration-competent cells even in the non-regenerative adult brain, and that immobility of those cells might cause the failure of regeneration. Here we review studies that have led to these conclusions.

  8. Brain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  9. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests don't provide enough information. Screening for brain aneurysms The use of imaging tests to screen ... and occupational therapy to relearn skills. Treating unruptured brain aneurysms Surgical clipping or endovascular coiling can be ...

  10. Brain Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed the f… Series Healthy Minds: Nurturing Your Child's Development Each of these age-based handouts are based ... report from the National Academy of Sciences on child and brain development. Podcast Nurturing Brain Development From Birth to Three ...

  11. Brain Fog

    MedlinePlus

    ... friendships and relationships. • Take your body to the gym and don’t forget to visit the “BRAIN SPA” – both will improve brain function. • Recent scientific data show that longevity ...

  12. Brain Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Reviews significant findings of recent brain research, including the concept of five minds: automatic, subconscious, practical, creative, and spiritual. Suggests approaches to training the brain that are related to this hierarchy of thinking. (JOW)

  13. Biogeography of the 'Lost World': a palaeoecological perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rull, Valentí

    2004-09-01

    The uniqueness of the flora from the remote tableaux summits of the Guayana region has been explained either as the result of a long history of evolution in isolation (Lost World hypothesis or LW) or by alternating upward and downward displacements during the glacial-interglacial Quaternary cycles (Vertical Displacement hypothesis or VD). So far, the problem has been addressed solely on the basis of present-day floristic observations. This paper faces the problem from a Quaternary palaeoecology perspective using recent palynological findings in the area, comparisons with palaeoecological records from Neotropical mountains and lowlands of similar latitude, isotopic glacial-interglacial records from marine and ice cores, and different points of view about the response of organisms to Quaternary climatic changes, with emphasis on the LGM and the debate on the existence or not of Neotropical refugia. It is concluded that both LW and VD hypotheses, together with autoecological and synecological considerations, are needed to explain the present-day specialisation and endemism of the flora from the tableaux summits. The case of a highly endemic genus ( Chimantaea, Asteraceae) is analysed as an example, to illustrate the usefulness and limitations of the different arguments to account for its biogeographical pattern. Some ideas are provided for future research, including a more extensive sampling strategy, the use of molecular phylogenetics, the evaluation of the individualistic versus the community approach, and the use of island biogeography and metapopulation methods on present-day floristic data.

  14. Geologic evolution of the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Alden R.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.

    2016-02-01

    The Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is a novel serpentinite-hosted vent field located on the Atlantis Massif southern wall. Results of 2 m resolution bathymetry, side scan, and video and still imagery, integrated with direct submersible observations provide the first high-resolution geologic map of the LCHF. These data form the foundation for an evolutionary model for the vent system over the past >120,000 years. The field is located on a down-dropped bench 70 m below the summit of the massif. The bench is capped by breccia and pelagic carbonate deposits underlain by variably deformed and altered serpentinite and gabbroic rocks. Hydrothermal activity is focused at the 60 m tall, 100 m across, massive carbonate edifice "Poseidon," which is venting 91°C fluid. Hydrothermal activity declines south and west of the Poseidon complex and dies off completely at distances greater than 200 m. East of Poseidon, the most recent stage of hydrothermal flow is characterized by egress of diffuse fluids from narrow fissures within a low-angle, anastomosing mylonite zone. South of the area of current hydrothermal activity, there is evidence of two discrete previously unrecognized relict fields. Active venting sites defined by carbonate-filled fissures that cut the carbonate cap rock at the summit of the massif mark the present-day northernmost extent of venting. These spatial relationships reflect multiple stages of field development, the northward migration of venting over time, and the likely development of a nascent field at the massif summit.

  15. Big Bang Day : Afternoon Play - Torchwood: Lost Souls

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Martha Jones, ex-time traveller and now working as a doctor for a UN task force, has been called to CERN where they're about to activate the Large Hadron Collider. Once activated, the Collider will fire beams of protons together recreating conditions a billionth of a second after the Big Bang - and potentially allowing the human race a greater insight into what the Universe is made of. But so much could go wrong - it could open a gateway to a parallel dimension, or create a black hole - and now voices from the past are calling out to people and scientists have started to disappear... Where have the missing scientists gone? What is the secret of the glowing man? What is lurking in the underground tunnel? And do the dead ever really stay dead? Lost Souls is a spin-off from the award-winning BBC Wales TV production Torchwood. It stars John Barrowman, Freema Agyeman, Eve Myles, Gareth David-Lloyd, Lucy Montgomery (of Titty Bang Bang) and Stephen Critchlow.

  16. Lablab purpureus—A Crop Lost for Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Maggie R.; Venkatesha, S. C.; Angessa, Tefera Tolera; Ramme, Stefan; Pengelly, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, so-called ‘lost crops’ have been appraised in a number of reviews, among them Lablab purpureus in the context of African vegetable species. This crop cannot truly be considered ‘lost’ because worldwide more than 150 common names are applied to it. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this paper aims to put forward four theses, (i) Lablab is one of the most diverse domesticated legume species and has multiple uses. Although its largest agro-morphological diversity occurs in South Asia, its origin appears to be Africa. (ii) Crop improvement in South Asia is based on limited genetic diversity. (iii) The restricted research and development performed in Africa focuses either on improving forage or soil properties mostly through one popular cultivar, Rongai, while the available diversity of lablab in Africa might be under threat of genetic erosion. (iv) Lablab is better adapted to drought than common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) or cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), both of which have been preferred to lablab in African agricultural production systems. Lablab might offer comparable opportunities for African agriculture in the view of global change. Its wide potential for adaptation throughout eastern and southern Africa is shown with a GIS (geographic information systems) approach. PMID:20835399

  17. Lost fishing gear and litter at Gorringe Bank (NE Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Rui P.; Raposo, Isabel P.; Sobral, Paula; Gonçalves, Jorge M. S.; Bell, Katherine L. C.; Cunha, Marina R.

    2015-06-01

    Studies concerning marine litter have received great attention over the last several years by the scientific community mainly due to their ecological and economic impacts in marine ecosystems, from coastal waters to the deep ocean seafloor. The distribution, type and abundance of marine litter in Ormonde and Gettysburg, the two seamounts of Gorringe Bank, were analyzed from photo and video imagery obtained during ROV-based surveys carried out at 60-3015 m depths during the E/V Nautilus cruise NA017. Located approximately 125 nm southwest of Portugal, Gorringe Bank lays at the crossroad between the Atlantic and the Mediterranean and is therefore characterized by an intense maritime traffic and fishing activities. The high frequency of lost or discarded fishing gear, such as cables, longlines and nets, observed on Gorringe Bank suggests an origin mostly from fishing activities, with a clear turnover in the type of litter (mostly metal, glass and to a much lesser extent, plastic) with increasing depth. Litter was more abundant at the summit of Gorringe Bank (ca. 4 items·km- 1), decreasing to less than 1 item·km- 1 at the flanks and to ca. 2 items·km- 1 at greater depths. Nevertheless, litter abundance appeared to be lower than in continental margin areas. The results presented herein are a contribution to support further actions for the conservation of vulnerable habitats on Gorringe Bank so that they can continue contributing to fishery productivity in the surrounding region.

  18. [The lost decade of global polio eradication and moving forward].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2010-06-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative was aimed to eradicate poliomyelitis by the year 2000, however, polio eradication is still not in sight even in 2010, over 10 years after the initial target date. In 2010, indigenous transmission of wild polioviruses has been interrupted throughout the world except four countries, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, and Nigeria. Despite the intense use of monovalent oral polio vaccines, type 1 and type 3 wild polioviruses still circulate in the four remaining polio-endemic countries, and multiple importations of wild polioviruses have also occurred extensively from Nigeria and India to a number of previously polio-free countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe. Furthermore, the emergence of type 2 vaccine-derived polioviruses has raised concerns about low level of immunity against type 2 poliovirus in some polio-endemic areas like Nigeria and India. On the other hand, operational improvements in 2009 were reported in high-risk states in northern Nigeria and transmission of type 1 and type 3 polioviruses in Nigeria is markedly declining from 2009 to 2010. Moreover, bivalent oral polio vaccine containing Sabin 1 and Sabin 3 strains has been introduced in 2010 as a promising tool to improve and simplify the supplemental immunization activities in high-risk areas. Although there was no apparent decline in the annual number of polio cases in 2000-2009 globally, it would be critical to review our experience during "the lost decade of global polio eradication" to move forward into the final stage of global polio eradication.

  19. Women's voices: lost or mislaid, stolen or strayed?

    PubMed

    Baker, Janet

    2010-04-01

    It is estimated that disorders of voice affect 3-4% of people from all strata of Australian society and while some voice disorders may be caused by organic conditions, most patients are troubled by non-organic or functional voice disorders (FVD). As professionals dealing with these problems, we wonder about the role of strong negative emotions arising from stressful life experiences preceding onset, or dispositional factors that may influence ways in which an individual responds to such incidents. We wonder too, how these complex processes may be inter-related, and if this may account for one person misusing or damaging the voice, while another loses the voice altogether. Evidence for the possible relationship between negative emotions arising out of stressful events and onset of FVD in women is briefly presented. The findings suggest that women with FVD may have difficulty in the processing of negative emotions, and when considered in a wider socio-cultural perspective, it is proposed that some have temporarily lost their voices, while others have been rendered powerless and had their voices stifled. These findings serve as the foundation for a broader discussion about the possible implications for the speech pathology profession which might be at risk of losing its voice.

  20. Big Bang Day : Afternoon Play - Torchwood: Lost Souls

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-13

    Martha Jones, ex-time traveller and now working as a doctor for a UN task force, has been called to CERN where they're about to activate the Large Hadron Collider. Once activated, the Collider will fire beams of protons together recreating conditions a billionth of a second after the Big Bang - and potentially allowing the human race a greater insight into what the Universe is made of. But so much could go wrong - it could open a gateway to a parallel dimension, or create a black hole - and now voices from the past are calling out to people and scientists have started to disappear... Where have the missing scientists gone? What is the secret of the glowing man? What is lurking in the underground tunnel? And do the dead ever really stay dead? Lost Souls is a spin-off from the award-winning BBC Wales TV production Torchwood. It stars John Barrowman, Freema Agyeman, Eve Myles, Gareth David-Lloyd, Lucy Montgomery (of Titty Bang Bang) and Stephen Critchlow.

  1. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  2. Brain Lesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don't look like normal brain tissue. Usually, a brain lesion is an incidental finding unrelated to the condition or symptom that led to the imaging test in the first place. ...

  3. The Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubel, David H.

    1979-01-01

    This article on the brain is part of an entire issue about neurobiology and the question of how the human brain works. The brain as an intricate tissue composed of cells is discussed based on the current knowledge and understanding of its composition and structure. (SA)

  4. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  5. 29 CFR 779.251 - Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity. 779.251... Coverage Interstate Inflow Test Under Prior Act § 779.251 Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity... been processed or manufactured so as to have lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they...

  6. 29 CFR 779.251 - Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity. 779.251... Coverage Interstate Inflow Test Under Prior Act § 779.251 Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity... been processed or manufactured so as to have lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they...

  7. 29 CFR 779.251 - Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity. 779.251... Coverage Interstate Inflow Test Under Prior Act § 779.251 Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity... been processed or manufactured so as to have lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they...

  8. 29 CFR 779.251 - Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity. 779.251... Coverage Interstate Inflow Test Under Prior Act § 779.251 Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity... been processed or manufactured so as to have lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they...

  9. 29 CFR 779.251 - Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity. 779.251... Coverage Interstate Inflow Test Under Prior Act § 779.251 Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity... been processed or manufactured so as to have lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they...

  10. 77 FR 21152 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel LOST SOUL; Invitation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ... SOUL; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY: Maritime Administration, Department of Transportation... the intended service of the vessel LOST SOUL is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Pleasure...

  11. Is the "Lost World" really lost? Palaeoecological insights into the origin of the peculiar flora of the Guayana Highlands.

    PubMed

    Rull, Valentí

    2004-03-01

    The peculiar biogeography of the so-called "Lost World", i.e. the summits of sandstone tableaux ( tepuis) in the Neotropical Guyana region of Venezuela, has generated a debate regarding the factors that are thought to account for modern vegetation patterns in the region. Some argue that plant communities on these high-elevation summits reflect a long history of evolution in isolation, while others surmise that there has been substantial biotic interchange with the surrounding lowlands during glacial times. Until now, these apparently competing hypotheses have not been tested using palaeoecological methods. I used pollen analysis of Quaternary sediments and documented past vertical migrations of vegetation in response to climate changes, which supports the second hypothesis. Physiographical analysis, however, shows that about half the tableaux summits are too high for their flora to have reached the lowlands during the last glaciation, suggesting that a portion of the tableaux vegetation has always experienced some degree of biotic isolation. Thus, a component of the summit vegetation evolved in isolation, whereas other taxa experienced interchange, as reflected in endemism patterns among the tableaux summits. Biogeographical patterns on the summits are the result of complex evolutionary processes. The two hypotheses invoked to explain the vegetation patterns are not mutually exclusive, but instead complement one another.

  12. Space Radar Image of the Lost City of Ubar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of the region around the site of the lost city of Ubar in southern Oman, on the Arabian Peninsula. The ancient city was discovered in 1992 with the aid of remote sensing data. Archeologists believe Ubar existed from about 2800 B.C. to about 300 A.D. and was a remote desert outpost where caravans were assembled for the transport of frankincense across the desert. This image was acquired on orbit 65 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 13, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The SIR-C image shown is centered at 18.4 degrees north latitude and 53.6 degrees east longitude. The image covers an area about 50 by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The image is constructed from three of the available SIR-C channels and displays L-band, HH (horizontal transmit and receive) data as red, C-band HH as blue, and L-band HV (horizontal transmit, vertical receive) as green. The prominent magenta colored area is a region of large sand dunes, which are bright reflectors at both L-and C-band. The prominent green areas (L-HV) are rough limestone rocks, which form a rocky desert floor. A major wadi, or dry stream bed, runs across the middle of the image and is shown largely in white due to strong radar scattering in all channels displayed (L and C HH, L-HV). The actual site of the fortress of the lost city of Ubar, currently under excavation, is near the Wadi close to the center of the image. The fortress is too small to be detected in this image. However, tracks leading to the site, and surrounding tracks, appear as prominent, but diffuse, reddish streaks. These tracks have been used in modern times, but field investigations show many of these tracks were in use in ancient times as well. Mapping of these tracks on regional remote sensing images was a key to recognizing the site as Ubar in 1992. This image, and ongoing field investigations, will help shed light on a little known early civilization. Spaceborne

  13. Acromegalic patients lost to follow-up: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kasuki, Leandro; Marques, Nelma Verônica; Nuez, Maria José Braga La; Leal, Vera Lucia Gomes; Chinen, Renata N; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 50 % of all acromegalic patients will require lifelong medical treatment to normalize mortality rates and reduce morbidity. Thus, adherence to therapy is essential to achieve treatment goals. To date, no study has evaluated the frequency and reasons for loss to follow-up in the acromegalic population. The current study aimed at evaluating the frequency of acromegalic patient loss to follow-up in three reference centers and the reasons responsible for their low compliance with treatment. All of the files for the acromegalic patients in the three centers were reviewed. Those patients, who had not followed up with the hospital for more than a year, were contacted via phone and/or mail and invited to participate. Patients who agreed to participate were interviewed, and blood samples were collected. A total of 239 files were reviewed; from these 42 patients (17.6 %) were identified who were lost to follow-up. It was possible to contact 27 of these patients, 10 of whom did not attend the appointments for more than one time and 17 of whom agreed to participate in the study. Fifteen of these 17 patients had active disease (88.2 %), and all of the patients restarted treatment in the original centers. The main reason for loss to follow-up was an absence of symptoms. High-quality follow-up is important in acromegaly to successfully achieve the aims of the treatment. An active search for patients may allow the resumption of treatment in a significant proportion of these cases, contributing to reduced morbidity and mortality in this patient population.

  14. Brain to music to brain!

    PubMed

    Azizi, S Ausim

    2009-07-31

    It has been implicitly understood that culture and music as collective products of human brain in turn influence the brain itself. Now, imaging and anatomical data add substance to this notion. The impact of playing piano on the brain of musicians and its possible effects on cultural and neurological evolution are briefly discussed.

  15. Modeling soil processes - are we lost in diversity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Hans-Joerg; Schlüter, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    Soils are among the most complex environmental systems. Soil functions - e.g. production of biomass, habitat for organisms, reactor for and storage of organic matter, filter for ground water - emerge from a multitude of processes interacting at different scales. It still remains a challenge to model and predict these functions including their stability and resilience towards external perturbations. As an inherent property of complex systems it is prohibitive to unravel all the relevant process in all detail to derive soil functions and their dynamics from first principles. Hence, when modeling soil processes and their interactions one is close to be lost in the overwhelming diversity and spatial heterogeneity of soil properties. In this contribution we suggest to look for characteristic similarities within the hyperdimensional state space of soil properties. The underlying hypothesis is that this state space is not evenly and/or randomly populated but that processes of self organization produce attractors of physical, chemical and biological properties which can be identified. (The formation of characteristic soil horizons is an obvious example). To render such a concept operational a suitable and limited set of indicators is required. Ideally, such indicators are i) related to soil functions, ii) are measurable and iii) are integral measures of the relevant physical, chemical and biological soil properties. This would allow for identifying suitable attractors. We will discuss possible indicators and will focus on soil structure as an especially promising candidate. It governs the availability of water and gas, it effects the spatial distribution of organic matter and, moreover, it forms the habitat of soil organisms and it is formed by soil biota. Quantification of soil structural properties became possible only recently with the development of more powerful tools for non-invasive imaging. Future research need to demonstrate in how far these tools can be used to

  16. Women with abnormal screening mammography lost to follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Chen, Guan-Ru; Hung, Shou-Hung; Liu, Yi-Lien; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Cheng, Shao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer has the highest incidence among all cancers for women in Taiwan. The current screening policy in Taiwan suggested a biennial mammography for all women 40 to 69 years of age. A recommendation for additional testing is recommended for women with a BI-RADS result of 0 or 4; a request made via postal mail. Approximately 20% of high-risk patients do not receive additional follow-up. Therefore, we aimed to explore the causes of these patients being lost to follow-up, despite an abnormal mammogram. Two questionnaires were designed separately according to the conceptual framework of the Health Belief Model. Study participants, women who received a screening mammography at the National Taiwan University Hospital in 2011 with a BI-RAD of 0 or 4, were interviewed via telephone. The dependent variable was receipt of follow-up or not. The analyses were performed by using χ2 tests and logistic regression models. In total, 528 women were enrolled in the study: 51.2% in BI-RADS 0 group and 56.6% in BI-RADS 4, respectively. In the BI-RADS 0 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the most likely causes to be physician suggestion, health implications, and concerns regarding breast cancer. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited a lack of time and a perception of good personal health as primary reasons. In the BI-RADS 4 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the physician's recommendation and a recognition of the importance of follow-up examinations. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited having received follow-up at another hospital and a desire for a second opinion. In the BI-RADS 0 group, multivariate analysis showed that patients with higher scores in the “perceived benefits” domain were statistically more likely to receive a follow-up examination. There was no significant difference in perceived threats, perceived barriers, action cues, or self-efficacy between

  17. Quest for the lost siblings of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Ruchti, G.; Feltzing, S.; Martínez-Barbosa, C. A.; Bensby, T.; Brown, A. G. A.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: The aim of this paper is to find lost siblings of the Sun by analyzing high resolution spectra. Finding solar siblings will enable us to constrain the parameters of the parental cluster and the birth place of the Sun in the Galaxy. Methods: The solar siblings can be identified by accurate measurements of metallicity, stellar age and elemental abundances for solar neighbourhood stars. The solar siblings candidates were kinematically selected based on their proper motions, parallaxes and colours. Stellar parameters were determined through a purely spectroscopic approach and partly physical method, respectively. Comparing synthetic with observed spectra, elemental abundances were computed based on the stellar parameters obtained using a partly physical method. A chemical tagging technique was used to identify the solar siblings. Results: We present stellar parameters, stellar ages, and detailed elemental abundances for Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, and Ni for 32 solar sibling candidates. Our abundances analysis shows that four stars are chemically homogenous together with the Sun. Technique of chemical tagging gives us a high probability that they might be from the same open cluster. Only one candidate - HIP 40317 - which has solar metallicity and age could be a solar sibling. We performed simulations of the Sun's birth cluster in analytical Galactic model and found that most of the radial velocities of the solar siblings lie in the range -10 ≤ Vr ≤ 10 km s-1, which is smaller than the radial velocity of HIP 40317 (Vr = 34.2 km s-1), under different Galactic parameters and different initial conditions of the Sun's birth cluster. The sibling status for HIP 40317 is not directly supported by our dynamical analysis. Based on observations made with Nordic Optical Telescope at La Palma under programme 44-014. Based on observations made with ESO VLT Kueyen Telescope at the Paranal observatory under program me ID 085.C-0062(A), 087.D-0010(A), and 088.B-0820(A

  18. 45 CFR 3.5 - Lost and found, and abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lost and found, and abandoned property. 3.5 Section 3.5 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE General § 3.5 Lost and found,...

  19. 45 CFR 3.5 - Lost and found, and abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lost and found, and abandoned property. 3.5 Section 3.5 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE General § 3.5 Lost and found,...

  20. 45 CFR 3.5 - Lost and found, and abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lost and found, and abandoned property. 3.5 Section 3.5 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE General § 3.5 Lost and found,...

  1. 45 CFR 3.5 - Lost and found, and abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lost and found, and abandoned property. 3.5 Section 3.5 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE General § 3.5 Lost and found,...

  2. 45 CFR 3.5 - Lost and found, and abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lost and found, and abandoned property. 3.5 Section 3.5 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE General § 3.5 Lost and found,...

  3. 7 CFR 735.11 - Lost or destroyed certificates of licensing, authorization or agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... UNITED STATES WAREHOUSE ACT General Provisions § 735.11 Lost or destroyed certificates of licensing... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lost or destroyed certificates of licensing, authorization or agreements. 735.11 Section 735.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  4. 7 CFR 735.11 - Lost or destroyed certificates of licensing, authorization or agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... UNITED STATES WAREHOUSE ACT General Provisions § 735.11 Lost or destroyed certificates of licensing... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lost or destroyed certificates of licensing, authorization or agreements. 735.11 Section 735.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  5. 7 CFR 28.59 - Lost memorandum or certificate may be replaced by duplicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... United States Cotton Standards Act Certificates and Memoranda § 28.59 Lost memorandum or certificate may... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lost memorandum or certificate may be replaced by duplicate. 28.59 Section 28.59 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture...

  6. 29 CFR 779.250 - Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity. 779...-State identity. Goods which are purchased or received by the enterprise from within the State will be... and have not lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they are purchased or received by...

  7. 29 CFR 779.250 - Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity. 779...-State identity. Goods which are purchased or received by the enterprise from within the State will be... and have not lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they are purchased or received by...

  8. 29 CFR 779.250 - Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity. 779...-State identity. Goods which are purchased or received by the enterprise from within the State will be... and have not lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they are purchased or received by...

  9. 29 CFR 779.250 - Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity. 779...-State identity. Goods which are purchased or received by the enterprise from within the State will be... and have not lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they are purchased or received by...

  10. 29 CFR 779.250 - Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity. 779...-State identity. Goods which are purchased or received by the enterprise from within the State will be... and have not lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they are purchased or received by...

  11. Assessment of net lost revenue adjustment mechanisms for utility DSM programs

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-01-01

    Utility shareholders can lose money on demand-side management (DSM) investments between rate cases. Several industry analysts argue that the revenues lost from utility DSM programs are an important financial disincentive to utility DSM investment. A key utility regulatory reform undertaken since 1989 allows utilities to recover the lost revenues incurred through successful operation of DSM programs. Explicitly defined net lost revenue adjustment (NLRA) mechanisms are states` preferred approach to lost revenue recovery from DSM programs. This report examines the experiences states and utilities are having with the NLRA approach. The report has three objectives. First, we determine whether NLRA is a feasible and successful approach to removing the lost-revenue disincentive to utility operation of DSM programs. Second, we identify the conditions linked to successful implementation of NLRA mechanisms in different states and assess whether NLRA has changed utility investment behavior. Third, we suggest improvements to NLRA mechanisms. We first identify states with NLRA mechanisms where utilities are recovering lost revenues from DSM programs. We interview staff at regulatory agencies in all these states and utility staff in four states. These interviews focus on the status of NLRA, implementation issues, DSM measurement issues, and NLRA results. We also analyze regulatory agency orders on NLRA, as well as associated testimony, reports, and utility lost revenue recovery filings. Finally, we use qualitative and quantitative indicators to assess NLRA`s effectiveness. Contrary to the concerns raised by some industry analysts, our results indicate NLRA is a feasible approach to the lost-revenue disincentive.

  12. [Secondary ambulatory prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism: outcome of patients who were lost to follow-up].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, L; Hajduk, B; Kober, J; Filipecki, S

    1998-01-01

    We have attempted to determine the outcome of 87 out-patients who were lost from follow-up. Several factors have been assessed: causes of lost from follow-up duration of oral anticoagulation, recurrent venous thromboembolic events, cause of death (if applicable).

  13. 33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.51 Section 125.51 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.51 Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card....

  14. 77 FR 73739 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Lost River...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    .... If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD), call the Federal Information Relay Service... preliminary tag- return data indicate that bird predation could substantially affect juvenile Lost River... reviewer suggested that management that reduces bird-fish interactions could improve Lost River sucker...

  15. 33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.51 Section 125.51 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.51 Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card....

  16. 33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.51 Section 125.51 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.51 Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card....

  17. 33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.51 Section 125.51 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.51 Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card....

  18. 33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.51 Section 125.51 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.51 Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card....

  19. 7 CFR 301.75-16 - Payments for the recovery of lost production income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... production that was lost as the result of the removal of commercial citrus trees to control citrus canker. (a... production that was lost as the result of the removal of commercial citrus trees to control citrus canker if the trees were removed pursuant to a public order between 1986 and 1990 or on or after September...

  20. 7 CFR 301.75-16 - Payments for the recovery of lost production income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... production that was lost as the result of the removal of commercial citrus trees to control citrus canker. (a... production that was lost as the result of the removal of commercial citrus trees to control citrus canker if the trees were removed pursuant to a public order between 1986 and 1990 or on or after September...

  1. 7 CFR 301.75-16 - Payments for the recovery of lost production income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... production that was lost as the result of the removal of commercial citrus trees to control citrus canker. (a... production that was lost as the result of the removal of commercial citrus trees to control citrus canker if the trees were removed pursuant to a public order between 1986 and 1990 or on or after September...

  2. Brain surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... to take these medicines. If you had a brain aneurysm , you may also have other symptoms or problems. ... chap 28. Read More Acoustic neuroma Brain abscess Brain aneurysm repair Brain surgery Brain tumor - children Brain tumor - ...

  3. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Lost Foam Thin Wall - Feasibility of Producing Lost Foam Castings in Aluminum and Magnesium Based Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fasoyinu, Yemi; Griffin, John A.

    2014-03-31

    With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, production of near-net shape components by lost foam casting will make significant inroad into the next-generation of engineering component designs. The lost foam casting process is a cost effective method for producing complex castings using an expandable polystyrene pattern and un-bonded sand. The use of un-bonded molding media in the lost foam process will impose less constraint on the solidifying casting, making hot tearing less prevalent. This is especially true in Al-Mg and Al-Cu alloy systems that are prone to hot tearing when poured in rigid molds partially due to their long freezing range. Some of the unique advantages of using the lost foam casting process are closer dimensional tolerance, higher casting yield, and the elimination of sand cores and binders. Most of the aluminum alloys poured using the lost foam process are based on the Al-Si system. Very limited research work has been performed with Al-Mg and Al-Cu type alloys. With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, and given the high-strength-to-weight-ratio of magnesium, significant weight savings can be achieved by casting thin-wall (≤ 3 mm) engineering components from both aluminum- and magnesium-base alloys.

  4. The costs of diabetes among Australians aged 45–64 years from 2015 to 2030: projections of lost productive life years (PLYs), lost personal income, lost taxation revenue, extra welfare payments and lost gross domestic product from Health&WealthMOD2030

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Deborah; Shrestha, Rupendra N; Cunich, Michelle M; Veerman, Lennert; Tanton, Robert; Kelly, Simon J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To project the number of people aged 45–64 years with lost productive life years (PLYs) due to diabetes and related costs (lost income, extra welfare payments, lost taxation revenue); and lost gross domestic product (GDP) attributable to diabetes in Australia from 2015 to 2030. Design A simulation study of how the number of people aged 45–64 years with diabetes increases over time (based on population growth and disease trend data) and the economic losses incurred by individuals and the government. Cross-sectional outputs of a microsimulation model (Health&WealthMOD2030) which used the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers 2003 and 2009 as a base population and integrated outputs from two microsimulation models (Static Incomes Model and Australian Population and Policy Simulation Model), Treasury's population and labour force projections, and chronic disease trends data. Setting Australian population aged 45–64 years in 2015, 2020, 2025 and 2030. Outcome measures Lost PLYs, lost income, extra welfare payments, lost taxation revenue, lost GDP. Results 18 100 people are out of the labour force due to diabetes in 2015, increasing to 21 400 in 2030 (18% increase). National costs consisted of a loss of $A467 million in annual income in 2015, increasing to $A807 million in 2030 (73% increase). For the government, extra annual welfare payments increased from $A311 million in 2015 to $A350 million in 2030 (13% increase); and lost annual taxation revenue increased from $A102 million in 2015 to $A166 million in 2030 (63% increase). A loss of $A2.1 billion in GDP was projected for 2015, increasing to $A2.9 billion in 2030 attributable to diabetes through its impact on PLYs. Conclusions Individuals incur significant costs of diabetes through lost PLYs and lost income in addition to disease burden through human suffering and healthcare costs. The government incurs extra welfare payments, lost taxation revenue and

  5. Mapping the unconscious maintenance of a lost first language

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Lara J.; Klein, Denise; Chen, Jen-Kai; Delcenserie, Audrey; Genesee, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Optimal periods during early development facilitate the formation of perceptual representations, laying the framework for future learning. A crucial question is whether such early representations are maintained in the brain over time without continued input. Using functional MRI, we show that internationally adopted (IA) children from China, exposed exclusively to French since adoption (mean age of adoption, 12.8 mo), maintained neural representations of their birth language despite functionally losing that language and having no conscious recollection of it. Their neural patterns during a Chinese lexical tone discrimination task matched those observed in Chinese/French bilinguals who have had continual exposure to Chinese since birth and differed from monolingual French speakers who had never been exposed to Chinese. They processed lexical tone as linguistically relevant, despite having no Chinese exposure for 12.6 y, on average, and no conscious recollection of that language. More specifically, IA participants recruited left superior temporal gyrus/planum temporale, matching the pattern observed in Chinese/French bilinguals. In contrast, French speakers who had never been exposed to Chinese did not recruit this region and instead activated right superior temporal gyrus. We show that neural representations are not overwritten and suggest a special status for language input obtained during the first year of development. PMID:25404336

  6. Years of Life Lost due to exposure: Causal concepts and empirical shortcomings

    PubMed Central

    Morfeld, P

    2004-01-01

    Excess Years of Life Lost due to exposure is an important measure of health impact complementary to rate or risk statistics. I show that the total excess Years of Life Lost due to exposure can be estimated unbiasedly by calculating the corresponding excess Years of Potential Life Lost given conditions that describe study validity (like exchangeability of exposed and unexposed) and assuming that exposure is never preventive. I further demonstrate that the excess Years of Life Lost conditional on age at death cannot be estimated unbiasedly by a calculation of conditional excess Years of Potential Life Lost without adopting speculative causal models that cannot be tested empirically. Furthermore, I point out by example that the excess Years of Life Lost for a specific cause of death, like lung cancer, cannot be identified from epidemiologic data without assuming non-testable assumptions about the causal mechanism as to how exposure produces death. Hence, excess Years of Life Lost estimated from life tables or regression models, as presented by some authors for lung cancer or after stratification for age, are potentially biased. These points were already made by Robins and Greenland 1991 reasoning on an abstract level. In addition, I demonstrate by adequate life table examples designed to critically discuss the Years of Potential Life Lost analysis published by Park et al. 2002 that the potential biases involved may be fairly extreme. Although statistics conveying information about the advancement of disease onset are helpful in exposure impact analysis and especially worthwhile in exposure impact communication, I believe that attention should be drawn to the difficulties involved and that epidemiologists should always be aware of these conceptual limits of the Years of Potential Life Lost method when applying it as a regular tool in cohort analysis. PMID:15601477

  7. Brain investigation and brain conceptualization

    PubMed Central

    Redolfi, Alberto; Bosco, Paolo; Manset, David; Frisoni, Giovanni B.

    Summary The brain of a patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) undergoes changes starting many years before the development of the first clinical symptoms. The recent availability of large prospective datasets makes it possible to create sophisticated brain models of healthy subjects and patients with AD, showing pathophysiological changes occurring over time. However, these models are still inadequate; representations are mainly single-scale and they do not account for the complexity and interdependence of brain changes. Brain changes in AD patients occur at different levels and for different reasons: at the molecular level, changes are due to amyloid deposition; at cellular level, to loss of neuron synapses, and at tissue level, to connectivity disruption. All cause extensive atrophy of the whole brain organ. Initiatives aiming to model the whole human brain have been launched in Europe and the US with the goal of reducing the burden of brain diseases. In this work, we describe a new approach to earlier diagnosis based on a multimodal and multiscale brain concept, built upon existing and well-characterized single modalities. PMID:24139654

  8. [Brain concussion].

    PubMed

    Pälvimäki, Esa-Pekka; Siironen, Jari; Pohjola, Juha; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Brain concussion is a common disturbance caused by external forces or acceleration affecting the head. It may be accompanied by transient loss of consciousness and amnesia. Typical symptoms include headache, nausea and dizziness; these may remain for a week or two. Some patients may experience transient loss of inability to create new memories or other brief impairment of mental functioning. Treatment is symptomatic. Some patients may suffer from prolonged symptoms, the connection of which with brain concession is difficult to show. Almost invariably the prognosis of brain concussion is good.

  9. 8 CFR 324.3 - Women, citizens of the United States at birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Women, citizens of the United States at... SPECIAL CLASSES OF PERSONS WHO MAY BE NATURALlZED: WOMEN WHO HAVE LOST UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP BY MARRIAGE AND FORMER CITIZENS WHOSE NATURALIZATION IS AUTHORIZED BY PRlVATE LAW § 324.3 Women, citizens...

  10. Smoking Costs World $1.4 Trillion a Year in Disease, Lost Productivity

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163313.html Smoking Costs World $1.4 Trillion a Year in Disease, Lost ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 6 percent of the world's health-care spending is tied to smoking, a ...

  11. Brain radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  12. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  13. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  14. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  15. Anatomy of the Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of ...

  16. Armageddon’s Lost Lessons: Combined Arms Operations in Allenby’s Palestine Campaign

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Unfortunately, the true lessons of Allenby?s campaign were lost for future generations of military officers. Focusing on the culture and romanticism ...Allenby’s campaign were lost for future generations of military officers. Focusing on the culture and romanticism of the horse cavalry, students of the... romanticism of the “last cavalry charge” instead of on the efficacy of combined arms operations, conservative military leaders saw the battle only as an

  17. Fragile Brains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Describes three types of brain disorders: the sluggish, the oppositional, and the depressed. Explains how to identify these disorders and offers educators strategies for dealing with each. (Contains 11 references.) (PKP)

  18. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... small abscess (less than 2 cm) An abscess deep in the brain An abscess and meningitis Several ... or MRI scan may be needed for a deep abscess. During this procedure, medicines may be injected ...

  19. Brain Basics

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for mental disorders. ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  20. Brain Autopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monthly Donation Named Funds Planned Giving Gifts of Stock Business Partnerships Host an Event AFTD-Team Races ... family members to reach a closure after a long struggle. Brain autopsy is often done in conjunction ...

  1. Back pain prevalence in US industry and estimates of lost workdays.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, H R; Tanaka, S; Halperin, W E; Cameron, L L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Back pain is the most common reason for filing workers' compensation claims and often causes lost workdays. Data from the 1988 National Health Interview Survey were analyzed to identify high-risk industries and to estimate the prevalence of work-related back pain and number of workdays lost. METHODS: Analyses included 30074 respondents who worked during the 12 months before the interview. A case patient was defined as a respondent who had back pain every day for a week or more during that period. RESULTS: The prevalence of lost-workday back pain was 4.6%, and individuals with work-related cases lost 101.8 million workdays owing to back pain. Male and female case patients lost about the same number of workdays. Industries in high-risk categories were also identified for future research and intervention, including those seldom studied. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides statistically reliable national estimates of the prevalence of back pain among workers and the enormous effect of this condition on American industry in terms of lost workdays. PMID:10394311

  2. Brain imaging and brain function

    SciTech Connect

    Sokoloff, L.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage.

  3. 27 CFR 25.286 - Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit between breweries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... tax on beer lost in transit between breweries. 25.286 Section 25.286 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.286 Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit between breweries. (a) Filing of claim. Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit...

  4. 27 CFR 25.286 - Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit between breweries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... tax on beer lost in transit between breweries. 25.286 Section 25.286 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.286 Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit between breweries. (a) Filing of claim. Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit...

  5. 27 CFR 25.286 - Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit between breweries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... tax on beer lost in transit between breweries. 25.286 Section 25.286 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.286 Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit between breweries. (a) Filing of claim. Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit...

  6. 27 CFR 25.286 - Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit between breweries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... tax on beer lost in transit between breweries. 25.286 Section 25.286 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.286 Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit between breweries. (a) Filing of claim. Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit...

  7. 27 CFR 25.286 - Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit between breweries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... tax on beer lost in transit between breweries. 25.286 Section 25.286 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.286 Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit between breweries. (a) Filing of claim. Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit...

  8. Brain death.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain death should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain death legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain death has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families.

  9. Selective Brain Cooling Reduces Water Turnover in Dehydrated Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, W. Maartin; Hetem, Robyn S.; Mitchell, Duncan; Maloney, Shane K.; Meyer, Leith C. R.; Fuller, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In artiodactyls, arterial blood destined for the brain can be cooled through counter-current heat exchange within the cavernous sinus via a process called selective brain cooling. We test the hypothesis that selective brain cooling, which results in lowered hypothalamic temperature, contributes to water conservation in sheep. Nine Dorper sheep, instrumented to provide measurements of carotid blood and brain temperature, were dosed with deuterium oxide (D2O), exposed to heat for 8 days (40◦C for 6-h per day) and deprived of water for the last five days (days 3 to 8). Plasma osmolality increased and the body water fraction decreased over the five days of water deprivation, with the sheep losing 16.7% of their body mass. Following water deprivation, both the mean 24h carotid blood temperature and the mean 24h brain temperature increased, but carotid blood temperature increased more than did brain temperature resulting in increased selective brain cooling. There was considerable inter-individual variation in the degree to which individual sheep used selective brain cooling. In general, sheep spent more time using selective brain cooling, and it was of greater magnitude, when dehydrated compared to when they were euhydrated. We found a significant positive correlation between selective brain cooling magnitude and osmolality (an index of hydration state). Both the magnitude of selective brain cooling and the proportion of time that sheep spent selective brain cooling were negatively correlated with water turnover. Sheep that used selective brain cooling more frequently, and with greater magnitude, lost less water than did conspecifics using selective brain cooling less efficiently. Our results show that a 50kg sheep can save 2.6L of water per day (~60% of daily water intake) when it employs selective brain cooling for 50% of the day during heat exposure. We conclude that selective brain cooling has a water conservation function in artiodactyls. PMID:25675092

  10. Brain heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Modarresifar, Homayoun; Ho, Linh

    2009-03-01

    We present a case with intractable partial complex seizures in a 14-year-old girl who was found to have brain heterotopia on MRI and PET-CT. The patient presented with intractable partial complex seizures and a normal electroencephalogram. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging showed heterotopic gray matter lining the ventricular margin of the right occipital horn. Subsequent PET-CT demonstrated moderate tracer localization in the heterotopic gray matter surrounding the ventricular margin of the right occipital horn. Heterotopia may demonstrate normal or increased FDG uptake on PET, therefore its appearance may be deceiving when other pathologies are being considered.

  11. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural regeneration after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Nabi, Ali

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the supplement of lost nerve cells in rats with traumatic brain injury by intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, this study established a Wistar rat model of traumatic brain injury by weight drop impact acceleration method and administered 3 × 10(6) rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the lateral tail vein. At 14 days after cell transplantation, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in injured rat cerebral cortex and rat neurological function was improved significantly. These findings suggest that intravenously administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can promote nerve cell regeneration in injured cerebral cortex, which supplement the lost nerve cells.

  12. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural regeneration after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Nabi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the supplement of lost nerve cells in rats with traumatic brain injury by intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, this study established a Wistar rat model of traumatic brain injury by weight drop impact acceleration method and administered 3 × 106 rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the lateral tail vein. At 14 days after cell transplantation, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in injured rat cerebral cortex and rat neurological function was improved significantly. These findings suggest that intravenously administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can promote nerve cell regeneration in injured cerebral cortex, which supplement the lost nerve cells. PMID:25206912

  13. Smart Brains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rebecca

    1995-01-01

    New techniques have opened windows to the brain. Although the biochemistry of learning remains largely a mystery, the following findings seem to have clear implications for education: (1) the importance of early-learning opportunities for the very young; (2) the connection between music and abstract reasoning; and (3) the importance of good…

  14. Animating Brains.

    PubMed

    Borck, Cornelius

    2016-07-01

    A recent paper famously accused the rising field of social neuroscience of using faulty statistics under the catchy title 'Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience'. This Special Issue invites us to take this claim as the starting point for a cross-cultural analysis: in which meaningful ways can recent research in the burgeoning field of functional imaging be described as, contrasted with, or simply compared to animistic practices? And what light does such a reading shed on the dynamics and effectiveness of a century of brain research into higher mental functions? Reviewing the heated debate from 2009 around recent trends in neuroimaging as a possible candidate for current instances of 'soul catching', the paper will then compare these forms of primarily image-based brain research with older regimes, revolving around the deciphering of the brain's electrical activity. How has the move from a decoding paradigm to a representational regime affected the conceptualisation of self, psyche, mind and soul (if there still is such an entity)? And in what ways does modern technoscience provide new tools for animating brains?

  15. Design, Development and Testing of a Drillable Straddle Packer for Lost Circulation Control in Geothermal Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Gabaldon, J.; Glowka, D.A.; Gronewald, P.; Knudsen, S.D.; Raymond, D.W.; Staller, G.E.; Westmoreland, J.J.; Whitlow, G.L.; Wise, J.L.; Wright, E.K.

    1999-04-01

    Lost Circulation is a widespread problem encountered when drilling geothermal wells, and often represents a substantial portion of the cost of drilling a well. The U.S. Department of Energy sponsors research and development work at Sandia National Laboratories in an effort to reduce these lost circulation expenditures. Sandia has developed a down hole tool that improves the effectiveness and reduces th cost of lost circulation cement treatment while drilling geothermal wells. This tool, the Drillable Straddle Packer, is a low-cost disposable device that is used to isolate the loss zone and emplace the cement treatment directly into the region of concern. This report documents the design and development of the Drillabe Straddle Packer, the laboratory and field test results, and the design package that is available to transfer this technology to industry users.

  16. [Years of potential life lost by female homicide victims in Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Silva, Leonildo Severino da; Menezes, Maria Lúcia Neto de; Lopes, Cyntia Lins de Almeida; Corrêa, Maria Suely Medeiros

    2011-09-01

    This cross-sectional epidemiological study aimed to calculate the potential years of life lost by female homicide victims in Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil, in 2003-2007. A database was used from the Operational Division for Information on Births and Deaths under the Recife Municipal Health Department. All death certificates for childbearing-age women were reviewed for the five-year period. The results showed a total of 12,120 potential years of life lost by these women, mostly young, black (88%), with unknown levels of schooling (78.2%), single (80%), in District III of the city, and murdered with firearms in their own homes. The specific mortality rate was 10.8 homicides per 100,000 childbearing-age women. The 43.3 years of life lost per woman express the city's characteristics, poverty levels, unemployment, population density, residential instability, and social inequality, exposing residents to social strife, crime, and violence.

  17. A predictive scoring instrument for tuberculosis lost to follow-up outcome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is troublesome, due to long therapy duration, quick therapeutic response which allows the patient to disregard about the rest of their treatment and the lack of motivation on behalf of the patient for improved. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system to predict the probability of lost to follow-up outcome in TB patients as a way to identify patients suitable for directly observed treatments (DOT) and other interventions to improve adherence. Methods Two prospective cohorts, were used to develop and validate a logistic regression model. A scoring system was constructed, based on the coefficients of factors associated with a lost to follow-up outcome. The probability of lost to follow-up outcome associated with each score was calculated. Predictions in both cohorts were tested using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC). Results The best model to predict lost to follow-up outcome included the following characteristics: immigration (1 point value), living alone (1 point) or in an institution (2 points), previous anti-TB treatment (2 points), poor patient understanding (2 points), intravenous drugs use (IDU) (4 points) or unknown IDU status (1 point). Scores of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 points were associated with a lost to follow-up probability of 2,2% 5,4% 9,9%, 16,4%, 15%, and 28%, respectively. The ROC curve for the validation group demonstrated a good fit (AUC: 0,67 [95% CI; 0,65-0,70]). Conclusion This model has a good capacity to predict a lost to follow-up outcome. Its use could help TB Programs to determine which patients are good candidates for DOT and other strategies to improve TB treatment adherence. PMID:22938040

  18. Years of life lost due to malignant neoplasms characterized by the highest mortality rate

    PubMed Central

    Pikala, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The analysis of premature deaths measured with years of life lost between the studied and referential populations helps to emphasize the social and economic aspect of a loss caused by deaths due to malignant neoplasms. The aim of the study was to analyze years of life lost by inhabitants of the Lodz province due to malignant neoplasms. Material and methods The study material included a database which contained information gathered from 313,144 death certificates (including 66,899 people who died of malignant neoplasms) of inhabitants of the Lodz province who died between 1999 and 2008. The SEYLLp (Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per living person) method was used to determine years of life lost. Jointpoint models were used to analyze time trends. Results In males the diseases which mostly contributed to death were tracheal, bronchial and lung malignant neoplasms (SEYLLp = 170.7) and cancer of the large intestine, rectum and anus (SEYLLp = 47.5). In females the principal diseases were tracheal, bronchial and lung malignant neoplasms (SEYLLp = 61.6), breast cancer (SEYLLp = 60.4) and cancer of the large intestine, rectum and anus (SEYLLp = 42.3). The years of life lost were growing in the period under study. Conclusions The number of years lost due to malignant neoplasms in the Lodz province between 1999 and 2008 was growing. The main reasons for deaths in females were tracheal, bronchial and lung malignant neoplasms as well as breast cancer and in males – cancer of the large intestine, rectum and anus as well as prostate cancer. PMID:25395953

  19. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  20. Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  1. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  2. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors A A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  3. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ...

  4. Lost Opportunities in the Buildings Sector: Energy-Efficiency Analysis and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, James A.; Anderson, David M.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2008-09-12

    This report summarizes the results and the assumptions used in an analysis of the potential “lost efficiency opportunities” in the buildings sector. These targets of opportunity are those end-uses, applications, practices, and portions of the buildings market which are not currently being addressed, or addressed fully, by the Building Technologies Program (BTP) due to lack of resources. The lost opportunities, while a significant increase in effort and impact in the buildings sector, still represent only a small portion of the full technical potential for energy efficiency in buildings.

  5. 30,000 years of hydrothermal activity at the lost city vent field.

    PubMed

    Früh-Green, Gretchen L; Kelley, Deborah S; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Karson, Jeffrey A; Ludwig, Kristin A; Butterfield, David A; Boschi, Chiara; Proskurowski, Giora

    2003-07-25

    Strontium, carbon, and oxygen isotope data and radiocarbon ages document at least 30,000 years of hydrothermal activity driven by serpentinization reactions at Lost City. Serpentinization beneath this off-axis field is estimated to occur at a minimum rate of 1.2 x 10(-4) cubic kilometers per year. The access of seawater to relatively cool, fresh peridotite, coupled with faulting, volumetric expansion, and mass wasting processes, are crucial to sustain such systems. The amount of heat produced by serpentinization of peridotite massifs, typical of slow and ultraslow spreading environments, has the potential to drive Lost City-type systems for hundreds of thousands, possibly millions, of years.

  6. Faraday-cup-type lost fast ion detector on Heliotron J.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, S; Ogawa, K; Isobe, M; Darrow, D S; Kobayashi, S; Nagasaki, K; Okada, H; Minami, T; Kado, S; Ohshima, S; Weir, G M; Nakamura, Y; Konoshima, S; Kemmochi, N; Ohtani, Y; Mizuuchi, T

    2016-11-01

    A Faraday-cup type lost-fast ion probe (FLIP) has been designed and installed in Heliotron J for the purpose of the studies of interaction between fast ions and MHD instabilities. The FLIP can measure the co-going fast ions whose energy is in the range of 1.7-42.5 keV (proton) and pitch angle of 90(∘)-140(∘), especially for fast ions having the injection energy of neutral beam injection (NBI). The FLIP successfully measured the re-entering passing ions and trapped lost-fast ions caused by fast-ion-driven energetic particle modes in NBI heated plasmas.

  7. Pressing back: Split Britches' Lost Lounge and the retro performativity of lesbian performance.

    PubMed

    Eschen, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Using theories of affect and queer temporality, this article examines Split Britches' Lost Lounge as lesbian resistance to the pressures to remember or forget the past, condemn or embrace the future. In this piece, butch-femme duo Peggy Shaw and Lois Weaver develop a retro performativity that pushes back against systems that strive to make lesbianism invisible, private, and apolitical. Through performances that resignify past pop culture artifacts, particularly the duo of Louis Prima and Keely Smith, Shaw and Weaver perform a past that is simultaneously lost and embodied, pressuring the audience to reconsider notions of progress and beauty.

  8. Lost Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimmer, D. P.; Luszczynski, K.

    1972-01-01

    Surveys some of the background information on energy use in transportation. Analysis suggests new policies must be formulated to make more efficient use of dwindling fossil fuel reserves, and more efficient means of transportation as bus, train, pipeline, waterway, and electric automobile. (BL)

  9. Lost Voices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiseri-Strater, Elizabeth

    Different writing voices are linked to early adult developmental issues that are gender-related. Research by Donald Graves has shown that gender affects topic choice in girls' and boys' writing as early as age seven. Adult developmental theories provide frames for looking at the growth potential of writers and locating gender-related issues. The…

  10. Paradise lost

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, K.

    1995-09-01

    This article discusses the unrest in the Pacific following France`s announced intention of conducting another series of underground tests at Moruroa Atoll in the South Pacific. Nations in this region, including New Zealand and Australia, have been upset for 30 years with the weapons testing program of France, and feel they are being snubbed one more time through this action. The author also describes actions involving the group Greenpeace, and its confrontations with France over this policy.

  11. An AP Calculus Classroom Amusement Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the school year, AP Calculus teachers strive to teach course content comprehensively and swiftly in an effort to finish all required material before the AP Calculus exam. As early May approaches and the AP Calculus test looms, students and teachers nervously complete lessons, assignments, and assessments to ensure student preparation.…

  12. College Student Internet Use: Convenience and Amusement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve M.

    2007-01-01

    Four hundred five college students completed a questionnaire that assessed patterns of Internet use. Results describe college students, with rare exception, as Internet users. The vast majority of college students frequently communicate online and access websites. While an Internet game experience is typical, relatively few college students are…

  13. The Creative Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Ned

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the differences between left-brain and right-brain functioning and between left-brain and right-brain dominant individuals, and concludes that creativity uses both halves of the brain. Discusses how both students and curriculum can become more "whole-brained." (Author/JM)

  14. Martian 'Brain'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    5 May 2004 Most middle-latitude craters on Mars have strange landforms on their floors. Often, the floors have pitted and convoluted features that lack simple explanation. In this case, the central part of the crater floor shown in this 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image bears some resemblance to the folded nature of a brain. Or not. It depends upon the 'eye of the beholder,' perhaps. The light-toned 'ring' around the 'brain' feature is more easily explained--windblown ripples and dunes. The crater occurs near 33.1oS, 91.2oW, and is illuminated from the upper left. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  15. Silicon Brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Beyond the digital neural networks of Chap. 16, the more radical mapping of brain-like structures and processes into VLSI substrates has been pioneered by Carver Mead more than 30 years ago [1]. The basic idea was to exploit the massive parallelism of such circuits and to create low-power and fault-tolerant information-processing systems. Neuromorphic engineering has recently seen a revival with the availability of deep-submicron CMOS technology, which allows for the construction of very-large-scale mixed-signal systems combining local analog processing in neuronal cells with binary signalling via action potentials. Modern implementations are able to reach the complexity-scale of large functional units of the human brain, and they feature the ability to learn by plasticity mechanisms found in neuroscience. Combined with high-performance programmable logic and elaborate software tools, such systems are currently evolving into user-configurable non-von-Neumann computing systems, which can be used to implement and test novel computational paradigms. The chapter introduces basic properties of biological brains with up to 200 Billion neurons and their 1014 synapses, where action on a synapse takes ˜10 ms and involves an energy of ˜10 fJ. We outline 10x programs on neuromorphic electronic systems in Europe and the USA, which are intended to integrate 108 neurons and 1012 synapses, the level of a cat's brain, in a volume of 1 L and with a power dissipation <1 kW. For a balanced view on intelligence, we references Hawkins' view to first perceive the task and then design an intelligent technical response.

  16. Brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the various imaging tools with examples of the different diseases shown best with each modality. It includes 100 case presentations covering the gamut of brain diseases. These examples are grouped according to the clinical presentation of the patient: headache, acute headache, sudden unilateral weakness, unilateral weakness of gradual onset, speech disorders, seizures, pituitary and parasellar lesions, sensory disorders, posterior fossa and cranial nerve disorders, dementia, and congenital lesions.

  17. Animating Brains

    PubMed Central

    Borck, Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper famously accused the rising field of social neuroscience of using faulty statistics under the catchy title ‘Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience’. This Special Issue invites us to take this claim as the starting point for a cross-cultural analysis: in which meaningful ways can recent research in the burgeoning field of functional imaging be described as, contrasted with, or simply compared to animistic practices? And what light does such a reading shed on the dynamics and effectiveness of a century of brain research into higher mental functions? Reviewing the heated debate from 2009 around recent trends in neuroimaging as a possible candidate for current instances of ‘soul catching’, the paper will then compare these forms of primarily image-based brain research with older regimes, revolving around the deciphering of the brain’s electrical activity. How has the move from a decoding paradigm to a representational regime affected the conceptualisation of self, psyche, mind and soul (if there still is such an entity)? And in what ways does modern technoscience provide new tools for animating brains? PMID:27292322

  18. 42 CFR 102.81 - Calculation of benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Calculation and Payment of Benefits § 102.81 Calculation of benefits... of work lost as a result of a covered injury or its health complications if the smallpox vaccine... based on the smallpox vaccine recipient or vaccinia contact's gross employment income, which...

  19. 27 CFR 479.37 - Certificates in lieu of stamps lost or destroyed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Certificates in lieu of stamps lost or destroyed. 479.37 Section 479.37 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS,...

  20. 27 CFR 479.37 - Certificates in lieu of stamps lost or destroyed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certificates in lieu of stamps lost or destroyed. 479.37 Section 479.37 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS,...

  1. 27 CFR 479.37 - Certificates in lieu of stamps lost or destroyed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certificates in lieu of stamps lost or destroyed. 479.37 Section 479.37 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS,...

  2. 27 CFR 479.37 - Certificates in lieu of stamps lost or destroyed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certificates in lieu of stamps lost or destroyed. 479.37 Section 479.37 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS,...

  3. 27 CFR 479.37 - Certificates in lieu of stamps lost or destroyed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Certificates in lieu of stamps lost or destroyed. 479.37 Section 479.37 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS,...

  4. A Review of "Wandering" Instruments for People with Dementia Who Get Lost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bantry White, Eleanor; Montgomery, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study is the first review to be conducted to evaluate measures of wandering behavior for identifying people with dementia at risk of getting lost. Method: Drawing upon systematic review search strategies, the relevant literature was reviewed for wandering instruments using MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and Cumulative Index to Nursing…

  5. Psychology's Lost Boy: Will the Real Little Albert Please Stand Up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with the recent debate about the identity of psychology's lost boy-Little Albert, the infant subject in Watson and Rayner's classic experiment on fear conditioning. For decades, psychologists and psychology students have been intrigued by the mystery of Albert's fate. Now two evidentiary-based solutions to…

  6. Quantitative evaluation of wall heat loads by lost fast ions in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Junki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Seki, Ryosuke

    2016-10-01

    In fusion plasmas, fast ions are produced by neutral beam injections (NBI), ion cyclotron heating (ICH) and fusion reactions. Some of fast ions are lost from fusion plasmas because of some kinds of drift and instability. These lost fast ions may cause damages on plasma facing components such as divertors and diagnostic instruments in fusion reactors. Therefore, wall heat loads by lost fast ions in the Large Helical Device (LHD) is under investigation. For this purpose, we have been developing the Monte-Carlo code for the quantitative evaluation of wall heat loads based on following the guiding center orbits of fast ions. Using this code, we investigate wall heat loads and hitting points of lost fast ions produced by NBI in LHD. Magnetic field configurations, which depend on beta values, affect orbits of fast ions and wall heat loads. Therefore, the wall heat loads by fast ions in equilibrium magnetic fields including finite beta effect and magnetic islands are quantitatively evaluated. The differences of wall heat loads and particle deposition patterns for cases of the vacuum field and various beta equilibrium fields will be presented at the meeting.

  7. 12 CFR 615.5461 - Lost, stolen, destroyed, mutilated or defaced Farm Credit securities, including coupons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Book-Entry Procedures for Farm Credit Securities § 615.5461 Lost, stolen, destroyed, mutilated or... Public Debt, P.O. Box 396, Parkersburg, WV 26102-0396, in the case of consolidated or...

  8. The Lost Boys of Sudan: Ambiguous Loss, Search for Family, and Reestablishing Relationships with Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luster, Tom; Qin, Desiree B.; Bates, Laura; Johnson, Deborah J.; Rana, Meenal

    2008-01-01

    The "Lost Boys of Sudan" were separated from their families by civil war and subsequently lived in 3 other countries--Ethiopia, Kenya, and the United States. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 refugees who located surviving family members in Sudan after an average separation of 13.7 years. The interviews probed their experiences…

  9. 5 CFR 332.322 - Persons who lost eligibility because of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... military service. 332.322 Section 332.322 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Eligibility Restoration of Eligibility § 332.322 Persons who lost eligibility because of military service. (a... date of his entrance on active military duty, exclusive of any additional service imposed pursuant...

  10. 7 CFR 301.75-16 - Payments for the recovery of lost production income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus... income. Subject to the availability of appropriated funds, the owner of a commercial citrus grove may be... production that was lost as the result of the removal of commercial citrus trees to control citrus canker....

  11. 7 CFR 301.75-16 - Payments for the recovery of lost production income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus... income. Subject to the availability of appropriated funds, the owner of a commercial citrus grove may be... production that was lost as the result of the removal of commercial citrus trees to control citrus canker....

  12. 30 CFR 202.557 - Must I pay royalty on insurance compensation for unavoidably lost gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must I pay royalty on insurance compensation for unavoidably lost gas? 202.557 Section 202.557 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ROYALTIES Gas Production From Indian Leases §...

  13. 42 CFR 102.81 - Calculation of benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Calculation and Payment of Benefits § 102.81 Calculation of benefits... of work lost as a result of a covered injury or its health complications if the smallpox vaccine... based on the smallpox vaccine recipient or vaccinia contact's gross employment income, which...

  14. 42 CFR 102.81 - Calculation of benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Calculation and Payment of Benefits § 102.81 Calculation of benefits... of work lost as a result of a covered injury or its health complications if the smallpox vaccine... based on the smallpox vaccine recipient or vaccinia contact's gross employment income, which...

  15. 42 CFR 102.81 - Calculation of benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Calculation and Payment of Benefits § 102.81 Calculation of benefits... of work lost as a result of a covered injury or its health complications if the smallpox vaccine... based on the smallpox vaccine recipient or vaccinia contact's gross employment income, which...

  16. 42 CFR 102.81 - Calculation of benefits for lost employment income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Calculation and Payment of Benefits § 102.81 Calculation of benefits... of work lost as a result of a covered injury or its health complications if the smallpox vaccine... based on the smallpox vaccine recipient or vaccinia contact's gross employment income, which...

  17. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-17 - Transfer agents' obligation to search for lost securityholders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., each recordkeeping transfer agent shall conduct two data base searches using at least one information data base service. The transfer agent shall search by taxpayer identification number or by name if a.... Such data base searches must be conducted without charge to a lost securityholder and with...

  18. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-17 - Transfer agents' obligation to search for lost securityholders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., each recordkeeping transfer agent shall conduct two data base searches using at least one information data base service. The transfer agent shall search by taxpayer identification number or by name if a.... Such data base searches must be conducted without charge to a lost securityholder and with...

  19. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-17 - Transfer agents' obligation to search for lost securityholders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., each recordkeeping transfer agent shall conduct two data base searches using at least one information data base service. The transfer agent shall search by taxpayer identification number or by name if a.... Such data base searches must be conducted without charge to a lost securityholder and with...

  20. NEW APPROACHES: The famous 'lost' energy when two capacitors are joined: a new law?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, William J.

    1997-03-01

    Reflections on the lost energy when two capacitors are connected, or two masses collide, or similar problems, suggests a new law of nature: that stored energy of one kind cannot be transferred without loss unless it undergoes a change in energy form in the transfer process.

  1. Locating Dewey's "Lost Individual" through 21st-Century Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Lance E.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that Dewey's conception of the lost individual and his proposed solutions for reconstruction can help both schooling and society address problems of depoliticization and individualization. He first examines Dewey's notion of formation of the self, forged through transactions with one's physical and social…

  2. Creative Problem Solving with Marginalized Populations: Reclaiming Lost Prizes through In-the-Trenches Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Ken W.; Baker, Philip A.; McCluskey, Andrea L. A.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes several initiatives in which Creative Problem Solving, in combination with career exploration and mentoring, has been used successfully to identify and develop the talents of "at-risk" populations. During the past decade, the Lost Prizes project helped turn around the lives of talented but troubled high-school…

  3. Repressive Coping, Emotional Adjustment, and Cognition in People Who Have Lost Loved Ones to Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Holly A.; McNally, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Research indicates that a repressive coping style is psychologically protective against the stress of trauma, yet it is unclear whether this finding generalizes to suicide bereavement. Thus, we assessed cognitive ability and mental health among individuals who lost a loved one to suicide. The results indicate that repressive coping may be…

  4. 27 CFR 24.65 - Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Claims for wine or spirits... TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Claims § 24.65 Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond. (a) Claim for remission...

  5. 27 CFR 24.65 - Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Claims for wine or spirits... TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Claims § 24.65 Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond. (a) Claim for remission...

  6. 27 CFR 24.65 - Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Claims for wine or spirits... TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Claims § 24.65 Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond. (a) Claim for remission...

  7. 27 CFR 24.65 - Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Claims for wine or spirits... TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Claims § 24.65 Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond. (a) Claim for remission...

  8. 27 CFR 24.65 - Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Claims for wine or spirits... TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Claims § 24.65 Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond. (a) Claim for remission...

  9. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  10. "Lixue" (?? "Ihak") the Lost Art: Confucianism as a Form of Cultivation of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Hyong-Jo

    2016-01-01

    This article approaches Confucianism as a lost art of living and asks how we can make it relevant again for us. Central to this approach is the cultivation of heart-mind ("Xinxue," ??) designed to help cure ourselves of self-oblivion and self-centeredness so prevalent in our culture today. It is based on the idea of "Li" (?),…

  11. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  12. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  13. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  14. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  15. The Ripples and Waves of Educational Effectiveness Research: Some Comments to "Getting Lost in Translation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheerens, Jaap

    2013-01-01

    The article "Getting lost in translation" by Harris, Chapman, Muijs and Reynolds addresses the engagement of policy-makers and educational practitioners with (the results of) educational effectiveness and improvement research. In this commentary the article is discussed from the perspectives of research utilisation, the solidity of the…

  16. The Long Goodbye: How Local Authorities Lost Control of Further Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Following the 1992 Further and Higher Education Act, local education authorities (LEAs) lost control of further education in England. Now, after spending almost two decades out in the cold, from 2010, local authorities are set to become re-involved in the further education system. Given this, this paper takes the opportunity to look back on the…

  17. 28 CFR 301.204 - Continuation of lost-time wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuation of lost-time wages. 301.204 Section 301.204 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE... duty work assignment after medical certification of fitness for such duty. (b) An inmate...

  18. Paradise Lost and Found: Obedience, Disobedience, and Storytelling in C.S. Lewis and Philip Pullman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Naomi

    2001-01-01

    Considers how in the fantasy series "The Chronicles of Narnia" and "His Dark Materials," by C.S. Lewis and Philip Pullman respectively, the authors use symbols and themes from "Paradise Lost." Notes that each author's narrative choice uses his view of cosmic order to persuade readers that obedience should be…

  19. The Initial Training of Physical Education Teachers--In Search of the Lost Meaning of Professionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascual, Carmina

    2006-01-01

    This article re-examines the initial training of physical education teachers with the purpose of pinning down its professional significance. The author maintains that we have lost, in part, its meaning, and, in an attempt to recover it, offers two initial strategies: to revisit two basic concepts--education in general and physical education in…

  20. Childhood Roles in Group Therapy: The Lost Child and the Mascot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Sandra A.; MacQuiddy, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Proposes that therapeutic efficacy of heterogeneous groups is additionally enhanced by the similarity of interpersonal dynamics and flawed communication patterns common among dysfunction families of all types. Focusing on the roles of the lost child and the mascot, presents case studies of an adult child of alcoholics and the adult child of a…

  1. Estimates and Projections of Value of Life Lost From Cancer Deaths in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Cathy J.; Mariotto, Angela B.; Brown, Martin L.; Feuer, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Value-of-life methods are increasingly used in policy analyses of the economic burden of disease. The purpose of this study was to estimate and project the value of life lost from cancer deaths in the United States. Methods We estimated and projected US age-specific mortality rates for all cancers and for 16 types of cancer in men and 18 cancers in women in the years 2000–2020 and applied them to US population projections to estimate the number of deaths in each year. Cohort life tables were used to calculate the remaining life expectancy in the absence of cancer deaths—the person-years of life lost (PYLL). We used a willingness-to-pay approach in which the value of life lost due to cancer death was calculated by multiplying PYLL by an estimate of the value of 1 year of life ($150 000). We performed sensitivity analyses for female breast, colorectal, lung, and prostate cancers using varying assumptions about future cancer mortality rates through the year 2020. Results The value of life lost from all cancer deaths in the year 2000 was $960.6 billion; lung cancer alone represented more than 25% of this value. Projections for the year 2020 with current cancer mortality rates showed a 53% increase in the total value of life lost ($1472.5 billion). Projected annual decreases of cancer mortality rates of 2% reduced the expected value of life lost in the year 2020 from $121.0 billion to $80.7 billion for breast cancer, $140.1 billion to $93.5 billion for colorectal cancer, from $433.4 billion to $289.4 billion for lung cancer, and from $58.4 billion to $39.0 billion for prostate cancer. Conclusions Estimated value of life lost due to cancer deaths in the United States is substantial and expected to increase dramatically, even if mortality rates remain constant, because of expected population changes. These estimates and projections may help target investments in cancer control strategies to tumor sites that are likely to result in the greatest burden of

  2. Record of archaeal activity at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City Hydrothermal Field.

    PubMed

    Méhay, S; Früh-Green, G L; Lang, S Q; Bernasconi, S M; Brazelton, W J; Schrenk, M O; Schaeffer, P; Adam, P

    2013-11-01

    Samples of young, outer surfaces of brucite-carbonate deposits from the ultramafic-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field were analyzed for DNA and lipid biomarker distributions and for carbon and hydrogen stable isotope compositions of the lipids. Methane-cycling archaeal communities, notably the Lost City Methanosarcinales (LCMS) phylotype, are specifically addressed. Lost City is unlike all other hydrothermal systems known to date and is characterized by metal- and CO2 -poor, high pH fluids with high H2 and CH4 contents resulting from serpentinization processes at depth. The archaeal fraction of the microbial community varies widely within the Lost City chimneys, from 1-81% and covaries with concentrations of hydrogen within the fluids. Archaeal lipids include isoprenoid glycerol di- and tetraethers and C25 and C30 isoprenoid hydrocarbons (pentamethylicosane derivatives - PMIs - and squalenoids). In particular, unsaturated PMIs and squalenoids, attributed to the LCMS archaea, were identified for the first time in the carbonate deposits at Lost City and probably record processes exclusively occurring at the surface of the chimneys. The carbon isotope compositions of PMIs and squalenoids are remarkably heterogeneous across samples and show highly (13) C-enriched signatures reaching δ(13) C values of up to +24.6‰. Unlike other environments in which similar structural and isotopic lipid heterogeneity has been observed and attributed to diversity in the archaeal assemblage, the lipids here appear to be synthesized solely by the LCMS. Some of the variations in lipid isotope signatures may, in part, be due to unusual isotopic fractionation during biosynthesis under extreme conditions. However, we argue that the diversity in archaeal abundances, lipid structure and carbon isotope composition rather reflects the ability of the LCMS archaeal biofilms to adapt to chemical gradients in the hydrothermal chimneys and possibly to perform either methanotrophy or methanogenesis

  3. Clay/latex mixture stops lost circulation in large carbonate fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Kurochkin, B.

    1995-08-28

    A mixture of latex and drilling mud clay controls lost circulation in large carbonate fractures by coagulating when it mixes with the formation fluids. The mixture forms large aggregates capable of plugging large formation fractures and is not prone to being washed out by formation water. The Scientific Research Institute of Drilling Techniques in Moscow (Vniibt) has developed a special lost circulation mixture combining a latex base and clay drilling mud for use in plugging these fractures. Mud powders of bentonite and calcium clays can be used to prepare the clay-latex mixture (GPC). The latex is mixed with drilling mud made from bentonite clay powder and is pumped to the lost circulation zone where it coagulates by reacting with the calcium ions in the formation water. The latex used to prepare GPC must be compatible with the mud being used. After coagulation, GPC changes to a rubber mixture. In the Tataria oil region, one of the drilling enterprises used GPC in 23 wells, with positive results in 20 of the wells. The bentonite powder base GPC mixture remains easily pumpable until the end of the operation. The mixture`s plastic strength increases over time as it is pumped into the lost circulation zone. This type of mixture is typically used to control lost circulation at depths greater than 1,000--1,500 m. GPC based on drilling mud made from calcium clay is used at shallower depths. For GPC pumped into a borehole, the latex/clay drilling mud ratio is typically between 1:1 and 1:2.

  4. A review of 145 234 ophthalmic patient episodes lost to follow-up.

    PubMed

    Davis, A; Baldwin, A; Hingorani, M; Dwyer, A; Flanagan, D

    2017-03-01

    PurposeLost to follow-up and delays in follow-up care are a major problem in chronic diseases, particularly when irreversible progression precedes symptoms. The NPSA Glaucoma Safety Alert in 2009 highlighted the risk and requirements for consistent robust review systems in ophthalmology. In response, Moorfields Eye Hospital reviewed the records of all patients in all subspecialties without review appointments booked. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ophthalmic patients lost to follow-up had come to harm and develop investigation techniques to optimise safety, which do not put excessive demands on clinical staff time.MethodsThe health records of all patients lost to follow-up (LTFU) between July 2007 and November 2012 were reviewed for evidence of clinical harm using a risk-based strategy involving an initial administrative review, then a clinician led electronic patient record review, followed by a review of paper records by clinicians. The final stage was a clinical outpatient review where required determined by clinical risk.ResultsPatients identified as lost to follow-up were 145 234; 79 562 episodes were closed following administrative review; 50 519 were discharged following clinician examination of paper records; 12 316 patients required clinical review; and 16 serious incidents were identified, of which 14 patients had glaucoma, 1 a medical retinal condition with secondary glaucoma, and 1 an oculoplastic condition. A number of actions implemented hospital wide are described which minimise future risk.ConclusionRisk from delays or lost to follow-up care continue and require better capacity and more accurate data nationally.

  5. Cortical plasticity and brain computer interface.

    PubMed

    Rossini, P M; Noris Ferilli, M A; Ferreri, F

    2012-06-01

    There is increasing evidence to support the concept that adult brain has the remarkable ability to plastically reorganize itself. Brain plasticity involves distinct functional and structural components and plays a crucial role in reorganizing central nervous system's networks after any lesion in order to partly or totally restore lost and/or compromised functions. The idea that a computer can decode brain electromagnetic signals to infer the intentions of a human and then enact those intentions directly through a machine is becoming a reasonable technical possibility. In neurological patients unable to move and to communicate with the external environment, technologies implementing brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) can be of valuable aid and support. The emerging possibility, through neuro-imaging advanced techniques, to clarify some crucial issues underlying brain plasticity will give the possibility to modulate these mechanisms in a BCI-oriented way. This approach may have a tremendous impact in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders and the clinical advent of this technology will usher in a new era of restorative medicine.

  6. [Reflexes in brain-dead patients].

    PubMed

    Ulvik, A; Salvesen, R; Nielsen, E W

    1998-05-20

    We report on a patient who suffered an acute, extensive intracerebral haemorrhage, leading to symptoms of cerebral herniation within a few hours. The clinical diagnosis of brain death was made based on a neurological examination, and an apnoea test eight hours after the haemorrhage. A few hours later the diagnosis was changed, as several reflexes reappeared. After six days mechanical ventilation was withdrawn, as the brain damage was considered so serious as to render further therapy futile. It was considered unethical to sustain therapy for a possible organ donation at a later date. A review of relevant the literature, however, shows that brain-dead patients may exhibit such varying degrees of autonomic and spinal reflexes as to cause confusion, thus delaying the physician in making a diagnosis. Often, an opportunity for organ donation is lost. Based on this review, we believe that our patient was indeed brain dead when the first diagnosis was made, and that a cerebral angiography should have been performed. Because organ donation is an important issue, the diagnosis of brain death must be definitive.

  7. Measurements of the total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost in low-pressure inductive argon, helium, oxygen and nitrogen discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Kwang; Ku, Ju-Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2011-02-01

    Experimental measurements of the total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost, ɛT, were performed in a low-pressure inductive atomic gases (Ar, He) and molecular gases (O2, N2) discharge. The value of ɛT was determined from a power balance based on the electropositive global (volume-averaged) model. A floating harmonic method was employed to measure ion fluxes and electron temperatures at the discharge wall. In the pressure range 5-50 mTorr, it was found that the measured ɛT ranged from about 70 to 150 V for atomic gases, but from about 180 to 1300 V for molecular gases. This difference between atomic and molecular discharge is caused by additional collisional energy losses of molecular gases. For argon discharge, the stepwise ionization effect on ɛT was observed at relatively high pressures. For different gases, the measured ɛT was evaluated with respect to the electron temperature, and then compared with the calculation results, which were derived from collisional and kinetic energy loss. The measured ɛT and their calculations showed reasonable agreement.

  8. Aging. Aging-induced type I interferon response at the choroid plexus negatively affects brain function.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; David, Eyal; Castellano, Joseph M; Miller, Omer; Kertser, Alexander; Berkutzki, Tamara; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Bezalel, Dana; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Amit, Ido; Schwartz, Michal

    2014-10-03

    Aging-associated cognitive decline is affected by factors produced inside and outside the brain. By using multiorgan genome-wide analysis of aged mice, we found that the choroid plexus, an interface between the brain and the circulation, shows a type I interferon (IFN-I)-dependent gene expression profile that was also found in aged human brains. In aged mice, this response was induced by brain-derived signals, present in the cerebrospinal fluid. Blocking IFN-I signaling within the aged brain partially restored cognitive function and hippocampal neurogenesis and reestablished IFN-II-dependent choroid plexus activity, which is lost in aging. Our data identify a chronic aging-induced IFN-I signature, often associated with antiviral response, at the brain's choroid plexus and demonstrate its negative influence on brain function, thereby suggesting a target for ameliorating cognitive decline in aging.

  9. Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Eric; Bar-Ilan, Ofek; Illes, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Advances in neuroscience are increasingly intersecting with issues of ethical, legal, and social interest. This study is an analysis of press coverage of an advanced technology for brain imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging, that has gained significant public visibility over the past ten years. Discussion of issues of scientific validity and interpretation dominated over ethical content in both the popular and specialized press. Coverage of research on higher order cognitive phenomena specifically attributed broad personal and societal meaning to neuroimages. The authors conclude that neuroscience provides an ideal model for exploring science communication and ethics in a multicultural context. PMID:17330151

  10. Fortress brain.

    PubMed

    Royall, Donald R

    2013-02-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are associated with neuronal inclusions, comprised of protein aggregates. In Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Lewy Body Disease (LBD) such lesions are distributed in a hierarchical retrograde transynaptic spatial pattern. This implies a retrograde transynaptic temporal propagation as well. There can be few explanations for this other than infectious agents (prions and viruses). This suggests that AD and LBD (at least) may have infectious origins. Transynaptic infiltration of the CNS along cranial nerve or other major projections, by one or more infectious agents has important implications. The clinical syndrome and natural history of each neurodegenerative disorder will reflect its portal of entry. There may be a different neurodegenerative syndrome for each cranial nerve or other portal of entry, and not all may manifest as "dementia". Each syndrome may be associated with more than one pathological lesion. Each pathology may be associated with several clinical syndromes. Host-parasite interactions are species specific. This may explain the rarity of AD-like pathology in most other older mammals. Over evolutionary timescales, the human brain should be adapted to predation by neurotropic agents. Viewed from this perspective, the prion-like pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic properties of β-amyloid and other proteins may be adaptive, and anti-microbial. Reductions in synaptic density may slow the progress of invading pathogens, while perineuronal nets and other structures may guard the gates. This suggests a defense in depth of a structure, the brain, that is inherently vulnerable to invasion along its neural networks.

  11. 14 CFR 61.29 - Replacement of a lost or destroyed airman or medical certificate or knowledge test report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... or medical certificate or knowledge test report. 61.29 Section 61.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS General § 61.29 Replacement of a lost or destroyed airman or medical... replacement of a lost or destroyed medical certificate must be made: (1) By letter to the Department...

  12. 49 CFR 385.205 - How can a person who has lost his or her certification be re-certified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How can a person who has lost his or her certification be re-certified? 385.205 Section 385.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Investigators, and Safety Inspectors § 385.205 How can a person who has lost his or her certification be...

  13. 49 CFR 1242.68 - Freight lost or damaged-solely related (to yard) (account 51-52-00).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Freight lost or damaged-solely related (to yard) (account 51-52-00). 1242.68 Section 1242.68 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Transportation § 1242.68 Freight lost or damaged—solely related (to...

  14. 27 CFR 19.263 - Claims on spirits, denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond-specific...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond-specific requirements. 19.263 Section 19.263..., denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond—specific requirements. (a) Claims for... spirits, articles, or wines in bond must include the following information: (1) Identity of...

  15. 27 CFR 19.263 - Claims on spirits, denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond-specific...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond-specific requirements. 19.263 Section 19.263..., denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond—specific requirements. (a) Claims for... spirits, articles, or wines in bond must include the following information: (1) Identity of...

  16. 27 CFR 19.263 - Claims on spirits, denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond-specific...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond-specific requirements. 19.263 Section 19.263..., denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond—specific requirements. (a) Claims for... spirits, articles, or wines in bond must include the following information: (1) Identity of...

  17. 77 FR 49825 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Lost Creek Uranium In...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Lost... of Land Management (BLM) has prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Lost Creek... cleaner air quality. The Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)...

  18. 77 FR 67860 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S. Passport Book and/or... INFORMATION: Title of Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S. Passport Book...

  19. 78 FR 15799 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S. Passport Book and/or... INFORMATION: Title of Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S. Passport Book...

  20. 27 CFR 19.41 - Claims on spirits, denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond. 19.41 Section 19.41 Alcohol, Tobacco... DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Taxes Claims § 19.41 Claims on spirits, denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost..., relating to the destruction or loss of spirits, denatured spirits, articles, or wines in bond, shall...

  1. [Abortion and the man. Psychological and psychopathological manifestations in the face of lost fatherhood].

    PubMed

    Benvenuti, P; Borri, P; Buzzoni, P; Clerici, L; Rossi Monti, M

    1983-01-01

    This study examines the psychological and psychopathological reactions that may appear in a man when his partner aborts. The small amount of literature that exists on the subjects was examined, and several men were, interviewed at the time their partners aborted voluntarely. It turns out that in spite of the man's lack of recognition of any reactions (reinforced by current attitudes and by the scant psychological and medical interest in the subject), there is considerable emotional involvement in the lost parenthood, both for the man and the woman. As revealed by the interviews, this involvement may manifest itself in persecutory or depressive anxiety and psychosomatic symptoms. Moreover, but very rarely, real and typical psychopathological symptoms may appear, such as depression and behavioural disorders. The appearance of these reactions is linked to the problems and conflicts aroused by prospective fatherhood, leading to a comparison between the experiences of fuliwed fatherhood and those of fatherhood lost.

  2. Outreach to Veterans With Serious Mental Illness Who Are Lost to Care: Predictors of Outreach Contact.

    PubMed

    Burton, Cynthia Z; Abraham, Kristen M; Grindle, Chelsea M; Visnic, Stephanie; Hack, Samantha M; McCarthy, John F; Bowersox, Nicholas W

    2017-03-13

    This evaluation identified factors associated with outreach contact to veterans with serious mental illness (SMI) who were lost to Veterans Health Administration (VHA) care. From March 2012 through September 2013, the VHA SMI Re-Engage initiative identified 4,241 veterans for reengagement outreach; 31% of whom were successfully contacted. Higher odds of contact was associated with older age, married status, no history of homelessness, bipolar disorder diagnosis, having no recent inpatient stay, living closer to a VHA medical center, fewer years since last visit, and having a service-connected disability. Several factors are associated with recontact with veterans with SMI who are lost to VHA care. These may promote treatment engagement and retention. Study findings may inform outreach interventions to enhance access for these veterans. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. Where is my mind? How sponges and placozoans may have lost neural cell types

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Joseph F.; Chiodin, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Recent phylogenomic evidence suggests that ctenophores may be the sister group to the rest of animals. This phylogenetic arrangement opens the possibility that sponges and placozoans could have lost neural cell types or that the ctenophore nervous system evolved independently. We critically review evidence to date that has been put forth in support of independent evolution of neural cell types in ctenophores. We observe a reluctance in the literature to consider a lost nervous system in sponges and placozoans and suggest that this may be due to historical bias and the commonly misconstrued concept of animal complexity. In support of the idea of loss (or modification beyond recognition), we provide hypothetical scenarios to show how sponges and placozoans may have benefitted from the loss and/or modification of their neural cell types. PMID:26554046

  4. [Zhang Zhongjings lost formulas not included in Shanghan Lun (Treatise on Cold Pathogenic Diseases)].

    PubMed

    Mi, Li

    2006-07-01

    In addition to the medical formulas of Zhang Zhongjing mostly existed in Shanghan Lun (Treatise on Cold Pathogenic Diseases) and Jinkui Yaolve Fanglun (Synopsis of Prescriptions of the Golden Chamber ) collated by Lin Yi in the Song Dynasty, there are some other lost formulas scattered in Beiji Qianjin Yao Fang (Essential Recipes for Emergent Use Worth a Thousand Gold), Qianjin Yi Fang (A Supplement to Recipes Worth a Thousand Gold ) , Waitai Miyao (Arcane Essentials from the Imperial Library) , written in the Tang Dynasty, and Taiping Shenghui Fang (Tiping Holy Prescriptions for Universal Relief) and Isimpo (Prescriptions from the Heart of Medicine)and those written in the Song Dynasty. Based on the textual research, collation, differentiation of Zhongjings formulas in different texts and medical works, the lost formulas of Zhongjing were collected besides those in Shanghan Lun (Treatise on Cold Pathogenic Diseases) and Jinkui Yaolve Fanglun (Synopsis of Prescriptions of the Golden Chamber), and then the state of the formulas were identified.

  5. First satellite tracks of neonate sea turtles redefine the 'lost years' oceanic niche.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Katherine L; Wyneken, Jeanette; Porter, Warren P; Luo, Jiangang

    2014-04-22

    Few at-sea behavioural data exist for oceanic-stage neonate sea turtles, a life-stage commonly referred to as the sea turtle 'lost years'. Historically, the long-term tracking of small, fast-growing organisms in the open ocean was logistically or technologically impossible. Here, we provide the first long-term satellite tracks of neonate sea turtles. Loggerheads (Caretta caretta) were remotely tracked in the Atlantic Ocean using small solar-powered satellite transmitters. We show that oceanic-stage turtles (i) rarely travel in Continental Shelf waters, (ii) frequently depart the currents associated with the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, (iii) travel quickly when in Gyre currents, and (iv) select sea surface habitats that are likely to provide a thermal benefit or refuge to young sea turtles, supporting growth, foraging and survival. Our satellite tracks help define Atlantic loggerhead nursery grounds and early loggerhead habitat use, allowing us to re-examine sea turtle 'lost years' paradigms.

  6. Laboratory evaluation of polyurethane foam for geothermal lost-circulation plugging

    SciTech Connect

    Tschoepe, E. III

    1982-04-01

    To evaluate polyurethane foam formulations for use in plugging hot (such as geothermal) formations when lost circulation is encountered during drilling, laboratory tests of three foams were performed. Foams were mixed at high temperature (up to 300/sup 0/F) and high pressure (up to 900 psig); the mechanical and fluid loss properties of the foams were subsequently determined. The results show that polyurethane foams can be mixed at downhole conditions and yield acceptable plugging properties.

  7. A review of underwater acoustic systems and methods for locating objects lost at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelady, R. W.; Ferguson, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Information related to the location of objects lost at sea is presented. Acoustic devices attached to an object prior to being transported is recommended as a homing beacon. Minimum requirements and some environmental constraints are defined. Methods and procedures for search and recovery are also discussed. Both an interim system and a more advanced system are outlined. Controlled acoustic emission to enhance security is the theme followed.

  8. Modeling Lost-Particle Backgrounds in PEP-II Using LPTURTLE

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.; Barlow, R.; Kozanecki, W.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2005-05-17

    Background studies during the design, construction, commissioning, operation and improvement of BaBar and PEP-II have been greatly influenced by results from a program referred to as LPTURTLE (Lost Particle TURTLE) which was originally conceived for the purpose of studying gas background for SLC. This venerable program is still in use today. We describe its use, capabilities and improvements and refer to current results now being applied to BaBar.

  9. Demographic analysis of Lost River sucker and shortnose sucker populations in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janney, E.C.; Shively, R.S.; Hayes, B.S.; Barry, P.M.; Perkins, D.

    2008-01-01

    We used 13 years (1995-2007) of capture-mark-recapture data to assess population dynamics of endangered Lost River suckers Deltistes luxatus and shortnose suckers Chasmistes brevirostris in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. The Cormack-Jolly-Seber method was used to estimate survival, and information theoretic modeling was used to assess variation due to time, gender, species, and spawning subpopulations. Length data were used to detect multiple year-class failures and events of high recruitment into adult spawning populations. Average annual survival probability was 0.88 for Lost River suckers and 0.76 for shortnose suckers. Mean life span estimates based on these survival rates indicated that Lost River suckers survived long enough on average to attempt reproduction eight times, whereas shortnose suckers only survived to spawn three to four times. Shortnose sucker survival was not only poor in years of fish kills (1995-1997) but also was low in years without fish kills (i.e., 2002 and 2004). This suggests that high mortality occurs in some years but is not necessarily associated with fish kills. Annual survival probabilities were not only different between the two species but also differed between two spawning subpopulations of Lost River suckers. Length composition data indicated that recruitment into spawning populations only occurred intermittently. Populations of both species transitioned from primarily old individuals with little size diversity and consistently poor recruitment in the late 1980s and early 1990s to mostly small, recruit-sized fish by the late 1990s. A better understanding of the factors influencing adult survival and recruitment into spawning populations is needed. Monitoring these vital parameters will provide a quantitative means to evaluate population status and assess the effectiveness of conservation and recovery efforts.

  10. Mortality and potential years of life lost by road traffic injuries in Brazil, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Silvânia Suely Caribé de Araújo; de Mello-Jorge, Maria Helena Prado

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the potential years of life lost by road traffic injuries three years after the beginning of the Decade of Action for Traffic Safety. METHODS We analyzed the data of the Sistema de Informações sobre Mortalidade (SIM – Mortality Information System) related to road traffic injuries, in 2013. We estimated the crude and standardized mortality rates for Brazil and geographic regions. We calculated, for the Country, the proportional mortality according to age groups, education level, race/skin color, and type or quality of the victim while user of the public highway. We estimated the potential years of life lost according to sex. RESULTS The mortality rate in 2013 was of 21.0 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants for the Country. The Midwest region presented the highest rate (29.9 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants). Most of the deaths by road traffic injuries took place with males (34.9 deaths per 100,000 males). More than half of the people who have died because of road traffic injuries were of black race/skin color, young adults (24.2%), individuals with low schooling (24.0%), and motorcyclists (28.5%). The mortality rate in the triennium 2011-2013 decreased 4.1%, but increased among motorcyclists. Across the Country, more than a million of potential years of life were lost, in 2013, because of road traffic injuries, especially in the age group of 20 to 29 years. CONCLUSIONS The impact of the high mortality rate is of over a million of potential years of life lost by road traffic injuries, especially among adults in productive age (early mortality), in only one year, representing extreme social cost arising from a cause of death that could be prevented. Despite the reduction of mortality by road traffic injuries from 2011 to 2013, the mortality rates increased among motorcyclists. PMID:27706375

  11. Finding the 'lost years' in green turtles: insights from ocean circulation models and genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Putman, Nathan F; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia

    2013-10-07

    Organismal movement is an essential component of ecological processes and connectivity among ecosystems. However, estimating connectivity and identifying corridors of movement are challenging in oceanic organisms such as young turtles that disperse into the open sea and remain largely unobserved during a period known as 'the lost years'. Using predictions of transport within an ocean circulation model and data from published genetic analysis, we present to our knowledge, the first basin-scale hypothesis of distribution and connectivity among major rookeries and foraging grounds (FGs) of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) during their 'lost years'. Simulations indicate that transatlantic dispersal is likely to be common and that recurrent connectivity between the southwestern Indian Ocean and the South Atlantic is possible. The predicted distribution of pelagic juvenile turtles suggests that many 'lost years hotspots' are presently unstudied and located outside protected areas. These models, therefore, provide new information on possible dispersal pathways that link nesting beaches with FGs. These pathways may be of exceptional conservation concern owing to their importance for sea turtles during a critical developmental period.

  12. Stress ratio effects in fatigue of lost foam cast aluminum alloy 356

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David E.

    Lost foam casting is a highly versatile metalcasting process that offers significant benefits in terms of design flexibility, energy consumption, and environmental impact. In the present work, the fatigue behavior of lost foam cast aluminum alloy 356, in conditions T6 and T7, was investigated, under both zero and non-zero mean stress conditions, with either as-cast or machined surface finish. Scanning electron microscopy was used to identify and measure the defect from which fatigue fracture initiated. Based on the results, the applicability of nine different fatigue mean stress equations was compared. The widely-used Goodman equation was found to be highly non-conservative, while the Stulen, Topper-Sandor, and Walker equations performed reasonably well. Each of these three equations includes a material-dependent term for stress ratio sensitivity. The stress ratio sensitivity was found to be affected by heat treatment, with the T6 condition having greater sensitivity than the T7 condition. The surface condition (as-cast vs. machined) did not significantly affect the stress ratio sensitivity. The fatigue life of as-cast specimens was found to be approximately 60--70% lower than that of machined specimens at the same equivalent stress. This reduction could not be attributed to pore size alone, and is suspected to be due to the greater concentration of pyrolysis products at the as-cast surface. Directions for future work, including improved testing methods and some possible methods of improving the properties of lost foam castings, are discussed.

  13. Brain Metastasis in Patients With Adrenocortical Carcinoma: A Clinical Series

    PubMed Central

    Tageja, Nishant; Rosenberg, Avi; Mahalingam, Sowmya; Quezado, Martha; Velarde, Margarita; Edgerly, Maureen; Fojo, Tito

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a heterogeneous and rare disease. At presentation or at the time of a recurrence, the disease commonly spreads to the liver, lungs, lymph nodes, and bones. The brain has only rarely been reported as a site of metastases. Objective: The aims of this report were to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with ACC who developed brain metastasis and were evaluated at the National Cancer Institute. Methods: We describe the history and clinical presentation of six patients with ACC and metastatic disease in the brain. Images of the six patients and pathology slides were reviewed when available. Results: The median age at the time of the diagnosis of ACC was 42 years. The median time from the initial diagnosis until the presentation of brain metastasis was 43 months. As a group the patients had previously received multiples lines of chemotherapy (median of three), and they presented with one to three metastatic brain lesions. Four patients underwent metastasectomy, one had radiosurgery, and one had both modalities. Two patients are still alive, three died, between 2 and 14 months after the diagnosis of brain metastases, and one was lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Patients with advanced ACC can rarely present with metastasis to the brain, most often long after the initial diagnosis. Timely diagnosis of brain metastasis with appropriate intervention after discussion in a multidisciplinary meeting can improve the prognosis in this particular scenario. PMID:25412413

  14. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/pubmed/22556195 . Szeder V, Tateshima S, Duckwiler GR. Intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, ... chap 67. Read More Aneurysm in the brain Brain aneurysm repair Brain surgery Recovering after stroke Seizures Smoking - ...

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  16. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Board Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  17. Brain-based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Ruth Palombo

    2000-01-01

    Discusses brain research and how new imaging technologies allow scientists to explore how human brains process memory, emotion, attention, patterning, motivation, and context. Explains how brain research is being used to revise learning theories. (JOW)

  18. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  19. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions Glossary Contact Us Visitor Feedback mild Traumatic Brain Injury mild Traumatic Brain Injury VIDEO STORIES What is TBI Measuring Severity ... most common deployment injuries is a mild Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). A mild TBI is an injury ...

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain to bump against the inside of your skull. Common TBIs, such as concussions, can happen during ... an object, like a bullet or piece of skull, pierces your brain. Symptoms of a traumatic brain ...

  1. That's Using Your Brain!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Dana R.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses new adult learning theories, including those of Roger Sperry (left brain/right brain), Paul McLean (triune brain), and Howard Gardner (multiple intelligences). Relates adult learning theory to training. (JOW)

  2. American Brain Tumor Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Molecule Read More ABTA News April 6, 2017 Chicago-Based American Brain Tumor Association’s Breakthrough for Brain ... Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. Ste 550 Chicago, IL 60631 © 2014 American Brain Tumor Association Phone: ...

  3. Estimating the Costs in Lost Power of Alternative Snake-Columbia Basin Management Policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, R. J.; Millham, C. B.

    1981-10-01

    This work, in part, describes a 51 dam, 56 time period long-range simulation model of the hydropower system in the Snake-Columbia basin, including projects on those two rivers and on major tributaries thereof. The model is then applied to study a series of alternative basin management scenarios, and the consequences in lost power of these scenarios are evaluated economically. With 56 time periods and 51 projects (some having as many as five data sets), computational efficiency in a restricted computing environment is important. Efficiency in this model was achieved via use of `French Curve' cubic spline data fits, together with fast pointers to carefully defined data structures. In addition, care was taken to couch the model in a setting making it accessible to use by nonprogramers, in a quasiconversational mode. Some technical detail on the implementation of the model is included in the paper. Mention is also made of another model developed during this effort, called PASO (Peaking Alternatives System Operation), a heuristic look ahead model now operational and available to interested users. Discussion of the validation procedures for both models is involved. The `firm power' capability of the hydropower system in the Pacific Northwest is that maximal (monthly or biweekly) energy production which the system could produce during a 44½-month `critical period' of extremely low historical flows. In years of higher, more normal flows, the hydropower system can generate power substantially in excess of the firm capability. This `secondary' power ebbs and flows annually as a function of many things, and it therefore seemed most relevant to focus studies of alternative basin management schemes on firm power production. Accordingly, the work assumed the historical flows of the period July 1, 1928-June 30, 1932, a period of time including the critical period. The model and flow data was applied to the series of alternative basin management schemes, each selected for its

  4. Interactions Between Serpentinization, Hydrothermal Activity and Microbial Community at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacour, A.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Schaeffer, P.; Frank, M.; Gutjahr, M.; Kelley, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Seafloor investigations of slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges have reported many occurrences of exposed mantle peridotites and gabbroic rocks on the ocean floor. Along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, these uplifted portions of oceanic crust host high-temperature black smoker-type hydrothermal systems (e.g., Rainbow, Logatchev, Saldanha), and the more distinct low-temperature Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF). Built on a southern terrace of the Atlantis Massif, the LCHF is composed of carbonate-brucite chimneys that vent alkaline and low-temperature (40-90°C) hydrothermal fluids. These fluids are related to serpentinization of mantle peridotites, which together with minor gabbroic intrusions form the basement of the LCHF. Long-lived hydrothermal activity at Lost City led to extensive seawater-rock interaction in the basement rocks, as indicated by seawater-like Sr- and mantle to unradiogenic Nd-isotope compositions of the serpentinites. These high fluid fluxes in the southern part of the massif influenced the conditions of serpentinization and have obliterated the early chemical signatures in the serpentinites, especially those of carbon and sulfur. Compared to reducing conditions commonly formed during the first stages of serpentinization, serpentinization at Lost City is characterized by relatively oxidizing conditions resulting in a predominance of magnetite, the mobilization/dissolution and oxidation of igneous sulfides to secondary pyrite, and the incorporation of seawater sulfate, all leading to high bulk-rock S-isotope compositions. The Lost City hydrothermal fluids contain high concentrations in methane, hydrogen, and low-molecular weight hydrocarbons considered as being produced abiotically. In contrast, organic compounds in the serpentinites are dominated by the occurrences of isoprenoids (pristane, phytane, and squalane), polycyclic compounds (hopanes and steranes), and higher abundances of C16 to C20 n-alkanes indicative of a marine organic input. We

  5. Nourish Your Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tags: brain, brain-healthy, cognitive decline, dementia, diet, exercise, health, lifestyle Family Health, Prevention and Wellness, Seniors, Staying Healthy December 2010 Copyright © American Academy of ...

  6. The cultural route of present and lost landscapes in the centre of Bucharest - digital model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru-Dan, Maria

    2015-04-01

    to be used. Second, we focus on the lost landscape. The lost natural and the lost cultural landscape. The lost natural landscape includes lost gardens of the area, about which our colleague Cerasella Craciun conducted archive research. The lost cultural landscape includes buildings which collapsed in the 1977 earthquake. We developed a digital model of guided tours for these landmarks. First, the lost items are identified on today's map. Second, a game is created in order to identify what replaces them on the historic map. We developed the code for these in Adobe Director and already experimented it for the city of Cologne in Germany, and tested for applicability for the landmarks of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, where a similar concept is suitable. The nodes of the route are to be mapped as landscape through photography using the COMOB application, which allows inclusion of intangible heritage items such as the world of words.

  7. Adult Bone Marrow Neural Crest Stem Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Not Able to Replace Lost Neurons in Acute MPTP-Lesioned Mice

    PubMed Central

    Neirinckx, Virginie; Marquet, Alice; Coste, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Adult bone marrow stroma contains multipotent stem cells (BMSC) that are a mixed population of mesenchymal and neural-crest derived stem cells. Both cells are endowed with in vitro multi-lineage differentiation abilities, then constituting an attractive and easy-available source of material for cell therapy in neurological disorders. Whereas the in vivo integration and differentiation of BMSC in neurons into the central nervous system is currently matter of debate, we report here that once injected into the striatum of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated mice, pure populations of either bone marrow neural crest stem cells (NCSC) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) survived only transiently into the lesioned brain. Moreover, they do not migrate through the brain tissue, neither modify their initial phenotype, while no recovery of the dopaminergic system integrity was observed. Consequently, we tend to conclude that MSC/NCSC are not able to replace lost neurons in acute MPTP-lesioned dopaminergic system through a suitable integration and/or differentiation process. Altogether with recent data, it appears that neuroprotective, neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory features characterizing BMSC are of greater interest as regards CNS lesions management. PMID:23741377

  8. Left brain, right brain: facts and fantasies.

    PubMed

    Corballis, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Handedness and brain asymmetry are widely regarded as unique to humans, and associated with complementary functions such as a left-brain specialization for language and logic and a right-brain specialization for creativity and intuition. In fact, asymmetries are widespread among animals, and support the gradual evolution of asymmetrical functions such as language and tool use. Handedness and brain asymmetry are inborn and under partial genetic control, although the gene or genes responsible are not well established. Cognitive and emotional difficulties are sometimes associated with departures from the "norm" of right-handedness and left-brain language dominance, more often with the absence of these asymmetries than their reversal.

  9. Imaging brain development: the adolescent brain.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2012-06-01

    The past 15 years have seen a rapid expansion in the number of studies using neuroimaging techniques to investigate maturational changes in the human brain. In this paper, I review MRI studies on structural changes in the developing brain, and fMRI studies on functional changes in the social brain during adolescence. Both MRI and fMRI studies point to adolescence as a period of continued neural development. In the final section, I discuss a number of areas of research that are just beginning and may be the subject of developmental neuroimaging in the next twenty years. Future studies might focus on complex questions including the development of functional connectivity; how gender and puberty influence adolescent brain development; the effects of genes, environment and culture on the adolescent brain; development of the atypical adolescent brain; and implications for policy of the study of the adolescent brain.

  10. Brain AVM (Arteriovenous Malformation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a brain scan for another health issue or after the blood vessels rupture and cause bleeding in the brain (hemorrhage). Once diagnosed, a brain AVM can often be treated successfully to prevent complications, such as brain damage or stroke. Find out why Mayo Clinic is the best ...

  11. Healthy Life-Years Lost and Excess Bed-Days Due to 6 Patient Safety Incidents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaolin; Vincent, Charles; Smith, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is little satisfactory evidence on the harm of safety incidents to patients, in terms of lost potential health and life-years. Objective: To estimate the healthy life-years (HLYs) lost due to 6 incidents in English hospitals between the years 2005/2006 and 2009/2010, to compare burden across incidents, and estimate excess bed-days. Research Design: The study used cross-sectional analysis of the medical records of all inpatients treated in 273 English hospitals. Patients with 6 types of preventable incidents were identified. Total attributable loss of HLYs was estimated through propensity score matching by considering the hypothetical remaining length and quality of life had the incident not occurred. Results: The 6 incidents resulted in an annual loss of 68 HLYs and 934 excess bed-days per 100,000 population. Preventable pressure ulcers caused the loss of 26 HLYs and 555 excess bed-days annually. Deaths in low-mortality procedures resulted in 25 lost life-years and 42 bed-days. Deep-vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolisms cost 12 HLYs, and 240 bed-days. Postoperative sepsis, hip fractures, and central-line infections cost <6 HLYs and 100 bed-days each. Discussion: The burden caused by the 6 incidents is roughly comparable with the UK burden of Multiple Sclerosis (80 DALYs per 100,000), HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (63 DALYs), and Cervical Cancer (58 DALYs). There were marked differences in the harm caused by the incidents, despite the public attention all of them receive. Decision makers can use the results to prioritize resources into further research and effective interventions. PMID:27753744

  12. Improving maintenance of lost weight following a commercial liquid meal replacement program: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ames, Gretchen E; Patel, Roshni H; McMullen, Jillian S; Thomas, Colleen S; Crook, Julia E; Lynch, Scott A; Lutes, Lesley D

    2014-01-01

    Clinic-based liquid meal replacement (800kcals/day) programs produce substantial weight loss. Nevertheless, long-term maintenance remains a challenge. A limitation of maintenance programs is that they continue to promote large behavior changes that are initially required to induce weight loss which may be unsustainable long-term. The study aims were to conduct a preliminary assessment of the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a small changes maintenance intervention (SCM) for 30 patients who completed liquid meal replacement program (LMR). The 20-session SCM delivered over 52 weeks offered no preset goals for maintenance behaviors and all changes in behavior were self-selected. Participants had a median BMI of 40.9 kg/m(2) and weight of 111 kg at the start of LMR. At LMR completion, they lost 18% (21 kg) of body weight. The SCM was completed by 22 patients (73%); 19 completers (86%) attended ≥ 17 of 20 sessions with a median satisfaction rating of 9 (on a scale of 1 to 9). Completers were asked to record self-selected maintenance behaviors daily (median 351 days recorded). The most commonly reported daily behaviors were self-weighing, use of meal replacements and step counting. Median percent regain at week 52 was 14% (2.8 kg) of lost weight (range, -42 to 74%), significantly less than a median of 56% (11 kg) percent regain of lost weight (range, -78 to 110%) in a demographically similar historical control group with no maintenance intervention after LMR completion (P<0.001). Thus, SCM holds promise for improving weight maintenance. Future research should compare SCM to standard maintenance programs that promote large program-directed changes.

  13. Axial momentum lost to a lateral wall of a helicon plasma source.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Chiba, Aiki; Komuro, Atsushi; Ando, Akira

    2015-05-15

    Momentum exerted to a lateral wall of a helicon plasma source is individually measured for argon, krypton, and xenon gases. A significant loss of the axial plasma momentum to the lateral wall, which has been assumed to be negligible, is experimentally identified when an axially asymmetric density profile is formed in the source. This indicates that the radially lost ions deliver not only the radial momentum but also the axial momentum to the lateral wall. The formation of the axial asymmetry causing the momentum loss is interpreted with competition between the magnetic field and neutral depletion effects.

  14. Teaching children with autism to seek help when lost in public.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Ryan; Najdowski, Adel C; Tarbox, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism may not develop safety skills (e.g., help-seeking behaviors) without explicit teaching. One potentially hazardous situation is when a child with autism becomes separated from caregivers in a retail establishment or other public setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a treatment package (rules, role playing, and praise) delivered in the natural environment for teaching 3 boys with autism to seek assistance from store employees when they became lost. Treatment was effective, and help-seeking behaviors generalized to untrained stores for all participants.

  15. Eleven ancestral gene families lost in mammals and vertebrates while otherwise universally conserved in animals

    PubMed Central

    Danchin, Etienne GJ; Gouret, Philippe; Pontarotti, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Background Gene losses played a role which may have been as important as gene and genome duplications and rearrangements, in modelling today species' genomes from a common ancestral set of genes. The set and diversity of protein-coding genes in a species has direct output at the functional level. While gene losses have been reported in all the major lineages of the metazoan tree of life, none have proposed a focus on specific losses in the vertebrates and mammals lineages. In contrast, genes lost in protostomes (i.e. arthropods and nematodes) but still present in vertebrates have been reported and extensively detailed. This probable over-anthropocentric way of comparing genomes does not consider as an important phenomena, gene losses in species that are usually described as "higher". However reporting universally conserved genes throughout evolution that have recently been lost in vertebrates and mammals could reveal interesting features about the evolution of our genome, particularly if these losses can be related to losses of capability. Results We report 11 gene families conserved throughout eukaryotes from yeasts (such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to bilaterian animals (such as Drosophila melanogaster or Caenorhabditis elegans). This evolutionarily wide conservation suggests they were present in the last common ancestors of fungi and metazoan animals. None of these 11 gene families are found in human nor mouse genomes, and their absence generally extends to all vertebrates. A total of 8 out of these 11 gene families have orthologs in plants, suggesting they were present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA). We investigated known functional information for these 11 gene families. This allowed us to correlate some of the lost gene families to loss of capabilities. Conclusion Mammalian and vertebrate genomes lost evolutionary conserved ancestral genes that are probably otherwise not dispensable in eukaryotes. Hence, the human genome, which is generally

  16. Colonial waterbird predation on Lost River and Shortnose suckers in the Upper Klamath Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, Allen F.; Hewitt, David A.; Payton, Quinn; Cramer, Bradley M.; Collis, Ken; Roby, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated predation on Lost River Suckers Deltistes luxatus and Shortnose Suckers Chasmistes brevirostris by American white pelicans Pelecanus erythrorhynchos and double-crested cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus nesting at mixed-species colonies in the Upper Klamath Basin of Oregon and California during 2009–2014. Predation was evaluated by recovering (detecting) PIT tags from tagged fish on bird colonies and calculating minimum predation rates, as the percentage of available suckers consumed, adjusted for PIT tag detection probabilities but not deposition probabilities (i.e., probability an egested tag was deposited on- or off-colony). Results indicate that impacts of avian predation varied by sucker species, age-class (adult, juvenile), bird colony location, and year, demonstrating dynamic predator–prey interactions. Tagged suckers ranging in size from 72 to 730 mm were susceptible to cormorant or pelican predation; all but the largest Lost River Suckers were susceptible to bird predation. Minimum predation rate estimates ranged annually from <0.1% to 4.6% of the available PIT-tagged Lost River Suckers and from <0.1% to 4.2% of the available Shortnose Suckers, and predation rates were consistently higher on suckers in Clear Lake Reservoir, California, than on suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. There was evidence that bird predation on juvenile suckers (species unknown) in Upper Klamath Lake was higher than on adult suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, where minimum predation rates ranged annually from 5.7% to 8.4% of available juveniles. Results suggest that avian predation is a factor limiting the recovery of populations of Lost River and Shortnose suckers, particularly juvenile suckers in Upper Klamath Lake and adult suckers in Clear Lake Reservoir. Additional research is needed to measure predator-specific PIT tag deposition probabilities (which, based on other published studies, could increase predation rates presented herein by a factor of roughly 2

  17. Complications of gallstones: the Mirizzi syndrome, gallstone ileus, gallstone pancreatitis, complications of "lost" gallstones.

    PubMed

    Zaliekas, Jill; Munson, J Lawrence

    2008-12-01

    Gallstones cause various problems besides simple biliary colic and choplecystitis. With chronicity of inflammation caused by gallstone obstruction of the cystic duct, the gallbladder may fuse to the extrahepatic biliary tree, causing Mirizzi syndrome, or fistulize into the intestinal tract, causing so-called gallstone ileus. Stones may pass out of the gallbladder and travel downstream through the common bile duct to obstruct the ampulla of Vater resulting in gallstone pancreatitis, or pass out of the gallbladder inadvertently during surgery, resulting in the syndromes associated with lost gallstones. This article examines these varied and complex complications, with recommendations for management based on the literature, the data, and perhaps some common sense.

  18. Development of 20 TaqMan assays differentiating the endangered shortnose and Lost River suckers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoy, Marshal S.; Ostberg, Carl O.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate species identification is vital to conservation and management of species at risk. Species identification is challenging when taxa express similar phenotypic characters and form hybrids, for example the endangered shortnose sucker (Chasmistes brevirostris) and Lost River sucker (Deltistes luxatus). Here, we developed 20 Taqman assays that differentiate these species (19 nuclear DNA and one mitochondrial DNA). Assays were evaluated in 160 young-of-the-year identified to species using meristic counts. Alleles were not fixed between species, but species were highly differentiated (F ST = 0.753, P < 0.001). The assays developed herein will be a valuable tool for resource managers.

  19. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel brain pathways and functions of the nervous system. Here, we review and further develop some insights to a new hypothesis on one mechanism that may contribute to nervous system evolution, in particular by brain pathway duplication. Like gene duplication, we propose that whole brain pathways can duplicate and the duplicated pathway diverge to take on new functions. We suggest that one mechanism of brain pathway duplication could be through gene duplication, although other mechanisms are possible. We focus on brain pathways for vocal learning and spoken language in song-learning birds and humans as example systems. This view presents a new framework for future research in our understanding of brain evolution and novel behavioural traits. PMID:26554045

  20. 25 CFR 292.9 - How does a tribe show that it lost its government-to-government relationship?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How does a tribe show that it lost its government-to... Gaming on Newly Acquired Lands Restored Landsâ Exception § 292.9 How does a tribe show that it lost its... relationship for purposes of § 292.7, it must show that its government-to-government relationship...

  1. What Turns Assistive into Restorative Brain-Machine Interfaces?

    PubMed Central

    Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) may support motor impaired patients during activities of daily living by controlling external devices such as prostheses (assistive BMI). Moreover, BMIs are applied in conjunction with robotic orthoses for rehabilitation of lost motor function via neurofeedback training (restorative BMI). Using assistive BMI in a rehabilitation context does not automatically turn them into restorative devices. This perspective article suggests key features of restorative BMI and provides the supporting evidence: In summary, BMI may be referred to as restorative tools when demonstrating subsequently (i) operant learning and progressive evolution of specific brain states/dynamics, (ii) correlated modulations of functional networks related to the therapeutic goal, (iii) subsequent improvement in a specific task, and (iv) an explicit correlation between the modulated brain dynamics and the achieved behavioral gains. Such findings would provide the rationale for translating BMI-based interventions into clinical settings for reinforcement learning and motor rehabilitation following stroke. PMID:27790085

  2. What Turns Assistive into Restorative Brain-Machine Interfaces?

    PubMed

    Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) may support motor impaired patients during activities of daily living by controlling external devices such as prostheses (assistive BMI). Moreover, BMIs are applied in conjunction with robotic orthoses for rehabilitation of lost motor function via neurofeedback training (restorative BMI). Using assistive BMI in a rehabilitation context does not automatically turn them into restorative devices. This perspective article suggests key features of restorative BMI and provides the supporting evidence: In summary, BMI may be referred to as restorative tools when demonstrating subsequently (i) operant learning and progressive evolution of specific brain states/dynamics, (ii) correlated modulations of functional networks related to the therapeutic goal, (iii) subsequent improvement in a specific task, and (iv) an explicit correlation between the modulated brain dynamics and the achieved behavioral gains. Such findings would provide the rationale for translating BMI-based interventions into clinical settings for reinforcement learning and motor rehabilitation following stroke.

  3. Lost life expectancy rate: An application to environmental levels of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.H.; Kearfott, K.J.

    1997-08-01

    The risk index Lost Life Expectancy Rate (LLER) provides a unitless number (time of life expectancy lost per time exposed) describing the risk from exposure to a given hazard or from partaking in a given activity. Simple equations to calculate the LLER from radiation-induced cancers caused by an exposure to low-level radiation were derived using the relative risk models developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (upper bound estimate), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation-1988, and the National Academy of Science`s Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR V). Estimates of the LLER to an average person from a continuous exposure to 0.1 {mu}Sv h{sup -1} based on these models, respectively, are 5.5 x 10{sup -4}, 9.5 x 10{sup -4}, and 9.4 x 10{sup -4}. These values compare to LLERs of 0.015 from occupational accidents, 0.25 from being an automobile passenger, and 2.0 from cigarette smoking. Factors effecting LLER from radiation exposures examined in this work include dose rate, age, sex, race and smoking status. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A SOLAR CYCLE LOST IN 1793-1800: EARLY SUNSPOT OBSERVATIONS RESOLVE THE OLD MYSTERY

    SciTech Connect

    Usoskin, Ilya G.; Mursula, Kalevi; Arlt, Rainer; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.

    2009-08-01

    Because of the lack of reliable sunspot observations, the quality of the sunspot number series is poor in the late 18th century, leading to the abnormally long solar cycle (1784-1799) before the Dalton minimum. Using the newly recovered solar drawings by the 18-19th century observers Staudacher and Hamilton, we construct the solar butterfly diagram, i.e., the latitudinal distribution of sunspots in the 1790s. The sudden, systematic occurrence of sunspots at high solar latitudes in 1793-1796 unambiguously shows that a new cycle started in 1793, which was lost in the traditional Wolf sunspot series. This finally confirms the existence of the lost cycle that has been proposed earlier, thus resolving an old mystery. This Letter brings the attention of the scientific community to the need of revising the sunspot series in the 18th century. The presence of a new short, asymmetric cycle implies changes and constraints to sunspot cycle statistics, solar activity predictions, and solar dynamo theories, as well as for solar-terrestrial relations.

  5. 'Lost to follow up': rethinking delayed and interrupted HIV treatment among married Swazi women.

    PubMed

    Dlamini-Simelane, Thandeka T T; Moyer, Eileen

    2016-10-13

    Through various campaigns and strategies, more women are being tested for HIV in countries with a high prevalence of the virus. Despite the ready availability of treatment at government clinics in sub-Saharan African countries like Swaziland, women consistently report difficulty in maintaining access to treatment. Drawing on two individual case studies selected from a larger study of the so-called leaky cascade in Swaziland, we illustrate the protracted journeys married women undertake to initiate treatment. We demonstrate how women manoeuvre tactically after diagnosis, highlight factors that influence their decisions related to initiating treatment, and detail the actors involved in the decision-making process. Our research shows the persistence of structural factors that inhibit access, including economic constraints, gender inequality and patriarchal social norms. Patients referred as 'lost to follow up' are in many cases actively pursuing treatment within a context that includes the biomedical health system, but also extends well beyond it. We argue that the phrase 'lost to follow up' conceals the complex social navigation required by women to initiate and maintain access to treatment. Further, we suggest that many of the logistical challenges of monitoring and tracking people with HIV can be better addressed by taking into account the structural and social aspects of delayed treatment initiative.

  6. Crater Identification Algorithm for the Lost in Low Lunar Orbit Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, Chad; Crain, TImothy

    2010-01-01

    Recent emphasis by NASA on returning astronauts to the Moon has placed attention on the subject of lunar surface feature tracking. Although many algorithms have been proposed for lunar surface feature tracking navigation, much less attention has been paid to the issue of navigational state initialization from lunar craters in a lost in low lunar orbit (LLO) scenario. That is, a scenario in which lunar surface feature tracking must begin, but current navigation state knowledge is either unavailable or too poor to initiate a tracking algorithm. The situation is analogous to the lost in space scenario for star trackers. A new crater identification algorithm is developed herein that allows for navigation state initialization from as few as one image of the lunar surface with no a priori state knowledge. The algorithm takes as inputs the locations and diameters of craters that have been detected in an image, and uses the information to match the craters to entries in the USGS lunar crater catalog via non-dimensional crater triangle parameters. Due to the large number of uncataloged craters that exist on the lunar surface, a probability-based check was developed to reject false identifications. The algorithm was tested on craters detected in four revolutions of Apollo 16 LLO images, and shown to perform well.

  7. Abortion affiliation, urban size, and geographic bias of responses to lost letters.

    PubMed

    Bridges, F S; Williamson, C B; Scheibe, J J

    1998-12-01

    A study using 1800 "lost letters" was designed to test the hypothesis that returned responses would be greater in smaller rural communities (population M = 964) than in a city (population = 60,591) or the suburbs (population = 195,847) unless the addressee was affiliated with a pro-abortion group. Returns to control, Committee For Free Abortion, and Committee Against Free Abortion affiliates were 37.2%, 24.0%, 29.3%, respectively. From the city, the number of returned letters was much larger than the number from the suburbs except for those letters with an affiliation to the pro-abortion condition. Returned letters from the city were fewer than those from smaller rural communities except those letters affiliated with the pro-abortion group. More letters affiliated with the pro-abortion condition were returned from the suburbs than from the smaller rural communities. The geographic condition influenced over-all rates of return. Rates were higher when letters were addressed to a city P.O. Box than to a rural one. Second, rates were also greater in smaller rural communities for letters bearing "in-town" (Molino) and "out-of-town" (Pensacola) addresses than those from the city bearing an "out-of-town" (Molino) address. These findings seem to indicate the possibility that there may be some geographic bias in the willingness of people to help a stranger in need by returning a lost letter.

  8. Identification of a gene in the process of being lost from the genus Agrostis.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaijun Michael; Rotter, David; Bonos, Stacy A; Meyer, William A; Belanger, Faith C

    2005-08-01

    Lineage-specific gene loss is considered one of the processes contributing to speciation and genome diversity. Such gene loss has been inferred from interspecies comparisons of orthologous DNA segments. Examples of intraspecific gene loss are rare. Here we report identification of a gene, designated Crs-1 (creeping specific-1), that appears to be in the process of being lost from heterozygous populations of the species creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). The Crs-1 gene encodes a protein with an N-terminal dirigent protein domain and a C-terminal lectin domain and is similar to the maize (Zea mays) beta-glucosidase aggregating factor. Most individual creeping bentgrass plants examined are lacking Crs-1. Some individuals are hemizygous for the Crs-1 locus, indicating major haplotype noncolinearity at that locus. Crs-1 was not detected in several other Agrostis species, indicating it is being lost from the genus. The Crs-1 locus in creeping bentgrass provides a rare example of the evolutionary process of gene loss occurring within a plant species.

  9. First satellite tracks of neonate sea turtles redefine the ‘lost years’ oceanic niche

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Katherine L.; Wyneken, Jeanette; Porter, Warren P.; Luo, Jiangang

    2014-01-01

    Few at-sea behavioural data exist for oceanic-stage neonate sea turtles, a life-stage commonly referred to as the sea turtle ‘lost years’. Historically, the long-term tracking of small, fast-growing organisms in the open ocean was logistically or technologically impossible. Here, we provide the first long-term satellite tracks of neonate sea turtles. Loggerheads (Caretta caretta) were remotely tracked in the Atlantic Ocean using small solar-powered satellite transmitters. We show that oceanic-stage turtles (i) rarely travel in Continental Shelf waters, (ii) frequently depart the currents associated with the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, (iii) travel quickly when in Gyre currents, and (iv) select sea surface habitats that are likely to provide a thermal benefit or refuge to young sea turtles, supporting growth, foraging and survival. Our satellite tracks help define Atlantic loggerhead nursery grounds and early loggerhead habitat use, allowing us to re-examine sea turtle ‘lost years’ paradigms. PMID:24598420

  10. Tobacco smoking attributable mortality and years of potential life lost in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Gvinianidze, K; Tsereteli, D

    2012-05-01

    Smoking-attributable deaths and years of potential life lost were estimated using the formula adopted to estimate UK and US deaths caused by smoking. These estimates are based on sex-specific proportions by age of current and ex-smokers and rates of relative risk. For prevalence data we used data of 2010 STEPS survey in Georgia and Georgia Reproductive Health Survey 2005. Relative risks for potentially fatal diseases due to smoking are those that were used to estimate UK 1995 deaths. They were derived from years 1984-1988 of the Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS II). Smoking attributable mortality was estimated for year 2008, period when registration of deaths was done by adopted methods and institutions. By the calculations according to mortality data of year 2008 number of active smoking attributable deaths were 4331. Smoking is related with 10,1% of all deaths. By causes of death smoking attributed is 30% of all deaths caused by cancers, 10% of cardiovascular diseases, 9% of respiratory and 7% of digestive diseases. About 72500 potential years of life is lost in Georgia during year 2008 due to active smoking. Great majority of this burden is related with cardio vascular diseases and cancers.

  11. Paradise Lost: The relationships between neurological and psychological changes in nicotine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Isomura, Takeshi; Suzuki, Joji; Murai, Toshiya

    2014-04-01

    The neural reward circuit and cognitive distortion play an important role in addiction; however, the relationship between the two has not yet been addressed. In this article, we review recent findings on nicotine dependence and propose a novel hypothesis. Previous research using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown that while activation of the reward circuit (ventral striatum) appears in response to tobacco-related rewards in nicotine dependence, responses to rewards other than tobacco (e.g. food and money) are reduced. Moreover, this change is observed at the very early stages of smoking, even when a person has smoked fewer than 10 cigarettes in his/her lifetime. Thus, we propose the following hypothesis, called the Paradise Lost theory: given addicts' lower ventral striatal responses to non-tobacco rewards, nicotine addiction disables smokers from sensing the pleasures of ordinary life (the Paradise Lost state). However, since smokers do not notice this, they produce an overestimation of tobacco (cognitive distortion), such that they do not have many pastimes other than smoking or feel that quitting smoking would reduce the happiness and pleasure and increase the difficulty of life. Cognitive distortion thus makes it difficult for smokers to take the initiative to quit smoking and even causes relapse after smoking cessation. This theory furthers our understanding of addiction and could improve our approach to the prevention and treatment of addiction.

  12. Detention of People Lost to Follow-Up on TB Treatment in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Restoy, Enrique; Kibuchi, Evaline; Holland, Paula; Harries, Anthony D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adherence to treatment is a key element for global TB control. Public health laws can be used to enforce isolation, adherence, and completion of TB treatment. However, the practical application of public health laws can potentially range from voluntary measures to involuntary detention approaches. This paper explores the potential risks and impacts of using detention approaches to enforce TB treatment adherence. In August 2015, we conducted a literature search regarding the application of public health laws to enforce adherence to TB treatment globally, and specifically in Kenya. Texts were analyzed using narrative synthesis. Results indicated that in Kenya, people lost to follow-up on TB treatment were frequently detained in prisons. However, incarceration and detention approaches curtail the rights to health, informed consent, privacy, freedom from non-consensual treatment, freedom from inhumane and degrading treatment, and freedom of movement of people lost to follow-up. Detention could also worsen social inequalities and lead to a paradoxical increase in TB incidence. We suggest the incorporation of less intrusive solutions in legislation and policies. These include strengthening health systems to reduce dependency on prisons as isolation spaces, decentralizing TB treatment to communities, enhancing treatment education, revising the public health laws, and addressing socioeconomic and structural determinants associated with TB incidence and loss to follow-up. PMID:27780998

  13. Stroke in parents who lost a child: a nationwide follow-up study in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiong; Johnsen, Søren P; Olsen, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    The association between psychological stress and stroke remains uncertain. We therefore examined whether or not one of the most extreme psychological stressors, the death of a child, was associated with the risk of stroke in a nationwide population-based follow-up study. All 21,062 parents who lost a child in Denmark during 1980-1996 were compared with 293,745 parents who had not lost a child. The overall adjusted relative risk (RR) of stroke was 1.00 (95% CI = 0.83-1.20) among the exposed after up to 18 years of follow-up. The RRs for fatal stroke and nonfatal stroke were 0.69 (95% CI = 0.37-1.26) and 1.03 (95% CI = 0.85-1.24), respectively. The RRs for hemorrhagic and nonhemorrhagic stroke were 1.02 (95% CI = 0.77-1.36) and 0.94 (95% CI = 0.74-1.20), respectively. The risk of stroke did not differ irrespective of whether the death of the child was unexpected or not. The death of a child was not associated with any substantially increased risk of stroke in the bereaved parents.

  14. Characteristics of children who lost the diagnosis of autism: a sample from istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Mukaddes, Nahit Motavalli; Tutkunkardas, Mustafa Deniz; Sari, Oktay; Aydin, Aydan; Kozanoglu, Pınar

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to describe a group of children who lost a diagnosis of autism following participation in early educational programs. Method. This is a descriptive study reporting the characteristics of children (n: 39) who lost their diagnosis of autism and explaining the educational programs that these children followed. The data were collected by reviewing the participants' files and through examinations. Results. All of the children were placed at regular psychiatric follow-ups. The mean age at referral was 2.39±0.75 years, whereas the mean age at the time of optimal outcome reported was 5.11 ± 1.95 years. Two of the children were in early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI), and the rest were in a comprehensive naturalistic behavioral program. The childhood autism rating scale (CARS) total scores at baseline and final were 32.75 ± 3.15 and 18.01 ± 1.76, respectively. The mean IQ of the group at final examination was 116.70 ± 18.88. Conclusion. It could be concluded that a group of children with an autism diagnosis could lose the diagnosis of autism upon early intervention. High IQ and the development of communicative and language skills at an early age could be the most powerful factors contributing to an optimal outcome.

  15. Characteristics of Children Who Lost the Diagnosis of Autism: A Sample from Istanbul, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Mukaddes, Nahit Motavalli; Tutkunkardas, Mustafa Deniz; Sari, Oktay; Aydin, Aydan; Kozanoglu, Pınar

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to describe a group of children who lost a diagnosis of autism following participation in early educational programs. Method. This is a descriptive study reporting the characteristics of children (n: 39) who lost their diagnosis of autism and explaining the educational programs that these children followed. The data were collected by reviewing the participants' files and through examinations. Results. All of the children were placed at regular psychiatric follow-ups. The mean age at referral was 2.39±0.75 years, whereas the mean age at the time of optimal outcome reported was 5.11 ± 1.95 years. Two of the children were in early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI), and the rest were in a comprehensive naturalistic behavioral program. The childhood autism rating scale (CARS) total scores at baseline and final were 32.75 ± 3.15 and 18.01 ± 1.76, respectively. The mean IQ of the group at final examination was 116.70 ± 18.88. Conclusion. It could be concluded that a group of children with an autism diagnosis could lose the diagnosis of autism upon early intervention. High IQ and the development of communicative and language skills at an early age could be the most powerful factors contributing to an optimal outcome. PMID:24876961

  16. Lost Mountain: a year in the vanishing wilderness; radical strip mining and the devastation of Appalachia

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, E.

    2007-02-15

    The mountains of Appalachia are home to one of the great forests of the world - they predate the Ice Age and scientists refer to them as the 'rainforests' of North America for their remarkable density and species diversity. These mountains also hold the mother lode of American coal, and the coal mining industry has long been the economic backbone for families in a region hard-pressed for other job opportunities. But recently, a new type of mining has been introduced -'radical strip mining', aka 'mountaintop removal'- in which a team employing no more than ten men and some heavy machinery literally blast off the top of a mountain, dump it in the valley below, and scoop out the coal. Erik Reece chronicles the year he spent witnessing the systematic decimation of a single mountain, aptly named 'Lost Mountain'. A native Kentuckian and the son of a coal worker, Reece makes it clear that strip mining is neither a local concern nor a radical contention, but a mainstream crisis that encompasses every hot-button issue - from corporate hubris and government neglect, to class conflict and poisoned groundwater, to irrevocable species extinction and landscape destruction. Published excerpts of Lost Mountain are already driving headlines and legislative action in Kentucky.

  17. Affiliation, community size, and person-positivity effect in return of lost letters.

    PubMed

    Bridges, F S; Ryan, S; Scheibe, J J

    2000-12-01

    A study using 1,008 "lost letters" was designed to test the hypotheses that returned responses would be greater in smaller rural communities than from cities, that addresses' affiliation with a group opposed to physical education in schools would reduce the return rate, and that a person-positivity effect would influence return rates. Community Size and Person-Positivity conditions were not significantly associated with different rates of return even though returned letters from the smaller rural communities were more frequent than those from the cities across addressee conditions. Findings seem to suggest no community bias in the willingness of people to help a stranger in need by returning a lost letter. Person-Positivity conditions did not seem to improve the technique. Both addressee' affiliations alone and community size and addressee' affiliations were associated with significantly different rates of return in smaller rural communities, with rates of return greater in the smaller rural communities than in the cities (except for the addressee opposed to physical education in schools).

  18. Assessing Implicit Cognition Among Patients Lost to Follow-up for HIV Care: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Eric; Lyons, Thomas; Wolfe, Brenda; Rolfsen, Norma; Williams, Maryanne; Rucker, Monique; Glick, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While a growing body of research indicates that implicit cognitive processes play an important role in a range of health behaviors, the assessment of these impulsive, associative mental processes among patients living with HIV has received little attention. This preliminary study explored how multidimensional scaling (MDS) could be used to assess implicit cognitive processes among patients lost to follow-up for HIV care and develop interventions to improve their engagement. Method: The sample consisted of 33 patients who were identified as lost to follow up for HIV care at two urban hospitals. Participants were randomly assigned to either the MDS assessment program or control group. All participants underwent measures designed to gauge behavioral change intentions and treatment motivation. Assessment group participants were interviewed to determine their reactions to the assessment program. Results: The MDS assessment program identified cognitive processes and their relationship to treatment-related behaviors among assessment group participants. Assessment group participants reported significantly greater behavior change intentions than those in the control group (p =.02; Cohen’s d = 0.84). Conclusion: MDS shows promise as a tool to identify implicit cognitive processes related to treatment-related behaviors. Assessments based on MDS could serve as the basis for patient-centered clinical interventions designed to improve treatment adherence and HIV care engagement in general. PMID:27347274

  19. Brain repair and reprogramming: the route to clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Grealish, S; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Parmar, M

    2016-09-01

    The adult brain has a very limited capacity for generation of new neurons, and neurogenesis only takes place in restricted regions. Some evidence for neurogenesis after injury has been reported, but few, if any, neurons are replaced after brain injury or degeneration, and the permanent loss of neurons leads to long-term disability and loss of brain function. For decades, researchers have been developing cell transplantation using exogenous cell sources for brain repair, and this method has now been shown to successfully restore lost function in experimental and clinical trials. Here, we review the development of cell-replacement strategies for brain repair in Parkinson's disease using the example of human foetal brain cells being successfully translated from preclinical findings to clinical trials. These trials demonstrate that cell-replacement therapy is a viable option for patients with Parkinson's disease, but more importantly also show how the limited availability of foetal cells calls for development of novel cell sources and methods for generating new neurons for brain repair. We focus on new stem cell sources that are on the threshold of clinical application for brain repair and discuss emerging cellular reprogramming technologies. Reviewing the current status of direct neural conversion, both in vitro and in vivo, where somatic cells are directly reprogrammed into functional neurons without passing through a stem cell intermediate, we conclude that both methods result in the successful replacement of new neurons that mature and integrate into the host brain. Thus, this new field shows great promise for future brain repair, although much work is still needed in preclinical animal models before it can be seriously considered for clinical applications.

  20. Obesity as a Possible Risk Factor for Lost-time Injury in Registered Nurses: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Gillian; Nowrouzi-Kia, Behnam; Gohar, Basem; Nowrouzi, Behdin

    2015-01-01

    Time-loss injuries are still a major occurrence in Canada, injuring thousands of Canadian workers each year. With obesity rates on the rise across the country, as well as around the world, it is important that the possible effects of obesity in the workplace be fully understood, especially those effects linked to lost-time injuries. The aim of this paper was to evaluate predictors of workplace lost-time injuries and how they may be related to obesity or high body mass index by examining factors associated with lost-time injuries in the health care sector, a well-studied industry with the highest number of reported time loss injuries in Canada. A literature review focusing on lost-time injuries in Registered Nurses (RNs) was conducted using the keywords and terms: lost time injury, workers' compensation, occupational injury, workplace injury, injury, injuries, work, workplace, occupational, nurse, registered nurse, RN, health care, predictors, risk factors, risk, risks, cause, causes, obese, obesity, and body mass index. Data on predictors or factors associated with lost-time injuries in RNs were gathered and organized using Loisel's Work Disability Prevention Management Model and extrapolated upon using existing literature surrounding obesity in the Canadian workplace. PMID:25830063

  1. Avoidable mortality measured by years of potential life lost (YPLL) aged 5 before 65 years in Kyrgyzstan, 1989-2003.

    PubMed

    Bozgunchievz, Maratbek; Ito, Katsuki

    2007-01-01

    There is considerable willingness in the entire medical society of Kyrgyzstan, which was directly involved in the reform process, to obtain reliable information about changes in population health that have occurred in the last decade, as well as about changes in mortality, which is the basic component of population health. The objective of this paper is to introduce the Year of Potential Life Lost (YPLL) in Kyrgyzstan caused by avoidable mortality in the population between 5 and 65 years of age during 1989-2003, and to provide a basis for setting the priorities for the reducing YPLL in the coming years. YPLL was calculated using data from the annual mortality tables according to causes of deaths and age for 1989, 1996, 1999 and 2003. YPLL is defined as the summation of the difference between 65 years of age and the age at death from the age of 5 and before 65. In 2003, the total number of YPLL due to avoidable mortality among those who died was 216,860, which represents a decline of 5.0% in comparison with 228,266 in 1989. During the study years, the largest proportion of YPLL in the population between 5 and 65 years of age resulted from injury and poisoning. In 2003, this proportion represented 41.5% of the total amount of YPLL due to all the causes studied here, followed by infections and parasitic diseases (12.0%), circulatory disturbance of the brain (11.5%), chronic liver diseases and cirrhosis (11.4%), diseases of the respiratory system (9.2%), and malignant neoplasm of the upper airways and digestive tract (4.6%). The decline in avoidable mortality caused by injury and poisoning, infections disease, malignant neoplasm of the female breast and uterus has to be priority-driven direction for developing Health Policy in the coming years in Kyrgyzstan. Attention also has to be given to reducing of avoidable mortality caused by malignant neoplasm of the female breast by implementing screening programs.

  2. The Pliocene Lost River found to west: Detrital zircon evidence of drainage disruption along a subsiding hotspot track

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, M.K.V.; Link, P.K.; Fanning, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    SHRIMP analysis of U/Pb ages of detrital zircons in twelve late Miocene to Pleistocene sand samples from six drill cores on the Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, suggests that an ancestral Lost River system was drained westward along the northern side of the SRP. Neoproterozoic (650 to 740??Ma, Cryogenian) detrital zircon grains from the Wildhorse Creek drainage of the Pioneer Mountains core complex, with a source in 695??Ma orthogneiss, and which are characteristic of the Big Lost River system, are found in Pliocene sand from cores drilled in the central SRP (near Wendell) and western SRP (at Mountain Home). In addition to these Neoproterozoic grains, fluvial sands sourced from the northern margin of the SRP contain detrital zircons with the following ages: 42 to 52??Ma from the Challis magmatic belt, 80 to 100??Ma from the Atlanta lobe of the Idaho batholith, and mixed Paleozoic and Proterozoic ages (1400 to 2000??Ma). In contrast, sands in the Mountain Home Air Base well (MHAB) that contain 155-Ma Jurassic detrital grains with a source in northern Nevada are interpreted to represent an integrated Snake River, with provenance on the southern, eastern and northern sides of the SRP. We propose that late Pliocene and early Pleistocene construction of basaltic volcanoes and rhyolitic domes of the Axial Volcanic Zone of the eastern SRP and the northwest-trending Arco Volcanic Rift Zone (including the Craters of the Moon volcanic center), disrupted the paleo-Lost River drainage, confining it to the Big Lost Trough, a volcanically dammed basin of internal drainage on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). After the Axial Volcanic Zone and Arco Volcanic Rift Zone were constructed to form a volcanic eruptive and intrusive highland to the southwest, sediment from the Big Lost River was trapped in the Big Lost Trough instead of being delivered by surface streams to the western SRP. Today, water from drainages north of the SRP enters the Snake River Plain regional aquifer

  3. Body Knowledge in Brain-Damaged Children: A Double-Dissociation in Self and Other's Body Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frassinetti, Francesca; Fiori, Simona; D'Angelo, Valentina; Magnani, Barbara; Guzzetta, Andrea; Brizzolara, Daniela; Cioni, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Bodies are important element for self-recognition. In this respect, in adults it has been recently shown a self vs other advantage when small parts of the subjects' body are visible. This advantage is lost following a right brain lesion underlying a role of the right hemisphere in self body-parts processing. In order to investigate the bodily-self…

  4. Epidemiology of Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Katharine A

    2016-11-01

    Brain tumors are the commonest solid tumor in children, leading to significant cancer-related mortality. Several hereditary syndromes associated with brain tumors are nonfamilial. Ionizing radiation is a well-recognized risk factor for brain tumors. Several industrial exposures have been evaluated for a causal association with brain tumor formation but the results are inconclusive. A casual association between the common mutagens of tobacco, alcohol, or dietary factors has not yet been established. There is no clear evidence that the incidence of brain tumors has changed over time. This article presents the descriptive epidemiology of the commonest brain tumors of children and adults.

  5. Understanding brain networks and brain organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessoa, Luiz

    2014-09-01

    What is the relationship between brain and behavior? The answer to this question necessitates characterizing the mapping between structure and function. The aim of this paper is to discuss broad issues surrounding the link between structure and function in the brain that will motivate a network perspective to understanding this question. However, as others in the past, I argue that a network perspective should supplant the common strategy of understanding the brain in terms of individual regions. Whereas this perspective is needed for a fuller characterization of the mind-brain, it should not be viewed as panacea. For one, the challenges posed by the many-to-many mapping between regions and functions is not dissolved by the network perspective. Although the problem is ameliorated, one should not anticipate a one-to-one mapping when the network approach is adopted. Furthermore, decomposition of the brain network in terms of meaningful clusters of regions, such as the ones generated by community-finding algorithms, does not by itself reveal "true" subnetworks. Given the hierarchical and multi-relational relationship between regions, multiple decompositions will offer different "slices" of a broader landscape of networks within the brain. Finally, I described how the function of brain regions can be characterized in a multidimensional manner via the idea of diversity profiles. The concept can also be used to describe the way different brain regions participate in networks.

  6. Numerical validation of axial plasma momentum lost to a lateral wall induced by neutral depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Kazunori

    2015-11-15

    Momentum imparted to a lateral wall of a compact inductively coupled plasma thruster is numerically investigated for argon and xenon gases by a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). Axial plasma momentum lost to a lateral wall is clearly shown when axial depletion of the neutrals is enhanced, which is in qualitative agreement with the result in a recent experiment using a helicon plasma source [Takahashi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 195001 (2015)]. The PIC-MCC calculations demonstrate that the neutral depletion causes an axially asymmetric profile of the plasma density and potential, leading to axial ion acceleration and the non-negligible net axial force exerted to the lateral wall in the opposite direction of the thrust.

  7. The Challenge of Pregnancy among Homeless Youth: Reclaiming a Lost Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Marcela; Bourgois, Philippe; Auerswald, Colette L.

    2011-01-01

    Young, homeless women often become pregnant, but little is known about how street youth experience their pregnancies. We documented 26 pregnancy outcomes among 13 homeless women (ages 18–26) and eight homeless men through interviews and participant-observation. Eight pregnancies were voluntarily terminated, three were miscarried, and fifteen were carried to term. Regardless of pregnancy outcome, street youths’ narratives focused on ambivalence about parenting, traumatic childhood experiences, and current challenges. Despite significant obstacles, almost all were convinced of their personal capacity to change their lives. While most wanted to be parents, the majority lost custody of their newborns and consequently associated contact with medical and social services with punitive outcomes. Most of the youth who chose to terminate successfully sought safe medical care. We offer recommendations for changing the approach of services to take full advantage of pregnancy as a potential catalyst event for change in this highly vulnerable and underserved population. PMID:20453382

  8. The dynamics of submicron-sized dust particles lost from Phobos

    SciTech Connect

    Horanyi, M. ); Tatrallyay, M.; Juhasz, A. ); Luhmann, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    The dynamics of submicron-sized dielectric particles lost from the Martian moon Phobos are studied in connection with the possible detection of dust by the Phobos 2 spacecraft. The motion of these small dust grains is influenced not only by gravity but also by solar radiation pressure and electromagnetic forces. The plasma environment of Mars is described by applying a hybrid gasdynamic-cometary model. Some of the submicron-sized grains ejected at speeds on the order of a few tens meters per second can stay in orbit around Mars for several months forming a nonuniform and time-dependent dust halo. The lifetime of the particles depends on their size, on the actual interplanetary parameters (constant or varying with a periodicity of 28 days) and also on the orbital position of Mars at the time of ejection since there is a 24 {degree} obliquity between the orbit of Phobos and that of Mars.

  9. Change in mortality and years of life lost attributable to tobacco in Japan, 1985 and 1995.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, K

    1999-01-01

    Despite the secular trend of decreasing prevalence of smoking and consumption of tobacco in most industrialized countries, the prevalence of smoking in Japan continues to be one of the highest. Based on the alternative measure of population attributable fractions, the present study gives an estimate of the number of deaths and the years of life lost (YLLs) attributable to tobacco in Japan for both 1985 and 1995. This study shows a considerable increase in mortality from tobacco-related diseases over the decade, in particular from lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a consequence of the intensified exposure to tobacco in the early 1960s. Although the period of the highest exposure to tobacco was in the late 1970s, prevalence of smoking is still considerably high in Japan and the burden from tobacco will persist if proper anti-smoking measures are not implemented immediately.

  10. The Creative Transformation of Trauma: Marcel Proust's in search of lost time.

    PubMed

    Blum, Harold P

    2012-10-01

    Hidden childhood trauma beneath poignant memories is a central aspect of In Search of Lost Time. Marcel Proust's magnum opus may be psychoanalytically understood as an extraordinary literary transformation of severe trauma and associated unconscious confiicts. Proust's nearly fatal childhood asthma and concomitant medical mistreatment contributed to an intense ambivalent bond and bondage with his mother, replicated in the ambivalent relationships depicted in his novel. The retrieved and re-created past is relived in the novel's fantasy playground of time and space. Proust's intuitive grasp of signiflcant aspects of time, memory, trauma, and transference was consistent with psychoanalytic thought. In the vast novel, the narcissistic mortiflcation and losses of the protagonist are mourned, worked through, and partially redeemed. I interpret the famed joyous tasting of the madeleine in tea as an artfully disguised, temporally displaced, and affective reversal of life-threatening trauma. This article probes the role of Proust's intractable asthma in his breathless journey to ego mastery and timeless creativity.

  11. Modelling small-area inequality in premature mortality using years of life lost rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congdon, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of premature mortality variations via standardized expected years of life lost (SEYLL) measures raises questions about suitable modelling for mortality data, especially when developing SEYLL profiles for areas with small populations. Existing fixed effects estimation methods take no account of correlations in mortality levels over ages, causes, socio-ethnic groups or areas. They also do not specify an underlying data generating process, or a likelihood model that can include trends or correlations, and are likely to produce unstable estimates for small-areas. An alternative strategy involves a fully specified data generation process, and a random effects model which "borrows strength" to produce stable SEYLL estimates, allowing for correlations between ages, areas and socio-ethnic groups. The resulting modelling strategy is applied to gender-specific differences in SEYLL rates in small-areas in NE London, and to cause-specific mortality for leading causes of premature mortality in these areas.

  12. Health-related lost productive time (LPT): recall interval and bias in LPT estimates.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Walter F; Ricci, Judith A; Leotta, Carol

    2004-06-01

    We examined the effect of interview characteristics (ie, recall interval, interview version) on estimates of health-related lost productive work time (LPT). Three versions of a telephone interview were administered using 7-day and 4-week recall periods. In a population-based survey, 7674 workers randomly were assigned to one of six interviews at contact; 615 participants received a follow-up interview. We found strong evidence of under-reporting using a 4-week recall period and a not significant trend in over-reporting LPT using a 7-day recall period. Of the three interviews, version 3 could be administered most quickly, on average, and yielded the most discriminating estimates of LPT by health condition (ie, headache, allergic rhinitis, and cold/flu). Our data suggest that variation in relatively short recall periods influences estimates of health-related LPT. A 2-week recall period may be optimal for minimizing overall reporting error but requires additional research to verify.

  13. Climatic and Tectonic Controls on Alluvial Fan Evolution: The Lost River Range, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Pierce, J. L.; Sharp, W. D.; Pierce, K. L.

    2006-12-01

    In the northern Basin &Range, alluvial fans developed along the Lost River range-front consist of several distinct inset fan segments with concave-up radial profiles. Multiple large radius (>5 km), shallow (2- 3°), alluvial fans extend across and beyond the active, ~140-km-long, normal Lost River fault. These large fans are relict features, formed by major sheetfloods that occurred intermittently between ~15-180 ka. More recent deposition has been dominated by debris-flows that form small-radius (<2 km), steep (8- 17°), fans closely confined to the mountain front [1,2]. In order to determine the timing of fan surface stabilization, we have undertaken precise mass spectrometric 230Th/U dating of pedogenic carbonate from calcic soils that mantle fan surfaces on the Arco fault segment. Careful selection of mg-size samples of dense soil carbonate pebble coats, from within a trench that cuts through gravelly fan deposits, indicates that the fan soils are geochemically suitable for uranium-series dating (median U=7ppm, 232Th=0.09ppm, 232Th/230Th=154). 230Th/U analysis of these calcic soils can thus provide precise temporal constraints on intervals of surface stability and subsequent soil formation. The oldest fan surface (Qfo1, 178+/-8 ka), exposed within the footwall of the trench, suggests an interval of surface stability, indicating that the fan was likely abandoned due to incision early in MIS 6. Incision may have resulted from surface faulting along the Arco segment of the Lost River fault, but could relate to changes in stream power or sediment supply associated with climatic change or with auto-cyclic variations within the drainage basin. A younger incised and faulted fan surface (Qfo2, 69+/-6 ka), likely represents active alluviation at the beginning of MIS 4 and, since it formed as hanging-wall alluvial gravel, provides age limits on an episode of fault displacement between Qfo1 and Qfo2. In situ pedogenic carbonate coats on sub-angular gravels within the

  14. System for Detecting Potential Lost Person based on Conditional Random Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuma, R. S.; Saptawati, G. A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) technology has been used widely in transsportation industry to help company in managing taxis. The most popular GPS utilization for taxi company is to identify the position of taxis and monitor theirs the mobility. Nowdays, data collected from GPS tracker is combined with data from taxi meter are analyzed to provide region information regarding potential passengers. Zicheng Liao’s proposed a system based on GPS taxi data to detect anomalous area/region which was then interpreted as region with to predict rare passengers. The system was developed based on conditional random field (CRF) method and features position, velocity, passenger loading information. Our research was aimed to develop tool based on GPS data to detect potential lost person. We motivated by Liao research and modified the algorithms and features of CRF. Our experiments showed that the system has precision of 98.86% and recall of 87.478%.

  15. Analysis of a tuberculosis model with undetected and lost-sight cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moualeu, D. P.; Nana Yakam, A.; Bowong, S.; Temgoua, A.

    2016-12-01

    A deterministic model of tuberculosis (TB) in sub-Saharan Africa including undetected and lost-sight cases is presented and analyzed. The model is shown to exhibit the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, when a stable disease-free equilibrium co-exists with one or more stable endemic equilibrium points when the associated basic reproduction number (R0) is less than unity. Analyzing the model obviously reveals that exogenous reinfection plays a key role on the existence of backward bifurcation. However, an analysis of the ranges of exogenous reinfection suggested that backward bifurcation occurs only for very high and unrealistic ranges of the exogenous reinfection rate. Random perturbation of reinfection rates was performed to gain insight into the role of this latter on the stability of the disease free equilibrium.

  16. Water resources in the Big Lost River Basin, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crosthwaite, E.G.; Thomas, C.A.; Dyer, K.L.

    1970-01-01

    The Big Lost River basin occupies about 1,400 square miles in south-central Idaho and drains to the Snake River Plain. The economy in the area is based on irrigation agriculture and stockraising. The basin is underlain by a diverse-assemblage of rocks which range, in age from Precambrian to Holocene. The assemblage is divided into five groups on the basis of their hydrologic characteristics. Carbonate rocks, noncarbonate rocks, cemented alluvial deposits, unconsolidated alluvial deposits, and basalt. The principal aquifer is unconsolidated alluvial fill that is several thousand feet thick in the main valley. The carbonate rocks are the major bedrock aquifer. They absorb a significant amount of precipitation and, in places, are very permeable as evidenced by large springs discharging from or near exposures of carbonate rocks. Only the alluvium, carbonate rock and locally the basalt yield significant amounts of water. A total of about 67,000 acres is irrigated with water diverted from the Big Lost River. The annual flow of the river is highly variable and water-supply deficiencies are common. About 1 out of every 2 years is considered a drought year. In the period 1955-68, about 175 irrigation wells were drilled to provide a supplemental water supply to land irrigated from the canal system and to irrigate an additional 8,500 acres of new land. Average. annual precipitation ranged from 8 inches on the valley floor to about 50 inches at some higher elevations during the base period 1944-68. The estimated water yield of the Big Lost River basin averaged 650 cfs (cubic feet per second) for the base period. Of this amount, 150 cfs was transpired by crops, 75 cfs left the basin as streamflow, and 425 cfs left as ground-water flow. A map of precipitation and estimated values of evapotranspiration were used to construct a water-yield map. A distinctive feature of the Big Lost River basin, is the large interchange of water from surface streams into the ground and from the

  17. Memorising Milton's Paradise lost: a study of a septuagenarian exceptional memoriser.

    PubMed

    Seamon, John G; Punjabi, Paawan V; Busch, Emily A

    2010-07-01

    At age 58, JB began memorising Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost. Nine years and thousands of study hours later, he completed this process in 2001 and recalled from memory all 12 books of this 10,565-line poem over a 3-day period. Now 74, JB continues to recite this work. We tested his memory accuracy by cueing his recall with two lines from the beginning or middle of each book and asking JB to recall the next 10 lines. JB is an exceptional memoriser of Milton, both in our laboratory tests in which he did not know the specific tests or procedures in advance, and in our analysis of a videotaped, prepared performance. Consistent with deliberate practice theory, JB achieved this remarkable ability by deeply analysing the poem's structure and meaning over lengthy repetitions. Our findings suggest that exceptional memorisers such as JB are made, not born, and that cognitive expertise can be demonstrated even in later adulthood.

  18. Symmetrization in jellyfish: reorganization to regain function, and not lost parts.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Michael J; Goentoro, Lea

    2016-02-01

    We recently reported a previously unidentified strategy of self-repair in the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita. Rather than regenerating lost parts, juvenile Aurelia reorganize remaining parts to regain essential body symmetry. This process that we called symmetrization is rapid and frequent, and is not driven by cell proliferation or cell death. Instead, the swimming machinery generates mechanical forces that drive symmetrization. We found evidence for symmetrization across three other species of jellyfish (Chrysaora pacifica, Mastigias sp., and Cotylorhiza tuberculata). We propose reorganization to regain function without recovery of initial morphology as a potentially broad class of self-repair strategy beyond radially symmetrical animals, and discuss the implications of this finding on the evolution of self-repair strategies in animals.

  19. Years of potential life lost (YPLL) before age 65 in Italy.

    PubMed

    Arcà, M; di Orio, F; Forastiere, F; Tasco, C; Perucci, C A

    1988-09-01

    The Italian death rates and years of potential life lost (YPLL) for all causes and for 12 selected aggregations of causes are reported for 1979 and 1983, with the latter compared to United States data. Cancer is the leading cause of YPLL in Italy (23.8 per cent of total YPLL), followed by unintentional injuries (16.3 per cent) and heart disease (11.2 per cent). Rates of YPLL for all causes decreased 12.0 per cent from 1979 to 1983, the strongest declines in absolute terms being observed for prematurity and unintentional injuries, and in percentage decline for pneumonia and influenza, and infectious diseases; during the same period, YPLL for diabetes increased. The rates of YPLL are higher for males than for females (rate ratio = 1.9) especially for causes related to lifestyle factors. Premature mortality is lower in Italy than in the USA, because of the striking difference in mortality from injuries and heart diseases.

  20. NONINVASIVE BRAIN STIMULATION IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Demirtas-Tatlidede, Asli; Vahabzadeh-Hagh, Andrew M.; Bernabeu, Montserrat; Tormos, Jose M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Brain stimulation techniques have evolved in the last few decades with more novel methods capable of painless, noninvasive brain stimulation. While the number of clinical trials employing noninvasive brain stimulation continues to increase in a variety of medication-resistant neurological and psychiatric diseases, studies evaluating their diagnostic and therapeutic potential in traumatic brain injury (TBI) are largely lacking. This review introduces different techniques of noninvasive brain stimulation, which may find potential use in TBI. We cover transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and transcranial doppler sonography (TCD) techniques. We provide a brief overview of studies to date, discuss possible mechanisms of action, and raise a number of considerations when thinking about translating these methods to clinical use. PMID:21691215

  1. Modulating brain oscillations to drive brain function.

    PubMed

    Thut, Gregor

    2014-12-01

    Do neuronal oscillations play a causal role in brain function? In a study in this issue of PLOS Biology, Helfrich and colleagues address this long-standing question by attempting to drive brain oscillations using transcranial electrical current stimulation. Remarkably, they were able to manipulate visual perception by forcing brain oscillations of the left and right visual hemispheres into synchrony using oscillatory currents over both hemispheres. Under this condition, human observers more often perceived an inherently ambiguous visual stimulus in one of its perceptual instantiations. These findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying neuronal computation. They show that it is the neuronal oscillations that drive the visual experience, not the experience driving the oscillations. And they indicate that synchronized oscillatory activity groups brain areas into functional networks. This points to new ways for controlled experimental and possibly also clinical interventions for the study and modulation of brain oscillations and associated functions.

  2. Modulating Brain Oscillations to Drive Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Thut, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Do neuronal oscillations play a causal role in brain function? In a study in this issue of PLOS Biology, Helfrich and colleagues address this long-standing question by attempting to drive brain oscillations using transcranial electrical current stimulation. Remarkably, they were able to manipulate visual perception by forcing brain oscillations of the left and right visual hemispheres into synchrony using oscillatory currents over both hemispheres. Under this condition, human observers more often perceived an inherently ambiguous visual stimulus in one of its perceptual instantiations. These findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying neuronal computation. They show that it is the neuronal oscillations that drive the visual experience, not the experience driving the oscillations. And they indicate that synchronized oscillatory activity groups brain areas into functional networks. This points to new ways for controlled experimental and possibly also clinical interventions for the study and modulation of brain oscillations and associated functions. PMID:25549340

  3. Left Brain, Right Brain: Facts and Fantasies

    PubMed Central

    Corballis, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Handedness and brain asymmetry are widely regarded as unique to humans, and associated with complementary functions such as a left-brain specialization for language and logic and a right-brain specialization for creativity and intuition. In fact, asymmetries are widespread among animals, and support the gradual evolution of asymmetrical functions such as language and tool use. Handedness and brain asymmetry are inborn and under partial genetic control, although the gene or genes responsible are not well established. Cognitive and emotional difficulties are sometimes associated with departures from the “norm” of right-handedness and left-brain language dominance, more often with the absence of these asymmetries than their reversal. PMID:24465175

  4. Marine reserves reestablish lost predatory interactions and cause community changes in rocky reefs.

    PubMed

    Guidetti, Paolo

    2006-06-01

    In the last decades, marine reserves have dramatically increased in number worldwide. Here I examined the potential of no-take marine reserves to reestablish lost predatory interactions and, in turn, cause community-wide changes in Mediterranean rocky reefs. Protected locations supported higher density and size of the most effective fish preying on sea urchins (the sea breams Diplodus sargus and D. vulgaris) than unprotected locations. Density of sea urchins (Paracentrotus lividus and Arbacia lixula) was lower at protected than at unprotected locations. Size structure of P. lividus was bimodal (a symptom of predation on medium-sized urchins) only at the protected locations. Coralline barrens were less extended at protected than at unprotected locations, whereas turf-forming and erect-branched algae showed an opposite pattern. Erect-unbranched and erect-calcified algae and conspicuous zoobenthic organisms did not show any pattern related to protection. Tethering experiments showed that predation impact on urchins was (1) higher at protected than at unprotected locations, (2) higher on P. lividus than on A. lixula, and (3) higher on medium-sized (2-3.5 cm test diameter) than large-sized (>3.5 cm) urchins. Sea urchins preyed on by fish in natural conditions were smaller at unprotected than at protected locations. The analysis of sea urchin remains found in Diplodus fish stomachs revealed that medium-sized P. lividus were the most frequently preyed upon urchins and that size range of consumed sea urchins expanded with increasing size of Diplodus fish. These results suggest that (1) depletion and size reduction of predatory fish caused by fishing alter patterns of predation on sea urchins, and that (2) fishing bans (e.g., within no-take marine reserves) may reestablish lost interactions among strongly interactive species in temperate rocky reefs with potential community-wide effects.

  5. Lost in space: Onboard star identification using CCD star tracker data without an a priori attitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketchum, Eleanor A.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    There are many algorithms in use today which determine spacecraft attitude by identifying stars in the field of view of a star tracker. Some methods, which date from the early 1960's, compare the angular separation between observed stars with a small catalog. In the last 10 years, several methods have been developed which speed up the process and reduce the amount of memory needed, a key element to onboard attitude determination. However, each of these methods require some a priori knowledge of the spacecraft attitude. Although the Sun and magnetic field generally provide the necessary coarse attitude information, there are occasions when a spacecraft could get lost when it is not prudent to wait for sunlight. Also, the possibility of efficient attitude determination using only the highly accurate CCD star tracker could lead to fully autonomous spacecraft attitude determination. The need for redundant coarse sensors could thus be eliminated at substantial cost reduction. Some groups have extended their algorithms to implement a computation intense full sky scan. Some require large data bases. Both storage and speed are concerns for autonomous onboard systems. Neural network technology is even being explored by some as a possible solution, but because of the limited number of patterns that can be stored and large overhead, nothing concrete has resulted from these efforts. This paper presents an algorithm which, by descretizing the sky and filtering by visual magnitude of the brightness observed star, speeds up the lost in space star identification process while reducing the amount of necessary onboard computer storage compared to existing techniques.

  6. An estimated cost of lost climate regulation services caused by thawing of the Arctic cryosphere.

    PubMed

    Euskirchen, Eugénie S; Goodstein, Eban S; Huntington, Henry P

    2013-12-01

    Recent and expected changes in Arctic sea ice cover, snow cover, and methane emissions from permafrost thaw are likely to result in large positive feedbacks to climate warming. There is little recognition of the significant loss in economic value that the disappearance of Arctic sea ice, snow, and permafrost will impose on humans. Here, we examine how sea ice and snow cover, as well as methane emissions due to changes in permafrost, may potentially change in the future, to year 2100, and how these changes may feed back to influence the climate. Between 2010 and 2100, the annual costs from the extra warming due to a decline in albedo related to losses of sea ice and snow, plus each year's methane emissions, cumulate to a present value cost to society ranging from US$7.5 trillion to US$91.3 trillion. The estimated range reflects uncertainty associated with (1) the extent of warming-driven positive climate feedbacks from the thawing cryosphere and (2) the expected economic damages per metric ton of CO2 equivalents that will be imposed by added warming, which depend, especially, on the choice of discount rate. The economic uncertainty is much larger than the uncertainty in possible future feedback effects. Nonetheless, the frozen Arctic provides immense services to all nations by cooling the earth's temperature: the cryosphere is an air conditioner for the planet. As the Arctic thaws, this critical, climate-stabilizing ecosystem service is being lost. This paper provides a first attempt to monetize the cost of some of those lost services.

  7. Network Centrality Analysis in Fungi Reveals Complex Regulation of Lost and Gained Genes

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe-Huntington, Jasmin; Xia, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Gene gain and loss shape both proteomes and the networks they form. The increasing availability of closely related sequenced genomes and of genome-wide network data should enable a better understanding of the evolutionary forces driving gene gain, gene loss and evolutionary network rewiring. Using orthology mappings across 23 ascomycete fungi genomes, we identified proteins that were lost, gained or universally conserved across the tree, enabling us to compare genes across all stages of their life-cycle. Based on a collection of genome-wide network and gene expression datasets from baker’s yeast, as well as a few from fission yeast, we found that gene loss is more strongly associated with network and expression features of closely related species than that of distant species, consistent with the evolutionary modulation of gene loss propensity through network rewiring. We also discovered that lost and gained genes, as compared to universally conserved “core” genes, have more regulators, more complex expression patterns and are much more likely to encode for transcription factors. Finally, we found that the relative rate of network integration of new genes into the different types of networks agrees with experimentally measured rates of network rewiring. This systems-level view of the life-cycle of eukaryotic genes suggests that the gain and loss of genes is tightly coupled to the gain and loss of network interactions, that lineage-specific adaptations drive regulatory complexity and that the relative rates of integration of new genes are consistent with network rewiring rates. PMID:28046110

  8. Effect of Diet Composition on Energy Expenditure during Weight Loss: The POUNDS LOST Study

    PubMed Central

    Bray, George A.; Smith, Steven R.; DeJonge, Lilian; de Souza, Russell; Rood, Jennifer; Champagne, Catherine M.; Laranjo, Nancy; Carey, Vincent; Obarzanek, Eva; Loria, Catherine M.; Anton, Stephen D.; Ryan, Donna H.; Greenway, Frank L.; Williamson, Donald; Sacks, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Weight loss reduces energy expenditure, but the contribution of different macronutrients to this change is unclear. Hypothesis We tested the hypothesis that macronutrient composition of the diet might affect the partitioning of energy expenditure during weight loss. Design A sub-study of 99 participants from the POUNDS LOST trial had total energy expenditure (TEE) measured by doubly labeled water and resting energy expenditure (REE) measured by indirect calorimetry at baseline and repeated at 6 months in 89 participants. Participants were randomly assigned to one of 4 diets with either 15% or 25% protein and 20% or 40% fat. Results TEE and REE were positively correlated with each other and with fat free mass and body fat, at baseline and 6 months. The average weight loss of 8.1±0.65 kg (LSmean±SE) reduced TEE by 120±56 kcal/d and REE by 136±18 kcal/d. A greater weight loss at 6 months was associated with a greater decrease in TEE and REE. Participants eating the high fat diet lost significantly more fat free mass (1.52±0.55 kg) than the low fat diet group (p<0.05). Participants eating the low fat diet had significantly higher measures of physical activity than the high fat group. Conclusion A greater weight loss was associated with a larger decrease in both TEE and REE. The low fat diet was associated with significant changes in fat free body mass and energy expenditure from physical activity compared to the high fat diet. PMID:21946707

  9. Sources of organic nitrogen at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field.

    PubMed

    Lang, S Q; Früh-Green, G L; Bernasconi, S M; Butterfield, D A

    2013-03-01

    The reaction of ultramafic rocks with water during serpentinization at moderate temperatures results in alkaline fluids with high concentrations of reduced chemical compounds such as hydrogen and methane. Such environments provide unique habitats for microbial communities capable of utilizing these reduced compounds in present-day and, possibly, early Earth environments. However, these systems present challenges to microbial communities as well, particularly due to high fluid pH and possibly the availability of essential nutrients such as nitrogen. Here we investigate the source and cycling of organic nitrogen at an oceanic serpentinizing environment, the Lost City hydrothermal field (30°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Total hydrolizable amino acid (THAA) concentrations in the fluids range from 736 to 2300 nm and constitute a large fraction of the dissolved organic carbon (2.5-15.1%). The amino acid distributions, and the relative concentrations of these compounds across the hydrothermal field, indicate they most likely derived from chemolithoautotrophic production. Previous studies have identified the presence of numerous nitrogen fixation genes in the fluids and the chimneys. Organic nitrogen in actively venting chimneys has δ(15) N values as low as 0.1‰ which is compatible with biological nitrogen fixation. Total hydrolizable amino acids in the chimneys are enriched in (13) C by 2-7‰ compared to bulk organic matter. The distribution and absolute δ(13) C(THAA) values are compatible with a chemolithoautotrophic source, an attribution also supported by molar organic C/N ratios in most active chimneys (4.1-5.5) which are similar to those expected for microbial communities. In total, these data indicate nitrogen is readily available to microbial communities at Lost City.

  10. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  11. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... CBTF Justin's Hope Fund Grant Recipients Grants Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  12. Genetic Brain Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  13. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  14. Brain cancer spreads.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Lara; Erler, Janine T

    2014-07-30

    The discovery that ~20% of patients with brain cancer have circulating tumor cells breaks the dogma that these cells are confined to the brain and has important clinical implications (Müller et al., this issue).

  15. Biophysics: Unfolding the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    The folded surface of the human brain, although striking, continues to evade understanding. Experiments with swelling gels now fuel the notion that brain folding is modulated by physical forces, and not by genetic, biological or chemical events alone.

  16. Brain Training for Seniors

    MedlinePlus

    ... than 65, stimulating your brain with activities and games can keep your mind sharp later in life ( ... you currently have some form of dementia, brain games and “active mind” activity can still help.There ...

  17. Operation Brain Trauma Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    et al. Statins and neuroprotectants: A comparatife in vitro study of lipopholicity, blood-brain barrier penetration, lowering of brain cholesterol ...heterogeneous disease involving multiple brain injury phenotypes and that success of an agent tested across multiple established TBI models using an...coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitor Simvastatin reduces serum cholesterol but also inhibits neuro-inflammation and has possible effects on brain

  18. NASA Robot Brain Surgeon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mechanical Engineer Michael Guerrero works on the Robot Brain Surgeon testbed in the NeuroEngineering Group at the Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. Principal investigator Dr. Robert W. Mah states that potentially the simple robot will be able to feel brain structures better than any human surgeon, making slow, very precise movements during an operation. The brain surgery robot that may give surgeons finer control of surgical instruments during delicate brain operations is still under development.

  19. Brain Death Determination.

    PubMed

    Spinello, Irene M

    2015-09-01

    In the United States, each year 1% to 2% of deaths are brain deaths. Considerable variation in the practice of determining brain death still remains, despite the publication of practice parameters in 1995 and an evidence-based guideline update in 2010. This review is intended to give bedside clinicians an overview of definition, the causes and pitfalls of misdiagnosing brain death, and a focus on the specifics of the brain death determination process.

  20. How the Ventral Pathway Got Lost--And What Its Recovery Might Mean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiller, Cornelius; Bormann, Tobias; Saur, Dorothee; Musso, Mariachristina; Rijntjes, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Textbooks dealing with the anatomical representation of language in the human brain display two language-related zones, Broca's area and Wernicke's area, connected by a single dorsal fiber tract, the arcuate fascicle. This classical model is incomplete. Modern imaging techniques have identified a second long association tract between the temporal…